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PROGRAM BOOK

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Visit the Classroom of the Future
With Escalate English™, English learners gain the confidence and skill needed Thursday, March 23 | 10:00 am
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Exhibit Hall Stage
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Ask your HMH Account Executive how you can experience the full Visit learn.hmhco.com/TESOL2017
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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt®, HMH®, and Escalate English™ are trademarks or registered trademarks of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. © Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. 01/17 MS188263
WELCOME
TESOL Board of Directors (2016–2017)
OFFICERS DIRECTORS
Dudley Reynolds Misty Adoniou John Schmidt TESOL International
President University of Canberra Texas International Education Convention & English
Carnegie Mellon University Canberra, Australia Consortium Language Expo
Qatar Austin, Texas, USA 21–24 March 2017
Doha, Qatar Deborah Crusan Washington State Convention Center
Wright State University Shelley Taylor 705 Pike Street
Ester de Jong Dayton, Ohio, USA Western University Seattle, WA 98101-2310 USA
President-Elect Ontario, Canada
University of Florida Deborah Healey TESOL International
Gainesville, Florida, USA University of Oregon Kyungsook Yeum Association
Eugene, Oregon, USA Sookmyung Women’s 1925 Ballenger Avenue
Andy Curtis University Suite 550
Past President Silvia Laborde Yongsan-Gu, Seoul, Korea Alexandria, VA 22314-6820 USA
Anaheim University Alianza Cultural Uruguay-
Anaheim, California, USA Estados Unidos Rosa Aronson Toll free 888.891.0041
Montevideo, Uruguay Executive Director Outside the US: +1 240.646.7037
Tel. +1 703.836.0774
Alexandria, Virginia, USA
Aya Matsuda Fax +1 703.836.7864
Email: members@tesol.org
Arizona State University
Web: www.tesol.org
Tempe, Arizona, USA

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 1
The American Federation of Teachers salutes the TESOL International
Association, which for half a century has brought together educators, researchers,
administrators and students to advance the profession of teaching English to speakers
of other languages.

TESOL has been the leading voice for best practices in English language teaching
and learning, and has worked to achieve the highest standards of excellence.

Now more than ever, the AFT’s 1.6 million members are working closely with parents
and community partners to preserve public schools as safe places where all children
can find the building blocks of success—including high-quality early childhood
education, an enriching K-12 curriculum that supports bilingual learning, and
affordable access to higher education.

As part of our commitment to English language learners, the AFT worked with PBS
station WETA to launch the Colorín Colorado website. For more than a decade,
ColorinColorado.org has been the nation’s leading source of research-based ELL
information and materials for educators and parents.

The AFT will continue to stand with TESOL members and other professionals as we
nurture our students and build up our diverse communities.

Randi Weingarten Lorretta Johnson Mary Cathryn Ricker


president secretary-treasurer executive vice president

The American Federation of Teachers is a union of 1.6 million professionals that champions fairness; democracy;
economic opportunity; and high-quality public education, healthcare and public services for our students, their families
and our communities. We are committed to advancing these principles through community engagement, organizing,
collective bargaining and political activism, and especially through the work our members do.
TABLE OF CONTENTS

WELCOME
◗◗ Welcome 5
◗◗ 2017 Convention Planning Team 5
◗◗ Week at a Glance 7
◗◗ About TESOL 8
◗◗ New Members & First‑Time Attendee Orientation 8
◗◗ TESOL Organizational Meetings 11
◗◗ Awards, Travel Grants, and Scholarships 12
◗◗ Keynote Speakers 13
◗◗ TESOL in Focus 15
◗◗ The TESOL Classroom of the Future 17
◗◗ Electronic Village and Technology Showcase 19
◗◗ Invited Speaker Sessions 23
◗◗ Coffee Talks With Distinguished TESOLers 25
◗◗ Public Policy and Advocacy 26
◗◗ Research Spotlight 29
◗◗ Best of Affiliate Sessions 30
◗◗ Colloquia & Presentations From Colleague Organizations 31
◗◗ Job MarketPlace 33
◗◗ ELT Leadership Management Certificate Program 34
◗◗ Thank You 36
◗◗ Maps
—— Sheraton Seattle 38
—— Washington State Convention Center, The Conference Center 39
—— Washington State Convention Center 41
◗◗ TESOL Global Partners 45
◗◗ How To Use This Book 46
◗◗ Abstracts 47
◗◗ Poster Sessions 193
◗◗ English Language Expo
—— Classroom of the Future Sessions 205
—— Exhibit Hall Map 206
—— Exhibitor Booth Numbers 207
—— Exhibitor Listings 208
◗◗ Indexes
—— Presenter Index 217
—— Content Area Index 228
◗◗ Notes 254

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 3
WELCOME

TESOL 2.0: Engage, 2017 CONVENTION


PLANNING TEAM

WELCOME
Enrich, Empower PROGRAM CHAIR LOCAL CO-CHAIRS
Margi Wald Joan Johnston Nelson
University of California, Trainer and Consultant
Surrounded by the lush, magnificent beauty of the Pacific Berkeley
Northwest, Seattle is a hub of innovation, technology, and Amy Renehan
University of Washington
creativity (home to companies like Boeing, Microsoft, and ASSOCIATE
Amazon) and a mosaic of languages, cultures, and people (ranging PROGRAM CHAIRS Bevin Taylor
from the Native peoples to Scandinavians, African‑Americans to Kathy Lobo Highline College

Asians and Latinos). Brandeis University

Ali Fuad Selvi


It is here that we join together to experience what makes TESOL unique: Middle East Technical
present and future teachers, administrators, researchers, and advocacy University
leaders engaging in conversation about language education and policy;
enriching their knowledge, networks, and professional experience;
and empowering themselves and their students to learn and lead in a TEAM LEADERS
2.0 world.
HOSPITALITY & PRE- AND
The convention offers participants multiple opportunities to develop their ENTERTAINMENT POSTCONVENTION
own English language teaching and learning knowledge with the most Dawn Allen INSTITUTES
up-to-date research and practices alongside a network of colleagues from Renton Technical College Nathanael Rudolph
Mukogawa Women’s
around the world: University
JOB MARKETPLACE
■■ Featured speakers and concurrent sessions drawing from the latest Linda Robinson Fellag
developments in TESOL Community College EDUCATIONAL
of Philadelphia SITE VISITS
■■ Pre- and postconvention institutes comprising in-depth workshops on Sandi Janusch
hot topics in the field University of Washington
POSTER SESSIONS
■■ Doctoral and master’s student forums, encouraging our field’s future Laura Adele Sorocco
Highline College COFFEE TALKS
teachers and scholars to hone their research and presentation skills WITH DISTINGUISHED
TESOLers
■■ The Electronic Village and Technology Showcase, demonstrating
VOLUNTEERS Caroline Payant
the use of current nonprint media resources for language teaching COORDINATOR University of Idaho
and learning Allison Rainville
Independent Consultant/Editor
■■ The Expo Hall, featuring the latest classroom and training materials PREK–12 DAY
Gretchen Fleming
■■ Association, affiliate, and interest section colloquia and business BAG & PROGRAM Edmonds School District
meetings, providing forums for member updates and input DISTRIBUTION
Beth Ankorn
■■ Educational site visits, providing a real-life glimpse into diverse Sacajawea Middle School ROUNDTABLES
educational settings for linguistically and culturally diverse populations AND NETWORKING
SESSIONS
■■ Many social events, allowing for more informal networking, including Jack A. Hardy
the all-TESOL closing celebration on Friday Georgia State University

On behalf of this year’s convention team, we welcome you and invite you
to take advantage of all that TESOL 2017 has to offer. Engage, enrich,
empower yourself, the association, and the field.
Margi Wald, Convention Program Chair
Kathy Lobo, Associate Convention Program Chair
Ali Fuad Selvi, Associate Convention Program Chair

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 5
Stop by , located in the Expo Hall

Chat with TESOL Staff and Volunteer Leadership


Meet the TESOL Interest Sections and Affiliates

Enter to win Daily Prizes


Daily Prize Drawings:
Wednesday & Thursday, 3:45 pm
Friday, 2:45 pm

Update your membership

Browse the TESOL Press Bookstore


enjoy 30% off list price!
WEEK AT A GLANCE

MONDAY, 20 MARCH 2017


Registration Hours

WELCOME
Monday. . . . . . . . . 3 pm–6 pm 1 pm–9 pm Preconvention Institutes+
various times
Tuesday . . . . . . . . 7 am–7 pm
Wednesday . . . . . 7 am–5 pm
Thursday . . . . . . . . 7 am–5 pm TUESDAY, 21 MARCH 2017
Friday . . . . . . . . . . 7 am–3 pm 8 am–12 pm Educational Site Visits+
8 am–5 pm Preconvention Institutes+
English Language various times
Expo Hours 8:30 am–4:45 pm Doctoral Research Forum
Wednesday .8:30 am–5:30 pm 8:30 am–4:45 pm Master’s Student Forum
Thursday . . . 8:30 am–5:30 pm 9 am–5 pm Affiliate Workshop
Friday . . . . . 8:30 am–3:30 pm 3:30 pm–5 pm Reception for New Members & First-Time Attendees
5:30 pm–7 pm Opening Keynote: Sherman Alexie
Job MarketPlace
Wednesday . 9:00 am–5:00 pm
WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH 2017
Thursday . . . 9:00 am–5:00 pm
Friday . . . . . 9:00 am–3:00 pm 8 am–9 am Presidential Keynote: Dudley Reynolds
9:30 am–11 am Affiliate Assembly
11:15 am–12:45 pm Affiliate Colloquium
Join the 12:30 pm–1:45 pm
3 pm–3:45 pm
Poster Sessions
Coffee Talks With Distinguished TESOLers+
Conversation! 4 pm–5 pm Town Meeting
5 pm–6:30 pm Interest Section Open Meetings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . see page 11
6:45 pm–8:15 pm Interest Section Open Meetings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . see page 11

#TESOL17 THURSDAY, 23 MARCH 2017


8 am–9 am James E. Alatis Plenary: Guadalupe Valdés
12:30 pm–1:45 pm Poster Sessions
TESOL Press 1 pm–3 pm Interest Section Assembly
Bookstore Hours 3 pm–3:45 pm Coffee Talks With Distinguished TESOLers+
POP-UP BOOKSTORE
(Located in Registration Area) FRIDAY, 24 MARCH 2017
Monday. . . . 3 pm–6 pm
8 am–9 am Friday Keynote: Yong Zhao
Tuesday. . . . 7 am–5:30 pm
12:30 pm–1:45 pm Poster Sessions
TESOL PRESS BOOKSTORE 3 pm–3:45 pm Coffee Talks With Distinguished TESOLers+
(Located in Expo Hall) 5 pm–6:30 pm TESOL Annual Business Meeting
Wednesday. 8:30 am–5:30 pm 7 pm–9 pm TESOL’s Closing Celebration
Thursday. . . 8:30 am–5:30 pm
Friday. . . . . . 8:30 am–3:30 pm SATURDAY, 25 MARCH 2017
8 am–12 pm POSTCONVENTION INSTITUTES+
8 am–12 pm Research Mentoring Workshop+
8 am–5:30 pm PREK–12 DAY+

Concurrent and exhibitor sessions are Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday beginning at
9:30 am each day, with the last session starting at 5 pm.

+ Ticketed Event

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 7
ABOUT TESOL

F
or 50 years, TESOL International Association
has been bringing together educators,
researchers, administrators, and students
to advance the profession of teaching English to
speakers of other languages.
With more than 12,000 members representing
160 countries, and more than 110 worldwide affiliates,
TESOL offers everyone involved in English language
teaching and learning an opportunity to be part of
INFORMATION
ASSOCIATION

a dynamic community where professionals like you


connect with and inspire each other to achieve the
highest standards of excellence.

Is this your first TESOL convention?


Are you a new member of TESOL?
The Reception for New Members & First‑Time Attendees is for you.

Tuesday, 21 March, 3:30 pm–5 pm


Washington State Convention Center,
The Conference Center, Tahoma 3-4

There is so much going on with so many


opportunities at the TESOL convention, it
can really help to have someone sort it all
out for you. In much the same way, if you’re
a new TESOL member, it’s very helpful to
learn about all that TESOL International
Association has to offer.

So here is your chance…


◗◗ HEAR from TESOL volunteer leadership ◗◗ CONNECT with other attendees and share
and staff. Ask questions directly to TESOL’s your thoughts about TESOL and the
president and executive director. international convention.
◗◗ MEET the TESOL Ambassadors, veteran ◗◗ WIN something! A drawing will be held at
members of TESOL, and listen to their the end of the reception for some special
helpful suggestions on how to navigate the TESOL prizes.
convention and the many benefits of the
association.

8 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


The
BESTSELLI N G FO U N DATI O NA L
TE X T O N SECO N D L A N GUAG E
TE ACH I N G M ETH O DS

ESL TEACHING
Principles for Success
Revised Edition

YVONNE S. FREEMAN
DAVID E. FREEMAN
MARY SOTO • ANN EBE

A cornerstone text for research-based


second language teaching methods
and practices, the Freeman’s ESL
Teaching: Principles for Success
is now better than ever with the
latest research on best practices for
emergent bilingual students.

Grades K-12
978-0-325-06249-5
2016 • 304 pp • $30.50

Also Available Now from Heinemann


Reading to Learn for ELs Dual Language Education
Dual Language
Motivation Practices and E D U C AT I O N Program Design and Implementation
Comprehension Strategies for
Sonia Soltero
Program Design and Implementation

Informational Texts Sonia W. Soltero

Grades K-12
Ana Taboada Barber
978-0-325-07813-0
Grades 3-8 2016 • 168pp • $21.50
978-0-325-06251-8
2016 • 192pp • $23.50

@HeinemannPub Heinemann.com | P 800.225.5800 | F 877.231.6980


When teachers soar,
so do their students
REACH NEW
HEIGHTS WITH
30% OFF BOOKS
FROM TESOL PRESS

POP-UP BOOKSTORE
(located in Registration)
Monday, 3 pm–6 pm
Tuesday, 7 am–5:30 pm

REGULAR BOOKSTORE
(located in the Expo Hall)
Wednesday, 8:30 am–5:30 pm
Thursday, 8:30 am–5:30 pm
Friday, 8:30 am–3:30 pm
TESOL ORGANIZATIONAL MEETINGS
All meetings listed here are located in the Sheraton Seattle unless otherwise noted (*).

TUESDAY, 21 MARCH
8:30 am–11:30 am Leadership Forum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Metropolitan B
9 am–5 pm Affiliate Leaders’ Workshop. . . Grand Ballroom A
1 pm–3 pm Interest Section
Leaders’ Workshop. . . . . . . . . . . Grand Ballroom B
1 pm–5 pm TESOL Professional Council
and Committee Meetings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . various
7 pm–9 pm Interest Section Steering
Committee Meetings. . . . . . . . . . Grand Ballroom B

INFORMATION
ASSOCIATION
WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH
1 pm–3 pm Affiliate Editors’ Workshop. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3A*
2 pm–3 pm IS Editors’ Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ravenna
3 pm–4 pm IS myTESOL Workshop. . . . . . . . . . . . . Capitol Hill
4 pm–5 pm Town Meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Issaquah
This meeting will be led by TESOL President
Dudley Reynolds and attended by the Board of Directors
and the Executive Director. The meeting provides a
forum for the membership to ask questions about
TESOL’s professional activities and offer comments and
suggestions relating to current and upcoming activities.

Interest Section Open Meetings THURSDAY, 23 MARCH


5 pm–6:30 pm Applied Linguistics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 620* 9:30 am–11:00 am Affiliate Assembly. . . . . . . . . . . . Grand Ballroom A
English for Specific Purposes. . . . . . . . . . . . 618* 1 pm–2 pm Interest Section Assembly. . . . . . . . . . . Willow A
Intensive English Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 615*
Intercultural Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . 611* FRIDAY, 24 MARCH
Nonnative English Speakers in TESOL. . . . 612*
Program Administration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 613* 5 pm–6:30 pm Annual Business Meeting. . . . . Grand Ballroom D
This meeting is open to all attendees. Members vote
Refugee Concerns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 617*
on resolutions, learn about the state of the association,
Second Language Writing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 619* and observe the installation of newly elected officers of
Teacher Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 614* TESOL. Eligible voting members will be wearing badges
Social Responsibility. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 616* encoded with the word “member” and will be seated in a
designated area.
Video and Digital Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 610*

6:45 pm–8:15 pm Adult Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 615*


Bilingual Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 610*
Computer-Assisted Language Learning . . . 606*
Elementary Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 612*
English as a Foreign Language. . . . . . . . . . . 618*
Higher Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 616*
International Teaching Assistants. . . . . . . . 613*
Materials Writers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 617*
Secondary Schools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 611*
Speech/Pronunciation/Listening. . . . . . . . . 614*

* Washington State Convention Center

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 11
AWARDS, TRAVEL GRANTS, AND SCHOLARSHIPS

The TESOL Awards Professional Council thanks the many readers who
volunteered their time adjudicating these awards and the institutional
and university sponsors who support many of the awards.
TESOL is proud to offer the following awards, travel grants, and scholarships:

◗◗ Albert H. Marckwardt ◗◗ TESOL Award for ◗◗ TESOL Research Mini-Grants


Travel Grants Distinguished Research
◗◗ TESOL Virginia French
2017 AWARD WINNER
◗◗ D. Scott Enright TESOL Interest Gary Barkhuizen
Allen Award
Section Service Award
INFORMATION
ASSOCIATION

FEATURED SESSION ◗◗ TESOL/TEFL Travel Grant


The Power of
◗◗ James E. Alatis Award Story for Exploring
for Service to TESOL Language Teacher ◗◗ Professional Development
Identity Travel Grant for Practicing
◗◗ Mary Finocchiaro Award for Wednesday, 22 March, ESL/EFL Teachers
Excellence in Nonpublished 10:30 am–11:15 am; Willow B, presented by Betty Azar
Pedagogical Materials Sheraton Seattle
◗◗ University of Pittsburgh Travel
◗◗ Ruth Crymes TESOL ◗◗ TESOL Teacher of Grant for IEP Instructors
Academies Fellowships presented by the University
the Year Award of Pittsburgh
presented by National
◗◗ Ruth Crymes TESOL Fellowship Geographic Learning
for Graduate Study
2017 AWARD WINNER
2015 AWARD WINNER Rawia Hayik
Namhee Suk FEATURED SESSION
FEATURED SESSION Engaging EFL Writing
A Guide to Implementing Through Participatory
Extensive Reading in ESL/ Documentary
EFL Classrooms Photography
Wednesday, 22 March, 1 pm–1:45 pm; (PhotoVoice) Projects
Juniper, Sheraton Seattle Thursday, 23 March,

2016 AWARD WINNER


10:30 am–11:15 am; Metropolitan A,
Sheraton Seattle DID YOU
Alannah Fitzgerald
FEATURED SESSION
KNOW?
Flexible, Free, and Open Data- ◗◗ TESOL Awards for Every year, TESOL
Driven Learning for the Masses International bestows more
Thursday, 23 March, 1 pm-1:45 pm, Participation at TESOL
Capitol Hill, Sheraton Seattle presented by ETS TOEFL than US$50,000 in
grants, scholarships,
◗◗ TESOL Award for an ◗◗ TESOL Leadership and awards.
Outstanding Paper on Mentoring Program To apply for an award or
NNEST Issues nominate a colleague, go to
presented by Eastern ◗◗ TESOL Professional www.tesol.org/awards
Carolina University Development Scholarships

12 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
OPENING KEYNOTE JAMES E. ALATIS PLENARY
SHERMAN ALEXIE GUADALUPE VALDÉS
Tuesday, 21 March 2017 Thursday, 23 March 2017
5:30 pm–7 pm 8 am–9 am
Power and Empowerment: Ruminations of an
An Urban Indian’s Comic, Old Language Teacher
Poetic, and Highly Irreverent In this presentation, Valdés talks about
Look at the World second language acquisition theory and research from the
perspective of a dedicated language teacher. She shares
An event not to be missed! Known for his semiautobiographical
some of what she has learned, tells you where she looked for
writings that illuminate challenges facing American Indians
answers, and invites you to engage with topics that will directly
while promoting cultural expression and social change,
or indirectly inform your practice.
Sherman Alexie presents his take on language, identity,
struggle, perseverance, hope, and respect—all with a heavy Guadalupe Valdés is the Bonnie Katz Tenenbaum Professor of
dose of candor and wit. Education at Stanford University. Much of her work has focused
on the English–Spanish bilingualism of Latinos in the United
Sherman Alexie, author, poet, and screenwriter, connects
States. In addition to her numerous publications and service
readers around the world to the American Indian experience.
on editorial boards, Valdés has worked extensively in teaching,
One of The New Yorker’s 20 top writers for the 21st century,
maintaining, and preserving heritage languages among
Alexie’s novels have won numerous awards. In addition to
minority populations.
writing and speaking, Alexie cohosts a podcast with best-
selling author Jess Walter.

HIGHLIGHTS
PRESIDENTIAL KEYNOTE MORNING KEYNOTE
DUDLEY REYNOLDS YONG ZHAO
Wednesday, 22 March 2017 Friday, 24 March 2017
8 am–9 am 8 am–9 am
PROFESSIONAL English Perils or Promises: Education
Language Teachers in the Age of Smart Machines
in a 2.0 World The world needs globally competent
Educational systems everywhere want to educate more creative and entrepreneurial talents to take advantage of the
students to higher standards while cutting resources for teacher opportunities brought about by technology and globalization.
education and development. Why do they think they can? Why But schools are pushed to produce homogenous, compliant,
do we know they cannot? The 2.0 world prizes nontraditional and employee-minded test-takers, as a result of the traditional
learning, interdisciplinarity, and technology. What do education paradigm. Zhao proposes a new education paradigm
professional English language teachers offer this world? needed for the new world.

Dudley Reynolds is the 2016–2017 president of TESOL and a Yong Zhao is a Foundations Distinguished Professor at the
teaching professor of English at Carnegie Mellon University in University of Kansas and a professor in the Department of
Qatar. His research focuses on the development, assessment, Educational Measurement, Policy, and Leadership at the
and teaching of L2 reading and writing, and he is a passionate University of Oregon. His work focuses on the implications of
believer in the power of ELT professional associations to help globalization and technology on education. An award-winning
teachers and learners. author, he has published more than 100 articles and 20 books.

Don’t miss the deep-dive session with Dr. Zhao at


1 pm, Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom C

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 13
Re-Engage Struggling Students!
English 3D® is proven to accelerate academic English language proficiency and prepare students for college
and career with 21st-century content, research-based instructional routines and built-in assessment.

The English 3D language development program was built to support Academic Language Learners, including
Long-Term English Language Learners, Advanced ELL/ELD Students, and Community Dialect Speakers.

Visit Booth #901 to learn more.

Meet Dr. Kate Kinsella


Keynote speaker and author of English 3D
TESOL’s Pre-K–12 day | March 25

Experience English 3D’s eSampler at hmhco.com/english3D


Connect with us: hmhco.com • 800.225.5425
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt®, HMH®, and English 3D® are registered trademarks of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. © Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. 01/17 MS188459
TESOL IN FOCUS

What initiatives is your association spearheading to advance the field?


Learn more about special projects and other initiatives at these special
sessions sponsored by TESOL.
All sessions take place at the Washington State Convention Center or the Sheraton Seattle (*).

Wednesday, 22 March Thursday, 23 March


◗◗ Actions and Advocacy ◗◗ Strategies for Writing ◗◗ What School Leaders Need to
in a 2.0 World Successful TESOL International Know About English Learners
PRESENTERS: TBA Convention Session Proposals PRESENTER: Jan Dormer
9:30 am–11:15 am; Grand Ballroom A* 9:30 am–10:15 am; Raveena* 2 pm–2:45 pm; 307
◗◗ Listening to TESOL ◗◗ Flexible, Free, and Open Data- ◗◗ I Want to Write a Book!
Voices: Insider Accounts Driven Learning for the Masses Getting Published With TESOL
of Classroom Life PRESENTER: Alannah Fitzgerald PRESENTERS: Robyn Brinks-Lockwood, Gilda
PRESENTERS: Tim Stewart, Phil Quirke, 1 pm–1:45 pm; Capitol Hill* Martinez-Alba, Gulbahar Beckett, Elizabeth
Tom Farrell, Sarah Rilling, Maria Dantas- Byleen, Margo DelliCarpini, Joseph Lee,
Whitney, Greg Kessler, Fiona Copland, ◗◗ More Than a Native Speaker: Allison Rainville, Ke Xu, Myrna Jacobs,
Sue Garton New Perspectives, New Edition Meghan Moran
2 pm–2:45 pm; 307 PRESENTERS: Don Snow, Maxi-Ann Campbell 2 pm–3:45 pm; Raveena*
1 pm–1:45 pm; 307
◗◗ How to Get Published ◗◗ A Guide to Implementing
in TESOL and Applied Using Corpora for Engaging Extensive Reading in

HIGHLIGHTS
◗◗

Linguistics Journals Language Teaching: Effective ESL/EFL Classrooms


PRESENTERS: Brian Paltridge, Techniques and Activities PRESENTER: Namhee Suk
Ahmar Mahboob PRESENTERS: Dilin Liu, Lei Lei 3 pm–3:45 pm; Ballard*
2 pm–4:45 pm; Grand Ballroom A* 2 pm–2:45 pm; 204 ◗◗ The Summit on the Future of the
◗◗ Beyond Repeat After Me: TESOL Profession Overview
Teaching Pronunciation PRESENTERS: Denise Murray, Sarah Sahr
With Imagination 3 pm–3:45 pm; 304
PRESENTER: Marla Yoshida
3 pm–3:45 pm; 307

Friday, 24 March
◗◗ Pedagogy and Practice for ◗◗ New Ways of Teaching With
Online English Language Humor to Enrich Your Classroom
Teacher Education PRESENTERS: John Rucynski, Jolene
PRESENTERS: Faridah Pawan, Kelly Jaquays, Lisa Leopold, Sara Okello, Nadezda
Wiechart, Amber Warren, Jaehan Park, Pimenova, Caleb Prichard, John Schmidt,
Crystal Howell Seth Streichler
10 am–10:45 am; 307 11 am–11:45 am; 307

◗◗ Empowering TESOL ◗◗ When Teacher-Researchers


Professionals to Lead Get Together, Engagement
in Diverse Contexts Becomes Empowerment
PRESENTERS: Rosa Aronson, Deena Boraie, PRESENTERS: Annie Kantar Ben-Hillel,
Christine Coombe, Suzanne Panferov Valerie Jakar, Bridget Schvarcz
10 am–11:30 am; Ballard* 5 pm – 5:45 pm; 212

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 15
JOIN US
Wednesday, 22 March
TESOL: YOUR CONTRIBUTION
TO WORLD PEACE AND
HARMONY
A focus on ELT programmes in the
contexts of military conflicts, racial
tension and refugee situations around the
in Middle East, Africa, and Asia.
Time: 4:00 PM – 4.45 PM
Venue: 613
…………………………......................................………...…

Thursday, 23 March
IMPROVING ENGLISH
IN NATIONAL EDUCATION
SYSTEMS:
LESSONS FROM THE WORLD
Four key lessons from large-scale English
At the British Council, we’re passionate about the English language and
education reform projects in Africa, Asia,
all those who teach it. That’s why we’re delighted to introduce Teaching and the Americas.
for Success, our new approach to professional development for English
Time: 11:30 AM – 12:15 PM
language teachers at TESOL 2017.
Venue: 611
We warmly invite you to join the Teaching for Success
celebratory afternoon tea, on Thursday 23 March, from Booth
TEACHING FOR SUCCESS:
1100. Find you own personalised professional development
pathway: CELEBRATORY AFTERNOON
• Assess your own teaching skills and knowledge across 12
TEA IN THE EXPO HALL
professional practices using the Teaching for Success self- Join us at the British Council booth
assessment tool for a celebratory afternoon tea and
collect your discount for 60+ online CPD
• Hone in on areas for your own professional development using the modules.
British Council’s Teaching for Success framework Time: 12:30 PM – 13:30 PM
• Select one of over 60 low cost self-study modules or fully-tutored Venue: Expo Hall, Booth 1100
online courses, with exclusive discounts available only at TESOL
2017 A CPD FRAMEWORK FOR
• Pick up your copy of the British Council’s new Teaching For Success THE DESIGN OF TEACHER
CPD framework for teachers and for managers at Booth 1100 EDUCATION PROJECTS
Assess your teaching and choose your own personal Discuss and select from 12 professional
professional development pathway at competences and 4 stages of
competence for teachers you work with.
http://bit.ly/TeachingForSuccessTESOL2017
Time: 2:00 PM – 2.25 PM
We are delighted to return as a strategic partner of TESOL International
Venue: 613
Association, in hosting the TESOL 2017 VIP Networking Reception,
Friday 24 March, 6.30 – 7.30 PM.
TEACHING FOR SUCCESS:
The British Council offers its warmest congratulations A GLOBAL APPROACH TO
to our longstanding partner, The International Research CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL
Foundation for English Language Education (TIRF) on DEVELOPMENT
receiving the 2017 TESOL Presidents’ Award.
Visit http://www.tirfonline.org/ Which of the 12 professional practices
are of most relevance to you? Discover
materials from our teacher education
curriculum.
Time: 5:00 PM – 5:45 PM
Venue: 613
THE TESOL CLASSROOM OF THE FUTURE

Now in its 4th year, the “Classroom”


features a new look, including new
sponsors and important sessions on
what’s in store for the future. The
Classroom attempts to answer:
■■ What will a “standard”
classroom look like
5, 10, or even 20
years from now?
■■ What new advances
in pedagogy will be
available?
■■ What sorts
of devices or
technology will

HIGHLIGHTS
teachers and
students be using?

See a list of Classroom of the Future presentations on page 205.

This area in the English


Language Expo The TESOL Classroom of the Future is
features sessions from made possible with support from
your peers as well as
demonstrations of
cutting-edge technology
from sponsors.
Check the TESOL online
program and mobile
app for a complete list
of presentation and
demonstration times.

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 17
TESOL | Te a c hing Englis h t o S pe a k e rs
o f O t he r L a ngua ge s

Mary Wong, Ph.D., Field-based Program Director, Myanmar, Winter Term

Bringi ng R e l e v a n t L e a r n in g t o Mu lt ic u lt u r a l S et t in g s
The TESOL programs at Azusa Pacific equip teachers with the vision Programs Offered:
and skills to educate diverse populations of English learners, both locally and
internationally. Graduates have taught around the globe in more than 40
M.A. in TESOL
countries, passionately pursuing their calling to bridge cultural and linguistic Certificate in TESOL
differences and make a meaningful impact in the lives of students.
Certificate in TEFL
• Enjoy engaging, practical training led by experienced faculty.
• Gain valuable teaching tools grounded in a Christian worldview.
• Choose from flexible program formats tailored to meet your needs.
• Study abroad options and conference travel awards available.

On c ampus | F ield - b ase d | O n lin e

Contact us today!
(626) 815-3844 | tesol@apu.edu | apu.edu/tesol
901 E. Alosta Ave., Azusa, CA 91702
20747
ELECTRONIC VILLAGE AND TECHNOLOGY SHOWCASE

Visit Convention Center 606–609 for Ideas on Technology and Language Learning!

Electronic Village Technology Showcase Events


Convention Center 608-609 Convention Center 606-607
The Technology Showcase features the CALL-IS
◗◗ CALL for Newcomers Academic Session as well as InterSection
Learn CALL basics from experts and enhance your sessions and a theme-based series of Hot Topics.
teaching with computer resources in this 90-minute New this year is a series of sessions— On the
hands-on introduction to CALL. Cutting Edge: Graduate Student Research Panels.
COORDINATORS: Ellen Doughetry, Many of these sessions will also be webcast on
Pass Now Needed for José Antônio da Silva the Internet.

Admittance to the EV CALL Academic Session:


Ask Us: Free Advice for CALL
◗◗
◗◗
◗◗ Admission to the Technology
The EV is open to all attendees who wish to explore A Call for 21st-Century Reading
Showcase is included in your How can technology be part of a reading lesson?
and learn about using technology, computers,
convention registration fee. How will students profit from learning reading with
software, and websites, or practice what they’ve
◗◗ To visit the Electronic Village technology? Reading is the skill most connected to
learned in Pre- and Postconvention Institutes and
(computer lab) you will need to EV workshops. Our CALL expert volunteers are technology and yet not very directly addressed. This
purchase a US$10 pass, available available to answer questions and share expertise session addresses the different options technology
on-site at registration or at the EV. incorporating CALL into the ES/FL curriculum. offers for teaching and practicing reading.
COORDINATORS: Deborah Healey, Tom Robb COORDINATOR: Claudio Fleury

◗◗ Electronic Village InterSection (CALL With TEIS)


Special Events Technology Fairs Preparing Teachers to Make

HIGHLIGHTS
The Electronic Village (EV) and the
Explore ways to use CALL in your classroom from Intelligent Technology
presenters who are stationed around the EV computer
Technology Showcase are hosted lab space. Discover how your colleagues use the
Decisions in Language Teaching
by the Computer-Assisted Language online materials and the latest technologies. Ask Thursday, 9:30 am–11:15 am
Learning (CALL) Interest Section. questions and get hands-on experience. This event
Conference attendees can explore offers multiple presentation times focusing on ◗◗ Mobile Apps for
computer-based and other technology presentations of interest to specific interest sections.
resources for language teaching and EV Technology Fair Themes include:
Education Showcase
learning in face-to-face classrooms The Mobile Apps for Education Showcase session
◗◗ Mobile Devices provides ESOL teachers with the opportunity to
and online. Highlights include ◗◗ Classroom Use
demonstrate pedagogical uses for their favorite
the latest in CALL technology and ◗◗ Self-Access mobile apps.
teaching, such as presentations and
COORDINATORS: José Antônio da Silva,
demonstrations by teachers, software COORDINATORS: Audra Hilterbran, Tom Robb
Claudio Fleury
and web designers, curriculum
specialists, CALL authors, and other ◗◗ Developers’ Showcase
CALL practitioners. Topics include ◗◗ EV Technology Fair Classics Discover the latest ideas in applied technology for
multimedia, Internet-based resources, EV Fair Classics are repeat performances of ESOL educational settings, including stand-alone
hardware, and mobile technology outstanding presentations from past EV Fairs. Explore software and Internet-based applications. Attend
devices and applications. tried-and-true ways to use CALL in your classroom or this presentation to see unique and original creations
extended classroom. Several presentations will be designed by teachers and researchers.
EV Events Coordinator webcast from the EV Technology Fair Classics.
◗◗ Stephanie
COORDINATOR: Andy Bowman
Korslund, Iowa State COORDINATORS: Christine Sabieh, Maria
University, Iowa, USA Tomeho-Palermino
◗◗ Hot Topics Sessions
EV Managers These panels cover topics that are current in the field
◗◗ Andy
◗◗ EV Mini-Workshops of CALL. Panelists share research around common
Bowman, Wichita State
Get hands-on practice with small groups and an themes such as virtual reality, digital literacy, and
University, Kansas, USA
instructor who specializes in using a particular intelligent CALL.
◗◗ Stephanie Korslund, Iowa State application or Internet-based resource. Space is
University, Iowa, USA limited, so stop by the EV early to sign up.
Find Webcasts of Technology Showcase Events at
◗◗ Justin Shewell, Arizona State
COORDINATOR: Sandy Wagner
University, Arizona, USA http://callis2017.pbworks.com

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 19
ELECTRONIC VILLAGE AND TECHNOLOGY SHOWCASE
(continued)
2017 Electronic Village Schedule At-A-Glance (Convention Center 608–609)
An EV pass (US$10) is available when you register on-site or at the EV.
Times Wednesday, 22 March Thursday, 23 March Friday, 24 March
8 am Ask Us: 8 am–8:30 am Ask Us: 8 am–8:30 am Ask Us: 8 am–8:30 am
8:30 am Technology Fair: Mobile Devices* Technology Fair: Classroom Tools* Technology Fair: Classroom Tools*
9 am 8:30 am–9:20 am 8:30 am–9:20 am 8:30 am–9:20 am
9:30 am Ask Us: 9:30 am–10 am Ask Us: 9:30 am–10 am Ask Us: 9:30 am–10 am
10 am Technology Fair: Self-Access* Technology Fair: Self-Access* Technology Fair Classics
10:30 am 10 am–10:50 am 10 am–10:50 am 10 am–10:50 am
11 am Technology Fair: Classroom Tools* Technology Fair: Mobile Devices* Technology Fair: Mobile Devices*
11:30 am 11 am–11:50 am 11 am–11:50 am 11 am–11:50 am
12 pm Ask Us: 12 pm–12:30 pm Ask Us: 12 pm–12:30 pm
CALL for Newcomers
12:30 pm
12 pm–1:30 pm EV Mini-Workshop†
1 pm
EV Mini-Workshop† 12:30 pm–2 pm
1:30 pm
EV Mini-Workshop† 1 pm–2:20 pm
2 pm Ask Us: 2 pm–2:30 pm
1:40 pm–3:10 pm
2:30 pm Technology Fair Classics
2:30 pm–3:20 pm EV Mini-Workshop†
3 pm Ask Us: 3:10 pm–3:30 pm
2:30 pm–4 pm
3:30 pm Technology Fair: Classroom Tools*
EV Mini-Workshop† 3:30 pm–4:30 pm
4 pm Ask Us: 4 pm–4:30 pm
3:30 pm–4:50 pm
4:30 pm Ask Us: 4:30 pm–5 pm
EV closed after 5 pm EV closed after 4:30 pm
CALL-IS Open Meeting SEE YOU NEXT YEAR!
5 pm & Steering Committee Election Electronic Village closed after 5 pm TESOL Annual Business Meeting
HIGHLIGHTS

6:45 pm–8:15 pm 5 pm–6:30 pm


in Convention Center 606-607

2017 Technology Showcase Schedule At–A–Glance (Convention Center 606–607)


Times Wednesday, 22 March Thursday, 23 March Friday, 24 March
8 am
Hot Topics* Hot Topics* Hot Topics*
8:30 am
8 am–9:20 am 8 am–9:20 am 8 am–9:20 am
9 am
9:30 am
CALL-IS/TEIS InterSection MWIS/PAIS/CALL-IS InterSection
10 am CALL-IS Academic Session
Preparing Teachers to Make Intelligent Meeting Today’s Needs and
A Call for 21st Century Reading
10:30 am Technology Decisions in Language Teaching Tomorrow’s Realities for ELT Materials
9:30 am–11:15 am
9:30 am–11:15 am 9:30 am–11:15 am
11 am
11:30 am On the Cutting Edge: On the Cutting Edge:
Hot Topics*
12 pm Graduate Student Panel Graduate Student Panel
11:30 am–12:50 pm
12:30 pm 11:30am–1 pm 11:30 am–1:10 pm
1 pm
1:30 pm The Electronic Village Online:
Mobile Apps for Education Showcase Hot Topics*
Best of 2016
2 pm 1 pm–2:45 pm 1:30 pm–2:50 pm
1:20 pm–2:50 pm
2:30 pm
3 pm On the Cutting Edge:
3:30 pm EFL-IS/CALL-IS InterSection Graduate Student Panel
Developers’ Showcase
EFL Learners Empowered Through CALL 3 pm–4:30 pm
4 pm 3 pm–4:50 pm
3 pm–4:45 pm
4:30 pm Tech Showcase Closed
SEE YOU NEXT YEAR!
Technology Showcase closed after 5 pm
MAPS

Technology Showcase closed after 5 pm TESOL Annual Business Meeting


5 pm CALL-IS Open Meeting 5 pm–6:30 pm
EV 2018 Planning Meeting:
& Steering Committee Election
5:30 pm–7 pm TESOL’s Closing Celebration
6:45 pm–8:15 pm
7 pm–9 pm
* Note that specific themes are subject to change. Please see the CALL-IS EV Program Book included in your bag for more information.
† Please visit the EV ahead of time to pick up a free ticket. First come, first served. Limited to 20 seats.

Key for abbreviations: EV = Electronic Village; Ask Us = Ask Us: Free Advice for Call.

20 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


The Electronic Village Online: The Classroom of the Future
Best of 2016 Located in the Exhibit Hall, the Classroom of the Future will
For 5 weeks in January and February, participants include a showcase of the future of classroom design, technology,
and ESOL experts engage in collaborative, online and pedagogy. See session titles and descriptions on page 205.
discussion or hands-on virtual workshops of
professional and scholarly benefit. These 5-week
sessions allow a fuller development of ideas than is The Electronic Village Schedule
possible in convention sessions.
is Available Online
EVO sessions are sponsored by a TESOL interest
section or affiliate, an IATEFL special interest group, Visit http://call-is.org/ev/schedule.php
or other groups or affiliates. Sponsors provide no or scan this code with a QR-enabled mobile device:
financial support.
Selected Technology Showcase events
Come to the EVO session in the convention center, will be webcast at
606–607, on Wednesday, 1:20 pm, or visit
http://callis2017.pbworks.com
http://evosessions.pbworks.com/
#evosessions

HIGHLIGHTS
More critical thinking.
More college skills.
A fresh approach to EAP.
Come learn about the newest
integrated skills series.

Booth 700

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 21
INVITED SPEAKER SESSIONS
Find abstracts for these sessions in the program under the date and time for each session.
All sessions take place in the Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom C, unless otherwise noted.

What the
Research Shows
◗◗ Teaching and Assessing
Vocabulary: What the
Research Shows
PRESENTERS: Sam Barclay, Averil
Coxhead, Keith Folse, Dee Gardner,
Diane Schmitt, Norbert Schmitt
Wednesday, 22 March,
9:30 am–11:15 am
◗◗ Teaching L2 Reading:
What the Research Shows
PRESENTERS: Neil J Anderson, Thursday, 23 March Friday, 24 March
William Grabe, Xiangying Jiang, ◗◗ Shifts in ESL Teacher ◗◗ Multicultural Capital:
Fredricka Stoller, Cui Zhang
Professional Expertise Connecting People, Families,
Thursday, 23 March,
10:30 am–12:15 pm for the 21st Century and Work in the 21st Century

HIGHLIGHTS
PRESENTER: Aida Walqui PRESENTER: Sylvia Acevedo
◗◗ Teaching and Responding 9:30 am–10:15 am 9:30 am–10:15 am
to L2 Writing: What the
Research Shows ◗◗ Engaging Multilingualism in ◗◗ Fear Not the Virtual Classroom:
PRESENTERS: Michelle Cox, Dana ESOL Classrooms: Toward Student Engagement
Ferris, Ann Johns, Christina Ortmeier- Culturally Linguistically in Online Learning
Hooper, Christine Tardy Sustaining Pedagogy PRESENTERS: Gena Bennett, Meredith
Friday, 24 March, PRESENTER: Shondel Nero Bricker, Maggie Sokolik, David Wiese
10:30 am–12:15 pm 1 pm–1:45 pm 1 pm–2:45 pm; Metropolitan B
◗◗ Perils and Strategies in ◗◗ Retirement With TESOL 2.0:
Wednesday, 22 March Retention/Completion Within Engaging, Enriching,
◗◗ High School ELLs at Community College IEPs Empowering Ourselves
Risk: Neither College PRESENTER: Jose Carmona and Others
nor Career Ready 2 pm–2:45 pm PRESENTERS: Leslie Barratt, Zakia Sarwar,
Betty Ansin Smallwood, Beth Witt
PRESENTER: Yasuko Kanno Teacher Development Through
◗◗
1 pm–2:45 pm; Sheraton Seattle,
1 pm–1:45 pm Teachers’ Associations: Lessons Grand Ballroom D
A Memorial Panel on the Life From Africa and Beyond
Deep Dive: “Perils or
◗◗
◗◗
and Legacy of Braj Kachru PRESENTERS: Okon Effiong, Aymen Elsheikh
Promises: Education in the
PRESENTERS: Suzanne Hilgendorf, Ahmar 3 pm–3:45 pm
Age of Smart Machines”
Mahboob, Aya Matsuda, Shikaripur Sridar,
Bedrettin Yazan PRESENTER: Yong Zhao

4 pm–5:45 pm 1 pm–3:45 pm

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 23
MASTER’S PROGRAMS
IN EDUCATION

The University of Miami Department of Teaching and Learning Application Process


has three new Master’s programs specializing in education.
Application is made through the
The programs focus on Teaching English to Speakers of Other
Graduate School online at:
Languages (TESOL), or Bilingual/Biliteracy Development in
Spanish for dual language teaching, or Special Education. The
https://www.applyweb.com/mi-
programs require 30-36 credits for completion; general
amigrd/index.html
information can be found below.
Application Deadline:
Teaching English to Speakers of Other
Languages (TESOL) Online Program Fall Deadline - June 1
Spring Deadline - November 1
The primary market for this program is teachers in Pre-K-16
contexts—English as a Second Language (ESL) specialists or Contact Information
mainstream content area teachers who work with English
language learners (ELLs) in the U.S. – “Teaching English as a For more information, please our
Second (ESL) Language” ONLINE PROGRAM with some graduate admissions coordinator:
face-to-face meetings
Ms. Lois Heffernan
Max Orovitz Building
Bilingual/Biliteracy Development in 1507 Levante Avenue – Suite 311
Spanish Online Program Coral Gables Florida 33124
305.284.2167 phone
The primary market for this program is U.S. teachers in 305 284-9395 fax
Pre-K-12 settings who wish to boost their proficiency in lheffernan@miami.edu
Spanish and teach in dual language learning (DLL) contexts.
Typically DLL ends in 5th or 6th grade. There is a recent and
progressive push for biliteracy and bilingualism which
requires biliteracy in middle and high school grades, across
content areas. Some Spanish language courses may be
required, depending on proficiency. ONLINE PROGRAM with
some face-to-face meetings

Special Education Progam


The primary market for this program is for Bachelor degree
holders who teach or wish to teach in K-12 contexts- general
education teachers in inclusive classrooms, special education
teachers, or special education program specialists.

EDUCATION.MIAMI.EDU
COFFEE TALKS WITH DISTINGUISHED TESOLERS
Renew your energy with a light snack and gather with
a small, casual group of colleagues to discuss a current
topic of interest with a leading TESOL expert.
Each coffee topic is limited to nine attendees. Coffee talks will take place 3 pm–
3:45 pm Wednesday–Friday in the Sheraton Seattle. Tickets are not transferable
and are only valid for the coffee printed on each ticket. A light snack is provided.
All coffees are US$45. Tickets to Coffee Talks With Distinguished TESOLers that are
not sold in advance can be purchased on-site at the TESOL registration desk.

Wednesday, 22 March 2017


Session # Host Topic
CT#1 Amanda Baker Pronunciation Pedagogy and Teacher Development in TESOL
CT#2 Sarah Benesch Pedagogy and Emotions: Exploring English Language Teachers’ “Emotion Labor”
CT#4 Luciana de Oliveira A Language-Based Approach to Content Instruction: Scaffolding in K–12
CT#7 Kim McDonough Using Collaborative Writing Activities in EFL Contexts
CT#8 Priyanvada (Priya) Abeywickrama Classroom Assessment: Engaging Teachers, Enriching Practices, and Empowering Students
CT#9 Elaine Tarone Relationship Between Alphabetic Print Literacy and Oral English Language Acquisition
CT#25 Okim Kang Teaching Listening and Speaking in EFL/ESL Contexts

Thursday, 23 March 2017


Session # Host Topic

HIGHLIGHTS
CT#6 Ahmar Mahboob Getting Your Work Published
CT#10 Neil J Anderson Engaging in Motivational Teaching Practices
CT#11 Donna Brinton Integrating Content and Language: A Flexible Architecture
CT#12 Anne Burns Exploring the Teaching of Speaking
CT#13 Ann Johns Teaching Genres to Secondary and University Students
CT#14 Karen Johnson Second Language Teacher Education
CT#15 Ryuko Kubota Seeking Welfare in TESOL: Social and Individual Engagement
CT#16 Stephanie Lindemann Sociolinguistics and Pronunciation Teaching
CT#17 David Nunan From the Classroom to the Wider World
CT#18 Randi Reppen Developing Learner Resources Using Corpus Linguistics
CT#28 Fernando Fleurquin How Does Your IEP Reflect the Needs of Your Stakeholders?

Friday, 24 March 2017


Session # Host Topic
CT#3 Peter De Costa The Power of Identity and Ideology in TESOL
CT#5 Tom Farrell Reflective Practice for Language Teachers
CT#19 Nancy Bell Integrating Humor Into the L2 Classroom: How and Why
CT#20 Liying Cheng Bridging Language Testing and Assessment in the Classroom
CT#21 Andy Curtis Learning to Lead in Language Education
CT#22 Scott Douglas Inquiry Supported Content-Based English Language Teaching and Learning
CT#23 Eli Hinkel Teaching Grammar Constructions for Speaking and Writing
CT#24 Jane Hoelker Multiple Literacies in Practice
CT#26 Joseph LoBianco Language Planning: What Is It? Can and Do Teachers Do It?
CT#27 Manka Varghese Raciolinguistics and Language Teacher Identity

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 25
PUBLIC POLICY AND ADVOCACY
What are some of the new education initiatives coming out of Washington, DC? What is
happening with legislation impacting K–12 education, adult education, and immigration
reform? To answer these and other questions, TESOL International Association has arranged
for speakers from the U.S. Departments of Education, State, Homeland Security, and Justice,
and other experts to present information on education laws, policies, and initiatives impacting
English language teaching and learning.
All of the following sessions take place in the Washington State Convention Center.

National Advocacy and Policy


Wednesday, 22 March
◗◗ U.S. Federal Education and
Language Policy Update
An overview of the legislative proposals and federal initiatives
TESOL International Association is monitoring
9:30–11:15 am; 602
◗◗ Scams That Target Your Students:
Tips and Tools for Educators
FEATURING: Speakers from the U.S. Federal Trade Commission
11:30 am–12:15 pm; 602
HIGHLIGHTS

◗◗ Presentation From the Office for


English Language Acquisition
1 pm–2:45 pm; 602

Thursday, 23 March
◗◗ National and State Initiatives in Adult ESOL Friday, 24 March
FEATURING: Speakers from the U.S. Department of Education’s ◗◗ Hot Topics in Enrollment, Visas,
Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education
SEVP, and Advocacy for IEPs
9:30 am–11:15 am; 602 FEATURING: Representatives from English USA and the
◗◗ ESSA and ELLs: What TESOL University of Alabama English Language Institute
Professionals Need to Know 9:30 am–11:15 am; 602
FEATURING: TESOL International Association staff offering an ◗◗ WIOA 101: An Overview of
overview of the new federal legislation’s effects on ELLs
Opportunities for Adult ELLs
11:30 am–12:15 pm; 602 FEATURING: TESOL International Association staff
◗◗ Special Public Policy Session: ELLs, 11:30 am–12:30 pm; 602
Immigrant Students, and U.S. Law ◗◗ Hot Topics and Updates From SEVP
FEATURING: Representatives from the Office of Civil Rights
FEATURING: Representatives from the Student and Exchange
at the U.S. Departments of Education and Justice, and the
Visitor Program, U.S. Department of Homeland Security
Migrant Legal Action Program
1 pm–4:45 pm; 602 1 pm–1:45 pm; 602
◗◗ Early Childhood Education Policy Update
MAPS

FEATURING: TESOL International Association Staff


3 pm–3:45 pm; 604

26 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Washington State
Advocacy and Policy
Wednesday, 22 March
◗◗ High School Newcomer Students
in Seattle: Student Voices
FEATURING: Seattle Public Schools students
and administrators
11:30 am–1:15 pm; 603

Thursday, 23 March
◗◗ Survey of Washington State
Initiatives in Support of ELLs
FEATURING: Speakers from the Washington
State Office of Superintendent of
Public Instruction
9:30 am–11:15 am; 603
◗◗ Using Open Educational Resources
to Create ESL Instructional Materials
FEATURING: Speakers from the
Washington State Board for Community U.S. Citizenship and Naturalization
and Technical Colleges The Office of Citizenship at the U.S. Department of Homeland
Security is sponsoring a series of special sessions and workshops

HIGHLIGHTS
9:30 am–11:15 am; 603
with information and resources on the naturalization process in
◗◗ Washington’s I-DEA: Flipping the United States.
Instruction for Adult ELLs
FEATURING: Speakers from the
Washington State Board for Community Wednesday, 22 March
and Technical Colleges
◗◗ Becoming a U.S. Citizen: The Naturalization Process
1 pm–2:45 pm; 603
2 pm–2:45 pm; 603
Friday, 24 March ◗◗ Improving Listening Skills for the
◗◗ Serving ELLs Under ESSA: Naturalization Process
Details for State Plans 4 pm–4:45 pm; 603
FEATURING: Speakers from the National Council
of State Title III Directors Friday, 24 March
2 pm–3:45 pm; 602 ◗◗ The U.S. Naturalization Test: Teaching Objectives
11:30 am–12:15 pm; 603
◗◗ An Overview of the Guide on Adult
Citizenship Education Content Standards
10:30 am–11:15 am; 603

Public Policy and Advocacy sessions are sponsored by

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 27
new! new! new! new!

Visit us in Booth 731


Look for our exhibitor sessions on: booth 731 e vents
March 22, 9:30-10:15 am, Room 615
Academically Speaking: Flipping the Speaking Classroom Meet the Author Coffee Hours:
Robyn Brinks Lockwood March 22, 10:30-11:30 am
March 22, 2:00-2:45 pm, Room 613 Robyn Brinks Lockwood
Guiding International Students through the Research Paper March 23, 10:30-11:30 am
Janine Carlock M. Ann Snow & Donna Brinton
March 24, 11:30 am-12:15 pm, Room 612 March 24, 10:00-11:00 am
16 Keys to Teaching ESL Grammar and Vocabulary Keith Folse
Keith Folse

new edition! coming soon! new editions!

www.press.umich.edu/elt/
RESEARCH SPOTLIGHT
TESOL is strongly committed to research as a way to improve professional knowledge and inform
classroom practice. TESOL’s Research Professional Council (RPC) created the following sessions,
which are led by experienced researchers. Anyone interested in research is encouraged to attend.
Find abstracts for these sessions in the program book under the date and time for each session.
All of these sessions are in the Sheraton Seattle.

Wednesday, 22 March

RESEARCH COLLOQUIUM A
10 am–11:45 am; Issaquah
◗◗ What Kinds of Research for
What Kinds of Practice?
PRESENTERS: Judy Sharkey, Anne
Burns, Sue Starfield, Rodney Jones, Tina
Proulx, Wendy Perron

TESOL AWARD FOR


DISTINGUISHED RESEARCH
10:30 am–11:15 am; Willow B
◗◗ The Power of Story for
Exploring Language

HIGHLIGHTS
Teacher Identity
PRESENTER: Gary Barkhuizen Thursday, 23 March Saturday, 25 March

TESOL RESEARCH AGENDA FAIR RSC WORKSHOP


RESEARCH COLLOQUIUM B
9:30 am–11:15 am; Issaquah 8 am–12 pm; Issaquah
3 pm–4:45 pm; Raveena
◗◗ Conducting Research at
◗◗ Reflecting Forward: Critical ◗◗ Research Mentoring Workshop
English Language Centers: Literacy in TESOL Research This session is designed to support novice
PRESENTERS: Theresa Austin, Deena Boraie, researchers in their study. A panel of RPC
Administrator Perspectives Rachel Grant, Lucilla Lopriore members and an invited speaker briefly
PRESENTERS: Peter De Costa, introduce aspects of research design.
Suzanne Panferov, Sue Starfield, Alan 2016 TESOL MINI-GRANT RECIPIENTS: Participants in small groups discuss
Juffs, Susan Glass Allison Briceno, Liv Davila, Monica Gonzalez
the topics, relating them to their own
experience. The invited speaker draws
JOINT SESSION WITH NABE conclusions.
2 pm–3:45 pm; Issaquah FACILITATORS: Neil J Anderson, Rachel
Grant, Lucilla Lopriore, Rebeca Elena
◗◗ NABE at TESOL: Examining Tapia Carlin, Patrick Chin Ng
Linkages Between Identity
and Language Learning
PRESENTERS: Theresa Austin, Marjorie
Haley, Sylvia Sanchez, Anita Pandey, Rachel
Grant, Peter De Costa, Minh-Anh Hodge

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 29
BEST OF AFFILIATE SESSIONS
The Best of Affiliate sessions are chosen from submissions from TESOL affiliates. Affiliates
are encouraged to submit sessions that showcase their members and the topics they are
discussing. Finds abstracts for these sessions in the program book under the date and time
for each session; all sessions are hosted in the Washington State Convention Center unless
otherwise noted.

TESOL ARABIA BELTA


◗◗ Mindfulness Strategies ◗◗ Reconsidering
for the ELT Classroom Conceptual Paradigms
PRESENTER: Christine Coombe in English Studies
22 March, 9:30 am–10:15 am; 612 PRESENTER: Arifa Rahman
23 March, 2 pm–2:45 pm; 210
BC TEAL
OREGON TESOL
◗◗ Breadth of Vocabulary
Thresholds Supporting ◗◗ Examining Cultural
Postsecondary Reading Assumptions Through
AFFILIATE COLLOQUIUM and Writing Dialogue, A Human
◗◗ Equal Partners— PRESENTER: Scott Douglas Library Inspired Project
Equal Opportunities 22 March, 10:30 am–11:15 am; 210 PRESENTER: Becki Quick
23 March, 11:15 am–12:45 pm; 23 March, 3 pm–3:45 pm; 210
HIGHLIGHTS

Grand Ballroom A, Sheraton Seattle
MITESOL
Successful examples of partnerships MATSOL
◗◗ Awareness, Recognition,
and collaboration among associations
and Production of ◗◗ Bilingualism Is a
are becoming more common in the
Speech Acts Gift (BiG) ESL/SPED
TESOL affiliate community. This
colloquium discusses experiences and PRESENTER: Sara Okello Collaborative Campaign
22 March, 3 pm–3:45 pm; 210 PRESENTER: Lauren Harrison
models of affiliates’ partnerships and
collaborations between affiliates or 24 March, 10:30 am–11:15 am; 210
between an affiliate and other types of ARTESOL
organizations and discusses how this INTERMOUNTAIN TESOL
collaboration has impacted affiliates. ◗◗ Teaching With Mobile
Devices: Some Practical ◗◗ Motivating and Teaching
PRESENTERS: Grazzia Maria Mendoza, HELTA
Honduras TESOL; Ulrich Schrader, MEXTESOL;
Ideas and Considerations Students to “Own”
Christine Coombe, TESOL Arabia; Naziha Ali, PRESENTER: Maria Camijo Their Writing
TESOL Arabia; Susan Spezzini, Alabama- 22 March, 4 pm–4:45 pm; 210 PRESENTER: Mornie Merrill
Mississippi TESOL (AMTESOL)
24 March, 11:30 am–12:15 pm; 210
MAPS

30 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


COLLOQUIA & PRESENTATIONS
FROM COLLEAGUE ORGANIZATIONS
Find abstracts for these sessions in the program book under the date and time for each session.
All sessions are in the Washington State Convention Center, Room 604.

◗◗ Supporting IEP Student


Retention and Success
Through Comprehensive
Services
Sponsored by NAFSA: Association of
International Educators
22 March, 9:30 am–10:15 am
PRESENTER: Joann Ng Hartmann

◗◗ Integrating Science
and Language for ALL
Students: Web of Life
Sponsored by the National Science
Teachers Association (NSTA)
22 March, 10:30 am–11:15 am
PRESENTER: David Crowther

◗◗ Supporting Networks for ◗◗ Building Assessment Into


ELL Success: Resources and
Everyday Activities
Approaches From WIDA

HIGHLIGHTS
Sponsored by the International
Sponsored by WIDA Language Testing Association (ILTA)
23 March, 9:30 am–10:15 am 23 March, 11:30 am–12:15 am
PRESENTER: Jesse Markow
PRESENTER: Anthony Green
◗◗ Making the Case ◗◗ Online Language Teacher
for Languages Education: Participants’
Sponsored by the American Perceptions and Experiences
Council for the Teaching of Foreign
Languages (ACTFL) Sponsored by The International
Research Foundation for English
23 March, 10:30 am–11:15 am Language Education (TIRF)
PRESENTER: Barbara Mondloch
24 March, 1 pm–2:30 pm
PRESENTER: Ryan Damerow

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 31
Master your
ability to educate
EARN A POSTGRADUTE TESOL
QUALIFICATION WHILE YOU WORK

UOW offers a range of TESOL postgraduate courses, covering a


number of key theories in ESL/EFL teaching and providing an
in-depth focus on specialized areas such as second language
learning, grammar and pronunciation pedagogy, assessment
and CALL. You can also choose to undertake a supervised
professional experience placement in an ESL classroom.

UOW offers flexible course delivery from leading education


experts. You can choose online or intensive face-to-face
learning, or a combination of both, so you can balance
study with full-time teaching.

go.uow.edu.au/master-ed Stands for purpose

Earn Your
MA-TESOL
• Excellent and well-rounded
teacher preparation
• Integration of theory and practice
• Hands-on teaching experience
• Optional K−12 certification

spu.edu/tesol
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

MARKETPLACE
Looking for a job? Have jobs to fill? Curious about
trends in English language teaching employment?
Don’t miss the Job MarketPlace at the TESOL
convention in the Expo Hall.
Every year, recruiters and job seekers from all over the world
BACK BY POPULAR meet at Job MarketPlace to fill a variety of English language
DEMAND: education jobs available worldwide: long and short term;
teaching and administrative; public and private; Pre-K–12,
◗◗ CV/ RÉSUMÉ REVIEWS
adult, and higher education.

➜ START HERE: www.tesol.org/jmp

Registered Recruiters* JOB SEEKERS


◗◗ Bilkent University, School of
English Language ◗◗ Construct or upload ◗◗ Meet recruiters and
◗◗ Educational Testing Service (ETS) electronic CVs/résumés interview face‑to-face
◗◗ Raytheon ◗◗ Search jobs online ◗◗ Network with other
◗◗ Southern University of Science professionals in the field
and Technology ◗◗ Request interviews online
Sultan Qaboos University ◗◗ Get your CV/résumé

PROFESSIONAL
◗◗
Maintain a personal

DEVELOPMENT
◗◗
Vinnell Arabia reviewed
◗◗
calendar of scheduled
◗◗ Westminster Public Schools interviews ◗◗ Attend presentations
◗◗ Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool given by recruiters
University
◗◗ Yasar University School
of Foreign Languages
*as of printing
FREE admission to Job MarketPlace
with your paid convention registration.
Only registered convention attendees may interview in the
Job MarketPlace. Even if you have not registered with the
Job MarketPlace, feel free to stop by and browse through the
jobs, and see which companies and institutions have come to
recruit: You never know what you might find.

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 33
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

ELT Leadership Management


Certificate Program
The ELT Leadership Management Certificate Program (ELT LMCP) provides quality
professional development and leadership training for ELT professionals in their current or
future leadership, administrative, or management roles in various kinds of ELT organizations
and institutions. This program is open to TESOL members and nonmembers.
To earn the 10-hour certificate, participants must complete a 7-hour required workshop and
two 90-minute elective workshops (3 hours total). All workshops must be completed at the
2017 TESOL convention.

FEES: US$300 for members, US$375 for nonmembers

ELT LMCP Registration Terms


Enrollment is limited to 100 participants for the
7-hour required workshop; all other workshops
are limited to approximately 35 participants.
Participants will be admitted to the ELT LMCP
on a first-come, first-served basis. Prepurchased
tickets can be picked up on-site at the registration
area of the convention center.

NOTE: The updated Leadership


PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT

Development Certificate Program


(LDCP) provides training for TESOL
members (membership required)
interested in developing their
knowledge and skills as current
or future leaders within TESOL
International Association. The LDCP
is now offered as an online self-
study program. The TESOL website
has information about all of TESOL’s
certificate training programs at
www.tesol.org/leadershiptraining.

34 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


REQUIRED ELT LMCP WORKSHOP

◗◗ LMCP: Leadership and Management Fundamentals


Tuesday, 21 March, 9 am–5 pm
This interactive workshop focuses on three key areas of leadership and
management: qualities of effective leaders, strategic planning, and
leadership for teacher change (supervision).
WORKSHOP LEADERS: Neil J Anderson, Brigham Young University,
Hawaii, USA; Fernando Fleurquin, University of North Texas, Texas, USA;
Christine Coombe, Dubai Men’s College, United Arab Emirates

REQUIRED ELECTIVE WORKSHOPS (choose two)

◗◗ LMCP1: Financial ◗◗ LMCP3: How to Run ◗◗ LMCP5: Effective


Planning: Budgets Effective Meetings Time Management
and Course Costing Thursday, 23 March, 9:30 am–11 am Strategies for ELT
Wednesday, 22 March, 9:30 am–11 am This workshop focuses on the Leaders/Professionals
This workshop provides an essential components of organizing Thursday, 23 March, 3 pm–4:30 pm
introduction to budgeting and and running a good meeting from the
This workshop focuses on the skills,
course costing. ELT professionals perspective of working as a team.
strategies, and tools you need to
who are not familiar with financial Participants discuss setting agendas,
more effectively manage your time.
concepts will be able to prepare and establishing priorities, keeping the
Workshop participants explore
understand institutional or program meeting on track, and dealing with
their current definitions and uses of
budgets and to determine the cost of difficult people.
time, learn about the most common
a course or program. WORKSHOP LEADER: Richard Robison, time wasters, and review the most
Azusa Pacific University, California, USA
WORKSHOP LEADER: successful time management
Fernando Fleurquin, University of strategies identified in the literature.
North Texas, Texas, USA ◗◗ LMCP4: Facilitating Groups WORKSHOP LEADERS:
Christine Coombe, Dubai Men’s
and Building Teams

PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT
College, United Arab Emirates;
◗◗ LMCP2: Hiring Essentials Thursday, 23 March, 11:30 am–1 pm Justin Shewell, Arizona
Wednesday, 22 March, 12:30 pm–2 pm This workshop focuses on the skills State University, Arizona, USA;
This workshop focuses on the skills you need to facilitate groups and Mashael Al-Hamly, Kuwait University,
you need to recruit and vet applicants build teams. Workshop participants Kuwait
for positions in your organization. consider the advantages and
Workshop participants consider disadvantages of working in
how to match the skills required for teams and groups, examine what
specific positions with appropriate characteristics make a good team,
applicants in order to find the right understand the dysfunctions of teams,
persons for the jobs. and review team leadership functions.
WORKSHOP LEADER: Renee Feather, WORKSHOP LEADER: Renee Feather,
Educational Consulting Services, LLC, Educational Consulting Services, LLC,
Colorado, USA Colorado, USA

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 35
THANK YOU
TESOL would like to thank the following reviewers and interest section leaders who helped
with the adjudication process for all concurrent and poster proposals. (Interest section leaders
are indicated in bold.)

Randa Abdelmagid Susan Bleyle Eva A. Combs Hilal Ergul Olga Griswold Najma Janjua
Mohamed Elsagheer Heather Boldt Catherine Condon Madden Zohreh Eslami Janet Gross Melina Jimenez
Abdulrazak Suzanne Bonn Robert Connor Bettney Esther Denise Maria Guarino Melanie Jipping
Paul Abraham Steven Bookman Alma L. Contreras-Vanegas Mohammad Etedali De Felice M. Karen Jogan
Shahid Abrar-ul-Hassan Lisa Bourial Jane Conzett Beth Evans Nilufer Guler Brianna Johnson
Shady Abuyusuf Elizabeth Bowles Amy Cook Jacqueline Evans Margret M. Guntren Kerry Johnson
Kristine Adams Cristin Boyd Ayanna Cooper Doreen Ewert Christine Guro Mark Johnson
Jayme Adelson-Goldstein Donette Brantner-Artenie Todd Cooper Drew Fagan KyongYoung Ha Stefanie Johnson
Natasha Agrawal Rosa Brefeld Elizabeth Corah-Hopkins Rhoda Fagerland Mary Beth Haan Kathleen Margaret
Yoo Young Ahn Colleen Brice Kelly Costner Anne Fairbrother Debbie Hadas Johnson Scholl
Khalid Al Hariri Robyn Brinks Lockwood Elena Cotos Mariah Fairley Elizabeth Haga Duff Johnston
Al Tiyb Al khaiyali Elise Brittain Sandra Cox Ming Fang Iftikhar Haider Camille Jones
Jalal Albaqshi Toby Brody Janay Crabtree David Fay Helena Hall Tamara Jones
Moises Elias Alcantara Alan Broomhead Cathryn Crosby Miguel Fernandez Andy Halvorsen Terry Jordens
Ayre Joy Brown Deborah Crusan Shanan Fitts Laura Hamman Mary Jorgenson Sullivan
Julie Alemany Meriam Brown Tunde Csepelyi Claudio Fleury Sasse Pascal Hamon Jin Kyeong Jung
Nawwaf Alhazmi Shirley Brown Brenda Custodio Monika Floyd Julie Hanks JoAnn Jurchan-Rizzo
Naziha Ali Stacy Brown José Antônio da Silva Gladys Focho Lindsay Hansen Madhav Kafle
Amany H. AlKhayat Udambor Bumandalai Jennifer Daniels Anne Marie Foerster Luu Christopher Hastings DJ Kaiser
Danilo Alpizar Lobo Lucy Bunning Peter De Costa Dayna Ford Melissa B. Hauber-Ozer Hee-seung Kang
Jawharah Alruwais John Bunting Carlos De la Paz Arroyo Douglas Forster Rebecca Haymore Seong-Yoon Kang
Khalid Al-Seghayer Jessica Burchett Lidiana de Moraes Jill Fox Jerri Haynes Fares Karam
Jenna Altherr Flores Debra Burgess Patricia De Oliveira Lucas David Freeman Graciela Helguero-Balcells Michael Karas
Aaron Alvero Morag Burke Sandra de Rezende Yvonne Freeman Andrea Hellman Eva Kartchava
Mokhtar Al-Zuraiki Walton Burns Nitzie De Sanley Debra Friedman Christyann Helm Nagwa Kassabgy
Maria Ammar Michael Burri Andrea De Toledo Jing Fu Sheri Henderson Hayriye Kayi-Aydar
Yukari Amos Robert W. Bushong Karin deJonge-Kannan Donna T. Fujimoto Sarah Henderson Lee Kenneth Kelch
Poonam Anand Linda Butler Saundra Deltac Sunao Fukunaga Joel Heng Hartse Kristina Kellermann
Michael Anderson Hitesh C. Bhakat Karen Dennis Susan Gaer Erin Hernandez Molly Kelley
Elena Andrei Cecilia Cabrera Martirena Cynthia L. Z. DeRoma Aracelis Galindez Mary Hillis Rochelle Keogh
Fanja Andrianarivo Catherine Caldwell Deirdre Derrick Linda Galloway Jennifer Himmel David Kertzner
Geeta Aneja Megan Calvert Megan DeStefano Bernadette Garcia Eli Hinkel Rania Khalil
Tuba Angay-Crowder Maxi-Ann Campbell Roisin Dewart Ana Garcia de Paredes Eliana Hirano Raj Khatri
Maria Antonini Nigel Caplan Gabriel Diaz Maggioli Roger Gee Jennifer Hirashiki Anastasia Khawaja
Karen Asenavage Jill Cargile Robert Dickey Elise J. Geither Cecelia Hitte Pokharel Khila
Nikki Ashcraft Gemma Carrillo Ai-Chu Ding Earlene Gentry U. Teng Ho Tabitha Kidwell
Sofiya Asher Shirlaine Castellino Juhyun Do Fatma Ghailan Jane Hoelker Cynthia Kilpatrick
Mohamed Ashraf EL Zamil Janice Cate Victoria Donaldson Ghada Gherwash Myles Hoenig EunGyong Kim
Erhan Aslan Robby Caughey Angela Dornbusch Ginger Gibbs Marvin D. Hoffland Soo Hyon Kim
Jane Averill Meghan Cavanaugh Julie Doty Judy Gilbert Camila Höfling Ye-Kyoung Kim
Tatiana Babenko Sharon Cavusgil Ellen Dougherty Jas Gill Laura Holland Yuzo Kimura
THANK YOU

Kyung-Hee Bae Raúl Cervantes Desouches Trisha Dowling Betsy Gilliland Melody Holm-Terasaki Yuriko Kite
Melanie J. Baker Leena Chakrabarti Julia Geist Drew Elizabeth Gillstrom Anna Hood Christina Kitson
Jim Bame Elisabeth Chan Qian Du Rosario Giraldez Peggy Hrolenok Hale Hatice Kizilcik
Sandra Bancroft-Billings Hoi Yuen Chan Scott Duarte Louise Gobron Marianne Hsu Santelli Gabriela Kleckova
Laura H. Baecher Chi-Fang Chang Karen Dundon Heather Godfrey Gaddis Jim Hu Laura Knudson
Lety Banks Mary Chang Diane Dunlap Deborah Goldman Shin-ying Huang Joanna Koch
Leslie Barratt Quanisha Charles Kaye Dunn Lynn Goldstein Philip Hubbard Akira Kondo
Mary Barratt Amy Alice Chastain Katherine Earley Stephanie Gollobin Wanda Huber John Kopec
Barbara Barrett Olga Lilliam Chaves Samuela Eckstut Sean Gomez Toni Hull Georgios Kormpas
Kathryn Bartholomew Yue Chen Anne Ediger Amitha Gone Kara Hunter Stephanie Korslund
Christine Bauer-Ramazani Dongmei Cheng Ilknur Eginli Casey Gordon Ju-A Hwang Ilka Kostka
Carol Bearse Manoj B. Chhaya Tonya Eick Barbara Gourlay Glenda Hyer Katya Koubek
Genene Beaumont Liz Tin-Lei Chiang Eric Ekembe John M. Graney Martha Iancu Lisa Kovacs-Morgan
Patrick Rodrigue Belibi Eunjeong Choi Nahida El Assi Holly Gray Brenda P. Imber Lisa Kowaleski
Enama M. Sidury Christiansen Abir R. El Shaban Betty Green Barbara Inerfeld Beth Kozbial Ernst
Ray Bennett Nelli Cirineo Abir Eldaba Brent A. Green Constantine Ioannou Christina Kozlowski
Adil Bentahar Adam Clark Elda Elizondo Bridget Green Yuko Iwai Eileen Kramer
Heather Benucci Rob Clément Olga Ellis Jennifer Green Rania Jabr Rachel Kraut
Marcellino Berardo Clarissa Codrington Entisar Elsherif Kathy Green Laura R. Jacob Elka Kristonagy
Dawn Bikowski Erica Coffelt Eman Elturki Kim Green Lily Jaffie-Shupe Miriam Kroeger
Sharon Bjorck Douglas W. Coleman Sarah Emory Susan Greene Valerie S. Jakar Erin Kuester
Emily Blair Jersus Colmenares Liz England Rob Griffin Eunjee Jang Kenneth Kuo-Pin Chi
Tasha Bleistein

36 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Lindsey Kurtz Christine McCourt Patricia Pashby Todd Ruecker Monica Snow Jack Watson
Alison Kwan Andrew McCullough Michael Pasquale Karen Russikoff Lea Sobocan Jodi Weber
Jungmin Kwon Kurtis McDonald Tarana Patel Marilyn J. Rymniak Amir H. Soheili-Mehr Jing Wei
Silvia Laborde Tracey McGee Caroline Payant David Saavedra Laura Adele Soracco Tsung-han Weng
Gabriela Ladron de Kimberly McGrath Moreira Mary Peacock Christine Sabieh Patricia Speers Cara Wenig Mori
Guevara de Leon Margaret McKenzie Pamela Pearson Shaheed Sabrin Sarah Springsteen Riah Werner
Ricky Lam Kathryn McLaughlin-Rojas Nancy Pederson Fabiana Sacchi James Stakenburg Debbie West
Barbara Lapornik Laura McWhorter Jeanne Peine Tanita Saenkhum Suzan Stamper Gordon West
Theresa Rita Laquerre Melissa Meisterheim Giselle Pempedjian Aysenur Sagdic Shelley Staples Jennifer Wiebe
Ditlev Larsen Miki Mendelsohn Kellie Pendley Amira Salama Elke Stappert Beth Wiens
Kathy Larson Grazzia María Mendoza Cassandra Perrone Leticia Araceli Salas John Stasinopoulos Nico Wiersema
Suman Laudari Chirinos Silvia Pessoa Carolyn Samuel Stephanie J. Stauffer Gwendolyn Williams
Rebecca Lawrence Christopher Meoli Rhonda Petree Derina Samuel Angela Steadman John W. Wilson
Margaret V. Layton Polly Merdinger Jim Pettersson Cristina Sanchez-Martin Jenny Stenseth Deborah Wilson-Allam
Brooke Leach Grable Jennifer Meyer Adriana Picoral Harisimran S. Sandhu Vance Stevens Adria Winfield
Alice S. Lee Suzanne Meyer Lorraine V. Pierce Julia Sandler Thomas Strasser Carter A. Winkle
Esther Lee Carol Miele Allison Piippo Arthur Sanford John Evar Strid Ilene Winokur
Joseph J. Lee Dale Miller Nadezda Pimenova Josefina Santana Jamie Sturges Ann Wintergerst
Ju Seong (John) Lee JoAnn Miller Carol Pineiro Shaeley Santiago Jennifer Summers Cynthia S. Wiseman
Paoli Lee Ryan Miller Juan Pino-Silva Kathy Santo Y. Paul Sussman Mae Wlazlinski
Martha Lengeling Comfort Mingot Angelo Pitillo Lucia Santos Chatwara Suwannamai Bryan Woerner
Cynthia Lennox Ariadne Miranda Costas Pitychoutis Dinorah Sapp Duran Melanie Wong
Constance Leonard Norbella Miranda Elizabeth P. Plummer Amir Sarkeshikian Ethel Swartley Wing Yan Wong
Lisa Leopold Thomas Mitchell Anne Politz Juli Sarris Carol L. Swett Andrea Word
Patrick Leung Nancy Montgomery Gizelle Ponzillo Elke Savoy Olivia Szabo Shinian Wu
Ellen Lewin Patricia Moon Tapper Dyanis Popova Leo Schmitt Robert Taferner Yong Wu
Demetria Li Jana Moore Ildiko Porter-Szucs Melanie Schneider Nicholas Richard Taggart Saihua Xia
Zhi Li Sarah Catherine K. Diane Potts Celeste Scholz Shannon Tanghe Wu Ya-Li
Li-Fen Lin Moore Hana Prashker Susan R. Schranck Gordon Tapper Se Jeong Yang
Bennett Lindauer Michele Moragne E. Silva Denise Seok Hoon Quah Suzanne Scott Jonathan Tarbox Qin Yao
Peggy Lindsey Meghan Moran Christina Quartararo Stephanie A. Sebolt Christine Tardy Lora Yasen
Farrah Littlepage Lesley Morgan Carolyn Quarterman Mary Theresa Seig Tara Tarpey Aiden Yeh
Quiandi Liu Tommy Dean Morgan Marcela Quintana Lara Ali Fuad Selvi Becky Tarver Chase Kyungsook Yeum
Yingliang Liu Kathryn Morris Muhammad Qureshi Arindam Sengupta Heather Tatton-Harris Youngjoo Yi
Katherine Lobo Katie Morris Juval V. Racelis Roxanna Senyshyn Karen Taylor May Youn
Kim Loh Rob Mucklo Maria Rossana Ramirez- Marti Sevier Phillip Taylor Fang Yu
Stephen Looney Robin Murie Avila Noha Shaaban Brad Teague Rui (Eric) Yuan
Julie Lopez Sandra Musanti Francisco Ramos Fauzia Shamim Bishnu Thapa Tess Yurik
Patricia Lopez Sandra I. Musanti Laura Ramos Frances Shapiro-Skrobe Laura Thomas Sandra Zappa-Hollman
Mario Lopez-Barrios Debbie Nelson Terri Rapoport Judy Sharkey Barbara Thompson Nicholas Zefran
Kay Losey Karen Newman Karen Rauser Annis N. Shaver Emily Thrush Deqi Zen
Lauren Lovvorn Melanie Newman-Morrow Lara Ravitch Donna Shaw Lynn Tiemann Cong Zhang
Grace Low Hanh Nguyen Kirsten Reitan Cai Shengrong Ronald J. Toering Lawrence Jun Zhang
Kris Lowrey Christine Nicodemus Lourdes Rey Beth Sheppard Thu Tran Ruilan Zhao
Bryan Lowry Deborah Norland Kate Mastruserio Reynolds Cynthia Shermeyer Shiao-Chen Tsai Yanan Zhao
Teresa Lucas Alissa Nostas Kathleen Reynolds Ari Sherris Martha E. Tummons Bingjie Zheng
Dawn Lucovich Judith O’Loughlin Jakraphan Riamliw Natalie Twelkemeier

THANK YOU
Justin Shewell Ally Zhou
Mehmet Murat Luleci Erin O’Reilly Anastasia Riazantseva Laura Shier Baburhan Uzum Cheng Zhou
Kara A. Mac Donald Diane Obara Janne Rice Jenna Shim Margaret van Naerssen Monica Beatriz Ziegler
Joy MacFarland Evelin Amada Ojeda Brooke Schreiber Ricker Karen Shock Vit Vanicek Lynn Zimmerman
John P. Madden Naveda Julie Riddlebarger Sagun Shrestha Lindsay Vecchio Emilija Zlatkovska
Janella Maldonado Flor Olivares Narad K. Rijal Elena Shvidko Lorrie Stoops Verplaetse Clare Zuraw
Veronika Maliborska David Olsher Bruce Rindler Megan Siczek Elena Vestri Lawrence Zwier
Miralynn Malupa-Kim Clara Onatra Michel Antonio Riquelme Leslie Siebert Vander Viana
Chadia Mansour Christine ONeill Sanderson Joseph Siegel Isabela Villas Boas
Douglas Margolis Rebecca Oreto Susanne Rizzo Anthony Silva Polina Vinogradova
Ruiz Maria Janet Orr Eunseok Ro Eduardo Silva Seniye Vural
Elizabeth Marnell Deniz Ortactepe Thomas Robb Tony Silva Robert Wachman
Marybelle Marrero-Colon Fernanda Ortiz Heather Robertson Katie Silvester Sandy Wagner
Kevin Martin Jeremy Ortloff Richard E. Robison Lindsey Simanowitz Santoi Wagner
Reena Mathew Judith Otterburn-Martinez Aida Rodomanchenko Virginia Simmons Daniela C. Wagner-Loera
Monica Maxwell-Paegle Elsie Paredes Vania Rodrigues Navin Singh Alice Wahl Lachman
Sheila Mayne Ho Ryong Park John Rogers Ann Sinsheimer Angela Waigand
Susan Mcalister Jaehan Park Amy Roither Elizabeth Skelton Lara Wallace
Jacqueline McCafferty Jeongbin Hannah Park Yasmine Romero Pamela Smart-Smith Joanna Waluk
Sean McClelland Seonmin Park Carol Romett Shira Smith Wendy Wang
Mary Lou McCloskey Seungku Park Cameron Romney Tara Smith Sherry Ward
Robb McCollum Maria Parker Glenda Rose Joye Smith-Munson Tamara Warhol
Alexandra McCourt R. Scott Partridge David Ross Debra Snell Amber Warren
Francesca Pase Zaline Roy-Campbell

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 37
SHERATON SEATTLE

SECOND FLOOR

Quiet Room

THIRD FLOOR
MAPS

38 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


WASHINGTON STATE CONVENTION CENTER
THE CONFERENCE CENTER

Skagit Lower Level Yakima Level One Chelan Level Two


FE FE FE FE

3 2 5 NP3

Dock
2 W
4 W

To/From M M
Level 1
To/From
Lower Level
W

M
FE FE
1 FE 3* 2

Dock
4 1 FE
FE Fireplace

To/From
Level 1
To/From
2 Level 3
2
1 FE
2 1
5 1
Fireplace
To/From Level 2
Open 1*
Wild Rye
FE Café Bakery

Entrance

PIKE STREET

MAPS

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 39
WASHINGTON STATE CONVENTION CENTER
THE CONFERENCE CENTER

TAHOMA LEVEL THREE


Tahoma Level Three

FE

FE

FE
W M

3
FE 1 2

4
FE
To/From
Level 4
Falls Suite

2
FE
1

To/From
Level 2
Open 5
MAPS

40 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


WASHINGTON STATE CONVENTION CENTER

LEVEL TWO

2AB Lobby
Convention
Open Center
To/From Office
Level 3 FE
12
To/From
11 Level 1
208*
W

2A
M 209*
205

2B 210*
FE
10
Open
FE 204

211
Ramp
Ramp

FE W M

212 203

213
202

FE

FE 214

201
FE 7 6
Ramp

To Two Union Square

Int’l.
Meeting
Place
MAPS

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 41
WASHINGTON STATE CONVENTION CENTER

LEVEL THREE

3AB Lobby

To 301-310
Open To/From
Level 2

12
To/From
11 Level 4

3A

3B Main Entrance to
10 Parking Garage
FE
FE

To Skybridge Lobby

306 Lactation
Room
307
FE 305
308
Open
304
309

FE

310
FE

303
FE 7 6
Galleria

302

Open 301*

To Garages
and Freeway
Park Garage
MAPS

42 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


WASHINGTON STATE CONVENTION CENTER

LEVEL FOUR
WSCC Use
FE

FE
M W

North Service Corridor

FE Deli FE N-2 North


Loading Dock

N- 1

To/From
The Conference
4F

UP
4E Center

DOWN

FE FE FE M W

Truck Bridge

4D Pike Street (Below)


Skybridge

South Service Corridor


ToAtrium Lobby

Skybridge FE Solera FE
Open Lobby FE FE 3
4 5
12 To/From
11 Level 3

English Language Expo South

& Job MarketPlace


400 Loading
Dock
Grill

10
W FE
FE 4C

ce
M

P la
ll
be
b

416
Hu

4B 4A
to
p

401
m
Ra

W M
k
FE

uc
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WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 43
WASHINGTON STATE CONVENTION CENTER

LEVEL SIX
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KEYNOTE AND PLENARY SESSIONS

6E 6C 6B 6A
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620 615
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(Below)
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MAPS

44 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


TESOL GLOBAL PARTNERS
TESOL International Association gratefully

ASSOCIATE PARTNERS
STRATEGIC AND
acknowledges the generous support of its partners.

STRATEGIC LEVEL

ASSOCIATE LEVEL

These partnerships are current as of 10 February 2017.

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 45
HOW TO USE THIS BOOK
HOW TO USE THIS BOOK

Types of Sessions Interest Section Icons

Academic Session (1 hour, 45 minutes): Research-Oriented Presentation Adult Education


An in-depth session sponsored by a specific (45 minutes): An oral summary, with occasional
interest section. reference to notes or a text, that discusses Applied Linguistics
the presenters’ work in relation to theory
Dialogue (45 minutes): Peer-to-peer facilitated and/or practice. Bilingual Education
discussions about a hot topic in TESOL.
Roundtable Discussion (45 minutes): Computer-Assisted Language Learning
Exhibitor Session (45 minutes): Peer-to-peer facilitated discussions, limited to
A session sponsored by an exhibitor. the first 19 attendees per table. Elementary Education
Forum Session: (45 minutes): Teaching Tip (20 minutes): Similar in content English as a Foreign Language
A session sponsored by a forum. to a practice-oriented presentation but shorter.

InterSection: (1 hour, 45 minutes): English for Specific Purposes


TESOL in Focus: Sessions sponsored by
Academic sessions that represent a TESOL highlighting special projects and
collaboration between two or more interest Higher Education
initiatives to further the field, or partnerships
sections or other entities. with colleague associations.
Intensive English Programs
Invited Speaker Ticketed Event: Ticketed events are a great
(45 minutes or 1 hour, 45 minutes): Sessions way to enhance your convention experience. Intercultural Communication
featuring a speaker selected by the program By attending a ticketed event, you are assured
committee because he or she has a message of a more intimate and interactive session. International Teaching Assistants
that is important to TESOL members. Any remaining tickets for events may be
purchased at the registration counters. Materials Writers
Panel (1 hour, 45 minutes): A forum for a group
of professionals to formally present and discuss Workshop (1 hour, 45 minutes): Nonnative English Speakers in TESOL
current ELT issues. Presenters exchange A carefully structured, hands-on, professional
outlines in advance and discuss positions development activity. The leader helps Program Administration
during the session. participants solve a problem or develop a
specific teaching or research technique. Refugee Concerns
Practice-Oriented Presentation
(45 minutes): A session that shows, as well as Secondary Schools
tells, a technique for teaching or testing.
Second Language Writing

Speech, Pronunciation, and Listening

Poster sessions are self-explanatory exhibits that allow participants to engage in informal discussion. Social Responsibility
For each poster session, there will be a corresponding bulletin board display. Conference attendees
may stroll through the poster session area in the Expo Hall to discuss the topics with presenters. The Teacher Education
displays and presenters change each day. Poster sessions are listed on page 193.
Video and Digital Media

Sample Abstract:

TYPE OF SESSION ICON Friday, 9:30 am–11:15 am DAY, TIME


Sheraton Seattle, Metropolitan B SITE, ROOM

SESSION TITLE Engage Students and Enrich Listening Materials With African Voices
DESCRIPTION How do you engage students while enhancing their global awareness? How do you enrich
listening materials with diverse models of eloquent speakers of English? This interactive
workshop answers these questions with authentic listening materials featuring World English
speakers from Africa.
PRESENTER Mary Romney, Capital Community College, USA

Please note: Abstracts are arranged by date followed by start


Key: TCC = The Conference Center
time, then by end time, and then in alphabetical order by title.
WSCC = Washington State Convention Center

46 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


ABSTRACTS
Please check the addendum for cancellations and changes to sessions.
Monday, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm

MONDAY, 20 MARCH
MONDAY, 20 MARCH 2017
Listening 2.0: University Listening in the Digital Era
For the location of a ticketed session, please check your ticket.
Content Area: Content-based Instruction
In this workshop, participants learn how to incorporate problem solving
WSCC = Washington State Convention Center
activities in their listening classes so their students can develop
listening-to-learn tools. Using these tools, ELLs will engage in an active
1:00 pm process of understanding difficult listening passages and interact more
deeply in understanding a listening passage.
Monday, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm Jim Bame, Utah State University, USA
Jim Rogers, Utah State University, USA
Effective Lesson Observation Practices:
More Than Meets the Eye Monday, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm
Content Area: Accreditation
In this PCI, participants explore ways to maximize the impact of lesson Supporting Students With Interrupted Education
observation both in pre- and in-service contexts. Lesson observation Content Area: Content-based Instruction
is one of the most widespread practices for assessing teachers. Doing Students with interrupted education constitute up to 20% of new
so in a principled and teacher-oriented manner will guarantee that a arrivals at the P–12 level in the United States. Who are these
lesson observation session becomes a productive learning intervention students, where do they come from, what are the causes of their
for the observer and the teacher. interrupted education, and, most important, what can we as educators
Gabriel Diaz Maggioli, National Teacher Education College, Uruguay do to help these students make up for lost time? In depth and
interactive workshop.
Monday, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm Judith O’Loughlin, Language Matters, LLC, USA
Brenda Custodio, Ohio State University, USA
Engaging Secondary School Language
Learners Through Media Literacy Activities Monday, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm
Content Area: Literature/Arts/Media
This workshop focuses on development of media literacy activities Teaching Critical Thinking to ELLs
for secondary school language learners. Participants gain an Content Area: Learning/Teaching Styles
understanding of media literacy as a natural extension of language Critical thinking is growing in necessity and demand around the world,
teaching that integrates linguistic and cultural learning. Participants but few texts discuss teaching it to ELLs. This workshop defines critical
leave with lists of resources for continued media literacy education thinking, shows how to design exercises for any skill (intermediate and
and drafts of lesson plans for their classrooms. above students), and discusses problems that might arise with pupils
Carla Chamberlin-Quinlisk, Pennsylvania State University, Abington from educational systems emphasizing memorization and regurgitation
College, USA and/or from systems with authoritarian and repressive policies.
Nancy Burkhalter, Seattle University, USA
Monday, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm

From Bystander to Active Participant:


Interaction Strategies for Effective Communication
Content Area: Speaking/Pronunciation/Phonology/Listening
ESL students can sometimes feel left behind when conversations take
off. This workshop offers a variety of interaction strategies to help
nonnative English speakers become more active listeners and more
engaging conversationalists in and out of the classroom. Participants
practice these strategies in role-plays, small and large group
discussions, small talk, and storytelling.
Cathy Raymond, Washington University in St. Louis, USA
Pamela Dzunu, Washington University in St. Louis, USA
Mica Tucci, Washington University in St. Louis, USA
Stephanie Moore, Washington University in St. Louis, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 47
5:00 pm Monday, 5:00 pm–9:00 pm

Teaching Writing in the ESOL Classroom:


MONDAY, 20 MARCH

Monday, 5:00 pm–9:00 pm


Handling the Workload
Content Area: Writing/Composition
A Sound Approach to Spelling:
Engage and Empower Your Learners Teaching writing in the ESOL classroom needn’t be frustrating or
Content Area: Reading/Literacy time consuming. This PCI focuses on three issues: teaching writing,
giving effective feedback, and maintaining student interest in writing.
English spelling is conventionally taught as a series of rules, each Participants build up and take home the scaffolding they need to teach
with exceptions that must be memorized. Using the Color Vowel Chart, writing in their own classrooms, along with the ideas, materials, and
learners take a sound-based approach, connecting pronunciation confidence to do it well.
to the written word as they discover unexpected spelling patterns
and striking trends. Learn how implementing this profoundly simple Melanie Rockenhaus, Scuola Normale Superiore, Italy
approach inspires curiosity and empowers learners to develop their
own speaking–spelling intuition. Monday, 5:00 pm–9:00 pm
Karen Taylor, English Language Training Solutions, USA
Robin Barr, American University, USA Using Songs and Music to Teach ESL/EFL
Shirley Thompson, English Language Training Solutions, USA ESL teachers are aware of the power of music and song in teaching
Laura McIndoo, Central New Mexico Community College, USA English as a new language—but they may not know all of the amazing
Michael Conners, E.L. Haynes Public Charter School, USA ways music supports learners’ progress. This PCI demonstrates a
wide range of activities, including content area, genre study, all four
Monday, 5:00 pm–9:00 pm domains, and even CCSS planning and test preparation. Come ready
for interaction and inspiration.
Designing Interactive Classrooms: Kristen Lems, National Louis University, USA
Discussion Strategies for ELLs
Content Area: Learning/Teaching Styles
Student-centered learning has been shown as the best way to teach
language. However, integrating activities that incorporate this type
of learning can be challenging. In this workshop, specific methods,
such as Harkness and fishbowl discussions, panels, and debates, are
described and demonstrated as attendees participate in the methods in
order to understand how to use them within their own classrooms.
Paula Wilder, Durham Technical Community College, USA

Monday, 5:00 pm–9:00 pm

Empowering Long‑Term ELLs: Responsive


Programming and Specialized Academic Strategies
Content Area: Curriculum/Materials Development
This highly interactive workshop addresses the urgency to create
specialized coursework and to use specific research-based strategies
known to move secondary long-term ELLs to proficiency in academic
English, whether in integrated or stand-alone classes. Attendees
practice innovative strategies that promote engagement, rich academic
vocabulary, and control of complex structures across the content areas.
Participants also receive supportive resources.
Elizabeth Hartung-Cole, Retired, USA
Nancy Cloud, Rhode Island College, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

48 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


TUESDAY, 21 MARCH 2017 Tuesday, 8:00 am–12:00 pm
For the location of a ticketed session, please check your ticket.
Listen Again: Strategies for an Integrated
Approach to Listening Skills
TCC = The Conference Center Content Area: Speaking/Pronunciation/Phonology/Listening
WSCC = Washington State Convention Center
This workshop offers a step-by-step approach to teaching listening
skills (rather than testing listening ability). Participants practice
8:00 am
assessing listening skills and metacognition diagnostically and at
semester-end to track improvement. Participants plan lessons using
Tuesday, 8:00 am–12:00 pm metacognitive listening strategies/checklists, and activities and
exercises. The workshop focuses on the aural skills that differentiate
A Lexical Look at Writing Instruction: listening from reading, which allows learners to comprehend utterance
Empowering the Reluctant Writer content and speaker intent.
Content Area: Vocabulary/Lexicon Marnie Reed, Boston University, USA

TUESDAY, 21 MARCH
Though many writing teachers spend little time on vocabulary Christina Michaud, Boston University, USA
development, writing and word learning belong together. Just as
fine-tuned word choices enrich and focus one’s writing, the process of Tuesday, 8:00 am–12:00 pm
writing provides a purpose for vocabulary development. This session
helps teachers optimize this reciprocal relationship by exploring Scaffolding Close Reading for ELLs
engaging techniques for each stage of the writing process. Content Area: Reading/Literacy
Cheryl Boyd Zimmerman, California State University, Fullerton, USA This PCI provides research-based methods for ELLs to meet challenging
standards in English language arts. Teachers learn scaffolding
Tuesday, 8:00 am–12:00 pm techniques for providing essential background and for identifying and
teaching vocabulary, as well as for accessing and engaging with more
Building Educational Communities of Inclusion: complex text during close reading. The session includes ample time
Cultural Proficiency and Equity for teachers to practice the techniques and to discuss implications
Learn effective strategies to create communities of inclusion by for implementation.
promoting cultural proficiency on your campus and/or in your school Lisa Tabaku, American Institutes for Research, USA
district. Participants take part in interactive activities that will prepare
them to advocate for equity and social justice as a means to create Tuesday, 8:00 am–12:00 pm
educational access and opportunity for every student, his or her family,
and the community they live in.
Teaching and Learning 2.0: Developing Engaging,
José Medina, Center for Applied Linguistics, USA Enriching, and Empowering Lessons
Annie Duguay, Center for Applied Linguistics, USA Content Area: Technology in Education
Enrich and empower yourself by discovering and applying best
Tuesday, 8:00 am–12:00 pm practices for successful online teaching, which in turn will enrich
and empower your students. A teacher who took the digital plunge
Extensive/Intensive Sociocultural Vocabulary and her teacher-mentor provide perspective and guidance in this
Teaching Strategies for Lexical Depth/Breadth experiential, engaging, and hands-on workshop on creating online
Content Area: Vocabulary/Lexicon lessons and activities.
Vocabulary is a vital aspect of knowing a language at all levels of Sandy Wagner, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language
second-language acquisition. Presenters demonstrate a sociocultural Center, USA
approach incorporating 32 dimensions of a lexical item, creating Debra Abrams, National Research University Higher School of
opportunities for extensive and intensive vocabulary acquisition (both Economics, Russia
breadth and depth). Rich handouts provide both personalized and
collaborative strategies for repeated vocabulary exposure and self-
regulation to promote autonomous and empowered language learning.
Lynne Diaz-Rico, California State University, San Bernardino, USA
Julie Ciancio, California State University, San Bernardino, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 49
9:00 am Tuesday, 9:00 am–4:00 pm

Essentials of Pronunciation Teaching and Learning


Tuesday, 9:00 am–4:00 pm
Content Area: Speaking/Pronunciation/Phonology/Listening

ELLs, Cultural Competency, and Academic Through explanations and demonstrations, participants gain skill and
Achievement: What’s the Connection? confidence in meeting the challenges of teaching pronunciation to
Content Area: Learning/Teaching Styles learners from a variety of backgrounds. Participants are familiarized
with the core features of pronunciation along with techniques for
Equality vs equity, language and culture, cultural sensitivity and addressing those elements of speech that have the most impact on
academic achievement—how do they interrelate? ELLs are the fastest overall intelligibility.
growing student population, and our classrooms are more diverse
than ever. What do educators need to do to expand their range of Donna Brinton, Consultant, USA
knowledge and skills to meet the needs of today’s students? Lynn Henrichsen, Brigham Young University–Salt Lake Center, USA
Tamara Jones, Howard Community College, USA
Ingrid Miera, AFT, USA Colleen Meyers, University of Minnesota, USA
TUESDAY, 21 MARCH

Joni Anderson, AFT, USA Carolyn Quarterman, North Carolina State University, USA
Becky Corr, AFT, USA
Areli Schermerhorn, AFT, USA
Giselle Lundy-Ponce, AFT, USA Tuesday, 9:00 am–4:00 pm

Tuesday, 9:00 am–4:00 pm Motivation, Participation, and Ongoing


All‑Skills Practice via Process‑Drama
Content Area: Integrated Skills
Enriching Learning, Saving Time:
Designing Effective Academic Writing Courses Recent brain-based research indicates that the partnership of
Content Area: Writing/Composition motivation, imagination, movement, and emotion vastly accelerates
second language acquisition. The Process Drama approach integrates
Teaching L2 writing is particularly demanding due to the need to these four components into extended, multiepisode, improvisational
provide out-of-class support, respond to drafts, and grade papers. In dramatic encounters that develop speaking, listening, grammar,
this workshop, writing instructors learn how to cope with these time and literacy skills while also ensuring creativity, dynamism, and
demands while simultaneously maximizing their students’ learning. learner engagement. In this workshop, teachers learn to create
Participants apply 10 recommendations by designing or revising a effective Process Dramas.
writing course syllabus.
Leslie Sapp, Montgomery College, USA
Zuzana Tomaš, Eastern Michigan University, USA Gary Carkin, Southern New Hampshire University, USA
Jennifer Mott-Smith, Towson University, USA Judy Trupin, Literacy Assistance Center, USA

Tuesday, 9:00 am–4:00 pm Tuesday, 9:00 am–4:00 pm

Essential Practices for Meeting Common Slow Down: Guide True Beginners to
Core Standards in Diverse Classrooms Mastery With Deep Learning
Content Area: Standards Content Area: Integrated Skills
Learn how Los Angeles Unified School District is using strategic True beginners need “deep learning” to reach mastery. Hardworking
observation and reflection teaching frames to support district-wide teachers of beginners need low-prep activities that provide meaningful
teacher implementation of the Common Core State Standards and opportunities for speaking, listening, reading, and writing and offer
California English Language Development standards. Examine, repetition without boredom. This highly interactive session offers
experience, and develop instructional materials and strategies used to engaging, repeatable classroom routines and activities for literacy-
support teachers’ enactment of these high-impact practices and build level students and very low beginners.
instructional capacity across school sites.
Shelley Lee, Wake Technical Community College, USA
Maricela Sanchez, Los Angeles Unified School District, USA Laurel Pollard, Consultant, USA
Isabel Aguirre, Los Angeles Unified School District, USA
Robert Pritchard, Sacramento State University, USA
Susan O’Hara, UC Davis, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

50 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


1:00 pm Tuesday, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm

Strengthening Instructions and


Tuesday, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm
Programming for Beginning ELLs
Content Area: Content-based Instruction
Citation Approaches:
Selection and Integration of Sources How can you strengthen instruction and programming for ELLs at
This workshop is devoted to a crucial area at almost all levels of the beginning stages? Teachers, specialists, administrators, and
academic writing: the integration of outside sources into student texts. stakeholders, join us to explore proven strategies for educating
Participants analyze model texts and work through the process of dynamically diverse populations of ELLs. Explore approaches and
source-based text production at secondary and college levels. tools that draw from students, families, and our strengths to create a
positive outcome for all.
Ann Johns, San Diego State University, USA
Judie Haynes, everythingESL, USA
Debbie Zacarian, Debbie Zacarian, Ed.D. & Associates, USA
Tuesday, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm

TUESDAY, 21 MARCH
Tuesday, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm
Developing Academic Discourse Competence
Through Formulaic Sequences
Teaching for World Citizenship
Content Area: Vocabulary/Lexicon
Through International Themes
The Academic Formulas List and Phrasal Expressions List include Content Area: Curriculum/Materials Development
formulaic sequences that build on traditional lists, such as the
This workshop demonstrates creative ways to promote world
Academic Word List, to better meet student proficiency needs at
citizenship in your classroom through thematic teaching units designed
the discourse level. Participants investigate the lists; experience
to foster global awareness and international understanding. Workshop
collaborative activities designed to assist students in acquisition,
participants learn about the field of global education, study content-
including online and corpus-based; and discuss considerations for
based approaches to materials design, experience classroom activities
adaptation and implementation. Step-by-step guides provided.
on international themes, and take home an exciting variety of global
Alissa Nostas, Arizona State University, USA education resources.
Mariah Fairley, American University in Cairo, Egypt
Susanne Rizzo, American University in Cairo, USA Kip Cates, Tottori University, Japan

Tuesday, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm Tuesday, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm

Engagement, Standards, and Hour of Techniques for Teacher Observation,


Code for Language Teachers Coaching, and Conferencing
Content Area: Technology in Education Content Area: Program Administration

Participants understand standards and principles for 21st-century This workshop for anyone interested in teacher observation
language learning and how coding may help address them. They learn explores guidelines for maximizing the benefits of observations
how to do basic coding and what resources are available to them to and conferences. Topics include etiquettes of observation, ways of
suit the coding needs of every context, even limited-technology ones. promoting reflection, and techniques for giving useful feedback that
Participants also receive an Hour of Code completion certificate. recipients can comfortably hear.
Joy Egbert, Washington State University, USA Christopher Stillwell, UC Irvine, USA
Seyed Shahrokni, Washington State University, USA
Maysoun Ali, Washington State University, USA Tuesday, 1:00 pm–5:00 pm
Jouma Debbek, Washington State University, USA
Sarah Debbek, Washington State University, USA The GO TO Strategies: Guiding Teachers
Jamie Jessup, Washington State University, USA to Scaffold Content Language
This workshop provides hands-on experience with instructional
strategy resources for teachers of ELLs. The GO TO Strategies help
teachers create scaffolded lessons for ELLs that connect with language
proficiency levels and research-based principles. Participants become
familiar with the components of the GO TO Strategies, learn how
to use the resources, and participate in strategy demonstrations
during the workshop.
Linda New Levine, Consultant, USA
Laura Lukens, North Kansas City Schools, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 51
5:30 pm

Tuesday, 5:30 pm–7:00 pm


WSCC, Ballroom 6ABC

OPENING KEYNOTE
Power and Empowerment:
An Urban Indian’s Comic, Poetic, and
Highly Irreverent Look At The World
An event not to be missed! Known for his
semi-autobiographical writings that illuminate
challenges facing American Indians while
promoting cultural expression and social change,
Sherman Alexie presents his take on language,
TUESDAY, 21 MARCH

identity, struggle, perseverance, hope, and respect—all with a heavy


dose of candor and wit.
Sherman Alexie, USA

Sherman Alexie will be signing copies of his book, The Absolutely


True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, immediately following his
presentation. Copies are available for purchase at the TESOL
Press Pop-Up Bookstore.

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

52 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH 2017 Wednesday, 9:30 am–10:15 am
WSCC, 615
For the location of a ticketed session, please check your ticket.
Academically Speaking: Flipping the
Spoken Language Classroom
TCC = The Conference Center Content Area: Listening, Speaking/Speech
WSCC = Washington State Convention Center
Working in groups, participating in discussions, and talking to
native speakers are important academic skills that are necessary to
8:00 am
succeed in postsecondary institutions. This session presents useful
activities that allows students to apply speaking and presentation
Wednesday, 8:00 am–9:00 am skills in both controlled practice and beyond to authentic settings.
WSCC, Ballroom 6ABC Samples provided.
PRESIDENTIAL KEYNOTE Robyn Brinks Lockwood, Stanford University, USA
PROFESSIONAL English Language Kelly Sippell, University of Michigan Press, USA
Teachers in a 2.0 World
Content Area: Personal and Professional Wednesday, 9:30 am–10:15 am
Development for Teachers WSCC, 616
Educational systems everywhere want to Ask Your Students: A Project for
educate more students to higher standards Introducing Teachers to Research
while cutting resources for teacher education Content Area: Teacher Education
and development. Why do they think they can? Grounded in reflective inquiry, Ask Your Students, is a writing-for-
Why do we know they cannot? The 2.0 world prizes nontraditional publication project for inservice trainees that introduces teachers to
learning, interdisciplinarity, and technology. What do ‘professional’ classroom research methodology and the production of writing for a
English language teachers offer this world? professional audience. This presentation outlines the project structure
Dudley Reynolds, Carnegie Mellon University, Qatar and tools developed to help teachers educators implement similar

WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH
projects with their students.
9:30 am Bill Snyder, Kanda University of International Studies, Japan

Wednesday, 9:30 am–9:50 am Wednesday, 9:30 am–10:15 am


WSCC, 610
WSCC, 614
Saying No Gracefully: A Research‑Based Critical Aspects of Teaching English Abroad:
Lesson on Declining an Invitation Preparing the Unprepared
Content Area: Teacher Education
Content Area: Discourse and Pragmatics
Face-threatening speech acts are challenging, but with targeted Many U.S. undergraduates plan to teach English abroad after
instruction using authentic models, learners can develop pragmatic graduation and assume that being a native English speaker is enough
and intercultural competence. Learn how one instructor incorporated for success. The practicals of designing a semester course to help
research on pragmatics to design a lesson using authentic models from prepare students are shared including a TESOL story map, short-term
native and nonnative speakers to help international graduate students teaching practicum ideas, and sample assignments.
decline an invitation politely. Robin Rhodes-Crowell, St. Lawrence University, USA
Lisa Leopold, Middlebury Institute of International Studies at
Monterey, USA Wednesday, 9:30 am–10:15 am
WSCC, 619
Wednesday, 9:30 am–10:15 am Effective Faculty Review in IEP Contexts
TCC, Tahoma 4 Content Area: Intensive English Programs
Academic Socialization and Identity of Chinese This session presents findings from research looking at IEP faculty
Undergraduate Students in America evaluation. Extensive survey and interview data are presented from IEP
Content Area: English as a Foreign Language administrators and faculty. Presenters share findings and discuss the
Through the lens of poststructuralist conceptualization of identity implications of their research for the implementation and revision of
and mixed qualitative methods, the research discussed focuses on IEP faculty evaluation processes for other institutions
Chinese undergraduate students’ academic socialization experiences Andy Halvorsen, University of Oregon, USA
in the USA, especially their academic knowledge, interactions with Janine Sepulveda, University of Oregon, USA
professors, TAs and classmates, and understandings of their identities
over time. Data were collected from multiple sources and triangulated.
Wei Zuo, University of Washington, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 53
Wednesday, 9:30 am–10:15 am Wednesday, 9:30 am–10:15 am
WSCC, 617 WSCC, 3B
Empower the Flipped Grammar Classroom Engaging Students Outside the Classroom:
With Engaging Videos and Activities Extracurricular English
Content Area: CALL/Computer-Assisted Language Learning/ Content Area: Intensive English Programs
Technology in Education
Planning effective extracurricular activities can be time consuming
Flipped classroom videos can go beyond a short presentation of a for busy teachers. In this session participants learn best practices to
target grammar point; they can be personalized and interactive like a implement extracurricular programs that enrich the learning experience
traditional classroom. Participants in this session learn how to create and empower students to communicate in the real world. Novel
interactive flipped classroom videos and activities, and receive links for approaches to book clubs, social/cultural activities, and community
samples for use in their learning institutions. outreach are presented.
Gregory Abrahams, Al Akhawayn University, Morocco Ece Ulus, University of Pittsburgh, USA
John Jordan, University of Kansas, USA Rob Mucklo, University of Pittsburgh, USA
Brianne Harrison, University of Pittsburgh, USA
Wednesday, 9:30 am–10:15 am
WSCC, 213 Wednesday, 9:30 am–10:15 am
Empowering Students Through Meeting Their WSCC, 201
Linguistic, Sociocultural, and Spiritual Needs Engaging, Enriching, and Empowering Students
Content Area: Intercultural Communication Through an IEP Ongoing Orientation
Four presentations, theoretical and practical in approach, will address Content Area: Intensive English Programs
the issue of seeing learners as whole persons, including spiritual In this session on the development, implementation and review of
beings. Participants are encouraged to consider how classrooms that an IEP ongoing orientation course, an experienced academic advisor
are open to including cultural and religious exploration can be enriched and an IEP coordinator share their model as well as a comprehensive,
through greater understanding, and students empowered through data-based analysis of its success. Participants learn practical ways to
validating their identity. promote integration and academic success in their own programs.
WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH

David Catterick, Briercrest College and Seminary, Canada Lara Ravitch, University of Oregon, USA
Michael Westwood, Idaho State University, USA Maiko Hata, University of Oregon, USA
Richard Robison, Azusa Pacific University, USA
Debbie Nelson, One Mission Society and International
Wednesday, 9:30 am–10:15 am
Partnerships, Ukraine
TCC, Tahoma 3
Natasha Bazilevich, International Partnerships, Ukraine
Error Appreciation: Using Listening Errors
to Discover What Students Hear
Wednesday, 9:30 am–10:15 am Content Area: Listening, Speaking/Speech
TCC, Tahoma 1
Student misunderstandings are a rich source of insight into the
Engaging Students in Making Grammar Choices:
processes that are and aren’t working for language learners as they
An In‑Depth Approach
listen. We briefly present our insights from a research study using
Content Area: Grammar
paused transcription, and then discuss how to achieve and apply
Appropriate use of grammar structures in academic writing can similar insights in the classroom.
be a challenge even for advanced ESL writers. Drawing on corpus
Beth Sheppard, University of Oregon, USA
research on the characteristics of written discourse, the presenters
Brian Butler, University of Oregon, USA
demonstrate how to engage students in making effective grammar
choices to improve their academic writing. Sample instructional
materials are provided.
Wendy Wang, Eastern Michigan University, USA
Susan Ruellan, Eastern Michigan University, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

54 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Wednesday, 9:30 am–10:15 am Wednesday, 9:30 am–10:15 am
Sheraton Seattle, Juniper WSCC, 605
I Wish My Teacher Explained Lessons Lexical Bundles in L1 and L2 University
in My Mother‑Tongue Student Argumentative Essays
Content Area: Bilingual Education Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition
The presentation reports on a programme that was designed to This presentation reports findings of a corpus-based analysis of the
ascertain the effectiveness of plurilingual instruction. It discusses what use, overuse, and misuse of lexical bundles in L2 university student
Nepalese multilingual EFL learners thought about receiving instruction argumentative essays. The presentation also provides ways ESL
in English-only and how they were benefited through plurilingual composition instructors can assist learners in using lexical bundles
instruction while developing their content knowledge and English more appropriately.
language, and also saving their home languages. Tetyana Bychkovska, Ohio University, USA
Pramod Sah, University of British Columbia, Canada
Anu Upadhaya, Tribhuvan University, Nepal Wednesday, 9:30 am–10:15 am
WSCC, 3A
Wednesday, 9:30 am–10:15 am Literacy Strategies for STEM Classes
WSCC, 310 Content Area: High School/Secondary Education
IEP Students in Their Own Voice: This presentation demonstrates strategies for reading and writing in
Factors for Academic Success STEM classes to improve literacy skills of all students, especially ELLs.
Content Area: Intensive English Programs Strategies include Power Writing, Backwards Math, Writing Technical
We present a qualitative study of twenty IEP students, who were each Descriptions, and Writing Instructions. All strategies incorporate group
interviewed for one hour. Their transcripts were analyzed using Interpretive work, and give students a real audience and purpose for their writing.
Phenomenological Analysis, which allowed subjects to describe their lived Teresa Dalle, University of Memphis, USA
experiences. We discuss the themes that emerged and their implications Emily Thrush, University of Memphis, USA
for the support systems universities provide for this population. Angela Thevenot, University of Memphis, USA

WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH
Rose Honegger, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, USA
Mark Honegger, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, USA Wednesday, 9:30 am–10:15 am
WSCC, 612
Wednesday, 9:30 am–10:15 am Mindfulness Strategies for the ELT Classroom
WSCC, 613 Content Area: English as a Foreign Language
Illustrating Key Uses of Academic Research shows that mindfulness practices in education can decrease
Language Through Multimedia stress at work and offset constant distractions of our multitasking,
Content Area: Content-Based and CLIL/Content and Language culture. In this presentation, we explore the pedagogical role
Integrated Learning
of mindfulness in the ELT classroom as well as offer strategies
Four key uses of academic language—recount, explain, argue, and that teachers can incorporate to help them both personally
discuss—represent the most prominent purposes for communication and professionally.
that are present in today’s elementary school classrooms. This
Christine Coombe, Dubai Men’s College, United Arab Emirates
session demonstrates the partnering of those key uses with readily Susanna Bloss, Dubai Men’s College, United Arab Emirates
available content-centered movies, graphic organizers, and text to plan Konrad Cedro, Higher Colleges of Technology, United Arab Emirates
instruction for ELLs.
Margo Gottlieb, WIDA Consortium, USA Wednesday, 9:30 am–10:15 am
Mariana Castro, WIDA Consortium, USA WSCC, 205
Beverly Fine, BrainPOP, USA
Multilingual Doctoral Students’ Intertextuality
and Academic Literacies at Web Seminars
Wednesday, 9:30 am–10:15 am Content Area: Higher Education
WSCC, 212
The presenter discusses findings of a 1-year microethnographic study
Intercultural Development of Saudi Learners:
examining the multilingual doctoral students’ use of intertextuality
Ethnographic Case Studies
to develop academic literacies during the literacy events of online
Content Area: Intercultural Communication
web seminars. Implications and recommendations regarding the use
This research offers an interpretation of a Saudi perspective on the of intertextuality in classroom contexts, including L2 and L1 writing
development of intercultural communicative competence as well as instruction, and research are provided.
an examination of this perspective upon Deardorff’s process model of Tuba Angay-Crowder, Georgia State University, USA
intercultural competence.
Trenton Hagar, UNICA, Nicaragua

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 55
Wednesday, 9:30 am–10:15 am Wednesday, 9:30 am–10:15 am
WSCC, 2A TCC, Chelan 5
Overseas or Localised TESOL Programs? Supplementing Limited EFL Materials
Weighing the Benefits for NNESTs With Bloom’s Taxonomy and Web 2.0
Content Area: Teacher Education Content Area: English as a Foreign Language
This study explores the impacts of overseas and localised master’s Add some spice to your English language materials, engage and
level TESOL programs on the teaching beliefs and practice of their inspire your students, and meet curricular and classroom needs using
NNEST participants. The findings are potentially a reliable reference Bloom’s Taxonomy and Web 2.0. This informative practice-oriented
point for NNESTs who are considering various course options for presentation is especially geared toward EFL instructors working with
professional development. limited or outdated English language textbooks or assessment tools.
Mai Nguyen, Griffith University, Australia Crystal Bock Thiessen, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, USA

Wednesday, 9:30 am–10:15 am Wednesday, 9:30 am–10:15 am


WSCC, 620 WSCC, 604
Proactive Advising: Developing Effective Supporting IEP Student Retention and
Support Systems for Probationary Students Success Through Comprehensive Services
Content Area: Intensive English Programs Content Area: Intensive English Programs
Following an overview of one successful proactive advising approach, This session highlights NAFSA’s research findings on supporting
this dialogue allows opportunity for IEP administrators and academic student retention and success focusing on key factors for institutions
advisors to reflect on their programs’ academic probation policies to consider. Two institutions discuss their comprehensive services
and advising approaches. Discussion focuses on best practices in including preparing students for academic success, collaborating
developing clear policies, as well as effective strategies for supporting with stakeholders and preparing campus and local communities for
probationary students. integration of international students.
Angela Dornbusch, University of Oregon, USA Joann Ng Hartmann, NAFSA: Association of International
WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH

Educators, USA
Wednesday, 9:30 am–10:15 am Katherine Hellmann, Washington State University, USA
Sheraton Seattle, Madrona Cheryl Ernst, University of Oregon, USA
Reducing International Graduate Students’ Language
Anxiety Through Oral Pronunciation Corrections Wednesday, 9:30 am–10:15 am
Content Area: Applied Linguistics TCC, Chelan 2

This study examines how interactions between language anxiety and The Impact of TESOL Teacher Education
on Teacher Job Satisfaction
certain types of oral corrective feedback help or hinder learners’ oral
Content Area: Teacher Education
English improvement. Specifically, the study explores subtle affective
risks of clarification requests, and identifies best practices for using This study examines whether having completed TESOL teacher
corrective feedback to alleviate language anxiety. education influences job satisfaction of native English speakers
Esther (Eunjeong) Lee, Claflin University, USA teaching English in Japan (N = 232). First, the study clarified existing
variations of TESOL qualifications, and then used both regression and
interview analysis to explore potential influences of those variations on
Wednesday, 9:30 am–10:15 am job satisfaction.
Sheraton Seattle, Willow B
Takahiro Yokoyama, Ara Institute of Canterbury, New Zealand
Scholarship on L2 Writing in 2016:
The Year in Review
Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition Wednesday, 9:30 am–11:15 am
WSCC, 203
Having difficulty keeping up with the scholarship in your research
area? Even in a relatively small field like second language writing, 10 Steps to Flip the English Language Classroom
staying abreast of the current literature can be difficult. To address this Content Area: Teaching Methodology and Strategy
situation, this session provides an overview and synthesis of second Easily flip your classroom! Student-centered learning is emphasized,
language writing scholarship published during 2016. where students complete in-class work at home, and then, traditional
Tony Silva, Purdue University, USA homework is completed in class (Sams & Bergman, 2013; Kahn,
Kai Yang, Purdue University, USA 2007). Concrete examples show flipping the EL classroom using a
Ji-young Shin, Purdue University, USA ten-step strategy. Teachers have more one-on-one time with individual
Elena Shvidko, Purdue University, USA students (Hunter, 2011).
Daniel Sloan, U.S. Department of State, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

56 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Wednesday, 9:30 am–11:15 am Wednesday, 9:30 am–11:15 am
WSCC, 606-607 WSCC, 211
A CALL for 21st-Century Reading Creating and Sustaining ELT Affiliates Across Africa:
Content Area: CALL/Computer-Assisted Language Learning/ Problems and Possibilities
Technology in Education Content Area: Teacher Education
How can technology be part of a reading lesson? How will students There are 54 countries in Africa—10 TESOL affiliates. What are the
profit from learning reading with technology? Reading is the skill challenges and possibilities that affiliates experience across the
most connected to technology and yet not so directly addressed. This continent? Come and learn about affiliates in Uganda, Cameroon,
session addresses the different options technology offers for teaching Rwanda, and Senegal. Share ideas for promoting and supporting
and practicing reading. these—and creating and sustaining new affiliates in Africa.
Christine Bauer-Ramazani, Saint Michael’s College, USA Kathleen Malu, William Paterson University, USA
Thomas Robb, Extensive Reading Foundation, Japan Eran Willliams, U.S. Department of State, USA
Christine Sabieh, Notre Dame University, Lebanon Catherine Zeh, Association of Teachers of English in
Christel Broady, Georgetown College, USA Cameroon, Cameroon
Lydia Watuulo, Uganda Association of English Teachers, Uganda
Wednesday, 9:30 am–11:15 am Richard Niyibigira, Association of Teachers of English in
TCC, Skagit 2 Rwanda, Rwanda
Bryce Smedley, Lewis–Clark State College, USA
Colonialism of the Mind:
Challenges and Opportunities for Justice
Content Area: Social Responsibility/Sociopolitical Concerns Wednesday, 9:30 am–11:15 am
WSCC, 603
While studying in English offers access to English academic
discourses, these discourses privilege certain worldviews and Developing Constructive Conversations Through
assumptions, resulting in what some call colonialism of the mind. This a Hybrid Massive Open Online Course
session explores dynamics of this colonialism, challenges for English Content Area: Bilingual Education
language teachers and learners, and strategies for decolonizing ELT for Massive Open Online Courses often result in low completion rates.

WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH
a more just academy. The hybrid, a blend of online courses and professional learning
Myles Hoenig, Maryland TESOL, USA communities provides access to current research and constructive
Cheryl Woelk, Language for Peace, Republic of Korea teacher dialog. Learn how teachers acquire, develop, and implement
Ana Solano-Campos, University of Massachusetts Boston, USA essential research-based knowledge for developing complex
Sunao Fukunaga, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Japan language and literacy.
Kenji Hakuta, Understanding Languages, Stanford University, USA
Wednesday, 9:30 am–11:15 am Sara Rutherford Quach, Understanding Languages, Stanford
WSCC, 618 University, USA
Veronica Gallardo, Seattle Public School District, USA
Connecting Research to Practice:
Ellen Barrett, Seattle Public School District, USA
Serving Adult Emergent Readers
Elizabeth Urmenita, Seattle Public School District, USA
Content Area: Adult Education Teresa Boone, Seattle Public School District, USA
Serving the diverse needs of adult emergent readers is
challenging. This research-to-practice panel includes SLA-informed Wednesday, 9:30 am–11:15 am
recommendations for instruction, assessment, and teacher education. TCC, Yakima 2
Participants receive ideas for balancing literacy and language,
Empowering Student Agency, Identity,
embracing loss due to migration, using mobile devices, and employing
and Learning in Blended Classrooms
multimodal design in literacy assessments and classroom pedagogy.
Content Area: Adult Education
Jenna Altherr Flores, University of Arizona, USA
Martha Bigelow, University of Minnesota, USA This panel examines the interplay between learner agency and identity
Patsy Egan Vinogradov, Hamline University, USA in blended personalized classrooms in a program that offers General
Raichle Farrelly, Saint Michael’s College, USA English, Academic English, and Bridge courses. In particular, we
Rosie Verratti, Howard Community College, USA discuss how student-generated rubrics, online modules, discussion
boards, and collaborative Google documents empower students to
negotiate themselves and learn.
Christy Williams, INTO University of South Florida, USA
Andrea Lypka, INTO University of South Florida, USA
Chi Rehg, INTO University of South Florida, USA
Nasseer Hasan, INTO University of South Florida, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 57
Wednesday, 9:30 am–11:15 am Wednesday, 9:30 am–11:15 am
WSCC, 304 Sheraton Seattle, Ballard
Enacting Authentic Academic Talk Increasing Rigor Across All Levels
Through Instructional Conversation of Instruction for Adult ELLs
Content Area: Teaching Methodology and Strategy Content Area: Adult Education
Through video and demonstration, this workshop showcases how Increasing rigor in adult ESOL is essential for learners’ successful
to use biography-driven instructional strategies to engage students transition into the college, career or community settings that
in authentic academic talk through Instructional Conversation. match their goals. Panelists discuss ways to add rigor to effective
Participants learn key instructional moves to elicit academic talk, and instructional practices: empowering learners with professional
how to utilize student language production to support connections language, enriching their language strategies and enhancing their
between students’ background knowledge and new material. ability to demonstrate their critical thinking.
Socorro Herrera, Kansas State University, USA Alejandro Nunez, Wisconsin Technical College System, USA
Melissa Holmes, Kansas State University, USA Debra Gylund, Fox Valley Technical College, USA
Shabina Kavimandan, Kansas State University, USA Ginger Karaway, Gateway Technical College, USA
Shawn Jensen, Northeast Wisconsin Technical College, USA
Wednesday, 9:30 am–11:15 am Jodi Koller, Lakeshore Technical College, USA
Sheraton Seattle, Metropolitan A Carolyn Nason, Milwaukee Area Technical College, USA
Fishbowl Conversations as a Method of
Language Development and Differentiation Wednesday, 9:30 am–11:15 am
Content Area: High School/Secondary Education WSCC, 611

The Fishbowl Conversation develops verbal presentation and Language Teacher Identity in
(Multi)lingual Educational Contexts
argumentation skills- but how can an activity like this work for
Content Area: Teacher Education
classes with students at varied levels of English proficiency? This
session provides lesson materials, instructional strategies and role- Language Teacher Identity (LTI) research is opening new avenues for
play experience to use Fishbowls for language development and understanding our teaching lives. This presentation brings together
WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH

differentiation with your EL students. five LTI scholars whose research represents the cutting edge of LTI
Rachel Wojciechowski, Danbury Public Schools, USA in TESOL today. Each provides new analysis and findings on LTI and
discusses implications for teacher education.
Wednesday, 9:30 am–11:15 am Geeta Aneja, University of Pennsylvania, USA
TCC, Tahoma 5
Elizabeth Ellis, University of New England, Australia
G. Sue Kasun, Georgia State University, USA
Helping ELLs in Grades 6–12 Meet Cinthya Saavedra, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, USA
Standards for Literacy Juyoung Song, Murray State University, USA
Content Area: High School/Secondary Education
This session provides research-based methods and concrete Wednesday, 9:30 am–11:15 am
ideas to support ELLs in meeting challenging state standards in WSCC, 214
reading and writing. Using critical text, teachers learn scaffolding
Pictures Worth a Thousand Words: L2
techniques to help ELLs with close reading, development of explicit Acquisition Through Learner‑Created Art
language structures, and writing. This session includes reflections on Content Area: Arts
applicability to one’s own setting.
Images have a power that words do not. Learn about task-based
Diane August, American Institutes for Research, USA
projects integrating visual art to enhance language development:
Lisa Tabaku, American Institutes for Research, USA
a mural project showcases identity images with inner-city ELLs;
Ashley Simpson Baird, American Institutes for Research, USA
immigrants with interrupted schooling experiment with visual art as a
motivational learning strategy. You leave with paint on canvas in hand.
Elfrieda Lepp-Kaethler, Providence University College, Canada
Katy Dueck, Providence University College, Canada
Talitha Kaethler, David Livingstone Community School, Canada

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

58 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Wednesday, 9:30 am–11:15 am Wednesday, 9:30 am–11:15 am
Sheraton Seattle, Aspen Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom D
Queering the ESL Classroom: Summing Up Math Language: Frameworks,
Strategies for Promoting Social Justice Activities, and Ideas to Empower
Content Area: Social Responsibility/Sociopolitical Concerns Content Area: Content-Based and CLIL/Content and Language
Integrated Learning
Have you wanted to queer your heteronormative ESL classes but
haven’t known where to begin? This session gives you a range of Participants learn to, 1) analyze mathematics discourse, language
practical strategies for promoting social justice by including LGBTQ functions and key vocabulary, 2) engage ELLs with vocabulary, phrase
themes in your classroom, including adapting materials, developing and sentence construction, 3) acquire a framework to transition
activities, and creating a safer space for difficult dialogs. from keywords to word problems, and 4) develop alternative
Jennifer Sacklin, Lane Community College, USA materials and hands-on activities to teach mathematical concepts for
Timothy Krause, Portland Community College, USA varying grade levels.
Judith O’Loughlin, Language Matters, LLC, USA
Wednesday, 9:30 am–11:15 am Kate Reynolds, Consultant, USA
TCC, Yakima 1
Brenda Custodio, Ohio State University, USA
Luciana de Oliveira, University of Miami, USA
Strategies to Motivate, Engage, and
Empower Your Language Learners
Content Area: Teaching Methodology and Strategy Wednesday, 9:30 am–11:15 am
WSCC, 307-308
When asked what one of their biggest challenges was, teachers cited
Teacher Beliefs About Haptic Pronunciation Teaching
student apathy and lack of motivation. We’ll look at research that
Content Area: Phonology/Pronunciation
explains what motivation is, how teachers can affect it, and share
concrete classroom strategies. This is an interactive session that Haptic pronunciation teaching, using systematic gesture and touch,
includes participants sharing what has worked for them. was first introduced in 2008. Adoption of the methodology continues
Melinda Sayavedra, INTO Oregon State University, USA to grow substantially, especially among nonnative English speaking
instructors. Reports on four recent studies of teacher trainees’

WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH
Cathie Becker, INTO Oregon State University, USA
responses to haptic pronunciation training and subsequent classroom
application are presented.
Wednesday, 9:30 am–11:15 am
WSCC, 303 Amanda Baker, University of Wollongong, Australia
William Acton, Trinity Western University, Canada
Subgroups Within Subgroups: ELLs With Michael Burri, University of Wollongong, Australia
Specialized Needs and Backgrounds Lilly Seville-Gamboa, Universidad Latina de Costa Rica, Costa Rica
Content Area: Program Administration Gaby Cordero, University of Costa Rica, Costa Rica
Presenters addresses varied perspectives on specialized student
populations. Topics include: broad considerations and theoretical Wednesday, 9:30 am–11:15 am
approaches to teaching SLIFEs; specific classroom-based strategies for TCC, Chelan 4
newcomer students’ access to texts; the establishment of newcomer The Mentoring Process:
centers for refugee students; implementation of RTI for secondary Enriching Individual Professional Growth
ELLs; and, the specialized needs of long-term ELLs. Content Area: Personal and Professional Development for Teachers
Helaine W. Marshall, Long Island University Hudson, USA
This panel brings together language professionals from university ESL
Tim Blackburn, Education Northwest, USA
and IEP contexts who serve in different mentoring roles. The focus we
Brad Capener, Salem-Keizer Public Schools, USA
Marybelle Marrero-Colon, Center for Applied Linguistics, USA be to examine how different types of mentoring experiences, often
Sarah Moore, Center for Applied Linguistics, USA overlooked as forms of professional development, can shape individual
Joanna Duggan, Center for Applied Linguistics, USA professional growth for those guiding the mentoring process.
Stacy Suhadolc, Pennsylvania State University, USA
Sharon Childs, Pennsylvania State University, USA
Megan Lynch, Pennsylvania State University, USA
Karen Johnson, Pennsylvania State University, USA
Paula Golombek, University of Florida, USA
Mary Black, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 59
Wednesday, 9:30 am–11:15 am 10:30 am
WSCC, 602
U.S. Federal Education and Language Policy Update
Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Content Area: Advocacy WSCC, 613
An overview of the legislative proposals and federal initiatives TESOL “Guerrilla” Pronunciation Teaching
International Association is monitoring. Content Area: Phonology/Pronunciation
David Cutler, TESOL International Association, USA In multi-skills courses, we often do not have enough time or materials
John Segota, TESOL International Association, USA
for full treatments of vowels, consonants, stress, and grammatical
endings, yet pronunciation is part of the course and an important need
Wednesday, 9:30 am–12:15 pm of our students. The presenter discusses strategies and resources for
Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom C effective guerrilla pronunciation teaching. Materials provided.
Teaching and Assessing Vocabulary: Michael Berman, Montgomery College, USA
What the Research Shows
Content Area: Vocabulary/Lexicon
Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
This colloquium applies state-of-the-art research of vocabulary WSCC, 212
acquisition and use to inform a range of pedagogical issues. Six well- 10 Timesaving Strategies for
known vocabulary specialists will discuss the following: vocabulary Enriching Writing Instruction
size targets, teaching pedagogy, media/Internet vocabulary resources, Content Area: Intensive English Programs
teaching specialist vocabulary, and assessing vocabulary. The
emphasis throughout will be on practical applications of the research. Teaching L2 writing is more demanding than teaching other academic
courses, primarily due to the involved feedback, grading, and out-of-
Sam Barclay, University of Nottingham, United Kingdom (Great Britain)
class student support. The presenter shares ten effective strategies
Averil Coxhead, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
that help alleviate the workload in writing courses while maximizing L2
Keith Folse, University of Central Florida, USA
writers’ learning.
Dee Gardner, Brigham Young University, USA
Zuzana Tomaš, Eastern Michigan University, USA
WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH

Diane Schmitt, Nottingham Trent University, United Kingdom


(Great Britain) Jennifer Mott-Smith, Towson University, USA
Norbert Schmitt, University of Nottingham, United Kingdom
(Great Britain) Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Sheraton Seattle, Madrona

10:00 am A Computer‑Mediated Shadowing Activity


and ESL Speaking Skill Development
Content Area: International Teaching Assistants
Wednesday, 10:00 am–11:45 am
This preliminary case study explored the instructional value and
Sheraton Seattle, Issaquah
potential of a computer-mediated shadowing activity for improving
What Kinds of Research for What Kinds Of Practice? prospective international teaching assistants’ speech intelligibility.
Content Area: Personal and Professional Development for Teachers Findings of the study suggest that the computer-mediated shadowing
A panel of researchers and classroom practitioners engage in a lively activity raised participants’ awareness of the problems in their
dialogue on the connections and/or IR/relevance of particular kinds of prosodic control and helped improve their speech intelligibility.
research for particular kinds of classroom practice. Each researcher Masakazu Mishima, Rikkyo University, Japan
presents his/her area of expertise: action research, ethnography, and Lixia Cheng, Purdue University, USA
discourse analysis. Practitioners extend the dialogue with connections,
concerns and questions. Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Judy Sharkey, University of New Hampshire, USA Sheraton Seattle, Juniper
Anne Burns, University of New South Wales, Australia
Academic Spanish in South Texas:
Sue Starfield, University of New South Wales, Australia
Bilingual Education and Beyond
Rodney Jones, University of Reading, United Kingdom (Great Britain)
Content Area: Bilingual Education
Tina Proulx, Henry J. McLaughlin Middle School, USA
Wendy Perron, Manchester School District, USA This study examines the precariousness of academic Spanish within
a South Texas district. Obstacles include the neglect of former ELLs
and treatment of Spanish as foreign. What would it mean to embrace
Spanish, at all levels? How can we balance English and Spanish
literacy, especially in districts with bilingual education?
Kip Austin Hinton, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

60 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom B Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom B
Arab, Jewish, and Christian Teens Learn Building Social Responsibilites Through
Social Responsibility Together Online Critical Pedagogy in ELT Classrooms
Content Area: Social Responsibility/Sociopolitical Concerns Content Area: Social Responsibility/Sociopolitical Concerns
A successful online collaborative educational project between teenage Teaching English is not only teaching language skills to students. It
Arab, Jewish, and Christian students from across the globe. The aim should also assist to boost up critical and creative skills to explore
of the project was social responsibility, multicultural understanding and analyze injustices of society. It is achieved through the critical
and acceptance of others. Our hope was that through promoting pedagogy, the teachers’ practice in classrooms. This ultimately helps to
tolerance of other cultures we would build bridges that otherwise build social responsibilities on students.
might be impossible. Narad Rijal, Kathmandu University High School, Nepal
Jennifer Ayzen, Ben Gurion High School, Israel
Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am WSCC, 620
Sheraton Seattle, Ravenna Can University IEPs Adapt to the
Assessing Online Language Teacher Rise of Pathway Programs?
Education Programs Content Area: Intensive English Programs
Content Area: CALL/Computer-Assisted Language Learning/ English language programming has taken on a strategic role in
Technology in Education
universities’ international student recruitment, leading to the
This talk describes a research study into the procedures and proliferation of pathway programs that offer a fixed period of study and
instruments used to assess teachers’ skills and knowledge in online guaranteed university admission. What is the role of the traditional
language teacher education programs. The findings provide insights for university IEP in this changed environment?
institutions wishing to establish best practices for teacher assessment Alan Broomhead, Boston University, USA
in their own online language teacher education programs. Deborah Osborne, University of Kansas, USA

WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH
Nicky Hockly, The Consultants-E, USA
Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom B
WSCC, 210 Challenges of Latin America Teacher‑Education:
Breadth of Vocabulary Thresholds Supporting Contextualized Perspectives
Postsecondary Reading and Writing Content Area: Teacher Education
Content Area: Vocabulary/Lexicon Latin America requires improvement of English teachers’ education
Establishing realistic breadth of knowledge lexical thresholds for programs due to educational reforms and new century demands.
English-medium postsecondary bound students from multilingual Presenters discuss challenges, policies and progress made in
backgrounds can facilitate positive engagement with the demands their countries through perspectives and a contextual broad view.
of first year reading and writing tasks. These lexical thresholds are Suggestions based on research/experience are shared to promote
explored along with the implications for teaching and learning English interest on impacting ELT globally/collaboratively.
for academic purposes. Grazzia Mendoza, Zamorano University, Honduras
Scott Douglas, University of British Columbia–Okanagan Campus, Canada Araceli Salas, Benemérita Universidad de Puebla, Mexico
Elizabeth Ortiz, World English Institute, Ecuador
Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am Jesus Ernesto Lisboa, VENTESOL, Venezuela
Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom B Mauricio Arango, Universidad de Antioquia, Colombia
Bringing the MT Back From Exile:
Optimality in Monolingual Environments
Content Area: Bilingual Education
Research promulgates optimal Mother Tongue use in monolingual EFL
classrooms with few studies attempting to shed light on what this
encompasses. To mitigate this, starting with a discussion of findings in
eight classrooms, the presentation will look at the active role students
could play in terms of scrutinizing the term.
Georgios Neokleous, Norwegian University of Science and
Technology, Norway

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 61
Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
TCC, Chelan 5 Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom B
Classroom Management of Floor: Easing Communication Between Middle
A Case Study on College ESL Students Eastern Students and ESL Teachers
Content Area: Sociolinguistics Content Area: Educational Linguistics
Successful floor management empowers students’ classroom This presentation focuses on the verbal and nonverbal
participation. This presentation examines college ESL students’ communication and misunderstanding that can occur between
perceptions and practices of managing their floor in classroom Middle Eastern students and their ESL teachers. The cause of these
interactions. Through focus group discussions (N=6) and classroom misunderstandings are identified and strategies to deal with them in
observations, the presentation reveals that factors influencing ESL ESL classes are discussed.
students’ conversational floor management are more complex than Malihe Eshghavi, University of San Francisco, USA
suggested by current studies.
Jialei Jiang, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, USA Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Riza Elfana, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, USA Sheraton Seattle, Redwood
Empowering Immigrant and Refugee Students
Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am With Identity, Voice, and Agency
WSCC, 201 Content Area: Refugee Concerns
Creating and Implementing an Many adult immigrant ESL students, especially refugees, feel
IEP‑to‑University Bridge Program disheartened, powerless, and lost without identity or voice. Going
Content Area: Intensive English Programs beyond survival English, this session shares a project-based curriculum
Led by an IEP director and 2 instructors, this practice-oriented that helps students develop their English language skills while, at the
session describes the steps one university-based IEP took to create same time, doing internal work toward resolving these issues and
a ‘Bridge’ (pathway) program, and discusses the first semester of its envisioning a future.
implementation at their University. Participants are asked to share their Allison Riley, New School of Architecture and Design, USA
WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH

experiences with other bridge programs.


Jill Fox, Creighton University, USA Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Susan Sullivan-Tuncan, Creighton University, USA WSCC, 3A
Isabel Barros, Creighton University, USA
Empowering Mainstreamed Multilingual Writers
Content Area: Higher Education
Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom B The presentation identifies various challenges that the different
subgroups of underserved multilingual writers face in mainstream
Differentiated Teacher Education
college composition classrooms. The presenter reports that each
Towards 2.0 Teachers in Uruguay

D
group makes a successful academic and social presence differently.

E
Content Area: Personal and Professional Development for Teachers

L
Specific recommendations are made to foster more inclusive learning

CE
Becoming a 2.0 Teacher involves being brave enough to explore new

CAN
environments for mainstreamed multilingual students.
paths. This session describes an In-Service Training program based on Eunjyu Yu, SUNY Canton, USA
the needs and queries of the participants, fostering the development of
2.0 skills in a differentiated and collaborative learning environment.
Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Cecilia Cabrera, Escuela y Liceo Elbio Fernandez, Uruguay Sheraton Seattle, Metropolitan B
Engage, Enrich, and Empower New Learners
Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am With Interrupted Formal Education
WSCC, 615
Content Area: High School/Secondary Education
Discover Conversation
Working with newcomers to English in mixed-level classes is
Content Area: Listening, Speaking/Speech challenging, and when the newcomers have gaps in their formal
DAVID: So...what’s this about anyway? ANDY: Well...Discover education, more so. Presenters describe and demonstrate four
Conversation is based on authentic dialogues. Students get involved research-based strategies to help students become engaged members
in analyzing spoken discourse and are introduced to the moves that of class and school communities, and to begin or restart their formal
make up typical conversations. Then...well...they build scaffolding education powerfully.
through mini-practice tasks...and create similar conversations of their Amy Berry, The Global Village Project, USA
own. DAVID: Awesome! Mary Lou McCloskey, The Global Village Project, USA
Andrew Boon, Toyo Gakuen University, Japan Amy Pelissero, Global Village Project, USA
David Harrington, Language Solutions, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

62 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom B WSCC, 604
English Language Motivation Integrating Science and Language for ALL Students:
Between Gender and Cultures Web of Life
Content Area: English as a Foreign Language Content Area: Math and Science
This current study investigates the effects of the sociocultural factors This session immerses grade 3–8 teachers in a life science lesson on
on the motivation of female and male students in 14 Arab and non- food chains/webs and trophic pyramids on how to use both physical
Arab countries. The findings of this research indicate that female and diagram modeling to make content comprehensible for ELLs for
students’ integrative motivation and attitudes toward English are appropriate 3-dimensional learning based in the Next Generation
higher than male students. Science Standards.
Said Al Harthy, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, USA David Crowther, National Science Teachers Association, USA

Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am


Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom B Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom B
Getting the Most From Your Teacher Evaluation International Students’ Religious Practices Conflicting
Content Area: Personal and Professional Development for Teachers With Classroom Practices: Teacher Awareness
Engaging ELL/EFL teachers in constructive observations is essential to Content Area: Teacher Education
teacher excellence and student achievement. This session empowers This presentation investigates the role of teachers’ awareness when it
teachers by understanding the critical components of the Danielson comes to dealing with novice international students who come to the
Framework’s Domain 3. Participants learn how the attributes of high USA with religious practices that may fall in conflict with classroom
quality instruction for ELLs aligns to the evaluation instrument and practices. Viewpoints of experienced teachers are discussed, examples
practice with sample lessons. are given, and potential solutions are examined.
Alexandra Guilamo, TaJu Educational Solutions, LLC, USA Mohamed Yacoub, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, USA
Kevin Belknap, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, USA

WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH
Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
WSCC, 605 Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
How Technology Shapes Our Language TCC, Chelan 2
and Feedback: Mode Matters Learning to Teach Grammar: Teacher Education
Content Area: Applied Linguistics and Student Teacher Cognitions
This presentation explores how the use of evaluative language differs Content Area: Grammar
between parallel corpora of text and screencast feedback and what Language teacher cognitions impact instructional decision-making
this means for the role of feedback and position of instructor. In and practice. This presentation discusses a Dutch research project
understanding the implications of technology choices, instructors can that investigated how student teacher cognitions on grammar
better match tools to their pedagogical purposes instruction develop and interact with perceptions of language learner
Kelly Cunningham, Iowa State University, USA characteristics. How can teacher education programmes influence
these cognitions? What are the pitfalls and are they avoidable?
Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am Johan Graus, HAN University of Applied Sciences, Netherlands
Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom B
Incidental Vocabulary Learning Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Through Watching Movies WSCC, 612
Content Area: Vocabulary/Lexicon Placement: Adaptive, Online, and
Although research indicates modest incidental vocabulary gains Automatically Scored 4‑Skill Assessment
from audio-visual input, little is known about the effects of viewing Content Area: Assessment/Testing
full-length feature films. This study measured the effect of watching Placement is an English proficiency test delivered online and scored
a single L2 movie on Japanese students’ recall of salient words from by automated systems. The test includes computer adaptive and
the movie script. linear form parts to examine progress and proficiency. Validation
Robert Ashcroft, Tokai University, Japan analysis shows high reliablity (test-retest reliability 0.861) and
Oliver Hadingham, Rikkyo University, Japan scores from automated scoring systems closely correspond to scores
Joe Garner, International Christian University, Japan from human raters.
Sara Davila, Pearson, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 63
Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom B Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom B
Preparing EFL Students for Academic Teaching the Refugee Newcomer Learner
Writing in Graduate Programs Content Area: Refugee Concerns
Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition This course is designed for educators who do or will service refugee
Afghan university instructors entering the Masters in Education for Newcomer learners. Participants investigates refugee resettlement
TESOL program needed to improve their academic writing skills. processes; identify key symptoms of shock and traumatic upset;
How do you design a program and materials to teach these skills in a recognize and respond to cultural differences in the classroom; and
short time? The curriculum designer and one of the Afghan graduate explore best practices techniques in ELA-E instruction and Newcomer
students share their successful program. family engagement.
Beth Trudell, U.S. Department of State, USA Louise Kreuzer-Yaafouri, Denver Public Schools, USA
Abdul Habib Khalid, Kabul Education University, Afghanistan
Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am WSCC, 614
WSCC, 617 The Color Vowel Chart: A Pronunciation
Press Record: How Podcast Creation Tool for Every Classroom
Empowers and Improves Student Speaking Content Area: Phonology/Pronunciation
Content Area: Media (Print, Broadcast, Video, and Digital) The Color Vowel Chart is a simple visual tool that powerfully supports
Students can improve many aspects of their English, including stress, listening, pronunciation, vocabulary, and spelling in ESL/EFL classrooms
intonation, and conversation skills by taking ownership over the for all ages and levels. Learn how the Chart is revolutionizing TESOL
creation of their own podcasts. Learn how to engage students in around the world as you discover the Color Vowel Approach through
creating their own podcasts and improving their speaking skills. multimodal participation and technique practice.
Michelle Kaplan, The New School, USA Karen Taylor, English Language Training Solutions, USA
Shirley Thompson, English Language Training Solutions, USA
WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH

Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am


Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom B Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Promises and Challenges of Criterion WSCC, 610
Feedback in Writing Classes Using Authentic Classroom Case Studies
Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition in TESOL Teacher Education Courses
This study examines the pedagogical effectiveness of Criterion Content Area: Teacher Education
feedback in a Korean university context. Specifically, this study Case studies have long been used as an instructional tool in many
investigates the extent to which the quality of essays differs between different disciplines and have also been recognized as a powerful
first drafts and second drafts as well as students’ perceptions of the experiential learning tool in TESOL teacher development. In this
benefit of the feedback. session, participants consider ways in which they can employ case
Young-Ju Lee, Hanbat National University, South Korea studies in their own courses and professional practice.
Sarina Molina, University of San Diego, USA
Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
WSCC, 2A Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Teachers Without Borders: Empowering Teachers WSCC, 205
Through Online Mentoring and Training Using Visual Mnemonics to Differentiate
Content Area: Teacher Education Commonly Confused Words
When teachers can collaborate without regard to geographic Content Area: Vocabulary/Lexicon
boundaries, the result is transformative! In this presentation, we ESL learners are often confused with words which look or sound
showcase international projects that illustrate the power of online alike but have different meanings. How can a learner effectively
collaboration to transform teaching, learning, and professional differentiate between a pair of confusing words and accurately process
development. Participants are given opportunities to share their own their meanings? This session demonstrates how visual clues with
online collaborative learning experiences, too. differentiating attributes help students accomplish this challenging
Barbara Sakamoto, International Teacher Development Institute, Japan vocabulary learning task.
Chuck Sandy, International Teacher Development Institute, Japan Takako Smith, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

64 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Wednesday, 10:30 am–11:15 am 11:30 am
WSCC, 616
Working It Out: Tasks to Integrate
Wednesday, 11:30 am–11:50 am
CCR Standards Across Levels
WSCC, 211
Content Area: Assessment/Testing
Note‑Taking Strategies in Modern Classrooms
Our adult learners’ ability to achieve their personal and professional Content Area: Teaching Methodology and Strategy
goals relies on their ability to meet the College and Career Readiness
Standards (CCRS). Participants in this session analyze and discuss the In the evolving era of rapidly changing technologies, separation of
questioning strategies, tasks, and formative assessments that play a learning and electronic devices can hardly sustain in the classroom.
role in developing beginning through intermediate learners’ CCR skills. As your students become less willing to take notes on paper, introduce
them to these three digital note-taking strategies for an efficient and
Jayme Adelson-Goldstein, Lighthearted Learning, USA
useful learning experience.
Anastasiia Kryzhanivska, Bowling Green State University, USA
Wednesday, 10:30 am–12:15 pm
WSCC, 619
Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
Setting the Stage for Oral Reading
WSCC, 213
Fluency Through Readers Theatre

E L
Content Area: English as a Foreign Language
E D An Introduction to the TESOL Diversity Collaborative
Content Area: Elementary School/Primary Education

A N C
In this workshop, participants learn how to use Readers Theatre to
How do we meet the nondiscrimination policy adopted by TESOL

C
increase English reading fluency and communicative English skills
amongst emergent readers. The presenter provides some teaching tips within the TESOL organization? The forum for all TESOL members has
on implementing RT in the classroom. a mission to infuse cultural competency within the organization. It is
everyone’s collective responsibility to strive for social justice in the
Patrick Ng, University of Niigata Prefecture, Japan
21st century. Come contribute to TESOL’s commitment.
Cheryl Woelk, Language for Peace, Republic of Korea
Wednesday, 10:30 am–12:15 pm Carter Winkle, Barry University, USA

WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH
TCC, Tahoma 4
Dana Horstein, Benedictine University, USA
Teaching Advanced ESP Writing Using Lavette Coney, The Fessenden School, USA
Dialogue, Models, and Iterative Feedback Heidi Faust, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, USA
Content Area: Higher Education
Legal English educators share their systematic approach to teaching Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
academic writing to advanced multilingual graduate students. They Sheraton Seattle, Metropolitan B
use dialogue, models, and an enriched, iterative feedback process Analyzing TESOL Programs:
to address the needs of law graduate students. The approach and ESL Teacher Preparation in Changing Times
teaching activities can also be applied by graduate student educators Content Area: Teacher Education
in other disciplines.
This presentation reports findings from content analysis of 50 TESOL
Michelle Ueland, Georgetown University Law Center, USA programs, examining their philosophy, goals, and curriculum, and how
Marta Baffy, Georgetown University Law Center, USA they address changing demographics, conceptualizations of language,
Lake Julie, Georgetown University Law Center, USA academic demands, and technology, and their effect on language
Kirsten Schaetzel, Georgetown University Law Center, USA
teaching and learning. Implications of findings for TESOL programs and
Kia Dennis, Georgetown University Law Center, USA
ESL teacher training are addressed.
Shondel Nero, New York University, USA
Wednesday, 10:30 am–12:15 pm
WSCC, 3B
Using Cell Phones to Create
Student‑Powered Podcasts
Content Area: Media (Print, Broadcast, Video, and Digital)
Learn the benefits of podcasting and use it to sustain English practice
outside of class. Work on storytelling, pronunciation, and confidence-
building. Identify what a podcast is, explore genre-specific samples,
work with various prompts, and get a glimpse of what it takes to be
a success story.
Shaheed Sabrin, Irvine Valley College, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 65
Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
TCC, Skagit 2 Sheraton Seattle, Aspen
Assessing Grammar: An “A” Is More Conversations About Identity: Promoting Critical
Than Absence of Error Dialogue Amidst Double Consciousness
Content Area: Assessment/Testing Content Area: Social Responsibility/Sociopolitical Concerns
Grammatical proficiency is evidenced by use of complex structures, The motivation for this presentation are countless teachers struggling
not simply by absence of error. How do we assess grammar in to incorporate issues such as racism, othering, inequity, and
a transparent way that rewards both accuracy and complexity? powerlessness in the classroom. This practice-oriented presentation
Presenters share approaches and assessment tools for writing and addresses concerns regarding ownership and privilege, discusses
speaking tasks at various levels. the role double-consciousness plays, and guides participants toward
Stephanie Gallop, Georgetown University, USA beginning critical discussions with classroom-tested activities,
Heather Gregg Zitlau, Georgetown University, USA materials, and assignments.
Andrew Screen, Georgetown University, USA Stephanie Gollobin Ventura, Vanderbilt University, USA
Heather Winfield, World English Tutor, USA
Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
Sheraton Seattle, Capitol Hill Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
Collectivizing for Reading Development WSCC, 616
in the L2 Legal Classroom Creating Activities for the Academic English
Content Area: English for Specific Purposes Classroom From TOEFL® Resources
This presentation shares a legal reading curriculum for L2 law Content Area: Intensive English Programs
students. The curriculum utilizes the notion of a collective so that Use TOEFL’s free online resources to create classroom activities that
responsibility for reading legal cases is divided among students until will help your students improve their academic English. By adapting
they develop the ability to read autonomously. This presentation shares actual TOEFL materials, you can increase students’ ability to succeed
the methods and materials used in developing the curriculum. in the higher education classroom. We review sample activities and
WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH

Lindsey Kurtz, Pennsylvania State University, USA discuss the use of rubrics to reinforce learning objectives.
Marian Crandall, Educational Testing Service, USA
Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
TCC, Tahoma 3 Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
Conversation Champions: Integration of WSCC, 203
Vocabulary Into Oral Production Developing Online Writing Courses That
Content Area: Adult Education Support Active, Project‑Based Learning
Conversation Champions, a task-based activity, integrates vocabulary Content Area: Intensive English Programs
into students’ existing semantic network by connecting with their An online writing course can offer student engagement equal to a face-
current experiences (Dunn, 2012). After recognizing target structures to-face classroom experience. The presenters share their experience
in info-gap listening exercise, partners perform original conversations. developing online courses with a project-based curriculum that fosters
Peers monitoring for correct forms choose Conversation Champions. an active learning environment. Participants leave with ideas for a
This multimodal, level-adaptable activity yields varied sample dynamic, learner-centered online writing course.
texts and rubrics. Eileen Kramer, Boston University, USA
Nonie Bell, University of Delaware, USA Amelia Onorato, Boston University, USA
Amanda Strickland, University of Delaware, USA
Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom D
Discussion of Issues Regarding Students
With Interrupted Education
Content Area: Refugee Concerns
The percentage of students entering school with interrupted education
is estimated to be up to 20%, while the requirements and rigors
involved in integration are ever increasing. This dialogue session
provides opportunities for participants to share the issues they are
facing and meet other professionals to share solutions.
Brenda Custodio, Ohio State University, USA
Judith O’Loughlin, Language Matters, LLC, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

66 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
TCC, Chelan 5 Sheraton Seattle, Ravenna
Dynamic Systems Perspectives on Individual Enhancing, Enriching, Empowering
Differences in L2 Listening Development Excellence in Online Course Design
Content Area: Second Language Acquisition Content Area: Distance Learning/Online Learning
L2 listening development is a complex and dynamic process involving Achieving excellence in online course design becomes a successful
L2 listeners’ linguistic, social, cognitive, and emotional systems. endeavor when teacher and learner perspectives come into play. A
To better understand such complexity, we report findings from a teacher who took the digital plunge and her teacher-mentor who
study designed to examine how individual differences (IDs) factors helped her thrive provide insights into best practices in online course
interactively affect and predict L2 listening development and discuss design, implementation and ensuring an enriching and engaging
its pedagogical implications. learner experience.
Pengyun Chang, University of Auckland, New Zealand Sandy Wagner, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language
Lawrence Jun Zhang, University of Auckland, New Zealand Center, USA
Debra Josephson Abrams, Higher School of Economics, Russia
Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
WSCC, 604 Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
Effecting Pedagogical Change Through a TCC, Tahoma 1

D
School‑based Community of Practice ESL/EFL Teachers’ Perceptions of
Content Area: Teacher Education

CE L E Constraints on Critical Thinking

CAN
A school-based Community of Practice (COP) can be an engaging and Content Area: English as a Foreign Language
effective way to achieve school-wide change. The presenter shares her Strong critical thinking skills are essential for effective language
experiences in establishing and running a COP, aimed at embedding a learning. However, several constraints impede the mastery of most
literacy approach that was particularly supportive of ESL students, in of these skills. This presentation reports on the findings of a research
her Australian elementary school setting. study about teacher perceptions of those constraints, and provides
practical strategies and tools to help overcome such constraints.

WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH
Rosemary Radford, ACT Education Directorate, Australia
Ozgur Pala, Qatar University, Qatar
Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
TCC, Yakima 1 Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
Empowering Low-Proficiency Learners WSCC, 303
With Critical Thinking Skills Examining the Literature: Moving From
Content Area: English as a Foreign Language Research to Practice
This presentation explores the concomitant relationship between Content Area: Teaching Methodology and Strategy
critical thinking skills and empowering low proficiency learners Three classroom teachers share their examination of research
with language enhancement. The gap between these two presents literature related to ELLs and Special Education, error response, and
numerous challenges. Bridging the gap, the presenters share strategies L2 reading processes with non-alphabetic first language readers.
developing learner autonomy through critical thinking skills, used Taking different corners of the room, presenters share what they
successfully in the disadvantaged Indo -Pakistani classrooms. learned, explain trends trends they found, and show how they moved
Namrata Parmar, Regional Institute of English, India research to practice.
Zakia Sarwar, SPELT, Pakistan Paul Abraham, Simmons College, USA
Greta Phillips, Newton Public Schools, USA
Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm Krista Rogers, University of Connecticutt, USA
WSCC, 614 Cynthia Slemaker, Bedford Public Schools, USA
English‑Spanish Connection:
Cross‑Linguistic Transfer of Foundational Skills
Content Area: Bilingual Education
Rather than assuming that cross-linguistic transfer will occur without
explicit teaching, we can organize literacy and language instruction
intentionally and strategically to promote proficient biliteracy.
Cross-linguistic transfer routines and strategies for foundational
skillÊinstruction that can be adapted and implemented across the
various biliteracy programs models will be demonstrated.
Silvia Dorta-Duque de Reyes, Benchmark Education, USA
Shauna Williams, Benchmark Education Company, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 67
Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
WSCC, 307-308 WSCC, 3A
Expanding Linguistic Repertoires Implementing CBI for Artists in On‑site
Through Play With Voices and Online University Courses
Content Area: Listening, Speaking/Speech Content Area: Content-Based and CLIL/Content and Language
Integrated Learning
Although the reconstruction of socially recognizable voices is an
important communicative resource, many L2 users lack confidence CBI has many facets, and the resulting implementation within even
to attempt such play. This session engages participants in tasks one university can be diverse. This session examines how two
combining elements of improv and stand-up comedy training CBI models were adapted for art students in an onsite and online
techniques with established L2 pedagogical practices to encourage course. Considerations for the success of CBI at the university
adult L2 learners to experiment with voices. setting are discussed.
Nancy Bell, Washington State University, USA Lisa Chou, Academy of Art University, USA
Sherise Lee, Academy of Art University, USA
Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
WSCC, 2A Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
WSCC, 611
Faculty Reflections: A Collaborative Autoethnography
of an International Field Experience Inclusive and Exclusive Pronouns in
Content Area: Teacher Education Multicultural Teacher Education Textbooks
Content Area: Intercultural Communication
Using autoethnography methodology, ESL faculty problematize
themselves in practice situations beyond the traditional classroom, This study adopted Positioning Theory as the theoretical framework
reflect on their marginalized identities, and discuss how facilitating an to explore the discursive construction of inclusivity and exclusivity
international field experience for preservice teachers has changed their in three textbooks, widely used in U.S. teacher education programs.
beliefs regarding the ways in which place shapes personal identities, The presenters analyzed instances of “we” and “you” (derivations
professional identities, and pedagogical practices. as subject, object, and possessive pronouns) throughout the
focal textbooks.
WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH

Kisha Bryan, Texas A&M University, USA


Monica Neshyba, Texas A&M University, USA Bedrettin Yazan, University of Alabama, USA
Ali Fuad Selvi, Middle East Technical University, North Cyprus
Campus, Turkey
Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
WSCC, 617
From Chaplin to Minions: Teaching Nonverbal Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
Sheraton Seattle, Juniper
Communicative Competence Through Film
Content Area: Teaching Methodology and Strategy L1 in the L2 Classroom: What Should Teachers Do?

D
Content Area: Bilingual Education

E
This presentation examines the use of gestures (miming) and facial

CE L
expressions in film that contains minimal dialogue, and how instructors Teachers have long been urged or even mandated to not allow

CAN
can adopt nonverbal skills to promote strategic competence in ELT. students’ L1s in L2 classrooms. However, many admit that they do
It also examines the debate of universal versus culturally specific use L1, regardless of policy. Researchers today are questioning this
nonverbal communication in relation to classroom practice. L2-only approach and validating teachers’ choices. We discuss the two
Lindsey Sanchez, University of Alabama, USA positions and the possibility of compromise.
Julie Riddlebarger, Khalifa University, United Arab Emirates
Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
Sheraton Seattle, Madrona Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
WSCC, 214
Herding Cats: Norming ITA Raters’ Judgements
Content Area: International Teaching Assistants Latino Teenage Boys’
Counter‑Narratives in Education
Insuring an acceptable degree of interrater reliability for International
Content Area: Intercultural Communication
Teaching Assistant performance testing is crucial yet tricky. Three
testing coordinators share their institution’s protocols as a start Mainstream studies understand Latino teenage boys as disengaged
to a discussion on appropriate calibration samples, coaching and and culturally deficient. This session explores nine Latino teenage
reliability. Participants share their own practices while also learning boys’ counter-narratives with issues of race/ethnicity, gender,
from each other. English language development, immigration status, and class as they
interrelate to other forms of oppression, shaping their education in
Susan Greene, Princeton University, USA
Barbara Beers, University of Minnesota, USA the United States.
Ian Nichols, University of Pennsylvania, USA Juan Rios, Bradley University, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

68 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
WSCC, 612 WSCC, 610
Learn Language and Content With Peer Review Practices That Work
Concept Maps, Games, and More Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition
Content Area: CALL/Computer-Assisted Language Learning/ Teachers and students commonly experience a number of obstacles to
Technology in Education
making peer review effective. This session explores the conditions that
ELLs need rich, motivating resources to engage in content while must be met for peer review to have a positive impact on the quality of
developing language and literacy skills. With the topic of ecosystems, students’ writing. Presenters model effective peer review activities for
the presenter demonstrates several online tools and learning strategies different writing genres and proficiency levels.
to incorporate academic language into content teaching. Participants Annelies Galletta, University of Maryland, College Park, USA
engage in activities, including using animated movies, games, Melanie Baker, University of Maryland, USA
and concept maps.
Beverly Fine, BrainPOP, USA Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
TCC, Yakima 2
Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm Phonemic Awareness and Literacy:
WSCC, 613 Using Phonics With Adult ELLs
Learning Analytics: Counting What Counts Content Area: Adult Education
Content Area: CALL/Computer-Assisted Language Learning/ Establishing a strong phonemic awareness is critical for ELLs in
Technology in Education
acquiring literacy, listening and speaking skills. Findings indicate
Insights from 25 years of data collection and student observations incorporating phonics with contextualized instruction improves
reveal what makes online language learning effective and guide proficiency, especially with beginner level learners. This presentation
innovative approaches to blended learning. Teachers and program overviews the pedagogical advantages of the inclusion of phonics and
administrators will benefit from this discussion of evidence-based provides practical strategies.
practices to accelerate student learning and improve outcomes. Jose Torres, Baltimore City Community College, USA

WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH
Andrew Blasky, DynEd International, USA
Kevin McClure, DynEd International, USA
Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
TCC, Chelan 4
Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm Practicum 2.0: Engaging Online MA TESOL
WSCC, 204
Students Through Practitioner Communities
Making the Leap to Consulting Content Area: Teacher Education
Content Area: Personal and Professional Development for Teachers
Rich interactions and real-world applications are essential for
Are you wondering what it is like to work independently? Thinking developing emergent teachers’ knowledge in online teacher education
about starting your own business or going out on your own? Join us programs. The presenters share the Structured Teaching Practice of
to discuss the nuts and bolts of consulting, freelancing, or otherwise their fully online MA TESOL program. They demonstrate sample tasks
working independently of an institution in the field of TESOL. and report successes and challenges in the online environment as well
Joe McVeigh, Consultant, USA as program participant outcomes.
Bruce Rindler, Boston University, USA Betsy Parrish, Hamline University, USA
Deborah Kennedy, Key Words, USA Julia Reimer, Hamline University, USA
Jayme Adelson-Goldstein, Lighthearted Learning, USA
Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm TCC, Chelan 2
WSCC, 618
Responsive Mediation in Learning‑to‑Teach
Metadiscourse and Identity Construction Content Area: Teacher Education
in a Teaching Philosophy Statement
Content Area: Teacher Education This presentation empirically documents the dialogic interactions that
emerge between teachers and teacher educators as they engage in
The presenters investigated how two MATESOL language instructors the practices of L2 teacher education. Interactional data from two
constructed their identity. Analyses revealed they employed innovative practices illustrate how teacher development is assisted by
metadiscourse resources to construct the identity of a competent the responsive mediation that emerges in these practices.
graduate student and a knowledgeable, reflective teacher. Findings
Karen Johnson, Pennsylvania State University, USA
offer insights into how linguistic resources can be mobilized to
Paula Golombek, University of Florida, USA
construct a strong and unique teaching philosophy statement.
Peter De Costa, Michigan State University, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 69
Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
WSCC, 602 WSCC, 310
Scams That Target Your Students: Student Ambassador Program: Cultivating
Tips and Tools for Educators Cooperative Relationships With IEP Students
Content Area: Adult Education Content Area: Intensive English Programs
Every day, scams that target adult learners threaten their financial This collaborative presentation shares one IEP’s orientation and
security. This session promotes an exchange of ideas: presenters tutoring services partnership, which builds cooperative relationships
give practical information about scams and what to do about them; among incoming students, tutors, instructors, and staff. Presenters
participants share their scam-related experiences. Each group leaves share videos, stories, and outcomes of their new Student Ambassador
with next steps to help students and their families avoid scams. Program, a prearrival communications and orientation approach, which
Charles Harwood, Federal Trade Commission, USA fosters strong community and student success.
Tina Kondo, Federal Trade Commission, USA Tony Cipolle, University of Oregon, USA
Laura Solis, Federal Trade Commission, USA Stef Brewer, University of Oregon, USA
Angela Dornbusch, University of Oregon, USA
Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
Sheraton Seattle, Metropolitan A Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
Secondary Schools to Learn From: WSCC, 615
Empowering ELLs Take Your Students to TASK: the Key to Success!
Content Area: High School/Secondary Education Content Area: Intensive English Programs
A national research study on secondary schools successfully serving In this session we examine how carefully designed activities in The
ELLs are outlined: the purpose of the study, the criteria for selection of Transferable Academic Skills Kit give students the skills that they lack
schools nationwide and the process for settling on the final schools. but sorely need—such as critical thinking, presenting, researching and
Schools are described, observation protocols and observer notes are referencing—to succeed not only in their postsecondary studies but in
shared, and research findings explained. their future careers as well.
WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH

James Stack, San Francisco Unified School District, USA Nicole Graham, English Central, Canada
Lydia Stack, Understanding Language Project, USA
Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm WSCC, 605
WSCC, 210 Teachers’ U.S. Corpus
Shaping Better Learners and Citizens Content Area: Research/Research Methodology
Through Project‑Based Learning
The presenters amassed a linguistic corpus-TUSC-representing
Content Area: Task-Based, Project-Based Instruction approximately 4 million words based on over 50 K–12 content area
This session depicts the process of getting students involved in Project textbooks. Findings of the corpus, including word lists representative
- Based Learning and coming up with an authentic production they of academic language, are offered. Participants are invited to
can share with their community. The presenter shows the connection discuss ways this corpus may assist K–12 teachers, especially
between learning outside the classroom, developing problem-solving teachers of ELLs.
skills and service learning implementation. Seyedjafar Ehsanzadehsorati, Florida International University, USA
Safietou Ndiaye, U.S. Embassy, Dakar, Senegal
Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm WSCC, 205
WSCC, 620 The Need for Voice: How Access Leads to Equity
Slow SLOs? Quick, Quick SLOs: Content Area: Teacher Education
Creating Effective/Efficient SLO Assessments
Community college ESL students traverse a myriad of sections before
Content Area: Accreditation/Certification/Credentialing
matriculating into credit-bearing courses. This interactive session
Creating effective Student Learning Objective (SLO) assessments demonstrates to practitioners how fostering student equity can shift
and data collection methods can often be overwhelming and time- whose voice is heard in the K–16 classroom. Specifically, the utilization
consuming due to improper selection of assessment methods and of leveled Mike Rose readings, mentor texting, reading apprenticeship,
ambiguous directions to instructors. This practical session shows and reading circles shared.
participants how to easily formulate SLO assessments using a simple Mark Manasse, San Diego Mesa College, USA
five-step process and template.
Emily Wong, UC Irvine, USA
Helen Nam, UC Irvine, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

70 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm Wednesday, 11:30 am–1:15 pm
WSCC, 304 TCC, Tahoma 5
Understanding Implied Meaning: Oral Language Development for Elementary ELLs
What Factors Matter to “Get It”? Content Area: Elementary School/Primary Education
Content Area: Second Language Acquisition How do we support oral language development within elementary
This study investigates the extent to which L2 proficiency, length content? In this workshop model, presenters model cooperative
of residence, and amount of L2 interaction affect ESL learners’ learning designed for preliterate students and academic conversations
pragmatic skills in understanding implied meaning in English. structured for debate and math content. Participants practice and
Relevant theories and the study findings are presented, and reflect upon ways to incorporate and differentiate oral language within
suggestions for ESL classroom implications to promote L2 pragmatic their own instructional practices.
development are provided. Christine Kennedy, Minneapolis Public Schools, USA
Aysenur Sagdic, Indiana University, USA Aanya DiBrito, Minneapolis Public Schools, USA
Felicia Orozco, Minneapolis Public Schools, USA
Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm Melissa Lowell, Minneapolis Public Schools, USA
WSCC, 201 Catherine Ragsdale, Minneapolis Public Schools, USA
Eve Kelley, Minneapolis Public Schools, USA
Variety of Excellence:
Curricular Models of Accredited IEPs
Content Area: Intensive English Programs Wednesday, 11:30 am–1:15 pm
WSCC, 2B
Accredited postsecondary IEPs must meet the same standards, yet
Pressed for Time: Strategies for
accreditor data confirm that they differ widely with respect to program
Writing for Publication
structure. This presentation maps the wide range of program designs
Content Area: Personal and Professional Development for Teachers
and their approaches to curriculum structure, assessment, and student
achievement data collection and analysis. TESOL professionals have many insights from teaching and research
Masha Vassilieva, Commission on English Language Program to share with domestic and international audiences but little time to
write and publish. In this panel and subsequent audience discussion,

WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH
Accreditation, USA
Mary Reeves, Commission on English Language Program presenters offer practical tips and strategies for integrating writing for
Accreditation, USA publication into demanding schedules.
Rachel Herman, Commission on English Language Program Deborah Crusan, Wright State University, USA
Accreditation, USA Christine Pearson Casanave, Temple University Japan, USA
Suhanthie Motha, University of Washington, USA
Wednesday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm Stephanie Vandrick, University of San Francisco, USA
Sheraton Seattle, Ballard
Writing With Scaffolds: Using Paragraph Frames 1:00 pm
Content Area: Adult Education
Research indicates that having strong paragraph writing skills is key in Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
academic and workplace success. Paragraph frames (writing scaffolds) WSCC, 605
help intermediate-advanced adult ELLs strengthen their writing skills.
50 Ways to Be a Better Teacher
In this session, participants practice using a paragraph frame model.
Content Area: Personal and Professional Development for Teachers
Ronna Magy, Los Angeles Unified School District (Retired), USA
Teaching is an art. It is more than a system of procedures and
learning outcomes; it is a complex and multifaceted human activity.
Wednesday, 11:30 am–1:15 pm This session, by an experienced program director, presents effective
WSCC, 603 practical strategies so you can develop yourself personally and
High School Newcomer Students in Seattle: professionally into the best teacher you can be.
Student Voices Chris Mares, Wayzgoose Press, USA
Content Area: Bilingual Education
Public schools across the United States have experienced an influx of
recent arrival immigrants and refugees. While research on newcomers
has increased, few offer the perspective of the students. Through a
panel presentation comprised of students and district leaders, learn of
the opportunities, challenges, and needs.
Veronica Gallardo, Seattle Public School District, USA
David Lewis, Seattle Public School District, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 71
Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
Sheraton Seattle, Juniper WSCC, 612
A Guide to Implementing Extensive Blended Learning in the Young Learner Classroom
Reading in ESL/EFL Classrooms Content Area: Elementary School/Primary Education
Content Area: English as a Foreign Language In this presentation, the presenters explore the possibilities,
This session provides guidelines for incorporating extensive reading practicalities, payoffs and pitfalls of blending digital learning
into existing intensive reading classes drawn from the findings with teacher-fronted instruction in the young learner classroom.
of the presenter’s research, which investigated the effects of We describe our involvement in a digital learning program called
extensive reading in a Korean EFL university setting. The presenter SMARTree in Vietnam and Korea, and present a vignette of one
shares instructional techniques and insightful tips for promoting blended classroom.
extensive reading. David Nunan, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Namhee Suk, Pukyong National University, South Korea Julie Choi, University of Melbourne, Australia

Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm


WSCC, 212 WSCC, 604
A World of Dual Language Books for Bridging a Graduation Pathway:
Young Emergent Bilinguals Evaluating Foreign Transcripts
Content Area: Reading and Literacy Content Area: High School/Secondary Education
Harness the power of two languages. Connect children’s early learning This session highlights the foreign transcript evaluation process.
environments through the use of dual language books. Explore Attendees receive a general overview of several educational
ways of using bilingual books to promote early reading and writing systems in other countries, grading scales, recommended courses
development in dual language learners. Promote translanguaging and and equivalent United States transfer credit. Participants learn the
advance vocabulary and concept learning across languages to ensure recommended practices for foreign transcript evaluation and have an
children’s school success. opportunity to evaluate a foreign transcript.
WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH

Nancy Cloud, Rhode Island College, USA Joanne Newby, DeKalb County School District, USA
Rachel Toncelli, Rhode Island College, USA Phoenicia Grant, DeKalb County School District, USA

Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm


WSCC, 2A Sheraton Seattle, Willow B
Adapting SIOP for Use in Evaluating Citations in L2 University Student Writing:
Teacher Effectiveness Form, Function, and Stance
Content Area: Teacher Education Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition
This presentation offers hands-on experience on how to use an This presentation reports findings of an in-depth analysis of L2
adapted Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol for evaluating university students’ use of citations in terms of form, function,
teacher effectiveness. We show video of classroom teachers and allow and stance. The presentation also provides ways ESL composition
participants to use the tool to evaluate their practices. We discuss the instructors can enhance and expand students’ repertoire for integrating
advantages and limitations of the tool. sources in constructing effectively persuasive texts.
Jason Jay, Brigham Young University, USA Joseph Lee, Ohio University, USA
Lisa McLachlan, Brigham Young University, USA Chris Hitchcock, Ohio University, USA
Stefinee Pinnegar, Brigham Young University, USA J. Elliott Casal, Pennsylvania State University, USA

Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm


TCC, Yakima 2 Sheraton Seattle, Issaquah
Adult ESL + Math: Study Circle Exploring Data‑Driven Decision‑Making in
Language and Numeracy ESL Program Administration
Content Area: Adult Education Content Area: Program Administration
Adult ESL + Math = ? In Minnesota, a new study circle for adult ESL/EFL program administrators make decisions almost every day
educators explored integrating language and numeracy instruction. affecting students, teachers and other stakeholders. This session focuses
In this session, hear about its content and insights, and learn how to on data driven decision-making as a key leadership competency and
access the complete study circle facilitator guide and all supporting ways in which current and prospective program administrators can
materials, available for free. collect and analyze data, thus making informed decisions.
Patsy Egan Vinogradov, Hamline University, USA Engin Ayvaz, Yasar University, Turkey

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

72 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
WSCC, 210 TCC, Skagit 2
Developing Sound and Ethical Placement Enhancing Research Competence Through Student
for International L2 Writers Engagement in Academic Discourse Synthesis
Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition
This presentation shares a process for redesigning placement for L2 writers often lack the discourse synthesis skills, involving
international L2 writers into first year writing courses at a U.S. the selection and integration of source material as well as
university. Presenters provide a framework for examining, developing, meaning creation, required to manage research tasks in university
and assessing local placement tools with the aim of developing sound settings. The presenters demonstrate effective reading-to-writing
and ethical placement practices. activities for improving these skills and further developing student
Christine Tardy, University of Arizona, USA competence with research.
Erin Whittig, University of Arizona, USA Mariah Fairley, American University in Cairo, Egypt
Alissa Nostas, Arizona State University, USA
Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm Susanne Rizzo, American University in Cairo, Egypt
WSCC, 619
EFL Learners’ Willingness to Communicate Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
in Task-Based Instruction TCC, Chelan 2
Content Area: English as a Foreign Language Exposing Neuromyths and Empowering Teachers
This study attempts to explore what influences L2 learners’ situational With Evidence‑Based Teacher Education
willingness to communicate when they engage in interaction-based Content Area: Teacher Education
tasks in the EFL classroom. The goal of this study was to investigate The presenters evaluate some commonly held misconceptions in
EFL learners’ communication disposition in L2 and find the keys to education that may be influencing the practice of English language
successful interaction-based tasks in the EFL classroom. teachers. Referencing scientific evidence and recent research, they
Junko Toyoda, Kansai Gaidai University, Japan show why such beliefs are considered myths and how pervasive these
ideas are. Alternative, evidence-based teacher education concepts and

WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH
activities are proposed and exemplified.
Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
WSCC, 203 Carol Lethaby, The New School, USA
Patricia Harries, Independent, Canada
Empowering Students Through a
Hybrid Extensive Reading Course
Content Area: Distance Learning/Online Learning Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
WSCC, 614
Discover how to use an online setting to organize and teach an
extensive reading course. Evidence are shared on how the online Fast Facts About IEPs:
environment strengthens the focus on reading as the primary activity A Snapshot of EnglishUSA Members
of the class and aids campus-based students to improve reading skills Content Area: Intensive English Programs
and become more autonomous readers. Comprehensive information from EnglishUSA member IEPs, including
Ellen Bunker, Brigham Young University–Hawaii, USA program statistics and overviews of enrollment, length and structure,
Aubrey Bronson, Brigham Young University–Hawaii, USA staffing, and curriculum, is presented. In addition, this session includes
discussion highlighting exemplary practices for IEPs as demonstrated
by EnglishUSA membership.
Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
WSCC, 213 Cheryl Delk-Le Good, EnglishUSA, USA
Anna Eddy, University of Michigan–Flint, USA
Engaging, Enriching, and Empowering Black ELLs
Content Area: Elementary School/Primary Education
This session engages, enriches, and empowers participants’
understanding of Black ELLs’ lived experiences, and their status within
dominant cultures is discussed. Recommendations and resources for
teachers and school administrators are shared to bring about greater
inclusivity, awareness, and best practices.
Ayanna Cooper, Consultant, USA
Heather Winfield, We Tutor, USA
Lavette Coney, The Fessenden School, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 73
Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
Sheraton Seattle, Aspen TCC, Chelan 5
Formative Assessments: Simulated Classroom Occupy Library: An Experiential Approach
Environments and Intercultural Communicative to Engaging ELLs in Research
Competence Dispositions Content Area: English as a Foreign Language
Content Area: Assessment/Testing A Scavenger Hunt engages ELLs in accessing library resources for
Cutting-edge assessments in the field of ESL/EFL are featured in research and in building teamwork and leadership skills as well as
results of a survey of future elementary teachers who participated communicative competence. Copresenters share these approaches
in a simulated classroom environment where EL-specific classroom facilitated at an American Library in Kolkata, India. Access to a
participation patterns are represented through avatars; combined replicable Scavenger Hunt tool will be provided to session participants.
with results of an innovative mediated learning project that enhanced Shinjini Sanyal, Vikramshila Education Resource Society, India
prospective teachers’ intercultural communicative competence. Jode Brexa, U.S. Department of State, USA
Lynne Diaz-Rico, California State University, San Bernardino, USA
Sultan Turkan, Educational Testing Service, USA Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
WSCC, 201
Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm Poster Sessions: Empower and Engage
Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom C Your Listening and Speaking Students
High-School ELLs at Risk: Content Area: Intensive English Programs
Neither College‑ Nor Career‑Ready Poster sessions engage students because they can speak on topics of
Content Area: High School/Secondary Education their choice. However, to arrive at the final product, students must first
Statistics show that nearly half of high-school ELLs either drop out or take part in the academic processes of inquiry, research, design, and
conclude their education at high school graduation without advancing analysis. Learn the steps to integrate a poster project into a listening
to postsecondary education. This presentation illustrates how such and speaking course.
undereducation of ELLs takes place and discusses concrete strategies Michael Vallee, University of Colorado Boulder, USA
for preparing non-college-bound ELLs for jobs upon graduation or for
WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH

Karen Eichhorn, University of Colorado Boulder, USA


vocational training. Leigh Ann Russell, University of Colorado Boulder, USA
Yasuko Kanno, Boston University, USA
Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm TCC, Tahoma 3
WSCC, 615 Relationship Between Suprasegmental Production
Hi‑Lo Fiction and Nonfiction for Newcomers and ESL Students’ Listening Comprehension
Content Area: Reading and Literacy Content Area: Phonology/Pronunciation
Adapting to a new country, its systems, and its cultural expectations This study investigated whether and how the production of the four
is one of the greatest challenges facing newcomers. This session suprasegmental features—speech rate, pausing, sentence stress, and
highlights fiction and nonfiction books developed around topics critical pitch—correlated with ESL learners’ listening comprehension scores.
to newcomers. Strategies for using these books in middle and high The findings suggest that success in ESL listening may depend on ESL
school classrooms are explored. learners’ speech rate and pitch production patterns.
Jill Haney, Saddleback Educational Publishing, USA Roman Lesnov, Northern Arizona University, USA

Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm


WSCC, 617 TCC, Chelan 4
Leveraging Technology to Publish Teacher Learning and Professional Growth
and Share Materials Through a Curriculum Development Course
Content Area: Materials Writers, Curriculum/Materials Development Content Area: Personal and Professional Development for Teachers
Do you wish you had an easy way to share classroom materials Student teachers benefit when their learning is situated in meaningful
you’ve created with students and other educators? Presenters contexts, when they are actively engaged in their own learning
outline processes for sharing teacher generated materials, showcase process, and when they collaborate with others. This presentation
technology available to teachers who want to publish their original highlights the impact on student teachers in a curriculum development
materials, and suggest automation and workflow techniques to course that collaborates with various language programs needing
simplify this process. curricular assistance.
Ryan Yates, Emily Griffith Technical College, USA Priyanvada Abeywickrama, San Francisco State University, USA
Ryan Jeffers, Emily Griffith Technical College, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

74 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
WSCC, 304 Sheraton Seattle, Metropolitan B
Teaching and Learning Key Prepositions Theory Into Practice: A Pedagogy of
in the Advanced ESL Classroom Translanguaging in Bilingual Classrooms
Content Area: Grammar Content Area: Bilingual Education
Why are prepositions so difficult for our students to learn? Advances in Flexible and dynamic understandings of language such as García’s
cognitive linguistics and new applications of Vygotskian theory point to translanguaging have gained prominence in the last decade. While the
solutions that can be used by language teachers in the classroom for empirical base for translanguaging has grown, much remains unknown
teaching the polysemy of key prepositions. about translating theory into practice. In this practice-oriented session,
Donald Englund, University of Kansas, USA we present specific techniques for creating a translanguaging space
in the classroom.
Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm Laura Hamman, University of Wisconsin–Madison, USA
WSCC, 214 Emeline Beck, Sandburg Elementary School, USA
Aubrey Hellenbrand, Sandburg Elementary School, USA
Teaching English and Intercultural Communication
Skills Through Critical Incident Exercises
Content Area: Intercultural Communication Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
WSCC, 616
Critical incident exercises help learners build both English and
intercultural communication skills. This session begins with a Unraveling the Mystery: Vocabulary and
demonstration of an exercise designed for English classes. A Grammar for Academic Writing
debriefing then addresses how to conduct such exercises, and the Content Area: Higher Education
ways in which they can help learners build both English skills and This workshop begins with a brief overview of issues faced by
intercultural competence. second language writers. It then focuses on ways to build the
Don Snow, Duke Kunshan University, China (People’s Republic) vocabulary and grammar needed for academic writing, providing
attendees with specific ideas and resources to help their students
accomplish this goal.

WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH
Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
WSCC, 307-308 Jeanne Lambert, The New School, USA
Randi Reppen, Northern Arizona University, USA
Telling the Whole Story:
Retelling Intervention With Young ELLs
Content Area: Standards, Common Core State Standards Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
WSCC, 205
Young ELLs need to be able to retell stories for social and academic
purposes. Participants learn about practical, culturally sensitive Using “Check, Please” as a Springboard
to a Communication Project
research-based techniques and tools to accelerate story retelling and
Content Area: Higher Education
language complexity simultaneously in young ELLs. Two research-
based intervention programs will be demonstrated and evidence of It is challenging for university instructors to get students motivated
effectiveness are shared. to have cultural experiences. By using the public television series
Darci Melchor, West Hartford Public Schools, USA Check Please as a model for a scaffolded, student-driven television
Lillian Rausch, West Hartford Public Schools, USA production project, students develop their own experiences and engage
authentically in the pragmatics of discussion, expressing opinion, and
agreeing/disagreeing.
Wednesday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
WSCC, 613 Elizabeth O’Hara Johnson, Illinois Institute of Technology, USA
Ellisa Cole, Illinois Institute of Technology, USA
The Teacher’s Guide to IELTS
Content Area: Assessment/Testing
IELTS tests English as an international language and is increasingly
accepted and used in North American higher education. IELTS brings
the outside world into the classroom with a face-to-face speaking
test providing a true-to-life assessment of speakers’ abilities to
communicate in English. Learn more about incorporating IELTS into
your curriculum.
Kate McKeen, IELTS, USA
Christine Grosse, Independent, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 75
Wednesday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm Wednesday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm
Sheraton Seattle, Willow A TCC, Yakima 1
Argue, Contend, Exort: Teaching the Engaging in Accreditation: Benefits to the
Language of Argumentative Writing Profession, Program, and Reviewer
Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition Content Area: Accreditation/Certification/Credentialing
Experience a flexible toolkit of grammatical techniques to help Presenters in this panel session review the steps involved in seeking
students expand their linguistic repertoires and write arguments specialized accreditation for an IEP, the tasks of administrators, staff,
more effectively. Practice with classroom-tested activities focusing and teachers in applicant IEPs, and the role of professionals who serve
on introducing sources, building and developing effective paragraphs, as reviewers, highlighting the benefits for all stakeholders.
and giving and understanding feedback. Learn how to adapt these Paul Angelis, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, USA
techniques to your teaching context. Nicole Martello, Commission on English Language Program
Silvia Pessoa, Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar, Qatar Accreditation, USA
Ryan Miller, Kent State University, USA Christine O’Neill, University of Pittsburgh, USA
Thomas Mitchell, Carnegie Mellon University in Qatar, Qatar Heather McNaught, University of Pittsburgh, USA
Nigel Caplan, University of Delaware, USA
Sandra Zappa-Hollman, University of British Columbia, Canada Wednesday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm
WSCC, 620
Wednesday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm Enriching Your CV/Résumé:
WSCC, 611 Empowerment for New Job Opportunities
Community Engagement: Enriching Content Area: Personal and Professional Development for Teachers
Student Experiences, Teacher Preparation, Useful for novices in the field and experienced professionals
and Program Implementation entertaining a job change, the workshop addresses effective CV/
Content Area: Teacher Education résumé writing. Participants engage with practice modules discussing
This colloquium includes five presentations on how community content elements, organization, layout/design as they assess and
engagement projects and programs have enriched ESL student improve sample sections of CVs/résumés. Participants are encouraged
WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH

experiences, MA TESOL teacher preparation and program to bring their CV/résumé for review.
implementation. Attendees are able to (better) implement service- Sigrun Biesenbach-Lucas, Georgetown University, USA
learning in their own programs. Deanna Wormuth, Georgetown University, USA
Cathryn Crosby, Columbia University, USA
Michael Fields, University of Delaware, USA Wednesday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm
Christine Rosalia, Hunter College–CUNY, USA WSCC, 3B
Tim Micek, Ohio Dominican University, USA
Judith Monseur, Antioch University Midwest, USA From IEP to Degree:
Michele Regalla, University of Central Florida, USA Strategies for Successful Transitions
Content Area: Higher Education

Wednesday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm Building support systems for students transitioning from IEP to degree
WSCC, 610 programs can greatly improve their chances for success. This session
focuses on sustainable initiatives to help ELLs in this transition
Educating Refugee‑Background Students:
including approaches related to academic needs, socialization, and
Adjustment, Literacy, and Equity
collaboration between IEPs and degree faculty.
Content Area: Refugee Concerns
Kevin Martin, Virginia International University, USA
This research-based panel comprises invited chapter authors and Bedrettin Yazan, University of Alabama, USA
the editors of an upcoming book on educating refugee-background Natalia Jacobsen, George Washington University, USA
students. Presenters share studies that foreground students’ goals, T. Leo Schmitt, The Graduate Center–CUNY, USA
experiences, and voices, as well as highlight the broader context
of school and society. Themes explored in this session include
adjustment, literacy, and equity.
Shawna Shapiro, Middlebury College, USA
Raichle Farrelly, Saint Michael’s College, USA
Delila Omerbašić, Tulane Universtiy, USA
Kristiina Montero, Wilfred Laurier University, Canada
Amadu Khan, The Welcoming Association, United Kingdom (Great Britain)
Paul Molyneux, University of Melbourne, Australia
Amanda Hiorth, University of Melbourne, Australia

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

76 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Wednesday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm Wednesday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm
TCC, Tahoma 1 WSCC, 310
In Defense of Teaching: EFL in the “Postmethods” Era Preparing TESOL Educators to Address
Content Area: English as a Foreign Language the Needs of Refugee Students
Current postmethods pedagogy deemphasizes input and presentation Content Area: Refugee Concerns
because these are thought to be inherently teacher centered and Researchers and practitioners discuss critical issues in preparing
unnatural. But EFL students require enriched language input and teachers to serve refugee students. Topics include cultural
intensive oral practice unavailable outside of class. Participants diversity, students’ strengths and contributions, trauma and
practice specific techniques to present language and activate student social-emotional support, unaccompanied minors, limited and
communication with minimal teacher-talking time. interrupted formal schooling, community resources, curriculum, team
Joan Saslow, Author, USA collaboration, and evidence-based training programs for teacher
Allen Ascher, Independent, USA professional development.
Brenda Custodio, Ohio State University, USA
Wednesday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm Debbie Zacarian, Debbie Zacarian, Ed.D. & Associates, USA
Sheraton Seattle, Metropolitan A Judie Haynes, everythingESL, USA
Stacy Brown, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of
Mind/Brain/Education in ESL/EFL Refugee Resettlement, USA
Content Area: Teaching Methodology and Strategy Julie Kasper, Lutheran Social Services of the Southwest, USA
Neuroscience is making huge contributions to MBE (mind/brain/ Laura Baecher, Hunter College–CUNY, USA
education). Why are those changes so slow to impact ESL/EFL? Jennifer Ballard-Kang, University of Louisville, USA
This session introduces seven concepts identified by MBE research Josephine Kennedy, World Learning, USA
as influencing learners. The presenters explore specific ways to Lois Scott-Conley, World Learning, USA
modify classroom activities and textbooks to make them more Allene Grognet, Center for Applied Linguistics, USA
compatible with the brain.
Marc Helgesen, Miyagi Gakuin Women’s University, Japan Wednesday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm

WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH
Curtis Kelly, Kansai University, Faculty of Commerce, Japan WSCC, 602
Robert Murphy, University of Kitakyushu, Japan Presentation From the Office for
English Language Acquisition
Wednesday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm Content Area: Advocacy
WSCC, 204 Representatives from the Office of English Language Acquisition
NNESTs Negotiating Identity and discuss federally-funded initiatives that support ELLs. Emphasis is on
Securing Legitimacy: Personal Accounts encouraging greater awareness and use of the department’s resources
Content Area: Nonnative English Speakers in TESOL for improving outcomes for ELLs.
The session explores professional experiences of NNESTs and how Supreet Anand, Office for English Language Acquisition, USA
intercultural communication intersects with negotiating identity. Panel
members a) describe challenges and b) how these were addressed Wednesday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm
institutionally, and c) examine how successful examples of identity WSCC, 303
negotiation may be transferred to other contexts for the language Refugees, Sectarian Strife, Community Building:
classroom and in preservice/in-service training. ELT in Turkey and Congo
Geeta Aneja, University of Pennsylvania, USA Content Area: Refugee Concerns
Helen Berg, Sam Houston State University, USA
Today there are 20 million refugees globally. Half of these are children
Maxi-Ann Campbell, Duke Kunshan University, China (People’s Republic)
and youth. Providing educational opportunities for this vulnerable
Kara Mac Donald, Defense Language Institute, USA
population is a major concern. What are the problems—and
Gloria Park, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, USA
Francisco Ramos, Loyola Marymount University, USA possibilities—for ELT? Come and engage with professionals from
Ramin Yazdanpanah, Florida State University, USA Congo and Turkey and learn about ways to support and assist.
Kathleen Malu, William Paterson University, USA
Bryce Smedley, Lewis–Clark State College, USA
Michael Morsches, Moraine Valley Community College, USA
Samson Matumo, International Relations, Congo, (Democratic
Republic of)
Andrea Schlinder, U.S. Department of State, Turkey
Eyup Dilber, Dicle University, Turkey

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 77
Wednesday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm 2:00 pm
WSCC, 211
Revisiting the Theory‑Practice Divide in TESOL
Wednesday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
Content Area: Teacher Education TCC, Chelan 2
The panel revisits the notion of the dysfunction of the theory-practice A Model for Integrating Service‑Learning
divide. Presenters critically examine the proposal that teachers should Into Teacher Education
be positioned as agents of change in the development of theories Content Area: Teacher Education
of practice for TESOL. They explore advances in teacher education
This presentation describes the use of service-learning in an ESL
programs internationally that aim to reduce the theory-practice gap.
teacher education course for which students taught or tutored
Anne Burns, University of New South Wales, Australia immigrants at community-based organizations. Offering the course as
Michael Legutke, Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Germany a working model, presenters describe syllabus design and teaching
Emily Edwards, University of New South Wales, Australia
strategies, methods for partnering with non-profits, and the student
Donald Freeman, University of Michigan, USA
perspective on volunteer teaching/tutoring.
Mark Clarke, University of Colorado Denver, USA
Jason Schneider, DePaul University, USA
Emily Power, DePaul University, USA
Wednesday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm
WSCC, 618
Wednesday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
Sustaining IEP Enrollment:
Sheraton Seattle, Issaquah
Innovative Ways to Keep Your Program Afloat
Content Area: Program Administration A Synthesis of Project‑Based Language Learning:
Research‑Based Teaching Ideas
In recent years, overall enrollment at IEPs across the country has been Content Area: Task-Based, Project-Based Instruction
decreasing due to various factors including changes in scholarship
benefits, visa restrictions, and increasing educational costs. This panel There has been much research on project-based language learning
discusses innovative approaches to sustaining IEP enrollment during (PBL), and publications about technology-infused PBL are becoming
times of extreme enrollment decline. more frequent. Recognizing that teachers do not always have time
WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH

to read and synthesize the research in usable ways, this session


Karen Asenavage, University of Delaware, USA
presents a synthesis with ideas for using projects in content-based
Sarah Arva Grosik, University of Pennsylvania, USA
language classes.
Jim Rogers, Utah State University, USA
Elaine Steneck, University of Northern Colorado, USA Tammy Slater, Iowa State University, USA
Brandon Cooper, Texas A&M University, USA Gulbahar Beckett, Iowa State University, USA

Wednesday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm Wednesday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm


TCC, Tahoma 4 WSCC, 203
Teaching English for Tourism: Concepts and Needs Academic Dishonesty and the Use
Content Area: English for Specific Purposes of Emerging Technologies
Content Area: CALL/Computer-Assisted Language Learning/
This panel critically discuss the current state of teaching English for Technology in Education
tourism from several perspectives including: a grounded review of
literature and textbooks, a view of effective practices and materials Advances in technology are also leading to new ways to cheat in
in a Hungarian university-based program, and insight into stakeholder the classroom. This practice-oriented presentation tell instructors
valued instruction in a Nicaraguan workplace program. how students are engaging in high-tech cheating and how you can
discourage it. Bring your laptop or tablet and learn about cutting edge
Gina Petrie, Eastern Washington University, USA
tools to combat academic dishonesty.
Michael Joseph Ennis, Free University of Bolzen-Bolzano, Italy
Mária Czellér, University of Debrecen, Hungary Sean McClelland, University of Oregon, USA
Tracey McHenry, Eastern Washington University, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

78 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Wednesday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm Wednesday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
WSCC, 2B WSCC, 604
And Furthermore Corrective Feedback Loops: Modeling L2
Content Area: Discourse and Pragmatics Practice and Oral English Learning
Advanced learner materials offer few guidelines for the use of the Content Area: Applied Linguistics
expressions “moreover,” “furthermore,” “in fact,” “likewise,” “in This mixed-methods study introduces an integrated corrective feedback
turn,” and other additive connectors. Grounded in pragmatic theory loop to schematize the interplay between corrective feedback and
and drawing on written corpus examples and experimental speaker- independent practice in L2 oral English learning, among advanced-level
judgement data, this talk defines optimal uses and paves a path to adult ESL students. The data for the corrective feedback loop were
enlightened class instruction. collected via qualitative open-ended survey questions and a set of forty
Howard Williams, Teachers College, Columbia University, USA student interviews.
Esther (Eunjeong) Lee, Claflin University, USA
Wednesday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
TCC, Skagit 2 Wednesday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
Back to School: Examining Teacher WSCC, 304
Preparation Effectiveness From the Inside Empowering Students to Be Metacognitive
Content Area: Teacher Education Through Written Feedback
This researcher evaluated an ESL teacher preparation program, in part, Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition
by completing the required practicum work and written assignments Grounded on classroom research examining the effectiveness of
herself as she taught K–12 ELLs for one semester. This presentation English teachers’ feedback practice in L2 writing classrooms, this
interests instructors who desire a close match between course content research-oriented presentation suggests an approach to giving written
and assignments and teacher preparation needs. comments which promotes students’ metacognitive knowledge and
Jill Swavely, Temple University, USA thus, empowers students to respond to teachers’ comments.
Ivan Chong, Yew Chung Community College, Hong Kong

WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH
Wednesday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm Cherry Au
Sheraton Seattle, Metropolitan B
Becoming a Materials Writer in the Digital Age Wednesday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
Content Area: Materials Writers, Curriculum/Materials Development WSCC, 612

Whether you’re an aspiring writer or have already published, join this English for All: Peace Corps, EL
Fellow, Fulbright Alumni Panel
discussion on working as a materials writer in today’s digital world.
Content Area: English as a Foreign Language
What choices do you have? What challenges do you face? Where can
you find support? Gain insights from authors with extensive experience Teaching English abroad through a U.S. government exchange program
in print and digital media. is a unique opportunity for cross-cultural experience and impactful
Jennifer Lebedev, Independent, USA professional development opportunities. In this session, learn first-
Linda Butler, Independent, USA hand from alumni about the U.S. government’s role in English teaching
worldwide, program goals and differences, and how these experiences
can enhance your career.
Wednesday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
WSCC, 603 Jenny Hodgson, U.S. Department of State, Office of English Language
Programs, USA
Becoming a U.S. Citizen: The Naturalization Process Thomas Santos, U.S. Department of State, USA
Content Area: Adult Education Scott Chiverton, U.S. Department of State, USA
During this presentation, a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
Officer walk participants through the basic process of becoming a
United States citizen. Participants are encouraged to ask questions and
will be provided useful resources.
Christine Pool, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Office of
Citizenship and Immigration Services, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 79
Wednesday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm Wednesday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
TCC, Tahoma 3 WSCC, 205
From EFL to ESL: Helping Learners High-Impact Professional Development
Bridge the Communicative Gap Through the Teaching Circle
Content Area: Teaching Methodology and Strategy Content Area: Higher Education
Students moving from EFL to ESL environments often report that This presentation explores ways in which an effective teaching
they feel inadequately prepared for study abroad. In this session the circle can become an integral, meaningful, and continuous part of
presenters share their experiences readying their EFL students’ for faculty professional growth and development. Based on their recent
study abroad in an ESL context and describe several communicative experiences with ESL faculty teaching circles, the presenters guide the
activities they have developed to help learners adjust. participants through the steps of creating teaching circles of their own.
Peter Neff, Doshisha University, Japan George Ellington, Salt Lake Community College, USA
Gavin Brooks, Doshisha University, Japan Brent Green, Salt Lake Community College, USA
Cameron Romney, Doshisha University, Japan Gordon Dunne, Salt Lake Community College, USA

Wednesday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm Wednesday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm


WSCC, 614 TCC, Chelan 4
Global Research on Teaching and Learning English Improving ELLs’ Learning by Enhancing
Content Area: Applied Linguistics Teachers’ Knowledge of Language
Learn from experts about cutting-edge research on key topics collected Content Area: Teacher Education
in The Global Research on Teaching and Learning English series, To support ELLs in making meaning from linguistically complex
copublished by The International Research Foundation for English texts, teachers not only need methods of teaching academic
Language Education (TIRF) and Routledg, to showcase research by language but also need to have an in-depth knowledge of language
young scholars from around the world funded through a carefully themselves. This presentation shares how preservice teachers
vetted international competition. increased their knowledge of language and created language-focused
instruction for ELLs.
WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH

Kathleen Bailey, Middlebury Institute of International Studies at


Monterey, USA Joshua Schulze, Western Oregon University, USA
Michael Carrier, Cambridge English Language Assessment, United
Kingdom (Great Britain) Wednesday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
MaryAnn Christison, University of Utah, USA WSCC, 214
Ryan Damerow, The International Research Foundation for English
Language Education, USA Intersectionality and Intercultural
Communication Beyond Culture
Content Area: Intercultural Communication
Wednesday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
WSCC, 613 Established approaches that rely on teaching one solid culture and
a fixed set of skills for intercultural communication often ignore the
Guiding International Students Through
complexity of different subject positions taken up by speakers engaged
the Research Paper Process
in intercultural communication. This presentation addresses these
Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition
shortcomings and argues for the nuanced approaches to intercultural
This session shows teachers how to move students through the writing learning in EAL classrooms.
process in stages to end up with a thorough and coherent research Natalia Balyasnikova, University of British Columbia, USA
paper. This approach allows students to construct knowledge as they
become more familiar with the process, making writing a research
paper a less intimidating task. Samples provided.
Kelly Sippell, University of Michigan Press, USA
Janine Carlock, Duquesne University, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

80 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Wednesday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm Wednesday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
WSCC, 307-308 WSCC, 212
Listening to TESOL Voices: Practical Ways to Make Classrooms
Insider Accounts of Classroom Life Inclusive to LGBTQIA ESL Students
Content Area: Teacher Education Content Area: Higher Education
What constitutes TESOL classroom life? This unique ecology is This presentation discusses practical ways instructors can create
described through stories of discovery, challenge, and growth. The inclusive classroom environments for lesbian, gay, bisexual,
TESOL Voices series contains rich insider accounts from students and transgender, queer, intersex, and asexual students. Presenters
teachers theorizing their learning and teaching practices. Participants discuss research showing that non-heterosexual students experience
describe authentic classroom life experiences that inform theory and anxiety stemming from their learning environments and affecting
practice from the classroom floor. their language outcomes before ending with tips to improve
Tim Stewart, Kyoto University, Japan their experiences.
Phil Quirke, Higher Colleges of Technology, United Arab Emirates Molly Kelley, University of Iowa, USA
Tom Farrell, Brock University, Canada Andrew Lewis, University of Iowa, USA
Sarah Rilling, Kent State University, USA
Maria Dantas-Whitney, Western Oregon University, USA Wednesday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
Greg Kessler, Ohio University, USA TCC, Yakima 2
Fiona Copland, University of Stirling, United Kingdom (Great Britain)
Sue Garton, Aston University, United Kingdom (Great Britain) Preparing Adult ESL Teachers to Meet
Today’s Rigorous Language Demands
Content Area: Adult Education
Wednesday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
WSCC, 617 Driving forces in adult ESL demand rigorous instruction that moves
beyond life skills. Learn about freely available LINCS materials for
Movie Trailers for the New EFL Learner
teachers and administrators on meeting the language demands faced by
Content Area: Media (Print, Broadcast, Video, and Digital)
today’s adult ELLs. Sample these professional development materials on
Meeting the needs of the 21st-century EFL learner is a challenge.

WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH
infusing academic language and critical thinking into instruction.
Movie trailers can turn into an amazing resource to meet those needs. Patsy Egan Vinogradov, Hamline University, USA
They are short, flashy, multisensory and authentic. The audience Betsy Parrish, Hamline University, USA
attending this session take home some practical ideas to put trailers to
use in their classes.
Wednesday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
Victoria Dieste, Alianza Cultural Uruguay–Estados Unidos, Uruguay WSCC, 619
Refusal Strategies by Advanced
Wednesday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm Korean and Norwegian ELLs
WSCC, 210
Content Area: Intercultural Communication
New Takes on TV Game Shows for the ESL Classroom
As face-threatening speech acts, refusals may pose a challenge
Content Area: Adult Education for L2 learners. Rooted in the tradition of interlanguage pragmatics
Looking for low-tech, highly motivating, flexible activities to energize studies, this presentation offers an analysis of semantic formulas used
your lessons? The presenters demonstrate how to use key elements in electronic refusals by advanced Korean and Norwegian learners
from three iconic TV game shows in the adult classroom to practice of English. Implications for language classrooms, including sample
speaking and reinforce vocabulary acquisition. Your students will love teaching materials, are discussed.
these versions of Feud, Pyramid and Price is Right. Tülay Dixon, University of Utah Asia Campus, South Korea
Patricia Pashby, University of Oregon, USA Anna Krulatz, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway
Kevin Cross, San Francisco City College, USA
Wednesday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom D
Scaling Success:
Using Small Grants for a Big Impact
Content Area: Elementary School/Primary Education
In the past 6 years, the presenter has obtained over $65,000 of funding
through various grants available to classroom teachers. This practical
presentation will give you tips for creating successful grant proposals,
a list of popular grant programs, and the confidence and motivation to
start applying on your own!
Barbara Gottschalk, Warren Consolidated Schools, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 81
Wednesday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm Wednesday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
WSCC, 201 Sheraton Seattle, Willow B
Speaking Assessments: Empowering Teacher Electronic Feedback in
Students to Engage in Discussion ESL Writing Course Chats
Content Area: Assessment/Testing Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition
The presenters outline procedures for assessing speaking skills This corpus-based study analyzes the rhetorical moves, uptake, and
through small group discussions which simulate a university classroom student perceptions of the teacher-student chats from five freshman
discussion. Participants will learn how pre-test preparation can lower ESL writing courses taught by three expert teachers. Findings show
communication anxiety, encourage authentic communication, and that chats are useful for establishing rapport and clarifying feedback,
produce more reliable pictures of students’ true speaking abilities. but we suggest that longer chat sessions may be more effective.
Julie Doty, University of North Texas, USA Estela Ene, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis, USA
Laura Rios, University of North Texas, USA Thomas Upton, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis, USA

Wednesday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm Wednesday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm


WSCC, 615 WSCC, 213
Supporting Change on Teacher’s Terms TESOL Skills Enrich Life Skills Throughout
Content Area: CALL/Computer-Assisted Language Learning/ Our Career and Retirement
Technology in Education Content Area: Personal and Professional Development for Teachers
Change is an important feature of teacher development, yet many Mastering the art of teaching throughout their careers, TESOLers
teacher education programs fail to bring it about. Drawing on a decade develop an extensive portfolio of diverse skills: leadership, teamwork,
of World Learning and SIT Graduate Institute’s blended and online advising, coaching, group dynamics, community engagement and
teacher education programs, presenters examine how they help government relations. Participate in this session related to career paths
teachers take change processes into their own hands and support them that capitalize on multiple skills for life-long enrichment and making a
to enact change in their teaching practice. difference in the world.
WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH

Leslie Turpin, SIT Graduate Institute, USA Liz England, Liz England and Associates, LLC, USA
Andy Noonan, World Learning, USA Richard Boyum, U.S. Department of State, USA
German Gomez, World Learning, USA John Schmidt, Texas International Education Consortium, USA

Wednesday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm Wednesday, 2:00 pm–3:45 pm


WSCC, 616 TCC, Tahoma 5
Teacher and the Machine: Student‑Centered Bystanders Becoming Upstanders:
Technology Approaches Media Literacy Education for Secondary ELL Students
Content Area: CALL/Computer-Assisted Language Learning/ Content Area: Social Responsibility/Sociopolitical Concerns
Technology in Education
This presentation shares ELL media literacy lessons aimed at
Blended, flipped, augmented? Technology will continue to have a major raising awareness of how someone becomes a victim of labeling
impact on the English language classroom. But how can teachers and discrimination and how the passivity of bystanders, peers,
embrace technology without making the computer the center of the and neighbors can make the situation more painfully serious. An
classroom? Exploring best practices for instruction will help teachers international project and traveling exhibit of student work is shared.
embrace technology while keeping the focus of instruction on students. Zsuzsanna Kozák, Visual World Foundation, Hungary
Sara Davila, Pearson, USA Lydia Stack, Understanding Language Project, USA
Christina Cavage, Savannah College of Art and Design, USA
Lester Holmes, Pearson, USA
Wednesday, 2:00 pm–3:45 pm
TCC, Chelan 5
SLIFE Unlimited: Cracking the
Code to Academic Writing
Content Area: High School/Secondary Education
Infusing textual evidence into written responses can be an
insurmountable feat for Students with Limited or Interrupted Formal
Education (SLIFE) who often lack prior exposure to academic writing.
This session aims to demonstrate writing strategies that have proven
to be effective with SLIFE at the secondary level.
Nicoleta Filimon, International High School, USA
Christi Cartwright Lacerda, International High School, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

82 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Wednesday, 2:00 pm–3:45 pm Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
WSCC, 2A
Where’s Real Extensive Reading in A Language‑Based Approach to Content Instruction:
the Adult ESL/EFL Curriculum? Scaffolding in K–12
Content Area: Reading and Literacy Luciana de Oliveira, University of Miami, USA
Extensive Reading (ER) is missing from many ESL/EFL programs for adult
learners. On this panel, four ER research experts and practitioners provide Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
evidence for the efficacy of ER in adult SLA as well as practical information TCC, Chelan 4
and resources addressing concerns about including ER in the curriculum. A Virtual Community of Practice for Teacher Trainers:
Doreen Ewert, University of San Francisco, USA Practical Impacts
William Grabe, Northern Arizona University, USA Content Area: Teacher Education
Thomas Robb, Kyoto Sangyo University, Japan Can a virtual community of practice have an impact on what teacher
Marc Helgesen, Miyagi Gakuin Women’s University, Japan trainers actually do in the training room? This presentation is about a
study to research the impacts of such a virtual community within the
Wednesday, 2:00 pm–4:45 pm context of a large-scale ELT project aimed at Iranian teacher trainers.
Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom A Sue Leather, Sue Leather Associates, Canada
How to Get Published in TESOL and
Applied Linguistics Journals
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
Content Area: Media (Print, Broadcast, Video, and Digital) TCC, Tahoma 3
This session provides authors with advice on how to get published in An Insider Perspective on Learning
academic journals. Editors from a number of journals discuss what they are to Teach English Pronunciation
looking for in submissions to their journal and answer audience questions. Content Area: Phonology/Pronunciation
Brian Paltridge, University of Sydney, Australia The literature provides numerous recommendations for pronunciation
Ahmar Mahboob, University of Sydney, Australia teacher education, but the perspectives of student teachers are

WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH
relatively unknown. This session presents a study exploring the
3:00 pm experiences of 15 student teachers learning to teach pronunciation.
Following an overview of the findings, a theoretical model constituting
effective pronunciation teacher preparation is discussed.
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:20 pm
Amanda Baker, University of Wollongong, Australia
Sheraton Seattle, Issaquah
Honglin Chen, University of Wollongong, Australia
Top 10 Tips for Online Tutors Michael Burri, University of Wollongong, Australia
Content Area: Distance Learning/Online Learning
The rise of online learning necessitates proficiency in connecting and Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
communicating effectively through technology. This session offers WSCC, 210
tips for online tutors, showcase exemplars, and provide an extensive Awareness, Recognition, and
resources. Gleaned from a recent ELL e-mentoring study, these tips Production of Speech Acts
empowers educators to engage, instruct, and inspire students online. Content Area: Discourse and Pragmatics
Jillian Conry, Southern Methodist University, USA ELLs typically learn fundamentals of language in class, but most
Karla del Rosal, Southern Methodist University, USA
textbooks minimally address the functional language and pragmatic
knowledge needed to perform the various speech acts. In this session
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm we give an overview of speech acts, explaining and demonstrating a
Sheraton Seattle, Ballard variety of activities to use in the classroom.
A Billion Hellos: How VIPKID Is Sara Okello, Maryville College, USA
Transforming the ESL Landscape Kathrine Colpaert, University of Michigan–Flint, USA
Content Area: Distance Learning/Online Learning
Since its founding in 2013, VIPKID has exploded onto the global ESL
scene, becoming the world’s fastest growing online learning platform
and the first to connect Chinese students with highly-qualified ESL
teachers for one-on-one instruction. Learn about its mission, vision,
and innovative approach to online ESL instruction.
Nick Compton, VIPKID, China (People’s Republic)
Beleza Chan, VIPKID, China (People’s Republic)
Cathy Hayes, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 83
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
WSCC, 307-308 Sheraton Seattle, Madrona
Beyond Repeat After Me: Current and Future Trends in Teacher‑Created
Teaching Pronunciation With Imagination Digital Materials Development
Content Area: Teacher Education Content Area: CALL/Computer-Assisted Language Learning/
Technology in Education
Students need and want to speak with pronunciation that’s easy for
others to understand. But old-fashioned repeat after me is not enough Many teachers create materials for their students, but how many of us
to help them reach that goal. This workshop presents practical ideas create digital materials? Is that necessary? Will it be? What support
for helping students improve their pronunciation through multiple do teachers need to move into digital materials writing? Come discuss
learning modalities—sight, sound, and movement. these issues and share resources and examples to advance your
Marla Yoshida, UC Irvine, USA materials development technologically.
Stephanie Hanson, University of Minnesota, USA
Adam Leskis, Oxford, United Kingdom (Great Britain)
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
TCC, Chelan 2
Bringing the Applied Alive in an Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
Online MA TESOL Program WSCC, 617
Content Area: Teacher Education Developing Authentic Academic Lectures for
Tech‑Enhanced Speaking/Listening Courses
Bringing applied principles to life in an online MA TESOL program
Content Area: CALL/Computer-Assisted Language Learning/
is challenging. Using a course in Applied Phonetics and Phonology Technology in Education
as an example, discovery-based, cooperative activities are used
to lead teacher candidates to an understanding of linguistic Authentic academic lectures prepare academically-bound students for
principles. Suggestions for applying these practices to other online the extensive listening demands of university coursework, but finding
courses are provided. appropriate lectures is a challenge. Presenters describe the planning,
development, and delivery of lectures by college professors for an EAP
Betsy Parrish, Hamline University, USA
listening/speaking course. Participants leave with materials to apply
WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH

this process to their own contexts.


Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm Kim Benedicto, Michigan State University, USA
Austin Kaufmann, Michigan State University, USA
Classroom Assessment: Engaging Teachers, Luca Giupponi, Michigan State University, USA
Enriching Practices, and Empowering Students
Priyanvada Abeywickrama, San Francisco State University, USA
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
TCC, Tahoma 4
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm Diversifying the Rhetoric in TESOL Classrooms:
Sheraton Seattle, Willow B A World Englishes Perspective
Conference With Simultaneous Oral‑Written Feedback Content Area: Nonnative English Speakers in TESOL
(SOWF): Students’ Preferred Writing Response
With a pluralistic view of English as a global language, TESOLers
Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition
should utilize diverse instructional techniques to empower the ESL/EFL
The presenters report on a study of student preferences for writing students in developing their language proficiency. The session reflects
feedback strategies. Quantitative surveys followed by qualitative on presenters’ academic experiences as ESL/EFL students and teachers
interviews with university students taking EAP writing revealed to suggest ideas for incorporating World Englishes.
that students most preferred coursework-based, teacher-student Yasir Hussain, University of New Mexico, USA
conferencing, particularly, simultaneous oral-written feedback. Majed Alharbi, University of New Mexico, USA
Their preference for direct or indirect feedback varied according to Jose Antonio, University of New Mexico, USA
specific problems.
Jim Hu, Thompson Rivers University, Canada

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

84 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
WSCC, 614 Sheraton Seattle, Aspen
Earn CEUs With CAL Institutes: Enriching Language Learning:
Research‑Based Professional Development Countering Neurosexism in the Classroom
Content Area: Personal and Professional Development for Teachers Content Area: Social Responsibility/Sociopolitical Concerns
CAL Institutes offer proven strategies and practical tools to help Some argue that girls and boys learn language differently. Using
educators boost student outcomes. EL and Spanish literacy, SIOP, classroom video and the concepts of priming and stereotype threat, the
dual language, newcomers, and more. Institutes are held in DC and presenter asserts that education, not hardwiring, is what ensures that
can come to your location; participants receive a CAL Certificate of both sexes flourish when learning language. Teaching ideas to combat
Completion. Get sample activities and enter to win resources. sexism and promote success with all children are presented.
Annie Duguay, Center for Applied Linguistics, USA Carol Lethaby, The New School, USA
José Medina, Center for Applied Linguistics, USA
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm WSCC, 618
WSCC, 604 Enriching the TESOL Practicum Experience
Effects of a Sociocognitive‑Transformative With an International Teaching Opportunity
Approach on CAF in Learners’ Essays Content Area: Teacher Education
Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition Creating an authentic TESOL practicum for our teacher candidates
This study examined the effects of a sociocognitive-transformative whose goal it is to teach internationally can be a challenge. This
approach on the complexity, accuracy, and fluency (CAF) in ESL session touches on the logistics, challenges, and rewards of a TESOL
learners’ essays. Findings reveal that the treatment group improved in practicum developed with a partner institution in France, as well as
fluency and complexity but not in accuracy. The treatment group also provide an opportunity for intercultural networking.
outperformed the control group in almost all aspects of CAF. Mary Hanson, University of Colorado Colorado Springs, USA
Jessie Barrot, National University, Philippines Evelyn Pudaite Adams, Independent, USA

WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
Sheraton Seattle, Metropolitan B WSCC, 201
Engaging, Enriching, and Empowering Enriching Vocabulary Learning Through
Students to Learn With Mobile Devices the Involvement Load Hypothesis
Content Area: CALL/Computer-Assisted Language Learning/ Content Area: Vocabulary/Lexicon
Technology in Education
The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate the application of
By 2020 76% of the world population will own a mobile device. Create the involvement load hypothesis as a method of sequencing vocabulary
engaging learning in your students and empower students to not only activities to increase depth of learning. The presenters explain the
use apps in the classroom and extend that learning to at home use as concept and provide an opportunity for teachers to apply the concept
well. Get a bagful of new ideas to use in your classroom. by choosing and sequencing activities.
Susan Gaer, Santa Ana College, USA Dawn McCormick, University of Pittsburgh, USA
Betsy Davis, University of Pittsburgh, USA
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
WSCC, 602 Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
Engaging, Enriching, and Empowering ELLs WSCC, 310
Through Poetry, Music, and Dance Feedback Matters: Time‑Saving Techniques
Content Area: English as a Foreign Language for Effectively Evaluating Student Writing
In this highly interactive presentation the presenter shows different Content Area: Intensive English Programs
ways of blending poetry, music, and dance to motivate students to Are you frustrated by the amount of time it takes to provide comments
learn English. Attendees have the greatest opportunity to write their on student papers only to watch a few of your students apply their
own poems, put them to music and dance. Get inspired and learn how feedback? This session walks participants through several techniques
to inspire all of your students! IEP instructors have used to ensure time spent on feedback leads to
Mokhidil Mamasolieva, Uzbek State University of World more impactful ESL writing.
Languages, Uzbekistan Chantelle Daniels, University of South Florida, USA
Rokhatoy Rustamovna Boltaeva, Uzbekistan State University of World Michelle Bell, University of South Florida, USA
Languages, Uzbekistan

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 85
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
TCC, Tahoma 1 WSCC, 214
I Forgot the Words: Classroom Factors Metaphorically Speaking: Framing the World
Influencing English Speaking Content Area: Intercultural Communication
Content Area: English as a Foreign Language Lakoff asserts that, “Metaphor is the main mechanism through which
Students’ resistance to speaking English seems to be accepted in we comprehend abstract concepts and perform abstract reasoning.”
classrooms in Japan. Through completing online narrative frames, 104 Leading participants through activities to help students recognize
freshmen described classroom factors that influence their capacities to different cultural mappings of metaphors, the presenters relate
speak in English. Based on the results, the presenters suggest ways to metaphors to the teaching of intercultural communication within the
stimulate classroom speaking. context of World Englishes.
Simon Humphries, Kansai University, Japan Christopher Hastings, ITMO University, Russia
Trenton Hagar, UNICA, Nicaragua
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
WSCC, 212 Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
Lessons for Multilingual Learners From TCC, Yakima 1
Native People of the Americas Moving Toward Interactional
Content Area: Content-Based and CLIL/Content and Language Competence in the EFL Classroom
Integrated Learning Content Area: English as a Foreign Language
European colonization has had a devastating impact on the cultures This presentation explores the concept of interactional competence
and languages of people around the globe. What can multilingual and the benefits of teaching specific interactional skills such as
students learn from the experience of Native Americans? The interruption and clarification to EFL learners. Practical advice on
presenters show how studying Native American writers, artists, how such skills can be taught are offered alongside video recordings
and activists can inspire EAP students to navigate the road of showing students’ interactional performance both inside and
in-between-ness. outside the classroom.
WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH

Sadi Sahbazian, Montgomery College, USA Samuel Crofts, Kwansei Gakuin University, Japan
Heather Satrom, Montgomery College, USA
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm WSCC, 205
Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom D
Music and Movement in the English Classroom:
Longitudinal Study Confirms Efficacy of Practical Implementation Strategies
Summer Learning for Elementary ELLs Content Area: Arts
Content Area: Elementary School/Primary Education
This highly interactive session provides teachers with the tools they
How can schools combat elementary ELLs’ summer language and need to integrate music and movement into their English classes.
literacy loss? In this session, presenters share data on the long- Participants examine theories of embodied cognition and practice
term academic gains made by students who attended an innovative adapting familiar songs to teach both vocabulary and grammar points,
seven-week summer program. Participants learn the outcomes of a leaving with specific strategies for classroom implementation.
longitudinal study on students who attended and practical information Riah Werner, SIT Graduate Institute, USA
on program implementation.
Laura Lukens, North Kansas City Schools, USA
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
R. Kent Yocum, Shawnee Mission School District - Apache Innovative
WSCC, 613
School, USA
Next‑Generation ACCUPLACER: Change for a Reason
Content Area: Assessment/Testing
This session provides an overview of the content of the newly designed
next-generation ACCUPLACER reading, writing, and math tests. The
presentation includes a discussion of the key features of the new test
design, test content, and sample test questions. A Q&A period follows.
Keith Henry, College Board, USA
Constance Tsai, College Board, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

86 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
WSCC, 203 WSCC, 615
Organizing a Writing Workshop Strategies for Fostering Key Uses of Academic
for Graduate Students Language Among Stakeholders
Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition Content Area: Content-Based and CLIL/Content and Language
Integrated Learning
Is there a need for a writing workshop for graduate students who are
nonnative speakers of English on your campus? Have you organized Students, families, teachers, and school leaders form a powerful force
or led one? This session is the place to share with your peers your that can lead to positive change in teaching and learning practices. But
successful lessons in organizing writing workshops for nonnative where do you even begin to make a difference? This session centers on
speakers of English graduate students. academic language use as the linchpin for promoting engagement and
Thu Tran, Missouri University of Science and Technology, USA fortifying curriculum.
Margo Gottlieb, WIDA Consortium, USA
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
Pedagogy and Emotions: Exploring English WSCC, 213
Language Teachers’ “Emotion Labor” Supporting Muslim Students in K–12 Schools:
Sarah Benesch, College of Staten Island–CUNY, USA Knowledge and Practical Suggestions
Content Area: Applied Linguistics
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm In addition to expanding current knowledge about the education of
WSCC, 603 Muslim students in Western settings, results of this project and its
Practical Applications of Reading Apprenticeship proposed pedagogical recommendations offer important implications
in the IEP Reading Classroom for pre and in-service teacher education and professional development.
Content Area: Intensive English Programs Specific outcomes for the education and socio-cultural integration of
Muslim children are also discussed.
In this session, the presenters share their own experiences and

WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH
demonstrate examples of activities using Reading Apprenticeship Laura Mahalingappa, Duquesne University, USA
strategies in community college IEP Reading classes. Attendees leave Nihat Polat, Duquesne University, USA
Terri Rodriguez, College of St. Benedict and St. John’s University, USA
with an understanding of general Reading Apprenticeship concepts and
strategies, and the ability to design activities for their own classrooms.
Kristina Kellermann, Cascadia College, USA Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
Sheraton Seattle, Metropolitan A
Jessica Weimer, Cascadia College, USA
Supporting Students With Limited or
Interrupted Formal Education (SLIFE)
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
Content Area: High School/Secondary Education

Relationship Between Alphabetic Print Students with limited or interrupted formal education (SLIFE) bring
Literacy and Oral English Acquisition a unique set of skills to the classroom and require specific forms of
Elaine Tarone, University of Minnesota, USA academic and socio-cultural support. The purpose of this dialogue is
to empower participants by sharing strategies and developing action
steps for supporting SLIFE in their schools.
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
WSCC, 612 Jill Kester, SupportEd, USA
Maria Konkel, Educational Testing Service, USA
Stand Out: Critical Thinking in the
Adult Education Classroom
Content Area: Adult Education Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
Students learning to learn, working through problems, and addressing
Teaching Listening and Speaking
new ideas is at the forefront of College and Career Readiness
in EFL/ESL Contexts
standards. Students at all levels can engage in critical thinking
Okim Kang, Northern Arizona University, USA
activities in the classroom. Learn how to help students learn to learn in
this interactive workshop!
Rob Jenkins, Santa Ana College, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 87
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
WSCC, 304 WSCC, 605
The Neuroscience of Stories: Using Corpus Linguistics in Teaching ESL Writing
Why Our Brains Love Them Content Area: Applied Linguistics
Content Area: Applied Linguistics This session explores the use of corpus linguistics in teaching L2
Stories, the original Wikipedia, are the oldest tool of teaching and still writing as an effective way to bring authentic language into the
the most potent. Our brains process stories more effectively than other classroom. The presenters discuss ways of incorporating corpora in
formats because narration works the same way brains do. Stories also teaching L2 writing and demonstrate a sample activity of how to use a
cause parallel activation of the insula and brain linking. Let’s look at corpus to address discourse competence.
the neuroscience of stories. Gusztav Demeter, Case Western Reserve University, USA
Curtis Kelly, Kansai University, Faculty of Commerce, Japan Ana Codita, Case Western Reserve Universtiy, USA
Hee-Seung Kang, Case Western Reserve University, USA
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
TCC, Yakima 2 Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
Triple E and Word Study in a Low‑Literacy Class WSCC, 616
Content Area: Adult Education Using Images to Elicit and Reinforce
This practice-oriented presentation focuses on a word study approach Language Structures and Vocabulary
for adult ELL students who are emergent ELLs, and whose educational Content Area: Vocabulary/Lexicon
level in their native language is below the 6th grade. Join ESL Library’s CEO Ben Buckwold for tips and techniques on using
Cathy Payne, RISE- Academy for Adult Achievement, USA vocabulary images to elicit language and teach vocabulary to beginner
and low-intermediate learners. Ben demos ESL Library’s flashcard
section, which has over 2,000 images that teachers can print or display
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm for games, activities, and lessons.
WSCC, 3A
Ben Buckwold, ESL Library, Canada
University Faculty and Staff Perceptions
WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH

of Nonnative English Speaker Needs


Content Area: Higher Education Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
WSCC, 610
The presenters describe findings from a survey of 1,500 faculty and staff
investigating perceptions of the benefits and challenges of supporting Wikis: Negotiating ESL Collaborative
nonnative English speakers at a large public research university. The Creative Writing
presenters also discusses the recommendations suggested by survey Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition
respondents for enhancing support for faculty and staff. The presentation describes a multiple case study that explored
Bethany Peters, University of Minnesota, USA the effect of collaborative creative writing on individual writing
Michael Anderson, University of Minnesota, USA development in terms of accuracy, complexity, and creativity. Group
dynamics, revision behaviors, and creative thinking processes were
also examined. Participants leave the presentations with practical
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
guidelines for using collaborative creative writing tasks.
Rima El Abdali, PSU, USA
Using Collaborative Writing
Activities in EFL Contexts
Kim McDonough, Concordia University, Canada Wednesday, 3:00 pm–4:45 pm
WSCC, 619
Advocating English Language Learning and
Interculturality in Colombia’s Coffee Region
Content Area: English as a Foreign Language
In this panel presentation, three educational and cultural academic
directors from the coffee region in Colombia advocate how they
engage the community in English language learning, provide
intercultural exchange, empower students to seek social, professional
and academic opportunities in the United States, and enrich English
teachers’ professional development.
Eliana Agudelo, Binational Center Pereira, Colombia
Alejandro Arias, Binational Center Manizales, Colombia
Andrea Russi, BNC Armenia, Colombia

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

88 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Wednesday, 3:00 pm–4:45 pm Wednesday, 3:00 pm–4:45 pm
Sheraton Seattle, Ravenna WSCC, 211
Conducting Research at English Language Centers: Engaging With Diverse Contexts:
Administrator Perspectives Enriching Practices in Teacher Education Programs
Content Area: Higher Education Content Area: Teacher Education
The English Language Center (ELC) at most universities is often a key With the generalist approach to teacher preparation waning, TESOL
focal point for graduate student and faculty research. This colloquium programs can be increasingly enriched by creating opportunities for
brings together four ELC directors, who themselves are renowned pre- and in-service teachers to engage in diverse contexts. Presenters
TESOL researchers, as they discuss the complexities that emerge while discuss innovative collaborations in their programs which empower
trying to conduct research at their respective centers. teachers through experience in context-sensitive and location-
Suzanne Panferov, University of Arizona, USA specific pedagogies.
Sue Starfield, University of New South Wales, Australia Raichle Farrelly, Saint Michael’s College, USA
Alan Juffs, University of Pittsburgh, USA Mary Anne Jaeger, Ypsilanti Community Schools, USA
Susan Gass, Michigan State University, USA Anna Krulatz, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway
Kristen Lindahl, University of Texas at San Antonio, USA
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–4:45 pm Zuzana Tomaš, Eastern Michigan University, USA
WSCC, 611 Mouhamadou Ka, Saint Michael’s College, USA
Critical Reflective Inquiry in TESOL:
Voices of Teacher‑Scholars Wednesday, 3:00 pm–4:45 pm
Content Area: Teacher Education WSCC, 3B

Framed by concepts of reflective language teaching and postmethod Homework and Assignments in the Speaking,
pedagogy, this panel highlights the critical inquiries and subsequent Listening, and Pronunciation Classroom
actions of three TESOL teacher-scholars across global contexts, Content Area: Listening, Speaking/Speech
including the U.S. and South Korea. Presenters discuss the implications A panel of experts discusses aspects of homework and assignments
of their experiences for advancing critical reflective practice within within the Speaking, Listening, and Pronunciation classroom, a

WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH
the larger field. daunting challenge that many teachers face. The panel explores
Sarah Henderson Lee, Minnesota State University, USA research findings concerning the types of assignments and how
Shannon Tanghe, St. Mary’s University of Minnesota, USA to successfully implement them with a range of goals, including
Gloria Park, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, USA learner autonomy.
William Acton, Trinity Western University, Canada
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–4:45 pm J.J. Wilson, Western New Mexico University, USA
WSCC, 620 Harisimran Sandhu, Independent, India
Developing an Appropriate Pedagogy:
Writing and Multilingual University Students Wednesday, 3:00 pm–4:45 pm
Content Area: Higher Education Sheraton Seattle, Willow A

Academic writing can be tortuous for postsecondary multilingual Interrogating Translingual Writing
students whose understanding of written academic texts and writing Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition
processes suffer from limited strategies. This expert panel seeks to The purpose of this panel session is to closely examine the somewhat
develop an appropriate pedagogy to support writing improvement by controversial notion of translingual writing in the context of second
integrating different perspectives and strategies focused upon students language writing studies in order to work toward developing a common
at the postsecondary levels of instruction. understanding of translingual writing and to facilitate a productive
Katherine Earley, University of New Hampshire, USA dialogue about it among second language writing professionals.
Sarah Jusseaume, University of New Hampshire, USA Tony Silva, Purdue University, USA
Alan Hirvela, Ohio State University, USA Hadi Banat, Purdue University, USA
Olga Griswold, California State University, Pomona, USA Yue Chen, Purdue University, USA
Sidury Christiansen, University of Texas at San Antonio, USA Negin Hosseini Goodrich, Purdue University, USA
Patrick Randolph, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, USA Ashley J. Velázquez, Purdue University, USA
Yogesh Sinha, Sohar University, Oman Zhaozhe Wang, Purdue University, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 89
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–4:45 pm 4:00 pm
WSCC, 303
L2 Pragmatics for ITA Practitioners
Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:20 pm
Content Area: International Teaching Assistants WSCC, 604
In this session, four speakers share studies on L2 pragmatics: one Using Blogger and Vocaroo to Facilitate
on a Vygotskian approach to teaching L2 pragmatics, one on using Interaction Outside of Class
mixed-methods to assess L2 pragmatics, and two on recent research in Content Area: CALL/Computer-Assisted Language Learning/
discourse analysis and L2 pragmatics. A discussion with the audience Technology in Education
concludes the session. Providing a space outside of class for students to interact can
Kathleen Bardovi-Harlig, Indiana University, USA contribute to a strong classroom community, resulting in increased
Soo Jung Youn, Northern Arizona University, USA communication in the classroom. This teaching tip describes the uses
María Pía Gómez Laich, Carnegie Mellon University, USA of Vocaroo and Blogger, in a university ESL oral communication skills
Debra Friedman, Indiana University–Bloomington, USA course, to promote speaking, listening, and interaction among peers.
Courtney Cunningham, English Village, USA
Wednesday, 3:00 pm–4:45 pm
WSCC, 204
Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:45 pm
Walking the Tight Rope of Social Justice Work Sheraton Seattle, Madrona
Content Area: Social Responsibility/Sociopolitical Concerns
Addressing the Digital Divide in
This panel addresses the fine line of teaching for social justice and ELT Materials Evaluation
negotiating the political backlash, as well as the expertise required Content Area: Materials Writers, Curriculum/Materials Development
in facilitating awareness activities, because sometimes well-
Many ELT materials are available in digital form; however, materials
intentioned social justice work can unintentionally cause harm when
evaluation continues to focus on print. This presentation addresses the
not well presented.
gap by expanding evaluation criteria to address both the pedagogical
Heidi Faust, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, USA and technological components of digital materials. The resulting
WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH

Carter Winkle, Barry University, USA nuanced set of questions is applied to two online commercial
Elisabeth Chan, Northern Virginia Community College, USA language courses.
Shelley Wong, George Mason University, USA
Laura Jacob, Mt. San Antonio College, USA Kay McAllister, Trinity Western University, Canada

Wednesday, 3:00 pm–4:45 pm Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:45 pm


TCC, Skagit 2 WSCC, 205

Workshopping Learning Outcomes and Assessment 2.0: Engaging Students With


Assessments for ESL Classrooms and Programs Program‑Wide Digital Portfolios
Content Area: Intensive English Programs Content Area: Assessment/Testing

This interactive workshop focuses on writing and revising student The presenters share their experience implementing digital portfolios
learning outcomes and the role of assessment in the language as a program-wide alternative assessment in level progression
curriculum. Using Bloom’s Taxonomy, participants gain exposure to decisions within an English language program focused on academic
writing and critiquing outcomes at the program and course level. preparation. Evidence of gains in multiple language skills is explored,
Participants then explore potential uses of assessment strategies. as well as student performance. Participants brainstorm implementing
digital portfolios in their teaching contexts.
Kevin Martin, Virginia International University, USA
Marcella Caprario, New York University Shanghai, China
(People’s Republic)
Kristin Hiller, New York University Shanghai, China (People’s Republic)
Marcel Daniels, New York University Shanghai, China (People’s Republic)

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

90 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:45 pm Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:45 pm
WSCC, 201 WSCC, 617
Authentic Encounters: Putting IEP Cultivating Critical Thinking About
Students Into University Classrooms Multimodal Texts in the ESL Classroom
Content Area: Intensive English Programs Content Area: Adult Education
Preparing students for success in American classrooms is a holistic Critical thinking and multimodality have been of interest in SLA.
process that should involve both the IEP and the university. Presenter Few studies have examined the intersections of critical thinking
reports research on the effects of placing IEP students into university and multimodality in ESL. We present ways to teach and assess
classes prior to matriculation, and will offer a model for developing students’ comprehension of multimodal texts and critical thinking
collaborative partnerships between IEPs and host institutions. skills using a question-making activity on Bloom’s taxonomy and Visual
Katherine Brinkmeyer, Saint Francis University, USA Thinking Strategies.
Sarah Wood, Saint Francis University, USA Nasseer Hasan, INTO University of South Florida, USA
Andrea Lypka, INTO University of South Florida, USA
Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:45 pm
WSCC, 618 Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:45 pm
Beyond Exit Tickets: Teaching Preservice TCC, Yakima 1
Candidates Linguistic Assessment Techniques Dilemmas and Solutions in a Standards‑Based
Content Area: Teacher Education Teacher Appraisal System
Helping preservice candidates implement appropriate classroom Content Area: Program Administration
assessment can prove a difficult task for any teacher educator. In Developing a comprehensive teacher appraisal system involves
this presentation, we discuss ways teacher educators can assist dilemmas ranging from what standards to include, how to incorporate
candidates to 1) develop the analytical skills required to enact effective data from classroom observations and other sources, and how to foster
assessment, and 2) use assessment results responsively to positively teacher development and promote differentiation. This discussion
inform subsequent instruction. addresses these issues and presents a standards-based teacher

WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH
Beth Clark-Gareca, University at New Paltz–SUNY, USA appraisal system in a large EFL program.
Isabela Villas Boas, Casa Thomas Jefferson, Brazil
Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:45 pm
WSCC, 3A Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:45 pm
Changing Conversation Norms and Their WSCC, 610
Impact on Oral Proficiency Development Dutch EFL Teachers’ Cognitions on Developing
Content Area: Sociolinguistics Students’ Digital Reading Skills
Students must practice outside of class to build their speaking Content Area: Teacher Education
proficiency, but how can they do this when everyone they meet is This presentation reports on a pilot lesson study project in the
staring at a screen? Participants consider ways technology is affecting Netherlands where secondary EFL teachers designed an innovative
oral communication, and discuss how to prepare students, linguistically lesson series together aimed at developing pupils’ higher order reading
and pragmatically, for changing conversation norms. skills in a digital environment. The research focus is on the teacher
Stephanie Hanson, University of Minnesota, USA cognitions that emerged. Results are shared, leaving room for discussion.
Pamela Pollock, Harvard University, USA Manon Reiber-Kuijpers, HAN University of Applied Sciences,
Netherlands
Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:45 pm
WSCC, 603 Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:45 pm
Critical Analysis Skills Empower Students WSCC, 214
to Think and Write Clearly Flipped Learning in Online Teacher Education
Content Area: Higher Education Content Area: Teacher Education
University professors often perceive that international students Presenters share their instructional design for Implementing flipped
lack critical thinking and writing skills. Explicit instruction of critical learning in online teacher education programs, in the U.S. and
reasoning skills to ESL students can yield surprising benefits. The Colombia, using synchronous sessions in a virtual classroom, peer
presentation will demonstrate how an EAP reading course designed instruction, and asynchronous access to relevant content, providing
around deep analysis of academic texts promoted students’ preservice teachers with robust learning opportunities and addressing
independent thought and improved their writing. the challenges of online teacher education.
Elizabeth Holloway, Missouri Valley College, USA Helaine W. Marshall, Long Island University Hudson, USA
Carolina Rodriguez-Buitrago, Institucion Universitaria Colombo
Americana, Columbia

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 91
Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:45 pm Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:45 pm
Sheraton Seattle, Metropolitan A WSCC, 203
Helping ELLs Develop Content Vocabulary Interpreting Student Feedback About a
and Academic Language Proficiency CALL Program Through Activity Theory
Content Area: Vocabulary/Lexicon Content Area: CALL/Computer-Assisted Language Learning/
Technology in Education
The speaker shares strategies to help ELLs develop their academic
and domain-specific vocabularies and language proficiency. She Given that ESL professionals regularly encounter opportunities to adopt
engages attendees with strategies using roots, affixes, cognates, emerging technologies, the use of a holistic approach for evaluation
and visuals, and shares ideas to help students utilize language, is necessary. This presentation demonstrates how two IEP faculty
access complex concepts, and become successful readers, thinkers, integrated a speaking-and-listening CALL program, English Central, into
speakers and writers. their courses and utilized activity theory to interpret student feedback
Donna Knoell, Consultant, USA and inform curricular decisions.
Nikki Mattson, Pennsylvania State University, USA
Stacy Suhadolc, Pennsylvania State University, USA
Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:45 pm
WSCC, 310
Improving IEP Learners’ Literacy Outcomes Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:45 pm
Through Faculty and Librarian Collaboration TCC, Tahoma 1
Content Area: Higher Education Logographic or Alphabetic,
What Difference Does It Make?
Partnerships between faculty and librarians can enhance international
Content Area: Higher Education
students’ academic success by embedding information literacy
standards in student learning outcomes. This presentation introduces There has been a renewed interest recently in examining the
attendees to the Association of College and Research Libraries orthographic sensitivity among second language learners with diverse
Information Literacy Framework, demonstrates a successful first language (L1) backgrounds. How do ELLs with alphabetic and
collaborative practice, and thus helps identifying opportunities for nonalphabetic L1 backgrounds differ in understanding the internal
orthographic structure of words? This presentation attempts to
WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH

improved practice in IEPs.


Beatrix Burghardt, Texas A&M University, USA address this issue.
Christina Wray, Indiana University, USA Ke Xu, City University of New York, USA
Ron Lee, East Los Angeles College, USA
Peiya Gu, Suzhou University, China (People’s Republic)
Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:45 pm
TCC, Yakima 2
Incorporating Career and College Readiness Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:45 pm
WSCC, 212
Standards in Beginning ESL Classrooms
Content Area: Adult Education Overcoming Barriers: Macro and Micro
Approaches to Curriculum Revision
The Career and College Readiness Standards incorporate 21st
Content Area: Program Administration
century skills into our adult education curriculum. Many assume
that these standards are appropriate only in upper transition ESL Language-program administrators often lead curricular revisions in
levels. However, students benefit if such skills are integrated from response to the changing needs of their student populations. Two case
Literacy/Beginning Low, building students’ skills throughout their ESL studies provide opportunities for participants to reflect on challenges
Program. Come learn how! related to curricular decisions and effective strategies to overcome
them. This session is relevant to individuals involved in this process.
Lisa Gonzalves, UC Davis, USA
Elizabet Wendt, Oakland Adult & Career Education, USA Brad Teague, Duke University, USA
Mackenzie Bristow, Emory University, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

92 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:45 pm Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:45 pm
TCC, Chelan 2 Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom D
Personal Accounts: U.S. Department of State’s Service Provision for ELLs With Disabilities:
English Language Programs’ Impact Fact vs. Fiction
In an interactive poster fair, over a dozen international program Content Area: Learning Disabilities/Special Needs
participants discuss how US Department of State programs have Based on an ethnographic study, this session focuses on five pervasive
supported their professional development, enhanced teaching and myths that educators had about service provision for ELLs with
learning of English in their communities, encouraged mutually disabilities. After identifying the myths, this session draws upon
supportive global networks, and positively impacted their lives and federal guidelines to clarify what the law says—and does not say—
those of their students. about providing services for these learners.
Jennifer Uhler, U.S. Department of State, USA Sara Kangas, Lehigh University, USA
Fife MacDuff, U.S. Department of State, USA
Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:45 pm
Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:45 pm WSCC, 213
WSCC, 307-308
Speaking Pedagogy: Vietnamese EFL
Pop‑Up Pronunciation: Integrating Pronunciation Teachers’ Cognitions and Practices
Mini‑Lessons Into All Skills Content Area: Nonnative English Speakers in TESOL
Content Area: Higher Education
This presentation reports on findings from an investigation into
Should teachers facing a time-crunch or course cutbacks still address six Vietnamese EFL teachers’ cognitions and practices in teaching
pronunciation? If so, how? The presenters discusses the relationship speaking skills to English-major students. Findings revealed that
of pronunciation to the other skills and demonstrate quick pop-up teachers’ overemphasis or exclusion of certain content in their teaching
activities that efficiently and effectively connect pronunciation to practices reflects gaps in their knowledge base. Implications for
reading, grammar, and writing. effective teacher training are discussed.
Marilyn Guekguezian, University of Southern California, USA Honglin Chen, University of Wollongong, Australia

WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH
Holly Gray, Montgomery College, USA Amanda Baker, University of Wollongong, Australia
Quan Nguyen, Can Tho University, Viet Nam
Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:45 pm
Sheraton Seattle, Willow B Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:45 pm
Research Informing a Methodological Approach WSCC, 210
Validating Focused Written Corrective Feedback Teaching With Mobile Devices:
Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition Some Practical Ideas and Considerations
This study investigated the effectiveness of providing focused direct Content Area: CALL/Computer-Assisted Language Learning/
written corrective feedback, (correcting one or a few structures), Technology in Education
completing a cognitively designed error log, and finally undertaking Mobile phones and tablets are powerful devices central to our lives.
a revision. The results support the introduction of a methodological Why not use them as teaching tools in and out of the classroom?
approach to focused feedback confirming its ecological validity and Practical ideas and activities are presented and hands-on activities
unifying two SLA theories. are carried out to explore the potential of mobile learning to create
David Frear, Zayed University, United Arab Emirates innovative learning opportunities.
Paul Carroll, Zayed University, United Arab Emirates María Kamijo, Leaders English Language Centre, Argentina

Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:45 pm


WSCC, 615
SCIE: An Excellent Option for Quality
Intensive English Language Learning
Content Area: Community College and Technical Education
Seattle Central Institute of English provides an extraordinary space
to improve English language proficiency while earning transferable
college credit in college classes. Our Intensive English and College
Bridge programs offer students opportunities to maximize learning in
the context of Seattle, Washington in the beautiful Pacific Northwest.
Check out our presentation!
Douglas Goodwin, Seattle Central Colleges, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 93
Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:45 pm Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:45 pm
WSCC, 612 WSCC, 616
TED Talks: Powerful Ideas to Inspire University Success: Beyond the
21st‑Century Learning English Language Classroom
Content Area: English as a Foreign Language Content Area: Intensive English Programs
When people want to learn, they do. Explore how powerful ideas from Many teachers understand the frustration learners feel about
TED Talks, combined with compelling real-world content from National the rigorous expectations of academic environments. The future
Geographic, will get learners asking questions like “What if?”, “Have of academic English programs requires introducing longer, more
you ever wondered?”, and “Could this be true?” and sets the stage for challenging, STEAM related content. University Success addresses
impactful 21st-century learning. these challenges with authentic content informed by Stanford
Lewis Lansford, National Geographic Learning, United Kingdom professors in a book designed for the English language learner
(Great Britain) Robyn Brinks Lockwood, Stanford University, USA
Anders Bylund, National Geographic Learning, USA Larry Zwier, Michigan State University, USA
Maggie Sokolik, UC Berkeley, USA
Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:45 pm Diane Schmitt, Nottingham Trent University, United Kingdom
WSCC, 613 (Great Britain)
TESOL: Your Contribution to
World Peace and Harmony Wednesday, 4:00 pm–5:45 pm
Content Area: Refugee Concerns Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom C

A celebration of ELT programmes designed to increase understanding A Memorial Panel on the Life and
in contexts of conflict and distress globally. A preview of the Legacy of Braj Kachru
forthcoming freely-available British Council publication English along To memorialize and honor Braj Kachru, the originator of World
the Fracture Lines. Case studies come from military conflicts, racial Englishes and the Circles of English model, this panel brings together
tension, and refugee situations in Middle East, Africa, and Asia. scholars whose lives works and practices influenced by Kachru—as an
intellectual, scholar and human being. The presenters also discuss his
WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH

John Knagg, British Council, United Kingdom (Great Britain)


legacy for the future of English(es).
Suzanne Hilgendorf, Simon Fraser University, Canada
Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:45 pm Ahmar Mahboob, University of Sydney, Australia
TCC, Chelan 4
Aya Matsuda, Arizona State University, USA
The edTPA Teacher Performance Assessment: Shikaripur Sridar, Stony Brook University, USA
Strategies to Support Candidates Bedrettin Yazan, University of Alabama, USA
Content Area: Accreditation/Certification/Credentialing
This session is of interest to TESOL professionals working with teacher Wednesday, 4:00 pm–5:45 pm
candidates completing the edTPA. Following an overview of research TCC, Tahoma 5
and current debates concerning the edTPA for English as an Additional Breaking the Unwanted Stepchild Curse:
Language, participants are invited to ask questions, share strategies to Elevating the Image of ESL
support candidates, and address common challenges. Content Area: Program Administration
Tabitha Kidwell, University of Maryland, College Park, USA The field of ESL has become a well-established discipline. Yet, despite
its pivotal role in fostering nonnative English speakers’ success,
Wednesday, 4:00 pm–4:45 pm ESL programs and professionals often receive minimal respect from
WSCC, 614 mainstream administrators and faculty. This workshop focuses
The Grammar You Need for Academic Writing: on the realities of many ESL departments and offers solutions to
Beginning Through Advanced elevate their status.
Content Area: Grammar Patrick Randolph, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, USA
The authors of the new ‘Grammar You Need’ series of fold-out cards Richard Forest, Central Michigan University, USA
demonstrate methods of teaching core grammar structures at basic, Kate Scott, Saginaw Valley State University, USA
intermediate and advanced ESL levels. Participants leave with practical Tiffany Wilson-Mobley, Fairview Elementary, Middle, and High
techniques and useful materials. This three-card series on grammar for Schools, USA
writing presents essential grammar visually and efficiently. Tamara Jones, Howard Community College, USA
Mark Alves, Montgomery College, USA
Eileen Cotter, Montgomery College, USA
Henry Caballero, Montgomery College, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

94 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Wednesday, 4:00 pm–5:45 pm Wednesday, 4:00 pm–5:45 pm
WSCC, 605 Sheraton Seattle, Ballard
Creating Career Pathway Programs That Literacy and Language Education
Engage, Enrich, and Empower Students for ELLS in the 21st Century
Content Area: Adult Education Content Area: Language Policy and Planning
In this practice-oriented presentation, participants learn the In this panel, the presenters use a series of vignettes to illustrate the
foundations for building a high-quality Career Pathways System, on-the-ground realities of literacy and language education for ELLs in
effectively supporting adult ELLs. The presenters share lessons U.S. schools and to illuminate the academic and social challenges ELLs
learned from their own award-winning program, engage participants encounter. Translanguaging pedagogies are proposed as a promising
in hands-on curriculum and contextualization activities, and encourage framework that can engage, enrich, and empower ELLs’ multilingual
participants to share in an interactive format. and multiliterate development for the 21st-century globalized world.
Tracy Henninger-Willey, Lane Community College, USA Xenia Hadjioannou, Pennsylvania State University, Lehigh Valley
Rosa Lopez, Lane Community College, USA Campus, USA
Aliscia Niles, Lane Community College, USA Danling Fu, University of Florida, USA
Xiaodi Zhou, University of Georgia, USA
Wednesday, 4:00 pm–5:45 pm
WSCC, 304 Wednesday, 4:00 pm–5:45 pm
Critical Perspectives in Evangelical Christianity TCC, Tahoma 3
and English Language Teaching Reading, Interpreting, and Creating
Content Area: Applied Linguistics Comics in the ESL/EFL Classroom
Evangelical Christianity has been recognized as a significant area Content Area: Media (Print, Broadcast, Video, and Digital)
of scholarship in English Language Teaching, especially in the past Graphic novels, comic strips, and rage comics are valuable multimodal
decade. This interactive session focusing on critical perspectives in resources that allow teachers and students to be creative with
this field of study brings together framing of this work and three recent language. This workshop features the use of these resources in the
studies situated in various countries all over the globe. ESL/EFL classrooms. Teachers experiment with different types of

WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH
Manka Varghese, University of Washington, USA comics and design their own classroom tasks using comic strips.
Huamei Han, Simon Fraser University, Canada Dongmei Cheng, Texas A&M University–Commerce, USA
Bill Johnston, University of Indiana, USA
Eun-Yong Kim, University of Toronto, South Korea Wednesday, 4:00 pm–5:45 pm
Xia Chao, Duquesne University, USA TCC, Tahoma 4
Start to Finish: Materials Development for ITAs
Wednesday, 4:00 pm–5:45 pm Content Area: International Teaching Assistants
WSCC, 2A
ITA trainers often need to make their own materials, but a large
Exploring the Relationships Among Interactiveness,
project can seem daunting. In this session, three presenters explains
Cognitive Load, and Test Difficulty
the process of how they each planned, funded, created, shared and
Content Area: Assessment/Testing
evaluated their projects for ITAs in three different media: workshops,
Test interactiveness concerns the extent to which learners completing videos, and written materials.
a test apply their language skills, topical knowledge, and emotional A. C. Kemp, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
experiences in the course of answering questions or completing tasks. Kenneth Hyde, University of Delaware, USA
In this workshop, participants compare reading subtests to examine the Pauline Carpenter, Harvard University, USA
relationships among interactiveness, cognitive load, and test difficulty.
Gordon Moulden, Trinity Western University, Canada

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 95
Wednesday, 4:00 pm–5:45 pm Wednesday, 5:00 pm–5:20 pm
TCC, Chelan 5 WSCC, 211
Supporting Multilingual Writers Through Tutor Empowering Academic English Students
Development: Becoming a Language Coach Through Reading Fluency Practice
Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition Content Area: Intensive English Programs
In this workshop, presenters from two different institutions—a Fluency reading practice is essential in advanced academic ESL
community college in the mid-west and a public university in the far classes; however, finding time for fluency practice is difficult. The
north—discuss and model methods to help tutors to develop effective presenter provides practical suggestions for employing this practice
strategies for supporting the multilingual writers in their writing in an efficient way with higher level students and includes time for
centers and thus become skilled language coaches. participants to discuss application to their own instructional contexts.
Jennifer Staben, College of Lake County, USA Kendra Bradecich, University of Delaware, USA
Sarah Kirk, University of Alaska Anchorage, USA
Wednesday, 5:00 pm–5:20 pm
Wednesday, 4:00 pm–5:45 pm WSCC, 203
WSCC, 602 Engaging and Empowering ELLs by
Teaching the Missing Link in University Writing: Incorporating Google Docs
Reader‑Writer Relationship Content Area: CALL/Computer-Assisted Language Learning/
Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition Technology in Education
Drawing on rhetorical, systemic-functional, and ESP orientations to This session explores practical ways to use Google Docs, which
teaching university writing, this hands-on workshop shows how writers facilitates synchronous group work and collaboration, to improve
create a psychological (cognitive and affective) interface with readers student writing (peer editing and citation), reading (annotation), critical
and establish a shared base of specific language (terms or wordings), thinking, grammar, and oral communication (pronunciation and public
knowledge (facts or information), and perceptions (viewpoints or speaking). Attendees leave the session with engaging lesson ideas
attitudes) to achieve their purposes. that can be immediately implemented.
WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH

Martha Pennington, SOAS University of London, United Kingdom Clarissa Moorhead, University of Miami, USA
(Great Britain) Barbara Barrett, University of Miami, USA

Wednesday, 5:00 pm–5:20 pm


5:00 pm WSCC, 3A
Increasing Student Engagement by Using
Wednesday, 5:00 pm–5:20 pm Student‑Derived Material for Class Content
TCC, Skagit 2 Content Area: Intensive English Programs
Developing and Empowering ESL Writers This presentation describes an adaptable teaching method that uses
Through Primary Research Projects materials derived from student research for class content. The goal
Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition of this approach is to increase student engagement, to empower
Drawing from sociocultural perspectives, this presentation explores students to contribute to their own learning, and to provide a context
teaching practices that incorporate primary research projects beyond for practicing responsible use of online resources.
the ESL writing classroom. Participants present examples and Denise Desrosiers, University of New Hampshire, USA
resources for primary research projects that empower students to
genuinely engage with campus, immigrant, and local communities, and
Wednesday, 5:00 pm–5:20 pm
broaden their literacy practices.
TCC, Yakima 2
Julie Dykema, University of Washington, USA
Strategies to Encounter and
Hee-Seung Kang, Case Western Reserve University, USA
Comprehend Complex Texts
Content Area: Reading and Literacy
The strategies employed by effective readers can be explicitly taught
to improve reading comprehension. The primary purpose for reading is
an active process requiring an intentional and thoughtful interaction
between the reader and the text. To enhance reading which leads to
perfect writing readers should educate with simple strategies.
Renuka Karunaratne, University of South Florida, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

96 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Wednesday, 5:00 pm–5:45 pm Wednesday, 5:00 pm–5:45 pm
WSCC, 212 WSCC, 213
Adapting Online Content for Meaningful Doing and Undoing (Non)nativeness:
Practice in ESP (Biotechnology) Glocal Perspectives From a Graduate Classroom
Content Area: English for Specific Purposes Content Area: Nonnative English Speakers in TESOL
This practice-oriented session demonstrates activities aimed at This presentation explores how two preservice teachers are
stimulating meaningful language practice within tertiary education in constructed as nonnative English speakers though the mobilization of
the field of biotechnology. The presenter discusses: 1) using podcasts discourses in which language is implicit (including race, religion, food,
as a source and model for practice and production; 2) using Michael etc.). Then, it considers how teacher educators can move beyond (non)
Alley’s Assertion-Evidence approach coupled with experiment.com’s native speakerist paradigms and increase equity in their classes.
crowd funded research platform to practice presenting. Geeta Aneja, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Brett Yarnton, University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt, Campus
Tulln, Austria Wednesday, 5:00 pm–5:45 pm
WSCC, 3B
Wednesday, 5:00 pm–5:45 pm Enriching Students’ Experience: Collaborative
WSCC, 303 Mobile‑Game Play With Native Speakers
Benefits of Translanguaging During Shared Content Area: Intensive English Programs
Read‑Alouds for Literacy Development To support IEP students in the development of communicative skills,
Content Area: Bilingual Education presenters used principles from collaborative learning to combine
This presentation examines how translanguaging during shared IEP and TESOL/Linguistics classes in a place-based mobile-game
reading facilitates comprehension, increases vocabulary, and develops activity. This session outlines results of the activity, adaptation of
language proficiency. Literature related to translanguaging during the game to other contexts, and tips for integrating such projects
storybook reading and translanguaging pedagogies within schools and into the classroom.
data from field recordings are presented to highlight how educators Phoebe Daurio, Portland State University, USA

WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH
can use student’s linguistic resources to enhance academic learning. Tetyana Sydorenko, Portland State University, USA
Stephanie Moody, Texas A&M University, USA
Zohreh Eslami, Texas A&M University, USA Wednesday, 5:00 pm–5:45 pm
TCC, Chelan 4
Wednesday, 5:00 pm–5:45 pm Establishing, Sustaining, and Facilitating Teacher
WSCC, 310 Engagement in Professional Reading Groups
Beyond Language Needs: Developing Content Area: Teacher Education
International Students’ Electronic Literacy We discuss the results of focus group interviews and questionnaires
Content Area: Intensive English Programs administered to adult ESL instructors who participated in monthly
Increases in enrollment have prompted universities to provide professional reading groups. We report participants’ perspectives
more blended and online classes. For this reason, the IEP at a large on the benefits, challenges, and factors affecting their research
Midwestern university has designed and implemented a technology engagement. Strategies for establishing and maintaining effective
course to help international students succeed in their university reading groups in ESL programs will be presented.
classes. Presenters describes the course and discuss lessons learned. Marilyn Abbott, University of Alberta, Canada
Jayme Wilken, Iowa State University, USA
Wednesday, 5:00 pm–5:45 pm
Wednesday, 5:00 pm–5:45 pm WSCC, 604
TCC, Tahoma 1 Flipped Classroom 3.0: ESL Digital Collaborative
Delivering Realistic Secondary School English Through Student‑Created Multimedia Materials
Proficiency Expectations in EFL Countries Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition
Content Area: English as a Foreign Language Presentation describes the process of designing a collaborative flipped
In many EFL countries, governments expect that most students will student-led and created digital multimedia project that addresses
be broadly functional in English by secondary school graduation. This cultural variations in classroom participation and encourages active
expectation is not realistic in countries where teacher training and learning in the process of students applying linguistic and course
English instructional time are both limited. This session provides a content expertise. Ultimately, it exposes students to rhetorical
framework for setting reasonable English proficiency and teacher composing expectations and multimedia software and skills.
preparation expectations. Olga Filatova, Miami University, USA
Brock Brady, U.S. Peace Corps, USA Charm Damon, Miami University, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 97
Wednesday, 5 pm–5:45 pm Wednesday, 5:00 pm–5:45 pm
TCC, Tahoma 2 Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom D
Grammar for Great Writing Let’s Plan Science Lessons Using
Content Area: English as a Foreign Language Just Right Picture Books
What grammar do our students need for better writing? What grammar Content Area: Content-Based and CLIL/Content and Language
Integrated Learning
problems should teachers anticipate? How can we help students with
the grammar needed for their writing? In this session, an experienced Addressing the Next Generation Science Standards for elementary
ESL writing teacher explains how the new series Grammar for Great ELLs with informational text in visuals and narration of picture books
Writing addresses all of these important questions. supports the comprehension of technical vocabulary, discipline-specific
Keith Folse, University of Central Florida, USA concepts, and provides opportunities for hands-on practice. The
presenter models the National Science Teachers Association 5E lesson
plan, including hands-on experiments, using picture books.
Wednesday, 5:00 pm–5:45 pm
WSCC, 201
Judith O’Loughlin, Language Matters, LLC, USA
IEP 2.0: Four Generations of Teachers in One Program
Content Area: Intensive English Programs Wednesday, 5:00 pm–5:45 pm
WSCC, 205
What happens when a Traditionalist, a Baby-boomer, a Generation
Overcoming Outgroup Favoritism Through
X-er, and a Millennial walk into a classroom? A better version of an
English Language Teaching in China
IEP will occur! Participate in a dialogue on issues and their solutions
Content Area: Intercultural Communication
regarding collaboration between educators of different generations to
engage students, enrich programs, and empower faculty. As part of an action research on a College English course Language,
Culture and Communication in a top university in Beijing, the study
Celeste Flowers, University of Central Arkansas, USA
Nanette Zobkov-Perez, University of Central Arkansas, USA found that outgroup favoritism had prevented students from becoming
Lisa Mommsen, University of Central Arkansas, USA interculturally competent, and discussed teaching practices that helped
empower students to embrace themselves when they learn English.
WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH

Wednesday, 5:00 pm–5:45 pm Xuan Zheng, Peking University, China (People’s Republic)
Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom A
Is Plagiarism Stealing? Reconceptualizing Wednesday, 5:00 pm–5:45 pm
Plagiarism in the Multilingual Writing Classroom TCC, Yakima 1
Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition Questioning English‑Only as a
Medium of Instruction in Japan
Teaching plagiarism as stealing obscures the nuances of effective
Content Area: English as a Foreign Language
source use, particularly when digital texts often lack a clear author
from whom to steal. This session offers activities and strategies to This exploratory research examined the perceptions of freshman
help multilingual writers reconceptualize source use and misuse in EFL students about English-only instruction in English for Academic
terms of ethos-building and responsible research rather than theft. Purpose courses offered at a private university in Japan. The
Bethany Bradshaw, George Mason University, USA findings suggest that an English-only policy may place less proficient
Juliana Pybus, North Carolina State University, USA students at a disadvantage, when the contents of classes are more
cognitively challenging.
Wednesday, 5:00 pm–5:45 pm Masakazu Mishima, Rikkyo University, Japan
WSCC, 210
Korean Students’ Perceptions of TOEFL iBT Writing Wednesday, 5:00 pm–5:45 pm
Content Area: Assessment/Testing Sheraton Seattle, Willow A

This study investigates how Korean students prepare for the TOEFL Response to Student Writing as a
Relationship‑Building Activity
iBT writing and what challenges they face by analyzing online forum
Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition
data obtained from gohackers.com. The study suggests that the format
and the scoring of the test be critically examined to accommodate This session discusses the results of a study conducted to examine
divergent needs of EFL students. oral response to student writing as a relationship-building
Eun-Young Julia Kim, Andrews University, USA activity. The presenter demonstrates how a composition instructor
used interactional resources during a writing conference to
provide negative feedback on student writing without damaging
interpersonal relationships with the student.
Elena Shvidko, Purdue University, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

98 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Wednesday, 5:00 pm–5:45 pm Wednesday, 5:00 pm–5:45 pm
WSCC, 204 WSCC, 307-308
Taking on the “P Word” in Low‑Level Teaching Around Taboos: Empowering Students
Oral Communication to Effectively Communicate Difficult Topics
Content Area: Discourse and Pragmatics Content Area: Intercultural Communication
The spiraling influences of culture, personality, and intention make Communication surrounding gender, race and sexuality in classrooms
pragmatics an ideal fit for oral communication classes. Participants can be difficult; however, these topics often appear as subject material
first discuss the implications of pragmatics instruction. Then they in advanced language classes. This session will illustrate common
experience activities that conflate pragmatics, vocabulary, grammar, taboos and ways that educators can empower students to successfully
and pronunciation. Adaptable lesson plan options for practicing both maneuver through difficult topics and break intercultural barriers
sides of a conversation are provided. through student role-playing.
Alice Savage, Lone Star College System, USA Rachel Fields, ELS Language Centers, USA
Angel Gambrel, ELS Language Centers, USA

WEDNESDAY, 22 MARCH

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 99
Dec16-2016 - Program Ad - Half-Page BW.pdf 1 2016-12-22 12:04 PM

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For the location of a ticketed session, please check your ticket.
A New Model for Major‑Specific Language Support
Content Area: English for Specific Purposes
TCC = The Conference Center
WSCC = Washington State Convention Center To increase efficacy in its language program, a large art and design
university with unprecedented international student numbers
developed a new model for major-specific English instruction. This
8:00 am
session outlines the university’s adapted ESL curricula and language
resources and provide suggestions for integrating major-specific
Thursday, 8:00 am–9:00 am language support into higher education contexts.
WSCC, Ballroom 6ABC Jill Ballard, Academy of Art University, USA
Hilaire Fong, Academy of Art University, USA
JAMES E. ALATIS PLENARY
Ruminations of an
Old Language Teacher Thursday, 9:30 am–10:15 am
WSCC, 304
Content Area: Applied Linguistics
Addressing ESOL Teacher Candidates’ Professional
In this presentation, the presenter talks about
Dispositions: A Critical Incident Analysis
SLA theory and research from the perspective of
Content Area: Teacher Education
a dedicated language teacher. She shares some
of what she learned, tells you where she looked This session presents research on professional dispositions in ESL
for answers, and invites you to engage with topics teacher candidates, using critical incident analysis. Professional
that directly or indirectly inform your practice. dispositions are an essential part of teacher education. The findings
enabled exploration of factors that caused teacher candidates to be
Guadalupe Valdés, Stanford University, USA
unsuccessful. Implications and recommendations for teacher education
programs are emphasized.
9:30 am Tim Micek, Ohio Dominican University, USA
Soonhyang Kim, University of North Florida, USA
Thursday, 9:30 am–10:15 am
WSCC, 201 Thursday, 9:30 am–10:15 am
A Dynamic Potential for the Word Learning of Writers WSCC, 212
Content Area: Vocabulary/Lexicon Black and Brown Minds Matter:
Latino Immigrants and Black Teachers
This session examines the complexities of vocabulary for academic
Content Area: Culture
writing, reaching beyond the use of definitions and memorization to a
focus on generating meaning. Participants will be able to meaningfully In a context filled with hostile public discourse surrounding Latino
address word learning as it relates to developing academic writers immigration, an emphasis on establishing caring K–12 classroom
Cheryl Boyd Zimmerman, California State University, Fullerton, USA environments is imperative. The presenters bring in-depth interview
data with African American TESOL educators to demonstrate the

THURSDAY, 23 MARCH
educators’ use of their lived experiences/vivencias to advocate for
Thursday, 9:30 am–10:15 am Latino immigrant students.
WSCC, 616
Spencer Salas, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA
A Modular Solution for Placement Bobbi Siefert, Furman University, USA
and Progress Testing Tamera Moore, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA
Content Area: Assessment/Testing
Learn more about CaMLA’s English Placement Test, Writing Test,
and Speaking Test and how to use them singly or in combination for
placement and progress testing. These CEFR-linked tests provide a
reliable, affordable, and easy to administer assessment solution for
multilevel language programs with students from level A1 to C1.
Barbara Dobson, CaMLA, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 101
Thursday, 9:30 am–10:15 am Thursday, 9:30 am–10:15 am
Sheraton Seattle, Aspen TCC, Chelan 2
Collaborating With Cuban TESOLers EFL Teacher Educators in the Chilean
Content Area: Teacher Education Educational Neoliberal System
The profession of teaching English in Cuba is robust, and educators Content Area: Teacher Education
training English teachers and students at all levels are well prepared Drawn from a sociocultural and critical language pedagogy
to deliver quality instruction. This forum examines this pedagogical perspective, this presentation shows a research study conducted with
environment and the opportunities it provides for English educators Chilean EFL teacher educators on how their lives, histories and past
from abroad to collaborate in professional exchanges with have influenced the way they view and describe the teaching of English
Cuban colleagues. and preparation of EFL teachers in a neoliberal education system.
Rob Griffin, Oklahoma City University, USA Michel Riquelme Sanderson, University of Washington, USA
John Schmidt, Texas International Education Consortium, USA
Liz England, Liz England and Associates, LLC, USA
Thursday, 9:30 am–10:15 am
Adita Chiappy, TESOL Cuba–GELI, Cuba
Sheraton Seattle, Ballard
Yilin Sun, Seattle Colleges, USA
Andrea Word, University of Alabama in Huntsville, USA ELLs’ Self‑Regulated Writing Strategy Use
During the Primary‑Secondary Transition
Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition
Thursday, 9:30 am–10:15 am
TCC, Chelan 4 This study identifies the dynamic self-regulated strategies that
Content and Language Integrated Learning and secondary ELLs use to overcome the challenges they encountered in
Sheltered Instruction: Learning Together writing during the primary-secondary school transition. The results
Content Area: Content-Based and CLIL/Content and Language reveal what pedagogical support is needed to help learners become
Integrated Learning more self-regulated when adapting to new learning demands in
secondary schools.
Both Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) and sheltered
instruction teach content subjects through a new language. This Xuesong Gao, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
session reviews research on CLIL and SIOP (a model of sheltered Jingjing Hu, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
instruction) to highlight techniques they share and lessons they may
learn from each other. Thursday, 9:30 am–10:15 am
Deborah Short, Academic Language Research & Training, USA WSCC, 3A
Gabriela Kleckova, University of West Bohemia, Czech Republic Empower Higher Ed ESOL Faculty Through
Positive Organizational Scholarship
Thursday, 9:30 am–10:15 am Content Area: Higher Education
WSCC, 210 Academia can be a challenging context for ESOL professionals.
Creating Effective Electives: A Needs‑Based Positive Organizational Scholarship (POS), an emerging field in
Approach in Curriculum Design organizational behavior, can help ESOL faculty in higher education
Content Area: Materials Writers, Curriculum/Materials Development feel more empowered in their working relationships. This session
In an ideal curriculum, the needs of a student population are addressed presents an overview of POS and discussion of implications for ESOL in
THURSDAY, 23 MARCH

to help achieve their academic goals. In this presentation, the speaker higher education.
shares a needs analysis approach to assess the needs of a specific Britt Johnson, University of Oregon, USA
student population to guide the creation of an IEP elective.
Rachel Miller, International English Institute, USA Thursday, 9:30 am–10:15 am
WSCC, 613
Thursday, 9:30 am–10:15 am Engaging ELLs With Nearpod
WSCC, 605 Content Area: English as a Foreign Language
Developing Pragmatic Competence Through Nearpod empowers ELL teachers to engage their students with
Task‑Supported Language Teaching interactive lessons using proven pedagogical strategies. In this
Content Area: Task-Based, Project-Based Instruction session, we discuss the research-based ELL strategies that are
Research promotes task-supported pedagogy and pragmatic-focused incorporated into Nearpod’s comprehensive K–12 ELL curriculum, and
lessons. Yet, few discussions focus on developing such lessons for share teaching tips for engaging ELLs with technology.
language classrooms. In this presentation, we share how and why Bethany Marcusson, Nearpod, USA
educators should consider developing and implementing pragmatic-
focused tasks for their L2 learners.
Caroline Payant, University of Idaho, USA
Derek Reagan, University of Idaho, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

102 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Thursday, 9:30 am–10:15 am Thursday, 9:30 am–10:15 am
TCC, Skagit 2 WSCC, 619
Enriching Understanding of Second Language Off Course: A Comparison of Coursebook
Writers’ Identities Through Narrative Inquiry and University Writing Tasks
Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition Content Area: Intensive English Programs
Through examining the findings of a narrative inquiry case study of Do writing tasks found in EAP coursebooks represent the real demands
Chinese undergraduate students at a U.S. university, participants of university writing? This presentation discusses ongoing research
enriches their understanding of how students’ cultural narratives about that is attempting to answer this question. Coursebook writing
what it means to be an academic writer in Chinese and English shape tasks will be compared to university writing tasks. Curricular and
biliterate students’ identities and actions as dual-language writers. pedagogical implications are also discussed.
Elizabeth Baertlein, Kirkwood Community College, USA Anthony Schmidt, University of Tennessee, USA

Thursday, 9:30 am–10:15 am Thursday, 9:30 am–10:15 am


TCC, Tahoma 3 WSCC, 303
Exploring Expert Raters’ and ESL Learners’ Open Educational Resources:
Perceptions of Speech Fluency Improving Access to Education Worldwide
Content Area: Listening, Speaking/Speech Finding good teaching materials is hard. That’s where open educational
This research-oriented presentation explores the various factors resources (OERs) come into play! OERs allow teachers to customize
influencing how speech fluency is perceived by expert raters and and share lessons and materials with a global audience. In this
intermediate to advanced ESL university students. The results indicate session, join the U.S. Department of State as they discuss OERs and
that temporal features (e.g. speech rate) and non-temporal features learn how your OERs contribute to the global teaching community.
of fluency appear to be inherently interrelated, further revealing the Curtis Chan, U.S. Department of State, USA
complexity of the fluency construct. Rich Rosenberg, U.S. Department of State, USA
Kent Williams, Carleton University, Canada
Thursday, 9:30 am–10:15 am
Thursday, 9:30 am–10:15 am WSCC, 2A
WSCC, 205 Putting the ELPS at Your Fingertips
Flipped Learning in TESOL: The First 5 Years Content Area: Standards, Common Core State Standards
Content Area: Higher Education Learn about an exciting new website, giving you full access to the
Language teachers at all levels and in a variety of contexts have begun English Language Proficiency Standards on your mobile device. Practice
flipping their classrooms to create fertile spaces for second language using this tool for our state’s standards and walk away with ideas of
acquisition. This session provides a review of the literature on flipped how you can incorporate this tool in your instructional practice.
learning in TESOL, noting how it is being implemented and what Melody Borcherding, English Language Acquisition Service, LLC, USA
benefits have been found.
Helaine W. Marshall, Long Island University Hudson, USA Thursday, 9:30 am–10:15 am
Ilka Kostka, Northeastern University, USA WSCC, 213

THURSDAY, 23 MARCH
Raising Environmental Awareness With University
Thursday, 9:30 am–10:15 am Writing Activities and Group Projects
WSCC, 214 Content Area: Social Responsibility/Sociopolitical Concerns
How Fairly Are Nonnative Teachers Evaluated? Through eco-composition techniques, students can write research
Content Area: Nonnative English Speakers in TESOL papers that incorporate aspects of the personal essay and bridge the
The presenter reviews ESL students’ evaluations of nonnative- gap between their fond memories, the natural world, and the university
English-speaking teachers, their accent ratings, and capacity to writing situation. Task-based group projects expand on the textbook
understand NNESTs’ speeches, and discusses his findings. The and increase critical thinking and presentation skills. Classroom
presenter also discusses the impact on hiring practices based on materials are provided.
students’ evaluations and offers solutions on what can be done to Jennifer Lund, Indiana University, USA
mitigate discrimination. Ashley Murphy, Lehigh University, USA
Rameshor Bhandari, California State University, Los Angeles, USA Jennie Roloff Rothman, International Christian University, Japan

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 103
Thursday, 9:30 am–10:15 am Thursday, 9:30 am–10:15 am
Sheraton Seattle, Metropolitan A WSCC, 604
Self‑Publishing ELT Materials Supporting Networks for ELL Success:
Content Area: Materials Writers, Curriculum/Materials Development Resources and Approaches From WIDA
The rise of e-books and print-on-demand paperbacks has made self- Content Area: Second Language Acquisition
publishing possible for individual authors. Find out what’s involved, At the heart of WIDA’s mission is the development of research-based
from formatting e-book and paperback files to royalty rates to resources to be used by networks of educators in supporting the
marketing and publicity. Learn different ways self-publishers create academic success of language learners. This session explores the
covers, handle art and audio, and arrange for editing and proofreading. latest initiatives and developments from WIDA that may be used in
Dorothy Zemach, Wayzgoose Press, USA both domestic and international contexts, Pre-K–12.
Jesse Markow, WIDA Consortium, USA
Thursday, 9:30 am–10:15 am
Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom C Thursday, 9:30 am–10:15 am
Shifts in ESL Teacher Professional WSCC, 614
Expertise for the 21st Century The Role of International ELT Exams
The 21st century requires that ELLs simultaneously apprentice into Content Area: Assessment/Testing
key disciplinary ideas, analytical practices, and the language which This session discusses the influence of International ELT exams; the
expresses them. This presentation discusses the nature of teacher growing popularity of IELTS for university admissions, employment
expertise needed to carry out this imperative and develop ELLs’ and Visa requirements; Trinity College London exams; ISE exams that
autonomy to participate in work and civic life responsibly while cover all four skills in two modules; Cambridge and CAMLA exams; and
becoming life-long learners. British versus American English.
Aida Walqui, WestEd, USA Lawrence Mamas, Global ELT, United Kingdom (Great Britain)

Thursday, 9:30 am–10:15 am Thursday, 9:30 am–10:15 am


WSCC, 612 WSCC, 615
So That’s How You Score TOEFL iBT® Writing Items Thrive, Don’t Just Survive, Cross‑Culturally
Content Area: Assessment/Testing Content Area: Culture
This presentation gives an overview of the two Writing tasks on the How to maintain a classroom when the cultural rules change.
TOEFL iBT® test and provide an explanation of the official rubrics used Mark Silvers, Crossworld, USA
to score test-taker responses. We review benchmark responses for a Barbara Tooley, Crossworld, USA
specific independent writing task, and participants practice scoring
additional responses using the rubrics.
Thursday, 9:30 am–11:15 am
Terry Axe, Educational Testing Service, USA WSCC, 304
Marian Crandall, Educational Testing Service, USA
Adapting Lessons to Dyslexic Learners:
Putting Theory Into Practice

D
Thursday, 9:30 am–10:15 am
THURSDAY, 23 MARCH

E
Content Area: Teaching Methodology and Strategy

E L
TCC, Yakima 2

NC
If one in five people worldwide struggles with dyslexia, chances are
Strategies to Enrich Novice Adult ESL Instructors

CA
they’ve been in your classroom. This workshop discusses the cognitive
Content Area: Adult Education
challenges of dyslexia, connects them to teaching strategies, and
If you’re a novice to adult ESL or supervise these instructors, here’s provides time to apply those strategies by adapting or creating a
a session providing insights in developing adult ESL instructional language skill lesson and getting peer feedback.
skills. We reflect on the adult learning context and explore numerous Deirdre McMurtry, University of Nebraska at Omaha, USA
professional develop resources available to enhance instructors’ skills
in meeting the needs of adult ESL students.
Edith Cowper, Wake Technical Community College, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

104 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Thursday, 9:30 am–11:15 am Thursday, 9:30 am–11:15 am
WSCC, 610 WSCC, 617
Advanced Teacher Training for Iraqi EFL Teachers Empowering Students Through
Content Area: Teacher Education Flipped Authentic Assessments
Iraqi English teachers face many challenges in teaching English. Content Area: Assessment/Testing
Methods are often teacher-centered, class sizes are large, technology In today’s 2.0 world, teachers must learn how to diversify their
can be scarce, and students lack motivation. The Advanced Teacher assessments using technology that provides authentic tasks which
Training Program for Iraqi English teachers constructed a social and allow learners to demonstrate their English proficiencies. Come learn
academic network of teacher trainers throughout Iraq. about project-based assessments that can be done online to reduce
Joseph Axel, Arizona State University, USA anxiety about writing and tests and enrich students’ creativities.
Lisa Morgan, U.S. Department of State, Iraq Evelyn Doman, University of Guam, Guam
Khadija Hashimk, Ministry of Education, Iraq Marie Webb, Anaheim University, USA
Arsto Ahmed, Sulaimani University, Iraq
Michael Hacker, Arizona State University, USA Thursday, 9:30 am–11:15 am
WSCC, 310
Thursday, 9:30 am–11:15 am Exploring Translanguaging as a
WSCC, 204 Phenomenon, Ideology, and Pedagogy
Authentic English for Business, Content Area: Bilingual Education
Medical, and Legal Purposes In recent years, the concept of translanguaging has developed as a
Content Area: English for Specific Purposes fundamental part and practice among bilinguals yet hitherto under-
How can we make ESP materials authentic enough to serve our explored phenomenon in multilingual settings. This panel discusses
students? This session brings together leading experts in business, current perspectives of translingualism as a phenomenon, ideology and
medical, and leadership English to share current research and insights pedagogy. Current perspectives, issues and implications are discussed.
for contextualized assessment. Panelists share research findings, David Freeman, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, USA
authentic texts, and applications for assessment and enhancing ESP Yvonne Freeman, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, USA
curriculum and materials. David Schwarzer, Montclair State University, USA
Kevin Knight, Kanda University of International Studies, Japan Andres Ramirez, Florida Atlantic University, USA
Margaret van Naerssen, Immaculata University, USA Alsu Gilmetdinova, Kazan National Research Technical University named
David Olsher, San Francisco State University, USA after A.N. Tupolev - KAI, Russia
Felicia Roberts, Purdue University, USA Mary Soto, California State University, East Bay, USA

Thursday, 9:30 am–11:15 am Thursday, 9:30 am–11:15 am


TCC, Yakima 1 TCC, Tahoma 1
Cooperative Learning 2.0: Flipping With Apps, Active Learning,
Creating “We‑ness” in the Classroom and Higher Order Thinking Skills
Content Area: Intensive English Programs Content Area: Personal and Professional Development for Teachers

THURSDAY, 23 MARCH
Presenters outline cooperative learning theories, the issues unique This presentation shows how a flipped learning approach is
to ESL students, and how cooperative learning can promote established to create an engaging classroom atmosphere, promote
proficiency. Participants take part in cooperative learning activities learner autonomy, develop learners’ Higher Order Thinking Skills,
and analyze these activities for effectiveness of skills to prepare and maximize intake. Apps and active learning activities are
students for university. demonstrated and the audience is invited to share experiences and
Julie Doty, University of North Texas, USA participate actively.
Joanna Spice, University of North Texas, USA Elizabeth Rabello, Casa Thomas Jefferson, Brazil
Regina Meireles, Casa Thomas Jefferson, Brazil

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 105
Thursday, 9:30 am–11:15 am Thursday, 9:30 am–11:15 am
Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom D TCC, Tahoma 4
Fostering Academic Interactions Among Legal Language: Strategies for Effective
Elementary ELLs: One District’s Journey Communication in Law School
Content Area: Teaching Methodology and Strategy Content Area: English for Specific Purposes
Learn how a large urban school district in California successfully This workshop provides strategies for Nonnative English speakers
implemented a systematic, district-wide approach to engaging ELLs studying in US Law programs to communicate effectively with their
in collaborative conversations with diverse partners on grade level professors and classmates both in and out of class. Law students
topics and texts. Examine, experience, and develop instructional must learn a magnitude of new legal vocabulary while also navigating
materials and strategies used to support teachers’ enactment of these all the nuances that accompany communicating effectively in
research-based practices. another language.
Robert Pritchard, Sacramento State University, USA Pamela Dzunu, Washington University, St. Louis, USA
Susan O’Hara, UC Davis, USA Kirsten Schaetzel, Georgetown University Law Center, USA
Maricela Sanchez, Los Angeles Unified School District, USA Shelley Saltzman, Columbia University, USA
Isabel Aguirre, Los Angeles Unified School District, USA Steven Horowitz, St. John’s University, USA

Thursday, 9:30 am–11:15 am Thursday, 9:30 am–11:15 am


WSCC, 618 TCC, Chelan 5
How to Manage, Facilitate, and Teach Make the Best of Your Class With an In-Class Flip!
About Culturally Sensitive Issues Content Area: Teaching Methodology and Strategy
Content Area: International Teaching Assistants This workshop focuses on how an in-class flip is carried out in two
This panel discussion addresses the need to manage, facilitate different EFL classes: literature (without technology) and public
and teach about culturally sensitive issues. Panelists representing speaking (with technology). Participants experience the logistics of
the ITA, ICI, and ILGBTF Interest Sections examine topics how this approach works, so that it can be applied and adapted to
ranging from respecting the students’ own cultural beliefs and different teaching needs and learning contexts.
perspectives, to outlining strategies used to orient learners to issues Martha Ramirez, Colegio San Mateo Apostol, Colombia
related to diversity. Carolina Buitrago, Institución Universitaria Colombo
Morag Burke, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA Americana, Colombia
Derina Samuel, Cornell University, USA
Courtney King, Central Michigan University, USA Thursday, 9:30 am–11:15 am
Juan Rios, Bradley University, USA WSCC, 611
Rebecca Oreto, Intercultural Communication Center, USA
Microteaching for Classroom Management:
Impromptu Challenge
Thursday, 9:30 am–11:15 am Content Area: Teaching Methodology and Strategy
WSCC, 3B
MATESOL programs are often unable to provide adequate
Innovative Solutions to Adult Education classroom management experience to preservice teachers. Early-
THURSDAY, 23 MARCH

Program Design and Collaboration


career and experienced teachers alike are encouraged to join
Content Area: Adult Education this hands-on microteaching workshop for practice and reflection
Are you looking for new initiatives in adult education? Listen to on how to turn common classroom management challenges into
panelists from adult education programs who have embarked on opportunities for success.
ground-breaking projects. Discussions include low-cost professional Laura Holland, University of Oregon, USA
development activities, college and career achievement assessment, Keli Yerian, University of Oregon, USA
advocacy for Workforce Training Fund grant monies, bilingual Spanish-
English workforce training design, and public charter school formation.
Thursday, 9:30 am–11:15 am
Tünde Csepelyi, Truckee Meadows Community College, USA WSCC, 602
Nikki Ashcraft, University of Missouri, USA
Kendi Ho, McKinley Community School for Adults, USA National and State Initiatives in Adult ESOL
Lee Haller, English for New Bostonians, USA Content Area: Advocacy
Allison Kokkoros, Carlos Rosario International Public Charter U.S. Department of Education provides an update on national program
School, USA performance and federal initiatives to improve adult ESOL student
Chad Patton, Literacy Center of West Michigan, USA outcomes. State panelists describe one key state level adult ESOL
initiative, issue, or product of value and benefit to other states.
Debra Suarez, U.S. Department of Education, Office of Career, Technical,
and Adult Education, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

106 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Thursday, 9:30 am–11:15 am Thursday, 9:30 am–11:15 am
WSCC, 620 Sheraton Seattle, Issaquah
New Boss, New Roles, New Rules: Reflecting Forward: Critical Literacy
IEP Administrators Talk Shop in TESOL Research
Content Area: Program Administration Content Area: Research/Research Methodology
New administrators face unique challenges in their organizational This session focuses on the impact of TESOL’s current Research
roles, with the first year being a foundational experience for the Agenda by highlighting the research of our 2016 mini-grantees. In
individual and the team. Pulling from diverse perspectives, this lively groups, we bring together leading research experts and doctoral
panel discussion focuses on the key themes of establishing trust, students to discuss the role of critical literacy in TESOL Research and
interpersonal relationships, managing up, change management, role address the issues, approaches, and challenges in research.
identity, and personal growth. Theresa Austin, University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA
Fred Griffiths, Oklahoma State University, USA Deena Boraie, American University in Cairo, Egypt
Elisa Hunt, Southern Illinois University, USA Rachel Grant, College of Staten Island–CUNY, USA
Rachel Kraut, Rice University, USA Lucilla Lopriore, Roma Tre University, Italy
Colin Large, Boston University, USA Allison Briceno, San Jose State University, USA
Katherine Larson, DePaul University, USA Liv Davila, University of Illinois, USA
Erin O’Reilly, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA Monica Gonzalez, University of South Florida, USA

Thursday, 9:30 am–11:15 am Thursday, 9:30 am–11:15 am


WSCC, 203 WSCC, 307-308
Our First MOOCs: Lessons Learned Say More: Strategies to Support
Content Area: Distance Learning/Online Learning Sustained Student Interaction
An increasing number of English language programs are joining the Content Area: Teaching Methodology and Strategy
movement to create Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC). From the Student interaction is essential in the TESOL classroom, but facilitating
experience of their first MOOCs, the panelists presents a rationale for student-to-student dialogue can be challenging. This workshop shares
developing MOOCs and describe how to design, implement, and deliver research-based techniques to elicit student thinking, limit teacher talk,
a successful one. and engage students in meaningful discussion. Participants return to
Suzi Lee, Georgia Institute of Technology, Jaipur, USA their classroom ready to get students talking, listening, and learning!
Rodrigo Carvalho, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA Tabitha Kidwell, University of Maryland, College Park, USA
Roger Drury, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA Megan Stump, University of Maryland, USA
Christina Budde, University of Maryland, USA
Thursday, 9:30 am–11:15 am
WSCC, 606-607 Thursday, 9:30 am–11:15 am
Preparing Teachers to Make Intelligent TCC, Tahoma 5
Technology Decisions in Language Teaching The Role of Academic Discourse in
Content Area: CALL/Computer-Assisted Language Learning/ K–12 Standards‑Based Instruction

THURSDAY, 23 MARCH
Technology in Education Content Area: Standards, Common Core State Standards
With technology present in almost all of today’s classrooms, TESOL This interactive workshop examines the role academic conversations
teachers now face challenges of harmonizing technological choice play in the development of language, the importance of quality
with classroom application. This panel discusses pedagogical conversations in the classroom, the relationship of discourse to
and technical principles of selecting appropriate technologies and ELL student achievement, and explore ways for teachers to adjust
developing related skills. their level of discourse for K–12 students acquiring English at
Volker Hegelheimer, Iowa State University, USA differing levels.
Phil Hubbard, Stanford University, USA Lynore Carnuccio, esl-etc Educational Consultants, USA
Greg Kessler, Ohio University, USA Kristin Grayson, Intercultural Development Research Association, USA
Christine Rosalia, Hunter College–CUNY, USA
Stephanie Korslund, Iowa State University, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 107
Thursday, 9:30 am–11:15 am 10:30 am
Sheraton Seattle, Metropolitan B
Thinking, Speaking, and Writing Like
Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
a Historian Learning English
TCC, Tahoma 3
Content Area: High School/Secondary Education
A Little Help From My Friends:
Social Studies teachers from an NYC Internationals-network public Peer Feedback for Speaking
high school lead a workshop on how to teach ELLs to think like Content Area: Teaching Methodology and Strategy
historians. This workshop involves teaching educators to engage
students with historical thinking by having them use the tools of When students give each other feedback on speaking tasks, they
historians with the aid of scaffolding and leveling. talk more, listen more and learn more, but they need clear criteria
and training to do it right. Learn about the benefits of peer feedback,
Michele Hamilton, International High School at Lafayette, USA engage in tried-and-true activities and discover how to adapt them
Matthew Hoffman, International High School at Lafayette, USA
for your learners.
Jean Lee, International High School at Lafayette, USA
Nicholas Lesser, International High School at Lafayette, USA Alice Llanos, Rice University, USA
Amy Tate, Rice University, USA
Thursday, 9:30 am–11:15 am
WSCC, 603 Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
WSCC, 210
Using Open Educational Resources to
Create ESL Instructional Materials Becoming Academic Sojourners:
Content Area: Curriculum/Materials Development Chinese MATESOL Students in South Korea
Content Area: Program Administration
This session provides participants with an overview of the use and
application of OER. Presenters explains basic OER concepts including: TESOL 2.0 faces new challenges with continuing increases in
open licenses, public domain, and creative commons licenses. They Chinese academic sojourners seeking master’s in TESOL degrees.
also provide participants with information on how to integrate OER into Twelve graduate students express their academic and cultural needs
their ESL courses. and offer suggestions for programmatic reform within master’s
programs: Enhancing cultural ability, incorporating creative extra-
Jodi Ruback, Washington State Board for Community and Technical
curricular language training, and building a strong, cooperative
Colleges, USA
learner community.
Eric Reynolds, Woosong University, South Korea
Thursday, 9:30 am–11:15 am
Xiaofang Yan, PaiChai University, South Korea
WSCC, 211
Writing Across Content Areas in
Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Elementary Education
WSCC, 212
Content Area: Elementary School/Primary Education
Beyond the Classroom and Into the Minds of ELLs
Discover techniques and activities to boost your young students’
Content Area: High School/Secondary Education
writing by exploring the language of elementary school content-area
genres. Learn practical ways for applying these ideas and tapping With the expectation of graduating high school students in 4 years,
THURSDAY, 23 MARCH

into the rich resources of students to amplify their interests in writing and ready for college, educators who work with unaccompanied
across the content areas. minors and ELL must be mindful of the many barriers, which impede
success. Educators who listen and seek to understand, help students
Luciana de Oliveira, University of Miami, USA
be successful in the classroom and within society.
Dong-Shin Shin, University of Cincinnati, USA
Maria Estela Brisk, Boston College, USA Genevieve Maignan, District of Columbia Public Schools, USA
Leslie Kirshner-Morris, The School District of Philadelphia, USA
Carol Behel, Florence City Schools, USA Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
WSCC, 616
Blending Authentic Content With Your ELT Materials
Content Area: Adult Education
ESL Library’s head writer Tara Benwell shares tips and examples for
combining ELT materials with authentic content to keep your learners
interested and engaged in language learning. Tara shares useful
activities and sources, such as articles, videos, and twitter feeds, that
can be paired with your ELT materials.
Tara Benwell, ESL Library, Canada

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

108 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom B WSCC, 201
China’s Recent Educational Reforms Designing Effective Rubrics:
in English Reading Instruction Maximizing Learning While Avoiding Pitfalls
Content Area: English as a Foreign Language Content Area: Assessment/Testing
English reading instruction is one of the hottest issues in China’s Well-designed rubrics are useful assessment strategies. Using
recent educational reform. This talk presents China’s English reading examples for three productive tasks (culminating in written essays,
instructional reforms in teaching content, teaching materials, teaching oral presentations, and group-based discussions), the presenter
methods and classroom reading assessment, hoping to offer EFL and outlines pitfalls to avoid when designing rubrics. Participants receive a
ESL reading teachers implications for their teaching practice. guideline that they can use in planning their own rubrics. Adaptations
Narentuya Ao, Beijing Capital Normal University, China for different proficiency levels are shared.
(People’s Republic) Heather Weger, Georgetown University, USA

Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am


TCC, Skagit 2 Sheraton Seattle, Ballard
Corpus‑Based Learning of Reporting Difficult Dialogues and Collaborative
Verbs in L2 Academic Writing Conversations About Coteaching for ELLs
Content Area: Higher Education Content Area: Content-Based and CLIL/Content and Language
We present findings from our study on the effectiveness of corpus- Integrated Learning
based learning of reporting verbs during a multidraft literature review We collaboratively explore both the advantages and challenges
assignment. The results suggest corpus-based instruction can improve of coteaching by discussing select authentic case studies (written
L2 students’ genre awareness and lexical variety without time- vignettes and video clips) and forming jigsaw discussion groups, each
consuming training. Participants receive sample corpus-based teaching exploring one critical question offered by the presenters and one
materials used in the revision workshop. generated by the group.
Ji-young Shin, Purdue University, USA Andrea Honigsfeld, Molloy College, USA
R. Scott Partridge, Purdue University, USA Maria Dove, Molloy College, USA
Ashley J. Velázquez, Purdue University, USA
Aleksandra Swatek, Purdue University, USA Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Shelley Staples, University of Arizona, USA WSCC, 615
Digital Innovations and Barriers:
Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am Blended Learning Across the Digital Divide
WSCC, 3A Content Area: Adult Education
Creating Spaces for Letting Multilingual Broadband is arguably the new electricity, but limited Internet access
Students Use Their Linguistic Repertoires prevents many students from using current instructional technologies.
Content Area: Higher Education The presenters offer highlights from their new Side by Side eText and
Based on the academic literacy negotiation patterns of three migrant FunZone as they describe what public/private players and advocates

THURSDAY, 23 MARCH
students, this presentation discusses both linguistic and non-linguistic are doing to expand access and bridge the digital divide.
issues to be considered while creating pedagogical spaces in English Bill Bliss, Language and Communication Workshop, USA
dominant settings so that multilingual students will be able to use Steven Molinsky, Boston University, USA
their linguistic repertoires for richer engagement in their academic
literacy classes.
Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Madhav Kafle, Pennsylvania State University, USA WSCC, 605
Empowering Learners via Interactional Identities
Content Area: Discourse and Pragmatics
This 3.5-month conversation-analysis led case study aims to address
the issue of language learning opportunities in relation to identities
co-constructed in the sequential organization of classroom talk. The
analysis of classroom interactions shows how teachers’ positioning
of learners with their interactional moves facilitate the language
learning process.
Ozlem Ozbakis, TOBB University of Economics and Technology, Turkey
Hale Isik Guler, Middle East Technical University, Turkey

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 109
Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
WSCC, 2A Sheraton Seattle, Juniper
Empowering Practitioners Through Engagement Enriching Publisher‑ESL Program Relationships
With Professional Development Content Area: Materials Writers, Curriculum/Materials Development
Content Area: Personal and Professional Development for Teachers Do ESL programs and publishers really understand each other’s
Professional development can be overwhelming, confusing, and roles and needs? How can developing relationships with each other
inaccessible. Framed within reflective practice and the empowerment maximize effective use of publisher materials in the classroom
of educators to contribute to the academic field, this presentation and improve professional program development? Join an open
reflects on work encouraging professional development at an EFL discussion between publishers and programs with the aim of helping
program in Japan and offers participants practical ways of overcoming develop these ideas.
professional development obstacles within a program. Joy MacFarland, FLS International, USA
Vanessa Armand, Tokyo International University, Japan Michelle Velissariou, Cambridge University Press, USA
Sara VanDanAcker, Tokyo International University, Japan
Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom B
Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom B Exploring Techniques for Sustaining
Engaging Students With Cultural Analysis Student Motivation
in the Language Classroom Content Area: Higher Education
Content Area: Intercultural Communication Sometimes even the best teachers face a class with negative energy
The presenters discuss how EFL teachers can blend motivation and that they dread. This session explores ways to shift classroom energy
the development of intercultural competence in order to promote to create a positive atmosphere that is conducive to learning and
successful language learning. This session employs discussion and increases student motivation. Techniques for putting students into a
practice of strategies and activities to critically analyze cultural receptive learning mode are demonstrated and practiced.
phenomenon while supporting English language development. Mohamed Ashraf El-Zamil, American University in Cairo, Egypt
Trenton Hagar, UNICA, Nicaragua
Christopher Hastings, ITMO University, Russia Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom B
Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am Female Saudi Learners’ Perceptions
TCC, Yakima 2 of Learning English in the USA
Engaging Teachers in Effective Content Area: Second Language Acquisition
Professional Development Do you believe that you have to travel to a Western country for
Content Area: Adult Education

D
education and participate socially with native speakers in order

L E
Teachers who are separated by schedules, geography and funding

CE
to learn English? Join us and learn more about the experiences

CAN
restraints seek ongoing opportunities to connect with peers and learn and challenges Saudi female learners had in learning English in
collaboratively. Learn how one state worked to overcome barriers to the United States.
providing professional development. This presentation demonstrates Abrar Alsofyani, University of South Florida, USA
THURSDAY, 23 MARCH

tools for engaging teachers and providing effective professional


development learning experiences.
Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Christina Terrell, Ohio State University, USA Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom B
Forget the Textbook: Empowering Students to
Become Independent Vocabulary Learners
Content Area: Vocabulary/Lexicon
This presentation describe an ESL vocabulary course designed to teach
students how to independently build their vocabulary. Instead of using
a textbook, online and print sources were used to create this course in
which students practiced the skills necessary to become autonomous
learners. Materials and methods are shared.
Heather Mehrtens, University of Maryland, College Park, USA
Raymond Smith, University of Maryland, College Park, USA
Annelies Galletta, University of Maryland, College Park, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

110 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
WSCC, 213 Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom B
Globetrotting TESOL Educators’ Passport Inclusive Pegagogy for Our Refugee
to the Joys of World Travel Student Population
Content Area: Personal and Professional Development for Teachers Content Area: Elementary School/Primary Education
In “The Joys of Travel” (2016), travel journalist and former EFL teacher Economic refugees have a multitude of experiences of value for
Thomas Swick illustrates seven joys, ones that globetrotting TESOL teachers to build upon through an inclusive pedagogy. Schools operate
educators also know well. Share and compare your joys, along with as a neutral vessel where the acculturation of students through an
globetrotting interests, experiences, and opportunities for professional, equitable education will empower students to succeed in a public
educational, and cultural engagement and enrichment worldwide. education setting.
John Schmidt, Texas International Education Consortium, USA Roxanne Stewart, Cobb County School District, USA
Steven Kroman, Texas Intensive English Program, USA Camelle Simmons, Cobb County School District, USA
Liz England, Liz England and Associates, LLC, USA
Christine Coombe, Dubai Men’s College, United Arab Emirates Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Fife MacDuff, U.S. Department of State, USA Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom B
Jane Hoelker, Community College of Qatar, Qatar
Interest and Confidence in Real and
Imagined L2 Speaking Events
Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am Content Area: Applied Linguistics
Sheraton Seattle, Capitol Hill
Confidence (self-efficacy) and interest are important for successful
Graphics and ELLs: Supporting Content‑Area
L2 learning, but the relationship between them remains inadequately
Comprehension and L2 Development
understood. This session describes an investigation of these
Content Area: Reading and Literacy
motivational qualities experienced by Japanese university students of
This presentation models how to evaluate whether textbook graphics English, at three levels of proficiency, as manifested in imagined and
support ELL students’ comprehension. Textbooks layouts have recently actual L2 speaking events.
shifted to mirror web pages, but ELL students require more than John Eidswick, Kyoto Sangyo University, Japan
engaging visuals to build knowledge. This presentation summarizes
text analysis findings and assist participants in evaluating and
selecting textbooks for ELLs. Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
WSCC, 214
Zohreh Eslami, Texas A&M University, USA
Just Let Them Talk: Establishing Egalitarian
EFL Student‑Teacher Dialogue
Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am Content Area: Intercultural Communication
TCC, Chelan 2
Students from exam-oriented education contexts who enter university
Imagining a Place for Grammar:
may lack engagement in the language classroom. Challenging the
Techniques for Anxious Teachers
stereotype of the passive Chinese learner, this session discusses the
Content Area: Grammar
importance of empowering students’ voices based on a project of
Grammar lends meaning to our messages. In this session, we continuous student feedback practices, as implemented at a Hong

THURSDAY, 23 MARCH
demonstrate techniques for countering teachers’ anxiety about Kong university.
teaching grammar. Participants have the opportunity to test their Ksenia Troshina, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
knowledge of English grammar (anonymously!), and engage Christine Burns, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
in activities that can be used to build grammar content and
pedagogical knowledge.
Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Patricia DiCerbo, George Washington University, USA WSCC, 604
Lottie Baker, George Washington University, USA
Making the Case for Languages
Content Area: Advocacy
Do languages matter? Learn strategies and access resources for
creating incentives for language learning, including the Seal of
Biliteracy. Position languages as part of college and career readiness,
recognize programs of quality, tap new data from national studies, and
outline a roadmap for expanding language learning.
Barbara Mondloch, Franklin Pierce School, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 111
Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom B TCC, Chelan 4
Publish or Perish Syndrome in Chile Teachers’ Emotion Labor and Plagiarism:
Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition Connecting Policies, Pedagogy, and Emotions
Non-Anglophone scholars face enormous pressures to publish in Content Area: Teacher Education
English. Few succeed. This study analyzes why by reflecting on writing The relationship between EL teachers’ emotions and plagiarism
center coordinators’ experience and client surveys from three Chilean is explored in this presentation of research on ‘emotion labor’ in
universities. Difficulties involve language, structure, isolation, and postsecondary settings. Using a discursive framework, the presentation
work load. Four suggestions are made for focusing writing center work focuses on interviewees’ discussion of their affective responses
to help scholars publish. to plagiarism. Implications of emotion labor research for teacher
Marna Broekhoff, University of Oregon, USA education will also be discussed.
Gracielle Pereira, Universidad Catolica, Chile Sarah Benesch, College of Staten Island–CUNY, USA
Mary Jane Curry, University of Rochester, USA
Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom B
WSCC, 303 Teaching English to Illiterates

D
Revision of the TESOL P–12 Professional Content Area: Refugee Concerns
Teaching Standards
Content Area: Adult Education
CE L E
The Mother-Tongue literacy must stand at the heart of any

CAN
educational programs that are designed to address the teaching
The performance-based P–12 Professional Teaching Standards are process of a Second-Language to illiterate individuals. Teaching
used by the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation English to illiterates requires following special methodologies differ
(CAEP) for national recognition of ESL teacher licensure programs. from those methodologies that are used generally in teaching any
Presenters discuss the revision process, changes in the revised Second-Language.
standards’ content and structure, and the timeline for implementation Hoda Thabet, University of Sohar, Oman
of the revised standards.
Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am WSCC, 613
WSCC, 205 The Graduate Experience at the New School:
Sherlock‑Themed Scavenger Hunts: Skill Building, Innovation and Impact
Community Building, and Community Engagement Content Area: Teacher Education
Content Area: Higher Education In the tradition of the New School, the MA TESOL bridges theory
A program-wide scavenger hunt was developed by three IEP instructors and practice, remaining relevant and ensuring teachers adopt
to build program community and engage students in Sherlock mysteries social, cultural and political perspectives on global English. In this
and the local surroundings. Presenters share how they developed a presentation alumni speak to distinctive components of the MA TESOL,
hunt utilizing story elements, developed students’ language skills, got which illustrate the professional benefits of taking this program.
students out in the community, and addressed mixed-level challenges. Lesley Painter-Farrell, New School, USA
THURSDAY, 23 MARCH

Melanie Jipping, Tokyo International University of America, USA Roshii Jolly, The New School, USA
Ann Glazer, Tokyo International University of America, USA Scott Thornbury, The New School, Spain
Russell Fauss, Tokyo International University of America, USA
Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom B
WSCC, 619 The Lives of English Language Teachers:
Taking the Pain out of Assessment Universals and Particulars
Content Area: Intensive English Programs Content Area: Teacher Education
Teachers assess students on learning objectives for the course, but In this workshop, the presenters explore how teachers from diverse
when students exit the class, how do we know that all learning backgrounds and contexts around the world construct identities and
objectives have been mastered? In this session, the presenters give an face challenges while struggling to develop professionally. We move
overview of their pilot of specifications grading (Nilson, 2015) and how from individual particulars to universals of the teaching life as we work
they aligned learning objectives with assessments. to locate our own place in the global community of educators.
Diane Deacon, Saginaw Valley State University, USA Barbara Sakamoto, International Teacher Development Institute, Japan
Kate Scott, Saginaw Valley State University, USA Miguel Mendoza, Univesidad Central de Venezuela, Venezuela
Amy Cook, Saginaw Valley State University, USA Evelyn Izquierdo, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Venezuela
Karen Frazier Tsai, International Teacher Development Institute, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

112 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am 11:15 am
Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom B
Using TED Talks to Enhance Critical Thinking
Thursday, 11:15 am–12:45 pm
Content Area: Media (Print, Broadcast, Video, and Digital) Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom A
How can I use TED talks in my EFL classroom to enhance my students’ Equal Partners—Equal Opportunities
critical thinking? If you are still not sure, you should attend this Content Area: Leadership
session. Incorporating new communication and research activities
increases your students’ critical thinking and motivation. Successful examples of partnerships and collaboration among
associations are becoming more common in the TESOL affiliate
Serhii Petrenko, Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Ukraine community. This colloquium discusses experiences and models of
affiliates’ partnerships and collaborations between affiliates or
Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am between an affiliate and other types of organizations and discusses
WSCC, 614 how this collaboration has impacted affiliates.
Value Added: What Hiring MIIS Grazzia Mendoza, Zamorano University, Honduras
Graduates Offers Your Programs Christine Coombe, Dubai Men’s College, United Arab Emirates
Content Area: Teacher Education Naziha Ali, Emirates Aviation College, United Arab Emirates
What can MIIS graduates bring to your educational organization? This Susan Spezzini, University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA
session combines an overview of our graduates’ preparation to be Ulrich Schrader, MEXTESOL, Mexico
on the vanguard of teaching, assessment, curriculum development,
technology enhanced language learning, and language program 11:30 am
administration, and time for questions and conversations about our
graduates and your employment needs.
Lynn Goldstein, The Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Thursday, 11:30 am–11:50 am
Monterey, USA WSCC, 617
Digital Infographics: Engaging, Enriching,
and Empowering in a 2.0 World
Thursday, 10:30 am–11:15 am
WSCC, 612 Content Area: CALL/Computer-Assisted Language Learning/
Technology in Education
Your Next Hire: A Returned Peace Corps
TEFL Certificate Volunteer? In an increasingly visual world, digital infographics are effective tools
that students can use to present visually appealing data, information,
Content Area: Culture
and statistics. This 20-minute teaching tip introduces the use of digital
The Peace Corps TEFL Certificate is institutionalized. It is underway in infographic tools such as Visme and Venngage that can be incorporated
12 countries and expanding annually. The first Certificate graduates into ESL reading, writing, and content classes.
came home in 2016. Learn about adjustments to the program to
Suzanne Bardasz, UC Davis Extension, USA
improve sustainability and employment opportunities that are opening
up as TEFL Volunteers leave service to enter our profession.
Thursday, 11:30 am–11:50 am
Brock Brady, U.S. Peace Corps, USA
WSCC, 211

THURSDAY, 23 MARCH
Engaging Students in Filmmaking
Thursday, 10:30 am–12:15 pm
for the IEP Reading Class
Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom C
Content Area: Integrated Skills
Teaching L2 Reading: What the Research Shows
In this teaching tip, the presenter shares the insights of a filmmaking
Content Area: Reading and Literacy
project that ELLs in the IEP did for their intermediate reading class. The
Panelists highlight current research implications and instructional presenter provides filmmaking project guidelines and the rubric.
applications for L2 reading, focusing on best practices for helping
Nadezda Pimenova, Purdue University, USA
students become fluent and strategic readers, for teaching discourse
structure, and for strengthening reading/writing relationships.
Participants gain ideas for both classroom activities and overall
approaches for teaching reading.
Neil J Anderson, Brigham Young University–Hawaii, USA
William Grabe, Northern Arizona University, USA
Xiangying Jiang, West Virginia University, USA
Fredricka Stoller, Northern Arizona University, USA
Cui Zhang, Eastern Kentucky University, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 113
Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
WSCC, 304 WSCC, 618
Accommodating for Working Memory: Candid Conversations About Race in
Engaging Students Without Overloading Them Your Life, in Your Classroom
Content Area: Psycholinguistics and Neurolinguistics in TESOL Content Area: Social Responsibility/Sociopolitical Concerns
Language learning requires a lot of cognitive resources. When students Participants develop an understanding of White privilege and racism
experience cognitive overload, their learning is interrupted. This and walk away with concrete strategies to deal with insensitive
session provides an overview of the theory of working memory; it then comments and actions. This session provides hands-on activities to use
presents simple techniques for improving classroom activities so that with low-level ELLs, teaching them historical background and ways to
students can learn without experiencing cognitive overload. respond to racism in nonviolent ways.
Julia Daley, Northern Arizona University, USA Elizabeth Logue, ASPIRA Olney Charter High School, USA
Sarah Apt, ASPIRA Olney Charter High School, USA
Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
TCC, Tahoma 4 Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
Addressing Linguicism: A Classroom Language Sheraton Seattle, Madrona
Discrimination Simulation Activity Critical, but Not Overly Critical:
Content Area: Nonnative English Speakers in TESOL Facilitating Self‑Evaluation and Celebration
This presentation replicates a classroom linguistic discrimination Content Area: International Teaching Assistants
simulation activity designed to introduce a critical awareness of What could be more engaging, enriching, and empowering than
linguicism, discrimination based on language usage. The simulation strategies for ELLs and ITAs developing autonomy through self-
addresses the need to raise awareness of linguicism, the structure and evaluation? In this dialogue session, two practitioners help others
implementation process of the activity, benefits, students’ reflections, share their strategies for creating environments for learners who
and pedagogical implications for language teacher education. self-evaluate their own language, particularly pronunciation, but also
Shannon Tanghe, St. Mary’s University of Minnesota, USA celebrate their gains.
Janay Crabtree, University of Virginia, USA
Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm Carolyn Quarterman, North Carolina State University, USA
WSCC, 201
An American English Institute Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
Professional Learning Community WSCC, 307-308
Content Area: Intensive English Programs Delayed Corrective Feedback for Speaking:
A group of dedicated professionals at the University of Oregon’s Tracking Learner Output
American English Institute has been meeting for 4 years in a structured Content Area: CALL/Computer-Assisted Language Learning/
Technology in Education
learning community. In this session, several of the members discuss
how to sustain a professional learning community. The discussion Learners need corrective feedback to promote language development,
centers on common pitfalls and misconceptions. but it is challenging to provide it systematically, especially in speaking
activities. This presentation demonstrates an online application
Sandra Clark, University of Oregon, USA
THURSDAY, 23 MARCH

Monica Hatch, University of Oregon, USA designed to provide delayed corrective feedback to individuals and
groups after speaking activities. Samples of learners’ non-target-like
production are systematically collected, analyzed, and tracked.
Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
WSCC, 604
James Hunter, Gonzaga University, USA
Building Assessment Into Everyday Activities
Content Area: Assessment/Testing
Assessing students’ developing proficiency does not have to be formal
or difficult. This practical presentation explores a range of activities
that teachers can use to integrate assessment of learners’ progress
into ordinary classroom activities. Everyday assessment provides
teachers with performance data that can underpin grading and
progression decisions.
Diane Schmitt, Nottingham Trent University, United Kingdom
(Great Britain)
Deborah Crusan, Wright State University, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

114 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
WSCC, 214 WSCC, 310
Empowering Language Learners: Enriching EFL Teachers’ Repertoire to
How a Circle Process Ignites Authenticity Engage Students in Literature
Content Area: Intercultural Communication Content Area: Content-Based and CLIL/Content and Language
Integrated Learning
Amid abundant digital language-learning resources, university teachers
must ensure that face-to-face language encounters engage learners as Differentiated instruction allows EFL teachers of literature to address
complex cultural beings. This practice-oriented session demonstrates the challenges of completing a curriculum, dealing with diversity, and
how a circle process known as Way of Council enriches learning incorporating technology into the classroom. This presentation helps
through the emergence of authentic language that empowers learners them enrich their repertoire and create a more engaging approach to
to own and grow with their English. helping students understand literary genres and themes.
Bernadine Clark, Independent, USA Katja Davidoff, Boston University, USA
Kenneth Clark, Independent, USA Carol Pineiro, Boston University, USA

Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm


WSCC, 210 WSCC, 2A
Empowerment Through Reflection: Enriching Traditional Roles Through
Getting Value Out of a Capstone Subject Collaborative Professional Development
Content Area: Personal and Professional Development for Teachers Content Area: Personal and Professional Development for Teachers
This session explores how four returning Japanese school teachers Engaging in self-reflective practices fosters professional development,
made sense of their postgraduate learning experiences through a yet can be more enriching within an uncommon collaborative team
capstone subject. Informed by a symbolic interactionist framework of director and faculty. Presenters model frameworks and strategies
and a narrative inquiry approach, student experiences were explored for attendees to create a professional development project that
that identified notable impacts on teacher empowerment and English encourages a supportive, empowering culture of collaboration between
language abilities. participants of differing institutional roles.
Mark Fraser, University of Wollongong, Australia Mackenzie Bristow, Emory University, USA
Peggy Wagner, Emory University, USA
Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
WSCC, 616 Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
WSCC, 602
Engage Your ELLs Using Speak Agent
to Acquire Academic Language ESSA and ELLs: What TESOL
Content Area: Elementary School/Primary Education Professionals Need to Know
Content Area: Advocacy
Learn how to effortlessly create digital activities and interactive
challenges to help your elementary ELLs learn academic language The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) created a number of sweeping
in science, reading, math, social studies, and other subjects. policy changes that will affect ELLs and educators. K–12 teachers and
Explore teacher-produced audiovisual resources and adapt them to administrators will learn how ESSA and major changes to Title I and

THURSDAY, 23 MARCH
your instruction on any classroom/mobile device. Shave hours off Title III will impact ELLs and educators.
preparation time and receive progress reports. David Cutler, TESOL International Association, USA
Ben Grimley, Speak Agent, Inc., USA
Dan LaFountain, Speak Agent, Inc., USA Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
TCC, Skagit 2
Final Assessment for Research Writing:
Addressing Validity and Authenticity
Content Area: Higher Education
In academic research writing, final in-class assessments tend to
disregard process-oriented writing practices, and out-of-class
assessments can be distorted by outside collaboration. This
presentation offers a final writing assessment that allows for
independent research, strong content development and reflection time
while capturing a student’s authentic voice.
Becki Quick, University of Oregon, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 115
Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
WSCC, 203 WSCC, 620
Finding Your Voice: Teaching Writing Integrating Students With Special
Using Tablets With Voice Capability Needs Into an EFL Curriculum
Content Area: CALL/Computer-Assisted Language Learning/ Content Area: Learning Disabilities/Special Needs
Technology in Education
This session outlines a framework created by program managers
This is about interjecting voice, literally, into writing. It is about the and administrative staff to serve special needs students in a large-
apps needed (e.g., Google Docs), voicing writing students do on paper scale and unified curriculum for a mandatory EFL course at a private
into Docs, giving on-the-fly feedback via voice comments, and getting university in Japan. This framework is described in detail and
students themselves talking into Google Docs. Other voice apps for exemplified by specific cases of its implementation.
writing are demonstrated as well. Davey Young, Rikkyo University, Japan
Glenn Stevens, Higher Colleges of Technology, United Arab Emirates Matthew Schaefer, Rikkyo University, Japan
Jamie Lesley, Rikkyo University, Japan
Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
Sheraton Seattle, Juniper Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
Harnessing Graphic Design for a More TCC, Chelan 5
Enriching ELT Experience Key Considerations in Conducting
Content Area: Materials Writers, Curriculum/Materials Development Postobservation Conferences
The graphic design of ELT materials is an overlooked and generally Content Area: Teacher Education
underappreciated element of the same. Generally, it is considered Offering feedback during postobservation conferences is one of
more for making thinks look prettier. The presenters propose to analyse the most difficult tasks in supervising second language teachers.
how graphic design may be better used in the elaboration of more This session aims to explore key considerations in carrying out
effective materials. postobservation conferences. Participants discuss strategies for
Katharine West, Universidad Distrital Francisco Jose de conducting effective postobservation conferences.
Caldas, Colombia Thu Tran, Missouri University of Science and Technology, USA
Francisco de la Torre, Independent, Colombia
Paola Bonilla, Colegio Nueva Granada, Colombia
Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
WSCC, 3B
Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm Language Learning: The Key to
WSCC, 611 Unlocking New Standards for ELLs
Improving English in National Education Systems: Content Area: Standards, Common Core State Standards
Lessons From the World
The presenters describe social constructivist theories of language
Content Area: Language Policy and Planning
learning and how these inform pedagogy under the Common Core and
The presenter shares lessons from case-study research and other college- and career-readiness standards. Innovative instructional
experiences of large-scale national English educational reform approaches are described in relation to both theories of language
projects. Comparing projects from Africa, Asia, and the Americas, learning and current research on effective instruction of ELLs in
THURSDAY, 23 MARCH

the presenter distills four key lessons for successful project design, content-area classrooms.
implementation, and evaluation, and highlights common reasons for Lindsey Massoud, Center for Applied Linguistics, USA
failure. For those interested in large-scale English reform. Joanna Duggan, Center for Applied Linguistics, USA
John Knagg, British Council, United Kingdom (Great Britain) Sarah Moore, Center for Applied Linguistics, USA

Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm


WSCC, 613
Mainstreaming Your WIDA Students
to English Success
Content Area: CALL/Computer-Assisted Language Learning/
Technology in Education
DynEd, aligned to WIDA standards, accelerates your students’
outcomes on the ACCESS for ELLs test. Key to your success in
mainstreaming your ELLs is DynEd’s language-learning methodology,
goal-based learning models, and predictable outcomes.
Alfonso Lara, DynEd International, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

116 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
WSCC, 212 WSCC, 213
Partnering With Parents to Foster Literacy Queer as a Second Language as Inclusive Pedagogy:
Development of Young ELLs What Works?
Content Area: Elementary School/Primary Education Content Area: Content-Based and CLIL/Content and Language
Integrated Learning
Presenters share work created by 48 teachers who participated in a
professional development grant focused on literacy development of LGBTQ educators and allies often seek to employ “inclusive pedagogy”
young ELLs. Educators collaborated to develop lessons and parent- and curriculum, offering opportunities for Queer as a Second Language
friendly activities for use at home designed to support the language (QSL) content absent from published curriculum. Emergent from
and literacy development of ELLs. qualitative interviews, the presenters share practices of Pre-K–20 ESL
Leslie Grant, University of Colorado Colorado Springs, USA educators evaluated through a literature-informed rubric.
Angela Bell, Independent, USA Sherri Martin-Baron, Monroe Community College, USA
Barbara Frye, University of Colorado Colorado Springs, USA Lara Ravitch, University of Oregon, USA
Carter Winkle, Barry University, USA
Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
WSCC, 3A Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
Peering Through the Lens: International TCC, Yakima 2
Student Expectations of Academic Work Reaching Differently‑abled Adult ELLs:
Content Area: Higher Education Drawing From Canadian Experiences
Content Area: Learning Disabilities/Special Needs
The International Student Work Expectations survey was piloted with
166 international students at a U.S. university. Statistically significant The presenter shares the procedures for inclusion when working with
results were found along five streams: (a) type of work, (b) application adult ELLs with disabilities. Instructional strategies for adult ELLs who
of research, (c) individual contribution, (d) academic participation, and have not been identified with disabilities but required special attention
(e) grading differences. Participants discuss the findings and their are also presented. Participants have opportunities to identify, discuss,
own experiences. and incorporate strategies, including Universal Design for Learning and
Kevin Martin, Virginia International University, USA differentiated instruction.
Raj Khatri, University of Victoria, Canada
Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
TCC, Tahoma 3 Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
Providing EAP Listening Input: WSCC, 204
An Evaluation of Recorded Listening Passages Reflective Practice for Preservice EFL Teachers:
Content Area: Listening, Speaking/Speech Action Research Project
Content Area: Teacher Education
Are the recorded passages that accompany listening textbooks
providing students with exposure to all the necessary elements of Although action research has become a common practice for in-service
academic lecture language? The presenter shares results of a corpus- language teachers, this study demonstrates that preservice language
based study, illustrating what recorded passages do well, where teachers also consider such practices as a problem-solving process.

THURSDAY, 23 MARCH
they fall short, and providing activities designed to supplement EAP Moreover, the study discusses the importance of such self-reflective
listening instruction. practices and how they facilitate the effectiveness of preservice
Erin Schnur, Northern Arizona University, USA English language teacher education programs.
Hatime Ciftci, Bahcesehir University, Turkey
Enisa Mede, Bahcesehir University, Turkey
Derin Atay, Bahcesehir University, Turkey

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 117
Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
WSCC, 610 WSCC, 605
Rethinking Online Course Design to Teaching Grammar Through Storytelling:
Enhance Interaction and Learning A Dialogical Approach
Content Area: Teacher Education Content Area: Grammar
Online education is often limited to posting and responding in Truly Vygotskian in nature, a dialogical approach to teaching
forums and completing writing assignments. An overuse of forums grammar encourages language learners to reflect on use of target
is monotonous and demotivating to students. This interactive language forms, collaborate and coconstruct meaningful grammatical
presentation includes principles for and examples of creative and explanations, and so much more. Storytelling is one such tool that
engaging assignments and activities that can energize learners allows students and teachers to discuss grammar.
in online courses. Randa Taftaf, University of South Florida, USA
Tasha Bleistein, Azusa Pacific University, USA
Jennifer Hirashiki, Westcliff University, USA Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
WSCC, 615
Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm The Critical Role of Grammar and
TCC, Tahoma 1 Syntax in Academic Language
Strengthening Students’ Voices Content Area: Grammar
Through Effective Feedback If ELLs are to access more rigorous standards, they must be able to
Content Area: English as a Foreign Language discuss, read, and write academic texts. Certainly, an understanding of
This session aims at showing a few techniques that provide academic vocabulary is critical. But explicit instruction in grammar and
meaningful feedback to students based on their online interactions in syntax is every bit as important. This session describes why and shares
a blended teacher-development course in an EFL setting. Participants specific strategies.
discuss and learn how guided interactions among teacher- David Freeman, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, USA
students and students themselves contribute successfully to their Yvonne Freeman, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, USA
learning outcomes.
Vania Rodrigues, Casa Thomas Jefferson, Brazil Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
WSCC, 603
Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm The Norm Dilemma: Lecturer Certification
TCC, Chelan 2 for English Medium Instruction (EMI)
Supporting the Professional Growth Content Area: International Teaching Assistants
of TESOL Supervisors The presenters describe validation studies for a performance-based
Content Area: Teacher Education EAP certification test, the Test of Oral English Proficiency for Academic
Although supervisors spend a great deal of one-to-one time providing Staff (TOEPAS), designed to assess lecturers’ oral proficiency for
feedback, they themselves often do not receive feedback on their coping with the demands of English-medium instruction (EMI). Updated
practice. The research discussed focuses on the impact of inviting TOEPAS assessment criteria and a new global assessment scale
supervisors to video their conference sessions and to engage in the are also presented.
THURSDAY, 23 MARCH

self-observation process that we routinely ask candidates to engage in. Joyce Kling, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
Laura Baecher, Hunter College–CUNY, USA Slobodanka Dimova, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm


Sheraton Seattle, Metropolitan B WSCC, 205
Teaching and Assessing ELL The Power of Credit:
Students’ Accountable Talk Strategies for Invigorating Your ESL Program
Content Area: High School/Secondary Education Content Area: Community College and Technical Education
“How can I tell what I think till I see what I say?” Let’s engage ELLs Credit-bearing ESL programs are necessary and essential players
in accountable talk! This session provides instructional strategies on in higher education. ESL instructors, program administrators, and
teaching academic discussion skills to ELLs, monitoring, and assessing support staff need strong strategies to empower themselves in order
their performance along the way. These strategies can be used to maintain the academic integrity of their programs. This presentation
immediately in any content classroom. provides 5 “Es” to invigorate your ESL program: engage, enrich,
Fenglan Yi-Cline, University of Washington, USA energize, empower, and equalize.
Stephanie Brown, Holyoke Community College, USA
Vivian Leskes, Holyoke Community College, USA
Eileen Kelley, Holyoke Community College, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

118 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
TCC, Yakima 1 WSCC, 612
Training a Nation: Empowering Teachers Utilizing a Language Lab to Maximize
Through Large‑Scale Reform Language Acquisition
Content Area: Personal and Professional Development for Teachers Content Area: Listening, Speaking/Speech
In response to a national bilingualism policy announced by the Finding adequate time for students to practice the target language
president in 2014, great strides are being taken in Peru to increase can be a challenge. Imagine if you could allow every student more
English language proficiency throughout the nation. This presentation time with the target language, differentiate instruction and activities
outlines the process from needs assessment to intervention easily, and provide immediate feedback. The possibilities are limitless
and monitoring in the training of the country’s public English for communication and comprehension activities using Robotel’s
teacher trainers. SmartClass+ language lab.
Maggie Steingraeber, English Language Programs, USA Lindsey Klein, Robotel SmartClass+ Language Lab, USA
William Machaca, Ministry of Education, Peru
Lisa Mann, English Language Programs, USA Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
TCC, Chelan 4
Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm Win, Win, Win: TEFL Practicum as Study Abroad
WSCC, 614 Content Area: Teacher Education
Understanding Culture: From Simple to The presenters describe a month-long in situ TEFL practicum
Complex Definitions and Frameworks
course that evolved from a partnership between a Chinese and an
Content Area: Culture American university. The presenters describe the development and
In this session, a series of definitions and frameworks of culture implementation of the popular course and share the impressions of
are presented, from the simple to the complex, in order to provide a both the American university student participants and their Chinese
multifaceted exploration of the intricacy and dynamics of culture and institution hosts.
how it relates to language and language teaching. Louise Gobron, Georgia State University, USA
Dianne Tyers, Advance Consulting for Education, Inc, Canada Kris Acheson-Clair, Georgia State University, USA
Xueying Wu, Shanghai University, China (People’s Republic)
Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
Sheraton Seattle, Ballard Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
Using Authentic Texts to Help Refugees Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom D
With Functional Literacy Winning Games: Creative Twists on Popular
Content Area: Refugee Concerns Games to Maximize Participation
Textbooks do not always address the functional literacy needs of Content Area: Elementary School/Primary Education
refugees. In this session, the presenter shares five lessons created Games can be valuable, but in popular whole-class games, most
from authentic texts that refugees need in their daily lives and show students sit, watch, and wait for their turn. In this session, we
the reading subskills that each lesson targets and discusses how introduce creative, low-prep ways to maximize individual participation,
refugees responded to these lessons. using three games as models: Password, Jeopardy, Fly Swatter.

THURSDAY, 23 MARCH
Curt Reese, University of Texas at Austin, USA Meg Parker, UC Irvine, USA
Emily Wong, UC Irvine, USA
Thursday, 11:30 am–12:15 pm
WSCC, 619
Using Multiple Measures to Choose
Level‑Appropriate Textbooks
Content Area: Intensive English Programs
Choosing textbooks is often done subjectively based on teacher
intuition. Though teacher intuition is important, educators should
also include objective measures of textbooks in their decision-
making. This presentation discusses how to use objective measures,
such as vocabulary, readability, and grade level, to select level-
appropriate textbooks.
Caitlin Hamstra, Central Michigan University, USA
Amy Bell, Central Michigan University, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 119
Thursday, 11:30 am–1:15 pm Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
Sheraton Seattle, Aspen WSCC, 310
Critical Pedagogies in ELT: Barron’s TOEFL iBT: The Next Generation
Classroom Applications and Lessons Content Area: Assessment/Testing
Content Area: Social Responsibility/Sociopolitical Concerns In keeping with the theme of the convention, Barron’s unveils its plan
This panel provides five concrete examples of critical ELT pedagogy for an innovative edition of the classic Barron’s TOEFL iBT book. Join
practices, emphasizing the challenges of implementation across the author for a look into the future of TOEFL preparation: Barron’s
classrooms and the specific opportunities for transformative pedagogy TOEFL 2.0. Leave with ideas, materials, and a book to upgrade
and critical insight that arise in each setting. Examples range from your TOEFL program.
EAP classrooms to teacher education programs in the USA, Canada, Pamela Sharpe, Barron’s Educational Series, USA
Mexico, and Australia.
Christian Chun, University of Massachusetts Boston, USA Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
Suhanthie Motha, University of Washington, USA WSCC, 201
Brian Morgan, York University–Glendon College, Canada
Stephanie Vandrick, University of San Francisco, USA Comprehension Out Loud: Collaborative
Mario López Gopar, Universidad Autónoma Benito Juárez de Strategic Activities for Building Reading Skills
Oaxaca, Mexico Content Area: Reading and Literacy
Are you looking for engaging ways to help your students build
academic reading comprehension skills? The presenters demonstrate
1:00 pm scaffolded group activities for students to summarize, paraphrase, and
respond to main ideas while ensuring individual accountability and
Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm equal participation. Participants leave with resources for designing
WSCC, 307-308 reading lessons that get students talking.
“More Than a Native Speaker”: Barbara Flocke, University of Colorado Boulder, USA
New Perspectives, New Edition Ruth Moore, University of Colorado Boulder, USA
Content Area: Second Language Acquisition
In this session, the presenters reflect on the special needs of novice Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
teachers working in EFL environments, and how such teaching WSCC, 604
environments differ from ESL settings. They introduce the new features Connect, Converse, Collaborate: Bridging the
of the third edition of “More Than a Native Speaker,” and end the Gap Between TESOLers and Affiliates
session with Q&A. Content Area: English as a Foreign Language
Don Snow, Duke Kunshan University, China (People’s Republic) How does networking with NS and NNS colleagues across the globe
Maxi-Ann Campbell, Duke Kunshan University, China (People’s Republic) germinate, postconvention, into meaningful connections that foster
growth and innovation in the classroom? This presentation connects
Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm TESOLers and affiliates in ongoing ELT collaborations through cross-
WSCC, 211 mentoring partnerships to bridge the gap between ESL and EFL
Academic Success Right From the Very professionals worldwide.
THURSDAY, 23 MARCH

Beginning With Trio Reading Shumaila Omar, Institute of Business Management, Pakistan
Content Area: Reading and Literacy
Come explore lesson design, strategies, and activities that support Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
students’ academic start. We will look at Trio Reading, a program TCC, Tahoma 1
that focuses on the fundamental skills beginning ESL readers need for Dealing With Adult Learners’ Speaking Stress
understanding and engaging with academic texts and also learn about Content Area: English as a Foreign Language
its companions: Trio Writing and Trio Listening and Speaking. This presentation aims at working with techniques to help adult
Kate Adams, Independent, USA learners overcome speaking difficulties in an EFL classroom. The
presenters describe factors that hinder or facilitate oral production and
show how they tackle this issue with adult students. They also share
activities that boost speaking acquisition.
Claudia Farias, Casa Thomas Jefferson, Brazil
Selma Almeida, Casa Thomas Jefferson, Brazil

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

120 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
TCC, Skagit 2 WSCC, 214
Dialogic Feedback: Rethinking Written Empowering Readers (and Teachers)
Corrective Feedback With Idea‑Based Reading Skills
Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition Content Area: Intensive English Programs
Using results from classroom research, this presentation demonstrates Do your intermediate to advanced students read Every Little
how an in-depth investigation of L2 students’ revision practices Thing? Do they focus on words only? Lack textual engagement?
over the period of one semester in IEP courses may challenge the Totally miss or misunderstand main ideas? Empower yourself and
traditional view of corrective feedback. Implications for the L2 writing your students with engaging idea-based reading skills to improve
classroom are discussed. speed and comprehension as well iBT and iELTS scores. Resources
Shokhsanam Djalilova, University of Mississippi, USA and links provided.
Cristin Boyd, San Jose State University, USA
Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
WSCC, 2A Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
Effectiveness of ELL Preparation Courses Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom C
on In-Service Teachers’ Self‑Efficacy Engaging Multilingualism in ESOL Classrooms:
Content Area: Teacher Education Toward Culturally Linguistically Sustaining Pedagogy
The study discussed investigates the impact of ELL teaching Content Area: Teacher Education
preparation courses on the level of in-service teachers’ self-efficacy This session counters the tension between ESOL students’ multilingual
changes over a semester. Along with a summary of the study, the practices and monolingual assessment in schools. Drawing upon Paris’s
presenters provide sample materials identified as the most effective to notion of culturally sustaining pedagogy, which has as its explicit
inform their teacher practices. goal perpetuating and sustaining linguistic and cultural pluralism, the
SungAe Kim, Purdue University, USA presenter discusses how we might constructively engage students’
Patricia Morita-Mullaney, Purdue University, USA multilingualism in the ESOL classroom.
Shondel Nero, New York University, USA
Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
Sheraton Seattle, Madrona Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
Empowering ITA Practitioners by Sheraton Seattle, Capitol Hill
Enriching an Outdated Assessment Flexible, Free, and Open Data‑Driven
Content Area: International Teaching Assistants Learning for the Masses
The SPEAK test is commonly used by international teaching assistant Content Area: Media (Print, Broadcast, Video, and Digital)
programs, but many programs are searching for a more appropriate and This presentation shares findings from multisite research with the
relevant alternative that is as efficient, consistent, and cost-effective. open-source FLAX (Flexible Language Acquisition) project. Open digital
In this session, presenters share issues and perspectives on using the collections used in formal classroom-based language education and
SPEAK and revising/replacing it to address testing concerns. in nonformal online education (MOOCs) are presented to demonstrate
Elise Geither, Case Western Reserve University, USA how openly licensed linguistic content using data-driven methods can

THURSDAY, 23 MARCH
Liz Tummons, University of Missouri, USA support learning, teaching, and materials development.
Elizabeth Wittner, University of Virginia, USA Alannah Fitzgerald, Concordia University, USA

Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm


WSCC, 203 WSCC, 210
Empowering Learning Online: Ideological Construction of Racial
Aligning Objectives, Activities, and Assessments Images in EFL Textbooks
Content Area: Distance Learning/Online Learning Content Area: Educational Linguistics
Alignment is fundamental to a successful online ESL course by This study investigates how racialized identities are shaped in the
promoting learning and retention. The presenters demonstrate how visual representations of high school English language textbooks in
to align objectives, technology, activities, and assessments and share Taiwan. By adopting a critical image analysis, the study discussed
examples of well-designed courses as well as potential errors of poor aims to unpack the equal power relations of racial groups embedded in
design. Participants receive guidelines for aligning course elements Taiwan EFL textbooks to achieve social justice and equality.
and develop an aligned module. Tsung-han Weng, University of Kansas, USA
Sarah Barnhardt, Community College of Baltimore County, USA
Mary Peacock, Richland College, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 121
Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
WSCC, 213 WSCC, 212
Interfaith Palestinian Educators and Friends Literature on Peacebuilding Promotes Summer
for Justice, Peace, and Reconciliation Language and Literacy Development
Content Area: Social Responsibility/Sociopolitical Concerns Content Area: Social Responsibility/Sociopolitical Concerns
Interfaith Palestinian Educators and Friends for Peace, Justice and Literacy in a program for middle school students with interrupted
Reconciliation is a forum to promote international exchange and education extends through a summer book club at the community
collaboration between Palestinian English Language Educators library. Presenter provides background research and rationale and
and Friends in the Middle East and concerned TESOL professionals demonstrates strategies using quality multicultural thematic literature
throughout the world, focusing on the challenging educational contexts that motivates learners to read, promotes engaged oral language use,
of conflict and war. and facilitates enriching literacy activities.
Liana Smith, Montgomery College, USA Mary Lou McCloskey, The Global Village Project, USA
Salameh Bishara, Lutheran Schools of Evangelical Lutheran Church in Amy Pelissero, The Global Village Project, USA
Jordan and The Holy Land, Israel
Ahmad Atawneh, Hebron University, Israel Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
Ibrahim El Hussari, Lebanese American University, Lebanon Sheraton Seattle, Kirkland
Reem Jaber, Evangelical School of Hope, Israel
Nazmi Al Mazri, Islamic University of Gaza, Israel Multilingual/Multimodal Writing as an Act of Identity:
Zein’s Case
Content Area: Refugee Concerns
Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
WSCC, 3A Framed within Ivanič’s conceptualization of language, learning,
and identity, the study discussed aims at examining how one Iraqi
International Student Orientations 2.0:
adolescent refugee ELL constructs his identity through engaging in
Creating a Campus Home
multilingual (e.g., use of “Arabizi”) and multimodal (e.g., developing
Content Area: Program Administration
video games and comic YouTube videos) school-based and out-of-
IEPs must find ways to help students participate in campus activities school writing practices.
in order to maximize their experience and increase retention. Project- Fares Karam, University of Nevada, USA
based orientations meet this challenge in a way that engages, Amanda Kibler, University of Virginia, USA
enriches, and empowers international students. Presenters show
how to utilize campus partnerships for seamless integration
into campus life. Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
WSCC, 619
Karen Lioy, University of North Texas, USA
Jessalyn Mayer, University of North Texas, USA Photography in ELT: Engage, Inspire, Create, Learn
Benjamin Wright, University of North Texas, USA Content Area: Arts
Get your students thinking beyond the selfie and using their phone
Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm cameras as interactive and fun language learning devices. This
WSCC, 613 presentation introduces and demonstrates photography-based
activities and lessons for building skills in vocabulary, oral expression,
THURSDAY, 23 MARCH

Like, Comment, Share: Building English


Learning Communities Through Facebook creative writing, community engagement, and more for all levels of
ELLs and photographers.
Content Area: Media (Print, Broadcast, Video, and Digital)
Crystal Bock Thiessen, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, USA
In the fast-paced world of globalization and technology, building
successful online communities is challenging. Explore best practices
for promoting English language learning while building an online
community. Hear from the U.S. Department of State, whose American
English Facebook page has grown into a global community of more
than 3.5 million ELLs.
Heidi Howland, U.S. Department of State, USA
Kevin McCaughey, U.S. Department of State, USA
Roger Cohen, U.S. Department of State, USA
Ruth Petzold, U.S. Department of State, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

122 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom D Sheraton Seattle, Ballard
Piloting Writing Analysis to Distinguish Between Selecting and Adapting Tasks for
Language Development and Disability Adult Multilevel ESL Classes
Content Area: Learning Disabilities/Special Needs Content Area: Task-Based, Project-Based Instruction
Presenters report on pilot efforts analyzing writing to distinguish Need to quickly adapt tasks for your multilevel adult ESL classes? The
ELLs who exhibit typical second language acquisition from those with presenters share four practical, easy-to-use frameworks for modifying
language-based learning disabilities. After the presenters provide tasks and provide examples corresponding to each. Participants gain
exemplars, participants analyze writing samples for possible language- experience in adapting tasks of relevance to their classes.
based learning disabilities to determine the characteristics of those Marilyn Abbott, University of Alberta, Canada
who might or might not have disabilities.
Paul Abraham, Simmons College, USA Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
Greta Phillips, Newton Public Schools, USA TCC, Chelan 2
Gareth Lindwall Honig, Newton Public Schools, USA
Taking U.S. MA TESOL Students Abroad:
Opportunities and Challenges
Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm Content Area: Teacher Education
TCC, Yakima 2
International service learning is exciting as participants can experience
Preparing Adult ELLs for Online and teaching English and simultaneously be language learners. The
Blended Language Learning presenters share findings from a U.S. program taking MA students
Content Area: Distance Learning/Online Learning to Costa Rica the summer of 2016 and exchange guiding practices in
Adult ELLs may need to develop digital literacy skills for successful preparing a course on teaching English in global contexts.
engagement in online/blended language learning. Presenters share Laura Baecher, Hunter College–CUNY, USA
a 10-module Preparation for Online Learning course and instructor Samantha Chung, New York City Department of Education, USA
guide. Participants leave with resources to adapt and implement
their own prep course or stand-alone lessons for successful online
Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
learning for adult ELLs.
WSCC, 303
Bonnie Nicholas, NorQuest College, Canada
Teacher Written Feedback:
Rozita Amini, NorQuest College, Canada
Focus on Student Revision and Text Quality
Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition
Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
Revision is an important writing process. It helps writers to rediscover
WSCC, 615
meaning, rearrange the structure, and refine the style and language.
Put Your Students on the Right Learning Path The presenters report part of a large study that investigated the
Content Area: Higher Education effects of pedagogical treatment on EFL students’ revision and
Preparing students for academic study in the 21st century requires writing improvement.
more than just authentic materials, engaging media, and stimulating Lawrence Jun Zhang, University of Auckland, New Zealand
activities. Real preparation involves instilling an academic mindset in Hua Geng, Nanjing University, China (People’s Republic)

THURSDAY, 23 MARCH
students and setting them on a purposeful learning path. Learn how to
create an energizing learning sequence for your students.
Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
Michael Rost, Independent, USA WSCC, 304
Teachers’ Attitudes, Roles, and Challenges
Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm When Implementing Critical Pedagogy
WSCC, 620 Content Area: Applied Linguistics
Reaching TESOL’s Potential: The presenter, drawing on data from a study, discusses in-service
Leadership, Relationship, and Your Organzation teachers’ attitudes, roles, and challenges when implementing critical
Content Area: Leadership pedagogy (CP) in Nepal’s EFL classroom. The study discussed is useful
While programming for TESOL is essential, no program will experience for teachers and researchers interested in CP and is expected to
success unless those implementing the program share a vision and contribute to the literature on CP in EFL contexts.
have a heart for ELLs’ progress. This workshop explores the research Jagadish Paudel, Dadeldhura Multiple Campus, Nepal
supporting character and compassion in ELL educators and presents
steps for improving TESOL leadership and relationships.
Dan Shepherd, Missouri Western State University, USA
Sanghee Yeon, Defense Language Institute, South Korea

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 123
Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm Thursday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm
WSCC, 614 WSCC, 618
Teaching and Learning Vocabulary 7 Topics Absent From ELT Textbooks:
Content Area: Vocabulary/Lexicon Keeping Hidden Curriculum Hidden
This session begins with a brief examination of the nature of the Content Area: Materials Writers, Curriculum/Materials Development
English lexicon, followed by an exploration of the dimensions of Textbook characters are never divorced; never LGBTQ; never drink
an ordinary lexeme. Participants experience specific techniques for wine or eat pork; and never discuss politics, sex, or religion: This
teaching vocabulary from several Pro Lingua publications, and conclude offers a distortion of the target culture. In this InterSection, panelists
with a discussion on approaches to teaching vocabulary. Raffle follows. representing various aspects of curriculum development, publishing,
Raymond Clark, Pro Lingua Associates, USA and teaching explore the implications of “PARSNIPs” in English
Andy Burrows, Pro Lingua Associates, USA language curriculum.
Walton Burns, Independent, USA
Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm Keith Folse, University of Central Florida, USA
WSCC, 616 Lara Ravitch, University of Oregon, USA
Scott Thornbury, The New School, Spain
Technology and Imagine Learning:
Accelerating Learning for ELLs
Content Area: Elementary School/Primary Education Thursday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm
TCC, Yakima 1
School districts are microcosms of the diversity in American society,
and that diversity has created the need for more effective instruction Brick by Brick: Building Academic Writing
With Elaborate Noun Phrases
for second language learners. Discover how technology and Imagine
Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition
Learning, working together, provide highly engaging language and
literacy instruction that accelerates English language development in IEP textbooks and curricula lend great weight to complex sentences
tandem with academic instruction. but fail to give sufficient, if any, time to complex nouns. In this
Arlene Vavasseur Fortier, Imagine Learning, USA workshop, participants create activities to develop learners’ awareness
and use of noun phrases and adapt these activities for their own
instructional contexts.
Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm
TCC, Chelan 4 Noah Schmidt, Spring International Language Center, USA
Nazila Aliyeva, Spring International Language Center, USA
The Impact of Master’s Theses on EFL Tony Hartman, Spring International Language Center, USA
Teachers’ Professional Learning Angela Ward, Spring International Language Center, USA
Content Area: Teacher Education
This presentation explores the impact of the master’s thesis on the Thursday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm
professional learning of EFL in-service teachers from seven teacher TCC, Tahoma 4
education programs in Colombia. The main areas of professional
Effective Public‑Private Partnerships in
learning that are supported through this project are examined English for Professional Purposes
as well as the implications for in-service teachers and teacher
Content Area: English for Specific Purposes
education programs.
THURSDAY, 23 MARCH

This panel presents three perspectives on building strong partnerships


Julio Gomez, Universidad Externado de Colombia, Colombia
between private sector language training providers and federal
government sponsors in English for professional purposes programs.
Thursday, 1:00 pm–1:45 pm Presenters describe challenges in expectation management, needs
Sheraton Seattle, Issaquah assessment, instruction and curriculum design, logistics, learner
Wanted: Excellent Hybrid Teachers. diversity, and learner motivation, and outline their approaches to
Must Be… Must Have… successful resolution.
Content Area: Program Administration Deborah Kennedy, Center for Applied Linguistics, USA
Having excellent teachers to deliver hybrid courses is a poignant Kevin Gormley, U.S. Department of Defense, USA
concern. It is no small feat for administrators to identify and hire Heidi Faust, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, USA
professionals who will be successful both online and on-ground. Nancy Schaffman, U.S. Department of Defense, USA
Presenters share a study done with outstanding hybrid language Christa Hansen, Georgetown University, USA
teachers and pinpoint the key factors in their success. Sharon Halstead, Federal Bureau of Investigation, USA
Silvia Laborde, Alianza Cultural Uruguay-Estados Unidos, Uruguay
Rosario Giraldez, Alianza Cultural Uruguay-Estados Unidos, Uruguay

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

124 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Thursday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm Thursday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm
TCC, Tahoma 3 WSCC, 611
Essentials of Haptic Pronunciation Teaching Lessons Learned From Designing and Implementing
Content Area: Listening, Speaking/Speech Large Professional Development Projects
This workshop presents a set of haptic (movement + touch)-based Content Area: Teacher Education
instructional techniques for presenting and correcting English L2 Considering implementing a new program for ELL educators? A
pronunciation, applicable for intermediate ELLs and above. Guided panel of project directors and district partners from three multiyear
by recent research on kinesthetic approaches to L2 pronunciation professional development projects funded by the U.S. Office of English
instruction, participants leave prepared to use the instructional Language Acquisition share challenges and insights encountered
techniques in their classrooms. in their project designs and implementations, and regarding
Nathan Kielstra, Trinity Western University, Canada sustainability. Highlights include five outcomes based on project data.
Karen Rauser, University of British Colombia, Canada Michaela Colombo, University of Massachusetts Lowell, USA
Laurie Hartwick, Lawrence Public Schools, USA
Thursday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm Judy Sharkey, University of New Hampshire, USA
WSCC, 617 Cynthia Stacy-Sevigny, University of New Hampshire, USA
Julie Whitlow, Salem State University, USA
Fostering Digital Responsibility
by Understanding Fair Use
Content Area: Media (Print, Broadcast, Video, and Digital) Thursday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm
TCC, Chelan 5
The plethora of easy-to-access content on the Internet makes it
Smartphones: Cyber Spicing Classes for Adults
tempting for students and teachers alike to use copyrighted works
Content Area: English as a Foreign Language
without understanding fair use. Come learn how to how to protect your
work, what factors to consider to fairly use digital content, and how to This hands-on session shows attendants how useful and practical it is
teach about fair use. to use smartphones when teaching adult learners. Aiming at making
Julie Lopez, University of Delaware, USA lessons more appealing for learners, presenters provide educators
Nancy Overman, Georgetown University, USA with activities that make lessons more dynamic and motivating
Nicky Hockly, The Consultants-E, USA by connecting adults with different technological resources and
their own gadgets.
Thursday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm Eliane Lima, Casa Thomas Jefferson, Brazil
Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom A Celina Rebouças, Casa Thomas Jefferson, Brazil
Issues in Implementing Learning
Strategy Instruction for ELLs Thursday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm
Content Area: English as a Foreign Language WSCC, 610

Panelists address research and practice in teaching learning strategies Successful Program Design in Teacher
to ESL/EFL students in both international and U.S. contexts. Topics Professional Development
include: culture strategies, affective strategies, and assessment within Content Area: Teacher Education
contemporary culturally diverse classes; grammar learning strategies The session reviews the features of the designs of successful

THURSDAY, 23 MARCH
for advanced students; global online interactive learning strategies applicants in the latest National Professional Development grant
instruction; and differentiating language learning strategies instruction. competition. This federal program aims to improve classroom
Anna Uhl Chamot, George Washington University, USA instruction for ELLs as an outcome of collaboration between
Christina Gkonou, University of Essex, United Kingdom (Great Britain) institutions of higher education and local educational agencies.
Rebecca Oxford, University of Maryland, USA Andrea Hellman, Missouri State University, USA
Miroslaw Pawlak, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poland
Jill Robbins, Voice of America, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 125
Thursday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm Thursday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm
WSCC, 605 WSCC, 603
Teaching Students Living With Trauma, Washington’s I‑DEA:
Violence, and Chronic Stress Flipping Instruction for Adult ELLs
Content Area: Elementary School/Primary Education Content Area: Adult Education
Though much information is available about working with the epic Project I-DEA, funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation,
number of students experiencing trauma, violence, and chronic stress, has concluded a 3-year pilot. The curriculum includes 31 flipped
it’s generally from a therapeutic and counseling perspective. This instructional modules designed to accelerate learning of lower level
session focuses on teaching and school-wide practices that support ELLs. Presenters share project design, the revised openly licensed
students’ development of resiliency, engagement in learning and their curriculum, and project data.
classroom community, and academic success. Jodi Ruback, Washington State Board for Community and Technical
Debbie Zacarian, Debbie Zacarian, Ed.D. & Associates, USA Colleges, USA
Helaine W. Marshall, Long Island University Hudson, USA Adria Katka, North Seattle College, USA
Judie Haynes, everythingESL, USA
Laura Lukens, North Kansas City Schools, USA Thursday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm
Sheraton Seattle, Metropolitan B
Thursday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm Empowering and Enriching an
WSCC, 3B ESL Program on the Brink
The 5 Myths of the 5‑Paragraph Essay Content Area: Higher Education
Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition Have sharp declines in enrollment put your ESL program on the
Despite attempts to limit or discourage its use, the five-paragraph chopping block? Empower yourself with persuasive evidence
essay lives on in L2 writing classrooms, assignments, and assessments that will help you convince stakeholders to save your program!
across the educational spectrum. The panelists dissect five myths that Glimpse worldwide trends and enrollment projections in English
are often cited in support of this formulaic approach to writing and language programs, and discover how you can enrich your program
propose practical, effective alternatives. despite low enrollment.
Nigel Caplan, University of Delaware, USA Gail Lugo, Trine University, USA
Deborah Crusan, Wright State University, USA Mark Algren, University of Missouri, USA
Dana Ferris, UC Davis, USA David Colbert, Trine University, USA
Ann Johns, San Diego State University, USA Graham Reeves, Trine University, USA
Luciana de Oliveira, University of Miami, USA Kate Villafranca, Trine University, USA
Christina Ortmeier-Hooper, University of New Hampshire, USA
Thursday, 1:00 pm–4:45 pm
Thursday, 1:00 pm–2:45 pm WSCC, 602
WSCC, 205 ELLs, Immigrant Students, and U.S. Law
Using Ethnographic Methodology to Content Area: Advocacy
Examine Language Use in Context Representatives from the Office for Civil Rights at the U.S. Department
THURSDAY, 23 MARCH

Content Area: English for Specific Purposes of Education, the U.S. Department of Justice, and the Migrant
ESP practitioners rarely use ethnographic approaches to examine Legal Action Program.
language use in context for needs analyses and program designing. Roger Rosenthal, Migrant Legal Action Program, USA
This panel presents ethnographic methodologies applicable to both James Ferg-Cadima, U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil
EAP and EOP contexts, which are research-based and practical Rights, USA
applications that can be utilized by ESP practitioners. Emily McCarthy, U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division, USA
Esther Perez-Apple, Perez Apple and Company, USA
Dan Douglas, Iowa State University, USA
Shelley Staples, University of Arizona, USA
Shahid Abrar-ul-Hassan, University of British Columbia, Canada

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

126 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


2:00 pm Thursday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
WSCC, 3A
Communities, Culture, and Developing Arguments:
Thursday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
Engagement in Graduate Classes
WSCC, 613
Content Area: Culture
A CPD Framework for the Design of
Teacher Education Projects The presenters describe how international students learned about
Content Area: Teacher Education the concept of communities of practice, thereby enriching their
understanding of the cultural adaptation process. This understanding
The presenter discusses an international continuing development empowered them to construct arguments about how to tailor their
framework for English teachers and its applications in different adaptation to their individual needs in order to become engaged
countries. The research-based framework is based on 12 professional members of the academic community.
competences and 4 stages of competence. Discuss and reflect on how
the teachers you work with might benefit. Anastasia Khawaja, University of South Florida, USA
Dedra Carpenter, INTO University of South Florida, USA
John Knagg, British Council, United Kingdom (Great Britain)
Thursday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
Thursday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm WSCC, 203
Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom D
Does the Flipped Classroom Actually
A Reading and Vocabulary Program for Improve Student Achievement?
ELLs With Learning Disabilities Content Area: CALL/Computer-Assisted Language Learning/
Content Area: Elementary School/Primary Education Technology in Education
This presentation describes a highly structured reading comprehension The flipped classroom is attracting much current interest globally.
and vocabulary program designed to improve the reading abilities Student perceptions of using more technology and video recorded
of ELLs with mild learning disabilities. The presenter describes the lessons are positive, although assessment results across many
program components and discusses the classroom management disciplines vary. Presenters share their experiences flipping
conditions for such a program to be effective. Questions and answers experimental courses and report on differences in student achievement
follow the presentation. and digital literacy compared to control classes.
Lía Kamhi-Stein, California State University, Los Angeles, USA Marie Webb, Anaheim University, USA
Evelyn Doman, University of Guam, Guam
Thursday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
WSCC, 614 Thursday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
CASAS: Assess — Learn — Achieve WSCC, 619
Content Area: Adult Education Empowering Students Through Advising:
This session showcases the resources CASAS offers—many at A Systems Approach for IEP Coaching
no cost—that help agencies implement quality ELL programs with Content Area: Intensive English Programs
standardized accountability measures. The CASAS framework In this session, the presenters provide an outline of IEP-specific
assists programs to assess, instruct, and track youth and adult ELLs’ advising practices and procedures based on an IEP that uses a

THURSDAY, 23 MARCH
progress from beginning literacy through transition to postsecondary system of advising designed to meet students’ needs. Sample forms
and the workforce. and policies are provided. Participants are encouraged to actively
Linda Taylor, CASAS, USA engage in the session.
Jane Eguez, CASAS, USA Pamela Smart-Smith, Virginia Tech Language and Culture Institute, USA
Sondra Schreiber, Virginia Tech Language and Culture Institute, USA
Aniseh Ghaderi, Virginia Tech Language and Culture Institute, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 127
Thursday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm Thursday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
Sheraton Seattle, Aspen WSCC, 615
English and Elitism: Cultural Consequences Get This Write: Sentence‑Writing Practice
of the Internationalization of Education Builds Confidence Through Competence
Content Area: Social Responsibility/Sociopolitical Concerns Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition
The presenter describes part of a theoretical framework for Do your middle school, high school, university, or adult learners
understanding the internationalization of education, as it has been speak better than they write? Get This Write® offers them a unique
implemented in the Thai context. International English language self-checking online program with clear grammar explanations and
programs have become markers of status and prestige. The presenter controlled sentence-writing practice. Learners gain skill and confidence
uses this framework to argue that this process has exacerbated through this self-paced practice so teachers can focus on other
inequities in Thai society. writing activities.
Matthew Ferguson, Mahidol University International College, Thailand JoEllen Christians, Get This Write, LLC, USA

Thursday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm Thursday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm


WSCC, 616 WSCC, 201
Every Picture Tells Their Story Keep It Up: Maintaining Motivation
Content Area: Teacher Education in TOEFL Test Preparation
WRiTE BRAiN BOOKS are illustrated, wordless books with lines on Content Area: Assessment/Testing
the pages. Through narrative and creative writing curricula, designed In TOEFL classes, student motivation can plummet under the weight of
for every kind of learner, students become published authors of their boring exercises and test anxiety. This presentation examines the role
own children’s books. The WRiTE BRAiN experience increases ELLs’ of motivation in these classes and demonstrates engaging activities
proficiency in English and dramatically decreases their fear of using it. for keeping motivation high, including feedback, revision, modeling,
Meredith Scott Lynn, WRiTE BRAiN Books, USA self-reflection, visualization, and good old fun. Classroom-ready
Julia Gabor, WRiTE BRAiN Books, USA activities are provided.
Amy Tate, Rice University, USA
Thursday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
Sheraton Seattle, Kirkland Thursday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
Experiences and Perceptions of Adult Sheraton Seattle, Ballard
Refugee ELLs and Their Teachers Merging Health Literacy Education and
Content Area: Refugee Concerns ESL Instruction Among Adult Immigrants
Volunteer-based ESL classes for refugees persist, in spite of a lack of Content Area: Adult Education
professional support. The mixed-methods study discussed highlights The presenter discusses the implementation of the Staying Healthy in
the experiences of three volunteer teachers of refugee ELLs and their Alabama program, a set of adult-oriented courses that blend health
perceptions of their own teaching, the needs of their students, and literacy and ESL instruction. The presenter describes the materials and
their students’ perceptions of their class. activities employed as well as the challenges faced and the outcomes
Kallie-Jo Ho, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA of the program’s execution.
THURSDAY, 23 MARCH

Cesar Bazo, Auburn University, USA


Thursday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
TCC, Skagit 2 Thursday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
Feedback Tools: Written and Audio Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom C
Comments in ESL Writing Courses Perils and Strategies in Retention/Completion
Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition Within Community College IEPs
This session offers activities and suggestions to help instructors Content Area: Intensive English Programs
improve feedback practices in writing courses. Several tools that have Community colleges across the United States are being held
an audio feedback option are discussed (audio attachments in a PDF accountable for retention and completion rates similarly to 4-year
file, audio attachments in Kaizena, and holistic comments in Turnitin), colleges and universities. What are the problems faced by IEPs and
and the application of these tools is demonstrated. what strategies work well to comply with new regulations? These and
Veronika Maliborska, Northeastern University, USA many other issues and strategies are discussed.
Jose Carmona, Independent, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

128 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Thursday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm Thursday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
WSCC, 214 WSCC, 310
Perspectives to Practice: Specialization for 21st‑Century Learning
Francophone West African ELLs Content Area: English for Specific Purposes
Content Area: Culture To achieve success, learners must develop the specialized English
ELLs come from culturally and linguistically diverse language skills and the 21st-century skills employers require. Career Paths
backgrounds, yet these learners are often assumed to have similar offers a unique approach to ESP by developing students’ vocational
needs within the K–12 educational system. This presentation helps English abilities while simultaneously improving their abilities to
dispel such myths by presenting the unique perspectives, experiences, communicate, collaborate, think critically, and create in both physical
and needs of Francophone West African ELLs. Implications for and digital contexts.
educators are addressed. Patrick Painter, Express Publishing, Canada
Zara Onie Abdush-Shakir Bever, Missouri Western State
University, USA Thursday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
Adrienne Johnson, Missouri Western State University, USA TCC, Tahoma 1
Teaching Reading Fluency: 3 Practical Activities
Thursday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm Content Area: English as a Foreign Language
WSCC, 211
Resources for teaching discrete reading skills like vocabulary,
Picture Rigor, Relevance, and Readiness With OPD
inferences, comprehension, main ideas, and details abound. However,
Content Area: Adult Education improving reading fluency—that is, effective and efficient reading—is
The presenter shares the Oxford Picture Dictionary’s newest academic often overlooked. This presentation provides three practical activities
and workplace topics, laying the foundation for instruction that for ESL teachers to instruct their students on reading more effectively
develops beginning learners’ college- and career-readiness skills. and more efficiently.
Participants work with visuals and word lists, text-dependent Bob Schoenfeld, Arizona State University, USA
questions, and higher-level thinking tasks that engage and challenge
learners right from the start.
Thursday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
Jayme Adelson-Goldstein, Lighthearted Learning, USA WSCC, 612
TED Talks: Presentation Skills are
Thursday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm the 21st‑Century Superpower
WSCC, 210 Content Area: English as a Foreign Language
Reconsidering Conceptual Inspiring thinkers and innovators share their ideas on the TED stage,
Paradigms in English Studies
generating billions of views at TED.com. Come explore practical
Content Area: English as a Foreign Language strategies TED speakers use to spread new ideas and learn how
With increasing recognition of the high value and transforming power TED Talks can be used to help learners improve their speaking and
of English, this session takes stock of the policy and practices of presentation skills, all while broadening their knowledge.
English studies in Bangladesh and the changes needed to provide Ian Martin, National Geographic Learning, USA
effective learning. This is presented within a wider framework of ELT Laura LeDrean, National Geographic Learning, USA

THURSDAY, 23 MARCH
practices to make it relevant to attendees.
Arifa Rahman, University of Dhaka, Bangladesh Thursday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
WSCC, 213
Thursday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm The Language of Peacebuilding:
TCC, Chelan 2 Empowering Young People for Peaceful Purposes
Reflective Practice in TESOL: An Appraisal Content Area: Social Responsibility/Sociopolitical Concerns
Content Area: Teacher Education Based on the precept that language learning, both process and
What is reflective practice in TESOL and what research has been product, should be meaningful, ESOL teachers around the world create
conducted on it? The presenter outlines and discusses the results of curricula to help students explore identities, gain understanding
a survey of 116 research articles from 58 academic journals on the and appreciation of the other, and build peaceful and sustainable
practices that encourage TESOL teachers to reflect with implications communities. Educators working with immigrants, refugees, and at-risk
for teacher education. youths share their stories.
Tom Farrell, Brock University, Canada Valerie Jakar, ETAI, Israel
Cheryl Woelk, Language for Peace, USA
Lydia Stack, Understanding Language Project, USA
Alison Milofsky, United States Institue of Peace, USA
Zsuzsanna Kozák, Visual World Foundation, Hungary

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 129
Thursday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm Thursday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
WSCC, 303 WSCC, 307-308
The Role of Explicit Anti‑Bias Training What School Leaders Need to Know About ELLs
Content Area: Social Responsibility/Sociopolitical Concerns Content Area: Personal and Professional Development for Teachers
In recognition of recent incidents of injustice within our society, explicit This presentation introduces the new TESOL book “What School
anti-bias training is not only needed in the police force but also within Leaders Need to Know About ELLs,” a resource to equip school leaders
our educational institutions. This session discusses the impact of bias with effective, research-based strategies and practices to help both
on our students and demonstrates specific ways to conduct anti-bias ESOL and content-area teachers succeed in their roles. Come for an
training in teacher education. overview of the book and dialogue with the author.
Maxi-Ann Campbell, Duke Kunshan University, China (People’s Republic) Jan Edwards Dormer, Messiah College, USA
Lavette Coney, The Fessenden School, USA
Dana Horstein, Benedictine University, USA Thursday, 2:00 pm–3:45 pm
Ramin Yazdanpanah, Florida State University, USA WSCC, 2A
Laura Jacob, Mt. San Antonio College, USA
Heidi Faust, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, USA Critical Thinking: Sequenced Activities and
Focused Language for ESL Classrooms
Content Area: Intensive English Programs
Thursday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm
WSCC, 204 Nothing is more empowering academically than critical thinking, but
teaching and practicing it in ESL contexts presents some daunting
Using Corpora for Engaging Language Teaching:
challenges. This workshop features a sequence of exercises that
Effective Techniques and Activities
teachers can incorporate across proficiency levels, with a particular
Using concrete examples from their new book published by TESOL, the focus on key language tools and cues.
presenters introduce some common useful procedures and activities for
using corpora to teach various aspects of English, including vocabulary, Bruce Rubin, California State University, Fullerton, USA
grammar, and writing. They also explain how to develop and use
corpora to assess learner language and develop teaching materials. Thursday, 2:00 pm–3:45 pm
Dilin Liu, University of Alabama, USA Sheraton Seattle, Raveena
Lei Lei, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China I Want to Write a Book! Getting Published With TESOL
(People’s Republic) In this interactive session, meet with the Publishing Professional Council
members and authors. Bring your ideas, proposals, and manuscripts and
Thursday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm receive feedback from experienced TESOL Press authors and editors!
Sheraton Seattle, Madrona Robyn Brinks-Lockwood, Stanford University, USA
Using MIT OpenCourseWare to Create Gilda Martinez-Alba, Towson University, USA
Authentic Materials for ITA Training Gulbahar Beckett, Iowa State University, USA
Content Area: International Teaching Assistants Elizabeth Byleen, University of Kansas, USA
Margo DelliCarpini, University of Texas at San Antonio, USA
Authentic lectures can be useful models for ITAs to see effective
Allison Rainville, Applewild School, USA
discourse performance and delivery of instruction. In this session, sample
Ke Xu, City University of New York, USA
awareness-raising activities based on MIT OpenCourseWare materials
THURSDAY, 23 MARCH

are described. The session aims to promote autonomous learning for


ITAs in their adjustment to the U.S. cultural patterns of teaching. Thursday, 2:00 pm–3:45 pm
TCC, Chelan 4
Erhan Aslan, University of South Florida, USA
Leveled Functional Language
Frames for Everyday Use
Thursday, 2:00 pm–2:45 pm Content Area: Elementary School/Primary Education
WSCC, 212
The English Language Development Frames provide ESL teachers
Using Popular Media to Enrich Language
models of language structures to use planning lessons. These frames,
Learning and Social Responsibility
modified from state curriculum documents, identify language functions
Content Area: Social Responsibility/Sociopolitical Concerns
organized by grade spans and proficiency levels. The documents
Mediascapes, our text-image-audio packed environments, are rich
provide accessible resources to guide targeted language instruction
sources of linguistic, social, economic, and political content. This
and supports across content areas for students.
presentation focuses on ways to use media resources in language
teaching to engage students’ senses of social responsibility as well as Kathryn Phillipson, Newton Public Schools, USA
enrich their language and intercultural communication skills. Tara Trent, Foster City School District, USA
Christine Leider, Boston University, USA
Carla Chamberlin-Quinlisk, Pennsylvania State University, Abington Jody Klein, Newton Public Schools, USA
College, USA Allison Levit, Newton Public Schools, USA
Claudia Payne, Edmonds Community College, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

130 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Thursday, 2:00 pm–3:45 pm Thursday, 2:00 pm–3:45 pm
WSCC, 604 Sheraton Seattle, Metropolitan A
Movie Segments to Teach Children TESOLers Supporting Mainstream Teachers of ELLs
Grammar Structures and Vocabulary Content Area: High School/Secondary Education
Content Area: Elementary School/Primary Education The National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) is working to help
Teaching children with videos is crucial. Connecting grammar and mainstream teachers’ thinking about ELLs. Authors in the Principles
vocabulary with authentic movie segments can effectively improve in Practice book series describe their contributions, present literacy
young learners’ language production. The presenters show how and equity-focused activities from their books, and exchange ideas
to choose appropriate movie scenes and conduct fun activities for with the audience.
different teaching objectives. Participants take on the roles of children. Betsy Gilliland, University of Hawaii Manoa, USA
Claudio Azevedo, Casa Thomas Jefferson, Brazil Shannon Pella, UC Davis, USA
Ana Maria Scandiuzzi, Casa Thomas Jefferson, Brazil Christina Ortmeier-Hooper, University of New Hampshire, USA
Melinda McBee Orzulak, Bradley University, USA
Thursday, 2:00 pm–3:45 pm Maja Teref, Von Steuben Metropolitan Science Center, USA
Sheraton Seattle, Issaquah
NABE at TESOL: Examining Linkages Thursday, 2:00 pm–3:45 pm
Between Identity and Language Learning TCC, Tahoma 5
Content Area: Educational Linguistics The Postcolonial Positioning of ELT
Utilizing intersectionality as a research paradigm, researchers in TESOL in the TESOL 2.0 World
and NABE explore the powerful relationship between identity and Content Area: Social Responsibility/Sociopolitical Concerns
language learning through critical lenses reflecting a variety of raced, This panel explores critical issues in relation to the postcolonial
classed, gendered, and “othered” identities. These examinations positioning of ELT, in terms of pedagogical issues with a focus on
address the explosion of interest in scholarship examining links teacher training, the geopolitics of language assessment and testing,
between bilingualism, identity and language learning. ELT in relation to social responsibility, and the critical importance of the
Theresa Austin, University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA mediating roles that different contexts play.
Marjorie Haley, George Mason University, USA Liying Cheng, Queen’s University, Canada
Sylvia Sanchez, George Mason University, USA Andy Curtis, TESOL International Association, Canada
Anita Pandey, Morgan State University, USA Rosemary Orlando, Southern New Hampshire University, USA
Minh-Anh Hodge, National Association for Bilingual Education, USA Christopher Hastings, ITMO University, Russia

Thursday, 2:00 pm–3:45 pm 3:00 pm


TCC, Yakima 2
Scaffolding Academic Conversations
in ESL and Content Areas Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:20 pm
Sheraton Seattle, Juniper
Content Area: High School/Secondary Education
Concept Maps: Illuminating Knowledge
Academic conversation is a key juncture for developing content
Gaps and Increasing Self‑Regulation

THURSDAY, 23 MARCH
vocabulary while integrating higher order thinking skills. This
Content Area: International Teaching Assistants
session aims to demonstrate effective strategies that enable all
ELLs—from students with limited or interrupted formal education Concept maps are representations of learners’ understanding of a
(SLIFE) to those at higher proficiency levels—to engage in rigorous complex topic. This session provides examples and tips to get students
academic discussion. started on creating a concept map. The presenters show how to use
Christi Cartwright Lacerda, International High School, USA the maps to design course activities targeting learner weak areas
Nicoleta Filimon, Lawrence Public Schools, USA while increasing self-regulation and language proficiency.
Jeannie Slayton, University of Connecticut, USA
Jennifer Green, Western Washington University, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 131
Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
WSCC, 213
3 Modes of Collaborative Writing Developing Learner Resources
Content Area: Second Language Writing/Composition Using Corpus Linguistics
Randi Reppen, Northern Arizona University, USA

D
This session presents qualitative data from the reflections of

E L E
Chinese university students after engaging in three different types of

NC
collaborative academic writing: real-time report writing, asynchronous Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm

CA
group essays, and group collaboration on individual essays. The WSCC, 3A
benefits and drawbacks of each approach are explored in light of Empowering Listeners Through Questioning
student comments. Modeled by Science Friday
Content Area: Higher Education

D
Jay Bidal, University of Macau, Macau

L E
Second language learners frequently cite listening comprehension as
E
NC
Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm a performance barrier. Postsecondary education includes significant

CA
WSCC, 615 lecture and discussion section attendance, which is inherently passive
Awareness Leads to Success: and idiomatic, and requires sustained attention. The Science Friday
How Young Learners Benefit From Benchmarks program introduces students to a model of active listening, traditional
Content Area: Elementary School/Primary Education discourse structures, and academic listener question types.
Standard benchmarks have provided an essential tool for teachers Alicia Ambler, University of Iowa, USA
of adults to determine the level of English that their learners are
achieving and to focus their teaching effectively. This session presents Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
the new young-learner-oriented objectives from the Global Scale of TCC, Chelan 5
English and explains how learner awareness leads to achievement. Empowering Teachers to Engage
Mike Mayor, Pearson, United Kingdom (Great Britain) Students With Learning Disabilities
Mario Herrera, Consultant, USA Content Area: Learning Disabilities/Special Needs
Learning disabilities constitute a current challenge in classroom
Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm routine. This practice-oriented session focuses on the enrichment of
WSCC, 603 teachers’ knowledge to understand learners with difficulties through
Collaborative Reading and Student‑Generated resilient elements. The presentation provides teachers with conceptual
Projects: Deepening Analysis, Building Agency tools to identify students’ cognition disorders and address those issues
Content Area: Reading and Literacy with proper accommodations.
This presentation integrates research on collaborative reading Fernanda Melo, Casa Thomas Jefferson, Brazil
benefits with creative and engaging student-generated projects Lucíola Souto, Casa Thomas Jefferson, Brazil
that deepen analysis and spark intrinsic motivation in practice. The
presenter introduces when and why collaborative reading should be Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
prioritized in the language classroom and how students can extend
learning with projects. Engaging in Motivational Teaching Practices
THURSDAY, 23 MARCH

Rhianna Weber, ELS Language Centers, USA Neil J Anderson, Brigham Young University–Hawaii, USA

Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm


Sheraton Seattle, Metropolitan B WSCC, 201
Conversations With Charlotte: ESL Teacher Enriching the IEP Classroom Through
Evaluations Using the Danielson Framework Coteaching and Colleague Collaboration
Content Area: High School/Secondary Education Content Area: Intensive English Programs
This research-oriented presentation introduces a single case study of Coteaching in IEPs is a valuable way to keep experienced teachers
an ESL specialist’s 2-year experience with the Danielson Framework for engaged while simultaneously training, mentoring, and empowering
Teaching to illustrate the issues associated with using it to evaluate novice teachers. Join the presenters as they share their experiences
teacher effectiveness, especially with regards to those who work with and provide useful tips, application, and advice for teacher
ESL students. Alternative evaluation materials are provided. collaboration and professional development.
Randi Freeman, Anaheim University, USA Alexis Gonzalez, Missouri State University, USA
Cali Pettijohn, Missouri State University, USA
Jennifer Morrison, Evangel University, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

132 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
WSCC, 210 WSCC, 307-308
Examining Cultural Assumptions Through Integrating Pronunciation Into
Dialogue, A Human Library Inspired Project the Reading Classroom
Content Area: Culture Content Area: Higher Education
The Human Library is a “method” for promoting dialogue, reducing There is little doubt that pronunciation instruction enhances both
prejudice, and encouraging community connection. This method listening and speaking skills. However, pronunciation has another place
becomes an ideal project for international students to connect with in ESL: the reading classroom. The presenters demonstrate activities
their new community. In this project, students engage in linguistically that link pronunciation to reading, not only increasing students’
and culturally meaningful interactions while challenging participants to awareness and ability but also supporting different learning styles and
reassess assumptions about one another. energizing the classroom.
Becki Quick, University of Oregon, USA Holly Gray, Prince George’s Community College, USA
Marilyn Guekguezian, University of Southern California, USA
Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
Exploring the Teaching of Speaking WSCC, 214
Anne Burns, University of New South Wales, Australia Language Ownership:
Empowering Teachers and Learners
Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm Content Area: Nonnative English Speakers in TESOL
In this dialogue session, the presenters address issues related to
From the Classroom to the Wider World identity and language ownership by sharing personal stories and
David Nunan, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong connecting them to classroom practice through critical theory.
Adriana Picoral Scheidegger, University of Arizona, USA
Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm Laura Soracco, Highline College, USA

Getting Your Work Published Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm


TCC, Chelan 2
Ahmar Mahboob, University of Sydney, Australia
Language Teacher Education and Teacher Beliefs:
A Synthesis of Research
Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
Content Area: Teacher Education

How Does Your IEP Reflect the This presentation provides a synthesis of past research on the
Needs of Your Stakeholders? impact of second language teacher education on language teachers’
Fernando Fleurquin, University of North Texas, USA beliefs. Specifically, it summarizes results from previous empirical
studies, outlining contextual and methodological factors, while noting
significant trends from the literature.
Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
Farahnaz Faez, University of Western Ontario, Canada

THURSDAY, 23 MARCH
Michael Karas, University of Western Ontario, Canada
Integrating Content and Language:
A Flexible Architecture
Donna Brinton, Independent, USA Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
WSCC, 611
Language Teacher Identity:
Exploring Old/New Domains and Practices
Content Area: Teacher Education
Language teacher identity has emerged as a major research interest
in TESOL. This presentation examines the historical development
of this construct and provides recommendations for theory and
practice. Toward this goal, the presenters discuss how neoliberal
governmentality, critical race theory, and media studies can inform
language teacher identity work.
Brian Morgan, York University–Glendon College, Canada
Manka Varghese, University of Washington, USA
Carla Chamberlin-Quinlisk, Pennsylvania State University, Abington
College, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 133
Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
TCC, Tahoma 3 WSCC, 205
Low‑Tech, Low‑Cost Gadgets for Preparing International Graduate Students
Your Pronunciation Toolbox for Nonacademic Job Searches
Content Area: Phonology/Pronunciation Content Area: English for Specific Purposes
Teaching pronunciation, like any craft, is easier if you have the right As nonacademic careers attract increasing numbers of international
tools. Come and try some new gadgets to make pronunciation teaching graduate students, this session describes how two university oral
more effective and engaging. Whether it’s drinking straws, pipe communication courses integrate job search activities into their
cleaners, giant teeth, or dried beans, you’re sure to find something new conventional EAP curriculum. The presenter describes training in mock
for your pronunciation toolbox. interviews including behavioral questions and elevator speeches to
Marla Yoshida, UC Irvine, USA ensure students’ language-related career goals are met.
Cathy Harrison, Duke University, USA
Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
WSCC, 614 Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
Newcomers in Your School:
Cultural Connections and Instructional Strategies Second Language Teacher Education
Content Area: Bilingual Education Karen Johnson, Pennsylvania State University, USA
Join CAL to learn effective strategies and get practical hands-on
activities to create a welcoming environment for newcomer students Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
and facilitate their learning. Participants receive information that
they can implement in their schools right away. Enter to win a free Seeking Welfare in TESOL:
registration to a CAL Newcomer Institute in DC. Social and Individual Engagement
Annie Duguay, Center for Applied Linguistics, USA Ryuko Kubota, University of British Columbia, Canada
José Medina, Center for Applied Linguistics, USA
Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
TCC, Yakima 1 Sociolinguistics and Pronunciation Teaching
Positioning of Teachers in the Linguistic Stephanie Lindemann, Georgia State University, USA
Marketplace of Private ELT
Content Area: English as a Foreign Language Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
This session examines commercial ELT in Vancouver, British Columbia, Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom C
using Bourdieu’s linguistic marketplace framework. Language Teacher Development Through Teachers’
acquisition is usually assumed as the primary goal, but many students Associations: Lessons From Africa and Beyond
desire social, not linguistic, resources. Understanding English as social This presentation reports on a study that investigated the role of Africa
capital may help teachers renegotiate their position in the power TESOL and its affiliates in providing for and improving the continuous
relations of ELT. professional development of teachers in their constituencies.
THURSDAY, 23 MARCH

Lisa Shorten, Simon Fraser University, Canada Implications for teacher development as well as for enhancing the
practices of language teacher associations are drawn.
Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm Okim Effiong, Qatar University, Qatar
WSCC, 613 Aymen Elsheikh, University of Missouri, USA
Practice Your English Through a
Graded ICT Curriculum
Content Area: Content-Based and CLIL/Content and Language
Integrated Learning
How can a brand new K–12 ICT curriculum help your students develop
their English language skills? Through engaging resources based on
international standards and written in carefully graded English.
Andreas Tsouchlaris, MM Publications, Greece

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

134 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
TCC, Tahoma 1 Sheraton Seattle, Grand Ballroom D
Teaching EFL Through Multiliteracies to Training and Supporting Bilingual
Empower NNESTs and Students Paraprofessionals for Pre-K–5th Grade
Content Area: English as a Foreign Language Content Area: Elementary School/Primary Education
English as a global language has been learned by many nonnative Many schools engage bilingual paraprofessionals to meet the diverse
speakers in ever-mounting numbers. However, the dominant EFL language needs of young students, but do they empower them with
teaching practices do not sufficiently benefit from the resourcefulness training and guidance on best practices? This interactive session
of NNESTs and their students. This presentation guides practitioners encourages participants to discuss their questions about supporting
about how to empower resourceful local teachers and students through paraprofessionals and provides innovative professional development
multiliteracies pedagogy. solutions, resources, and examples from the field.
Mehtap Acar, University of Arizona, USA Karen Nemeth, Language Castle LLC, USA
Ahmet Serdar Acar, University of Arizona, USA Pam Brillante, William Paterson University, USA
Jessica Burchett, Marion City Schools, USA
Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
WSCC, 612
Teaching Genres to Secondary
and University Students Transforming Teenagers Into 21st‑Century
Ann Johns, San Diego State University, USA Global Citizens With Impact
Content Area: English as a Foreign Language
Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm For young teenagers, life can be both exciting and confusing. They
WSCC, 3B are discovering who they are and who they want to become. In this
workshop, the series editors behind National Geographic Learning’s
The Effect of Bullying Victimization
Impact series will offer tips to help students better understand
on ELL Motivation and Identity
themselves, each other, and the world they live in.
Content Area: Applied Linguistics
Joan Kang Shin, George Mason University, USA
This study investigates the relationship between bullying victimization, JoAnn (Jodi) Crandall, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, USA
L2 Motivational Self System, and L2 identity. The presenter interacts
with the participants through an audiovisual activity and guides them
to create antibullying strategies specifically designed for ELLs. Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
WSCC, 212
Hilal Peker, University of Central Florida, USA
Understanding Needs of ELLs via Needs
Analysis of Undergraduate Courses
Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm Content Area: Program Administration
WSCC, 304
A needs analysis examined the demands facing ELLs in introductory-
The Summit on the Future of the level university courses. The presenters share their process and the
TESOL Profession Overview findings from observations of lectures, review of course syllabi, and
This summit brought together respected and innovative thought leaders

THURSDAY, 23 MARCH
examination of assignment types. The presentation also demonstrates
from a variety of contexts for a strategic conversation about the future how these findings are enriching the curriculum revision process.
of the profession. Participants from around the world participated in Tom Delaney, University of Oregon, USA
online and face-to-face conversations focused on our four themes. Jennifer Rice, University of Oregon, USA
Attendees discover what’s taken place and what’s to come. Korey Rice, University of Oregon, USA
Denise Murray, Macquarie University, Australia
Sarah Sahr, TESOL International Association, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 135
Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
WSCC, 616 WSCC, 617
Using Actionable Data to Drive YouTube Just for You: Differentiating
Instruction in the Classroom Instruction Within Videos Using Zaption
Content Area: Second Language Acquisition Content Area: CALL/Computer-Assisted Language Learning/
Communication of strategies is crucial to the growth of our students. In Technology in Education
the presenters’ program, every district role has the opportunity to track Differentiating and embedding language instruction in content
and contribute to the academic success of students. The presenters lessons can be challenging, but when done successfully, can
demonstrate how to effectively combine educational expertise with maximize learning. This session guides educators through the process
technology to provide optimal success for ELLs. of selecting a YouTube video and inserting appropriately leveled
Mellony Deuel, Project ELL, USA questions and comments throughout, using an interactive online app
Steve Navarre, Project ELL, USA called EDpuzzle.
Jillian Conry, Southern Methodist University, USA
Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm Karla del Rosal, Southern Methodist University, USA
WSCC, 619 Paige Ware, Southern Methodist University, USA
What’s the CEFR and How Can ESL Instructors Use It?
Content Area: Intensive English Programs Thursday, 3:00 pm–4:45 pm
Sheraton Seattle, Madrona
Participants in this practice-oriented session learn how to use the
Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) to American Sign Language as a Bridge to English
support their students’ learning and reinforce their capabilities through Content Area: Elementary School/Primary Education
a brief introduction to the CEFR as it relates to IEPs, followed by ESL/EFL teachers are finding that ASL promotes the retention of
practical, hands-on activities using relevant CEFR scales. English vocabulary in their language classrooms and, therefore,
Renée Saulter, Cambridge Michigan Language Assessments, USA increases each student’s level and fluency of English. This is a
Kristin Graw, Michigan State University, USA “learning with your hands” workshop in which participants learn 50+
Laure Bordas-Isner, Cambridge Michigan Language Assessments, USA ASL signs to use immediately in their classrooms.
Vicky Allen, Independent, USA
Thursday, 3:00 pm–3:45 pm
WSCC, 203 Thursday, 3:00 pm–4:45 pm
Who Benefits From MOOCs, and Who Pays the Cost? WSCC, 605
Content Area: CALL/Computer-Assisted Language Learning/ Conation in Adult Ed: Grit, Resilience,
Technology in Education and the Noncognitive Hobgoblin
Administrators and institutions have taken strong interest in massive Content Area: Adult Education
open online courses (MOOCs). They are also popular with learners, Resilience. Persistence. Executive function. Grit. Hazy terms cropping
especially in low-resource environments. But questions arise about up around the field, leading to clutter and confusion. We know they’re
accountability and cost. Here, the presenters discuss ways that MOOCs interrelated. But how? Conation. Participants develop an understanding
can benefit participants and institutions, visible and hidden costs, and of conation and related constructs, work with conative assessments,
THURSDAY, 23 MARCH

equity and accountability. identify conative development activities, and take steps toward
Deborah Healey, University of Oregon, USA integrating conation into curriculum.
Justin Shewell, Arizona State University, USA Robert Sheppard, Quincy Asian Resources, USA
Justin Gerald, Lenox Hill Neighborhood House, USA

Academic Session Dialogue Exhibitor Session Forum Session InterSection Invited Speaker

136 TESOL INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION & ENGLISH LANGUAGE EXPO


Thursday, 3:00 pm–4:45 pm Thursday, 3:00 pm–4:45 pm
WSCC, 303 WSCC, 310
Developing Our Intercultural Skills When Fiction vs Facts: Don’t Be a Hater, Be a Reader
Interacting With Students and Colleagues Content Area: Reading and Literacy
Content Area: Intercultural Communication Are your students reading “haters?” This session dispels four reading
As teachers, we often concern ourselves with developing the myths and shares proven methods to overcome them. With the
intercultural competence of our students, but we also need to ultimate target being real-life application, and students achieving
continuously practice our own intercultural skills. This panel discusses their academic/professional goals, presenters incorporated engaging
methods for being more critically responsive when teaching, culturally reading activities, including literature circles. Attendees leave with
competent in our relationships with colleagues, and globally minded empowering activities and handouts for turning haters into readers!
in our pedagogy. Catherine Moore, California State University, Fullerton, USA
Jan Edwards Dormer, Messiah College, USA Lily Roh, California State University, Fullerton, USA
Patrick Ng, University of Niigata Prefecture, Japan Andrea Schmid, California State University, Fullerton, USA
Eleni Pappamihiel, University of North Carolina Wilmington, USA
Thursday, 3:00 pm–4:45 pm
Thursday, 3:00 pm–4:45 pm WSCC, 204
WSCC, 606-607 Language, Culture, Identity in Language Acquisition:
EFL Learners Empowered Through CALL Personal Testimonies
The EFL field benefits from different strategies and methods for Content Area: Culture
teaching and learning, technology being one of the highest contributors This session explores the role and impact of language, culture, and
in this sense. This panel discusses varied strategies and ways in which identity issues on the daily lives and teaching experiences of second
to empower EFL learners while using technological means at their language teachers and learners, as well as how these issues can be
reach. It presents a variety of options that fit different contexts and adequately addressed in and out of the second language classroom.
can benefit learners worldwide. Participants learn from the panelists Dawn Wink, Santa Fe Community College, USA
and seek clarification on ways to adapt the different processes to their Alsu Gilmetdinova, Kazan National Research Technical University named
own institutions. after A.N. Tupolev - KAI, Russia
Yilin Sun, Seattle Colleges, USA Yilin Sun, Seattle Colleges, USA
José Antônio da Silva, Casa Thomas Jefferson, Brazil Natalia Balyasnikova, University of British Columbia, USA
Helaine W. Marshall, Long Island University Hudson, USA Lavette Coney, The Fessenden School, USA
Christel Broady, Georgetown College, USA Kisha Bryan, Texas A&M University, USA

Thursday, 3:00 pm–4:45 pm Thursday, 3:00 pm–4:45 pm


Sheraton Seattle, Capitol Hill TCC, Tahoma 4
Engaging, Enriching, and Empowering Online Tools to Boost Your Author Presence
ESP Teachers and Students Content Area: Materials Writers, Curriculum/Materials Development
Content Area: English for Specific Purposes Whether traditionally published, self-published, or not yet published,

THURSDAY, 23 MARCH
This colloquium presents guidelines for learning the discourse, authors today can use online tools to further their careers. Learn tips
language, and vocabulary in ESP settings and tailoring English lessons. and techniques of some of the most popular online tools, such as
Panelists present their journeys into teaching English at law schools websites, blogs, and social media, to build your reputation, maximize
and the principles, generalizable to other ESP fields, enabling them to your profile, build relationships, and increase your following.
develop curricula and lessons. Patrice Palmer, Global Training, Coaching and Development for
Kirsten Schaetzel, Georgetown University Law Center, USA Educators, Canada
Marta Baffy, Georgetown University Law Center, USA Dorothy Zemach, Wayzgoose Press, USA
Shelley Saltzman, Columbia University, USA
Cynthia Flamm, Boston University, USA
Maria Tameho-Palermino, Boston University, USA
Michelle Ueland, Georgetown University Law Center, USA

Roundtable
Panel Practice-Oriented Research-Oriented Teaching Tip TESOL in Focus Workshop
Discussion

WWW.TESOLCONVENTION.ORG 137
Thursday, 3:00 pm–4:45 pm Thursday, 3:00 pm–4:45 pm
WSCC, 211 WSCC, 610
Political, Social, and Integration Implications TESOLpreneurs: Developing a Highly Successful
for Refugees and Asylum Seekers Career as an Independent Professional
Content Area: Refugee Concerns Content Area: Personal and Professional Development for Teachers
TESOL practitioners and researchers discuss global issues concerning The presenters discuss their development as successful independent
forced migration: ideologies of U.S. citizenship; civic participation and TESOL professionals. Topics include cultivating professional identity,
access to citizenship in European countries; pathways to citizenship challenges and benefits of not having a full-time job, and valuing one’s
in Egypt, Turkey, and Jordan; governmental assistance for refugees; professional worth in the TESOL marketplace. Practical tips are offered
structures of identity among displaced persons; and social needs and for those working as consultants, contractors, or freelancers.
legal rights of unaccompanied minors. Sarah Eaton, University of Calgary, Canada
Deborah Norland, Luther College, USA Renee Feather, Educational Consulting Services, LLC, USA
Pindie Stephen, International Organization for Migration, Switzerland Dora