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GOVERNMENT COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, JALGAON 425002

Department of Civil Engineering

CERTIFICATE

This is to certify that the Seminar report entitled, “STRUCTURAL HEALTH


MONITORING OF BRIDGE”, which is being submitted herewith for the award of B.E.,
is the result of the work completed by PRACHI S. JOSHI , VEDANT S. MANKAR AND
MANMIunder my supervision and guidance within the four walls of the institute and the same
has not been submitted elsewhere for the award of any degree.

Prof. V.T.Patil Dr. S. S. Pusadkar


Assistant Professor Head of Civil Engg. Department
Guide

Prof. Dr. R. P. Borkar


Principal Examiner

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DECLARATION

I, hereby declare that the seminar entitled, “STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING OF


BRIDGE” was carried out and written by me under the guidance of V.T.Patil, Assistant.
Professor ., Department of Civil Engineering,Govt. College of Engineering, Jalgaon. This work
has not been previously formed the basis for the award of any degree or diploma or certificate
nor has been submitted elsewhere for the award of any degree.

Place: Jalgaon VEDANT S. MANKAR

Date:

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

At the outset, we wish to express our deep sense of gratitude to our guide V.T.Patil, Assistant
Professor in Civil Engineering, Jalgaon for the grateful efforts to inoculate me & his direction
encouraged me to complete this seminar report & only due to his illuminating supervision, it
became possible for me to study the whole process in detail.
My sincere thanks to Dr. S. S. Pusadkar, Head of Civil Engineering Department and the
entire staff member from Civil Department and my friends. I am very much thankful to them
for inspiring me towards ensuring & retaining the quality of seminar report.

VEDANT S. MANKAR

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ABSTRACT

The process of implementing a damage identification strategy for aerospace, civil and
mechanical engineering infrastructure is referred to as structural health monitoring (SHM).
Here, damage is defined as changes to the material and/or geometric properties of these
systems, including changes to the boundary conditions and system connectivity, which
adversely affect the system’s performance. A wide variety of highly effective local non-
destructive evaluation tools are available for such monitoring. However, the majority of SHM
research conducted over the last 30 years has attempted to identify damage in structures on a
more global basis. The past 10 years have seen a rapid increase in the amount of research related
to SHM as quantified by the significant escalation in papers published on this subject. The
increased interest in SHM and its associated potential for significant life-safety and economic
benefits has motivated the need for this theme issue.This introduction begins with a brief
history of SHM technology development. Recent research has begun to recognize that the SHM
problem is fundamentally one of the statistical pattern recognition (SPR) and a paradigm to
address such a problem is described in detail herein as it forms the basis for organization of this
theme issue. In the process of providing the historical overview and summarizing the SPR
paradigm, the subsequent articles in this theme issue are cited in an effort to show how they fit
into this overview of SHM. In conclusion, technical challenges that must be addressed if SHM
is to gain wider application are discussed in a general manner.
To help the engineer, the report gives a brief overview of the general systems that are
commercially available. The report does not go into detail on each company’s particular
system, but offers the general characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages of a system. An
overview of 25 systems based on different techniques is presented. These include: 3-D laser
scanning, accelerometers, acoustic emissions, automated laser scanning, chain dragging,
concrete resistivity, digital image correlation (DIC), electrochemical fatigue, electrical
impedance (for corrosion), electrical resistance strain gauges, fatigue life indicators, fiber optic
sensors, global positioning (GPS), ground penetrating radar (GPR), impact echo, infrared
thermography, linear polarization resistance (for corrosion), string pots (linear potentiometer),
linear differential variable transducer (LVDT), macrocell corrosion rate sensors, chloride
content, scour devices, tilt and slope, ultrasonic C-scan, and vibrating wire strain gauge systems.

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The report also discusses other terminology that the authors consider necessary for
understanding the report. Some of these terms have many different interpretations and need to
be clearly defined. These definitions pertain to the time frame for monitoring, the scale of the
monitoring, and the type of monitoring metrics used to identify bridge health.

Keywords: Structural Health , Health Monitoring Sensors, Bridge Monitoring Sensors

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CONTENTS

S Titl Page No.


r e
.
N
o
.

Cert i
ifica
te
Dec ii
larat
ion
Ack iii
now
ledg
eme
nt
Abs ivi
tract
Con vii
tent
s
List ix
of
figu
re
1 Intr 1
odu
ctio
n
1.1 I 1
n
t
r
o
d
u
c
t

vi
i
o
n

1.2 1
Brid
ge
stru
ctur
e
1
.2.1
Stru
ctur
e
type
clas
sific
atio
n

1
.2.2
Fixe
d or
Mo
vabl
e
brid
ge

1
.2.3
Bas
ed
on
mat
erial
s
used

1
.2.4
Dou

vii
ble-
dec
ked
brid
ge

1.3
Som
e
dou
ble
dec
ked
brid
ges
in
all
over
the
worl
d

1.4
Dou
ble
dec
ked
brid
ges
in
Indi
a

1.5
Proj
ect
Obj
ecti
ves

viii
2 Lite 5
ratu
re
Rev
iew
2.1
Gen
eral
2.2
Rev
iew
3 Met 7
hod
olog
y

3.1
ST
AA
D.pr
o:
Soft
war
e
Stud
y

3
.1.1
Intr
odu
ctio
n

ix
3
.1.2
Crea
ting
brid
ge
geo
metr
y in
STA
AD.
pro

3
.1.3
Gen
erat
e
IRC
6-
200
0
Max
imu
m
Res
pons
e

3.2
Dat
a for
brid

x
ge
desi
gn

3.3
Man
ual
desi
gn
of
brid
ge
(IR
C 6:
200
0)

4 Con 9
clus
ion

Ref
eren
ces

xi
LIST OF FIGURE

Figure Title Page No.


No.
1 Principle and organization of a SHM system 6

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