Você está na página 1de 18

SEISMIC ZONE RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM (UoL, 2011) 

 
Seismic Zone Residential Construction Improvement Program project development is based on the 
lectures given in the books ‘PMP® in depth: project management professional study guide for the PMP® 
exam’ (Sanghera, 2010) and ‘Effective Project Management: Traditional, Agile, Extreme’ (Wysocki, 
2009). Individual project assignment, resources, costs and schedule for working out this project are 
given in material handed over by University of Liverpool/Laureate Online Education (UoL, 2011).
 
 
 
 
Flexible Models 
Industrial Model Developers and Builders 
  
 
 
Research and Development Unit 
Property Development Department of the Government (PDDG) 
Someplace 
Somewhere 
 
 
Project: The Seismic Zone Residential Construction Improvement Program 
 
 
SEISMIC ZONE RESIDENTAL CONSTRUCTION IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM PROJECT SCOPE STATEMENT 

Scope is defined as description of the project boundaries and is defining what project will deliver, what 
is needed and organizations affected. 

Flexible Models (FM) will design, produce and assemble specified ‘PDDG Box Mk3’ on the site 
designated by Property Development Department of the Government (PDDG) in order that PDDG can 
start their work on effectiveness assessment of the boxes. Planned project duration is 51 day with cost 
of $121,794.00 and project plan is shown in the Gantt chart as part of this scope. Given plan, in 
Appendix A is created with assumption that there will be no delays in transport, specifications given 
are final and that PDDG will prepare site for assessment in time to receive shipment and that 
implementation may begin. As per Stoller (2010) The Gantt chart will help project manager and 
stakeholders in communication by visualizing timelines and their interrelation as well as dependencies.

Project will be created in Microsoft Project instead of previously planned OpenProj,  which change 
should not bring any alternations to the plan itself but will enhance control and communication as MS 
Project offers availability of connection to our Web‐based project tracking system which is offering 
information on the project at any moment in time. 

Quality of the delivered boxes is depending entirely on quality of the material specified by PDDG while 
FM is guaranteeing best possible design and production from their end. The quality of the project itself 
will be controlled trough the Quality Management Plan, which consists of the details on quality 
assurance, quality control and continuous improvement.  
 
Resources for production are available in all departments except in 'Cutting and parts development' 
department which is scheduled for work on the earlier contracted projects, however, they may be 
available for this project exclusively if we reschedule them from other projects which action may result 
in increase of cutting costs as we will have to hire sub‐contractors for other ongoing projects or utilize 
them when they are free from their assignments elsewhere which may cause schedule extension for 6 
days for each day delayed in this particular task. Cost of exclusive availability is shown in the cost 
estimation. 
 
Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) is created and shown in Appendix B and based on it Requirement 
Breakdown Structure (RBS) and Staffing (Resources) Management Plan are created in the next chapter 
of this paper. 
 
Portny (2010) stating that WBS is laying foundation of the project’s success by putting down on the 
paper all work required to be done in order to accomplish stated objectives, further, WBS must be 
comprehensive and friendly to understand to others by organizing it in accordance with immediate and 
final deliverables. 
 
In his article on significance of WBS, Zhao (2006) wrote following: ‘The level of detail shall be driven by 
a well established work breakdown structure (WBS), which shall be inherently built into a contingency 
risk model. When the contingency amount is derived, it will be automatically dispersed into 
appropriate accounts based on the risk levels and cost weighing factors. He is also writing that ‘using 
the WBS to help break down the estimate has far reaching effects for both cost management and 
contingency depletion, because: 
‐ Future changes can be attributable to the associated WBS accounts; 
‐ Human errors can be traceable back to appropriate WBS home domains; 
‐ Responsible individuals can be accountable for respective WBS contingency; 
‐ Potential savings can be recognizable in corresponding risk free WBS’. 
 
Scope of work is remaining the same as described in the Project Proposal. 
 
Schedule (Wysocki, 2009, pp.242‐244) is presented in the Gantt chart – Appendix A, with possible 
prolongation of 12 days if PDDG decline option for the cost compensation in order to secure 'Cutting 
and parts development' department specialists availability. 
 
Deliverable of this project is boxes production, delivery and their implementation on the site 
designated by PDDG. 
 
FM is not bearing any responsibility for the quality of material specified by PDDG, further there is no 
fault or any responsibility of FM if delivery or implementation is delayed due to natural causes 
(weather conditions) or PDDG failure to prepare implementation site timely. 
 
Product, boxes of a particular dimension used in the foundation of buildings is designated as ‘PDDG 
Box Mk3’ and specification for it is set by Research and Development Unit (RDU) of PDDG. Product will 
be accepted if quality control confirms conformity with specifications after assembly integration is 
completed. 
 
 
 
 
Project stakeholders: 
Name  Position  Department  Company 
Kunal Chopra  Project Manager  Project  FM 
Roy Benjamin  General Manager  Designing and Drafting  FM 
Michael Gartner  General Manager  Cutting  FM 
Philip Cloony  General Manager  Assembly  FM 
Jim Stanford  General Manager  Supply Chain  FM 
Management 
John Morris  Vice President  New Model  FM 
Caroline Smith  Marketing Chief  Marketing  FM 
Paul Lee  Technical Lead  RDU  PDDG 
  Program Manager  Seismic Zone  PDDG 
Joseph Bukhmann  Chief Editor    Construction 
Consortium Journal 
 
 
STAFFING (RESOURCES) MANAGEMENT PLAN 
Resources requirement is estimated by use of Estimate Activity Resources process, which purpose is to 
give us estimation on resource types needed and estimation on quantity of each type of needed 
resource (Sanghera, 2010). 
 
In order to create Resources Management Plan following Requirement Breakdown Structure (RBS) is 
developed in the table shown bellow (Wysocki, 2009, pp.63‐65): 
Activity  Task  Department  Person in Charge 
1 ‐ Requirements      1.1 Interview client      Design & Drafting  Roy Benjamin 
      analysis        stakeholders 
  1.2 Product detail analysis  Design & Drafting  Roy Benjamin 
Assembly  Philip Cloony 
  1.3 Refinement of the final   Design & Drafting  Roy Benjamin 
      draft   
2 ‐ Design and   2.1 High level design  Design & Drafting  Roy Benjamin 
      concept   
  2.2 Details with operation    Design & Drafting  Roy Benjamin 
      design   
3 ‐ Purchasing    3.1 Cardboard sheet  Supply Chain  Caroline Smith 
     Material  purchasing  Management 
  3.2 Metal sheet purchasing  Supply Chain  Caroline Smith 
Management 
  3.3 Cubes Purchasing  Supply Chain  Caroline Smith 
Management 
4 ‐ Production  4.1 Set up  Assembly  Philip Cloony 
  4.2 Cutting and parts   Cutting  Michael Gartner 
      development 
  4.3 Sub‐Assembly 1  Assembly  Philip Cloony 
  4.4 Sub‐Assembly 2  Assembly  Philip Cloony 
  4.5 Sub Assembly 3  Assembly  Philip Cloony 
  4.6 Assembly integration  Assembly  Philip Cloony 
5 ‐ Delivery  5.1 Pre‐delivery  Supply Chain  Caroline Smith 
Management 
  5.2 Shipment/Delivery  Supply Chain  Caroline Smith 
Management 
  5.3 Implementation  Design & Drafting  Roy Benjamin 
Assembly  Philip Cloony 
 
Staffing (resources) management plan is shown in Appendix C and project network schedule in 
Appendix D. 
 
COST ESTIMATION 
 
Hamilton (2006) is stating that ‘cost management is the process of estimating, control, and data 
analysis to establish a continuous cycle of information for the efficient implementation of projects’. 
 
In his article Good (2009) is stating that defined project scope is base of cost estimation. He is writing 
following: ‘The development team and cost estimator must provide their best estimate of actual 
required quantities. Quantities will developed using a variety of sources, including the cost estimators 
knowledge and experience, comparable industry projects, company databases, functional experts, and 
historical factors. Pricing is typically sourced from procurement groups, recent comparable past 
projects, and vendors/contractors’. 
Good (2009) further establishing that cost estimate always must have back‐up which is showing origin 
of the numbers and what assumptions were made and that is very important that there is no hidden 
contingencies in cost estimation, simply because, he says, hidden contingencies regardless whether 
they coming from inflating prices or quantities, degrading quality of cost estimation, eroding 
management confidence in cost estimation and may ultimately show the picture of uneconomic 
project. 
 
Cost calculation for Seismic Zone Residential Construction Improvement Program is made based on 
methodology given in Sanghera’s book (2010, pp.357‐361) and final project description handed by 
University of Liverpool (UoL, 2011).  
Task ID  Cost Description  Duration  Total Cost $ 
1.1  work  4  4,800.00
1.2  work  6  14,400.00
1.3  work  2  1,200.00
2.1  work  4  2,400.00
2.2  work  6  10,800.00
3.1  material    1,000.00
3.2  material    1,250.00
3.3  material    9,000.00
4.1  work  4  3,600.00
4.2  work  3  2,430.00
4.3  work  6  10,800.00
4.4  work  6  10,800.00
4.5  work  4  4,800.00
4.6  work  3  2,700.00
5.1  Fixed cost  2  3,000.00
5.2  Fixed cost  14  6,000.00
5.3  work  7  18,900.00
    Grand Total $:  107,880.00
 
Initial calculation showing estimated total cost at $107,880, however, final cost will be determined 
after Risk Management Plan analysis is performed. 
 
According to Ciraci and Polat (2009) accurate cost estimate made in planning stage is having potential 
of averting many problems. 
 
RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN 
Bragdon (2007) is stating that ‘risk identification is iterative; it must be properly executed on a 
continuing basis in order for the overall risk management effort to add any value. Nevertheless, there 
is no surefire formula for success. Successful risk identification requires discipline and creativity, 
urgency and patience, technical knowledge and intuition’. 
 
‘Risk is the uncertainty of occurrence of a phenomenon which, if happens, has a positive or negative 
effect on project objectives. Risk indicates the impact of a future event on current projects and 
measures the degree of deviation from the objectives of the project proposed standards. Any activity 
requires knowledge and risk taking. For successful activity is necessary to identify all possible risks, 
their quantification, and taking entire period of their progress’ (Melnic, 2010). 
 
For this project risk identification was conducted in the initial project risk assessment meeting.  Risks 
have been identified and as schedule is quite stringent those risks are included in the Risk Register. It is 
still remaining to conduct Risk Assessment Meeting of senior project team members and stakeholders 
and eventual additional risks identified should be also entered in the Risk Register. 
 
Risks in this project will be managed and controlled within the management, interproject, technical 
and time constraints.  All of identified risks must be evaluated in order to determine how they affect 
those constraints.  The project manager, with the project team assistance, will determine the best way 
of response for each risk in order to ensure compliance with those constraints. 
 
Risk management plan for Seismic Zone Residential Construction Improvement Program 
Risk  Constraint  Risk Identification  Risk Mitigation  Person in Charge 
ID  type 
1  Management  Two leading cutters from  Rescheduling their tasks in  Michael Gartner 
  Cutting Department may  order to ensure that they are 
Interproject  not be available for  available on required days 
scheduled dates 
2  Management  Rescheduling and  Updated list on personnel  Roy Benjamin 
transfer of designers and  deployment must be kept and  Philip Cloony 
assemblers from task to  reviewed daily in order to 
task  make timely transfer 
3  Management  Possible schedule creep  Management team must  Department 
monitor the project at all  Heads 
times and keep up to date   
with activities.  Kunal Chopra

4  Technical  Tasks 1.3 and 4.6 are  Heads of Departments must  Roy Benjamin 


critical for the project  control given schedule and  Philip Cloony 
and delay with timely  ensure that required resources 
completion of any of  are available for scheduled 
these two will cause  days 
chain of delays 
5  Technical  Possible delay of  Person in charge of the hiring  Jim Stanford 
Shipmen/Delivery, task  subcontractor for the task 
5.2  must stress situation to the 
subcontractor and ensure 
severe contractual penalty in 
case of delay which must 
cover costs created by that 
delay 
6  Technical  Possible damage to the  Person in charge of the hiring  Jim Stanford 
components during pre‐ subcontractors for the tasks 
delivery and  must stress that fact to the 
shipment/delivery  subcontractor and ensure 
severe contractual penalty in 
case of delay which must 
cover additional costs created 
by damage 
7  Technical  Weather conditions on  Site must be protected from  Kunal Chopra
the implementation site  rain, secure required   
protection accessories from  Jim Stanford 
PDDG 
8  Technical  Change in client  Contract between FM & PDDG  Kunal Chopra
requirements after  must cover such possibility 
cutting stage  and allow change of the 
schedule, reimbursement of 
the costs caused by 
requirement change as well as 
covering costs of requirements 
change. 
9  Technical  Delay in the arrival of  There is enough time to  Jim Stanford 
raw materials  arrange for timely delivery and 
SCM is having enough time to 
get the quotes well in advance 
and make preliminary 
agreement on delivery of 
material 
10  Technical  Incorrect set up  Historical data for similar  Philip Cloony 
projects in the past must be 
reviewed and stringent control 
of set up must be observed. 
11  Time  Tight schedule  Management team must  Kunal Chopra
monitor the project at all   
times and keep up to date  Department 
with activities.  Heads 
 
Risk with highest probability at the moment and prospective highest damage to the cost and schedule 
is Risk #1, Task 4.2 which must be eliminated. Elimination is of utmost importance as impact of Risk#1 
is irreparable to the schedule and the cost. Kunal Chopra and Michael Gartner will coordinate with 
leaders of other projects and arrange for cutters availability on required days which will eliminate this 
risk. 
 
‘Traditionally, there has been a 0.3 probability of components getting damaged during shipment and 
the costs should incorporate 30% of additional budgeting for these incidences’ (UoL, 2011).  

Affected Tasks in  Cost  Calculated  Additional  Cost with 


case of damage  Description  cost $  Budgeting %  Additional 
Budgeting $ 
3.1  material  1,000.00 30  1,300.00
3.2  material  1,250.00 30  1,625.00
3.3  material  9,000.00 30  11,700.00
4.1  work  3,600.00 30  4,680.00
4.2  work  2,430.00 30  3,159.00
4.3  work  10,800.00 30  14,040.00
4.4  work  10,800.00 30  14,040.00
4.5  work  4,800.00 30  6,240.00
4.6  work  2,700.00 30  3,510.00
Grand Totals $    46,380.00   60,294.00
 
It is visible that activities 3 and 4 will be affected in the case of the damages and additional material 
must be purchased in order to replace damaged and with that additional labor must be hired in order 
to meet schedule requirements. For that purpose additional funds in the budget must be added in 
amount of $13,914.00 which is setting total cost of the project at $121,794.00 as final. 
 
COMMUNICATION PLAN 
‘The right policy, with both letter and spirit, can guide workers toward effective communications. 
Especially as organizations introduce electronic management information systems, with 
communication applications such as shared data‐bases, electronic mail, or computer‐generated 
routine reports and letters, the need for communication policy would appear to become critical’ 
(Gilsdorf, 1987) 
 
In order to achieve highest possible efficiency and contact with clients, FM is developed and using 
Web‐based project tracking system which helps management, team and clients to obtain any 
information on the project and offer their feedback and comments. Such developed Web‐based 
tracking system offering and welcoming active participation to all stakeholders in the project. 
 
As primary mean of communication FM is using e‐mail and telephone contacts, and for that purpose 
project stakeholders directory is created and distributed to all stakeholders.  
 
 
PROJECT STAKEHOLDER DIRECTORY 
Role  Name  E‐mail  Phone 
Project Manager  Kunal Chopra  mh@fm.nl +311 1235001 
Designing &  Roy Benjamin  rb@fm.nl  +311 1235002 
Drafting Lead 
Cutting Lead  Michael Gartner  mg@fm.nl +311 1235003 
Assembly Lead  Philip Cloony  pc@fm.nl +311 1235004 

Supply Chain  Jim Stanford  js@fm.nl +311 1235005 


Manager 
Project Sponsor  John Morris  jm@fm.nl +311 1235006 
 
Marketing lead  Caroline Smith  cs@fm.nl  +311 1235007 
 
Technical Lead  Paul Lee  pl@rdu.nl  +311 2230001 
 
Program Manager    pm@pddg.nl  +311 4230001 
 
Journalist  Joseph Bukhman  jb@ccj.nl  +311 3230001 
 
 
Communication plan for the project is as shown in Appendix E. 
 
QUALITY PLAN 
Oakland (2011) wrote that effective Total Quality Management (TQM) is ensuring that strategic 
overview of quality is adopted by management and focuses to prevent not to detect possible 
problems. That is in essence way how to plan, organize and understand each activity and it is 
depending on each team member at each level. 
 
Further, Oakland (2011) stating that ‘quality policy requires top management to:  
1. Identify the end customer’s needs (including perception); 
2. Assess the ability of the organization to meet these needs economically; 
3. Ensure that any bought‐in materials meet the required standards of performance and efficiency; 
4. Ensure that subcontractors or suppliers share the values and process goals; 
5. Concentrate on the prevention rather than detection philosophy; 
6. Educate and train for quality improvement and ensure that any subcontractors do so as well; 
7. Measure customer satisfaction at all levels, the end customer as well as customer satisfaction 
between the links of the supply chain; 
8. Review the quality management systems to maintain progress. 
 
Quality plan for the project is as shown in Appendix F. 
 
 
 
 
References: 
University of Liverpool, (2011), PLANNING AND BUDGETING WITH RISK (MPM).20110505.203 
(UKL1.PBWRSK.20110505.203)  WEEK 4 ASSIGNMENTS [Online]. Available from: University of 
Liverpool/Laureate Online Education (Accessed: 25 May 2011) 
 
Sanghera, P. (2010), PMP® in depth: project management professional study guide for the PMP® exam. 
2nd ed. Boston: Course Technology/Cengage Learning. 
 
Wysocki, R.K. (2009), ‘Effective Project Management: Traditional, Agile, Extreme’, 5th ed., Indianapolis, 
USA, Wiley Publishing Inc. 
 
Stoller, J. (2010), 'The world according to Gantt', CMA Management, 84, 5, pp. 33‐34, Business Source 
Premier, EBSCOhost, (Accessed: 18 March 2011). 
 
Portny, S.E. (2010), 'Improving Project Performance With Three Essential Pieces of Information', 
Journal for Quality & Participation, 33, 3, pp. 18‐25, Business Source Premier, EBSCOhost, (Accessed: 
31 March 2011). 
 
Zhao, J. (2006), 'Significance of WBS in Contingency Modeling', AACE International Transactions, pp. 
5.1‐5.5, Business Source Premier, EBSCOhost, (Accessed: 22 June 2011). 
 
Hamilton, A.C. (2004), 'Cost Management', AACE International Transactions, p. 1, Business Source 
Premier, EBSCOhost, (Accessed: 22 May 2011). 
 
Good, G.K. (2009), 'Project Development and Cost Estimating ‐ A Business Perspective', AACE 
International Transactions, pp. TCM.01.1‐TCM.01.14, Business Source Premier, EBSCOhost, (Accessed:  
22 May 2011).  
 
Ciraci, M. & Polat, D. (2009), 'Accuracy Levels of Early Cost Estimates, in Light of the Estimate Aims', 
Cost Engineering, 51, 1, pp. 16‐24, Business Source Premier, EBSCOhost, (Accessed: 22 May 2011). 
 
Bragdon, D.J. (2007), 'The Importance of Risk Identification', Defense AT&L, 36, 3, pp. 13‐16, Business 
Source Premier, EBSCOhost, (Accessed: 2 June 2011). 
 
Melnic, A. (2010), 'RISK RESPONSE STRATEGIES IN PROJECT MANAGEMENT', Metalurgia International, 
pp. 74‐78, Computers & Applied Sciences Complete, EBSCOhost, (Accessed: 2 June 2011). 
 
Gilsdorf, J.W. (1987), 'Written Corporate Communication Policy: Extent, Coverage, Costs, Benefits', 
Journal of Business Communication, 24, 4, pp. 35‐52, Business Source Premier, EBSCOhost, (Accessed: 
10 June 2011). 
 
Oakland, J. (2011), 'Leadership and policy deployment: the backbone of TQM', Total Quality 
Management & Business Excellence, 22, 5, pp. 517‐534, Business Source Premier, EBSCOhost, 
(Accessed: 22 June 2011) 
APPENDIX A - PROJECT SCHEDULE
ID Task Name Duration Start Finish Predece Resource Names Jun 19, '11
S M T W T F
TeamStatus Pending: No 51 days Mon 6/27/11 Mon 9/5/11
1 Interview clients stakeholders 4 days Mon 6/27/11 Thu 6/30/11 Design Department
2 Product detail analysis 6 days Mon 6/27/11 Mon 7/4/11 Design Department,Assembly Department
3 Refinement of the final draft 2 days Wed 7/6/11 Thu 7/7/11 1,2 Design Department
4 High level design 4 days Fri 7/8/11 Wed 7/13/11 3 Design Department
5 Details with operation designs 6 days Tue 7/12/11 Tue 7/19/11 3 Design Department
6 Set up 4 days Wed 7/20/11 Mon 7/25/11 4,5 Assembly Department
7 Purchase required material - Card 1 day Wed 7/20/11 Wed 7/20/11 5 Supply Chain
8 Purchase required material - Meta 1 day Thu 7/21/11 Thu 7/21/11 5 Supply Chain
9 Purchase required material - Cub 1 day Fri 7/22/11 Fri 7/22/11 5 Supply Chain
10 Cutting and parts development 3 days Tue 7/26/11 Thu 7/28/11 6,7,8,9 Cutting Department
11 Sub-Assembly 1 6 days Tue 7/26/11 Tue 8/2/11 6,7,8,9 Assembly Department
12 Sub-Assembly 2 6 days Tue 7/26/11 Tue 8/2/11 6,7,8,9 Assembly Department
13 Sub-Assembly 3 4 days Tue 7/26/11 Fri 7/29/11 6,7,8,9 Assembly Department
14 Assembly Integration 3 days Wed 8/3/11 Fri 8/5/11 10,11,12 Assembly Department
15 Pre-delivery 2 days Tue 7/26/11 Wed 7/27/11 6 Pre-Delivery
16 Shipment 14 days Mon 8/8/11 Thu 8/25/11 14,15 Shipment/Delivery
17 Implementation 7 days Fri 8/26/11 Mon 9/5/11 16 Design Department,Assembly Department

Task Milestone External Tasks


Project: Seizmic Zone
Split Summary External Milestone
Date: Tue 6/28/11
Progress Project Summary Deadline

Page 1
APPENDIX A - PROJECT SCHEDULE
Jun 26, '11 Jul 3, '11 Jul 10, '11 Jul 17, '11 Jul 24, '11 Jul 31, '11
S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T

Design Department
Design Department,Assembly Department
Design Department
Design Department
Design Department
Assembly Department
Supply Chain
Supply Chain
Supply Chain
Cutting Department
Assem
Assem
Assembly Department

Pre-Delivery

Task Milestone External Tasks


Project: Seizmic Zone
Split Summary External Milestone
Date: Tue 6/28/11
Progress Project Summary Deadline

Page 2
APPENDIX A - PROJECT SCHEDULE
Aug 7, '11 Aug 14, '11 Aug 21, '11 Aug 28, '11 Sep 4, '11 Sep 11, '11
F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W

bly Department
bly Department

Assembly Department

Shipment/Delivery
Design Department,Assembly Departm

Task Milestone External Tasks


Project: Seizmic Zone
Split Summary External Milestone
Date: Tue 6/28/11
Progress Project Summary Deadline

Page 3
APPENDIX B – WORK BREAKDOWN STRUCTURE

Project 
Completion

1.0 Requirement  2.0 Design and  3.0 Purchasing  4.0 Production 5.0 Delivery
Analysis Concept Material

1. Refinement  Cardboard  Metal 


3.2 Metal 3.3 Cubes
Cubes 5.3
3.1 Cardboard
of the final  Sheet Sheet Purchasing Implementation
sheet Sheet Purchasing Implementation
Purchasing Purchasing
detail purchasing Purchasing

4.64.6
Assembly
Assembly  5.1 5.2
1.1
1.2interview
Interview 1.2 Product detail
Product detail  Pre‐delivery Delivery
Integration
integration Pre-Delivery Shipment
client stake
client stakehol analysis
analysis
holders

2.2High level 
High level 2.1 Details with 4.2 Cutting & 4.3 Sub- 4.4 Sub- 4.5 Sub-
Details with  Cutting and  Sub‐Assembly  Sub‐Assembly Sub‐Assembly 
Design
design operational
operation design Parts
Parts developm. Assembly
1 1 Assembly
2 2 Assembly
3 3
Design Development

4.1 Set up
APPENDIX C – STAFFING (RESOURCES) MANAGEMENT PLAN 

Activity  Task ID  Requirement  Period  Days  Total Rqre  Transfer to  Transfer  Remark  Total 
ID  per Task  Task ID  from Task  Required 
ID  Availability 
for Activity 
1  1.1  Designer  27.06‐30.06  4  8  1.2    After completion of   
task 1.1 transfer to 1.2 
  1.2  Designer  27.06‐30.06  4  10      Required 10 designers   
for first 4 days of 1.2 
  1.2  Designer  03.07‐04.07  2  10  1.3  1.1  8 designers transferred   
on completion of 1.1 
  1.2  Assembler  27.06.‐04.07  6  6        6 
  1.3  Designer  06.07‐07.07  2  4    1.2  After completion of  18 
task 1.2, 4 designers 
transferred to task 1.3 
2  2.1  Designer  08.07‐13.07  4  4  2.2    After completion of   
task 2.1 transfer to 2.2 
  2.2  Designer  12.07‐13.07  2  12      Required 12 designers   
for first 2 days of 2.2 
  2.2  Designer  14.07‐19.07  4  8    2.2  After completion of  16 
task 2.1, 4 designers 
transferred to task 2.2 
4  4.1  Assembler  20.07‐25.07  4  6  4.3 & 4.4    After completion of   
task 4.1, 3 assemblers 
transfer to task 4.3 and 
other 3 to task 4.4 
  4.2  Cutter  20.07‐22.07  3  9        9 
  4.3  Assembler  26.07‐29.07  4  12    4.1     
  4.3  Assembler  01.08‐02.08  2  8    4.5  After completion of   
task 4.5, 4 assemblers 
transferred to task 4.3 
  4.4  Assembler  26.07‐29.07  4  12    4.1     
  4.4  Assembler  01.08‐02.08  2  8    4.5  After completion of   
task 4.5, 4 assemblers 
transferred to task 4.4 
  4.5  Assembler  26.07‐29.07  4  8  4.3 & 4.4    After completing task   
4.5, 4 assemblers 
transferred to task 4.3 
and other 4 to task 4.4 
  4.6  Assembler  03.08‐05‐08  3  6    4.3 or 4.4  Upon completion of  32 
tasks 4.3 and 4.4, 6 
assemblers transferred 
to task 4.6 
5  5.3  Designer  26.08‐05.09  7  11        11 
    Assembler  26.08‐05.09  7  7        7 
APPENDIX D – PROJECT NETWORK DIAGRAM

4 4 3 3
1.1 2.2 3 4.2
2

1.3
6 6 4 6

1.2 2.2 4.1 4.3

4.4

4.5

3 2

4.6 5.1

14

5.2

5.3
APPENDIX E – COMMUNICATION PLAN 

Type  Mode  Objective  Frequency Audience  Owner  Deliverable 

Kickoff  Face to face  Introduction of the project team  Once  Project Sponsor  Project  Agenda 


Meeting  and the project.  Review of the  Project Team  Manager  Meeting Minutes 
project objectives and  Stakeholders 
management approach 
Project  Face to face  Status review of the project with  Daily  Project Team  Project  Agenda 
Team  e‐mail  the team  Manager  Meeting Minutes 
Meetings  telephone 
Project  e‐mail  Status review of the project  Weekly  Project Sponsor  Project  Agenda 
Sponsor  telephone  Manager  Meeting Minutes 
Meetings 
Budget  Face to face  Status review of the project’s  Daily  Project Manager  Marketing Lead  Budget update 
Review  telephone  budget  Supply Chain Manager 
Technical  Face to face  Discuss development of technical  Weekly  Project Manager  Technical Lead  Agenda 
Design  e‐mail  design solutions and progress of  Meeting Minutes 
Meetings  telephone  the project. 
Program  e‐mail  Update on project progress.  Bi‐Weekly  Project Manager  Program  Agenda 
Progress  telephone  Manager   
Report 
Program  Face to face  Discuss project, development and  As needed Chief Editor  Project Sponsor  Project outline 
Progress  e‐mail  update on project progress.  Project status 
Information  telephone  Marketing FM 
APPENDIX F – QUALITY PLAN 

Type  Objective  Frequency  Audited  Auditor  Deliverable 

Acceptance  Control of quality documentation  Once  Project Manager  Technical Lead  Acceptance of project 


Audit  resources qualification and FM    facilities 
facilities technical capability 
Task Audit  Quality control of performance  On each task  Department Lead  Project Manager  Audit report 
completion 
Material Audit  Quality control of material used for  Once  Supply Chain  Technical Lead  Audit report 
boxes  Manager  Acceptance document 
Subcontractor  Audit of pre‐delivery subcontractor  Once  Pre‐delivery  Supply Chain  Acceptance and service 
Audit  subcontractor  Manager  contract 
 
Subcontractor  Audit of Shipment/Delivery  Once  Shipment/Delivery  Supply Chain  Acceptance and service 
Audit  subcontractor  subcontractor  Manager  contract 
 
Final Assembly  Quality control of assembled boxes  Once  Cutting Lead  Technical Lead  Audit Report 
Audit  Assembly Lead  Acceptance document 
 
Implementation  Quality control of implementation  Once  Design Lead  Technical Lead  Audit Report 
Audit  Assembly Lead  Acceptance document