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Institute of Agri Business Management

Swami Keshwanand Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner- 334006

Business Plan
on
Peanut butter

G-lite Foods Pvt.Ltd


GIDC,,

Rajkot highway,

Junagadh,

Gujarat-362001

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Institute of Agri Business Management
Swami Keshwanand Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner- 334006

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

The present investigation is a synthesized effort of various sources. Word scan hardly express
our feeling of gratitude to all those who extended cooperation in completing this business plan
successfully. The satisfaction that accompanies the successful completion of any task would be
incomplete without the mention of all those people who made it possible whose constant
guidance and encouragement crowns the efforts with success

Our thanks to Dr.Y. Sudarshan, Director, IABM, SKRAU,Bikaner for this business plan.

We are very grateful to Dr. Aditi Mathur (Assistant Professor), Dr. Amita
Sharma(Assistant Professor) and Mr.Satyveer Singh Meena(Assistant Professor) for
providing necessary help during the preparation of business plan.

Aghera Vivekkumar

MBA(AB) 1st YEAR

IABM,BIKANER

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Institute of Agri Business Management
Swami Keshwanand Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner- 334006

Index
Sr.no. Particular Page No.

1 Introduction 4-

2 Production Process 5

3 Nutritive Profile 8

3 Benefits of Peanut butter 8

4 Market Potential 11
Herbal Garden Preparation
5 Peanut butter product strategies 11

6 Peanut butter product line 11

7 Distribution Strategy of G-lite organization 12

8 Markets for G-lite foods Products 12

9 Pricing strategy 13

10 Financial plan 13

11 Break even analysis 21

12 Return on investment [ROI] 23

13 Payback Period of the project 23

14 Market feasibility 24

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Institute of Agri Business Management
Swami Keshwanand Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner- 334006

15 Reference 24

INTRODUCTION:-
Peanut butter:

• Peanut butter is a food paste or spread made from ground dry roasted peanuts. It often
contains additional ingredients that modify the taste or texture, such as salt, sweeteners
or emulsifiers.
• Peanut butter is served as a spread on bread, toast or crackers, and used to make
sandwiches
• Peanuts have considerable nutrients and are consumed in different forms all over the
world
• Consumed in large quantities especially in western countries.
• Hence, to target growing export market and local market and intend to be financially
sound.

HISTORY:
The use of peanuts dates to the Aztecs and Incas, and peanut paste may have been used by the
Aztecs as a toothache remedy in the first century of the Common Era (CE).
Marcellus Gilmore Edson (1849 – 1940) of Montreal, Canada obtained a patent for peanut butter
in 1884. Edson's cooled product had "a consistency like that of butter, lard, or ointment"
according to his patent application which described a process of milling roasted peanuts until the
peanuts reached "a fluid or semi-fluid state". He mixed sugar into the paste to harden its
consistency. A businessperson from St. Louis named George Bayle produced and sold peanut
butter in the form of a snack food in 1894.
John Harvey Kellogg, known for his line of prepared breakfast cereals, was issued a patent for a
"Process of Producing Alimentary Products" in 1898, and used peanuts, although he boiled the
peanuts rather than roasting them. Kellogg's Western Health Reform Institute served peanut
butter to patients because they needed a food that contained a lot of protein, yet which could be
eaten without chewing. At first, peanut butter was a food for wealthy people, as it became
popular initially as a product served at expensive health care institutes.

A Meal Ready to Eat or "MRE kit" which contains peanut butter packets.

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Swami Keshwanand Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner- 334006

Early peanut-butter-making machines were developed by Joseph Lambert, who had worked at
John Harvey Kellogg's Battle Creek Sanitarium, and Dr. Ambrose Straub who obtained a patent
for a peanut-butter-making machine in 1903."In 1922, chemist Joseph Rosefield invented a
process for making smooth peanut butter that kept the oil from separating by using partially
hydrogenated oil"; Rosefield "...licensed his invention to the company that created Peter
Pan peanut butter" in 1928 and in "...1932 he began producing his own peanut butter under the
name Skippy". Under the Skippy brand, Rosefield developed a new method of churning creamy
peanut butter, giving it a smoother consistency. He also mixed fragments of peanut into peanut
butter, creating the first "chunky"-style peanut butter. In 1955, Procter & Gamble launched a
peanut butter named Jif, which was sweeter than other brands, due to the use of "sugar and
molasses" in its recipe.
As the US National Peanut Board confirms, "Contrary to popular belief, George Washington
Carver did not invent peanut butter."Carver was given credit in popular folklore for many
inventions that did not come out of his lab. By the time Carver published his document about
peanuts, entitled "How to Grow the Peanut and 105 Ways of Preparing it For Human
Consumption" in 1916, many methods of preparation of peanut butter had been developed or
patented by various pharmacists, doctors and food scientists working in the US and
Canada. January 24 is National Peanut Butter Day in the United States.

TYPES:
The two main types of peanut butter are crunchy (or chunky) and smooth. In crunchy peanut
butter, some coarsely-ground peanut fragments are included to give extra texture. The peanuts in
smooth peanut butter are ground uniformly, creating a creamy texture.
In the US, food regulations require that any product labelled "peanut butter" must contain at least
90% peanuts; the remaining <10% usually consists of "...salt, a sweetener, and an emulsifier or
hardened vegetable oil which prevents the peanut oil from separating". In the US, no product
labelled as "peanut butter" can contain "artificial sweeteners, chemical preservatives, [or] natural
or artificial coloring additives."Some brands of peanut butter are sold without emulsifiers that
bind the peanut oils with the peanut paste, and so require stirring after separation. Most major
brands of peanut butter add white sugar, but there are others that use dried cane syrup, agave
syrup or coconut palm sugar.
Organic and artisanal peanut butters are available, but their markets are small.

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Swami Keshwanand Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner- 334006

Benefits of peanut butter:


1.Rich Source of Protein

Peanut butter (100 grams) contains a high amount of protein (25 – 30 grams). Proteins that we
eat are broken down into amino acids, which are then utilized in each and every cell for repairing
and building the body.

2. Lowers cholesterol levels


The fat content in peanut butter is almost equal to that of the fats found in olive oil. It contains
both polyunsaturated fats and monounsaturated fats. As these fats are not saturated, they are
good to consume without putting the heart at any risk. The unsaturated fats in peanut butter help
to lower bad cholesterol levels (low-density lipoprotein) and promote the circulation of good
cholesterol (high-density lipoprotein).

3. Prevents type ii diabetes


Consuming peanut butter can also be beneficial in reducing the risk of type II diabetes. Peanuts
contain not only protein but also unsaturated fats. Unsaturated fats have been noted to improve
insulin sensitivity. Research into peanut butter consumption and diabetes showed that a higher
intake of peanut butter and other nuts lowers the risk of type II diabetes.

4. Good Source of Vitamins


Peanut butter contains many vitamins that are good for our body to function properly. Vitamin A
found in it is helpful for eyesight, while vitamin C helps to boost the immune system and heals
simple ulcers faster. On the other hand, the vitamin E found in peanut butter is a very important
micronutrient needed by our body to dissolve complex fatty acid structures and fat blockages in
the arteries.

5. Antioxidant properties
Peanut butter contains antioxidant properties due to the presence of folate, niacin, pantothenic
acid, pyridoxine, riboflavin, and thiamin. One of the antioxidants found in it is resveratrol.
Resveratrol is a polyphenolic antioxidant which has been found to be effective in controlling
certain types of cancers, heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease, viral and/or fungal infections, and
degenerative nerve diseases.

6. Prevents cancer
Peanut butter contains B-sitosterol, a phytosterol that has a great property of fighting against
cancer, particularly colon, prostate, and breast cancers. Peanuts and its products, such as peanut
oil and peanut butter are ideal sources of phytosterols.

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7. Regulates blood sugar levels


Peanut butter is a good source of magnesium (170mg/100 grams). This makes up for 42% of the
daily recommended value of magnesium. Magnesium has an important role to play in muscle,
bone, and immunity development in the body. Magnesium also helps in regulating
blood sugar levels and blood pressure. Its presence in our body helps in more than 300
biochemical reactions that are extremely important for our survival.

8. High in Potassium
Peanut butter contains potassium (70 mg/100g) that acts as an electrolyte and is a fluid-balancing
element in the body. In comparison to sodium, which directly puts pressure on the cardiovascular
system in the form of hypertension, potassium does not put any pressure either on the blood or
on the cardiovascular system. In effect, potassium is a heart-friendly element that is found in
high quantities in peanut butter.

9. Reduce Risk of Gallstones


Gallstones, a major health risk in developed countries, is caused by being overweight, crash
diets, certain types of cholesterol drugs, and birth control pills. A study on peanuts and nut
consumption relating to the risk of gallstones was undertaken and the results of the study showed
that over a period of 2 decades, women who consumed peanut butter and nuts on a regular basis
had reduced their risk of developing gallstones.

10. Rich in Dietary Fiber


Peanuts and peanut butter are both high in dietary fiber. One cup or approximately 125 g of
peanuts and peanut butter has 12 g and 20 g of dietary fiber, respectively. Dietary fiber is one of
the most important parts of our diet since a lack of dietary fiber can lead to several health
problems and diseases such as constipation, diabetes, cholesterol, and various heart diseases.

Production Process

Planting and harvesting:


Peanuts are usually planted in Kharif. The peanut comes from a yellow flower which bends over
and infiltrates the soil after blooming and wilting, and the peanut starts to grow in the soil.
Peanuts are harvested from late August to October, while the weather is clear. This weather
allows for dry soil so that when picked, the soil does not stick to the stems and pods. The peanuts
are then removed from vines and transported to a peanut shelling machine for mechanical drying.
After cropping, the peanuts are delivered to warehouses for cleaning, where they are stored
unshelled in silos.

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Swami Keshwanand Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner- 334006

1.Shelling
The most important thing about shelling is to remove the shell of peanuts with the smallest
damage to the seed. The moisture of the unshelled peanuts is controlled to avoid excessive
frangibility of the shells and kernels, which in turn, reduces the amount of dust present in the
plant. After, the peanuts are sent to a series of rollers set specifically for the batch of peanuts,
where they are cracked. After cracking, the peanuts go through a screening process where they
are inspected for contaminants.

2.Roasting
The dry roasting process employs either the batch or continuous method. In the batch method,
peanuts are heated in large quantities in a revolving oven at about 426.6℃. Next, the peanuts in
each batch are uniformly held and roasted in the oven at 160℃ for about 40 to 60 minutes. This
method is good to use when the peanuts differ in moisture content. In the continuous method, a
hot air roaster is employed. The peanuts pass through the roaster whilst being rocked to permit
even roasting. A photometer indicates the completion of dry roasting.This method is favoured by
large manufacturers since it can lower the rate of spoilage and requires less labor.

3.Cooling
After dry roasting, peanuts are removed from the oven as quickly as possible and directly placed
in a blower-cooler cylinder. There are suction fans in the metal cylinder that can pull a large
volume of air through, so the peanuts can be cooled more efficiently. The peanuts will not be
dried out because cooling can help retain some oil and moisture. The cooling process is
completed when the temperature in the cylinder reaches 30℃.

4.Blanching
After the kernels have been cooled down, the peanuts will undergo either heat blanching or water
blanching to remove the remain seed coats. Compared to heat blanching, water blanching is a
new process. Water blanching first appeared in 1949.

5.Heat blanching
Peanuts are heated by hot air at 280 degrees Fahrenheit (137.8 degrees Celsius) for not more than
20 minutes in order to soften and split the skins. After that, the peanuts are exposed to
continuous steam in a blanching machine. The skins are then removed using either bristles or soft
rubber belts. After that, these skins are separated and blown into waste bags. Meanwhile, the
hearts of peanuts are segregated through inspection.

6.Water blanching
After the kernels are arranged in troughs, the skin of the kernel is cracked on opposite sides by
rolling it through sharp stationary blades. While the skins are removed, the kernels are brought

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Swami Keshwanand Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner- 334006

through a one-minute hot water bath and placed on a swinging pad with canvas on top. The
swinging action of the pad rubs off the skins. Afterward, the blanched kernels are dried for at
least six hours by hot air at 120 degrees Fahrenheit (48.8 degrees Celsius).
After blanching, the peanuts are screened and inspected to eliminate the burnt and rotten peanuts.
A blower is also used to remove light peanuts and discoloured peanuts are removed using a
colour sorting machine.

7.Grinding
After blanching the peanuts are sent to grinding to be manufactured into peanut butter. The
peanuts are then sent through two sizes of grinders. The first grinder produces a medium grind,
and the second produces a fine grind. At this point, salt, and a vegetable oil stabilizer are added
to the fine grind to produce the peanut butter. This adds flavour and allows the peanut butter to
stay as a homogenous mixture. Chopped peanuts may also be added at this stage to produce
“chunky” peanut butter.

8.Packaging
Before packaging, the peanut butter must first be cooled in order to be sealed in jars.The mixture
is pumped into a heat exchanger in order to cool it to about 48.8 degrees Celsius. Once cool, the
peanut butter is pumped into jars and vacuum sealed. This vacuum sealing rids the container of
oxygen so that oxidation cannot occur, preserving the food. The jars are then labelled and set
aside until crystallization occurs. The peanut butter is then packaged into cartons distributed
to retailers, where they are stored at room temperature and sold to consumers.
A 2012 article stated that "China and India are the first and second largest producers,
respectively", of peanuts. The United States of America "...is the third largest producer of
peanuts (Georgia and Texas are the two major peanut-producing states)"and "more than half of
the American peanut crop goes into making peanut butter."
Manufacturing process

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Institute of Agri Business Management
Swami Keshwanand Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner- 334006

Nutritional profile

Calories-588 (Amount-100gm.) (amount-100 gm.)

% Daily Value*

Total Fat 50 g

Saturated fat 10 g

Polyunsaturated fat 14 g

Monounsaturated fat 24 g

Cholesterol 0 mg

Sodium 17 mg

Potassium 649 mg

Total Carbohydrate 20 g

Dietary fiber 6 g

Sugar 9 g

Protein 25 g

Vitamin A(eyesight) 0% Vitamin C 0%

Calcium 4% Iron 10%

Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 25%

Vitamin B-12 0% Magnesium 38%

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Institute of Agri Business Management
Swami Keshwanand Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner- 334006

Peanut allergy
For people with a peanut allergy, peanut butter can cause a variety of possible allergic
reactions, including life-threatening anaphylaxis. This potential effect has led to banning peanut
butter, among other common foods, in some schools.

Market potential
• Indian peanuts are popular all over the world with large exports every year.
• But unfortunately, our market share is primarily confined to raw peanuts and value added
products like blanched and roasted or peanut butter have very negligible contribution
• Peanut butter has high penetration in western countries market as compared to Asia-
Pacific region due to lack of awareness about the benefits associated with peanut butter
• Growing awareness about the autoimmune diseases such as celiac disease is raising the
need of low calorie nutritional food thus increasing the demand of peanut butter across
globe.
• The global peanut butter market is estimated to reach value USD 6.73 billion and is
expected to grow at a CAGR 10% over the forecast period i.e. 2016-2024

• Asia-Pacific peanut butter market is expected to reach USD 1 billion in 2024 and is
projected to grow at a CAGR of 13% the during the time period of 2016 to 2024 due to
the influence of US culture using peanut butter as a staple food.
• Peanut Butter is part of the staple break-fast food in US. Statistics says that about 89% of
the entire US households consume it as bread spread. This is further evident from the fact
that about one-third of the US peanut harvest is utilized for manufacturing peanut butter.
• From an international perspective it is shown that revenue of peanut butter generated in
the United States (US$1,961m in 2017)
• The consumption of peanut butter is also high in the countries like Philippines, South
Korea, Canada, etc. as they are well influenced by US culture
• As an increment in population of working women in India encourages the market for
ready to eat products in which peanut butter is an important player.

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Swami Keshwanand Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner- 334006

Product life cycle


• Introduction stage.
• New product in retail market.
• Riskiest stage of life-cycle.
• Little direct competition.

Product strategy
• Spicy peanut butter as the “star” of its product line.

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Swami Keshwanand Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner- 334006

• This flavor is offered by international brands such as Jif and Skippy but is not produced
by any local food processors.

Peanut butter product line.


Peanut Butter Flavors primary consumer Purchaser/Decision- Maker

Regular Adults and children Mothers/Wives

Spicy (principal flavor) Adults Mothers/Wives

Sweetened Children Mothers

Pricing strategy:
• Our approach is “existing product in new market” for domestic markets & “existing
product in existing market” for export markets.

• The ideal pricing strategy will be Value Based Pricing in which we would win customers
by charging low price and high quality to attract customers and expand our market share.

Markets for G-lite foods Products:


• Retailers—supermarkets, convenience stores, artisan markets, specialty stores, informal
market vendors

• Institutional customers—restaurants, hotels, organizations, agencies, trade groups,


schools, etc.

• Production center—selling wholesale from production site

• Individuals—clients/employees of G-lite foods sell to individual friends, family and


community members

Distribution Strategy of G-lite organization:

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Swami Keshwanand Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner- 334006

Financial plan:
• Capital investment
Land and building

– Land 1500 m2

– Construction area 1000m2

– Cost of construction 42 lakh

– Cost of land 105 lakh

Plant and machinery

- groundnut shelling capacity 10 tone per shift


- Blanching capacity 5 tone per shift
- Roasting capacity 5 tone prr shift
- Peanut butter making capacity 5 tone per shift
- Estimated values of plant and machinery

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Swami Keshwanand Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner- 334006

Estimated values of plant and machinery:

ITEM/MACHINE QUANTITY PRICE (Rs)

Elevator 2 70000
Pre-cleaner 1 468000
Destoner 1 315000
Vibratory Screw 1 30000
Opener 1 45000
Slotting Screen 1 30000
Picking/Sorting tables 4 500000
Vibrating Screens 1 40000
Radiant Ray Roaster 1 1200000
Cooling Seive 1 50000
Whole Nut Blancher 1 500000
Chamberless vacuum Packing Machine 1 150000
Air Compressor 1 35000
Split Nut Blancher 1 500000
Peanut Butter Mill 2 1000000
SS Holding Tank with Stirrer & Butter Pump 1 225000
Stabilizer Feeder 1 100000
Ingredient Feeder 1 100000
Ribbon Blender 1 150000
Scrape Surface Heat Exchanger 1 3000000
Ammonia Plant 1 1000000
SS Piping Kit 100000
PistonFiller For Butter Packing 1 300000
12289600
Total

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Swami Keshwanand Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner- 334006

Taxes, Transportation, Electrification & Installation 2000000


Total 14289600

Estimated expenditure of manpower:

Total
Particulars Nos Monthly Salary Salary
(Rs/Person) (Rs)
Works Manager 1 14000 14000
Supervisor 2 10000 20000

Machine Operators/Mechanic 3 9000 27000


Skilled Workers 3 7000 21000
Semi-skilled Workers 3 6000 18000
Helpers 5 6000 30000
Personnel Manager 1 8000 8000
Accountant 1 7000 7000
Clerk 1 6000 8000
Peon 2 4000 7000
Watchman 1 4500 2500
Electrician 1 4500 2500
Total 38 168000

Tentative Implementation Schedule:

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Swami Keshwanand Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner- 334006

Activity Period (months)

Application and Sanction of Loans 2

Site Selection and Commencement of Work 1

Completion of Civil Work & Placement of orders for


machinery 4

Erection, Installation and Trials Runs 1

Estimated value of land and building:

Particulars Area (sq. m) Cost (Rs. In lakh)

Land 1500 105

Building 1000 42

Total 147

Working capital requirement:

Particulars Period Margin Total Bank Promoters

(Rs in
(months) (Rs in Lakhs) (Rs in Lakhs) Lakhs)

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Swami Keshwanand Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner- 334006

Stock of raw
and packing
material 1 20% 184.26 147.41 36.84

Other
Expenses 1 5 0 5

Total 189.26 147.41 41.84

Cost of project and means of finance:

Item/Particulars Amount

Land and Building 14700000

Machinery 14289600

Miscellaneous Assets 500000

Preliminary & Pre-operative Expenses 2000000

Contingences at 10% on Land & Building and Plant & Machinery 2698900

Working Capital 18926000

Total 53114500

Means of Finance

Promoter's Contribution 12747500

Term Loan From bank 40367000

Total 53114500

Debt Equity Ratio 3:1

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Swami Keshwanand Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner- 334006

Promoter's Contribution 24%

Estimated sales value:

Product Quantity (ton) Price/ton (Rs) Sales value (in Lakh)

Peanut Butter 1000 260000 2600

Husk 220 3750 8.25


Total 2608.25

Estimated expenditure of raw material:


Product Quantity(ton) Price/ton(Rs.) Sales value(in Lakh)

Peanut butter 1000 260000 2600


Husk 220 3750 8.25
Total 2608.25

Interest on term loan of Rs 21441000 is calculated at 13% per annum assuming complete
repayment in 5 years including a moratorium period of 6 months

Interest on Term Loan:

Term loan = Total Loan – Working Capital

= 40367000-18926000

= 21441000 Rs.

Moratorium period of 6 months

Repayment of loan in 54 months

Loan and interest for 5 years:

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Institute of Agri Business Management
Swami Keshwanand Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner- 334006

Loan Year Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5

Amount of loan in
starting of year 21441000 18224850 12650190 7075530 1072050

Repayment 3216150 5574660 5574660 6003480 1211420

Loan at the end of year 18224850 12650190 7075530 1072050 -

Interest at 13% 2787330 2369230 1644525 919820 139370

Interest on working capital of 3 years:

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3

Working Capital 18926000 18926000 18926000

Interest at 14% 2649000 2649000 2649000

Depreciation of 2 years :

Cost Depreciation

1st Year 2nd Year 1st Year 2nd Year

Building (10%) 4200000 3780000 420000 378000

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Swami Keshwanand Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner- 334006

Machinery (20%) 14289600 11431680 2857920 2286336

Miscellaneous Assets
(20%) 500000 400000 100000 80000

Total Depreciation 3377920 2744336

Projected Profitability:

(Rs. In lakhs)
No. Particulars 1st Year 2nd Year
A Installed capacity 1000 tonnes
Capacity Utilisation 60% 75%
Sales Realization 1564.95 1956.18
B Cost of Production
Raw and Packing Materials 564.78 705.97
Utilities 5.00 6.00
Salaries 20.04 23.10
Stores and Spares 8 9.2
Repairs & Maintenance 12.00 14.00
Selling & distribution expenses 6 7
Administration expenses 8 9
Total 623.82 774.27
C Profit Before Interest & Depreciation 941.13 1181.91
Interest on Term Loan 27.87 23.70
Interest on Working Capital 26.49 26.49
Depreciation 33.71 27.45

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Profit Befor Tax 853 1104.27


Income tax at 33% 281.49 364.41
Cash Accurals 571.51 739.86
Repayment of Term Loan 32.16 55.75

Break even analysis:

No. Particulars Amount (Rs. In lakhs)

A Sales 1564.95

B Variable Cost

Raw and packaging materials 570.10

Utilities 5

Stores and Spares 8

Selling and distribution 8

Total 591.1

C Contribution (A-B) 972.9

D Fixed Cost

Salary 20.04

Administration Cost 8

Repairs and Maintenance 12

Interest on term loan 27.87

Interest on Working Capital 26.49

Depreciation 33.71

Total 128.11

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Swami Keshwanand Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner- 334006

• Break-even Sales

It is the amount of sales sufficient to reach the break even point

Fixed cost

BES= _______________

PV ratio

Contribution

PV = ________________ X 100

Sales revenue

972.9

PV = _______________ X 100 = Rs. 62.17

1564.95

128.11

Break even sales = _________________ X 100 = Rs. 20606400


62.17

Return on investment [ROI]:


Return on investment is the average return one investor gets from his total investment.

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EBIT

ROI = _________________ X 100

Capital employed

35817000

ROI = -------------------- X 100 = 67.45 %

53114500

Payback Period of the project:

It is the period required for an investor to get back all the money he has invested in one business.

Total Project Cost 53114500

------------------------ = ------------- = 1.97 years

Average Cash Flow 27010000

Market feasibility
% Increase in cost Particular Increase in production Increase or decrease
cost level of profit
(in lakh)

10% land & building 28.98 lakh 2% decrease

10% plant & machinery 14.28 lakh 1.7% decrease

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Swami Keshwanand Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner- 334006

20% land & building 57.97 lakh 4% decrease

20% plant & machinery 28.56 lakh 3.4% decrease

10% raw material 94.13 lakh 13.7% decrease

20% raw material 188.23 lakh 27.5% decrease

Reference:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peanut_butter

https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/seed-and-nut/health-benefits-of-peanut-butter.html

http://www.insidertradings.org/2017/12/18/peanut-butter

http://dasfoodindia.com/2017/01/24/peanut-butter-market-in-india/

timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/ahmedabad/Gujarat-leads-peanut-butter-production

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