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ADVERB PLACEMENT CHART

beginning of clause/sentence usually, normally, often, frequently, sometimes Usually we see him at church.
and occasionally
Last night we went dancing.
NOT: always, ever, rarely, seldom and never*

end of the clause/sentence usually, normally, often, frequently, sometimes We’ve performed
and occasionally thereoccasionally.

NOT: always, ever, rarely, seldom and never* Where did you eat yesterday?

All the bedrooms are upstairs.

adverbs of time: today, every week, finally, Have you taken the TOEFL yet?
already, soon
Have you eaten dinner already?

adverbs of manner (how something is


done): slowly, suddenly, badly, quietly She sang that aria very well.

He drives competently.

middle of sentence

after BE verb adverbs of certainty: certainly, definitely, clearly, They are definitely suited for
obviously, probably each other.

They’ll probably arrive late.


after auxiliary verb
He has apparently passed the
before other verbs class.

They obviously forgot to read the


directions.

after BE verb adverbs of frequency: never, rarely, sometimes, He is rarely morose.


often. usually, always, ever
after auxiliary verbs We have never eaten Moroccan
food.
before other verbs
He always takes flowers to his
girlfriend.

She quite often invites people for


Thanksgiving.

They almost never go to the


theater.
after BE verb focusing adverbs: even, only, also, mainly, just He is only five years old.

after auxiliary verbs We don’t even know his name.

before other verbs adverbs of time: already, still, yet, finally, We’ve already eaten dinner.
eventually, soon, last, just
He also rents chainsaws.

I am finally ready.

He is still planning to go tonight.

We just finished painting the


house.

after BE verb adverbs of manner (how something is She is slowly finishing her PhD.
done): slowly, suddenly, badly, quietly
after auxiliary verbs He has carefully gathered the
evidence.
before other verbs
We methodically checked all the
bags.

THE ROYAL ORDER OF ADVERBS


Verb Manner Place Frequency Time Purpose
enthusiasticall before
Beth swims in the pool every morning to keep in shape.
y dawn
before
to get a
Dad walks impatiently into town every afternoon suppe
newspaper.
r
before
Tashonda naps in her room every morning
lunch.
In actual practice, of course, it would be highly unusual to have a string of adverbial modifiers beyond two or three (at the
most). Because the placement of adverbs is so flexible, one or two of the modifiers would probably move to the beginning of
the sentence: "Every afternoon before supper, Dad impatiently walks into town to get a newspaper." When that happens, the
introductory adverbial modifiers are usually set off with a comma.