Você está na página 1de 4

REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES

OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENTIAL ASSISTANT


FOR FOOD SECURITY AND AGRICULTURAL MODERNIZATION
PHILIPPINE COCONUT AUTHORITY
ZAMBOANGA RESEARCH CENTER
San Ramon, Zamboanga City 7000 Tel. /Fax No. (062) 982-0302
P.O. Box 356 TIN: 000724616
E-mail:

NON-FOOD PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT DIVISION


 
COCONUT‐BASED BIOMASS AND BIOFUELS LABORATORY 
 
MONTHLY ACCOMPLISHMENT REPORT 
FOR THE MONTH OF APRIL 2018 
 
 
1.  AR/NFPD  ‐  11/01.  Utilization  of  Coconut‐based  Biomass  for  Bioethanol  Production.  (N.J. 
Melencion, J.B. Mainar, and M.M. Melencion)  

1a. Utilization of Coconut‐Based Lignocellulosic Biomass for Ethanol Production. 

The project is temporarily halted due to the delayed approval of requested pressure cooker 
and hot plate with magnetic stirrer needed for acid‐based hydrolysis experiments. Breaking 
down of plant materials (cellulose, hemicellulloses, and lignin) into sugar monomers requires 
combination  of  treatments  (mechanical,  chemical,  and  biological)  prior  to  ethanol 
fermentation and distillation. 

Crucial to the optimization process (i.e. to find the best treatment parameters to produce the 
highest amount of fermentable sugars with the least unwanted side products is the use of 
High Performance Liquid Chromatograph (HPLC).  For this month, laboratory activities were 
focused on the familiarization on the use of Shimadzu HPLC.   

Initial results from coconut water samples showed the potentials of using HPLC to determine 
the types and quantity the amount sugars present from coconut biomass hydrolysates and 
from coconut water (buko and mature) and inflorescence sap (toddy). 

   

Page 1 of 4
 
Graph No. 1. Chromatogram of coconut water (buco stage, Aromatic variety). 
 

  Graph No. 2. Chromatogram of coconut water (Buco stage, Unknown variety). 

 
Graph No. 3. Chromatogram of coconut water (Mature stage, Aromatic variety). 
 

Page 2 of 4
 
Graph No. 4. Chromatogram of coconut water (mature stage, unknown variety)
 

Based on initial results, it appeared that the composition of coconut water varies between 
varieties/cultivars and maturity. Aromatic dwarf variety has high in fructose followed by 
glucose.  Sucrose  and  maltose  were  also  detected  but  of  lesser  concentration  (Graph 
No.1).    Ordinary  buko  water  (unknown  variety)  has  the  same  major  sugars‐  fructose, 
sucrose and sucrose but in lower in concentrations compared to aromatic dwarf variety.  
A trace amount of lactose was also detected (Graph No.2). 
Coconut water from mature nuts showed that in aromatic dwarf variety, sucrose is the 
dominant sugar followed by sucrose.  The amount of fructose is now greatly reduced as 
compared  to  that  in  the  buko  stage.  Trace  amounts  of  maltose  and  lactose  were  also 
detected. On the other hand, dominant sugars found in mature coconut water (unknown 
variety) are sucrose and fructose. Both sugars are almost of the same concentration unlike 
in the aromatic dwarf variety (mature) where the concentration of sucrose is almost twice 
as that of fructose. A trace amount of lactose was also detected.   Exact concentration of 
these sugars will soon be quantified using the same HPLC. 
The  implication  for  this  is  that  we  can  now  characterize  the  composition  of  different 
sugars in coconut water among different varieties/cultivars and in the different stages of 
maturity.  In  the  future  PCA  can  suggest  to  coconut  water  processors  the  appropriate 
coconut variety and age for their specific requirement. 
In 2017 when he was still the OIC of Agronomy, Soils, and Farming Systems Division, Dr. 
Melencion  submitted  a  capsule  proposal  (including  work  and  financial  plans)  on  this 
researchable  area  entitled  “Characterization  of  the  chemical  composition  (sugars, 
minerals, & vitamins) of coconut water of different coconut cultivars at different stages of 
maturity” for funding.  The said proposal, however, did not get the necessary funding for 
2018. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Page 3 of 4
2.  Commercialization of Coco‐coir Processing Technologies and Machineries in CALABARZON. 

2a.  Product development from coir‐cocoshell‐acrylic. (N.J. Melencion, M.M. Melencion, & J.B. 
Mainar) 

  No  activities  was  conducted  during  the  month  due  to  the  lack  of  acrylic  resins  and  other 
materials.   The Biomass and Biofuels laboratory was prevented from purchasing acrylic resins 
and other materials despite the fact that funds were still available at that time (November 
2017).   Currently, the funds for this project is already depleted. 

   

 2b.  Coconut‐based  Biodegradable  Bacterial  Cellulose  Product  Development  (N.J.  Melencion, 


M.M. Melencion & J.B. Mainar) 

Culture of bacterial cellulose from mature coconut water wastes were continued.   

3. Coconut Sap Concentrator (N.J. Melencion) 

  The  Biomass  and  Biofuels  Laboratory  is  still  waiting  for  the  stainless  steel  pressure  cooker  (as 
reaction vessel) and other supplies requested for purchase hence the activities for this project is 
temporarily halted. 

5. Research Extension/Training 

Dr. Neil Melencion, Sr. Science Research Specialist, together with two Research Assistants of the 
Biomass  and  Biofuels  Laboratory  ‐  Mrs.  Marybeth  Melencion  and  Mrs.  Josephine  B.  Mainar 
attended the High Performance Liquid Chromatograph (HPLC) Training Course on Sugar Analysis 
at Shimadzu Philippines Corporation, Bonifacio Global City, Taguig City on April 11‐14, 2018. 

Submitted by: 

NEIL J. MELENCION, PhD. 
Senior Science Research Specialist 

Page 4 of 4