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BDA (Before, During After) Lesson Plan Template

Teacher: Jeremy Neiss Grade: 8

CCSS Standard for mathematics:


8.G.A.3 Describe the effect of dilations, translations, rotations, and reflections on two-dimensional figures
using coordinates.

Objective (Explicit): Students will be able to perform the above transformations on two-dimensional figures
by demonstrating an understanding of how each translation affects the coordinates of the figure.
Evidence of Learning: What will you look for in students’ work to determine what they know? (pictures,
numbers and words). Students should be able to graph and describe the tranlsation.

Key math vocabulary: Materials:


Dilation Graph paper
Translation Graph handout w/ drawn triangle
Rotation A triangle cut-out that is equal to the one on handout
Refelction
Coordinates
Engage (BEFORE)
 What will you say to activate prior knowledge and explain the task?
 What is the problem that the students wil be working to solve?
 What materials will the students have available to work on, model the problem?
 What questions will you ask to be sure students understand the task?
How will you open with the objective:
Teacher will:
What will you say to activate prior knowledge and explain the task?
“Turn to a partner and review what a coordinate on a graph is. Talk about an ordered pair.”
“Next, talk about a triangle and a square on a graph. How many coordinates do you need to draw a triangle? How
many do you need to draw a square?
“Let’s see what you’ve come up with. What is a coordinate on a graph? How many do you need to draw a triangle?
A square?”

Explain the task:


“Today we will be performing ‘Transformations’ on two-dimensional figures, like triangles and squares. A
transformation is how we can manipulate a shape on a graph. We can move a shape around, make it bigger or
smaller, reflect it, and rotate it.“

“I have a handout of graph-paper with a triangle printed on it, as well as some cut-outs of the same triangle. Start at
the triangle on the handout, then move the cut-out around the graph. Make sure you take note of how the points of
the traingle change when you move it around. You will be turning in the handout when you are done. You won’t be
able to make the triangle bigger, but we’ll discuss that a little later.”

What is the problem that the students wil be working to solve?


Move, reflect, or rotate the cut-out triangle from the position of the triangle on the handout. Take note of the new
coordinates of the cut-out traingle and see how they relate to the original triangle.

What materials will the students have available to work on, model the problem?
They will use the provided unit triangle cut-outs and the graph paper hand-out. They can also trace the triangle/new
shape on their own graph paper and use a sleeve plus dry-erase markers to draw new triangles or shapes.

What questions will you ask to be sure students understand the task?
“What will you be doing? What materials do you use? Are you marking the points of the new traingle? How do those
points relate to the triangle on the handout? What are you turning in?”

Explore (DURING)
 What questions or prompts will you be prepared to use with students while they are “exploring”?
 What extension question will you use for students who solve the problem quickly?
 Provide differentiation for slow /advanced/ language learners

What questions or prompts will you be prepared to use with students while they are “exploring”?
When you moved the triangle, what were the new coordinates? How do they relate to the coordinates of the original
triangle? What operation was used? Can you think of a way to generalize this to all figures?

What extension question will you use for students who solve the problem quickly?
Now think about dilation. How can we make the shape bigger or smaller. Use graph paper, draw a 1x1 square and
make it bigger. Take note of the new coordinates. What are you doing to the coordinates of the old square to make
them the new ones?

Provide differentiation for slow /advanced/ language learners


REPEAT, REPEAT, REPEAT. Take my time explaining. Try explaining in different ways.

For more advanced learners, focus in on all transformations. Perhaps introduce them to transformations of lines
and parabolas.

For those struggling, I could offer them more direct problems.


EXAMPLE:
“Draw another triangle on the graphing portion of the worksheet using these points. How does the new triangle
relate to the older one? Are they the same size? How have they moved? Could you write an equation to represent
this change?”

Explain (AFTER)
What questions will you ask to initiate and maintain a discussion about the students solution to the problem?
What will you say to summarize the lesson/connect it to the objective? How will you check for
understanding?
What questions will you ask to initiate and maintain a discussion about the students solution to the
problem?
What did you find?
How was the position of the triangle related to the older one?
Has anyone tried flipping or rotating the triangle? What have you come up with?
Were you able to create an equation or expression?
Refer to questions some students had asked during exploration on the board. Perhaps other students can benefit
from thinking about them.

What will you say to summarize the lesson/connect it to the objective? How will you check for
understanding?
When you moved the new triangle around on the paper, starting at the old triangle’s position. You were performing
transformations on the triangle!
 If you moved it up/down/left/right you were performing a translation
 If you rotated the triangle, you were performing a rotation
 If you flipped the triangle across an axis, then you reflected it
 If you attempted to draw a larger/smaller shape, than you dilated the figure.
All of these transformations can be performed by manipulating the values of the points in some way. I’ll collect your
worksheets to see how many of you have understanding.

How will you close with the objective:


With some guided practice. Let’s walk through some examples of each transformation with wolfram alpha.

Evaluate (ASSESSMENT) What observational data will you collect and how will it be
recorded?

I will just check on how things are progressing with students. If they have a large
amount of questions, with great variety, then I would have a feeling that my
instructions weren’t clear or my goals weren’t conveyed properly. I will record good
questions on the whiteboard during exploration.
I will also collect the worksheets at the end of class as a formative assessment.

Lesson Assessment (optional)