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Terry Prosser

with Jane Revell and Mary Tomalin

pre-intermediate A

Teacher’s Guide
Letter to you, the teacher
Welcome to Jetstream, a course designed to
motivate and engage learners. We aim to provide
you with material that’s stimulating and relevant,
so your students learn English easily and with real
enjoyment.
We hope to give you everything you’d expect, and
more besides. We’ve aimed to balance the familiar
and the new: to give you what you know works
well and, at the same time, to introduce some
unique features that will greatly enhance your
students’ learning experience.

Our approach in general


We believe that engaging content together with
enjoyable and useful learning activities are the keys
to successful learning.
We believe that students need to be exposed to
the most useful vocabulary that they’ll need to
speak and write English at this level.
We pay special attention to the grammar of the
language – without grammar, vocabulary is just
words!
We believe in the importance of having students
meet words and grammar in exciting and
interesting situations – and in giving opportunities
for students to practise this language so that they
feel comfortable with it.
We also believe that teacher support is crucial –
we know you’re really busy. This Teacher’s Guide
provides clear lesson notes and a lot of other
things as well (see Contents on page 3). There’s
also a lot of support online in the form of extra
material, practice tests and so on.
You don’t have to use all – or even any – of the
Teacher’s Guide, of course, but it’s there if you
need it and it’ll help to give you lots of choices.
We’ve put a lot of work into ensuring that
Jetstream is simple to use. And thought-provoking.
And effective. And fun.

Enjoy!

Jane Revell and Mary Tomalin

2
Contents
Letter to you, the teacher 2
Jetstream Pre-intermediate Student’s Book contents 4
Introduction
Jetstream Pre-intermediate components 6
Jetstream approach – a summary 6
Unit overview 10
Unit notes
Getting to know you 21
Unit 1 27
Unit 2 40
Units 1&2 Review 55
Unit 3 57
Unit 4 72
Units 3&4 Review 86
Unit 5 89
Unit 6 103
Units 5&6 Review 117
Photocopiable games 121
Photocopiable tasks 130
Technique banks
Using the video 135
Using stories 136
Using memory games 137
20 easy games 139
Five fun techniques to use with a flagging class 141
Extra questions and tasks for Art & Music 142
Working with mixed-ability classes 142
Ensuring learner autonomy and using technology 143
De-stress! cartoons 145

Contents 3
4 Contents
Contents 5
Jetstream Pre-intermediate For the teacher:
components Teacher’s Guide with class audio CDs
The Teacher’s Guide contains full teaching notes
For the student: for each unit, including all transcripts, keys and
Student’s Book useful background information, plus ideas for early
finishers and mixed-ability suggestions.
The Student’s Book contains 6 units of three Three class audio CDs contain all the listening
double-page lessons, and a Vocabulary plus and material for the Student’s Book.
Everyday English section at the end of each unit. The Teacher’s Guide also contains the following
It also contains the following: extra material:
• a two-page Review unit after every two units • one photocopiable game per unit
• four stories • one task per unit
• a comprehensive grammar reference section • eight ‘technique banks’ giving ideas in the
following areas:
• information-gap activities and extra material
Using the video
• complete transcripts for the audio Using stories
• a Pronunciation spread contrasting similar Using memory games
sounds 20 easy games
• an irregular verbs list. Five fun techniques to use with a flagging class
Extra questions and tasks for Art & Music
Workbook with audio Working with mixed-ability classes
Ensuring learner autonomy and using technology.
The Workbook contains 6 units of four pages –
one page per SB lesson, and one page for Interactive book for whiteboards DVD-ROM
Vocabulary plus and Everyday English.
It also contains the following: E-zone
• a Review quiz after every two units Full access to the students’ area plus
• a Check your progress test after every two units • the video for all Everyday English pages
• one page of dedicated Writing practice for • mp3 audio files
each unit, giving students a structured writing • downloadable Teacher’s Guide with answer keys
development course. • Helbling placement test
• guide for new teachers
E-zone
• Testbuilder containing 6 unit tests covering
The e-zone is an online resource for students and grammar, vocabulary, functions and the four
teachers containing: skills and six progress tests.
• the video for all the Everyday English pages
• a cloud book – an interactive version of the
Student’s Book, including all video and audio
Jetstream approach – a
• cyber homework – interactive activities
covering grammar, vocabulary, reading, summary
listening and dialogues. They’re assigned by
Motivation
the teacher in a virtual classroom and have
automatic feedback. (They can also be used in Research shows that motivation is key to learning;
self-study mode – see below.) to learn, students need to be interested! Jetstream
has been written to be highly motivating for
• mp3 audio files
students, and includes the following:
• online training – pronunciation exercises, exam
• interesting and relevant topics
practice (Cambridge ESOL, TOEFL, IELTS and
TOEIC) and cyber homework in self-study • stimulating and often thought-provoking
mode (extra practice) photos
• CLIL projects. • lots of personalisation activities where students
For more information on the e-zone, see page 9. are encouraged to talk about themselves

6 Introduction
• communicative activities which give students a Most of the three main lessons in Jetstream have a
real purpose for completing a task vocabulary component. In addition:
• highly motivating tasks throughout • Vocabulary plus pages (one at the end of each
the Student’s Book, and also a bank of unit) provide an opportunity for vocabulary
photocopiable tasks in the Teacher’s Guide enrichment.
• an Art & Music feature in every unit which • Focus on sections within the Vocabulary plus
encourages students to use their English in a pages highlight and practise high-frequency
fun and less formal way words and phrases and their different uses and
• Everyday English pages at the end of every meanings.
unit which provide immediately useful • Preposition Park sections in the Review units
conversations practising different functions, focus on prepositions, usually within an
including short video clips interesting text.
• plenty of games and game-like activities, and • Similar or different activities ( ) get students
also a collection of 20 easy games and a bank comparing new words with words which are
of photocopiable games (one for each unit) at the same or different in their own language.
the back of the Teacher’s Guide. • Useful expressions sections are usually within
the Vocabulary plus pages; they highlight and
Grammar practise common expressions used in different
Grammar is an important element in Jetstream. It’s situations.
dealt with in the following way:
• It’s introduced gradually – each of the three Reading
main lessons in a unit usually has a grammar The main reading focus in Jetstream is usually in
point. This enables the grammar to be Lesson 2, but there are often other, shorter reading
introduced step-by-step, practised and easily texts elsewhere.
absorbed. There’s a variety of high-interest text types – real-
• It’s revised in the Review units that occur every life stories, articles, quizzes, blogs, etc. Where
two lessons. possible at this level, texts are based on real
people, places and events.
• The grammar for a lesson is introduced in
context. The grammar form is highlighted and • Activities develop students’ ability to scan
students are given activities where they deduce a text for its general meaning and guess
the form and meaning. meaning from context.
• Activities are realistic and meaningful. • Texts, whether in the form of human-interest
articles or fiction stories, are absorbing and
• A clear and straightforward grammar reference
memorable and a key way of learning and
section at the end of the Student’s Book
practising language.
explains each lesson’s grammar.
• Four two-page stories at the back of Jetstream
• The we don’t say ... / we say ... section at the
are an extra resource that provide practice in
end of each Everyday English page rounds off
extensive reading, where students can read
a unit by highlighting common grammatical
for meaning and pleasure without necessarily
mistakes in the language learnt in the unit.
studying the text in detail. See page 136 for
• The Irregular verbs section provides an
more ideas on how to use these stories.
invaluable reference for students.
Other sections that provide very short, high-
interest texts for additional reading comprehension
Vocabulary relevant to the topic are:
It’s increasingly recognised that vocabulary is just
• Art & Music
as important as or perhaps even more important
than grammar when learning a language. • Did you know?
Jetstream has a high vocabulary input so that The Cross Culture section in the Review units
students can understand, speak, read and write also provides additional reading matter. It offers
with ease. Stimulating and unusual pictures and interesting and practical information on different
motivating activities ensure students absorb the cultures and should lead to stimulating discussions.
vocabulary easily and there’s plenty of practice.
Introduction 7
Writing • At Pre-intermediate level, activities are
Regular short Writing sections in the Student’s carefully designed so that students can express
Book provide guided writing practice through a themselves freely without making a lot of
variety of tasks. The core writing course, however, mistakes.
is to be found at the back of the Workbook, which • The main speaking section of a lesson generally
includes a full page of guided writing tasks per has longer speaking activities than earlier in the
unit. In this writing development course, students lesson.
cover the following areas: • The photos, cartoons, listening and reading
• a personal profile texts all provide stimulating platforms for
• a biography speaking activities.
• a CV • You first! at the start of some lessons uses a
short question to get students engaged with
• a blog
the lesson topic immediately.
• a holiday review
• Everybody up! sections encourage students
• instructions to stand up and move around the class,
• advice interacting with each other to find out
• a presentation information.
• a complaint • The Art & Music and Did you know? sections in
• a magazine article the main units, and the Cross Culture sections
in the Review units, also provide platforms for
• a book review
stimulating discussions.
• a summary.
• The photocopiable tasks in the Teacher’s
The Don’t forget feature summarises the use of Guide and the information-gap activities at
linkers and other accuracy features: word order, the back of the Student’s Book provide further
punctuation, time expressions, paragraphing, etc. communicative practice.
The Writing section also starts to cover format and
tone, which many lower-level books don’t cover. Pronunciation
Check it! sections allow students to review and Short pronunciation activities throughout the
improve their work. Student’s Book provide clear practice of some
common areas, including:
Listening
• specific sounds
The main listening focus in Jetstream is in Lesson 3
of each unit, but there are often short listening • word stress
activities elsewhere. The Everyday English page • sentence stress
provides further listening practice in the form of • simple intonation.
functional dialogues. In addition, students are encouraged to listen
To train students in useful and relevant listening to and repeat the main vocabulary groups
skills, the listening texts reflect a variety of real- throughout the book.
life situations, including conversations, interviews, The Pronunciation section on pages 84–85 of
talks, reports and radio programmes. the Student’s Book includes a phonemic chart for
The transcripts of the listening texts can be found students’ reference and practice of similar sounds
at the back of the Student’s Book for students’ that students often confuse.
reference and are also reproduced in the relevant
activity notes in the Teacher’s Guide. Stories
There are stories about real and fictional people
Speaking throughout the course, but at the back of the
For many learners of English, speaking is the most Student’s Book (SB pages 68–71) you’ll also find
important language skill. four slightly longer, completely new stories. These
There are speaking activities at all stages of a stories are a way of providing an opportunity
lesson in Jetstream: for students to read more extensively and gain
a sense of satisfaction from doing so. For this

8 Introduction
reason, they deliberately contain language which Online resources – available on e-zone
is slightly above students’ level (linking in with
Stephen Krashen’s idea that we learn most from HELBLING Placement Test
language which stretches us a little – but not too Designed to give students and teachers of English
much). However, the texts are not too difficult, a quick way of assessing the level of a student’s
and students shouldn’t be reaching for their knowledge of English grammar and usage.
dictionaries all the time.
Online training
There are no tasks on the Student’s Book page
itself. This is in order to leave you completely free Resources and interactive activities for individual
as to how you approach the stories, but you’ll find student access. Includes:
a variety of interesting techniques on page 136. • exam practice
• pronunciation
Consolidation and review • all exercises from the cyber homework in self-
Consolidation of recently acquired language and study mode.
regular revision are crucial to learning. Cloud book
After every two units, there’s a Review unit that An interactive version of the Student’s Book and
revises key language in these units. Each Review Workbook, where students can access all audio
unit contextualises the language through reading and video content at the click of a mouse or touch
and sometimes listening texts. There are also of a screen. Students can complete the activities,
grammar exercises and writing and speaking tasks. check their results and add their own notes.
The Workbook provides further practice and
testing of the language in a unit. In addition, Cyber homework
after every two units in the Workbook, there’s a Interactive activities assigned to students by their
Review quiz, which tests students using a general teacher within an online virtual classroom. Results
knowledge quiz. This is followed by a Check your and feedback are automatically given when the
progress test. deadline fixed by the teacher has been reached.

Projects
Open-ended tasks on both cultural and global
themes, where students can embed other
resources and share them with the teacher and
their class.

How to integrate an LMS (a Learning Management System) into your teaching

Initial assessment

Assessment HELBLING Placement Test

1 Planning
Exam practice 6 >
Testbuilder 2 Scope & sequence
>

Teacher’s Guide
5
> 3 Class routine
Virtual class and self-study practice 4
Lesson enrichment Student’s Book
• Projects Workbook
• Online training
• Cyber homework • Resources
• Student downloads • Videos
• Interactive book for whiteboards
• Teacher downloads
Introduction 9
Unit overview

You first!
You’ll find a You first! box on many of the large photos at the beginning of a
lesson. It has a triple purpose. Firstly, to engage students and get them saying
something immediately. Secondly, to allow students to use what they already know
and boost their confidence. And thirdly, to give you an idea of what and how much
they already know so that you can target your teaching much more effectively.
What if your students don’t respond at all? That’s fine. Now you know. Just move
on and start to teach them something.

10 Introduction
Information gap
There’s an information-
gap activity in every
second unit. In these,
students need to get
information from
each other in order to
complete a task. All the
material students need
to do the tasks is in the
back of the Student’s
Book on pages 62–65.

Grammar reference Art & Music


There’s a useful grammar Most people enjoy looking at pictures and listening to songs.
reference at the back of the This section utilises this interest in order to motivate students
Student’s Book. Each main and transfer the topic language to a new context. The Art
grammar point from the grammar section provides a picture and related tasks, while the Music
boxes throughout the book has a section gives some information about a song and provides
relevant section in the grammar related tasks. The tasks give students the opportunity to
reference. research online and bring the information back to the class,
and should often stimulate lively discussions. There’s a natural
mixed-ability element: more competent students will be able to
take it further than those who are less competent.
For the Art task, students turn to page 125 (Units 1–6) or page
145 (Units 7–12) of the Student’s Book to find larger versions of
the pictures.

Introduction 11
Listening
This symbol tells you that there’s
recorded material that goes with
the activity. This can either be a full
listening text or, as here, it might
be listening to check answers and
hear the correct pronunciation. Full
transcripts are given in the back of
the Student’s Book.

12 Introduction
Everybody up!
This is a chance for
students to move around
the classroom and use
specific language in a
controlled way to get
information from other
students. This kind of
short intensive practice
can be very lively and also
very rewarding if students
succeed in completing the
task using the language
resources available to
them. It also allows them
to interact with lots of
different people. The act
of physically getting up
and moving around is also
mentally refreshing; being
physically active helps
us to learn. Students
may naturally find that
they engage in longer
conversations than the
activity requires. If time
allows, this is good and
enjoyable practice for
them. However, it’s a
good idea to set a time
limit for this activity.

Explore De-stress!
This is an opportunity for students to Apart from providing tiny practical texts to read, these
go beyond the page and find out more sections are there to help students unwind from time
about some aspect of the topic: a sort of to time. Why? Because, quite simply, we don’t learn
mini project. They should do the research well when we’re stressed; we learn best when we’re
online, make notes and report back, relaxed. You’ll find a simple de-stress exercise in every
working either alone or in pairs. You unit. If it’s a piece of advice, talk about it with students.
may want to set this up in the classroom If it’s a physical exercise, get (or help) students to read
by suggesting possible websites or just it and follow the instructions. Do it there and then in
by eliciting suggestions for words and the classroom if you can. Then you can use it again and
phrases to type into the search engine. again, whenever it’s useful (see, for example, SB page
As with Art & Music, there’s a natural 33, Volume B, where students are advised to do simple
mixed-ability element to this section. shoulder exercises to release tension).

Introduction 13
Guess
Asking students to
‘guess’ answers before
reading or listening to
information not only
gets them to interact,
it also frees them up
from having to know
the ‘right’ answer and
thus inhibiting their
response. In addition,
it prepares them for
the text and gives
a valid reason for
reading or listening
to something – to
see if they were right.
For this reason, it’s
very important not to
confirm if students
are right or not in
their guesses. Just say
things like: Hmm or
That’s interesting or
Possibly, etc and let
the text provide the
answers.

P Pronunciation
There are two pronunciation activities in each unit of the Student’s Book: one
in Lessons 1–3 and one in either Vocabulary plus or Everyday English. At Pre-
intermediate level, there’s work on stress and intonation and an emphasis on
sounds, as these can often pose problems for students. All the pronunciation
activities are recorded so that students can hear the correct sounds or stress.
There’s also a Pronunciation section at the back of the Student’s Book on pages
84–85. This provides practice in differentiating between similar sounds (minimal
pairs), eg the difference between /p/ and /b/.

14 Introduction
Similar or different?
This symbol often occurs where
new vocabulary is introduced
and it suggests that you ask
students which words are the
same as or similar to words in
their own language – and which
are very different. This feature
of Accelerated (or Holistic)
Learning (see page 20) aims
to draw students’ attention to
the fact that they already know
some words. It serves to reassure
them, build their confidence and
lighten their learning load. It can
also give them a basis for word-
building (eg the fact that words
ending in -ion in English may also
end in -ion in their language).
Suddenly they know ten words,
not just one.
Note: Very often, if the word is
a similar one, the difference is
in the pronunciation – especially
the word stress – or the spelling.
Also, similar or different is
obviously easier if you have a
unilingual class, especially when
you’re familiar with the students’
mother tongue, but it can work
well with a multilingual class,
where students compare words
in different languages.

Think
This is used to signal a creative or critical-thinking
exercise. Students are asked to work something out
for themselves, give their opinions or comments or Did you know?
use their creativity, rather than find an answer directly
These are very short, interesting
on the page. A simple example might be where a text
pieces of information related
describes a problem at work and students are invited
to the theme of the lesson. The
to come up with solutions. Encouraging students to
section can usually be done at
think creatively means they increase their engagement
any point in the lesson. The
with the material. The increased alertness enhances
teacher’s notes suggest ways
their learning capacity.
of exploiting it, but if students
With these sections – as indeed with many others – it’s want to know more, they can be
a good idea to give students a chance to look at the encouraged to search online.
material and think about (or even write down) their
ideas individually (for say 30 seconds) before they start
talking to each other. Some students are quick thinkers
and talkers, while others need more time. Giving them
‘thinking time’ evens it out a little.

Introduction 15
Vocabulary plus
Students need
words. They need
lots of them and
they need to know
how to combine
them. This page,
which comes after
the third lesson in
every unit, provides
an opportunity
for vocabulary
enrichment and
consolidation. It’s
a flexible section
and can be used
in several ways. It
can be done as a
complete lesson.
Alternatively, the
unit-by-unit notes
indicate points
where a vocabulary
set can be usefully
explored in a lesson.
Or an exercise can
be used as a filler
by a teacher with
time to spare, or
given to stronger
students when
they’ve finished a
task ahead of the
others.

Wordbuilder Focus on
Learning about how words are formed is These short sections appear on many of the
an important part of acquiring a language, Vocabulary plus pages. They’re dedicated
as it helps learners to recognise and practice of a word or words that have come up
manipulate related words. In this section, in the unit, taking them further, and showing
students do various students how they can be used in different
word-formation activities, ways. In Pre-intermediate, there are Focus on
eg adding prefixes (im + polite), suffixes sections for up and down, come, phrasal verbs,
(care + ful), forming verbs from nouns and go, get, keep, out, give and take, the news
creating compound nouns (back + pack). and like.

16 Introduction
Everyday English
This section provides
practice in the everyday
functional language that
students need when
interacting with people,
such as making requests,
opening and closing
a conversation, giving
instructions and so on.

Video We don’t say … / We say …


The main conversation in Everyday This section focuses on common errors that we know
English appears on video, which from experience students are likely to make. The ones
provides extra contextualisation we’ve selected are those made by learners from a
for the functional language. (If you variety of different language backgrounds, but there
don’t have the video or prefer not will, of course, be many errors which are made by
to use it, then just play the audio speakers of a particular language that you’ll also need
version.) to pick up on. By drawing students’ attention to them,
See also Using the video on page 136. and making it very clear that these are errors, we hope
to help them avoid making such mistakes.
One way of using this section is to ask students to cover
the We say … column and produce the correct version,
then look back and check.

Introduction 17
Review units
Six Review units
revise key language
from the preceding
two units, using a
reading text as the
main presentation.

Memory games
This symbol represents your brain! Memory is a crucial component
in learning anything and it’s like a muscle: the more you exercise
it, the stronger it’ll be. These simple games ask students to
remember a variety of things: vocabulary items, facts from an
article and so on. But you can play a lot more games than the
ones suggested here (see page 137). And remember that the more
you get students to exercise their memory in English, the more it’ll
serve them in other aspects of their life as well.

18 Introduction
Cross Culture
Each of the Review
units finishes
with a Cross
Culture section.
This is often an
opportunity to
reflect on how
people do things
differently (or not!)
in different parts of
the world and how
we can begin to be
sensitive to these
differences and act
accordingly. There’s
usually a short
reading text with a
task or questions,
often leading to a
discussion and a
comparison with
the students’ own
culture(s).

Preposition Park
This section appears in each
Review unit and provides a short
text that revises and extends
prepositions that students already
know, enabling them to recycle
prepositions in a new way, or
introduces new ones.

Introduction 19
A final word
The features new to Jetstream, which occur 5 People know a lot already – more than they
throughout the units, are informed – in a think. Good teaching and good material can
gentle way – by some of the key principles of help to make students aware of what they
Holistic Learning (sometimes called Accelerated already know and boost their confidence.
Learning*): 6 People are different. Some people are more
1 We learn with our body as well as our mind: outgoing and sociable, while others are more
they are connected. Hence the value we attach introspective and reflective. The former readily
to bringing more physical activities into the enjoy interacting with others, while the latter
classroom and paying attention to students’ often prefer to work on their own. They usually
physical well-being. welcome time to think on their own too,
2 Different learners prefer different kinds of before being asked to participate in an activity.
input. Some people learn more with their eyes, As teachers, we need to try to cater for these
some more with their ears and some more differences.
with their bodies and movement. We aim to
provide a variety of activities to reflect these
preferences.
3 What we learn with emotion, we tend to
remember best. We hope to engage students’
emotions through the use of stories, songs and
games – and making them laugh. *The roots of Accelerated Learning go back to the
4 Our memory is very powerful … and we can Bulgarian educator, Georgi Lozanov, who developed
make it work even better. The reason for all something called ‘Suggestopaedia’ in the early 1960s. By
the little memory-training games is to give helping learners feel comfortable, relaxed and confident,
students practice in using their memory, and they were able to absorb and remember more information
aid their learning. more quickly. That’s it in a nutshell!

20 Introduction
Getting to know you
UNIT GRAMMAR: questions; be; have; present simple; present continuous; want / need
VOCABULARY: personal information; the alphabet; physical activities; work and life; musical instruments
FOCUS FUNCTIONS: introducing yourself and other people; asking personal questions; talking about objectives

practise natural pronunciation and connected


Lesson 1 Who are you? pp 4–5 speech: What’s your name? /wɒtsjəneɪm/ How
do you spell that? /haʊʤəspelðæt/ Where are
Aims
you from? /weəjəfrɒm/.
The focus of this first lesson in the introductory
unit is to give students the opportunity to find out Answers
more about each other. 1 Are you 2 ’s your name 3 do you spell
Warm-up 4 do you spell 5 are you from

Ask students to look at the main photo. Get them


to guess who the people are. Ask: Do they know Transcript
each other, or are they meeting for the first time?
teacher Hello! Are you here for the pre-
Then get students to think of things we say when
intermediate English course?
we meet someone new. Elicit their answers and
carla Yes, I am.
write them on the board.
teacher What’s your name?
1 1.2 Play the audio and ask students to carla Carla Valenzuela.
listen. Repeat the conversation all together, teacher Sorry. How do you spell that?
then individually. carla C-A-R …
Using the phrases you wrote on the board in teacher No, I meant how do you spell your
the warm-up, elicit and highlight features of surname?
informal greetings such as choice of vocabulary carla Oh, sorry – V-A-L-E-N-Z-U-E-L-A.
(Hi), contractions (I’m Firat, My name’s Olga) teacher Ah. OK. And where are you from?
and subject ellipsis ((It’s) Good to meet you, carla I’m from Santiago.
(It’s) Really nice to meet you too). teacher In Spain?

Encourage students to walk around the room carla No, in Chile!


and say hello to other people. Encourage them teacher Wow! That’s a long way!

to use the correct phrases. If extra support


3 1.4 Teach / Elicit tricky (= difficult). Write
is needed in a multinational class, revise the
the letters on the board and ask students to
alphabet and spelling to help students with
say them. If they make mistakes, try to elicit
each others’ names.
self-correction. Then play the audio so they
Transcript can check their pronunciation. There may be
some sounds that they find difficult to make,
firat Hi! I’m Firat.
so encourage them to notice the shape of your
olga Hello! My name’s Olga.
mouth, then practise themselves. You may
firat Good to meet you.
need to play the audio a few times to get the
olga Really nice to meet you too.
correct pronunciation for each letter.
2 1.3Put students in pairs to read the Note: These letters have been selected as
conversation and try to guess the missing ones students frequently have problems
words. Then play the audio and pause it so with, but it may be a good idea to recap all
students can complete the conversation. the other letters of the alphabet too.
Ask students to tell you the questions and
write them on the board. Then repeat them Transcript
and get students to say them quickly to a, e, i, o, u, w, y, g, j

Getting to know you 21


4 Go through the conversation in exercise 2 explain any new words to each other and
again with the whole class. Play the audio check together afterwards.
again if necessary. Put students in pairs to
repeat the conversation using their own 6 Ask students to work in pairs to complete the
personal information. Monitor pairs as they phrases. Check answers with the class, then
practise, making a note of any common ask pairs to work out the rules for using do, go
problems with grammar, pronunciation or and play. Elicit answers from the class:
intonation. In particular, check they pronounce
• Do is used with individual, non-team sports
the letters in their name correctly. When
or sports without a ball (do aerobics, do
they’ve finished, ask them to find a different
yoga).
partner and repeat the conversation. They
• Go is used with activities and sports that
should do this three times in total.
end in -ing (go skiing, go swimming).
• Play is used with activities and team sports
Extra idea: You could also get students to
and also sports that need a ball (play
write down an alias, with a new name and
football, play basketball).
country. Then tell them that they’re at a
Point out that we use the after play with
party and meeting lots of new people. Put
instruments (play the piano, play the guitar).
some background music on and have them
walk around the room chatting to each
Answers
other. Check afterwards and find out who
had the funniest new identity. 1 Pilates 2 running, swimming 3 volleyball
4 drums, keyboard, saxophone, violin

Vocabulary 7 Check understanding of each word in the box,


5 Go through the words first to check then check students understand the rules for
comprehension and pronunciation. Students using each verb. Then ask them to make verb
complete the table individually or in pairs. Ask –noun collocations with the new list of words.
them to match the words and categories and
find the odd one out. Answers
Point out the note below the table. Remind 1 do exercise, karate 2 go riding, sailing,
students that they should always ask if they skiing 3 play golf, table tennis 4 play the
don’t understand something. If they don’t banjo, flute
know any of the words in this list, tell them to
ask a partner to explain the meaning. 8 There are a few 3x3x3 exercises throughout the
book. They get students to find a set number
Answers of things in a set time (not always three things
physical activities: Pilates, running, – it could be more). You may want to make
swimming, volleyball these activities into a team competition.
work and life: retired, student, teacher, For this activity, write We all go / do / play /
unemployed play the on the board and ask students to
musical instruments: drums, keyboard, discuss activities and hobbies that they all have
saxophone, violin in common. Encourage conversation and elicit
The word that doesn’t fit is snake. questions they could ask each other, eg What
do you like doing in your free time? What are
Extra idea: To do the activity in a slightly your hobbies? Point out that they all have to
different way, vary learning styles and agree on the things in their list.
generate more vocabulary, put three
posters up around the class – one for each Extra idea: You could also introduce and
heading in the table. Then ask students to practise ways of showing surprise and
walk around the room and add a different agreeing, eg Really? Me too! Encourage
idea under each heading. Get them to students to ask follow-up questions
to show interest and continue the
conversations.

22 Getting to know you


Grammar Questions Tip: Listening activities are individual activities,
9 Complete the first two sentences as examples so it’s often helpful to get students to
with the class and ask students to explain compare their answers together after
their choices. See if they can explain when we listening. This provides the opportunity
use be and do. Write the two questions and for them to share their ideas and answers,
answers on the board so students notice that help each other and correct mistakes, and
when the statement contains a form of be increases interaction, speaking and
(I’m from Salzburg), we use be and invert the co-operative learning.
subject and verb in the question form (Where
are you from?). When the statement contains Speaking
a verb other than be (I live in Málaga), we use
do in the question (Where do you live now?). 11 Ask students to read the questions in exercise
Point out that in spoken English, we often 9 again and think of their own answers.
shorten answers by not repeating the verb or Encourage them to think of extra information
words that are already understood in context they’d like to add.
(In Málaga). Explain that there’s one question Point out the note below the exercise and
with two possible answers (question 3). Don’t remind students to ask if they don’t know the
check answers yet. word for something.

10 1.5 Ask students to work in pairs, then play


Tip: Always allow a little time for students to
the audio for them to check their answers. think individually before talking to each
other. It’s very important for them as part of
Answers their intrapersonal intelligence.
1 are (b) 2 do (g) 3 do (d / h) 4 do (f)
5 Do (e) 6 Are; do (a) 7 Do (c) 8 are (i) 12 Put students in pairs to ask each other five of
the questions from exercise 9. Giving students
Transcript the choice encourages them to think about
which questions might be relevant to their
1 a Where are you from?
partner. Students could also ask extra questions
b I’m from Salzburg.
and give more information about themselves to
2 a Where do you live now?
keep the conversation going. Remind them to
b In Málaga.
listen carefully and remember as many details
3 a What do you do?
as possible, as they will need this information
b I’m a social worker.*
in exercise 13.
4 a Where do you work?
b In a children’s hospital. MA It might be helpful for weaker students to
5 a Do you do any sports or physical make notes on their answers if it helps them
activities? feel more secure.
b Yes, I do zumba! (The MA symbol in these notes indicates different
6 a Are you married or do you have a ways of working with mixed-ability classes.)
partner?
13 Ask students to introduce their partner to
b No, I’m on my own right now.
someone else. Go through the Remember box
7 a Do you play a musical instrument?
below the photo. Remind students to think
b I play the trumpet, but not very well.
carefully about the following:
8 a How old are you?
b I’m sorry, I never tell people my age! • short forms in spoken English: I’m a
teacher. He’s a waiter. He isn’t studying
* Only this option is recorded on the audio, although I’m French. She doesn’t work in an office.
not working at the moment. I’m unemployed is also a valid
response.
• third person singular s: He works in a café.
• irregular verb have: She has a great job.
If necessary, go through the notes on be
present simple and have present simple in the
grammar reference on SB page 72.

Getting to know you 23


To increase interaction and speaking, get Speaking
students to walk around the room and speak
to as many different students as possible. 1 Go through the verbs and nouns in A and B
Monitor pairs as they work, making a note and check comprehension of news articles.
of any common problems with grammar, Ask students to make collocations using words
pronunciation or intonation. from each box, then check answers as a class.

Answers
Extra idea: Ask students to look at the
get a job, go on holiday, meet people, pass
sentences in the Remember box and make
an exam, read news articles, speak English,
questions for each one using be and do.
watch films

Writing Extra idea: You could do the activity as a


14 Write a short paragraph about yourself as a game. Put students into small teams and
model and read it together. Then get students explain you’re going to say a word and they
to write their own paragraphs and include the have to think of a verb that goes before it.
ideas and information from exercise 11. Then say one of the nouns in B. The first
team to give the correct answer gets a
point. The team with the most points at the
Extra idea: As a follow-up, tell students
end wins.
not to write their name in their paragraphs.
Collect in the paragraphs and mix them
up, then redistribute them to different 2 Tell students to work in pairs and think of as
students. Ask them to read the paragraphs many words as they can that go with the verbs
and try to guess who wrote them. in A. Elicit ideas from pairs and write good
Take the paragraphs home, select one collocations on the board.
fact about each student and make a Find
someone who … worksheet. In the next Suggested answers
lesson, hand out one worksheet to each get: a present, a promotion, a new car
student. Then ask them to walk around the go on: a journey, a trip, an excursion, an
room asking be and do questions and try adventure
to find the correct person for each fact. To meet: friends, a politician, a celebrity
increase speaking and interaction, explain pass: a driving test, the salt
that they can only speak to one person at a read: a book, a magazine, an essay
time – and make sure they don’t all group speak: a foreign language, Arabic, Spanish
together! watch: TV, a football match

Lesson 2 Why are you learning Tip: Students do not always copy new
English? pp 6–7 vocabulary from the board, so it’s best
to actually tell them to write new words
Aims down. This should help to develop good
learning habits in class and gradually
The focus of this second lesson in the introductory
increase their vocabulary.
unit is to make students think about their reasons
for learning English, to introduce helpful learning
strategies, and to provide some useful classroom 3 Put students in groups to study the photos.
language for asking questions and clarifying Elicit ideas for how each one involves English
information. and write them on the board. Point out the use
of the present continuous to talk about what’s
Warm-up happening in photos.
Introduce the lesson by asking students which
languages are the most popular around the world.

24 Getting to know you


6 a Why do you need English?
Suggested answers
b Because everybody needs to speak
A The woman is listening to her mp3 English! It’s the number-one world
player. She might be listening to a song language.
in English.
B The girl is visiting London. She might be 6 Play the audio again, and tell students to
speaking English to find her way around listen, this time making a note of any extra
and order food. information they hear (note that it’s always
C The man is taking an exam. It might be in the second sentence). You might need to
an English exam. pause after each speaker for students to make
D The people are in a meeting, or they notes. Play the audio a final time, without
might be having an interview. It could pausing, for students to check their answers.
be in English.
Answers
Listening Speaker 1: He’s an air-traffic controller.
Speaker 2: No extra information
4 Ask students to close their books and work Speaker 3: He hates his current job.
in groups. Write Reasons to learn English on Speaker 4: She’s going to Canada next year.
the board and ask them to think of as many Speaker 5: He has an English exam next
reasons as they can. Invite students to write month.
their reasons on the board. Then tell them Speaker 6: English is the number-one world
to open their books and check the replies to language.
see how many were the same. Elicit possible
questions for the answers, eg Why are you Speaking
learning / studying English? or Why is English
important to you? Why do you need English? 7 Ask students to think of their own personal
reasons for learning English and how the
5 1.6 Play the audio. Ask students to listen language may help them in future. You could
and tick the responses they hear. Do the first also get them to think about what they like or
one with the class as an example and elicit the dislike, find easy or difficult about learning a
answer. Play the audio again for students to language. This is all useful information for you
check their answers. to use in your lessons.
This is quite challenging, but it’s very important
Answers to get students thinking about their objectives
Speaker 1: 1 Speaker 2: 8 Speaker 3: 6 at this stage.
Speaker 4: 5 Speaker 5: 4 Speaker 6: 9 MA Add other reasons allows stronger students
to branch out a bit and be more creative.
Transcript 8 Tell students to walk around the room and ask
1 a Why do you need English? each other their reasons for learning English to
b I need it for my work. I’m an air-traffic see if they have the same goals or objectives.
controller. Write useful language on the board to help
2 a Why do you need English? them talk about similarities and differences, eg
b I don’t need it at all. I just enjoy both of us / neither of us.
meeting people. Go through the Remember note about need
3 a What about you? and want. Encourage students to use the
b I want a better job. I hate my current phrases to help them express their ideas.
job. Refer to the grammar reference on SB page
4 a Why do you need English? 72 now or at the end of the lesson and go
b I need it to go on holiday. I’m going to through it with students.
Canada next year.
Monitor pairs as they practise, making a note
5 a And you?
of any common problems with grammar,
b I need to pass an English exam … next
pronunciation or intonation.
month!
Getting to know you 25
Learning strategies 6 If your teacher is speaking too fast, like this
(bla bla bla bla bla), you can say: Could you
9 Ask students if they know what a strategy is. speak more slowly, please? or Could you
Teach / Elicit the difference between strategies possibly speak more slowly, please?
and skills. (A strategy is a deliberate, planned,
conscious activity that helps us do things.
These turn into unconscious and automatic Extra idea: To review the vocabulary from
skills over time.) exercise 5 on page 5, write the following
Allow time for students to read the information anagrams on the board and tell students
about personal goals individually and write to rearrange the letters to find the activities
their reasons for learning English. Ask them to and musical instruments. (The answers are
discuss with a partner how effective they think given in brackets – don’t write those on the
this strategy is and also encourage them to board!)
share any other strategies and ideas they have
for learning English. 1 UMDRS (drums)
2 DARBOYEK (keyboard)
10 Go through the Useful language box with the 3 ATSPELI (Pilates)
class. Say each incorrect sentence or question 4 NINUNRG (running)
in the We don’t say column and elicit ideas for 5 SAPEXONOH (saxophone)
the correct version from students. 6 IMMWGNIS (swimming)
Look at the cartoon and ask students to 7 LIVOIN (violin)
explain why the teacher says what she does. 8 LALBLOLEVY (volleyball)
Then look at the six situations in exercise 10
and ask students to work in pairs and think
of things to say in each one. Teach / Elicit the
phrases get someone’s attention and get past
someone. Tell students to look back at the
Useful language box if needed. Don’t check
the answers yet.
11 1.7 Play the audio for students to check
their answers. You might also write the useful
language from SB page 7 and display it on the
board. This should help students remember it
more easily and express themselves more in
English (rather than their first language).

Transcript and answers


1 If you don’t know how to spell something,
you can say: Sorry. How do you spell that?
or Could you spell that, please?
2 If you didn’t understand what someone
said, you can say: Sorry. Could you say that
again, please?
3 If you want to get someone’s attention, you
can say: Excuse me. For example, Excuse
me. Where’s the bus stop?
4 If you want to get past someone, you can
say: Excuse me! or Sorry!
5 If you step on someone’s foot, you can
say: Sorry! or So sorry! or I’m so sorry! or
perhaps Are you OK?

26 Getting to know you


1 Ways of learning
UNIT GRAMMAR: present continuous; present simple; adverbs of frequency; expressions + -ing form;
reflexive pronouns
FOCUS VOCABULARY: make / do; multiple intelligences
FUNCTIONS: expressing opinions; agreeing and disagreeing

Lesson 1 What are you good at? Grammar 1 Present continuous


pp8–9 2 To introduce the rule, write some sentences
on the board and also include adverbs such
Aims as now or at the moment to help students
The focus of this lesson is to review the present understand the grammar, eg We’re learning
continuous and present simple and also to look at English at the moment. Ask: When is this
the use of the -ing form with various expressions happening? Is it the past, present or future?
for talking about likes and dislikes. Students also
learn about multi-tasking. Answer
is happening
You first!
There are You first! boxes at the beginning of Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 73
many lessons in the Student’s Book. They have now or at the end of the lesson and go through
three goals: firstly, to engage students and get it with students.
them saying something immediately; secondly, to
allow students to use what they already know and 3 1.8 Go through the verbs in the box. Find
boost their confidence; and thirdly, to give you an out how many students used these verbs in
idea of how much they already know so that you their answers to exercise 1. Then allow time
can target your teaching much more effectively. for them to work individually to complete the
Students can say as much or as little as they want. sentences. Play the audio for students to check
For this one, put students in pairs to talk about their answers. Ask one or two students to say
how many things they think they can do at the which activity was missing.
same time. Ask: Do you do other things when
you’re learning at home? Do you work and listen Answers
to music, or maybe watch TV and surf the internet 1 looking after 2 ’s doing 3 ’s sending
at the same time? (media multi-tasking). 4 ’s having 5 ’s working on 6 ’s making
7 ’s paying
Speaking Missing activity: She’s reading a book.
1 Write the word multi-tasking on the board and
ask students if they know what it means. Then
Transcript
tell them to look at the picture and discuss
the questions. Students don’t need to get The woman in the picture is doing eight things
the answers right at this point, as they’ll find at the same time.
out more in exercise 3, but encourage lots of 1 She’s looking after a baby.
discussion about possible answers. Monitor 2 She’s doing exercises.
pairs as they work, helping with any necessary 3 She’s sending a text message.
vocabulary. 4 She’s having a drink.
5 She’s working on her tablet.
Suggested answers 6 She’s making an omelette.
7 She’s paying for something with her credit
1 See Transcript 1.8.
card.
2 Because it’s difficult for busy working
And … she’s also reading a book!
people to find time to do everything they
need to. / The pace of life in the 21st
century means people have to balance lots
of different jobs / relationships / free time.
Unit 1 27
Vocabulary make / do
4 I never use my mobile phone in the car
4 1.9 Check understanding and pronunciation but I sometimes listen to music.
of difficult words, eg decision (stress on the 5 They usually send text messages and
second syllable), omelette (stress on the first look at / read their emails on their way
syllable and silent e: /'ɒmlet/), Sudoku to work.
(/suː'dəʊkʊ/). Students then work in pairs to
make phrases with make or do. Play the audio 7 Students work on their own to rewrite the
for students to check their answers. sentences in exercise 6. To help them compare
answers with a partner, elicit what questions
Transcript and answers they could ask to get these sentences as
make: coffee, a decision, a mistake, a noise, answers, eg I always listen to the radio in the
an omelette, a phone call morning – Do you listen to the radio in the
do: the cooking, exercise, homework, morning? Students then ask and answer the
the shopping, sport, Sudoku, a test, yoga questions together. Encourage them to use
different adverbs to describe how often they
Grammar 2 Present simple do things.
5 To introduce the rule for when to use the Reading
present simple, write some sentences on the
board. Include adverbs such as every day 8 To introduce the topic, ask students to discuss
or often to help students understand the whether they think it’s possible to do more
grammar, eg I walk to school every day or than one thing well at the same time, and
I often play video games. Ask: When is this? what the advantages and disadvantages of
Is it the past, present or future? Does it happen multi-tasking are. Tell them to read the extract
one time or many times? Ask students to quickly to see if their ideas are true.
complete the rule. Go through the things in
9 Ask students to read the extract again and
exercise 4 again, then put students in pairs to
match the words in bold with the definitions.
discuss the questions. Monitor pairs as they
Check answers as a class.
work, making sure they use the correct tense:
present simple or present continuous.
Answers
Answer 1 tasks 2 myth 3 inefficient 4 bestseller
5 employees
happens

Refer to the grammar reference on SB pages Extra idea: Review the meaning of the
72–73 now or at the end of the lesson and go words by getting students to write extra
through it with students. sentences in context.
6 Do the first sentence together with the class
as an example. After students have completed 10 Tell students to read the extract again and
the task individually, write the answers on the choose the best answers to summarise the
board. main ideas in the article.
MA Suggest that stronger students do this
without looking at the verbs in the box. Answers
1b 2c 3a 4b
Answers
1 I always listen to the radio in the morning.
Extra idea: Ask: Are you good at multi-
I never watch TV.
tasking? Do you sometimes do two or
2 Ruth often has breakfast in a café. She
more things at the same time? If so,
goes to a different café every day.
what things? Tell students to discuss the
3 Jack hardly ever reads / looks at the
questions with a partner.
newspaper at breakfast. He usually does
Sudoku.
28 Unit 1
Grammar 3 Expressions + -ing form Extra ideas: As a follow-up, ask students to
rank the activities 1–9 from most popular to
11 Ask students to look at the expressions and least popular.
activities in the grammar box and to think To see if students can multi-task, put them in
about the things that are true for them. groups of four. Ask them to choose a person
Encourage them to think of extra things they from the group. Get one student to sit on
could say about the activity, or reasons why the person’s right-hand side. This student will
they like or don’t like it. Model the activity so ask lots of questions about likes and dislikes,
they can clearly see what to do, eg I’m not eg Do you like drawing? Are you good at
good at multi-tasking because everything takes singing? Another student sits on the left and
longer and I often forget something important. asks quick questions at the same time about
I prefer to focus on one thing at a time. maths, eg What’s two times two? What’s
Refer to the grammar reference on SB page four plus six? Help students with vocabulary
74 now or at the end of the lesson and go before the game. The other student in the
through it with students. group sits in front and makes movements
and gestures. The person has to answer all
Extra idea: You could do some revision the questions and copy the movements of
work on modifiers at this stage to help the student in front of them at the same
students with their comparisons. Write on time. After one minute, stop the game and
the board: very, a bit, really, quite. Ask swap roles. Get feedback afterwards. Ask:
students to number the words from 1 What questions did you prefer? Was it hard
(least) to 4 (most). Then tell students to get to do everything at the same time?
up and ask other students, eg What are
you quite good at? What things aren’t you
very good at? Lesson 2 How do you learn best?
pp10–11
Speaking
Aims
12 Note that this is similar to the 3x3x3 exercise The focus of this lesson is to discover different
students did earlier, only this time they have ways of learning and to write a multiple-intelligences
four things to think about. In this activity, profile.
students work in groups of four to discuss the
things they all like and hate doing. Remind Warm-up
them that they only have four minutes to make Write the following quote on the board and ask
their list, so they need to work quite quickly. students to discuss it with a partner to see if they
This helps to focus their minds on the activity. agree or disagree. Ask them to give reasons for
It should be short and lively! their answers.
Note: You need to make it clear that ‘Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by
students have to reach unanimity: if only its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life
two out of four like or don’t like doing believing that it is stupid.’ (Albert Einstein)
something, then that doesn’t count and they
need to go on searching. Vocabulary Multiple intelligences
13 Tell students to work with other groups and 1 GUESS When you see GUESS in front of an
compare their lists. Get feedback from the instruction, it means students can talk about
groups to find out the most popular and least what they think the answers to something are,
popular activities. but they don’t have to know the right answers.
For more information about these exercises,
see the Introduction, page 14.
Tell students to cover the text on SB page
10 and just look at the picture. Tell them to
discuss what they think it means. Accept any

Unit 1 29
answers at this stage, but explain that they’ll
Answers
learn more through the lesson.
1 It goes back to 1983.
2 1.10 Ask students to look at the picture 2 physical intelligence (be good at sports,
again and this time focus on the photos. athletics), mathematical intelligence (be
As many of the words will be unknown, tell good at maths), visual intelligence (be
students to match any that they know first, good at drawing), naturalist intelligence
then work together to match the others, (be good with animals), musical
discussing their ideas. Explain that examples of intelligence (be a fantastic singer), social
some of these intelligences will be given later intelligence (be good at connecting with
in the lesson (in the text in exercise 5). Play the other people)
audio for students to check their answers.
7 P 1.11 Write the /ɔː/ sound on the board
Transcript and answers and elicit the correct pronunciation. Practise
A linguistic, B mathematical, C visual, D social, the sound and get students to repeat it
E naturalist, F personal, G physical, H musical together. Go through the words in the box.
3 When you see this icon with a vocabulary Say each word out loud and ask students to
exercise, it means that you should ask students discuss in groups which word they think has
which words are the same as or similar to the different sound. Play the audio for students
words in their own language – and also which to check their answers. Then play it again,
are very different. See detailed notes in the pausing for them to repeat each word.
Introduction, page 15.
Answers
Go through the words in exercise 2 with the
class and get feedback about each one. Work does not have the /ɔː/ sound.

4 Read the three statements first. Then ask


students to work with a partner and discuss if Transcript
the ideas are true or false. Get class feedback all, board, call, drawing, false, forty, four, law,
and quickly check their ideas, but don’t give more, sports, talk, thought, walk, work
the answers yet.

5 Students read the text quickly to check their Extra idea: Ask students to write a short
ideas from exercise 4. Then ask them to read story (about 100–150 words) and include as
it again, this time more slowly. Ask individual many of the words from the list in exercise
students: Are your ideas and opinions the same 7 as they can. Then ask them to erase the
as Gardner’s multiple intelligences theory? words and leave a gap instead. Students
read their stories to each other. Every time
Answers they come to a gap, their partner has to
guess what the word is from context.
1 false 2 true 3 true

8 P Read the sentences with the class, then


Tip: Try to set short time limits so that students call on individual students to read them. Ask
read quickly for gist and don’t worry too students to work in pairs to think of a context,
much about unknown words. eg Paul has had an argument with his friend.
Get feedback from the class and vote for the
You could do exercises 1–4 on Subjects in best idea.
Vocabulary plus at this point.

6 THINK When you see THINK in front of


an instruction, it means students should think
about ideas before they start. They could
also think on their own for one minute, then
talk to a partner about their ideas. For more
information about these exercises, see page 17.
30 Unit 1
Reading and speaking Explore
9 Go through the instructions with the class. The Explore exercises give students the opportunity
Explain how the scoring system for the quiz to go beyond the page and find out more about
works. Encourage students to guess any new some aspect of the topic. They should do the
words from the context. You could remind research online, make notes and report back,
them of the language revised in the Useful working either alone or in pairs. You may want to
language box on SB page 7 and invite them to set this up in the classroom by suggesting possible
ask (either their partner or you): What does … websites or just by eliciting suggestions for words
mean? and phrases to type into the search engine.
Put students in pairs to ask each other For this activity, students should type ‘multiple
questions 1–8 on SB page 10. Encourage them intelligence quiz’ into their browser and make
to make notes as they work so that they can notes about what they find. They then report back
report back to the class in stage d. Tell them in the next session.
that it’s a good idea to proceed section by
section rather than have one student ask all
28 questions, then swap! Ask students to find
Lesson 3 Count on your memory
one similarity and one difference between pp12–13
their and their partner’s answers. If they have
the same answers for each question, tell them Aims
to work with other people until they find one The focus of this lesson is to introduce reflexive
difference. pronouns and to learn about helpful strategies for
For stage d of the task, ask students to report remembering things.
their findings to the class. It’s a good idea
You first!
to keep a note of students’ answers on the
board, as this will be useful when students Ask individual students the question: How good
write their profile in exercise 10. Help them is your memory? Encourage lots of discussion
with vocabulary and grammar as necessary, in and feedback. To help them, ask: What important
particular the use of both and the switch from things do you sometimes forget? How do you
first to third person. remember new vocabulary in English?

Writing Listening 1
10 After students have done the quiz and looked 1 To introduce the extract, ask students to
at the results, ask them to write their own look at the photos and guess how they’re
short profile. connected. Help them with vocabulary
if necessary, eg (playing) cards, joker.
Elicit feedback from students and check
Tip: It’ll be useful for you as a teacher to have their predictions. Welcome any inventive
an idea of where students’ strengths suggestions.
and weaknesses lie so that you can help
them more effectively. In this book, we 2 1.12 Tell students you’re going to play a
deliberately aim to embrace all these recording about a memory champion. Teach /
intelligences. Elicit what a champion is. Play the audio while
students listen and fill in the missing numbers.
11 Ask students to do the same quiz at home with As numbers can be difficult for students to pick
someone they know. It could be someone in up, play the audio again, pausing after each
their family or a friend. section. Then play it again all the way through
for students to check their answers.
12 Go through the example profile with the Point out the language note below the extract
class. Make sure students understand what and explain that we don’t say one time or two
they have to do. Get students to write a short times – we use once or twice instead. Note,
profile about the person they chose in exercise however, that in American English, you may
11 and present it to the group in the next class. also hear one time and two times.

Unit 1 31
In fact, he thinks we can remember better as
Answers
we get older. But we have to believe we can.
1 eight / 8 2 fifty-two / 52 3 fifty-four / 54 And we must practise.
4 three / 3 5 2,916
4 Put students in pairs to ask and answer
questions about Dominic and try to remember
Transcript the information. Play the audio again if
An amazing memory for numbers! necessary for students to check their answers.
Dominic O’Brien has a really amazing
memory and he’s won the World Memory Extra idea: Put about ten different objects
Championships eight times. There are 52 cards around the room and give students time
in a pack of playing cards (without the jokers) to look around and try to memorise where
and Dominic can memorise 54 packs in one they are. Then get them to close their eyes
hour. That’s almost 3,000 playing cards! He and try to remember the location of each
looks at each card just once, puts it away and thing. The student that remembers the
then says all the cards in order. There are 2,916 most things wins the game.
cards altogether – if he uses the jokers.

3 1.13 Put students in groups to think of ways Explore


that Dominic manages to remember so many Tell students to search online for Dominic O’Brien
things. Tell them to read and try to complete to find out more about memory strategies. The
the sentences, then get feedback from the Peak Performance Training website has a great
groups. Play the audio for them to check if video of him.
their predictions were correct. Play the audio
again and ask them to complete Dominic’s Listening 2
three-step strategy.
5 1.14 Tell students they’re going to play a
memory game. Ask them to listen to the 20
Answers
words on the audio. Tell them not to write
1 interesting mental pictures 2 pictures [to] anything while they’re listening to the list.
something personal in his life 3 in a special Explain that they’ll then hear some instructions,
place in a ‘house’ in his mind which they should follow. Play the audio once,
[He] practises again and again and again. all the way through. Students then write down
[He believes] he can remember enormous as many words as they can remember in any
quantities of information. order.

Transcript Transcript
To remember information, O’Brien does three instrument, exam, holiday, intelligent,
things: he changes information into interesting crocodile, crossword, hairdresser, memory,
mental pictures; he connects these pictures maths, map, whistle, diary, holiday, photo,
to something personal in his life; and he puts banana
each item of information in a special place in And the last five … unemployed, team, party,
a ‘house’ in his mind, so he can find it again sport, secretary.
easily. And – something very important – he Right. That’s the end of the list!
practises again and again … and again. Now write down as many of the words as
But perhaps his biggest secret is that he believes you can remember. You can write them in any
he can remember enormous quantities of order you like.
information. He knows it is possible because he 6 Tell students to work in pairs and go through
knows our brain is incredibly powerful. The title their lists to find the words they both managed
of his latest book says it all. It’s called You Can to remember. Tell them to discuss why they
Have An Amazing Memory. He thinks everyone think they remembered those particular words
can improve their memory – at any age. rather than others. Elicit feedback from the
class.

32 Unit 1
It’s easier to remember things which are
Extra idea: Write each word in turn on important for us personally. If I have an exam
the board – getting students to spell it – next week, I am likely to remember the
and ask for a show of hands to find out word exam. If I have an appointment at the
how many people in the class remembered hairdresser’s this afternoon, then I am probably
that word. Write that number next to the going to remember the word hairdresser.
word and repeat the process for the whole And finally, we remember things we learnt
list. Find out which words many / not recently – maybe like the word whistle, which
many students remembered and ask for was in the Multiple Intelligences Quiz. That’s
suggestions why. They’ll find out more in why it’s important to revise new words as soon
the next exercise. as possible after learning them. That way they
can’t escape!
7 1.15 Go through the sentences with
students. Tell them to work in pairs to decide Grammar Reflexive pronouns
whether the statements are true or false. Play 8 Focus on the grammar box and read out the
the audio for students to check their ideas. sentence (To help you remember a word, say
it to yourself several times). Point out you at
Tip: Explain that reading through information the beginning of the sentence and yourself
before students listen gives them a clearer later in the sentence. Teach / Elicit that we
idea of what they’re listening for. use reflexive pronouns to talk about an action
where the subject (here: you) is the same as
the object (here: yourself). Allow time for
Extra idea: As a follow-up, ask students students to work individually to complete the
to choose the statements they agree or sentences. They can refer back to the grammar
disagree with and to give their reasons. box if necessary.

Answers
Answers 1 yourself; myself 2 himself 3 herself
1 false 2 false 3 true 4 true 5 true 4 ourselves

Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 74


Transcript now or at the end of the lesson and go through it
Research shows that most people remember with students.
beginnings and endings but not middles. We
often remember words at the beginning of a Speaking
list because we’re awake and interested and
9 Ask: How can you improve your memory? Elicit
paying attention. And we remember them at
ideas from around the class, then tell students
the end because we tell ourselves it’s going to
to read the text quickly and underline the
finish soon and we relax.
information that gives them the answer.
Research also shows that repetition helps us to
remember things. We remember things better
Answer
if we hear them more than once. How many of
you remembered the word holiday? The person … you need to use your brain cells …
said it twice. To help you remember a word in you need to exercise it regularly
English, make sure you say it to yourself – or
write it – several times. 10 This symbol shows that this is a memory
We also remember words or pieces of game – the first of many in the book. Memory
information which are unusual or silly – like the is an important part of learning anything, and
word crocodile or banana. We sit up and pay the more we exercise our memory by playing
attention. These kinds of words surprise us or these kinds of games, the better it will be.
make us laugh, so they stay in our long-term
memory.

Unit 1 33
Students cover the text and try to remember to try some of the tips. Ask them to summarise
and summarise what it says. Tell them to what they learnt in the lesson and go through
check together afterwards to find out who can everything they’ve learnt at the end of each
remember it in the most detail. day. You should also include a quick review of
new vocabulary and grammar at the beginning
of the next lesson.
Extra idea: Do a dictagloss with the text.
Tell students you will read the text and
they should just listen. Dictate the text at
Answers
a natural pace; don’t slow down or repeat 1 Tip 3e 2 Tip 4g 3 Tip 1h 4 Tip 2d 5 Tip 8c
anything. Then read the text again. This
time students should take notes. Tell them 14 EVERYBODY UP! When you see
to work with a partner to try to reconstruct EVERYBODY UP! in front of an instruction,
the text from their notes. Alternatively, it means that this is a chance for students
they can walk around the room speaking to move around the classroom and use the
to different people until they’ve completed language they’ve learnt. This kind of short
the text. They’ll probably try to copy each intensive practice can be very lively and
other or group together, but don’t let also very rewarding if students succeed in
them do that, as it reduces the amount of completing the task using the language
speaking. Remind them that they can only resources available to them.
speak to one person at a time and they Tell students to write down tips 4, 5, 6 and 7,
can’t copy! then walk around the room and find out who
uses those tips.

Tip: A dictagloss is a classroom dictation activity 15 Explain that for this memory game, you’ll
where learners have to reconstruct a text read out some instructions which students
by listening and noting down key words. have to follow. Say: Work in pairs. Student A:
They then use these words as a basis for tell your partner seven things you like doing.
reconstructing the text. It helps students Student B: listen carefully – without taking
practise listening, writing and speaking, notes. When student A has finished, tell
and is a useful collaborative learning tool. them as many of the seven things as you can
remember. Then you swap over.
11 THINK This task asks students to develop Go through the example with the class,
their ideas. Ask students to work in small explaining that students have to give the
groups of three or four and make a quick list full list of things their partner likes doing.
of ways to improve their memory. Encourage Monitor pairs as they work, making a note
them to share their own strategies. of any common problems with grammar,
pronunciation or intonation.
12 Go through the list of memory tips and check
comprehension of any difficult vocabulary, eg Art & Music
vitamins, plenty, last but not least, recycle. This section is designed to motivate students and
Tell students to connect the sentence halves transfer the language to a new context. Most
and then check how many memory tips they people enjoy music and art, and this section also
had on the list they made in exercise 11. Get gives students the opportunity to research online
feedback from the class on some of the ideas and bring the information back to the class.
and find out which ones they like best. The Art section contains a picture of a painting
or sculpture and an associated task. Students go
Answers online to check their ideas and to find out answers
1 h 2 d 3 e 4 g 5 f 6 a/b 7 b/a 8 c to one or two questions. Note that all the images
are shown much larger at the back of the Student’s
13 Explain that the suggestions here match five Book.
of the tips in exercise 12. Put students in pairs The Music section often gives an incomplete line
to try to match them up and encourage them from a song, or a song title, which students have

34 Unit 1
to complete. Again, they can go online, answer Jay Lerner and the music was composed
a couple more questions, then find the lyrics and by Frederick Loewe. The song was sung by
listen to the song if they want to. French actor Maurice Chevalier and British
For more detailed information about this section, actress Hermione Gingold. In the song, the
see the Introduction, page 11. two actors remember their younger days and
contradict each other about their first date
Ask students to look at SB page 67 and discuss the
together.
meaning of the painting. When they’ve found its
name, they should discuss why it’s relevant for this
lesson (it’s about memory). Vocabulary plus p14
This page provides an opportunity for vocabulary
Extra questions for class or homework enrichment. It’s a flexible section and can be used
Art in several ways. It can be done as a complete
What’s the significance of the background lesson or alternatively, there are notes at
in this painting? appropriate points in this book where a vocabulary
Did Dalí include clocks in any other of his set can be usefully learnt and practised. You could
paintings? also practise a vocabulary set when you have
Music time to spare or give a Vocabulary plus activity to
Find the name of another song (not from stronger students when they’ve finished a task
Gigi) sung by Maurice Chevalier. ahead of other students.
Name one other film that Hermione Gingold
appeared in. Subjects
1 Write smuci on the board and tell students
Answers that they have to unscramble the letters to find
the word. Elicit answers from the class. Then
Art
put them in pairs to complete the anagrams.
The Persistence of Memory
You could make this into a team game or
Music class race to make it more competitive. After
I Remember it Well from Gigi (1958) students have found the words, tell them to
match each word with the correct picture.
Don’t check the answers yet, as they’ll listen
Culture notes: The Persistence of Memory to the words in the next exercise. Ask students
was painted in 1931 by Salvador Dalí which names for subjects are very similar
(1904–1989). It’s a very small painting in their own language and which are very
(24cm x 33cm) and contains images of different.
melting watches which symbolise the
passing of time and mortality. Dalí was 2 1.16 Play the audio for students to check
born in Figueres in Spain. He studied their answers. Then play it again for students
drawing at school, then moved to Madrid to repeat each word. Check their pronunciation
to study at the art academy there. He was of difficult words, eg maths, psychology (silent
expelled from the academy in 1926 (for p: /saɪ'kɒlədʒi/), geography. (Note that there’s
causing rebellion among the students!) work on the /dʒ/ sound in exercise 4.)
but continued to develop his painting Then ask students to work individually to add
skills, particularly through his appreciation two more subjects. If they don’t know any, it
of other artists like Picasso and Miró. He doesn’t matter, but they should be able to get
eventually became one of the best-known other languages, eg French, Spanish, and they
and prolific Surrealist artists – making films may know science, physics, chemistry, biology.
and sculptures as well as paintings. You can If not, help them with new vocabulary.
find more information about him in Unit 11
on SB page 40 (Volume B). Answers
I Remember it Well is a song from the 1958 1b 2g 3e 4a 5i 6h 7c 8j 9f 10d
American film Gigi (directed by Vincente
Minnelli). The lyrics were written by Alan

Unit 1 35
Transcript sentences using the different expressions of
1 music, 2 maths, 3 history, 4 sport, quantity and uncountable nouns.
5 psychology, 6 geography, 7 English, 8 law,
9 art, 10 engineering Extra idea: Put students into small teams
3 Put students in pairs to talk about their to play a countable and uncountable nouns
favourite and least favourite subjects at school. game. Tell them you’re going to dictate
You could also get them to make a class survey a list of things. They have to shout out
to find out which were the most popular countable or uncountable. The first team to
subjects and why. shout out the correct answer gets a point
and the team with the most points wins.
4 P 1.17 Write the sound /ʤ/ on the board
and ask students to repeat it. If they find it 6 1.18 Ask students to complete the
difficult, show them how to make the sound. sentences with the correct quantifiers and
Tell them to make a /d/ sound and then move match them to form dialogues. Play the audio
their tongue back slightly to make a /ʒ/. Then for students to check their answers.
get them to combine the two sounds. Ask one
or two pairs to read the dialogue, then ask Transcript and answers
pairs to underline the /ʤ/ sounds. Ask: What
1 man Oh no! There’s a lot of traffic!
do you notice about the spelling of the /ʤ/
woman Do you want some advice? Let’s
sound? (It can be either g or j. Both sounds
walk!
have e or i after them to make a soft rather
2 man Have you had any news?
than a hard sound.) Play the audio for students
woman No, we haven’t had any
to listen and check, then play it again for them
information at all.
to repeat.
3 woman There’s too much stuff in this room.
man Yes, let’s sell some furniture.
Transcript and answers
4 woman Did you do any homework?
woman Which subjects are you going to study,
man Just a bit. But I did some
George? Geography, engineering or housework!
languages?
man Oh, languages, Julia. German and Wordbuilder Verbs and nouns
Japanese! Elicit the five vowels from students and write them
on the board. Do the first item with the class as an
Uncountable nouns example. To make it competitive, get students to
race against their partners to see who can complete
5 Write an incorrect sentence on the board, eg all 12 words first. Students compare answers with a
I don’t know what to do. Can you give me partner, then check answers as a class.
some advices? Ask students if they can find
the mistake (some advice, not advices). Quickly Answers
review the difference between countable and 1 answer 2 help 3 need 4 reply 5 work
uncountable nouns. (We can count countable 6 sound 7 dance 8 exercise 9 drink 10 call
nouns, and plural countable nouns have s at 11 question 12 test
the end, eg biscuit(s), cake(s), girl(s). We can’t The noun forms are all the same as the verbs.
count uncountable nouns and they have no
plural form, eg coffee, milk, cheese.) Students
work in pairs to find one countable noun in the Extra idea: Write the following list of verbs
list of words. on the board. Ask students if they know the
nouns for these verbs (the answers are given
Answer in brackets). Point out that in this list, all the
idea noun forms are different.
live (life), meet (meeting), think (thought), solve
Point out the Remember box below the activity.
(solution), choose (choice), decide (decision)
Read through the rules with the class and check
comprehension by getting students to make
36 Unit 1
Focus on: up and down Everyday English p15
a Students complete the sentences individually,
then check together. Try to concept-check to
Expressing opinions Strong likes and
make sure they know what the phrasal verbs dislikes
mean. Look up and take up may be difficult, This page provides practice in the everyday
so encourage students to guess the meaning functions that students need when getting around
through context and think of synonyms (look in English and interacting with people. The main
up = try to find a piece of information by conversation has a video which provides extra
looking in a book or on the internet; take up = contextualisation and is fun to watch. (See page
start a new activity or hobby). 136 for suggestions on exploiting the video.) If you
don’t have the video or prefer not to use it, then
Answers just play the audio.
1 up 2 down 3 up 4 down 5 up; up 6 up
Warm-up
Write best food / worst food on the board and
Extra idea: Ask: What are the opposites of tell students about the things you like and dislike
the verbs in questions 4, 5 and 6? (speed to model the activity. Include adjectives such
up, go to bed / go to sleep, give up) as delicious, lovely, disgusting and horrible to
encourage them to describe things. Ask students
to tell each other about their favourite food and
b To encourage learner interaction and speaking,
also things they don’t like. Get class feedback
put students in pairs and split the vocabulary
afterwards.
between them. Tell them to look each verb
up quickly; they should try to find all their 1 Allow time for students discuss their ideas for
words before their partner. Then tell them to each picture and explain their reasons.
explain the meaning of their verbs to their
partner. Students work in their pairs to think Answers
of two things you can do with each verb. Elicit a garlic b coffee c cheese (camembert)
feedback from pairs, then check ideas around d fish e perfume / aftershave f cabbage
the class. g onion h grass

Suggested answers
You can cool down after exercise. / You can Extra idea: Tell students that a UK survey
let a cake cool down when you take it out in 2014 found that these were people’s
of the oven. top-ten favourite smells: 1 cut grass
You can cut up a piece of material to make 2 aftershave 3 a clean house 4 fresh bread
a dress. / You can cut up paper to make 5 Sunday roast 6 fresh flowers 7 clean
small cards. sheets 8 shampoo 9 sausages cooking in
You can heat up food. / You can heat up a pan 10 leather. Ask students to walk
metal. around and find the top-ten favourite
You can pick up a pencil. / You can pick up smells in the class, then ask for feedback.
a friend at the airport. Did everybody agree?
You can put down your book. / You can
put down a heavy suitcase.
2 1.19 Give students time to read each of the
You can put up a tent. / You can put up a
descriptions and match them with six of the
notice on a noticeboard.
pictures. Then play the audio for students to
You can turn down an invitation. / You can
listen and check.
turn down a job offer.
You can turn up at a party. / You can turn
Answers
up late.
1f 2b 3h 4d 5a 6c

Unit 1 37
Transcript 5 Draw a scale from strongest to weakest on the
1 I really hate the smell of cabbage. It’s a board. Ask students to look at the modifiers
horrible vegetable. It reminds me of school and try to put them in order. After they’ve
dinners. finished, ask them to come to the board and
2 I think coffee’s an absolutely wonderful write them on the scale.
smell first thing in the morning. I need a
good strong cup before I do anything. Answers
3 I really like the smell of grass when it’s cut. 3 really 2 quite 4 incredibly 5 absolutely
And I love walking on it without shoes. 1 a bit
4 I can’t stand the smell of fish. Or the taste.
Especially salmon. 6 Ask students to work with a partner and
5 I think garlic’s a gorgeous smell. The best! talk about the smells that they like, dislike,
Especially when it’s frying in butter. love or really hate. Remind them to use the
6 Camembert cheese is a really disgusting expressions for giving opinions, as well as the
smell. Like dirty socks! I don’t know how extreme adjectives and modifiers.
people can eat it.
Agreeing and disagreeing
3 Ask students to look back at the expressions
in exercise 2 and find the words that express 7 1.20 6 Decide whether you’re going to
opinions or show ideas. Draw two columns on use the video or simply play the audio (you
the board (positive and negative) and invite may not have the video or the necessary video
students to come and write the phrases in the equipment).
correct column. Then ask them to discuss their Ask students to guess what the photos are.
ideas about each picture together. Then tell them to guess which adjectives are
used for each photo. Elicit their ideas quickly,
Answers then play the video or audio for them to check
positive: I think it’s an absolutely their answers.
wonderful …, I think it’s a gorgeous …,
I really like …, I love … Answers
negative: I really hate …, It’s a horrible …, 1 dramatic, silly, stylish 2 ugly,
I can’t stand …, It’s a really disgusting …, uncomfortable 3 cool, silly 4 amazing
I don’t know how people can …

Transcript
4 To introduce the activity, write the words
good and bad on the board, then tell students 1 a Wow, that hat’s quite dramatic!
that sometimes these words aren’t enough to b Actually, I think it’s really silly.
explain how we feel about things, so we use a I disagree. I think it’s stylish.
other, stronger adjectives. Write on the board: b I don’t think so at all.
2 a What do you think of those boots?
Guess what! I passed my exams! – Good.
b They’re incredibly ugly!
I broke my leg playing football. – That’s bad.
a Absolutely! And they look really
Try to elicit different responses from students
uncomfortable.
using the extreme adjectives given. Then get
b I agree.
them to write P or N next to the adjectives. Ask
a I can’t imagine wearing them.
students which words are very similar in their
b Me neither.
own language and which are very different.
3 a I really don’t like that hairstyle.
b Actually, I think it’s cool.
Answers
a Really? I think it’s a bit silly!
awful N, brilliant P, disgusting N, fantastic P,
b Do you? I like it a lot.
gorgeous P, horrible N, nasty N, terrible N,
4 a What do you think of the sculpture?
terrific P, wonderful P
b I think it’s absolutely amazing!
a Me too. Um … what exactly is it?
b I have no idea!

38 Unit 1
8 Play the video or audio again and ask students Ask: Do you know anything about aromatherapy
to listen or watch again and identify the things and the effects that different essential oils have?
that the people agree and disagree on. Ask: If so, what do you know? Have you ever used any
What tells us they agree / disagree? What of them?
phrases do they use? Note: Tell students to be careful to use just a few
drops of lavender oil on their pillow, as using too
Answer much can have the opposite effect.
They disagree about the hat and the
hairstyle. They agree about the boots and we don’t say ... / we say ...
the sculpture. This section focuses on common errors that
students of many different language backgrounds
9 Allow students time to decide which are likely to make. By drawing students’ attention
expressions are used to agree and which to to them, and making it very clear that these are
disagree. Then play the video or audio again errors, you can help students avoid such mistakes.
for them to check their answers. Check students understand the heading and
explain that the section focuses on common
Tell them to write down the phrase that isn’t
mistakes in the unit. Give some examples of
used in the conversations, then check answers
mistakes. Then ask students to cover the green
as a class.
we say … side and to see if they can correct the
mistakes themselves before they look and check.
Answers
This section focuses on the following errors:
Agree: I agree. Me too. Me neither. • incorrect tense use
Absolutely! • incorrect word order with adverbs of frequency
Disagree: I disagree. I don’t think so. • incorrect use of reflexive pronouns
Actually, I think … Really? No, you’re • incorrect word order.
wrong.
No, you’re wrong doesn’t occur in the
conversations.

10 Ask students to look at the photos again and


discuss each thing with a partner. Encourage
them to use the adjectives and phrases
of agreement and disagreement in their
conversations. Monitor pairs as they work,
making a note of any common problems with
grammar, pronunciation or intonation.

De-stress!
These sections do two things. First, they provide
very short practical texts. Second, and more
importantly, they’re there to help students unwind
from time to time. You’ll find a simple de-stress
activity in every unit – not necessarily a physical
one, but one that’s easy to do in the classroom
as far as possible, or else a piece of advice which
you can discuss with students by asking them
simple questions. For more detailed information
about the De-stress! section, see the Introduction,
page 13.

Unit 1 39
2 Amazing … or crazy?
UNIT GRAMMAR: past simple; past continuous
VOCABULARY: life events; transport
FOCUS FUNCTIONS: telling stories

Lesson 1 He was 89 years old. 3 Tell students to read the article again, then
match the words in bold with the definitions.
pp16–17 Remind them to work out the meaning
from the context if they can. Students check
Aims answers in pairs.
The focus of this lesson is to revise the past simple
affirmative of the verb be and regular and irregular Answers
verbs, to revise past simple questions, and to learn
1 take up 2 centenarian 3 raises 4 move
vocabulary for talking about life events.
5 tornado
Warm-up
To introduce the story, write the words old age on Grammar 1 Past simple affirmative
the board. Ask: What do older people usually do?
4 Go through the grammar box and ask students
What hobbies do they have? Students discuss their
to quickly complete the sentences. They can
ideas in pairs. Elicit ideas from the class.
find the first two in the article.
Reading
Answers
1 Tell students to look at the photo and discuss 1 was 2 were 3 wanted 4 wore
the questions in pairs or small groups. Point
out that the lesson title says he was 89 years
Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 74
old. Ask: How old do you think he is now?
now or at the end of the lesson and go through it
Elicit ideas quickly from the class.
with students.
Suggested answers 5 Ask students to read and complete the article,
1 The man is very old and he’s running. then check together with their partners.
2 He’s exercising / running / jogging.
3 He’s wearing a turban, running / jogging / Answers
exercise clothes and trainers. 1 did 2 was 3 ran 4 came 5 was 6 died
7 moved 8 wanted 9 took up 10 became
2 Ask students to read the article to find out why 11 finished 12 used 13 were
Fauja became a marathon runner. Tell them not
to worry if they don’t understand all the words
– they’ll do some vocabulary work in the next Extra idea: Ask students to say which
exercise, but the focus of this activity is to find verbs in the article are regular and which
one piece of information quickly. Get feedback are irregular (regular: die, move, want,
from the class. finished, use; irregular: do, be, run, come,
take up, become).
Answer
He started running because he didn’t want 6 Tell students to close their books. Write the
to sit at home all day. He runs marathons years on the board and ask: What happened
to raise money for children’s and babies’ in 1911? Elicit the answer to this first year.
charities. Then ask students to work in pairs to try to
remember what happened in the other years.
Then they can read the article again to check.

40 Unit 2
Answers Answers
1 Fauja Singh was born. 1 He wasn’t born on 2nd April. He was born
2 Singh’s wife died. on 1st April.
3 Singh became famous / finished the 2 He didn’t move to the USA. He moved to
London Marathon in 6 hours 54 minutes. the UK.
4 Singh did the Toronto Marathon / ran 42 3 He didn’t live with his daughter in the UK.
kilometres in 8 hours 25 minutes. He lived with his son.
4 He didn’t take up boxing. He took up
jogging.
Grammar 2 Past simple negative
5 He didn’t become famous in 2011. He
7 Although students often use verbs correctly became famous in 2000.
in the affirmative form, they often have 6 He wasn’t part of a publicity campaign for
difficulties with negatives. Look out for typical Nike. He was part of a publicity campaign
mistakes such as use of no (He no wanted to for Adidas.
go home) and conjugation of both the auxiliary
and main verb (He didn’t wanted to go home). Grammar 3 Past simple questions
Write an incorrect past simple negative
sentence on the board, eg He no wanted to sit 10 Students often have problems with past simple
at home. Elicit the correction from students (He questions as well. Write How old he is? on
didn’t want to sit at home), then ask them to the board and elicit the correct question from
complete the grammar table. students (How old is he?). Highlight subject–
verb inversion in questions, then ask students
Answers to complete the questions in the grammar
table. Look out for mistakes such as use of no
1 wasn’t 2 weren’t 3 didn’t want
(Why he no moved?), as well as leaving out the
4 didn’t wear
auxiliary verb (When he took up jogging?).

Refer to the grammar reference on SB page Answers


74 now or at the end of the lesson and go
1 was 2 did … move 3 did … take up
through it with students.
Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 75
Extra idea: You could also do some drilling now or at the end of the lesson and go through it
of contracted forms, eg with students.
Teacher: was not
11 Do the first question together with the class as
Students: wasn’t
an example. Write In 1911 on the board and
Teacher: were not
ask students if they know what the question
Students: weren’t
is. After students have completed the task
Teacher: did not
individually, write the answers on the board.
Students: didn’t
Answers
8 Allow students time to work individually to find
1 When was Fauja Singh born?
other examples of the past simple negative in
2 When did his wife die?
the article.
3 Why did he move to the UK?
4 Who were part of / took part in the Adidas
Answers
publicity campaign?
Fauja Singh wasn’t a young man … He 5 When did Singh run the London
didn’t come last … he didn’t want to sit Marathon / become famous?
at home all day. 6 Did he come last? / Did he win?

9 Students read the article again and correct the


You could do exercises 5 and 6 on Ordinal
sentences together.
numbers in Vocabulary plus at this point.

Unit 2 41
De-stress! 14 Read through the instructions for the game
and model the example dialogue with one or
Write Count your blessings! on the board and
two students. Then write three important years
ask students what they think it means (we often
from your life on the board and get students
use it to tell somebody not to complain, but to
to ask questions and try to guess why they’re
realise that they have a lot to be glad about). Ask
significant (eg the year you graduated from
students to tell their partner just one true thing
university, the year your son / daughter was
about their life beginning with the words: I’m
born). If they make mistakes with question
lucky because …
forms, gently correct and help them. After
12 Allow time for students to work individually they’ve guessed correctly, tell them to write
to do the first part of the activity, then check three important dates of their own, then ask
answers with the class. Then elicit / say that and answer questions. Monitor pairs as they
questions 1 and 2 are factual, they need to work, making a note of any common problems
work out questions 3 and 4, and questions with grammar, pronunciation or intonation.
5 and 6 are subjective (ie they have to give Make sure they only ask three questions!
their own opinion). Tell them to choose three
15 Ask the class if they know what a bucket list
questions (ideally one of each type) to ask and
is. If they don’t know, tell them a few things
answer with a partner.
you’d like to do before you die and see if they
can guess through context. (It comes from the
Answers
English phrase to kick the bucket, which is an
1 was (He was from India.) informal way of saying ‘to die’! A bucket list
2 did (Because his wife died and he didn’t is a list of things you’d like to do before you
want to sit at home all day.) die.) Tell them to think of at least five things
3 did (the London Marathon); was (He was they’d like to do before they die. They should
89.) then work in groups of three to agree on
4 Was (It was slower, probably because he three things that they’d all like to do, first in
was older.) their eighties, then for a long and happy life.
5 does Remind students that they only have three
6 do minutes to do this activity, and they must all
agree on the three things for the list.

Extra idea: To increase learner interaction 16 Tell students to read the text on SB page 65
and speaking, get students to quiz each and see if any of their ideas from exercise 15
other to see if they can remember the story. are mentioned.

Did you know?


Vocabulary and speaking Life events
Students read the information about Jeanne
13 1.21 Ask students to work individually Calment. Ask: Has anybody ever heard of this
to make the collocations, then check with a woman? Tell them to find out more about her
partner before checking with the whole class. online.

Transcript and answers Extra idea: Tell students to write down


buy: a new flat, my first car the things they do to keep fit and healthy.
finish: school / university, my exams Then get them to share their ideas in small
get: a new job, a new flat, my first car, groups and do a survey to find the most
engaged / married popular and important ideas. To extend
go: travelling the activity and encourage more learner
meet: my partner / boyfriend / girlfriend / interaction, get students to also talk about
husband / wife the unhealthy things they do.
move into: a new flat
pass: my exams, my driving test
start: school / university, a new job

42 Unit 2
Explore Reading
Ask: Who is the oldest person alive today? Tell
3 Tell students to look at the photos on SB page
students to find out more about one or two
18 and read the title. Tell them to talk together
people. You may want to start this activity in class
and write down five things they expect to read
and ask students to finish it for homework.
about in the article and to say what it’s about.
Don’t check answers yet.
Lesson 2 He was swimming
when … pp18–19 Extra idea: If you found a clip of Jason
Lewis, you could play it now to create
Aims interest, set the scene and provide extra
The focus of this lesson is to learn more about the listening practice.
contrast between the past continuous and past
simple, to learn words for talking about different 4 Allow students time to read the article
forms of transport, and to find out more about an individually and check how many of their
interesting world traveller. predictions were correct. Ask: Which things
Note: You might want to find and download were the most interesting or surprising about
a clip of Jason Lewis to help with this lesson. It the article?
would also be useful to have a world map to
help with exercise 13. Answer
It’s about a man who travelled around
You first!
the world in 13 years using only his own
Students work in pairs and discuss if they’d like to power.
go around the world alone. Ask them to think of
the advantages and disadvantages of travelling on
5 Tell students to close their books. Write the
your own, then get feedback from the class.
headings on the board, and ask students to
Vocabulary Transport work individually to make a list of things they
remember from the article. Tell them to check
1 1.22 Ask students to match the pictures their ideas with a partner, then read the article
and words. Then play the audio for students to again and check together. Check answers as a
listen and check their answers. Play it again for class. Ask: Why couldn’t he use a sailing boat?
students to listen and repeat the words. (Because it’s powered by the wind.)

Transcript and answers Answers


a hot-air balloon b mountain bike forms of transport: sailing boat, pedal
c cruise ship d school bus e rescue boat, roller blades, mountain bike, kayak
helicopter f camper van g car ferry countries: Portugal, Australia, Indonesia,
h roller blades i fishing boat Singapore, Ethiopia, Sudan, Egypt, Syria,
2 Put students in pairs or groups to ask and Turkey, Bulgaria, Romania, Austria,
answer the questions. Encourage them to give Germany, Belgium
extra information by asking, eg What kind of cities: London, Lagos, Miami, San
transport have you been in? Where were you Francisco, Cooktown, Darwin, Alice
when you used this transport? Springs, Mumbai, Djibouti
oceans: Atlantic, Pacific Ocean, Indian
Answers Ocean (note that the Channel and the
Bosphorus are not oceans)
1 motor: cruise ship, school bus, rescue
health problems: He broke both his legs
helicopter, camper van, car ferry, fishing
in a car crash while he was rollerblading
boat; pedals: mountain bike; neither:
in the USA; a crocodile attacked him while
hot-air balloon, roller blades
he was swimming in Australia; he caught
malaria while he was travelling in the
Pacific region.

Unit 2 43
6 Go through the questions first to check Grammar Past continuous and past simple
understanding. Point out that the answers are
not directly in the article, so students have to 8 Ask students to complete the table with the
work them out. Put students in pairs to talk correct form of the verb. Remind them that
about the questions. they can look back at the article to help them.
Say that you’ll explain more about when to use
Answers each verb in exercise 10. For now, they should
just focus on the form of each tense.
1 He was 39 years old.
2 He travelled east to west.
Answers
3 South America and Antarctica
4 He was probably bitten by a mosquito. 1 was swimming 2 attacked
3 wasn’t travelling 4 caught

Extra idea: Ask students to write five quiz Refer to the grammar reference on SB page
questions of their own about the article. 75 now or at the end of the lesson and go
Tell them that the answer must be in the through it with students.
text somewhere. Walk around the room
and gently correct if needed. Then put 9 Tell students to look back at the article again
them in groups of three and tell them to and underline other examples of the past
ask and answer each other’s questions. continuous. Elicit feedback from individual
students.

7 P 1.23 Do the first item with the class as Answers


an example. Write caught on the board and was rollerblading, was swimming, was
ask students to identify and underline the travelling, was kayaking, was crossing
vowel sound (caught – /kɔ:t/). Ask them to find
a word in the box that has the same vowel
10 Ask students to work in pairs to complete the
sound (thought).
rules about the use of the past simple and
Tell them to work in pairs to match the past continuous. Check their understanding
other words. Make sure they say each word with concept-checking questions, eg How
out loud so they can hear the sound. Then many things happened in the sentence? What
play the audio for students to check their happened first? Then what happened? Did the
answers. Play it again for them to repeat first activity continue or was it interrupted?
each pair of words. What words link the sentences together?
You could also draw a timeline on the board
Transcript and answers to help students understand how to use each
caught – thought, could – took, got – lost, tense. Look at SB page 75 for a timeline you
heard – hurt, knew – flew, rang – sang, could use.
rode – stole, said – read, shut – won
Answers
Finally, ask students to quickly read the article
again and find five of the verbs. Check answers 1 past continuous 2 past simple
as a class. 3 while; when

Answer 11 Explain that the past continuous and past


rode, got, couldn’t, caught, thought all simple can be inverted, with no change
occur in the article. in meaning. Do an example with the first
sentence in the table in exercise 8, eg While
Jason was swimming across a river, a crocodile
attacked him. / When the crocodile attacked
Jason, he was swimming across a river. In this
activity, however, students should follow the
order of the words given.

44 Unit 2
Ask students to decide in pairs which action in
scary / bad moment: She got very close to a
each sentence was in progress when the other
huge iceberg.
thing happened, then write the sentences.
Ranulf Fiennes
Note: They will find out more about these
profession: adventurer and writer
people in the following exercises.
nationality: British
MA With weaker students, you could write date of birth: 7th March, 1944
each action on the board and ask students to famous because …: He sailed the
list them in the order they happened. Leave Northwest Passage in 1981, he crossed
this information on the board while they do Antarctica in 1992, he ran seven marathons
the exercise. in seven days in seven continents in 2003,
he climbed Mount Everest in 2009.
Answers
scary / bad moment: He got frostbite in his
1 Jason Lewis caught malaria while he was left hand – he had to cut off his fingers.*
travelling in the Pacific.
2 Helen Thayer was crossing Antarctica when * The full story is slightly less gruesome than this implies.
she celebrated her 60th birthday. After Fiennes’s return to the UK, his doctor advised him to
3 Freya Stark had an accident while she was leave the fingers for a while before an operation to amputate
the dead parts could be carried out. However, Fiennes grew
working in a factory in Italy. impatient and cut the tips off himself with a saw.
4 Ellen MacArthur was sailing in the South
Atlantic when she almost hit a whale.
Extra idea: Students search online to
5 Ranulph Fiennes was walking to the North
find out more about the other travellers in
Pole when his fingers froze.
exercise 11: Helen Thayer and Freya Stark.

Extra idea: Say the sentences in different Explore


ways so students notice weak forms in Encourage students to search online for
was /wəz/ and were /wə/. Then get them information about other travellers they know.
to repeat the pronunciation and say the
sentences in a more natural way. Extra idea: Ask students to write a story
about the traveller they researched using
12 This is the first of regular pairwork information- the article about Jason Lewis as a model.
gap activities. They appear in every second unit They could show pictures, map the route,
throughout the book. In these activities, each talk about difficulties the explorer had, etc.
student looks at a different page at the back of
the Student’s Book. Make sure they don’t look Speaking and writing
at each other’s information during the activity.
Check students understand what they have to 13 Ask students to turn to the map of the world
do in this activity. Tell them they’re going to on SB page 66 and mark Jason’s journey.
learn about two famous travellers. Tell them Alternatively, do the activity with a big world
to work in pairs and decide who is student A map on the wall and put sticky notes on the
and B. They each read a text about a famous map to show the route. Get students to write
traveller, make notes about them, then ask and dates and things that happened (rollerblading
answer questions to exchange information. accident, crocodile attack …) and stick them
on the map in the appropriate place. Don’t tell
Answers students if their route is correct yet.
Ellen MacArthur 14 Put students in pairs to check their route.
profession: retired sailor Model the example dialogue with one or
nationality: British two students first and point out the use of
date of birth: 8th July, 1976 sequencers to help them get the sequence of
famous because …: She broke the world events right. Ask one or two pairs to describe
record for sailing solo non-stop around the Jason’s journey, or ask each pair to say one part
world.

Unit 2 45
of the journey, then move on to the next pair 2 1.24 Play the audio. Ask: Which words did
for the next stage and so on. Tell students to you expect to hear? Why? Did you hear them
make notes as they listen. in the conversation? Elicit answers, then play
15 Have students write a summary of the story, the audio again for students to answer the
using the notes they made in exercise 14 questions in their notebooks – they’ll need to
to help them. Remind them to use the past be able to see their answers for exercise 3. Play
continuous and past simple as well as words the audio a final time for students to check
like first, then, finally, while and when to their answers.
sequence the story. Ask them to share with Note: There are some dates in the audio. You
a partner afterwards and read each other’s might want to remind students that we usually
stories. Monitor pairs as they work, making a say the years after 2012 as twenty twelve,
note of any common problems with grammar twenty thirteen, not two thousand and
and vocabulary for classroom feedback later. twelve / thirteen, etc, but people do say both.
Encourage them to correct any small mistakes
they see themselves, and help each other. Answers
MA If you used a wall map in exercise 13, tell 1 She was the first person to swim from
weaker students to look at the sticky notes Cuba to the USA without a shark cage.
to remind themselves what happened in each 2 She was 64 years old.
place and then make notes before they write. 3 It took her almost 53 hours (over two
days and two nights).
4 She was wearing a protective mask, a
Lesson 3 Why was she wearing special bodysuit at night, and gloves
a mask? pp20–21 and boots to protect her from sharks
and jellyfish.
Aims 5 She tried five times.
6 The first time, strong winds and high
The focus of this lesson is to continue learning
waves pushed her off course. The
about the contrast between the past continuous
second time, she had an asthma attack.
and past simple, this time when asking questions,
The third time, there were too many
and to find out about two amazing women and
jellyfish. The fourth time, there were
what they’ve done.
jellyfish and electrical storms.
Note: You might want to watch videos or
download information about Diana Nyad and
Rosie Swale Pope before this lesson. Diana Nyad Transcript
has also given a TED talk, which might be useful ian What are you doing?
for you and students to look at. amanda Well, I saw this amazing talk yesterday
by someone called Diana Nyad, so
You first! now I’m looking her up online.
Tell students to look at the photos and the lesson ian Diana Nyad? I don’t think I’ve heard of
title and try to guess what Diana has done. her. What’s special about her?
Encourage lots of active guessing! amanda Well … in August / September 2013,
she was the first person ever to swim
Listening 1
all the way across from Cuba to the
1 Explain to students that they’re going to hear States … without a shark cage.
more information about the woman in the ian Wow. There are a lot of sharks in that
photo. Go through the words in the box and sea, aren’t there?
check comprehension and the pronunciation of amanda Yes, there are – which is why
any difficult words, eg calm (silent ‘l’ – /kɑːm/), swimmers always use a cage. Diana
rough (gh as ‘f’ – /rʌf/). Ask students to decide was wearing a protective mask, a
which ones they expect to hear and how they special bodysuit at night, gloves and
might be connected. Check their ideas quickly. boots, but no cage.

46 Unit 2
ian That’s incredible. It’s a long way You could turn to the Wordbuilder section on
from Havana in Cuba to Key West in SB page 22 at this point and do more work on
Florida! compound nouns like jellyfish.
amanda Yes, it’s about 160 kilometres.
4 1.25 Explain that when Diana finished her
ian So it took her a long time?
swim on the beach in America, she said three
amanda Yes, the swim took over two days and
important things. Read the messages first and
two nights – almost 53 hours. And the
ask students to try and predict the mistake in
sea there can be really dangerous; it’s
each one. Elicit suggestions for each correction.
often incredibly rough and, apart from
Then play the audio for students to check their
sharks, it is also home to a lot of nasty
answers.
jellyfish. So it was a really brave thing
to do.
Answers
ian I don’t think I could do that! How old
was she? 1 We should never, ever give up.
amanda Sixty-four.
2 You’re never too old to chase your dream.
ian Sixty-four? Gosh. That’s an amazing 3 It looks like a solitary sport, but it is a
achievement. team.
amanda Yes, it was actually her fifth attempt
in 35 years. Her first attempt was in Transcript
1978 when she was 28. But because
amanda … I’ve just watched the clip online.
very strong winds and high waves
ian Oh, I’d like to see that.
were pushing her badly off course, her
amanda Yes, it’s great. And you know what?
team pulled her out of the water after
Even though she was completely
42 hours.
exhausted, she took time to talk to the
ian But she tried again?
people on the beach while the doctors
amanda Yes. Her second attempt was in
were giving her medical treatment.
August 2011, but she had to give up
ian What did she say?
after 29 hours because of an asthma
amanda It was very moving. She said: ‘I have
attack. She tried again one month
three messages. One is: we should
later, but this time there were a lot of
never, ever give up. Two: you’re never
jellyfish in the water and their stings
too old to chase your dream. And
made it difficult for her to breathe.
three: it looks like a solitary sport, but
ian But she still kept on trying?
it is a team.’
amanda Yes, she tried again in 2012, but
ian Those are great messages for us all.
jellyfish attacked her again, and there
amanda Yes, they are.
were terrible electrical storms as well.
ian Those jellyfish sound really scary! But 5 THINK Ask students to talk about the
she never gave up? questions in pairs or small groups. Elicit
amanda No, she never gave up. In 2013 she feedback from pairs / groups and find out what
finally made it. And as she walked out different messages students thought up.
of the sea in Florida, lots of supporters
were waiting to congratulate her. It
Extra idea: Show a video clip about
was a fantastic moment – I’ve just
Diana’s amazing journey. You could also do
watched the clip online.
extra listening practice and include true /
3 Tell students to cover exercise 2 or close false or gap-filling activities by using one
their books and recreate the questions using of the many online articles about Diana, or
the answers they wrote in their notebooks. watch her giving a TED talk.
Then tell them to look and compare and also
correct any mistakes they have.

Unit 2 47
Listening 2 man What a brave woman.
woman Absolutely. And that’s not all she’s
6 1.26 Explain that students are now going to done … she’s crossed the Atlantic in
hear about another astonishing woman, Rosie a five-metre boat, she’s sailed around
Swale Pope. To set the scene, point to the the world, she’s ridden a horse 4,800
photo of Rosie and ask students to guess what kilometres across Chile and she’s run
she did. Tell them to listen and compare Diana across the Sahara Desert!
and Rosie’s journeys. Ask: What was the same man Goodness. I feel tired just thinking
and what was different? Which achievement about it!
do you think was the most impressive? Why?
7 Tell students to listen again and decide if the
Suggested answer sentences are true or false. Play the audio
They both did amazing journeys when they again, pausing if necessary at relevant places
were quite old. However, Diana swam, for each questions. Encourage students to
while Rosie walked / ran. check their answers together afterwards.

Answers
Transcript 1 true 2 false 3 false 4 false 5 true 6 false
man Hi, what are you doing?
woman I just found this really interesting article
in the paper. Extra ideas: Ask students to correct the
man Uh-huh. false sentences. (2 She slept in her cart.
woman About this woman called Rosie Swale 3 She didn’t have a support team. / She
Pope. She’s amazing! was totally alone. 4 She was in regular
man Why? What did she do? contact with her son. 6 She’s had lots of
woman Well, when her husband died of cancer other adventures.)
in 2002, she decided to run more than The audio doesn’t say when she had
30,000 kilometres around the northern the other adventures, so you could ask
hemisphere to raise money for cancer. students to try and find out more and see
man 30,000 kilometres! That’s a bit more if they can add in any dates (solo crossing
than a marathon. What a challenge! of the Atlantic – 1982; round-the-world
woman Yeah, and especially as she was 57. She sailing trip – started in 1971; across Chile
actually set out on her 57th birthday, on on horseback – 1984–85; Sahara Desert
the 2nd of October 2003 … pulling a (the Marathon des Sables) – twice: once in
cart behind her. 1997 and again in 2000).
man A cart? What? Like a horse and cart?
woman Probably not quite as big, but a cart
8 Write the numbers on the board. Ask
she could carry everything she needed
students to try to remember what they refer
in: clothes, food, camping equipment
to. Then play the audio again for them to
… She could sleep in it too, and on
listen and check their answers. Ask: Who
most nights she just camped at the side
remembered the most details?
of the road.
man Let’s have a look. Oh. That looks quite
Answers
big. Did she go alone?
woman Yes, completely alone.
1 Rosie’s age when she began her journey
man What? No team with her? 2 the date Rosie set off
woman No, she was totally alone. But she was
3 the year Rosie arrived back home
in regular contact with her son, James. 4 the length of the boat in which Rosie
He ran a website with news about her. crossed the Atlantic
man So how long did it take her? 30,000 5 the distance that Rosie ran around the
kilometres is a huge distance on foot. northern hemisphere
woman Well, she expected it to take two years
6 the time it took Rosie to complete her
but in the end it took five! She arrived journey
back home in Wales in 2008.
48 Unit 2
9 Go through the four things with the class,
3 What was she doing when a bus
then ask students to write notes about each
knocked her down?
one. Walk around the class as they work,
4 What happened when she didn’t eat
checking their ideas and correcting any small
much?
mistakes if needed.
5 What happened while she was sleeping in
Alaska?
Answers
1 He died of cancer in 2002.
12 1.27 Go through the answers first and
2 a cart containing everything she needed,
check understanding of any difficult words,
which she pulled behind her
eg froze (past simple of freeze), weak, wolves.
3 He ran a website with news about her
Students work individually to match the
journey.
questions and answers. Play the audio for
4 She crossed the Atlantic in a five-metre
students to listen and check their answers.
boat; she sailed around the world; she
rode a horse 4,800 kilometres across
Answers
Chile; she ran across the Sahara Desert.
1c 2d 3e 4b 5a

Extra idea: Put students in pairs to re- Transcript


tell Rosie’s story using information from
1 man What happened while Rosie was
exercises 7, 8 and 9.
running in Siberia?
woman Some wolves ran with her for a
You could do exercises 1–4 on Places in Vocabulary week.
plus at this point. 2 woman Where was Rosie running when she
slipped on the ice?
Grammar Past continuous v past simple: man She was running in Iceland.
questions 3 man What was she doing when a bus
10 Go through the table first and elicit which knocked her down?
tense students should use in each gap. Ask a woman She was crossing a road in Russia.
few questions to review, eg How many things 4 woman What happened when she didn’t
happened in the sentence? Which action was eat much?
first / second? Which action shows a longer / man She became weak and fell ill.
continuous action in the background? 5 man What happened while she was
sleeping in Alaska?
Answers woman She nearly froze in her sleeping bag.
1 happened 2 was running 3 did … do
4 slipped 13 EVERYBODY UP! Energise your lesson with
this quick walk-around activity. Elicit examples
of questions from the class, eg Were you
Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 75
having dinner at eight o’clock last night? Focus
now or at the end of the lesson and go through it
on the example question students should ask if
with students.
the answer is no. Give students three minutes
11 Tell students to use the words and write to walk around the room and find someone
questions about Rosie. Encourage them to who was doing the activities in the past.
refer back to the grammar box if needed, then
check answers as a class. Art & Music
For the sculpture, tell students to look at SB page
Answers 67 to see a bigger image. Read the information
1 What happened while Rosie was running and elicit ideas for the sculptor’s name. Students
in Siberia? may not know any other sculptors, so encourage
2 Where was Rosie running when she them to check online for more information about
slipped on the ice? The Wave.

Unit 2 49
For the song, write the words on the board and
elicit guesses for the missing word – students may
Vocabulary plus p22
know this, as it’s a very famous song. Places
Extra questions for class or homework 1 Go through the headings first and check
students understand them all. Ask: What’s
Art
the difference between a mountain and
Why do people think the sculpture is by
a mountain range? (There’s more than
Rodin? Find out more.
one mountain in a mountain range.) You
Whose work influenced The Wave? What
could elicit one place for each one to check
similarities are there?
comprehension. Then ask students to work
in pairs to complete the table. Encourage
Answers students to add the in front of some of the
Art items if they can, but explain that you’ll do
It’s by Camille Claudel. more work on this in exercise 3.
Music Test students’ general knowledge by asking:
year: 1968 Which place in the list doesn’t belong in any
last word: Wild; cult movie: Easy Rider; how of the categories? (Titicaca is a lake – it isn’t a
were the riders travelling: by motorbike; sea, an ocean or a river.)
where were they going: New Orleans Ask students which names for places are very
similar in their own language and which are
very different.
Culture notes: Camille Claudel was a
French sculptor, born in northern France Answers
in 1864. She studied sculpture at the city: Havana, London, Miami
Académie Colarossi in Paris and after country: Egypt, the UK, the USA
that rented a workshop with several mountain / volcano: Mount Everest,
other young female sculptors. She started Mount Fuji, Vesuvius
working in Rodin’s studio sometime around mountain range: the Andes,
1884 and they started a long relationship. the Himalayas, the Pyrenees
In the early 1900s, she developed a mental sea / ocean / river: the Indian Ocean,
illness and spent many years struggling the Orinoco, the South Atlantic
with the illness, eventually dying in an
asylum in 1943. She destroyed many of
her works, but some do survive and she’s Extra idea: This activity could be done as a
considered an important artist of the 19th race with word cards to cater for different
and 20th centuries. learning styles and start the lesson in a fun
The Wave is made of onyx marble and way.
bronze and was first shown as a plaster
version in 1897. There are three small 2 Look at all the places marked with an
female figures standing in front of a large asterisk (*). Put students in groups of three and
wave that’s about to break over their tell them to remember the connection between
heads. The piece was heavily influenced by all the places and the stories in this unit. Set
Japanese art and is similar to the famous a time limit of two or three minutes and get
print by Hokusai. It can be seen in the them to write down as many as they can. Then
Musée Rodin in Paris. tell them to check their answers by looking
Born to be Wild was released by back through the unit to find the places.
Steppenwolf in 1968. It was used in the
movie Easy Rider, about two motorbike Answers
riders travelling east across the USA from Egypt: Jason Lewis cycled / kayaked
Los Angeles to New Orleans. through it.
Havana: Diana Nyad swam from there to
Key West in Florida.
50 Unit 2
The Himalayas: Jason Lewis cycled / walked
Explore
through them. Tell students to look up information about the
The Indian Ocean: Jason Lewis pedalled rivers and where they’re located.
across it.
Answers
London: Jason Lewis started his journey
there. the Amazon (Brazil, Colombia, Peru)
Miami: Jason Lewis arrived there after the Danube (Germany, Austria, Slovakia,
crossing the Atlantic. Hungary, Croatia, Serbia, Bulgaria,
South Atlantic: Ellen MacArthur sailed there. Romania, Moldova, Ukraine)
The USA: Jason Lewis rollerbladed across it. the Indus (Pakistan, India, China)
the Mekong (China, Burma, Laos, Thailand,
Cambodia, Vietnam)
3 Get students to look at the list of places again.
the Nile (Ethiopia, Sudan, Egypt, Uganda,
Write the Andes and the Egypt on the board
Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya,
and ask them which is correct. If they added
Tanzania, Rwanda, Burundi, South Sudan,
the in front of places in exercise 1, elicit their
Eritrea)
answers and ask for their reasons for adding
the Orinoco (Venezuela, Colombia)
the. Go through the places (see the key for
the Rhine (Germany, Austria, Switzerland,
exercise 1) and ask them to complete the rules.
France, Netherlands, Liechtenstein)
the Volga (Russia)
Answers
the Yangtze (China)
1 don’t use 2 use

Extra idea: You could give one river


Extra idea: Ask: Can you give an example to each student, then ask them to give
of each item in rule 1 and 2? An example feedback to the class about their river.
might be: a group of islands – the Maldives.

Ordinal numbers
4 P 1.28 Students often have difficulties
with the dental sounds /θ/ and /ð/, as they 5 1.29 Tell students to work in pairs and
often don’t exist in their first language. say each number and write it out in words.
Play the audio while students listen to the Monitor pairs as they work, making a note of
pronunciation of the each time. See if they can any problems with pronunciation and spelling.
notice when we say /ðə/ and when we say /ði:/ Play the audio for students to listen and check
– the pronunciation changes if a noun starts their answers, then again for them to repeat.
with a consonant or a vowel. Help students with the pronunciation of /θ/ and
do some quick repetition drilling to practise.
Answer Elicit / Teach the pattern of ordinals (th after
You use /ðiː/ before a vowel. each number except with 1, 2 and 3).

Transcript and answers


Transcript
1 first 2 third 3 twenty-second 4 fifth
the Amazon, the Danube, the Indus, 5 thirty-first 6 hundredth 7 twentieth
the Mekong, the Nile, the Orinoco, 8 three thousand, eight hundred and fiftieth
the Rhine, the Volga, the Yangtze
6 Go through the dates and ask students to find
Extra idea: Write these countries on the out why they’re important.
board: Canada, Ecuador, Germany, Italy,
Mexico, Pakistan, Portugal, Switzerland. Answers
Ask students to say them out loud and
1 date of birth of Fauja Singh
mark the stress. Ask: Which one has a
2 date of death of Jeanne Calment
different stress? (They all have the stress on
3 date that Jason Lewis got back to London
the first syllable except Pakistan.)
Unit 2 51
2 woman
Come in! Come in!
Extra idea: Ask students to work in pairs and man I can’t come in! The door’s locked!
write down five important dates in their lives, 3 man I came top of my class in English.
then tell their partner why they’re meaningful. woman Oh, well done! That’s brilliant!
I came bottom!
Wordbuilder Compound nouns 4 woman Come on! It’s time to leave.
man Yes, I know, I know. I’m coming!
a Write jelly and fish separately on the board.
You could also just show a picture of a jelly
and a picture of a fish. Ask students if it’s
Everyday English p23
possible to put the words together to describe
Warm-up
a different thing. Then tell them to look at the
photo of jellyfish on SB page 20. Tell students to look at the photo and try to
imagine what sort of story they might hear about
Tell students to work in pairs to match the
it. Encourage lots of guessing and get feedback
words to make compound nouns. Go through
from the class.
the words together and elicit / teach that the
word stress in compound nouns is on the first Telling stories
part. Say each word and ask students to repeat
after you. 1 1.31 Put students in pairs to look at the

MA You may want to point out to weaker sentences from the beginning of a story. Tell
students that one of the words in B goes with them to try and put them in the correct order.
two of the words in A. Get quick feedback from one or two pairs,
then play the audio for students to listen
Answers and check their answers. Note that students
may not initially suggest the same order that
backpack, campsite, cashpoint, dustbin,
appears in the audio (eg b could come
honeymoon, motorbike, nightlife, raincoat,
before f). Accept any plausible order.
wildlife, windscreen

Answers
b Focus on the cartoon and ask a student to
a) 5 b) 3 c) 7 d) 4 e) 9 f) 2 g) 8 h) 1 i) 6
read the caption. Then tell students to make
similar sentences with the nouns in exercise
a. Encourage them to say their sentences Transcript
with the correct pronunciation, and ask other
It was a dark and stormy night. I was walking
students to repeat each sentence.
home after the cinema. It was raining hard
Focus on: come and the streets were empty. Suddenly, I heard
footsteps behind me. They were coming
1.30 Look at the words in the list, then closer and closer. My heart was beating faster
look at the words in italics. Read through the and faster. I panicked and started to run. The
first dialogue and elicit suggestions for which footsteps ran too. They were right behind me
expression students can used instead of returned. and then …
Ask students to work in pairs to do the other
dialogues. Then play the audio for students to 2 GUESS Ask: How do you think the story
listen and check their answers. ended? What happened next? Elicit a few
ideas, then ask students to work together with
Answers a partner and guess what happened next.
1 came back 2 Come in!; come in Then tell them to write their own ending to
3 came; came 4 Come on!; coming the story. Monitor pairs as they work, making a
note of any common problems with grammar
and vocabulary and helping where necessary.
Transcript
Now ask them to change pairs and share their
1 man Oh, hello again! That was quick!
stories so they can compare their ideas.
woman Yes, I came back for my glasses.
I left them in the kitchen.
52 Unit 2
3 1.32 Play the audio while students listen • a series of events that lead to a resolution
to the complete story and compare endings. (I panicked and started to run. The
Ask: What was similar, the same or different footsteps ran too. They were right behind
about your stories? Did anybody have the same me and then someone grabbed my arm.)
ending? Which ending did you prefer? • a resolution (the person said gently, ‘I’m so
sorry. I didn’t mean to frighten you. Is this
Transcript your scarf? I think you left it in the cinema.’)
It was a dark and stormy night. I was walking • an assessment of what happened (I felt
home alone after the cinema. It was raining rather stupid … but I was glad to have my
hard and the streets were empty. Suddenly, I scarf back.).
heard footsteps behind me. They were coming Put students in groups and ask them to follow
closer and closer. My heart was beating faster the typical structure and create their own
and faster. I panicked and started to run. The stories. Explain that each person just adds
footsteps ran too. They were right behind me one sentence to the story. If there are only a
and then … few people in each group, they can continue
… someone grabbed my arm. I shouted, but around the group until they’ve finished their
the person said gently, ‘I’m so sorry. I didn’t story. Encourage them to use the past simple
mean to frighten you. Is this your scarf? I think and past continuous and also include adverbs
you left it in the cinema.’ such as suddenly to make their stories more
He was holding out a pale blue scarf. It was my interesting and dramatic. Monitor students
pale blue scarf! as they work and help them if needed. Praise
‘Oh yes, that’s mine,’ I said as I took it. ‘Thank good ideas and use of English.
you so much. That’s really nice of you.’ You could ask students to write up their stories
He smiled, turned around and walked away. for homework.
I felt rather stupid … but I was glad to have my 6 1.33 6 Decide whether you’re going to
scarf back. use the video or simply play the audio. Read
4 Explain that this activity will help students the introduction and explain to students that
invent ideas. Write the sentence beginnings on they’re going to watch or listen to an interview
the board and elicit different endings for each between a woman and the police. Play the
sentence. Encourage students to be creative audio or video and ask students to note down
and fun and to brainstorm ideas together. what the woman says. Ask: Do you think she
stole the painting? Why? / Why not? Elicit
5 Ask students highlight two adverbs in the ideas and write them on the board.
sentence beginnings in exercise 4 (patiently,
busily). Explain how using adverbs can help Transcript
make a story more interesting. Then play audio detective I’d just like to ask you a few
1.32 again and ask students to listen for the questions, if that’s OK.
typical structure of stories. Elicit their ideas woman That’s fine.
and write the main sections on the board. detective Where were you between eight and
Generally there is: ten last night?
• a typical opening (It was a dark and stormy woman Um … I was at home.
night.) detective What were you doing?
• an orientation and introduction to the woman I was sitting on the sofa in my living
characters (I was walking home alone after room and watching TV.
the cinema. It was raining hard and the detective What were you watching?
streets were empty.) woman Um … a film. A James Bond film in
• a complicating action or problem (Suddenly, fact.
I heard footsteps behind me. They were detective Which one?
coming closer and closer.) woman Oh a very old one – Goldfinger.
• a description of how the characters were detective Were you alone?
feeling (My heart was beating faster and woman No, my husband was with me.
faster.) detective What was he doing?
woman He was doing the ironing!

Unit 2 53
detective
So you were both at home all the 10 Get students to work with another pair and
time? take turns interviewing each other. The police
woman Yes. We weren’t near the national art can ask questions together, but the suspects
gallery! must be questioned separately. Make sure
7 Go through the prompts and tell students to the suspect who isn’t in the interview cannot
write complete questions. Then play the audio hear their partner speaking. Encourage the
or video again while students check their police officers to note down the answers
answers. each suspect gives and see if they can find
any discrepancies in their stories. Encourage
Answers the suspects to tell their stories using the past
simple and past continuous.
1 What were you doing?
2 What were you watching? we don’t say … / we say …
3 What was he doing? This section focuses on the following areas:
• incorrect use of the past continuous
8 Ask students to read the introduction. Check • incorrect use of prepositions
comprehension of any new vocabulary, eg • incorrect tense use before when
activists, research laboratory, suspect. Tell them Ask students to cover the green we say … side
to use the context to help them understand and see if they can correct the mistakes themselves
the vocabulary. before they look and check.
9 1.34 Elicit / Teach alibi. Ask students to
work in pairs to think of their alibis, but point
out that they can’t make notes – they must
remember their story without writing anything
down. Remind them to think about the
questions in exercise 7 and any other questions
they might be asked. Before they begin, ask
lots of questions to help them, eg If you were
at the cinema, where did you sit? What time
did the film start? Who was in it? Was the
cinema full? Point out that they’ll need to
know the answers to lots of different questions
if their alibi is a good one.
Play the audio and tell them to listen carefully
to the questions and create a good story of
their activities and movements.

Transcript
Where were you and your partner?
If you were at home … what were you doing?
If you were watching TV … what programmes
did you see?
If you were having dinner … what did you eat
and drink?
If you weren’t at home … where were you?
If you were at the cinema … how did you go?
… what was the film?
If you were at a restaurant … which
restaurant? … describe the waiter!

54 Unit 2
Units 1&2 Review pp24–25

Speaking and reading Answers


1 Ask students to just look at the photos and the 1 false: She only decided to be a stunt actor
title of the article. Tell them to think of words when she heard there were no black stunt
to describe each photo and discuss how they’re women in the UK.
different. Ask: How are they connected? How 2 false: She had all of them before she was
did the woman change her life to become a 21.
stunt woman? Which photo do you like most? 3 true
Why? 4 false: At one point she thought she wasn’t
going to succeed.
2 Allow time for students to read the article and 5 false: She climbs trees, jumps into rivers
check their ideas. Ask: Did you hear any of the and rides bikes and motorbikes with her
words you suggested in question 1? Did you grandchildren.
guess correctly how the woman became
a stunt woman? Point out the glossary
which explains the word stunt, and check Extra idea: Ask students to read the
comprehension of any other difficult words, eg text carefully and try to remember the
stunt double (students should be able to work details. Tell them you’re going to read the
this out from the context), film extra, financial. story with some mistakes. They have to
3 Give students time to read through the listen carefully and find the information
questions, then ask them to read the article that’s different. When they hear false
again. Check answers as a class. information, they have to say No, that isn’t
true and correct you.
MA As an extra challenge, ask stronger
students to close their books and try to answer
the questions from memory, then read again to Grammar
check.
5 Allow time for students to complete the
sentences individually before checking in pairs.
Answers Make sure they use the correct form of each
1 Amanda’s life was difficult as a child verb: past simple, past continuous, present
because she grew up in children’s homes, simple or -ing form.
not with her parents. It was difficult as an
adult because she had to work to support Answers
her three children. 1 was 2 was working; heard 3 decided
2 Because she had to qualify in lots of 4 took; did 5 think 6 loves climbing
different activities and work at the same
time. 6 Go through the answers and explain that this
3 They’re very proud of her and think she’s activity will make students think more deeply
wonderful. about the text, and they’ll also have to work
some things out. Question 5 is good for people
4 Ask students to read the text again and find with a strong mathematical intelligence!
out if the sentences are true or false. Tell them Students can write the questions individually
to correct any false statements they find, then or in pairs. Check answers as a class.
check answers with a partner. Check answers
as a class.

Units 1&2 Review 55


Answers Cross Culture: Social etiquette
1 How many children does Amanda have? Each of the six Review units finishes with a Cross
2 How long / How many years did it take Culture section. This is often an opportunity to
her to train as a stunt actor? reflect on how people do things differently (or
3 When did she get her first role (as a stunt not!) in different parts of the world and how we
actor)? can begin to be sensitive to these differences and
4 How old is Amanda? act accordingly. There’s usually a short reading
5 It says in the text that Amanda is 46 text with a task or questions, often leading to a
now and her oldest child (Aaron) is 30, discussion and a comparison with students’ own
so: How old was Amanda when she had culture.
her first child? or How old was Amanda
when Aaron was born? a To introduce the topic, ask students if they
6 The question for the answer I don’t know about the rules for politeness in
know can be anything where the answer countries such as Argentina, Greece, Japan,
isn’t given in the text, eg How many South Korea and Russia. Allow time for them
grandchildren does Amanda have? What to read the advice and try to match it with
happened to the children’s father? etc. each country. Check answers with the class
and ask: Why did you choose each country?
Their knowledge of the countries could be
Speaking and writing as a visitor or as a native speaker. Encourage
7 Give students time to think about the students to check online to find out more
questions, then ask them to walk around about each one.
the room and talk with different people. Tell
students to make notes of their answers. When Answers
they’ve finished, get feedback on their ideas, 1 Japan 2 Greece 3 Russia 4 Argentina
opinions and experiences. 5 South Korea

Answer b Find out if students agree with the advice. Ask:


1 She heard that there were no black stunt Did you find anything surprising? Ask them
women in the UK. to choose a country and find out more about
customs and social etiquette as homework.
Preposition Park c Ask students to work together and talk about
social etiquette and advice for visitors to their
Preposition Park is an exercise on prepositions that
country.
occurs in each Review unit.
Focus on the picture of Houdini and ask: Do you
know anything about Houdini? What did he do? Extra idea: Ask students to make a poster
Elicit ideas, then tell students to read the text of the top ten pieces of advice for visitors
to check their ideas. Use the pictures to check to their country.
understanding of handcuffs and chains.
Write the following on the board and ask students
to say which prepositions to use with each one
(the answers are given in brackets – don’t write
those on the board!): places (in), dates (on),
movement (to), jobs (as). Ask students to read and
complete the article with the correct preposition.

Answers
1 of 2 in 3 on 4 in 5 to 6 as 7 for 8 from
9 out of 10 under

56 Units 1&2 Review


3 Work and its problems
UNIT GRAMMAR: going to; verb + infinitive; present continuous for future use; will future
VOCABULARY: work; professions; future time expressions
FOCUS FUNCTIONS: giving instructions; making requests; instant decisions and promises

Lesson 1 I’m going to leave 2 employed = working for someone in


my job. pp26–27 return for payment; unemployed = without
a paid job
Aims 3 get on with = have a good relationship
The focus of this lesson is to introduce a series of with; colleagues = people that you work
work-related words and expressions, to practise with
going to for talking about future plans and 4 experience = knowledge and skill to
intentions, and to learn more about verbs followed do something; qualifications = official
by another infinitive. Students also talk about their record of ability or skill needed for a job
own job and career plans in the near future. 5 business = the activity of buying and
selling to make money; earn = receive
You first! money as payment for work
Put students in pairs to discuss the question. Find 6 boss = the person in charge at work
out how important work is for them and ask: 7 self-employed = working for yourself
What do you like or dislike about it? Ask other
questions about their work, eg Do you work in an Transcript
office or do you work from home? Or are you a
salary, employed, unemployed, get on with,
student or unemployed at the moment? Get class
colleagues, experience, qualifications, business,
feedback and check their ideas and opinions.
earn, boss, self-employed
Vocabulary Work 3 Go through the statements in exercise 2 again
1 THINK Focus on the photo and ask students and tell students to tick those they agree with.
to work in groups to talk about the questions. Then ask them to talk with a partner and
Encourage lots of ideas and help with explain the reasons why. Get class feedback
vocabulary if necessary. and encourage further discussion.

You could do exercises 5 and 6 on Similar verbs


Suggested answers in Vocabulary plus at this point.
1 The smiling faces mean ‘We’re happy
with our work, we enjoy it.’ Reading and speaking
2 They don’t want to tell their boss their
4 Tell students to look at the photo at the top
real feelings. They aren’t happy and they
of SB page 27. Go through the words in the
don’t enjoy their work.
box and check comprehension of ask for a
rise (= ask for more money). Ask: What is
2 1.35 Ask students to read the statements the difference between an assistant and a
and guess the meaning of the words in bold. manager?
Point out that experience in question 4 is
Put students in pairs or small groups to talk
uncountable in this context. Play the audio
about the questions. Encourage lots of ideas.
for students to listen to the words, then play
it again for them to repeat each word. Ask
Suggested answers
students which words are very similar in their
own language and which are very different. 1 in an office / at work
2 One of them (the woman?) is the manager
Answers and the other (the man?) is her assistant.
3 They are probably discussing a project.
1 salary = a fixed amount of money paid
to an employee every month
Unit 3 57
5 You might find it best to break the activity any other ideas. Write any extra ideas on the
into two parts. First, ask students to read the board.
article quickly for gist and answer the question Model the example sentence with one or two
What’s Jack’s problem? Set a short time limit students, and point out the use of should to
(one or two minutes only) so they read quickly. give advice. Write some helpful phrases on the
Then tell students to work in pairs and board to help students express their opinions
write quick definitions of the words in bold. and ideas, eg I think he should …, Maybe he
Encourage them to read the article again to could …
help them work out meaning through context. Give students a few minutes to work alone and
think about the situation. Then ask students to
Answers talk together and think of things Jack should
travel agency = company that organises do. Check their ideas as a class.
trips and holidays
career plan = an idea of how you want Tip: It might be useful to ask students to read
your working life to develop the article again and highlight all the
leave = finish working examples of going to and verbs followed
hard = difficult by an infinitive they can find. This gets
intends = wants, plans them ready for the grammar section and
Jack’s problem is that although he enjoys helps them see exactly where the lesson is
his job, his salary isn’t good; but he can’t going and what they’ll be learning. It also
ask for a rise because the company can’t helps them see the grammar in context and
afford it. makes it easier to understand.

6 Read through the questions with the class first. Grammar 1 going to
Allow students time to read the article again
in more detail, then answer the questions. Ask 8 Focus on the grammar box and read the
one or two students for their answers, then example sentences. Point out that in short
check answers as a class. answers, we don’t repeat going to (Yes, I am
going to). To give further practice, ask the
MA As an extra challenge, stronger students
class what Jack’s plans are next month. Write
could try to answer the questions from
the following sentence on the board and ask
memory first, then read the article again to
some questions to check their understanding:
check. To help weaker students, identify the
Next month he’s going to spend a week in
relevant part of the article for each question
the Amazonian rainforest. Ask: When are we
(either number the lines in the article or say
talking about? (the future) What words tell us
paragraph 1, 2, etc).
it’s the future? (next month, going to).
Answers Ask students to read the article again and
underline other examples of going to + verb. If
1 It plans long trips to exciting places.
you already asked them to do this (see the Tip
2 He travels to different countries.
above), then just ask them to look back at the
3 He’s going to stay in his job for another
items they highlighted. Ask them to decide if
two years.
the rule in exercise 8 is true or false.
4 He enjoys his job because he loves travel
and gets on well with his colleagues.
Answers
5 Because a lot of people plan their holidays
online. he’s going to spend a week … he’s going
to visit some hotels … He’s going to stay
in the job
7 THINK This task asks students to develop
The statement is true.
their own ideas, taking the discussion away
from the article. Tell students to imagine
they’re Jack. Go through the ideas in the box Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 75
and ask students if they would like to add now or at the end of the lesson and go through it
with students.

58 Unit 3
9 Write the first question prompt on the board: Jack earn a lot of money? How do you know?
Where / Jack / spend a week / next month? (No, he doesn’t. The article says ‘his salary
and elicit the question from the class. Then isn’t good’.) Do you think he can afford to buy
elicit the answer from one or two students and lots of things? (No, he probably can’t afford
write it on the board. to do that.) Elicit that the answer to item 1 is
Ask students to complete the rest of the therefore false. Before students start, check
questions and write their answers. Ask understanding of all the verbs.
students how they might begin their answer to
question 6. Ask: Is the answer clear from the Answers
article? Elicit that it isn’t, so they should begin 1 false: He wants a better salary.
their answer I think / I don’t think he’s going 2 false: He plans to stay for another two
to … years.
3 false: He hopes to start an online travel
Answers agency.
1 Where is Jack going to spend a week next 4 false: He intends to work with a friend.
month? 5 false: They can’t afford to give him a
He’s going to spend a week in the rise.
Amazonian rainforest.
2 What is Jack going to do in Nepal? Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 75
He’s going to visit some hotels. now or at the end of the lesson and go through it
3 Is Jack going to stay in the / his job for a with students.
long time?
11 Read through the grammar box again, then tell
No, he’s only going to stay in the / his job
students to underline examples of these verbs
for another two years. / Yes, he’s going to
in exercise 10 (afford to buy, plans to stay,
stay in the / his job for another two years.
hopes to get, intends to work, agreed to give).
4 How is Jack going to get more business
Go through the example with students and
qualifications?
explain that they must use each verb once to
He’s going to study in the evenings (to get
write true sentences about themselves.
more business qualifications).
5 Why isn’t he going to travel for a year? Allow them time to work individually, then ask
Because it can be hard to find a job these one or two students for feedback. Get general
days. feedback from the class.
6 Is Jack going to ask for a rise? MA For weaker students, write the verbs
I don’t think he’s going to ask for a rise on the board and, before they start writing
because he doesn’t think that the company sentences, brainstorm a few ideas of things
can afford to give him one. they could say, eg Next week I plan to go
swimming. I hope to see my brother. I intend
to wash my car.
Grammar 2 Verb + infinitive
You could do exercises 1–4 on Verbs + infinitives
10 Go through the grammar box. If you asked
in Vocabulary plus at this point.
students to highlight examples of a verb +
infinitive before (see the Tip on page 58), tell Explore
students to look back at those items. If not,
Encourage students to look online for information
ask them to go through the article now to find
on future career plans and advice and have them
more examples.
find out details of how to develop their work
Now read through the sentences about Jack. ambitions. It would be useful to set specific
Ask students to decide if they’re true or false questions to give the activity a clear focus. Ask:
and to correct any false ones. Point out that What things do you have to do in that job? How
the answers aren’t always clear from the long would it take you to become qualified? What
article, so they’ll need to make a personal personal and social skills do you need? What are
judgement as to whether something is true or the advantages and disadvantages of having
not. You could do the first item as an example that job?
with the class to demonstrate this. Say: Does
Unit 3 59
Speaking know’). Ask: Why do people say they’re ill on
Friday? Elicit lots of ideas and get feedback from
12 Tell students to turn to SB page 66. Read the class.
through Roleplay 1 and make sure students
are clear what they have to do. Put students Extra idea: Ask students to discuss what
in pairs, A and B. Ask all the A students to could be done about the problem of people
write notes before they begin to help them being ill or leaving their jobs because of
with what they want to say to their boss. If stress.
necessary, model an example conversation with
a strong student. Then give students time to
have their conversations. Monitor pairs as they
work, making a note of any common problems
Lesson 2 I’m flying to LA
with grammar, pronunciation or intonation. tomorrow. pp28–29
Then look at Roleplay 2 and repeat the
Aims
process. Help the B students with ideas for
Jack’s options. It might be useful to write some The focus of this lesson is to introduce a series
ideas on the board, eg leave and look for of words related to professions and to find out
another job. Give students time to have their more about a scriptwriter’s life. It also looks at the
conversations. difference between the present continuous to talk
about future arrangements and going to to talk
When they’ve finished, ask pairs to tell the
about plans and intentions. In addition, students
class what advice Jack’s friend gave. Find out
practise their writing skills with an informal email
how many students gave the same advice.
to make arrangements with a colleague.
13 Model the example dialogue with one or
two students. Encourage them to give more
You first!
information about their career plan. If they Look at the photos and explain / elicit that they’re
don’t have a career plan, tell them to invent all about crime / the police. Ask students to talk in
information, otherwise the conversations will pairs about whether they watch crime drama, and
be very short! Alternatively, if students don’t if so to talk about their favourite crime shows on
have a job, they can talk about someone they TV. Ask: What are your favourite shows and why?
know who does. It doesn’t matter if students say they don’t watch
crime drama – this question is just to find out
Put students in groups of three and ask them
more about their personal TV tastes.
to ask and answer questions to find out more
about their jobs. Vocabulary Professions
Tip: Always try to relate recently learnt 1 Look at the photos again and go through
grammar and vocabulary to students’ the questions. Check comprehension of each
own lives and experiences. This helps it word in the list. Point out that the questions
become more meaningful and memorable are designed to help students understand
and gives them a real reason to learn. Try the vocabulary. Tell them to work in groups
to leave plenty of time for freer speaking to answer the questions, using a dictionary
activities at the end of the lesson so or checking online if necessary. Get feedback
students can actually use the grammar in a from groups and check answers as a class.
natural context.
Suggested answers
Did you know? 1 criminal
2 criminal, detective, police officer (and
Discuss the statements with the class. Ask: What
possibly photographer) – because a
did you find interesting or surprising? Do you
criminal commits a crime and detectives
think these things are true? Do you agree with the
and police officers try to solve a crime.
phrase ‘It’s not what you know, it’s who you know
A photographer might take photos
that counts.’? Ask them if they know anybody
of a crime scene.
who got a job through networking (ie ‘who you

60 Unit 3
3 A: cameraman B: detective / photographer Tip: Pre-teaching words helps to clarify the
C: police officer meaning of new words and helps students
4 actor, cameraman, director, producer, writer to read the text without stopping to keep
businessman, lawyer looking words up in the dictionary. It also
criminal, detective, police officer, helps students to read more quickly and
journalist, photographer remember the details more easily.
editor, journalist, writer
5 A
4 Allow a few minutes for silent reading and
ask students to check their predictions from
2 P 1.36 Say the word actor and ask exercise 3. Ask: Did any words surprise you?
students to repeat it. Offer help and gentle
correction if needed and get them to notice Answers
the schwa sound at the end of the word. You
Words in the article: change, competition,
could also write the word and its pronunciation
creative, crime drama, criminal, do research,
on the board and highlight the sound you
editor, episode, project, rewrite, version
want them to practise: actor – /ˈæktə/. Point
out the changing stress and pronunciation on
photograph – photographer (/ˈfəʊtəɡrɑːf/ – 5 Tell students to read the article again and
/fəˈtɒɡrəfə/. answer the questions. You could set a time
limit to encourage students to find the answers
Focus on the words in exercise 1. Tell students
as quickly as possible. If you do this, it’s a
to work in pairs and find the schwa sounds in
good idea to get students to read through the
each word. Play the audio for students to listen
questions first so they know what information
and check their answers. Ask: Which word
they’re looking for.
doesn’t have the schwa sound?
MA For some students it might be helpful Answers
to read through the list of words with the
1 She’s sitting at her desk, drinking a cup of
class first so that they can hear the words.
strong coffee and working on her TV script.
Alternatively, play the audio before they do the
2 In the first two months of the project
exercise, then again to check.
3 She’s writing the second version of episode
2, because the editors have asked for a lot
Transcript and answers
of changes.
actor, businessman*, cameraman*, 4 By Tuesday afternoon at the latest
criminal, director, editor, journalist, lawyer, 5 There’s a big meeting at 9am in Los
photographer, police officer, producer, Angeles with the producers, writers and
soldier, writer editors of the TV series to discuss the next
Detective doesn’t contain a schwa. three episodes. In the afternoon she’s
* Note that the ‘i’ in businessman and the ‘e’ in meeting her editor to look at the changes
cameraman are not usually pronounced. to episode 2.
6 Because they aren’t happy with it and they
Reading think she’s the most creative person on the
3 Tell students they’re going to read a text about team.
a scriptwriter. Teach / Elicit the meaning of 7 Tony is a friend of Renata’s and she doesn’t
scriptwriter (somebody who writes the words want to upset him.
(the script) for films). Ask them to look at the
words in the vocabulary box and underline MA As an extra challenge, stronger students
those they think will be in the text. If there could try to answer the questions without
are any words they don’t know, get them to looking at the article again, then read and
quickly look them up in their dictionaries. check their answers.
Elicit ideas from the class, but don’t check
answers yet.

Unit 3 61
Extra idea: Ask more questions about the She’s staying in a hotel … (present
article, eg What time is it at the beginning continuous)
of the article? How old is Renata? Where … the producers, editors and writers are
does she live? How many scriptwriters having a big meeting. (present continuous)
are working on the crime drama? Which They’re going to discuss the stories …
episodes is Renata writing? Why is she (going to future)
feeling stressed? Renata is meeting her editor … (present
continuous)
6 Put students in groups of three to talk about … they’re going to look at the changes
the questions. Get class feedback and check … (going to future)
their ideas. Write their ideas for question 2 on … the producers are going to ask her to
the board and ask students to vote for the best rewrite it … (going to future)
advice to give Renata. ‘What am I going to do?’ (going to future)

Extra idea: To review recently learnt Note: These are things that are happening now.
vocabulary, put students in small teams. They use the present continuous, but they’re not
Tell them you’re going to write some of the about the future:
vocabulary from the lesson on the board. Renata Gonzalez is sitting at her desk.
Choose one student in each team and She is drinking a cup
of strong coffee.
ask them to turn their chair so they can’t She is working on her TV script.
see what’s written. Their partners have to She and three other scriptwriters are writing a
describe the word to them and they have crime drama.
to guess what it is. The first one to guess Renata is writing episodes 2 and 6.
the word correctly gets a point. The team She’s feeling stressed.
with the most points at the end wins the Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 76
game. now or at the end of the lesson and go through it
with students.
Grammar Present continuous for future use
8 Tell students to look at the sentences they
7 Write I’m having lunch with a colleague on the underlined in the article, then look at the
board and ask: When are we talking about? statements in the exercise. Ask them to work
If they say now, write tomorrow at the end in pairs and tick the statements that are true.
of the sentence. Then ask: Do we always use At this point, they may ask questions about
the present continuous to talk about things the difference between the present continuous
happening now? Point to tomorrow on the and going to. Write the example sentences
board and teach / elicit that we can also use in statement 4 on the board and try to elicit
the present continuous to talk about things which sentence is more certain. Ask: Which
we’ve arranged to do – future arrangements. one is arranged and which one is a plan? The
Tell students to find other examples in the difference is often very slight, but we tend to
article about the scriptwriter’s life. Ask: Which use the present continuous to talk about fixed
sentences describe things happening now future arrangements.
and which ones describe the future? Tell them
to only underline sentences that refer to the Answers
future. 1, 2 and 3 are true.

Answers 9 Tell students to cover the article and try to


… the script is going to be ready by then. remember Renata’s arrangements for the week
(going to future) ahead. Model the example dialogue with one
Renata is flying to LA. (present or two students to help them see what kind
continuous) of questions they should ask each other. Put
students in pairs to discuss the arrangements,

62 Unit 3
agree on the correct ones and write a diary 12 Tell students they’re going to write an email
for her week. Then tell them to read the back to Jerry. Ask them to work in pairs and
article again to check how many things they allow them a few minutes to think of ideas
remembered correctly. together before they start writing. Elicit reasons
why Lisa can’t meet Mike on the dates Jerry
10 EVERYBODY UP! Energise your class with
suggests and write them on the board. While
this walk-around activity. Go through the list of
students are working, walk around and offer
items and revise how we ask questions. Ask:
help if needed. After they’ve finished, ask them
How do we ask questions using the present
to read each other’s emails and help correct
continuous? Highlight subject–auxiliary verb
any small mistakes they see.
inversion: I am travelling by train next week. /
Are you travelling by train next week?
Give students time to think of the questions Tip: Try to encourage peer correction after
they need to ask, then tell them to walk around writing activities. This creates a feeling
and find out about other people’s future of co-operative learning and also helps
arrangements. You may want to set a fixed students notice mistakes, correct their work
time for this activity to make it more dynamic. and develop better grammatical accuracy.

Extra idea: Give students a handout that 13 Ask one or two pairs to read out their email
looks like a diary or planner. For each day it from exercise 12. Choose one and break it
should have space for morning, afternoon down into sections. Go through each section
and evening. Tell students to write plans and elicit what students might say in a
in the spaces for each day but leave four telephone conversation instead of an email.
spaces empty. Show an example planner Teach / Elicit useful phrases for talking on the
so they know what to do. Tell them to phone, eg Hello, could I speak to Jerry, please?
go around the room and try to arrange Speaking.
meetings with each other using the present Students then all work on their emails to
continuous, eg Hi Jan, what are you doing turn them into telephone conversations and
on Friday afternoon? Shall we meet? – No, act them out. Monitor pairs as they work,
I’m sorry. I’m busy on Friday afternoon. I’m making a note of any common problems with
going shopping with my mum. pronunciation or intonation. Make sure they
use the correct future forms for plans and
Writing and speaking arrangements.
MA For weaker students, it would be useful
11 Read through the email with the class first and to write language they might need on the
do the first item together as an example. Ask: board. You could also note down the stages of
What words could go in this gap? What word the telephone conversation: greeting, saying
do we use with ‘meeting’? Elicit ideas, eg have, what you’re calling about, giving a reason why
hold, arrange, organise. Put students in pairs to you can’t make the date, apologising, saying
complete the email. Where they think there’s goodbye.
more than one possible answer, tell them to
come to an agreement about which word to De-stress!
use. Monitor pairs as they work, making a note Read through the text and tell students to look
of any common problems and helping with any at the picture to help them understand the
vocabulary as necessary. Make sure students instructions. Ask: How does it feel to massage your
use the correct tense for each missing verb. forehead in this way? Tell them that it’s actually
something we tend to do naturally when we’re
Suggested answers feeling tense or stressed. Encourage them to do it
1 to have / hold / arrange / organise now!
2 project / programme 3 meeting 4 for
5 ’m going / flying / travelling 6 editor
7 are having 8 ’s doing 9 going to

Unit 3 63
Lesson 3 Will they like this? actor) in the order that they hear them. Play
the audio once all the way through, then play
pp30–31 it again, pausing if necessary, for students to
check their answers. Check answers with the
Aims class.
The focus of this lesson is to practise future time
MA It might be helpful for weaker students if
expressions and to use will and won’t to talk about
you write the letters of the sentences about
future predictions.
comedians on the board: a, b, c, e, f, g, h.
You first! Alternatively, tell students to underline the
sentences about the comedian.
Ask: Are you good at telling jokes? Elicit answers
from around the class and perhaps get one or two
Answers
confident students to try telling a joke.
1g 2a 3b 4f 5e 6h 7c
Listening 1
1 To introduce the listening activity, ask Transcript
students to discuss the questions in pairs or Hi, I’m a man with a very unusual job – I’m
small groups. Ask: What do you think the a comedian. Well, maybe my job isn’t that
advantages and disadvantages of being a unusual. In many ways, comedians are like
comedian are? Use the photos to pre-teach actors: we don’t have a nine-to-five job or
the words audience, comedian and stage. regular working hours, we travel and perform
Get feedback from students and see if they all over the country, and we don’t have a
guessed correctly what a stand-up comedian regular salary.
does. Ask: How are comedians like actors? But in other ways, a comedian’s job is very
Explain that like here means ‘similar to’. different from an actor’s. For one thing,
you don’t need any qualifications to be a
Answers comedian. The only qualification is that you’re
3 A stand-up comedian stands in front of funny – that’s all. We write our own scripts,
an audience and tells jokes and funny and we don’t have colleagues. Actors are
stories. different, they work with a group of people.
It isn’t an easy job. You write your script. You
2 Go through the statements first and explain think: will the audience like this? Yes, it’s funny.
the meaning of the phrase nine-to-five (we And they’ll love this. Mmm, maybe they won’t
use it to refer to a job where you start work like this joke. What about this one? Will they
at nine o’clock and finish at five o’clock every like it? Yes, they will! I think they’ll love it. But
day). Have students look at the statements you can never be sure. You tell yourself, I’ll do
together and decide which things are true for well, it will be fine. But the problem is, every
an actor or a comedian and get them to think audience is different. You stand up on the
of similarities and differences between the stage and tell a joke and the audience loves
jobs. Note that students could have different you. Two days later, you tell the same joke in
answers to those given here – that’s fine if they a different city – and nobody laughs. And you
can give reasons for their answers. feel terrible. You need people to laugh. And
then you tell another joke – and the audience
Suggested answers laughs. And you think: That’s it. That’s why I’m
a) C, A b) C, A c) C d) A e) C f) C a comedian.
g) C, A h) C, A
Extra idea: Instead of students ticking the
3 1.37 Tell students they’re going to hear items in exercise 2, you could write them
a stand-up comedian talking about his job. out on separate pieces of paper and ask
He’ll say some of the things in exercise 2. Tell students to put them in the correct order
students to listen and number the sentences as they listen. This helps with different
about the comedian (not the ones about the learning styles and provides a kinaesthetic
and auditory focus.
64 Unit 3
4 1.38 Students work individually to try to Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 76
complete the extract from memory. Play the now or at the end of the lesson and go through it
audio for them to listen and check their answers. with students.
6 Pre-teach the word report. Allow time for
Answers students to complete the text individually.
1 script 2 like 3 love 4 joke 5 love Tell them to look back at the grammar box if
6 never 7 fine 8 audience necessary.

Answers
Transcript
1 will take / ’ll take 2 won’t be
It isn’t an easy job. You write your script. You
3 will be / ’ll be 4 Will I enjoy 5 won’t
think: will the audience like this? Yes, it’s funny.
6 will feel / ’ll feel
And they’ll love this. Mmm, maybe they won’t
like this joke. What about this one? Will they
like it? Yes, they will! I think they’ll love it. But 7 Tell students to work individually and think of
you can never be sure. You tell yourself: I’ll do something they have to do at work (or school
well, it will be fine. But the problem is, every or home). Tell them to describe the task to a
audience is different. partner and make predictions about it, eg It
will / won’t take a long time. I think it’ll be
Extra idea: To set up more learner easy. Encourage them to use the future simple
interaction and speaking, give students (will + verb) to make predictions and remind
a text that has more gaps. Play the audio them to look back at the text in exercise 6 if
again without pausing it while students they need help.
listen and try to complete as much as they
can. Tell students to share what they have Vocabulary Time expressions
with a partner, then talk to other people 8 Introduce the time expressions in the box.
until they’ve completed the text. Ask: When does each expression refer to?
Help with understanding by saying: Today is
Grammar will future Monday. Tomorrow is Tuesday and the day
after tomorrow is Wednesday. Elicit which
5 Read through the grammar box with students. expressions basically mean the same thing.
Point out that in short answers we don’t repeat To check comprehension say: Tomorrow is
the verb, eg Yes, they will, not Yes, they will Tuesday. The day after that / the next day / the
like. following day is Wednesday.
Ask students to read the extract in exercise 4
again and underline sentences with will. Read Answers
out the rule and ask students to look at their the day after tomorrow, the next (day), the
underlined sentences to work it out. (day) after that, the following (day)
Note that students sometimes have difficulty All these expressions can be used to mean
hearing the /l/ in subject–verb contractions, ‘the day after tomorrow’.
so write the following sentences on the board
and get them to practise the pronunciation: 9 Read the examples with one or two students
I think they’ll like it. I’ll do well. and revise ways of saying the date. Point
out that in order to practise the last three
Answers expressions in exercise 8, students need to
... will the audience like this? give a day or date first, eg Saturday is
... they’ll love this. October 29th. The …
... maybe they won’t like this joke. Allow time for students to write sentences.
... Will they like it? Monitor students as they work, making a note
Yes, they will! of any common problems with dates and time
I think they’ll love it. expressions. Ask one or two confident students
I’ll do well, it will be fine to read out their work.
We use will + verb to make a prediction.
Unit 3 65
10 EVERYBODY UP! Model the example The following week, I have no work so I’ll be at
dialogue with one or two students and point home. That’s OK, I’m happy to spend time with
out the use of will in the prediction and in my family. The week after that, I’m going to be
the answer. Ask students to walk around the in London again, performing at the same clubs
room and make predictions about each other as before.
using will and the time expressions. Get class All this travelling is quite hard. It isn’t good
feedback, correct small mistakes and highlight for your relationships, you know, with your
good sentences that you heard. partner and your family. And the money isn’t
great, either. And nothing’s certain. Will I have
Extra idea: Play Hangman (see page 139) work in May? Maybe I will, maybe I won’t. And
but instead of getting students to guess when there’s no work, there’s no money. And
letters in words, ask them to guess where I have a family! You have to really love being a
you’ll be later in the week. If they say comedian to stay in the job.
incorrect sentences, add another piece to
14 Go through the questions first and highlight
the hangman picture.
the use of the time expressions. Tell students to
listen again and work out what the comedian
Listening 2 will be doing at these different times. Play
11 Tell students they’re going to hear more about the audio again and have them answer the
the comedian’s job. To set the scene, ask them questions.
to work in pairs, close their books and think of MA For weaker students, it might be helpful
problems that a comedian might have. Elicit a to write the time expressions on the board and
few ideas from the class. Accept any answers elicit the timeframe, eg this week, next week,
at this point, as long as students can give the week after that, the following week (ie this
reasons for them. refers to four consecutive weeks).

12 Tell the pairs to read through the list of


Answers
problems. Ask: Did you think of any of the
same problems? Get class feedback and write 1 He’s performing in three different clubs in
any other problems they thought of on the London.
board. Ask the class: Do you agree with these 2 He’s working in Scotland.
other ideas? 3 He’ll be at home.
4 Because he has no work that week.
13 1.39 Play the audio while students listen 5 He’ll be in London, performing at the same
and tick the problems in exercise 12 that are clubs as before.
mentioned. Tell students to check their answers
with a partner, then check answers with the
class. Tips: Giving students time to look at the
questions first means they know what to
Answers
listen for.
b, g, d, e, f
Try not to ask students if they want to
listen to the audio again. It’s important to
Transcript walk around and monitor how students are
One problem comedians have is that we have doing when they’re doing listening tasks.
to travel a lot. Most comedians travel between This means that you can actually see if they
40 and 50 weeks a year. You usually have need to listen to the audio again and then
half the week at home and half the week play and pause the audio as needed.
away from home. Here’s an example from
my schedule. This week and next week I’m Extra ideas: As this audio is quite dense,
performing in three different clubs in London. with a lot of information in a short
The week after that, I’m working in Scotland. time, it would be useful to ask some
That will be hard work, I can tell you – it isn’t extra questions, eg How many hours do
easy being an English comedian in Scotland! comedians usually travel in a year? Does

66 Unit 3
the comedian like being at home? Why 17 Allow students time to work in pairs and talk
isn’t the work certain? Why does the about the cartoon. Ask: What’s happening in
comedian say ‘And I have a family!’? the picture? Does the comedian look happy?
Tell students to work in pairs and compare Why not? Encourage lots of active discussion.
the jobs of a comedian and a lawyer. Ask: Elicit answers for question 1 from several pairs
Would you like to be a comedian or a and see if they agree.
lawyer? Talk about qualifications, working
hours, colleagues, salary, time with partner Answer
and family, travel, type of employment. The audience is bored; they don’t think
she’s funny.
Speaking
18 Ask pairs to read out their ideas to the
15 Ask students to work in small groups and talk question What do you think the comedian is
about why they like or dislike their jobs. If they thinking? Accept any logical ideas – there’s no
don’t have a job yet, tell them to imagine a job correct answer. Do a class vote on the best or
they’d like to have in the future. funniest ideas.
Model the example sentence and focus on
the use of will to make a prediction and Explore
also the use of for to talk about a period of For this activity, students should type the name
time. Tell students to take turns to give their of their favourite comedian into a search engine.
information to the other people in the group Encourage them to find a video clip that shows the
and encourage them to write one or two comedian telling jokes. Ask them to write down
predictions for each person as they listen to one or two jokes that they can bring into class.
each other. However, they should make sure that the jokes are
MA Help weaker students by brainstorming appropriate!
lots of different jobs and writing them on the
board. It might also be useful to do an example
Art & Music
first with the class. Talk about your job and For the painting, tell students they can see a larger
say why you enjoy (or don’t enjoy!) being a version on SB page 67. Tell them to read the
teacher. Ask: Do you think I’ll still be a teacher questions and see what they can find out online.
in five years? How long do you think I’ll stay in A good starting point would be to search using
this job? the painting’s title and the artist’s name, then
research more about the people in the painting.
For the song, ask students if anybody knows
Tip: Write your questions on the board and these lyrics and can sing them – it’s a very well-
keep them and the jobs there during the known song, so somebody may know it. Tell them
speaking activity to remind students during to find the video for the song on YouTube. It’s a
their conversations. Leaving sentences wonderful video and has a very famous actor in it.
highlighting the grammar focus on the
board is very useful as students can use Extra questions for class or homework
them throughout an activity.
Art
Find out one extra piece of information about
16 Model the example dialogue with one or two each of the Marx Brothers.
students. Highlight the expressions they can Find one other painting by Bill Manson and
use, eg That’s interesting. Sorry, I don’t think write a short description of it.
... Elicit other expressions from the class, eg Music
I agree / I don’t agree. I think you’re wrong. Who were the two actors in the video with
Yes, that’s right, etc. Tell students to discuss Bobby McFerrin? Find out more about
their predictions together. Find out how many them.
people in each group made the same or similar
predictions about the others in the group.

Unit 3 67
Answers Vocabulary plus p32
Art
They were actors and comedians and they Verb + infinitive
were called the Marx Brothers. 1 Before students start the activity, ask them to
Music cover the conversations and just look at the
Song: worry, be happy pictures. Ask: What do you think is happening
McFerrin says that when you worry, you in each picture? Elicit some ideas, then put
make it double; you should call him when students in pairs to read the conversations and
you worry so that he can make you happy. match them with the pictures. Point out that
there’s one conversation that doesn’t go with
Culture notes: Bill Manson is an artist who any of the pictures. Check comprehension of
lives and works in Arizona in the USA. He’s the words in bold.
also a drummer and has played around the Elicit answers from the pairs and ask them to
world for over 25 years – his musical tastes give reasons for their choice. Check answers
influencing his strong images. He’s also a as a class.
trained designer and this led him to start
painting his colourful images – many of Answers
well-known artists, singers and sports men A4 B3 C2
and women.
Three’s Comedy is a painting he did in 2011 2 P 1.40 Say the words in bold on their
of the Marx Brothers. They were a family own: promised, arranged, managed. Ask:
comedy act, performing from 1905 to 1949. What sound do you hear at the end of each
There were five brothers, and initially all word? (promised = /t/, arranged and managed
five of them were in the act, but eventually = /d/). Now say quickly: promised to. Ask:
the two younger brothers left and the three Can you hear the sound /t/ twice? Elicit that
older brothers – Chico, Harpo and Groucho you can only hear it once. Do the same with
– became the act. They all had very distinct arranged to and managed to. Ask: Can you
comedy personalities. They were already hear the sound /d/ before you hear the /t/
popular on the stage when ‘talking movies’ sound in ‘to’? Elicit that you can’t hear it.
were developed, so they moved from stage Teach / Elicit that this is because in rapid
to film and became even more successful. speech we often run sounds together.
The three brothers made 13 films together Play the audio and ask students if they can
and five of these films were selected by the hear the /d/ at the end of each word in bold.
American Film Institute as among the top You may need to play the audio two or three
100 comedy films. times for students to hear the sound correctly.
Bobby McFerrin is an American musician
and singer who’s famous for his 1988 song Answer
Don’t Worry, Be Happy. The song was a No, you can’t hear the ‘d’.
number-one hit in the USA and won three
Grammy Awards in 1989. The song was also
a top-ten hit in 17 countries, and the original Transcript
video included the comedians Robin Williams 1 You promised to do it.
and Bill Irwin. Bobby McFerrin has won 2 I’ve arranged to give you a rise.
ten other Grammy Awards for songs such 3 I managed to do it.
as Another Night In Tunisia (1985), Round
3 P Play the audio again for students to repeat
Midnight (1986 and 1992), What Is This
the sentences.
Thing Called Love and The Elephant’s Child
(1987) and Brothers (1988). He’s also been 4 Check pronunciation of the words in bold in
a guest conductor for symphony orchestras exercise 1. Focus particularly on expected. Ask:
and makes volunteer appearances as a guest Does this have a /t/ or a /d/ sound at the end?
music teacher at schools in America. Elicit that it doesn’t have either – it has the
sound /ɪd/.
68 Unit 3
Allow students time to work in pairs to write
three short conversations, using the words in 2 Work and job mean roughly the same
bold and the conversations in exercise 1 as a in this sentence. However, point out
model. Go around the class helping with ideas that work is uncountable, and while a
or vocabulary where needed. job is the name of the work that you do
to earn money, work is more general. It
MA Elicit ideas from the class before they start
can mean ‘job’ but it can also mean the
and write them on the board to help weaker
different activities you do in your job,
students.
and also anything that requires effort.
When they’ve finished, ask students to practise 3 A career is a progression through your
their conversations with two other pairs. working life, probably involving several
Monitor pairs as they practise, making a note jobs.
of any common problems with pronunciation 4 Salary and pay mean roughly the same
or intonation, focusing particularly on how in this sentence.
students join words in rapid speech. 5 If you’re out of work, you’re
unemployed. If you’re at work, you’re
Extra idea: Tell students to write their at the office (or other place that you
conversations but miss out the verbs in work).
each one. Tell them to swap conversations 6 An employer pays someone to work for
with another pair and guess what the them. An employee is paid to work for
missing verbs are in the conversations from someone else.
context.
6 Tell students to work in their pairs to talk about
Similar words their own jobs using the words from exercise 5.
If they don’t have a job, they can talk about
5 Go through the sentences and point out the
the job of somebody they know well, or make
words in italics. Do the first one with the class
up a job.
as an example. Ask: What does ‘part-time’
mean? What does ‘full-time’ mean? Elicit that Focus on: Phrasal verbs
they have a different meaning.
a Go through the verbs with the class. Teach /
Allow students time to work individually or in
Elicit that these are all phrasal (or multi-word)
pairs to go through the remaining sentences.
verbs, so they’re made up of a verb, eg deal,
Encourage pairs to give simple definitions of
and a preposition (or particle), eg with. Point
each word. Check answers as a class.
out that the meaning of the phrasal verb can’t
usually be guessed from the meaning of just
Tip: Explain that it can be very useful to try and the verb. Note that at this stage, we’re just
give a definition of a word using other dealing with meaning and not going into the
simpler words, eg part-time = when you grammar of phrasal verbs.
don’t work every day, or when you perhaps Tell students to check the meaning of
work in the morning, but not in the the phrasal verbs (they can look them up
afternoon. Tell students that if they don’t in a dictionary or online) and complete
know a word in English, this can be one the paragraph. Remind them to use the
way of finding out what it is from a native correct tense in each gap (present simple or
speaker. continuous).
MA To help weaker students, go through the
Answers gaps first and identify which tense is needed in
1 A full-time job is one that involves each one. For each gap, ask: Is this something
working the whole working week that happens regularly, or is it happening now?
(around 40 hours a week). A part-time Check answers with the class.
job is one that involves working only
part of the working week (20 hours a
week or less).

Unit 3 69
Answers Answers
1 work for 2 go in 3 working on 5 and 8 are the least polite as they use
4 deal with 5 work out 6 look for imperatives. Note, however, that sentence
5 also uses please, which does make it
b Put students in pairs to ask and answer the more polite than sentence 8.
questions. Tell them to look at the questions Sentence 7 could also be considered less
and underline the phrasal verbs first. Elicit polite than the others.
feedback from the class.
2 Go through the instructions and model an
Extra idea: Ask students to say what they example dialogue with a strong student. Make
answered for the first question. Put the a request or give an instruction, eg Could you
class into two groups – those who think open the door, please? and ask the student
it’s better to work for a big company and to do the action. Choose another student and
those who think it’s better to work for a give an instruction, eg Tell Tia to stop writing.
small one. Ask each group to write five The student should follow the instruction or
reasons why they think they’re correct, give a reply, eg OK.
then give groups one minute to try and Put students in groups to practise making
convince the other group of their position. requests and giving instructions. Monitor
groups as they practise, making a note
Everyday English p33 of any common problems with grammar,
pronunciation or intonation.
Giving instructions; making requests
3 Explain that you’re going to watch a video
1 Go through the verbs in bold and check (or just listen to a conversation) between a
comprehension. Ask: What word comes after manager and an employee. Go through the
each verb? Elicit that it’s an object (you, Yoko, questions with the class and tell students to
him, etc). Ask: What comes next? Elicit that look at the photos. Ask: Which person do you
it’s an infinitive with to (to think, to do, to think is Luke? Which person is Mehmet? Make
come, etc). Explain that we often use this sure they’re clear about the difference between
structure (verb + object + infinitive) to give a manager and an office worker.
instructions or make requests. Point out that in Students work in pairs or small groups to
the negative, we say not to, eg Tell him not to predict answers to the questions. Elicit a few
do that. Look at question 1 together. Ask: Can ideas from the class, but don’t tell them if
we say ‘We want to think about this carefully’ they’re right or wrong.
here, or does that mean something different?
Teach / Elicit that it has a very different 4 1.41 6 Decide whether you’re going to use
meaning to We want you to think about this the video or simply play the audio. Pre-teach
very carefully. document, urgent and chat. Play the video or
audio for students to watch or listen and check
Refer to the grammar reference on SB page
their predictions.
76 now or at the end of the lesson and go
through it with students.
Answers
Ask them to read the sentences and work
1 Luke asks Mehmet to look at a
out which ones sound the least polite. Ask:
document.
Why do you think they aren’t as polite as the
2 He tells them to get back to work.
others? Show how we use modal verbs such as
can, could and would to be more friendly and
polite. Transcript
luke Could you take a look at this
document, Mehmet?
mehmet No problem.
luke When can you do it? It’s pretty urgent.

70 Unit 3
mehmet I’m very busy today. Let me think … Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 76
I can look at it first thing tomorrow. now or at the end of the lesson and go through it
Is that OK? with students.
luke That’s fine, but I need you to write a
report on it by Friday. 8 Tell students to look at the sentences in
mehmet Sure thing. You’ll have it on Friday,
exercise 1 again. Put students in pairs and tell
that’s a promise. them to take turns reading out a sentence,
luke Excellent!
then making a decision or a promise. Model
mehmet I’m getting a coffee, do you want one,
the first one as an example with a strong
Luke? student. Elicit ideas for a relevant response,
luke Thanks, yes, I’ll have it black, no sugar. eg OK, I’ll think about it very carefully.
And, um, can you tell everyone to stop MA As an extra challenge, stronger students
chatting and do some work? could write two or three more sentences
mehmet You tell them, Luke. They’ll run to their and use these to elicit a response from their
desks! partner.
luke Hey, guys, get back to work!
Extra idea: Create a grammar quiz with
Useful expressions ten to 15 sentences and questions that
review the language from this unit. Put
5 Go through the phrases in the box. Ask
students in small groups and get them to
students to complete the conversation, then
answer the questions together. Tell them
compare answers with a partner. Don’t check
they can look in their books to help them.
answers as a class yet.
The team with the most correct answers at
MA To provide help for weaker students, play the end is the winner.
the video or audio again before students
Example questions:
complete the conversation.
1 Which sentence is a future
6 Play the video or audio again (up to Excellent!) arrangement? ‘I’m meeting Tom at the
for students to check their answers. restaurant tomorrow’ or ‘I’m going to
visit my friends at the weekend’?
Answers 2 Which sentence is a prediction? ‘I think
1 take a look 2 No problem 3 pretty it’s going to rain’ or ‘I’m going to meet
4 Let me think 5 first thing 6 Sure thing my friends next week’?
7 that’s a promise
we don’t say … / we say …
Instant decisions and promises This section focuses on the following areas:
• omission of to in the structure verb + infinitive
7 Read the sentences in the table and teach / • incorrect future tense use for talking about an
elicit the difference between an instant intention
decision and a promise. Point out that very • incorrect future tense use for a prediction
often they’re the same thing. • incorrect use of don’t for a negative instruction
Tell students to turn to SB page 81 and look Ask students to cover the green we say … side
at transcript 1.41. Tell them to find all the and see if they can correct the mistakes themselves
examples of will in the conversation and work before they look and check.
in pairs to decide whether they’re an instant
decision, a promise or a prediction. Elicit a few
answers from students, then check answers as
a class.

Answers
a) I’ll have it black
b) You’ll have it on Friday
c) They’ll run to their desks!

Unit 3 71
4 How we live
UNIT GRAMMAR: present perfect v past simple; for and since; already,
VOCABULARY: technology, household items, household tasks
yet, just

FOCUS FUNCTIONS: opening and closing a conversation

Lesson 1 Have you ever e-reader = a small computer on which you


written a blog? pp34–35 can read books
download = to copy or move programs
Aims or information into a computer’s memory,
The focus of this lesson is to introduce a series of usually from the internet
words and phrases to do with technology, and to software = computer programs
focus on the different uses of the present perfect hardware = the physical and electronic
to describe past experiences and the past simple parts of a computer
to give more details. Students then talk about their blogs = online diaries
own experiences with technology. printer = a machine linked to a computer
that prints onto paper
Note: It would be useful to bring in some photos
put it right = correct or resolve something
of people using technology for this lesson, in
particular people looking at their mobiles instead
of each other in a restaurant or home situation. 3 Do the first question with a student as an
example. If they answer yes, give them one
You first! point. Tell students to do the quiz with a
Tell students to talk with a partner about how partner and give a point for each answer as
long they spend online each day. Ask: Do you follows: 1 Yes, 2 No, 3 Yes, 4 Very important,
think you spend too long using laptops, tablets or 5 Yes; yes, 6 Yes, 7 Yes. Explain that if they get
smartphones? Elicit feedback from the class and 7 points, they’re very good with technology.
ask for their reasons. It would be a good idea for students to
alternate asking questions, rather than one
Vocabulary Technology person asking all the questions, then swapping
over. This will help to keep the interest level up
1 Read the definition of technophobe together.
and will encourage interaction and speaking.
Check comprehension of advanced technology
by asking for more examples, eg a mobile Ask: How many people in the class are / aren’t
phone, tablet. Then ask students to discuss the very good with technology?
question. You could do exercises 1 and 2 on Technology in
2 Explain / Elicit the fact that How technological Vocabulary plus at this point.
are you? means ‘How much do you like using
technology? How good are you with it? Do you
Reading
have problems using it?’. Go through the quiz 4 Ask: What do you think ‘opposites attract’
with the class first. Find out how many people means? (When people are very different,
already know the words in bold – many of they often like each other.) Do you think it’s
these are the same in different languages, so true? Ask for ideas and reasons. Allow time
they may be able to guess the meaning if they for students to read the article and quickly
don’t know it already. Put students in pairs to describe Fergus and Dan.
work through the words. They can either use a
dictionary or look them up online if they don’t Suggested answers
know them. Fergus is an artist. He hates technology and
has never used a computer.
Answers Dan is a journalist. He loves technology but
gadgets = small devices or machines with a realises that face-to-face communication is
particular purpose important too.

72 Unit 4
6 THINK Ask students to discuss the questions
Tip: It’s a good idea to set a focus question
(with an answer that can be found together. Elicit class feedback and find out their
somewhere near the end of the text) to ideas and opinions.
give students a reason to read quickly for
gist. Ask them to write down the answer. Extra idea: You could also tell students
They’ll often just try to underline it, to think about the advantages and
but it’s better if they write it, as this disadvantages of e-readers. Ask: Do you think
gives you a clear visual sign that they’ve e-readers will ever replace printed books?
finished reading.
Grammar Present perfect v past simple
Extra idea: Write the title of the article 7 Write Fergus and I have been friends for a
Opposites attract on the board. Ask long time and Five years ago a friend gave him
students to work with a partner and write an old desktop computer on the board. Ask
down as many words as they can using the students to look at the sentences and identify
letters in the title. Model the activity on the the tense in each sentence.
board with words like sit and act so they can Tell them to read the article again and find
see what to do. You could make this into a other examples of the present perfect and past
competition by setting a short time limit. simple. Then ask them to complete the table.
Check answers as a class.
5 Go through the list of things and
write them on the board. Check students Answers
understand personal (Phone calls are so much present perfect: have been, has never used,
more personal). Tell students to write down Has … ever used, hasn’t watched, has read
everything they can remember from the article past simple: gave, put, called, showed
about these things and Fergus. Tell them to 1 has 2 has not / hasn’t 3 Has 4 hasn’t
check with a partner and see who remembered 5 Have 6 have / ’ve 7 used 8 did not /
the most things. Get feedback from pairs, then didn’t 9 did; read
give them time to read the article again to
check their answers. Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 76
MA Encourage stronger students to give a little now or at the end of the lesson and go through it
bit more detailed information. You can get with students.
slightly shorter answers off weaker students,
8 Highlight used in the first sentence. Use it to
as they may not yet have the language or
teach / elicit the meaning of past participle.
confidence to give longer answers. Point out
Ask: What’s the infinitive? (use). Tell students
that comprehension is the aim here, not using
to underline the remaining past participles and
language correctly.
write down the infinitives.
Answers Note: Sometimes students confuse the second
and third person forms of the verb, so it’s
1 Fergus has never used a computer.
helpful to elicit the difference and show them
When someone gave him one, he put it
that the past participle has the auxiliary verbs
in a cupboard.
have or has before it.
2 He has used a mobile phone, but only
for phone calls, not for texts.
Answers
3 He thinks phone calls are more personal
than text messages. used – use; watched – watch; read – read;
4 He has never watched a video on written – write
YouTube.
5 He read Dan’s latest blog last week. 9 Focus on the sentences in the grammar table
again and tell students to use them to work
out and complete the rules.

Unit 4 73
Elicit extra example sentences from the article
Answers
that talk about the past in general (He has read
a blog), say when something happened exactly 1 He sent an embarrassing email to the
(He called me yesterday), or use ever and never wrong person.
(Has Fergus ever used a mobile phone? He has 2 She got a text message from a stranger.
never used a computer).
Transcript
Answers
1 man Have you ever sent an
1 present perfect 2 past simple
embarrassing email to the wrong
3 present perfect
person?
woman No, I’ve never done that, have you?
Did you know? man Yes, I have. It was terrible. I wrote
Check comprehension of negative. Tell students an email about my boss to a
to read through the facts, then ask: Which fact friend. I said my boss was really
surprises you most? Why do you think respondents horrible. And I sent the email to
said people need technology too much? Do you my boss by mistake!
agree? This provides an opportunity to discuss the woman Oh no! What happened?
effects of smartphones, etc on social interaction. 2 woman 1 I got a text message from
someone I didn’t know yesterday.
Extra ideas: If you brought in a picture of Have you ever received a text
people looking at their smartphones instead message from a stranger?
of talking to each other, show it to students woman 2 Yes, I have. It said, ‘It’s been a
and ask: What do you think of this picture? long time. I’m thinking about
Is it a typical situation? you.’
Tell students to do a survey on mobile woman 1 Interesting! Did you reply?
devices and their effect on concentration at woman 2 Yes! I …
school and work. You could include some of
12 Play the audio again and ask students to
the questions below or get them to create
work individually to think about how each
their own: Do smartphones distract you
conversation could end and to make notes.
when you’re working? How often do you
Elicit a few ideas from the class.
check your phone for messages? Do you
look at messages or send texts in lessons? MA Tell students to work in pairs to think
Do you think mobile devices help you learn? about a suitable ending for each conversation.
Have the internet and mobile devices helped 13 Put students into groups to discuss their ideas.
you get better grades or not? Tell them to use the notes they made to help
them as they talk together. Then ask them to
Listening and speaking walk around the room and share their ideas
with other students. Elicit ideas from the class
10 GUESS To introduce the listening activity, and take a vote on the best ending.
ask students to look at the photos and guess
what’s happened. Elicit ideas from the class 14 Write the first question on the board, then
and encourage lots of active guessing. quickly review the present perfect and adverbs
ever and never. Ask: Have you ever published
11 2.2 Tell students they’re going to hear people a book online? Elicit the answer: I’ve never
talking about the situations in the photos. Play published a book online.
the audio for students to check their ideas. Find
Ask concept-checking questions, eg When do
out how many guessed correctly.
we use ‘ever’? (in questions), When do we use
Play the first conversation again and ask ‘never’? (in negative sentences) and Where
students what the tenses are. Point out that do ‘ever’ and ‘never’ go in the sentence?
once we start giving details, we use the past (between have and the past participle).
simple (It was terrible, I wrote an email, I said
Ask students to create questions, then
my boss was ..., etc).
encourage them to check in pairs.

74 Unit 4
Answers
Reading and speaking
1 Have you ever published a book online? 1 Pre-teach achieve and countryside. Ask
2 Have you ever sent an email to the students to read the short text and think about
wrong person? their dreams, then work with a partner and
3 Have you ever received a text from a tell each other their hopes and ambitions.
stranger? Suggest they start with the phrase My dream
4 Have you ever written a blog? is to ... This could also be done as a guided
5 Have you ever tried online dating? visualisation. Tell students to close their eyes,
6 Have you ever lost a / your mobile then read the text to them. You could also play
phone? some gentle background music to relax them
as they imagine the future.
15 EVERYBODY UP! This is a chance for
everyone to move around and re-energise. Tip: To introduce the text and encourage
Before they start, ask students to work predictions about the topic, tell students
individually and write two more questions to look at the photos on SB page 37 and
like the ones in exercise 14. Then tell them to guess where Georgina lives. Ask: Who are
walk around the room and ask and answer all the people in the photos? What job do you
the questions. Explain that when somebody think Georgina does? This helps to create
answers yes, they must ask more questions to interest in the text and gives students
find out what happened. Monitor pairs as they a reason to read and find out if their
work, making a note of any common problems predictions are correct.
with grammar – particularly the correct use of
the present perfect and past simple. 2 Write both questions on the board: What was
16 Read the statement from the end of the Georgina’s dream? Did she achieve it? Ask:
first paragraph in the article. Ask students What does the title ‘Living the Dream’ mean?
to discuss the questions in groups, then ask Encourage students to read the article quickly
for class feedback to find out their ideas and and answer the questions. Set a short time
reasons for their opinions. limit so they read for gist. Ask one or two
students to come and write their answers on
the board under the questions. Find out how
Lesson 2 Have you ever had a many people had the same answers.
dream? pp36–37 MA You could ask stronger students to
quickly read the article and find the names
Aims of as many places, cities, regions and
The focus of this lesson is to provide practice of countries as they can.
the present perfect, particularly with the adverbs
for and since to describe a period of time and Answers
a point in time, and also to learn the language 1 Her dream was to live in a house in the
required to talk about other peoples’ lives. mountains and share it with people of
different nationalities.
Warm-up 2 Yes, she did.
Divide the class into two. Ask one group to
describe photo 1 on SB page 36 and the other
3 Tell students to read the article again more
group to describe photo 2. When they’ve finished,
slowly and find words that match the
tell students to work with somebody from the
definitions. Teach / Elicit the meaning of
other group and describe their photo.
relationship in question 3 and ask students
what they think fortunate means.
MA For more support, tell students which
paragraph the words are in (1 paragraph 1,
2 and 3 paragraph 2, 4 paragraph 3,
5 paragraph 4).

Unit 4 75
When do we use ‘for’? (to show a period of
Answers time) Which sentence is past simple? (5) Do
1 realised 2 Inuit 3 broke up 4 share we use ‘since’ in present perfect or past simple
5 tiny sentences? (present perfect) Do we use ‘for’
in present perfect or past simple sentences?
4 To introduce the more detailed reading (both).
section, ask students to look at the photos
with a partner and see if they can relate them Answers
to things they remember from the text. They 1 a specific point in time
then answer the questions individually or in 2 a period of time
pairs before reading the article again and 3 present perfect
checking their answers. 4 past simple, present perfect

Answers Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 77


Photo 1: This town is in Greenland. now or at the end of the lesson and go through it
Georgina taught English there. with students.
Photo 2: This is Copenhagen. Georgina was
6 P 2.3 Vowel sounds are sometimes
there from 1990 until 1997.
difficult for students, so it’s helpful to highlight
Photo 3: It’s in the Pyrenees in the north-
the differences and do plenty of repetition
west of Spain (the Basque country); it now
drilling. Write the words see and since and
has seven bedrooms and eight bathrooms.
the sounds /i:/ and /ɪ/ on the board and ask
Photo 4: He’s a lawyer.
students to repeat them. If they have difficulty,
Photo 5: They learn Spanish, discover the
model the sounds and tell them to watch the
Basque culture and go for long walks in the
shape of your mouth. They’ll notice that your
mountains.
mouth is wider when you make an /i:/ sound.
Read the conversation with a strong student
Grammar for and since and ask the other students to listen. Then play
5 Focus on the diagrams in the grammar box and the audio while students listen and circle the
teach / elicit the different uses of for and since. short vowel sounds and underline the longer
Tell students to read the article again, then sounds. Don’t check their answers yet.
look at the grammar box and try to complete
the rules together. Point out that both answers Transcript
may be correct. a How long have you been here?

To present the grammar in a different way, you b We’ve been here for about three weeks.

could ask students to read the article again, When did you arrive?
then write the following sentences on the a Just this morning.

board: b You must go to the beach.


a We’ve been. The sea is green!
1 She has lived there since 2001.
2 Georgina has owned a successful holiday
company called Pyrenean Experience since Extra idea: Write the words ship, sheep,
1999. bean, bin, leave, live, chip and cheap on
3 They’ve been together for many years now. the board and get students to match them
4 People have lived there for thousands of to the correct sound.
years.
5 She lived in Copenhagen for seven years. 7 P Play the audio again for students to check
their answers. Point out that in have you been
Underline the words for and since, then
in line 1 and We’ve been here in line 2, the ee
ask concept-checking question, eg Which
sound is short, unstressed – /ɪ/. In line 5, been
sentences show when something started?
is a stressed sound (We’ve been) so the sound
(1 and 2) Which sentences show a length or
is long – /iː/.
period of time? (3 and 4) When do we use
‘since’? (to show when something started) Ask students to practise the conversation in
pairs, focusing particularly on the short and
76 Unit 4
long i sounds. Monitor pairs as they practise, person, but they have different information
making a note of any common problems with and must find out the missing details by asking
pronunciation or intonation. questions. Give them a few minutes to prepare
and think of the questions they’d like to ask.
Answers When they’ve finished, tell them to take turns
/ɪ/: been (line 1 and line 2), did, this, to ask and answer questions to complete the
morning information. They then work individually to
/iː/: we’ve, three, weeks, beach, we’ve, write questions about Jake using the present
been, sea, green perfect, eg How long has Jake known Kay?
How long has he been married? Tell them
8 Do the first sentence together with the class to work in their pairs to ask and answer the
as an example and elicit the correct verb tense. questions they’ve written.
Ask: Is Georgia still in Copenhagen? (No) Is it Finally, ask pairs to say what they know about
still happening, or is it a finished action in the Jake (without looking at the information).
past? (It’s finished) When did she leave? (In Ask the other students to say if the things are
1997) So do we make the question in the past correct or not.
simple or present perfect? (past simple).
10 Ask: What kind of information is in the
Ask students to work in pairs and make the article about Georgina? Elicit the main things
questions and answers using the past simple or from her story, eg place of birth, early life,
present perfect. education, where she lived, life experiences,
family and career, likes and dislikes, and write
Answers them on the board. Allow time for students to
1 How long did Georgina live in work individually to write questions to ask a
Copenhagen? She lived in Copenhagen partner about their life using the headings on
for seven years. the board. When they’ve finished, tell them to
2 When did Georgina arrive in the Basque take turns to find out information about each
country? She arrived in the Basque other by asking their questions. Remind them
country in 1999. to make notes of their partner’s answers.
3 How long has Georgina had her house?
She’s had her house since 2003. 11 Ask students to write a biography of their
4 How long has Georgina owned her partner, using the notes they made in exercise
holiday company? She’s owned her 10. Encourage them to use the present perfect,
holiday company since 1999. past simple and the adverbs for and since.
5 How long has Georgina lived in the
Basque country? She’s lived in the Tip: Read through students’ work and use
Basque country for over [14]* years. correction symbols for different types of
6 How long has Georgina known her mistake, eg ‘S’ for spelling mistakes, so
husband? She’s known her husband for that when you give the writing back, they
many years. can correct the mistakes themselves and
7 When did Georgina and her Danish write a second draft. This encourages them
boyfriend break up? They broke up to notice mistakes and really think about
about 20 years ago. how to correct them, and also increases
grammatical accuracy.
* Note that the answer will depend on the current year.

You could do exercises 3–5 on Relationships Explore


in Vocabulary plus at this point. Ask: Would you like to visit a place like the
Pyrenees and discover the Basque culture? Find
Speaking and writing
out what kind of holidays students would like
9 Check students understand what they have to and tell them to look online for an ideal holiday
do in this information-gap activity. Explain that destination. You could get them to do this for
they each have information about the same homework and make a poster presentation in

Unit 4 77
class, which includes information about places of
Answers
interest and historical facts, as well as an itinerary
of activities and events available. A iron B dishwasher C washing machine
D dustbin E kettle F freezer G fridge
H vacuum cleaner
Lesson 3 I’ve just done it.
pp38–39 Extra idea: Ask students to categorise the
Aims household items into two lists: Things I could
live without and Things I couldn’t live without.
The focus of this lesson is to learn words for
talking about household items and to introduce
the use of just, yet and already with the present 3 2.4 Go through the verbs first, then the

perfect to talk about things that have been phrases and check comprehension. Point out
recently completed or describe things that will that all these words can be used together to
happen in the future. Students also discuss make household tasks. Ask students to match
differences in attitudes to housework. the words and phrases to make verb–noun
collocations.
Note: It would be useful to research and bring in
a photo of a messy teenage bedroom for students Play the audio for students to check their
to work with in exercise 5. You could also research answers, then play it again for them to repeat
images of different household objects. the phrases.
Note that you can also clean some of the other
You first! items, eg the fridge, the kitchen floor, but
Ask: How do you feel about housework? Ask we’ve given the most common collocations
students to work together and discuss the (clean the bath / the shower) in the audio. You
question. Get class feedback and get their ideas can also empty a washing machine and use a
and opinions. bath / shower.

Vocabulary Household tasks Transcript and answers


1 THINK Ask students to talk about the photo clean: the bath, the shower
in pairs and answer the questions. Teach / Elicit do: (the) housework, the ironing, the washing
that to talk about a decade, we say the 1950s up
or the 50s, the 60s, etc. Get class feedback empty: the dishwasher, the dustbins, the fridge
and encourage lots of discussion about what make: your bed
people wear to do housework. use: the washing machine, the dishwasher
vacuum: the carpet
Answer wash: the kitchen floor
1 It’s from the 1940s or 1950s.
Culture note: In American English, a
dustbin is called a trashcan. Americans
2 Check the household vocabulary and ask also say wash the dishes instead of do the
students to match the words with the pictures. washing up.
Help with the pronunciation of tricky words
such as iron (silent ‘r’) and vacuum. Students
sometimes pronounce the silent ‘r’ in iron and Extra idea: To review vocabulary in a fun
have difficulty with the diphthong + schwa way, play a memory game. Make small
combination: /aɪən/. Also explain that students cards showing different household items.
will often hear hoover as another way of Put students in pairs and give each pair
saying vacuum cleaner. Hoover is a well-known a set of cards. Tell them to turn the cards
brand of vacuum cleaner and the name has over so they can’t see the pictures and
become synonymous with the object. spread them out across the table. Students
take turns and turn over two cards. If they
find a matching pair, they keep the cards.
If the cards are different, they have to turn
them over again. The person with the most
78 Unit 4
cards at the end is the winner. To reinforce Transcript
the words, tell students that every time We all have to do household tasks – we have
they turn a card over, they have to say what to make the beds, clean the shower, put out
the household task is. the dustbin. The question is, who does them?
People with enough money usually employ
4 In this 3x3x3 activity, put students in groups a cleaner. But not everyone with money has
of three to talk about household tasks they a cleaner. Some people actually enjoy doing
dislike. Note that their decision must be housework! The other big question about
unanimous – they must all dislike the three household tasks is, of course, is the man in
tasks. Set a time limit of three minutes. your household happy to vacuum or wash the
When they’ve finished, get class feedback to kitchen floor? So we asked people, ‘Do you
find out the least popular chores. like doing housework?’ and ‘Who does the
housework in your household?’.
5 Write there is / there are on the board
and quickly review prepositions of place. Tell Extra idea: This could also be done as a
students to close their books, then, in pairs, dictation.
ask and answer questions about the photo.
They can then look and check their answers.
7 2.6 Go through the icons in the table.
MA For extra support, allow students one Explain that the thumbs up and thumbs down
minute to look at the photo before they do images signify like and dislike; the other icons
the task. answer the question Who does the housework
in your household? – the bucket signifies a
Extra ideas: Put students in pairs and tell cleaner. Tell students to listen and tick the
one student in each pair to look at the information about each person. Play the
picture in the book and say five true or audio, pausing as necessary, then play it again
false sentences about it. Their partner has for students to check their answers. Check
to close their book and try to remember understanding of the word dust.
what things there are. If they think the
sentence is true, they say Yes, there’s a … Answers
and if it’s false, they say No, there isn’t a …
Students take turns describing the picture.
If you brought in a picture of a teenager’s woman 1
bedroom, show students the picture (on
man 1
the board or by using a digital projector)
and tell them they have one minute to look man 2
at it and remember everything they can. woman 2
Give them two minutes to write everything
that needs to be tidied up in the room. man 3

Listening 1 Transcript
6 2.5 Tell students they’re going to listen to woman 1 I hate doing housework, it’s so

the introduction to a radio programme about boring. But I also don’t want to live
housework. Play the audio and tell them to in a dirty house and I certainly don’t
listen for the two questions people were asked. have money for a cleaner. Both
Encourage students to compare their ideas. Gavin and I work and we share the
housework between us. Gavin’s very
Answers good, he never complains.
man 1 My wife does the housework, she’s
Do you like doing housework?
a housewife and we have three
Who does the housework in your household?
children, two are under five. I have a
full-time job, and I take work home,
I don’t have time to do housework.

Unit 4 79
man 2 I love doing housework, it’s relaxing. Note: Students sometimes have quite flat
Ironing – I love it. I vacuum every day, intonation, so tell them to listen as you read
of course – dust isn’t good for you out the dialogues, then to underline the
– and I wash the kitchen floor every stressed words in each sentence and listen for
day, too. My mum did the same. I live the rising intonation in yes / no questions and
alone and I like a clean house. I’ve falling intonation in wh- questions.
just done the ironing.
woman 2 Who does the housework? Um, we Answers
all do – but not very often, I’m afraid. 1C 2A 3B
I share a flat with friends – they’re a
couple – and none of us enjoys doing
10 Look at the sentences in the grammar box
housework, so our flat isn’t exactly
and tell students to complete them with the
clean. There are more important
correct word. Encourage them to look back at
things in life than a clean house.
the dialogues in exercise 9 to help them. Ask
man 3 I’ve never done housework. I have a
questions to check understanding, eg Which
cleaner, she comes in every day and
word do we use to say we did something a
she does everything, makes the beds,
short time ago? (just) Which word do we use
cleans the kitchen.
to say we did something earlier than people
8 Describe your own work and household expected? (already) Which word do we use to
situation as a model first, eg I’m a teacher say that something will happen in the future
and I share a flat with two people. We share or to ask if something has happened? (yet).
household tasks, but I don’t enjoy doing Check answers with the class.
housework! We wash the kitchen floor once a
week. I usually do my preparation for this class Answers
on Sunday evening. I haven’t cleaned my room 1 just 2 already 3 yet 4 yet
yet this week! Put students in small groups
to discuss housework in their own home. Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 79
Encourage them to ask extra questions, eg now or at the end of the lesson and go through it
Who usually does the housework? How often with students.
do they do it? Is it important for you to have
a clean and tidy house? Which things do you 11 Ask students to complete the rules. Check the
most like or dislike doing? Would you like to answers as a class and ask students to write
have a cleaner? Get class feedback and check personalised sentences about things they’ve
their ideas and opinions. just done, haven’t done yet or things that have
already happened. Also teach / elicit that just
De-stress! and already usually come between the auxiliary
Read the short text and check students understand verb and past participle, and yet is located at
why it’s a good idea to have plants around you. the end of present perfect sentences.
Ask: What plants do you have in your home or
workplace? This will be challenging for their Answers
vocabulary, so you can ask them to describe a 1 Just 2 already 3 yet 4 yet
plant, or search for the English equivalent online
or come to the board and draw it. Listening 2
Grammar already, yet, just 12 2.7 Write on the board: What are Tomas
and Max doing and why? Play the audio for
9 Focus students on the pictures and ask them
students to listen and write their answer. Play
to predict what’s happening in each one. Elicit
the audio again if necessary for them to check
lots of ideas.
their answers.
Then ask students to read the dialogues and
match them with the pictures. Finally, put
students in pairs to read the dialogues aloud.

80 Unit 4
Answer Answers
They’re tidying and cleaning the flat, as 1 false: He hasn’t vacuumed the
Max’s parents are coming for the weekend. bedrooms or the hall yet.
2 false: He hasn’t met them before.
3 false: Max has changed them.
Transcript 4 true
max This place is a mess! Have you 5 false: Tomas hasn’t put it in the oven
vacuumed yet, Tomas? It doesn’t look yet.
like it. 6 false: They haven’t visited the flat
tomas I’ve just done the sitting room. I haven’t before.
done the bedrooms yet. I’ll do them
now. MA For extra support, tell students to look at
max The hall, don’t forget the hall ... transcript 2.7 on SB page 81. This will make it
tomas What time are your parents arriving? easier to work out who has done each thing.
max Seven thirty.
tomas OK, we have five minutes. They’re Extra idea: Draw three columns across
staying the whole weekend, aren’t the board and label them something
they? I’ve never met your parents. What that happened sooner than we thought,
are they like? something that happened a short time
max They’re OK. They, er ... they hate ago and something we think will happen
untidiness. soon. Tell students to listen carefully and
tomas Great, great! How do they feel about write down sentences they hear with
dust? already, just and yet. Play the audio again
max They hate that too. Hmm … This floor for students to do the activity. Get them
needs washing. to check together, then compare with the
tomas We don’t have time to do that. At least transcript on SB page 81.
they have a bedroom to sleep in. It’s a
Something that happened sooner than
good thing Jon’s away for the weekend.
we thought: Max has already changed
Hey, we must change the sheets.
the sheets. Max has already taken the
max I’ve already changed them. I did that
vegetables out of the freezer.
last night.
Something that happened a short time ago:
tomas Cool! Oh – I haven’t put the food in the
Tomas has just vacuumed the sitting room.
oven yet. And the vegetables, let’s get
Something we think will happen soon: Tomas
them out of the freezer.
hasn’t vacuumed the bedrooms yet. Tomas
max I’ve already done that. I’ll put them in
hasn’t put the food in the oven yet.
the pan. … Oh no, they’re all over the
floor now … Hi, Mum, hi Dad!
mum and dad Hello! Speaking
mum It’s great to see you! So this is your new
14 THINK Students discuss the questions in
flat! Hmm … pairs. Get class feedback to find out their ideas
dad Have you ever thought of getting a
and opinions and encourage further discussion.
cleaner?

13 Tell students to decide if the statements are


Art & Music
true or false. Give them time to read the For the painting, tell students to look at SB page
sentences so they know what they’re listening 67 to see a bigger image. Tell them to read the
for. Play the audio again for them to check questions individually or in pairs, then check their
their answers. Pause as necessary to help answers online.
students check. For the song, elicit what students need to search
for and tell them to find a video for the song. You
could encourage them to search during class with
their smartphones or do the task for homework.

Unit 4 81
Extra questions for class or homework Extra idea: Create an art and music
Art webquest. Select three websites about
What can you see in the painting? Johannes Vermeer and two sites
Describe what the woman is doing. for the B52s. Make a set of reading
Music comprehension questions about both and
What does the singer say she can do when provide the links for students. They have to
she’s cleaned the floor? read each web page to find the answers.
Find the name of another song by the B52s
and read the lyrics.
Vocabulary plus p40
Answers Technology
Art 1 2.8 Ask students to look at the sentences
Johannes Vermeer was a 17th-century below the pictures and the words in bold, then
Dutch painter. The painting is called The match them with the pictures. Check answers
Milkmaid, but in fact the woman is a as a class by playing the audio.
kitchen maid and helps with the cooking
and cleaning. Answers
Music
1B 2E 3C 4A 5D
‘I am doing my housework’. The singer says
she needs a man to move in with her and
help her clean, pay rent and do the dishes. Transcript
A You turn the computer on or off here.
Culture notes: The Milkmaid by B You often need a password to get onto a
Johannes Vermeer is one of the most website.
famous paintings in the Rijksmuseum in C You click on a file with your mouse to
Amsterdam. It was painted in 1657 or open it.
1658 and is considered a masterpiece. It’s D It isn’t very loud. Turn up the volume!
appeared in many art exhibitions around E You click on the X icon to close a file.
the world. 2 Put students in pairs and tell them they’re
Johannes Vermeer only did around 34 going to play a memory game. Give them one
paintings in his lifetime. His pictures, minute to look at the sentences in exercise 1,
such as The Milkmaid, The Girl with a then tell them to cover them and write them
Pearl Earring and The Little Street, are still down from memory. They can use the pictures
popular today. Many of his pictures show to help them. Give them two minutes to write
interior views, and although there’s nothing them down correctly, then get them to look
spectacular or extraordinary about them, again and check how many they remembered.
his use of bright colours and light gave a
photographic quality to his paintings. Relationships
The B52s are an American band from 3 2.9 Students complete the sentences with
Athens, Georgia, who were famous for the words in the vocabulary box. Point out that
chart hits such as Love Shack, Roam and they can only use each verb once – and that
Deadbeat Club. The band consisted of Fred the verb must go with all the words in each
Schneider, Kate Pierson, Cindy Wilson, line. Play the audio for students to listen and
Ricky Wilson and Keith Strickland. Kate check their answers.
Pierson’s distinctive voice also appears on
REM hits such as Near Wild Heaven and Answers
Shiny Happy People. The B52s formed in 1 go to 2 be 3 have 4 get
1976 and have sold over 20 million albums
in their career so far.

82 Unit 4
Transcript
Everyday English p41
1 go to a wedding
2 be divorced / married / single / together Opening and closing a conversation
3 have a partner / a relationship
4 get divorced / married 1 GUESS To introduce the topic, ask: Do you
talk to people doing surveys in the street?
4 Go through the sentences and tell students Do you like to talk to people, or do you try
to choose the statement that best describes to avoid them and walk past them? Elicit
their situation. Point out that some sentences answers from several students.
may not be applicable for them, so they may Ask students to look at the photo and think
only underline one or two items in total. Allow about how someone doing a survey might get
them time to work in pairs to do the activity, their attention and try to start a conversation.
then encourage them to ask and answer Ask: What would they say? Elicit students’
questions about the statements. ideas and write useful phrases and
5 To model the activity, describe people you expressions on the board. Then get students
know and follow up with a few quick to discuss the questions with their partner.
questions, eg Can you remember how long Tell them to write notes, as they’ll check their
my (mum and dad) have been married? What ideas in exercise 4.
about my (sister)? Then ask students to talk
to a partner about people they know. Remind Tip: It’s often helpful to get students to think of
them to use the new vocabulary from exercises things from a character’s perspective, and
3 and 4. this often helps with listening and prompts
pair speaking activities. Ask students to
Focus on: go look at the title and photo and try to
a Do the first item together with the class as brainstorm what the audio is about. Ask
an example. Ask: What does ‘go to school’ them to imagine they’re the people in the
mean? Elicit that it means to be at a place photo and to think about how each person
of education. Put students in pairs to do the feels about the situation.
remaining items, then check answers as a class.
2 Ask students to look at the expressions and
Answers decide which ones are formal and informal.
1i 2h 3a 4d 5b 6c 7g 8f 9e Point out that some can be both. Check their
ideas and get them to explain the reasons for
their answers.
Extra idea: You could also do this activity
with the different phrases on pieces of Answers
paper to vary learning styles and include a A 1 F / I 2 I 3 F 4 F / I 5 I 6 F
kinaesthetic activity. B 1 F / I 2 F 3 F 4 F 5 I 6 I

b Ask students to create one or two short 3 P 2.10 Focus on the questions in section
conversations using at least four of the words A in exercise 2. Tell students to listen carefully
or phrases from exercise a. Give them time to to the speakers’ intonation. Explain that a
brainstorm ideas with a partner and write their big voice range means that there’s a lot of
conversations down. expression in the question. A small voice
c This is a learner-centred dictation activity. Go range means that the question sounds quite
through the instructions with the class. Tell flat. Play the audio for students to listen to
students to find new partners and take turns the questions. Elicit answers from the class,
reading out their conversation from exercise then play the audio again, pausing after each
b. Their partner listens and writes down the question for students to repeat.
conversation. Then they read it back and
compare what they wrote with the original.

Unit 4 83
man That was the last question. Thanks so
Answer
much for your time.
In each case, the speaker’s voice range is big. woman It was a pleasure. So when will the
survey be in the paper?
man I think a couple of weeks, something
Transcript
like that.
1 Can I have a word with you? woman OK, I’ll look forward to it.
2 Hi, do you have a minute?
3 Excuse me. Can I have a few minutes of 5 Play the video or audio again for students to
your time? answer the questions. Tell students to discuss
4 Do you have time for a quick chat? their answers in pairs, then elicit feedback from
5 How are things? the class.
6 Let me introduce myself.
Answers
Extra idea: At this point, you could also 1 He’s asking questions about attitudes to
have students highlight the stressed words technology.
and rising or falling intonation. To do this, 2 She doesn’t really want to answer the
play the audio and ask students to write questions because she asks how long
the sentences they hear. Once they’ve done the survey will take and she also says
this, play the audio again and ask them to she has to go.
underline the words with the most stress
and draw small arrows up and down to
show the speakers’ intonation. Then put Extra idea: Write each line of the
them in pairs to practise the sentences. conversation on a separate piece of paper,
then mix them up. Hand each line to a
different student and ask them to work
4 2.11 6 Decide whether you’re going to
use the video or simply play the audio. Tell together to put the conversation in the
students they’re going to see or hear the street correct order. When they’ve finished, play
interview shown in the photo at the top of the the video or audio again for students to
page. Play the video or audio while students check if their predictions were correct.
watch or listen and check their predictions
from exercise 1. If you’re using the video, point 6 Look at the expressions in exercise 2 and ask
out the woman’s facial expressions to help with students if they can remember which were
showing what she’s thinking. formal and which informal. Play the video or
audio again while students tick the expressions
Transcript they hear. Ask: Are they formal or informal?
man Excuse me. Can I have a few minutes Ask students to give their reasons.
of your time? We’re doing a survey
and I’d just like to ask you a few Answers
questions. A 3 Excuse me. Can I have a few
woman Who are you doing this for? minutes of your time?
man Oh, let me introduce myself. My 6 Let me introduce myself
name’s Billy Walton and the survey’s B 1 I have to go.
for the local newspaper. 3 It was a pleasure.
woman Um, how long will this take? 4 Thanks so much for your time.
man Just two minutes. They’re formal because it’s a street
woman OK, but no longer than that, please. interview and the interviewer is being
man The survey’s on attitudes to polite.
technology.
woman OK! 7 2.12 Play the first part of the conversation
man So, the first question is, … and tell students to guess what the woman
woman You know, I have to go. says. Elicit quick feedback to check their ideas.

84 Unit 4
Transcript 11 Look again at the expressions in list A in
man Hi. Do you have time for a quick exercise 2. Ask: Which ones did the interviewer
chat? use? (Tell students to look at their answers
woman Erm … to exercise 6.) Allow time for them to work
individually to write their questions. Monitor
8 Explain that you’re now going to play the students as they work, making a note of
whole conversation. Play the audio for students any common problems with grammar and
to check their ideas from exercise 7. helping with vocabulary where necessary.
When they’ve finished, tell them to interview
Answer three people and make a note of their
She says OK, but only if it’s quick. answers. Encourage them to use some of the
expressions to open their conversations in a
polite way. Get feedback from the class about
Transcript attitudes to technology within the class.
man Hi. Do you have time for a quick chat? MA For extra support, elicit some ideas for
woman Erm … OK, but be very quick because
questions before they start and write them on
I have to leave in five minutes. But it’s the board.
good to see you.
man You too. So, how are things? Is the 12 Look again at the expressions in list B in
business going well? exercise 2. Ask: Which ones did the woman
woman Yes, it is, it’s going well, we’re so use to end the conversation? (Tell students
pleased ... to look at the answers to exercise 10.) Allow
… students time to speak to different people and
woman I’m so sorry, I have to go. It’s been nice have a short conversation. Remind them to
talking to you. close their conversations politely.
man See you soon, I hope. Erm … how MA For extra support, tell students to work
about going out for dinner sometime? in pairs to write a conversation, helping them
woman Great idea – when? I’m free this with ideas, eg You want to talk to somebody
evening. about a meeting. Students then practise their
conversation in pairs.
9 Go through the questions with the class and
ask students to make notes, then discuss their we don’t say … / we say …
answers in groups. Play the audio again if they
This section focuses on the following areas:
have difficulty remembering the conversation.
• incorrect tense use and use of for / since
• incorrect tense use for length of time
Answers
• omission of auxiliary verb have in the present
1 They chat about the woman’s business perfect
and how it’s going. • confusion between been and gone
2 How about going out for dinner Ask students to cover the green we say … side
sometime? and see if they can correct the mistakes themselves
3 She thinks it would be a great idea. She before they look and check.
seems very enthusiastic.

10 Look at the expressions in exercise 2 again. Play


the audio again while students underline the
ones they hear this time. Check answers with
the class.

Answers
A 4 Do you have time for a quick chat?
5 How are things?
B 2 It’s been nice talking to you.

Unit 4 85
Units 3&4 Review pp42–43

Reading and grammar 2 How long has Chris been a house


husband?
1 GUESS To introduce the article, ask students
He’s been a house husband for 15 months.
to look at the photos and the title of the article
(two years minus nine months)
and discuss the questions together. Check
3 How long did Chris work for the software
comprehension of house husband (= a man
company?
who stays at home and looks after the house
He worked for the software company for
and children while his wife goes out to work)
five years.
and look after (children) (= take care of). Elicit
4 Has Lola ever been unemployed?
ideas from the class, but don’t give away the
No, she’s never been unemployed.
answers.
5 What has Chris started doing?
He’s just started looking for jobs again.
Extra idea: Before students read the article
6 Has Chris found a job?
in exercise 2, tell them to write three things
No, he hasn’t found a job yet.
they expect to see in the text.

4 Allow time for students to read the article


2 Pre-teach childcare. Set a short time limit so
again and write at least three questions about
that students read the article quickly for gist
it (note that the answers must be in the
and check their guesses from exercise 1.
article). They then find a new partner and ask
and answer each other’s questions.
Answers
1 The woman is a nurse, the man is a house Listening and grammar
husband.
2 They’re married – she goes out to work, 5 2.14 Explain that Chris got the job he
but he stays at home. had an interview for. Read through the three
3 He likes spending time with the children, questions and elicit one or two ideas for each
but he gets bored and feels he spends too one. Students then work individually to make
much time at home. two predictions for each one. Remind them
to use will in their answers. If necessary, refer
back to SB page 30 or the grammar reference
3 Quickly review the use of for, since, never, just
on SB page 76. Play the audio for students
and yet. Look back at Unit 4 Lesson 1 (SB page
to check their answers. Check students
35), Lesson 2 (SB page 36) and Lesson 3 (SB
understand childminder.
page 39) if necessary. Ask students to write
questions using the words in brackets. Check
Answers
answers quickly, then get students to ask and
answer the questions in pairs. 1 She’ll be surprised.
2 She’ll say, ‘I’m really pleased’,
Answers ‘I understand’, ‘We’ll need to find
a childminder’. (She says a lot more
1 How long have Lola and Chris been
than this, but these are the three most
married?
important things she says.)
They’ve been married since [2012].
3 I’ll vacuum and I’ll wash up too.
(The answer will depend on the current
year, as the article says they got married
four years ago.)

86 Units 3&4 Review


Transcript 6 Use this exercise to evaluate how well students
lola I’m so tired. I haven’t sat down all day. have understood the different tenses for
chris Neither have I! talking about the future. If necessary, refer to
lola I’m going to bed in a minute. the grammar reference on SB pages 137 and
chris Actually, I have something to tell you. 138. Students then complete the sentences
lola OK, what? with going to or the present continuous. Elicit
chris I have a job. I’m starting next month. a few answers and ask students to explain
lola Really! When did that happen? Why why they chose a particular form. Note that
didn’t you tell me? sometimes both are possible.
chris I wanted to surprise you.
lola Well, I’m surprised. Tell me about the Answers
job. 1 is going / is going to go 2 is starting /
chris Well, you know my friend Mike? He’s is going to start 3 is starting / is going to
recently started a new job as manager of start 4 are / is going to look 5 aren’t
a software company called Teccy, and he going to get
told me they need someone there. So,
I went for an interview last week and I Speaking and writing
got the job. I’m going to their office next
week to discuss it. 7 Allow time for students to discuss the
lola Well, that’s brilliant – I’m really pleased. questions in small groups. Encourage them to
I know you haven’t been very happy for talk about their ideas and give reasons for their
a while. opinions. Tell them to write short notes so that
chris No, I haven’t and I’m very bored. I mean, they can use the information later.
the kids are great but, you know, I need
8 Tell students they’re going to write a report
a proper job.
about housewives and house husbands. Before
lola Being a house husband is a proper job.
they start, show them the layout of a typical
chris Well, it is and it isn’t, you know.
report so that they can follow the format easily
lola Well, what about all the women who are
in their own writing. Explain that a report
housewives? You know how many hours
has a title, it’s divided into different parts and
you work every day. You always say
that each section has a heading. Encourage
there’s so much to do. It’s a proper job.
students to include:
chris Yes, OK, that’s true. But I need to get out
of the house. I need to go out to work. • an introduction that says what the report is
and earn some money. Then I’ll feel good about
about myself. • the feelings and opinions of the people in
lola Yeah, I really understand. We’ll need to the report
find a childminder. • recommendations and reasons for their
chris Yes, we will. Jenny’s starting school in ideas.
September. That will help. Shall we get a Monitor pairs as they work, making a note
cleaner? of any common problems with grammar and
lola No, I think we can do it, don’t you? vocabulary, and giving help where necessary.
chris You know how much you hate doing Ask one student from each group to read out
housework. You never vacuum. their report and find out how many people had
lola I promise I’ll vacuum. And I’ll wash up similar ideas.
too.
chris Wow! Extra idea: Appoint two students to make
notes of the numbers and results from the
Extra idea: Ask some comprehension reports on the board. The other students
questions about the conversation, eg Why’s should tell them what to write, eg Six
Lola tired? When’s Chris starting his new women in the class are housewives and
job? What’s the software company called? two men are house husbands. Two of the
What’s their daughter’s name? women are bored. The others feel happy at
home and enjoy being with their children.

Units 3&4 Review 87


9 Look at the beginning of the email together Transcript
and tell the class to write the rest of it, There are now about 1.4 million house
including information about the points in the husbands in the UK – they stay at home while
list. Allow a few minutes before they start so their wives go out to work. That’s ten times as
they can brainstorm ideas with a partner. many house husbands as ten years ago. Men
You may want to start this activity in class and and women no longer feel that the man has
ask students to finish it for homework. Collect to go out to work. Childcare is expensive and
the written work and use it to obtain example if the woman earns more money, the man is
sentences for review at the beginning of the often happy to look after the household and
next lesson. family.
In China, men started to stay at home in about
Preposition Park 2000. Some of these men prefer not to tell
Teach the meaning of against (I’m leaning against others about their new role, as their image is
the wall) and background (in the background). very important.
Ask students to look at other pictures in the SB Traditionally, the woman has always stayed at
and ask: What’s in the background? (There’s ..., home in India. But in cities now, about 3% of
I can see ...). Then focus on photo B on SB page men are stay-at-home dads and 12% of single
42. Students work individually to complete the men say they have no problem with the idea.
description with the correct prepositions. Explain In Australia, less than 1% of men are house
that these are all useful prepositions to use when husbands.
describing a picture or photo.
b THINK Read through the questions first,
Answers then ask students to discuss what they think
1 against 2 in 3 against 4 to 5 in about the information with a partner.
6 In 7 of
Explore
Encourage students to search online to find
Extra idea: Tell students to cover the out more about stay-at-home dads in different
description and describe the photo, then countries. They could draw up a table comparing
read the description again to check. attitudes to house husbands in different countries,
then present a short report to the class about their
Cross Culture: House husbands findings.

a 2.15 In pairs, ask students to guess and


complete the information with the numbers.
Check their ideas, then play the audio for them
to check their answers.

Answers
1 1.4 million 2 ten times 3 ten years
4 2000 5 3% 6 12% 7 1%

88 Units 3&4 Review


5 Getting away
UNIT GRAMMAR: modals: must, have to, can; might, may, could, will probably
VOCABULARY: travel; clothes
FOCUS FUNCTIONS: describing an object; speculating about the present and future

Lesson 1 You must have a qualifications you would need to work on a


cruise ship and the kind of jobs that might be
certificate. pp44–45 available. Elicit a few ideas, then tell them to
complete the questions in the section called
Aims Are you looking for adventure?. Tell them not
The focus of this lesson is to learn more about to worry if they don’t know all the words.
using modal verbs to express obligation and talk They then ask and answer the questions with a
about things we have to have or do, to practise partner.
talking about requirements for jobs, and to write
about your ideal job. Answers
Note: You may find it useful to research various Do you want to travel the world and earn
travel destinations for this lesson and download money?
some images or collect images from magazines. Would you like to spend your winters in
Bali and your summers in Mauritius?
You first! Does the idea of free meals and
Students work in pairs to talk about where they accommodation sound good?
would like to travel in the world and why. Ask: Do you enjoy meeting people from
Would you like to go on holiday, live or study there different cultures?
or just have a job that involves lots of travelling? Would you like to work on a cruise ship?
Reading and speaking
3 Focus on the middle section: We are looking
1 To introduce the topic and ideas for this for waiters … Tell students to read sections
activity, research some images of various travel A, B and C at the bottom of the advert and
destinations and show them on your laptop, match the job descriptions with jobs from
tablet or digital projector, or just stick images the middle section. Ask them to give reasons
from magazines on the walls or board. Put for their choice, eg Dance instructors have to
students in small teams to guess where each know lots of dance styles.
place is. The first team to call out the answer
gets a point. The team with the most points at Answers
the end wins the game. A scuba-diving instructors
Now focus on the photo of a cruise ship on SB B dance instructors
page 44. Find out what students know about C fitness instructors
cruises. Ask: Where do you think the beach is?
What type of ship is it? What kind of things 4 Now focus on the words in bold. Students
do people do on these holidays? Where do may have already worked these out from
cruise ships go? Students then work in pairs to doing exercises 2 and 3. You could also ask
discuss the questions. You may want to review questions to check comprehension of some of
the difference between want and would like at the other words, eg What can help you save
this point. Elicit feedback from pairs and find someone’s life? (a first-aid certificate) What do
out how many people thought of the same many celebrities have to help them keep fit?
advantages and disadvantages. (a personal trainer). Check answers with the
2 Explain that the photo forms part of an advert class.
for working on a cruise ship. Before students
begin, ask them to think about what skills and

Unit 5 89
not? (School is closed on Saturday) What
Answers words show that I don’t need to do it? (Don’t
accommodation = a place to live or stay have to); You mustn’t talk in the exam. Is it
staff = the people who work for an normal to talk in an exam? (No) Why not? (It’s
organisation prohibited and it’s against the rules).
certificate = a piece of paper that proves Point out that must and have to have a very
you have a qualification similar meaning, although we sometimes use
first aid = knowledge of how to help in a must to talk about an obligation from the
medical emergency speaker (I must leave now) and have to to talk
fluent = very good at speaking a language, about an obligation made by somebody else
like a native speaker (I have to have six months’ experience to do
this job). Elicit the opposite of must – there are
Extra idea: Another way to concept- two verbs for this.
check is to get students to write a simple
definition for each word or do a matching Answers
activity on the board. Write the words down 1c 2e 3d 4b 5a 6c
one side, then the definitions (see answers The opposites of must are mustn’t and
above) in a random order on the other side. can’t.

5 Go through the jobs in the advert and ask Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 77
students to talk together about which jobs now or at the end of the lesson and go through it
they’d like to do and give reasons why. You with students.
could also elicit a few more jobs and write
8 Do the first sentence together with the class as
them on the board.
an example. Show students where to find the
Grammar must information in the advert. Students then work
individually to complete the activity and correct
6 Go through the sentences in the grammar box the false sentences.
and remind students that with modal verbs, MA As an extra challenge, students can do the
all forms are the same. Then look back at jobs activity without looking back at the advert,
A, B and C on SB page 44. Ask students to then look and check their answers.
find the essential skills and requirements. Elicit
words that show something is necessary. Answers
1 true
Answers
2 false: They must have an instructor’s
A Must have, Must speak certificate.
B Must be good at, necessary 3 false: They should be couples if possible
C essential, necessary (couples preferred).
4 false: They must be good at all dance
7 Give students time to match the modal verbs styles.
(1–6) with their meanings (a–e). Look out for 5 true
typical mistakes (mustn’t and don’t have to 6 true
are often confused when describing a lack of
obligation); if students have difficulty, provide
contextual examples to help them understand.
Speaking and writing
Give some situations and ask extra questions 9 Put students in pairs and ask them to think
to concept-check, eg When I fly to another of a job and write a list of essential and non-
country, I must take my passport. Can I fly essential qualities or requirements. Make sure
without a passport? (No) Is it essential? (Yes) they understand essential and unnecessary.
What word shows it’s essential? (Must); Give them a few minutes to come up with six
It’s Saturday today so I don’t have to go to ideas – using the list of requirements if they
school! Do I need to go to school? (No) Why want to. Remind them to use the modal verbs
from exercise 7.
90 Unit 5
MA The instruction says they can use the ideas 13 Encourage students to share other ideas and
to help them, but they don’t have to. This suggestions with their partner and get class
choice gives weaker students some support, feedback.
while allowing stronger students to be more
creative. De-stress!
Read through the short text about doing facial
Tip: One of the main reasons speaking exercises. Encourage students to all try it together.
activities are difficult is because students They (and you!) should open their mouth wide as
are shy or lack confidence with the though they’re yawning, at the same time opening
language. It’s really helpful to put students their eyes wide, and then close it. They then screw
in pairs before speaking activities so they up their face, closing their eyes, then relax.
can brainstorm ideas with a partner to Note: Tell them to do this very gently, as it’s easy
think of things they’d like to say. to strain your jaw.

10 Put students together with another pair to


discuss their list of requirements. Remind them Lesson 2 It might rain. pp46–47
not to say what their job is – the other pair has
to guess. Monitor pairs as they work, giving
Aims
help where necessary. The focus of this lesson is to introduce modal
verbs to talk about future possibilities, to learn
Explore vocabulary for the types of clothes we take on
Go through the jobs students came up with in different journeys, and to find out more about
exercise 9 and write them on the board. Elicit and how to travel light when going on holiday.
add any other jobs that students find interesting. Note: It might be useful to bring in images of
Tell them to choose one and search online to find different weather to help with talking about
out more about it. It must be a job they’d really probability in exercise 8, and a world map might
love to do. also be useful.

11 Tell students you’re going to describe your Warm-up


dream job. Describe the skills, qualities and Divide the class into two groups: A and B. Tell
qualifications needed and see if they can guess students in group A to describe the photo of the
what it is. Students then write a description woman on SB page 46 and students in group B to
of their ideal job – using the information they describe the photo of the man. They then work
found online if they want to. Remind them to with a student from the other group and take
look back at the advert on SB page 44 to help turns to ask and answer questions about the other
them and encourage them to use some of the photo, eg What’s she wearing? Where is she?
vocabulary too. You may want to start this What’s her suitcase like?
activity in class and ask students to finish it for
homework. If they do it in class, after they’ve Vocabulary Travel
finished, tell them to share with their partner
and guess each other’s job. 1 2.16 Do the first couple of words as an
example with the class. Ask: Is ‘backpack’
12 THINK This task encourages students to connected with travel? (Yes) How? (You
develop their own ideas and think more about can use a backpack to carry things in when
things they need to do to become fluent in you travel). Repeat with bumbag (You use
English. Put students in groups of three to a bumbag to put your money and travel
discuss the questions. Tell them to talk about documents in). Allow time for students to do
the learning strategies they like best and list the activity with a partner, then elicit a few
the ones they all agree on. Get feedback from connection ideas. Note that all the words could
the class. Point out that in fact they need to do be connected with travel, but only some are
all the things on the list – they’ll all help them directly connected (and these are given in the
to learn faster. answers on page 92).

Unit 5 91
Play the audio for students to listen to the wheel can all be verbs too, but the verb use is
words, then play it again for them to repeat, higher level than Intermediate, so we’ve only
focusing on any difficult sounds in eg iron, taught the noun use here.
luggage, scissors, weight.
Answers
Answers backpack (N), bumbag (N), check in (V),
backpack (You use a backpack to carry check out (V), corkscrew (N), (suit)case (N),
things in), bumbag (You put your money guidebook (N), hairdryer (N), iron (N, V),
and travel documents in a bumbag), journey (N), luggage (N), pack (V), penknife
check in (You check in at an airport), (N), scissors (N), size (N), travel (V), trip (N),
check out (You check out of a hotel), unpack (V), voyage (N), weight (N), wheel (N)
(suit)case (You use a suitcase to carry things
in), guidebook (You use a guidebook to 3 THINK These questions encourage students
help you find your way around a city or to think more about some of the words in the
country), journey (You go on a journey list and take their knowledge of them further.
when you travel somewhere), luggage (You Ask students to discuss the questions with
take luggage with you when you travel), a partner. Encourage them to look in their
pack (You pack a bag or suitcase), travel dictionaries or search online to distinguish the
(You travel to different places), trip (You differences between words.
often go on a trip to see something when
you’re on holiday), unpack (You unpack a Answers
bag or suitcase), voyage (You might go on
1 Journey and trip are both nouns. They
a voyage in a boat), weight (You need to
have a similar meaning, but a trip is
know the weight of your bag when you
usually shorter. Travel is a verb. Voyage
travel by plane)
is a trip on a boat.
2 backpack, bumbag, (suit)case, luggage
Transcript (Luggage is a general term to describe
backpack, bumbag, check in, check out, all your bags.)
corkscrew, suitcase, guidebook, hairdryer, iron, 3 corkscrew, penknife, scissors
journey, luggage, pack, penknife, scissors, size, 4 Because they determine what luggage
travel, trip, unpack, voyage, weight, wheel you can take on the plane, and how
much luggage you can put in the hold
of the plane.
Extra idea: Ask a student to choose a
word from the list and mime it for other
people to guess. Repeat with a few You could do exercises 1–6 on Useful things
students and words. in Vocabulary plus at this point.

Reading
Tip: Repeating a list of words with the
4 To introduce the topic and set the scene, ask
class helps with pronunciation such as
students to look at the title and the photos
articulation and word stress. If students
and predict what the article is about. Teach /
are unsure about pronunciation, they’ll
Elicit the meaning of travelling light. Ask: What
often avoid speaking, so repetition drilling
do you think Cheryl and Arun have in their
increases confidence and helps them to
suitcases?
remember the vocabulary better.
Set a short time limit so students read quickly
for gist. Ask them to check their predictions.
2 Put students in pairs to identify if the words are
Ask: Do you travel light, or do you take a lot of
nouns (things) or verbs (actions). Explain that
things with you?
check in and check out are verbs, but when
they’re spelt with a hyphen (check-in, check-
out), they’re nouns. You might also want to
mention that journey, size, trip, voyage and

92 Unit 5
7 Look back at the questions from exercise 6
Tip: Remind students to try to guess any new and elicit what type of words always, usually
words from the context. If they can’t and never are. If necessary, review adverbs
work out a meaning, review the phrase: of frequency (see SB page 73). Give students
What does … mean? Using the context time to find other adverbs of frequency in the
to work out meaning is a useful skill, as article and underline the sentences where they
it shows students that they don’t have to appear.
understand every word to understand the
meaning of an article. Answers
I may sometimes have to pay a lot to
Extra idea: Use the text as a jigsaw check it in.
reading activity. Put students in pairs: A I often save money too.
and B. Student A reads about Cheryl and You never know what might happen.
student B reads about Arun. They make You can never trust the weather 100%.
notes about their text, then take turns to
share information with their partner. Grammar might, may, will probably
5 Allow students time to read the article more 8 Draw a scale of probability on the board (from
slowly, then to complete the sentences. Check 100% (certain) to 0% (not certain)), then read
answers with the class. out the sentences in the grammar box and ask
students to match them with different degrees
of probability. Tell students that in practice,
Answers
we don’t always differentiate between might
1 Cheryl 2 Cheryl 3 Arun 4 Arun 5 Arun
and may, so much depends on the intonation
6 Cheryl and Arun
– but at this stage, it’s useful to have a rule.
We sometimes use might when we think
6 Tell students to cover the article, then something is possible, but not very likely.
answer the questions and try to remember You can also check understanding with
how often Cheryl and Arun do things. If pictures. If you have them, show different
necessary, review adverbs of frequency by weather images and ask students to predict
looking at SB page 73. Students then read and what might, may or will probably happen. If
check their answers together. you have a map, you could also ask students to
predict what the weather will be like tomorrow
Answers in different places such as Morocco, England,
1 a Cheryl always packs lots of books. Australia, etc.
b She usually takes an iron and a hairdryer.
2 a Arun always takes his bag on the Answers
plane with him. 1c 2a 3b
b He never checks his bag in.
Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 77
Tip: It would be useful to remind students that now or at the end of the lesson and go through it
this kind of activity forces them to exercise with students.
their brain and relates to the information 9 Ask students if they can remember what we
on memory in Unit 1. say when we’re sure something will happen.

Extra idea: You could ask the following Answer


comprehension questions: Why does will
Cheryl pack lots of things to wear? Why
does she pack lots of books? What are the 10 Put students in groups of three to predict
advantages of having only hand luggage? things that will probably, may or might happen
in the next few days. Remind them that in this
kind of activity, they must all agree on the six
Unit 5 93
things. As they only have six minutes, they Transcript
must work fast to create a list, then make their ship, shop, Russian, Finnish, sure, sharp, shorts,
final decisions. wash
Vocabulary Clothes 15 P 2.18 Play the audio while students listen
to the tongue twister. Get them to practise and
11 Check comprehension of any difficult
say it as quickly as possible. Encourage them to
vocabulary, eg suitable, smart, scheme. Allow
repeat until they do it perfectly! Play the audio
time for students to read the travel tips
again if necessary.
individually, then work in pairs and talk about
the most useful ideas. Give them four or five
Transcript
minutes to agree with their partner and list
woman Show me what’s in your shopping bag,
them in order of usefulness. When they’ve
finished, tell them to compare their lists of the Shane.
man A shirt, shorts, shoes, shampoo,
best ideas with another pair.
shower gel, aftershave and washing
12 Students quickly read the tips again and circle powder. I’m shortly going on a ship to
the items of clothing. Check and help with Shanghai!
pronunciation if needed. Elicit more items of
clothing and write them on the board. You 16 2.19 Tell students they’re going to hear
could also write men and women on the board some instructions. They should listen and
and get students to put the clothes in the follow the instructions, repeating parts of
correct category. the sentence. Explain that this shows them
how to break sentences into chunks to help
Answers pronunciation. Play the audio, pausing if
necessary after each section. Note that the
top, socks, tights, underwear, skirt, (pair of)
last sentence is given first before it’s broken
trousers, swimming things, shorts, dresses,
down so that students can hear it first, then
suits
do the backchaining before saying the whole
sentence. There are long pauses in this audio
13 Tell students to cover the tips, then try to to allow plenty of time for repetition, but
remember them and complete the sentences. pause the audio if you need to.
Tell students that they don’t need to write the
tips word-for-word – they just need to get the Transcript
general sense of what was written in the tips,
Repeat parts of the sentence and then the
eg 1 Check the weather forecast and pack
whole sentence.
clothes you need for the weather. Students
Shopping bag, Shane // show me // show me
check answers with a partner, then read and
what’s in your shopping bag, Shane //
check against the tips.
A shirt, // shorts, // shoes, // shampoo, //
MA As extra support, you could give students shower gel, // aftershave, // washing powder. //
one minute to read the information again A shirt, shorts, shoes, shampoo, shower gel,
before they cover it up. aftershave and washing powder.
I’m shortly going on a ship to Shanghai!
Answers Shanghai // ship to Shanghai // I’m shortly
See text on SB page 47. going on a ship to Shanghai //

14 P 2.17 Write the sound on the board Tip: Backchaining (saying the last part of the
and ask students to repeat it after you. Elicit sentence first and going back) often helps
words that contain /ʃ/, eg shower, shopping. If students, so talk about the strategy with
students have difficulty pronouncing the sound, them afterwards and discuss how helpful
explain the tongue position (tongue pressed it was.
against the hard palate in the middle of the
mouth, lips pressed together and rounded). You could do exercises 7 and 8 on Useful
Play the audio for students to listen and repeat. expressions in Vocabulary plus at this point.

94 Unit 5
Speaking the phrases. Encourage students to compare
their answers with a partner, but don’t confirm
17 THINK Use this activity to personalise things their answers yet.
and invite students to offer their own ideas
and opinions about travelling light on holiday. 3 2.20 Play the audio for students to check
Tell them to look back at the tips in exercise their answers to exercise 2. Point out the
11 and answer the questions with a partner. definition of should and elicit what Gemma
Encourage them to add tips of their own and says we should do when we reach our
get class feedback. destination.
You could also get students to listen again and
Extra idea: Ask students to think about write down all the examples of should they
airport and travel problems that have hear, then do a quick concept check so they
happened to them. Give them a few ideas understand the function and form. Ask: Do
by telling a story of your own. Maybe your we have to do these things? (No) Is Gemma
luggage was lost or damaged, things stolen trying to help us? (Yes) What do we call it
or perhaps you were delayed in some way. when people tell us things to help us? (Advice,
Get them to talk in groups of three and suggestions, tips, recommendations) What
find out their stories afterwards. word tells us it’s advice? (Should).

Answers
Lesson 3 You should move 1d (should) 2f (shouldn’t) 3b (shouldn’t)
4c (should) 5e (should) 6a (should)
around. pp48–49 Gemma says you should do things at the
‘new’ time from the moment you arrive
Aims
and try to go outside.
The focus of this lesson is to use the modal verbs
should and shouldn’t for giving travel advice and Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 78
suggestions to avoid jet lag, and enabling students now or at the end of the lesson and go through it
to talk about their experiences and things they do with students.
or don’t do on long-haul and overnight flights.
Transcript
Warm-up
interviewer Good morning and welcome to
Tell students to keep their books closed, then read
the travel show. Do you ever go
out the title of the lesson. Ask: What do you think
on a long flight and arrive feeling
the lesson is going to be about? When do you
really terrible? With us today in the
think you should move around? What might you
studio is Gemma Howard, author
be doing? Elicit ideas, then tell the class to open
of Why fly and cry? and an expert
their books and look at the photos and see if they
on long-distance travel. So, thank
guessed correctly.
you for coming, Gemma. Tell us,
Speaking why do we get jet lag?
gemma Well, Bill, if you fly across several
1 Put students in pairs to talk about the time zones, your body clock gets
questions. Elicit class feedback and quickly confused. You get tired during the
check who likes or dislikes flying; ask for day and you can’t sleep at night.
reasons why. interviewer So what should we do to avoid it?
gemma There are several very simple
Listening 1 things. You should drink plenty
2 Ask: Have you ever been on a long-distance of water, but you shouldn’t drink
flight? (often called a long-haul flight because too much alcohol and coffee. And
it feels difficult). If students answer yes, ask: you shouldn’t eat heavy meals on
Where did you go? How long did it take? How board either.
did you feel when you arrived? Teach / Elicit interviewer Yes, it’s easy to eat too much if

the phrase jet lag, then tell students to match you’re bored.

Unit 5 95
gemma Yes, it is. And it’s easy to stay in
your seat all the time, too. But you Answer
should get up and move around She’s telling him to hurry up or she’ll miss
during the flight and do stretches her flight.
and exercises. It’s also a good idea
to change your watch to the ‘new’
Transcript
time as soon as you get on the
narrator Alice is going to Canada for a
plane.
interviewer What about when you get there?
conference. Her husband, Mike, is
Should we do anything special? going to take her to the airport, but
gemma You should try to do things at the he says he has to do some things
‘new’ time from the moment you first. Her flight is at 11.55.
narrator 9.25
arrive, so stay awake until night
alice It’s nine twenty-five, Mike. We should
and then sleep. Go outside, too, if
you can. It can help you experience go. I don’t want to miss my plane.
mike We don’t have to leave yet, Alice.
the new time of day.
interviewer Thank you very much for those
I must just finish this email. I won’t
tips, Gemma. be long.
alice Oh. Alright. But remember I have to
gemma It’s a pleasure.
check in two hours before my flight,
Speaking at 9.55.
mike Uh-huh.
4 Put students in pairs to discuss the tips in narrator Five minutes later. 9.30
exercise 2. Ask: How often do you do them? alice Can we go, Mike? It’s half past.
How did they help, and how effective were mike We have plenty of time, Alice. I need
they? Go through the list of items in question to have a quick coffee before we go.
2 and use the picture to check comprehension. alice Well, OK … but please don’t be long.
Tell students to make notes for each of the I might miss my plane.
questions. mike OK, OK …
narrator Ten minutes later. 9.40
5 Put students together with another pair and
alice Come on, Mike … look at the time!
tell them to report back, ie use their notes
to tell the other pair about their experiences. It’s 9.40! I may miss my plane.
mike It’s OK. I must just feed the dog
Although students may not have covered
reported speech yet, you could help them by before …
alice No! You don’t have to feed him now,
writing phrases they can use on the board such
as: He / She told me … He / She said … Mike. You can feed him when you
get back. Please let’s go!
Listening 2 mike OK, OK. Chill! No need to panic …

6 GUESS Ask students to look at the pictures, 8 See if the class can remember why Mike took
read the information below them and guess so long. Ask students to tick the things that he
what’s happening. Elicit ideas and predictions did before they left the house. Play the audio
and encourage lots of active guessing, but again for students to check their answers.
don’t confirm if they’re correct or not.
Answers
7 2.21 Ask students to listen and compare
D, F
their ideas. Play the audio, then encourage
them to talk about how they’d feel if this
happened to them. 9 Ask students to work in pairs and answer
the questions together. Check answers
MA You might want to pause the audio after
for questions 1–3, then invite students to
each section and ask questions to check
say whether they think Mike and Alice are
comprehension, eg What time is it? What time
behaving reasonably. Ask: What would you do
is Alice’s flight?
in this situation?

96 Unit 5
Answers Answer
1 She feels very frustrated. They get caught in a traffic jam on the way
2 She wants to leave in time to check in for to the airport and Alice misses her plane.
her flight. She’s so upset she tells Mike she’s leaving
3 She doesn’t want to miss her plane. and not coming back.

10 Write the two times (9.30 and 9.40) on Transcript


the board and invite students to come up and
narrator Twenty minutes later. 10.00
write what Alice says at each time. Play the
alice Oh, no. I don’t believe it. We haven’t
audio again to check who was right.
moved for ten minutes.
MA As an extra challenge, see if they can recall mike This traffic is terrible, isn’t it? I think
the exact words she uses. you’ll probably miss your plane!
At this point, you could also write the alice Yes, I think I will. Why does this
sentences on the board and quickly check the always happen, Mike? Every time I go
meaning of the modal verbs might and may. away.
Ask: When is the flight? (Soon) Does she know mike It’s not my fault there’s a lot of traffic!
for certain she’ll miss it? (No) Is it possible alice No, but we always leave at the last
she could miss it? (Yes) So when Alice says minute and …
‘might’ and ‘may’, what’s she guessing about?
(Something possible in the future). narrator Twohours later. 12.00
alice At last!
Answers mike I think you’ve missed your flight,
1 I might miss my plane. darling. What a pity. Now you don’t
2 I may miss my plane. have to go to the conference at all
and we can spend the weekend
together!
Tip: Students don’t always ask questions alice I’ve missed that flight, Michael. But
and often stay quiet when they don’t this is an airport. There are other
understand, so it’s always useful to take flights.
a few minutes to quickly concept-check mike What do you mean?
new grammar. Without concept-checking, alice I mean I’m going to fly somewhere
it’s difficult to know if they’ve understood else. And this time I’m not coming
the function, form and meaning of the back! Goodbye, Michael!
new grammar. Even if some students mike Oh!
have a good grasp of the language,
concept-checking helps to reinforce their 13 Play the audio again and tell students to
knowledge and helps weaker students answer the questions. Play the audio a third
get a better idea of things they weren’t time, pausing if necessary for students to check
completely clear about. their answers.

Answers
11 Check understanding of the phrase is likely
to. Teach / Elicit that it has the same meaning 1 There’s a traffic jam.
as will probably. Ask students to predict what 2 It happens every time she goes away.
they think is likely to happen next. Elicit a few 3 Two hours and 20 minutes
ideas from around the class. 4 12.00
5 She misses it.
12 2.22 Play the audio so students can check 6 Alice decides to get another flight and
their ideas together, then find out if anyone leave Mike.
guessed correctly. Ask: Who would have done
the same as Alice?

Unit 5 97
Writing and speaking to explain that in the song, the singer says I’ve
rode buses, I’ve rode trains – rode is an American
14 2.23 Ask: Can you remember Alice and variant of ridden, which is also used in the song.
Mike’s last conversation? Play the audio and
tell students to listen and write it down. Then Extra questions for class or homework
have them compare with a partner and get
Art
them to check against the transcript on SB
Choose one person in the painting and
page 82.
describe what they’re wearing.
MA As an extra challenge, ask stronger Find one more painting by Haber online
students to try to remember parts of the and describe it.
conversation before you play the audio again. Music
Find out more about Tom Paxton and write
Transcript a short biography of him.
alice At last!
mike I think you’ve missed your flight, darling.
What a pity. Now you don’t have to Answers
go to the conference at all and we can Art
spend the weekend together! Airport, 2008, Ronald Haber
alice I’ve missed that flight, Michael. But this Music
is an airport. There are other flights. … must stay behind. The singer wants to
mike What do you mean? leave his partner again because he loves
alice I mean I’m going to fly somewhere else. the mountains and sea.
And this time I’m not coming back!
Goodbye, Michael!
Culture notes: Ronald Haber is a British
mike Oh!
artist who paints a wide variety of popular
pictures of landscapes and images from
Extra idea: Alice is very upset and angry,
his travel experiences at home and abroad,
so she uses quite definite stress on certain
including Sunset over the Grand Canal
words in the sentence: I’ve missed that
and Bridlington Harbour. His painting
flight, Michael. But this is an airport. There
Airport is a brightly coloured image of a
are other flights. Ask students to listen
cosmopolitan crowd of people, including
again and mark the stressed words in the
holidaymakers and businessmen, at the
sentence (see underlined words in the
airport with their suitcases checking in.
sentence).
Tom Paxton is an American folk singer. He
was born in Chicago in 1937 and his career
15 Ask students to work with a partner and create
has spanned more than 50 years. He’s
a different ending to the story. Invite pairs to
famous for songs such as The Last Thing on
act out their conversation to the class and
my Mind and Bottle of Wine and received
take a class vote on the best / funniest / most
a Grammy Lifetime’s Achievement Award
dramatic one.
in 2009. His popular songs have been
16 EVERYBODY UP! Elicit and practise the covered and played by artists such as Bob
questions first, eg Do you have to travel a lot Dylan, The Seekers, John Denver and Willie
in your work? Tell students to walk around and Nelson.
talk to other people. Encourage them to ask I’m Bound for the Mountains and the Sea is
extra questions and find out more about each taken from Paxton’s debut album Ramblin’
other’s travel experiences. Boy (1964) and describes the journey of
a restless traveller across the vast land of
Art & Music America.
Tell students they can find a larger version of this
painting on SB page 67. Encourage them to search
online to find more information about the artist,
and to find the lyrics to the song. You might want

98 Unit 5
Vocabulary plus p50 3 Students make lists of the things they take
with them when they travel.
Warm-up 4 Ask students to add extra things to their lists.
As a warm-up, ask students to make a list of Encourage them to look up words in the
five things they always take in their luggage on dictionary if needed or get them to describe
holiday. Then get them to compare their answers them so you can provide the words they don’t
with a partner and explain the reasons why. know.

Useful things 5 Teach / Elicit the phrase do without. Students


identify the essential and non-essential items
1 2.24 Ask students to name as many of
on their lists, then compare their list with other
the items as they can without looking at the people.
words in the box. Encourage guessing and use
of words from their own language. Then tell Did you know?
them to look at the words and match them Ask: Who’s this person? (It’s an unusual photo of
with the pictures. Play the audio for students the Queen of England, so some students may not
to check their answers, then play it again for recognise her at first.) Read the short text together.
students to repeat the words. Help students You could add that all other members of the
with pronunciation if they have any difficulties. British royal family need a passport, as do the Pope
Point out that jewellery is only three syllables: and the US President.
/ʹdʒuːəlri/ – the third ‘e’ is not pronounced.
6 Explain the memory-chain game to the
Transcript and answers class. Put students in small groups. The first
1 shower gel 2 adaptor 3 jewellery student says something they take on holiday
4 make-up 5 phone charger 6 shampoo and the next person has to remember what
7 towel 8 pillow they said and then add another item. If
someone makes a mistake or can’t remember,
2 Go through the words with the class and they’re out of the game. The last person left
have them repeat after you. Ask: How many is the winner. Remind students to use have to
of these words do you already know? They and don’t have to correctly.
should know most of them by now. Encourage
guesses for the meaning of any they don’t Useful expressions
know. Ask: Which things can’t you take in your
7 Ask students to look at the expressions and
hand luggage? Elicit answers from the class.
find them in the Travelling light text on SB
Note that the answers may vary from country
page 46. Tell them to underline them and
to country, but these are the regulations in the
try to guess their meaning from the context.
UK. Ask students which names for these items
Check answers as a class.
are very similar in their own language and
which are very different.
Answers
Answers fit in = manage to get into a suitcase
It’s a pain to … = It’s a lot of trouble to …
corkscrew, knife, penknife, scissors (with
It’s worth it! = The benefits of doing it are
blades longer than 6cm), plus any bottles
greater than the trouble of doing it.
of water, shampoo, etc over 100ml
Just in case. = In the event that something
Things you would expect to be prohibited,
happens to make me need it.
but aren’t: matches, lighter, scissors with
No way! = never, not at all
blades no longer than 6cm.
Absolutely! = definitely
at both ends = when I check in and when
Extra idea: To review the vocabulary, write I land at my destination
an anagram on the board and get students get it wrong = do something that’s against
to try to guess the word. Then put students the airline’s rules
in pairs to make anagrams and take turns loads of = a lot of
guessing each other’s words. save time = spend less time doing something
Unit 5 99
8 Model the example dialogues with one or
two students. Then ask students to work in Extra idea: Review the prefixes and
pairs and use the expressions in spontaneous adjectives with a guessing game. Ask
conversations about their travel experiences. students to write down definitions for each
word and test each other. One student
Focus on: get gives a definition and their partner has to
Explain that get is often used in different phrases guess the word with the correct prefix.
and has lots of different meanings. Ask students
to replace get with a different word. Have them Everyday English p51
compare answers with a partner and decide if the
sentences are true or false. Tell them to correct the You first!
false statements. Introduce the topic (personal stories are always
interesting and provide opportunities for live
Answers listening practice), then ask if students have ever
1 becomes; true lost their luggage. Put them in pairs and get them
2 obtain; true to share their stories.
3 catch; false: People catch malaria from
a mosquito bite. Describing an object
4 buy; true
1 2.25 6 Decide whether you’re going to use
5 travel; false: You have to get on a train
the video or simply play the audio. Go through
or a ferry to cross the English Channel.
the questions first and ask students to predict
6 receive; true
the story. This will also help them to have a
clear idea what information they’re listening
Wordbuider Negative prefixes: im-, in-, un- for. Then play the video or audio. Discuss the
answers as a class.
a Learning prefixes and suffixes is a really
helpful way of increasing students’ vocabulary.
Answers
Write possible on the board, then add the
prefix im. Teach / Elicit how it changes the 1 The passenger has lost his suitcase.
meaning of the word, then ask the class to 2 No, he isn’t.
identify the correct prefix for each word. Write 3 His name is Vladimir Balanovsky, he’s
the table on the board and invite students just arrived from Moscow via Frankfurt
to come and write the words in the correct on Lufthansa flight LH0345, he isn’t
column. Ask students which words are very very young.
similar in their own language and which are 4 He has trouble saying Mr Balanovsky’s
very different. name.

Answers Transcript
im-: impossible, impatient, impolite, luggage attendant Good afternoon, sir. Can I
impractical help you?
in-: inefficient, incorrect, inexpensive, traveller Yes, I’ve just arrived from Moscow
informal, invisible but I’m afraid my luggage hasn’t.
un-: unnecessary, unfriendly, unhappy, attendant Oh dear. I’m sorry to hear that.
unimportant, unlikely, unpopular, untidy, I’ll need to fill in a form. Right …
unusual What’s your name?
traveller Balanovsky. Vladimir.
b Go through the words and check attendant Oh right, um … could you spell
comprehension. Ask students to circle the that for me, please?
words that describe them, then compare their traveller B-A-L-A-N-O-V-S-K-Y.
words with a partner. Find out which were the attendant B-A-L-A-N-O-V-S-K-Y, Vladimir?
most commonly used adjectives. traveller I’m staying at the Hilton, Park
Lane.

100 Unit 5
attendant OK. And you’ve just arrived from
Moscow – what was the flight Answers
number, Mr Balloon ...? a4 b3 c2 d1
traveller Balanovsky! Lufthansa LH0345 via
Frankfurt. 4 Students work individually to put the phrases
attendant Right. Now, I’m going to show you in the correct order, then check their answers
some pictures of bags. Which one with a partner.
of these is most like yours? Is it like
these? Answers
traveller No, it isn’t a backpack. Young 1 a beautiful blue backpack
people carry backpacks, not people 2 a hundred horrible big handbags
like me. 3 one wonderful white wheelchair
attendant No, of course not. What about 4 six stylish, small, silver suitcases
these?
traveller No, it isn’t a bag. It’s a suitcase like
5 Ask students to describe the other items of
this one.
luggage in the picture using the correct order
attendant And is it big or small?
of adjectives.
traveller It’s quite big. About 1m by 1m.
And it has wheels.
Suggested answers
attendant And what colour is it?
traveller Red. Mainly red, but with some 1 a small red bag
black too. It’s a very beautiful case. 2 an ugly, large, black and red suitcase
attendant So it’s a beautiful, big, red and with wheels
black case with wheels. Does it 3 a small red and black backpack
have your name on it? 4 a large red and black suitcase
traveller Of course it does! 5 a small black bag (with red handles)
attendant Well, we’ll do our best to find it,
Mr Balloon … 6 Put students in pairs and see if they can
traveller Balanovsky! remember five of the questions the lost-
luggage man asked. Then play the audio or
2 Focus on the pictures of bags. Ask: Which video again for them to check.
piece of luggage is most like Mr Balanovsky’s?
Students work in pairs to describe his luggage Answers
and identify it. Play the video or audio
Can I help you?
again for students to check their answers if
What’s your name?
necessary, or ask them to look at transcript
Could you spell that for me, please?
2.25 on SB page 82.
What was the flight number?
Which one of these is most like yours?
Answers
Is it like these?
suitcase number 5 What about these?
It’s quite a big suitcase, about 1m by 1m. And is it big or small?
It’s a beautiful, big, red and black case with And what colour is it?
wheels and it has Mr Balanovsky’s name on it. Does it have your name on it?

3 Look at the sentence with the class and focus


Speculating about the present and the
on the order of adjectives. Identify each
adjective, ie colour = green, size = small,
future
opinion = beautiful, number = two. Students 7 P 2.26 Go through the sentences in
number the adjectives in the correct order. the box and focus on the words in bold. Ask
Point out that we usually use commas between questions to check comprehension, eg Does
the adjectives when there are three or more the luggage man know where the luggage is
adjectives. for certain? (No) Does he really know when
they will find it? (No) Is he talking about the

Unit 5 101
past, present or future? (Present and future) attendant It could be tonight or it could be
Is he saying something that he’s sure about, tomorrow. It all depends where it is
or is it a guess? (It’s a guess). Teach / Elicit that now. It’s definitely … somewhere.
we use all these words to speculate (make
10 Put students in pairs to describe the painting
guesses) about the present and the future.
on SB page 49 (or they can look at the larger
Refer to the grammar reference on SB page version on SB page 67). Encourage them to
79 now or at the end of the lesson and go speculate using the phrases on this page.
through it with students. Monitor pairs as they work, helping with
Put them in pairs to say the sentences and try vocabulary if necessary.
to find the stressed words. Play the audio for
them to listen and check their answers. Suggested answer
a The departure hall is very crowded.
Transcript and answers A lot of people are waiting.
1 It may still be in Russia. b Perhaps some flights are late. The
2 It might be in Germany. computer system might be down.
3 It might even be in the UK. Maybe there’s a strike. It might be the
4 It’s possible that it’s still on the plane. beginning of the school holidays.
5 Do you think it could be in Helsinki?

8 Put students in groups to talk about where Tip: When students are doing speaking
the suitcase might be. Encourage them to use activities, it’s a good idea to walk around
the correct words and phrases for speculating the room and note down typical mistakes
about something. they make. This tells you what they
haven’t completely got yet and identifies
9 2.27Play the audio so students can listen
areas for review in future lessons.
and check their predictions.

Answers Extra idea: As students are talking or


1 It may still be in Moscow, or it might be working on activities in this lesson, walk
in Frankfurt, or it might be in London. around the room and take some of their
2 It could be tonight or it could be things. Take bags, magazines, hats, pens,
tomorrow. and of course, mobile phones are good
too. Then set up a lost-property office (you
can put all their things behind your desk)
Transcript and get them to come up and describe the
traveller Oh, just one more question. things they’ve lost. Encourage them to use
attendant Of course, Mr … um … ah … adjectives in the correct order, but tell them
traveller Where do you think my suitcase that they have to use correct sentences to
might be? get their lost property back!
attendant Well, it may still be in Moscow.
That’s possible. Were you late for
we don’t say … / we say …
your flight?
traveller Of course not. I am never late for a
This section focuses on the following errors:
flight! • confusion of the phrases do you like and
attendant Well, in that case, it might be in
would you like
Frankfurt. You changed planes there. • incorrect use of the infinitive with to after must
traveller Yes, that’s true. It could be in
• incorrect use of mustn’t
Frankfurt. That’s better than • incorrect word order
Moscow. • incorrect use of the infinitive after shouldn’t
attendant It might even be in London and we
Ask students to cover the green we say … side
just haven’t found it yet. and see if they can correct the mistakes themselves
traveller Well, I hope you find it quickly!
before they look and check.
When do you think it could be
here?
102 Unit 5
6 Survival
UNIT GRAMMAR: zero conditional; when clauses; first conditional;
VOCABULARY: emergency equipment; global warming
relative pronouns: who / which / that

FOCUS FUNCTIONS: giving instructions; checking understanding

Lesson 1 If you get stuck, 4 2.28 Tell students they’re going to listen to a
winter checklist. Ask them to look back at the
keep calm and don’t panic! picture in exercise 2 and tick the items the man
pp52–53 mentions.

Aims Answers
The focus of this lesson is to introduce the zero All the items are mentioned, in this order:
conditional to talk about what to do in certain jacket, gloves, boots, torch, first-aid kit,
situations, to practise when clauses, to learn blanket, sunglasses, umbrella, battery,
vocabulary for describing emergency equipment, phone charger, mobile phone, chocolate
and to learn about the dangers of extreme bar, bottle of water
weather conditions.

You first! Transcript


Ask students to look at the photo and elicit a few a The last time we had really bad snow, a
answers from the class. It doesn’t matter if some friend of mine got stuck for six hours.
students never get snow in their country. b Six hours!
a Yeah, so this year, I’m going to be
Vocabulary Emergency equipment (1) prepared.
1 GUESS Tell students to look at the photo of b Uh-huh.

the car again and talk about the questions. a I found this really good website with a

Encourage lots of ideas and discussion. Get checklist of things for driving in winter.
feedback from the class and check their ideas. b So what does it say?
a Well, obvious things like always have a
2 Before you go through the words with the warm jacket, gloves and boots … and then
class, ask students to try and name as many of things that we always keep in the car all
the items as they can. They should know quite the time … a torch and a first-aid kit. Oh,
a few of these words already. Then go through and something to clean the snow off the
the words together, checking comprehension windscreen.
and the pronunciation of battery. b Yes, I have all those in my car too.
a And it says always have a blanket too – for
Answers extra warmth – and sunglasses because the
a boots b umbrella c bottle of water sun is so low in winter and an umbrella to
d first-aid kit e blanket f sunglasses keep dry – because if you get wet, you get
g jacket h torch i battery j mobile phone cold.
k phone charger l gloves m chocolate bar b It’s a good idea to have an extra mobile-
phone battery and charger too, I think. And
3 Allow students time to read about the extreme a mobile phone, of course!
a Yes, they’re on the list, and food and drink
weather conditions and snow across Europe in
2012–2013 and discuss the questions together. are on the list too: a chocolate bar and a
Before they start, model the example sentence bottle of water.
with a student and check understanding of the You could do exercises 1–5 on Emergency
phrase a good idea. equipment in Vocabulary plus at this point.

Extra idea: Tell students to find out about


other extreme weather like the snowstorms
in New York in 2014–2015.
Unit 6 103
Listening 7 Allow a few moments for students to read
the questions first so they know what to listen
5 Go through the statements first to check any for. Then play the audio again, pausing if
new vocabulary, eg panic, engine, run out of. necessary, and encourage students to check
Ask students to read the statements and guess their answers together. Elicit answers to the
if they’re true or false. Elicit ideas, but don’t third question and write any other ideas
check answers yet. students have on the board. Find out how
6 2.29 Play the audio. Tell students to listen
many people had similar ideas.
and check if their answers were correct or not.
Get them to correct the false statements with Answers
the right advice. 1 It’s difficult to walk in snow and easy
to get lost, and it’s easier for people to
Answers find you in your car.
1 false: You should keep calm. 2 a) Run the engine for about 15 minutes
2 true every hour to keep yourself warm.
3 true b) Call someone to tell them what’s
4 false: Turn on the engine if you want to happened and where you are.
keep warm. (Run the engine for about c) Put on warm clothes.
15 minutes every hour.) d) Drink some water.
5 true
6 false: You should always check the Tip: It’s very difficult to listen and write at the
weather forecast. same time, so tell students you’ll play the
audio at least twice for activities like this.
Transcript Explain that the first time, they should just
listen and perhaps make a few notes. At
Well, the first thing is, if you ever get stuck in
this point, if they try to write more, they’ll
the snow, keep calm and don’t panic! I know
miss important details. The second time
that’s easy to say and not so easy to do, but
they listen, they can fill in more details.
it’s true. You can’t think clearly if you panic. So
just sit for a few moments and breathe slowly.
Then you’re ready to take action. Grammar 1 Zero conditional
If you can see a house, you should get out 8 Go through the grammar box first and ask
and walk there. If you can’t see anything, then a few questions to make sure students
don’t leave the car. Remember that it’s very understand the meaning and function of
difficult to walk in snow and it’s easy to get the grammar. Complete the first sentence
lost. It’s easier for people to find you if you stay together and ask: How many parts are there
in your car, too. in the sentence? (Two) What has to happen
Turn on the engine if you want to keep warm, first? (The if clause – get wet) What’s the other
but don’t leave it on too long if you don’t part of the sentence? (The result or thing that
want to run out of fuel. Turn it on for just 15 happens after – get cold) Are these things just
minutes each hour, then turn it off again. possible or are they facts? (Facts) How certain
If you have a phone, you should call someone are we? (Completely sure). Students complete
and tell them what’s happened and where you the remaining sentences.
are.
Then put on some warm clothes, drink some
Answers
water, eat some chocolate and just wait.
1 get 2 get 3 are 4 stay 5 can’t
But of course you should always check the
6 panic
weather forecast and road conditions if you’re
driving a long way. If the weather conditions
are very bad, stay at home! Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 78
now or at the end of the lesson and go through it
with students.

104 Unit 6
9 Ask students to look back at the statements in
exercise 5 and underline the zero conditional. Answers
are; drive
Answer
All the sentences in 5 are examples of the We use when to talk about specific situations, not
zero conditional. possible situations. For a full explanation, see SB
page 78.
10 Go through the three situations first and check Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 78
that students understand the words signal for now or at the end of the lesson and go through it
help, thunderstorm and earthquake. Allow with students.
time for them to complete the table on their
own, using the ideas to help them, or they Speaking
could make up their own ideas. 13 EVERYBODY UP! Energise your class with
this walk-around activity. Allow time for
Suggested answers students to first work individually and answer
If you’re out in a thunderstorm the questions. Remind them to use the zero
do: get inside, stay calm conditional. Then tell them to walk around the
don’t: stand under a tree, put up your room, share their ideas and find people that do
umbrella, swim in a pool, panic! the same things.
If you’re in an earthquake Make sure you model the activity first and
do: get under a table, keep away from tall encourage students to ask questions so they
buildings, stay calm don’t just show each other the answers, eg
don’t: swim in a pool, panic! A What’s the first thing you do when you get
If you get lost in the mountains really cold at home?
do: light a fire, signal for help, stay calm B If I get cold, I put the heating on. What
don’t: panic! about you?
A I put my sweatshirt on if I’m cold.
11 Put students in pairs to compare their ideas B Why do you do that?
from exercise 10. Monitor pairs as they work, A It saves electricity.
making a note of any problems with grammar
14 Check students understand what they have to
or vocabulary. Encourage them to use zero
do in this information-gap activity. Explain that
conditional sentences and correct any small
they each have information about different
mistakes you hear.
situations: being lost in the jungle or the
Note: Students sometimes get the desert. Tell them to read their tips and make
zero conditional confused with the first notes, then take turns to tell each other what
conditional, so give extra examples if to do in each situation. Then allow time for
needed to show the difference in meaning them to answer the questions.
between facts and possibilities. Don’t go
into detail at this stage, however, as they’ll Answers
do work on the first conditional in the next
A If you’re lost in the jungle, find a river
lesson.
to follow; climb a tree if you can; light
You could do the Focus on: keep section in a fire if you can; don’t eat colourful
Vocabulary plus at this point. berries; keep your clothes on, even if
you’re hot; don’t take off your shoes.
Grammar 2 when clauses B If you’re lost in the desert, stay near
your vehicle if you’re in one; cover your
12 Elicit answers for the missing words in the
neck and your head; walk along hills or
sentence, then ask: Can anybody explain the
high ground; find water (cactus plants
difference in meaning between ‘if’ and ‘when’
are good); walk slowly not quickly;
statements?
don’t breathe through your mouth,
breathe through your nose.

Unit 6 105
on its prey. Although there are tales (which
Tip: It’s often difficult to react quickly to
may have been spread by Rousseau himself)
questions and activities, particularly in a
that he had studied the jungle during his
foreign language, so try to give students
travels in Mexico, he never left France,
thinking time before they begin. This helps
and learnt all he knew of the jungle from
them to think of ideas and the vocabulary
botanical gardens, textbooks and other
and grammar they could use to express
people’s stories!
themselves. If we rush them straight into
activities, they sometimes say very little, but Katy Perry was born in California in 1984.
if we give them time, they’ll generally have She’s a famous singer and model and is
more fluency and accuracy. known for hit singles such as I Kissed a Girl,
California Gurls and Firework. She has won
many awards for her music. In 2012, she
Art & Music made the move into movies, releasing the
For the painting, tell students to look at SB page documentary feature film Katy Perry: Part
67 to see a bigger image. Tell them to work in of Me. Throughout her career, she’s sold
pairs to discuss a good title for the painting, then 11 million albums and 81 million singles
check their answers online. worldwide, making her one of the best-
For the song, elicit a few ideas for the missing selling artists of all time.
words, then get students to check online. They Roar is one of her best-known songs. It
could also find a video of Katy Perry’s half-time was released in 2013 on her fourth album,
show at the 2015 Super Bowl. Prism. The song is about standing up for
yourself and being strong and was her
Extra questions for class or homework eighth number-one song in the US charts.
Art In 2015, she sang the song in front of a
Describe the painting and the weather. huge crowd at half-time at the US Super
What’s the tiger about to do? Bowl.
Music
What do you think Katy Perry is talking
about in this song?
Lesson 2 If temperatures go
Answers up, fish will die. pp54–55
Art Aims
Surprised! or Tiger in a Tropical Storm,
The focus of this lesson is to introduce the first
1891, Henri Rousseau
conditional and use it to talk about the dangers of
Music
global warming and its effect on the planet, and
tiger, fire, champion; other animals: lion,
to learn some useful words for talking about the
butterfly, bee
consequences of global warming and rising sea
levels.
Culture notes: Henri Rousseau was born
in Laval, France, in 1844. Although he Warm-up
didn’t have great success in his lifetime Quickly find out what students know about global
(painting was more of a hobby for him – warming and climate change. If they need to use
in fact, he only started painting seriously L1 for some words, that’s fine – help them with
after he had retired), like many artists, he the vocabulary they need to talk about it. Keep
became extremely well known after he this short and dynamic – they’ll find out much
died, and his paintings were bought by more about it in the lesson.
many collectors and museums.
1 GUESS To introduce the topic, tell students to
He’s best known for his paintings with look at the photos and guess the connections
jungle themes, such as the one here: Tiger between them. Encourage lots of discussion.
in a Tropical Storm or Surprised! It shows
a tiger, lit by lightning, preparing to jump

106 Unit 6
Transcript
Extra idea: You could also include a
short video clip to increase interest and 1 Which of these are fossil fuels? a) coal
set the scene. Search online for the trailer b) oil c) gas
for the Academy Award-winning film An The answer is all of them.
Inconvenient Truth. 2 Which of these are greenhouse gases?
a) carbon dioxide (CO2) b) oxygen (O)
c) methane (CH4)
2 Ask students what they know about global
The answer is carbon dioxide and methane.
warming and its causes. Encourage discussion
3 Which country produces the most
and activate their background knowledge and
greenhouse gases? a) China b) Russia
opinions on the subject. Then quickly check the
c) the USA
meaning of the words in bold before they do
The answer is China.
the quiz.
4 How many people die because of global
warming every year? a) 1,500 b) 15,000
Answers c) 150,000
fossil fuels = fuels, such as gas, coal and oil, The answer is 150,000.
that were formed underground from plant 5 How long does it take CO2 to disappear
and animal remains millions of years ago from the atmosphere? a) 10 years
coal = a hard, black substance that’s dug b) 100 years c) 1,000 years
from the Earth in pieces, and can be The answer is 100 years.
burned to produce heat or power, or a 6 Which of these activities produce
single piece of this greenhouse gases? a) driving
oil = petroleum (= the black oil obtained b) cutting down trees c) meat production
from under the Earth’s surface from which The answer is all of them.
petrol comes)
gas = a substance in a form like air that’s Reading
used as a fuel for heating and cooking
4 Check that students understand the
greenhouse gases = gases that cause
vocabulary and get them to quickly look up
the greenhouse effect, especially carbon
any words they don’t know in a dictionary or
dioxide
online. Explain that all of the words except one
carbon dioxide = the gas formed when
are directly linked to the weather and tell them
carbon is burned, or when people or
to circle the odd one out. Ask students which
animals breathe out
words in the list are very similar in their own
oxygen = a chemical element that is a gas
language and which are very different.
with no smell or colour. Oxygen forms a
large part of the air on Earth, and is needed
Answer
by animals and plants to live.
methane = a gas with no smell or colour, mosquito
often used as a fuel
atmosphere = the mixture of gases around 5 Students work in pairs and take turns to mime
the Earth and guess words from the list in exercise 4.
Some of them would be very difficult to
3 2.30 Give students time to do the quiz on mime, so instead of miming those words (eg
their own first. Then have them compare their acid, degree, drought), tell students to give a
answers with a partner. Play the audio for them definition for their partner to guess.
to check if their ideas were correct. 6 Focus on the question: What will happen in the
future if we continue to burn fossil fuels? Elicit
Answers a few ideas from the class, then tell students
1 a, b, c 2 a, c 3 a 4 c 5 b 6 a, b, c to read the report and underline the possible
effects. Set a short time limit so they read
quickly for gist.

Unit 6 107
Grammar First conditional
Answers
There will be more storms and they’ll 9 Look at the first line of the table and teach /
be more severe. There will also be more elicit how we form the first conditional. Ask
heatwaves, more droughts, more rain – and students to complete the sentences in the
therefore more floods and more hurricanes; table. Get feedback and correct any mistakes.
temperatures will go up several degrees;
the ice and snow at the north and south Answers
poles will melt, and sea levels will rise. 1 is 2 will be 3 will be 4 don’t act
The sea will become more ‘acid’. More 5 will happen 6 go on
places will be hotter, and because more
mosquitoes will survive in these places, Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 78
there will be more malaria. There won’t be now or at the end of the lesson and go through it
nearly as many fish in the oceans, and the with students.
ones that are left will be smaller.
10 Tell students to look back at the first sentence
in the grammar box and complete the rule
7 It’s helpful to model reading strategies, so do
with a partner. Write the sentence on the
the first word with students and try to elicit the
board (If there is more rain, there will be more
meaning of severe from context. Encourage
floods), then ask a few concept-checking
them to read sections around the words (the
questions, eg Is this about the past, present or
co-text) to guess the meaning. You could
future? (The future) What word tells us it’s the
prompt them by asking questions, eg What
future? (will) Why do floods happen? (Because
weather conditions does the text mention?
there’s too much rain) So what thing has to
(Floods and hurricanes) Are these storms
happen first? (More rain) And what will the
normal or very serious and extreme? (Serious
result be? (More floods) How certain are we?
and extreme) So what do you think ‘severe’
(Quite certain) Can we say the sentence in a
means? (Very serious).
different way? (There will be more floods if
Students work in pairs to complete the activity. there is more rain). Elicit that the floods won’t
happen if there isn’t more rain, so we can’t say
Answers that something will definitely happen.
severe = extreme, very serious
absorb = take in a gas, liquid or other Answer
substance (here, heat) may happen
reflect = throw back (heat, light or sound)
without absorbing it
11 Look at the sentence you wrote on the board
melt = turn to water
and highlight the form. Ask students to read
rise (v) = go up
through the article again and underline other
affect = cause changes in
examples of the first conditional. Remind
eco-systems = all the living things in an
them that the first conditional has will in the
area and the way they affect each other
result clause so they don’t confuse it with zero
and the environment
conditional sentences in the text.
rise (n) = increase
Answers
8 Give students time to read through the
if we continue to burn … there will be
questions first, then read the report and
more storms
answer the questions. Check answers with the
If we go on producing them, temperatures
class.
will go up
Answers
1a 2a, b, c 3a, b 4a, b, c 5a, c

108 Unit 6
12 Do the first sentence with the class and elicit Speaking and writing
the sentence. Ask students to work with a
partner and complete the other sentences 14 THINK This activity encourages students
using the first conditional. Encourage them to to think more critically about the problem of
look back at the grammar box if needed. global warming and use the language they’ve
learnt to make more predictions. Ask students
Answers to work in pairs and discuss the questions
together, making a note of their answers
1 If the temperature goes up, there will
to questions 3 and 4. Monitor pairs as they
be more mosquitoes.
work, helping with any necessary vocabulary.
2 If the sea gets warmer, a lot of fish will
Encourage them to use the first conditional to
not survive.
make predictions about the future.
3 A lot of fish will die if that happens.
4 If we act now, climate change won’t be 15 Tell students to look at the notes they made
so bad. for questions 3 and 4 and give them a few
5 A lot of people will die if climate minutes to expand the notes and put them
change continues. in a suitable order for writing about them.
Students then write a paragraph about the
13 Encourage active discussion and elicit ideas environment, including their future predictions
from the class. Then tell them to read the and suggestions for saving the planet. You
report again and check their ideas. may want to start this activity in class and ask
MA For greater support, students could read students to finish it for homework, then bring
the report again before they do this activity. in their work to the next lesson.

Answers Extra idea: You could also set up a role-


play. Put students in pairs: A and B. Student
1 Temperatures will go up several
A is an environmental expert and student B
degrees.
is a journalist finding out about the dangers
2 The ice and snow at the poles will melt.
of global warming. Allow a few minutes of
3 Sea levels will rise.
thinking time so that student A can quickly
4 The sea will become more acid.
read and remember facts from the quiz
5 Fish will die or become smaller and
and report, and student B can think of the
therefore more expensive.
questions they’d like to ask.

Extra ideas: To give more practice of the MA Encourage stronger students to ask
first conditional in a different context, tell more questions so they don’t finish much
students that they’re all going on holiday to earlier than the weaker students.
a foreign country. Ask them to think about
what they’ll do in different places. Give an
example or two first, eg If I go to Rome, I’ll
Lesson 3 It’s an animal that
visit the Trevi Fountain. lives in the jungle. pp56–57
You could ask for alternatives to the phrase
Aims
If we don’t change our ways and suggest
students use a different one each time, The focus of this lesson is to introduce and practise
eg If we continue / carry on as we are, If relative pronouns to connect sentences, to learn
we go on burning fossil fuels / producing vocabulary to talk about endangered animals, and
greenhouse gases, If we don’t stop … etc. to talk about what we can do to help endangered
species around the world.

Unit 6 109
Warm-up 3 Pre-teach the word extinct and ask students to
predict which animals they think are in danger.
Find a simple description online about an animal.
Elicit ideas from the class.
Write down its name and its Latin name, eg
hedgehog – erinaceus europaeus, and some
helpful phrases, eg commonly found, its natural Answer
habitat is, it prefers, its diet is and it builds its All of them apart from the leatherback
nest in. Give a copy to each student. Check they turtle.
understand the vocabulary, then describe yourself
as if you were a wild animal, eg Terry (Professoria
Tip: Students usually know a lot about different
Terriceus europaeus) Commonly found in Europe,
things, so try to elicit their ideas and find
though often found in other parts of the world.
out what they know before they listen.
Its habitat is a small village near a river in the
This involves them far more and helps
Czech Republic. Its diet consists of fruit, vegetables
to activate their background knowledge
and cornflakes and it’s also known to eat pizza.
about the topic.
By day, it works, runs to stay fit, and looks after
its children, and by night it can be found in the
local café. Listening
Give students time to think of an animal they’d 4 Focus on the table below the photos and tell
like to be and write a short, humorous description students to read the last column – Interesting
of themselves. When they’ve finished, either put facts – and guess which six animals from
them in pairs to read out their descriptions to each exercise 2 match each fact. Elicit a few ideas,
other or ask students to present to the class. but don’t check answers yet.
MA Weaker students could do this in pairs or
5 2.32 Explain to students that they’re going
groups of three, so they can help each other
to hear a talk about the six animals. Play
with ideas and vocabulary.
the audio for them to listen and check their
Vocabulary Animals in danger answers to the animals (column A), then
play it again and tell them to make notes
1 To introduce the topic and check students about where the animals live (column B) and
know important vocabulary, ask them to match how many there are in existence (column C).
the words and photos. Ask students which Play the audio again, pausing as necessary.
names for these animals are very similar in their Encourage students to compare answers with
own language and which are very different. a partner, then check answers as a class.

Answers Answers
a salamander b turtle c leopard d rhino A Animal
e tiger f whale g gorilla 1 Amur leopard 2 Javan rhino 3 mountain
gorilla 4 Siberian tiger 5 right whale
2 2.31 GUESS Write phrases on the board 6 giant salamander
like: I think there is … There could be … There B Place
might be … and model the example sentence. 1 southeast Russia and northeast China
Then ask students to work in pairs to guess 2 Asia – now only Indonesia 3 Rwanda and
which adjectives describe the animals. Play the Congo, central Africa 4 eastern Russia
audio for them to check how many they got 5 North Atlantic, along east coast of US
right. Then play it again for students to repeat 6 China, Taiwan
the words. C How many left
1 40 2 60 3 fewer than 700 in 1989,
Transcript and answers more now 4 about 450 5 fewer than 350
1 Amur leopard 2 giant salamander 6 not sure
3 Javan rhino 4 leatherback turtle
5 mountain gorilla 6 right whale
7 Siberian tiger

110 Unit 6
Transcript The audio finishes with the question So
Good evening and thank you for coming to … what can we do to help? This is a nice
this short talk about animals in danger and the opportunity to prompt more discussion and get
things that we can do to help. students’ ideas and opinions.
There are many, many animals in danger
nowadays sadly, but tonight I’m just going to Suggested answers
mention six which are especially in danger of D
extinction. 1 hunted for skin (fur coats) and bones
First, there’s the Amur leopard. It lives in (medicine) 2 horn used in medicine;
southeast Russia and northeast China and its disease and natural disasters which destroy
skin can sell for $1,000. They’re very, very close habitat 3 disease (tourism), wars destroy
to extinction. There are only about 40 of them habitat, hunted for meat, babies kept as
left in the wild. pets 4 hunted for skin (fur coats) and
Second is the Javan rhino – one of the rarest bones (medicine); forests disappearing
mammals in the world. There was a time when 5 swim in polluted waters, crash into ships
it lived all over Asia, but these days there are 6 rivers and lakes polluted, luxury food
only 60 of them left in Indonesia.
Then there’s the mountain gorilla. It’s an
animal which lives in high forests in Rwanda
Transcript
and Congo in central Africa. In 1989, there man So why are these animals in danger?
were fewer than 700 mountain gorillas. Their Why are so few of them left in the
numbers have gone up again – this is great wild?
news – but they still have lots of problems. woman That’s a great question. Well, there are

There are only about 450 Siberian tigers left. lots of different reasons why animals
They’re beautiful animals and the biggest cats are in danger.
in the world, so it’s important to protect them. The Amur leopard and the Siberian
They only live in the eastern part of Russia. tiger are animals that have beautiful
Right whales are creatures which live in the fur and there are a lot of people who
North Atlantic, along the east coast of the US. want to wear very expensive leopard
There are fewer than 350 of these amazing and tiger coats! So there are people
creatures left, even though they’ve had that hunt them for their skins. Also,
protection for more than 80 years. their bones are an ingredient in
And my last animal is the giant salamander traditional Asian medicine. And the
from China and Taiwan – the largest amphibian forests where the Siberian tiger lives
in the world. People who keep records aren’t are disappearing because people are
exactly sure how many giant salamanders cutting down the trees.
are left, but one thing is certain: they are People use rhino horn in traditional
becoming rarer and rarer. medicine too, and people who hunt
rhino can make a lot of money. Rhinos
6 THINK Put students in groups to talk about are also dying because of disease and
why the animals might be in danger. Tell them natural disasters like tsunamis, as
that they can look up and use some of the these destroy their habitat.
words from the vocabulary box to help them. Mountain gorillas are dying from
Elicit ideas from each group, but don’t check disease too, partly because of
answers yet. increased tourism but also because
of wars which are destroying their
7 2.33 Play the next part of the talk for
habitat. Also, some people enjoy
students to check their reasons from exercise 6.
eating gorilla meat and – very sadly –
Play it again, pausing as necessary for students
some people like to have gorilla babies
to make notes in column D, then ask them to
as pets.
compare their ideas.

Unit 6 111
The giant salamander is another A short time limit also means the pace is fast
creature that is losing its habitat as and more fun. Encourage students to use
more rivers and lakes become dirty different relative pronouns so that they talk
and polluted. But the salamander’s about people, things and places.
biggest problem is that people like to
10 Focus on the WWF logo with the panda and
eat it, and it has become a luxury food
ask: How many of you have seen this logo?
item in restaurants in Asia.
Elicit answers to the first question, then tell
Right whales have a different problem.
students to read the text quickly to find the
They have had protection for many
answers to both questions. They then read
years, but their numbers are still going
it again more slowly, this time filling in the
down. They are very big and very slow
missing relative pronouns. Do the first one as
and they swim very near the coast
an example. Ask: What’s the word before the
where the water is not so clean. It also
gap? (organisation) Which pronoun do you use
means that they often crash into ships
to talk about a thing? (which / that). Students
and die.
complete the activity individually, then check in
So … what can we do to help?
pairs.
Extra idea: Tell students to choose one of
the animals and use the notes they made in
Answers
exercise 7 to write a short text about it. 1 World Wide Fund for Nature
2 It’s the symbol of the WWF.
1 which / that 2 which / that 3 which / that
Grammar Relative pronouns who / 4 which / that 5 who / that 6 who / that
which / that
8 Ask students to look at the examples of relative 11 Ask students to cover the text or close
pronouns in the grammar box. You could their books and play the memory game. Give
also write the sentences on the board and them a target of perhaps five or six things to
highlight the pronouns. Get them to look at remember. Then tell them to read again to
the sentences and work out the rules together. check.
Note: We’ve just focused on the pronouns
in this level, not relative clauses, so you don’t Extra ideas: You could also do the activity
need to go into the different types of clause as a class quiz to see which team can
at this point. Work on both defining and remember the most facts.
non-defining relative clauses will be done in Ask questions about the text, eg How long
Jetstream Intermediate. has the giant panda been the symbol of the
WWF? What does the panda symbolise?
Answers Does everybody who works for the WWF
1 a) who, that b) which, that get paid? What does the WWF always
2 that need?

Refer to the grammar reference on SB page 78 Explore


now or at the end of the lesson and go through it Tell students to go to the WWF website and
with students. find out more about endangered animals and
9 Tell students they’re going to play a game to conservation.
practise relative pronouns. Read through the
instructions and model the example with one Extra idea: Create a webquest for the
or two students. Put them in pairs to play the class and get students to either complete
game; set a time limit of one minute for each the activity at home or in class using their
round so they’re quickly on task and don’t smartphones. This is often motivating for
take too long thinking about their answers. students, so provide links to two or three
websites about endangered animals and

112 Unit 6
conservation. Make a worksheet with Writing
reading comprehension questions from
each site, then have students search the 15 Read through the advertisement with the class
sites to answer the questions. and elicit the most important requirements for
volunteers. Ask: What skills, qualities and type
of personality would volunteers need to have?
Speaking Make a short list on the board.
12 P 2.34 Say the words five and give to Give students a few minutes to brainstorm
help students notice the difference between ideas with a partner, then ask them to write
the long /aɪ/ and short /ɪ/ sounds. Write both a formal email expressing interest in being
words on the board and ask students to work a WWF volunteer. Remind them to include
in pairs, say the words in the box to each other, details about all of the requirements. Walk
then write them under the correct sound. Play around and offer help and gentle correction if
the audio for students to listen and check, then needed, then get students to share and read
play it again for them to repeat each word. their partner’s emails afterwards.
Help with pronunciation difficulties and get
students to see the difference in mouth
position. They should feel the movement from
Vocabulary plus p58
a more open to closed position when they
Emergency equipment (2)
make the longer vowel sound /aɪ/ and see the
more closed position of the shorter vowel /ɪ/. 1 2.35 Ask students to match the words and
Note: Only the verb form of live is given here. pictures. Then tell them to compare with a
The adjective live is pronounced /laɪv/. partner. Play the audio for them to check their
answers, then play it again, pausing for them
Transcript and answers to repeat each word.
/aɪ/ five: advice, China, describe, drive, inside, MA For an extra challenge, ask students to
item, mobile, right, wildlife try to name as many of the items as they can
/ɪ/ give: condition, drink, engine, extinction, without looking at the words in the box.
live, since, symbol
Transcript and answers
Extra idea: Give students these tongue 1 box of matches 2 sweets 3 sun cream
twisters to practise the two sounds: 4 sleeping bag 5 whistle 6 GPS device
A See much wildlife in Dubai? 7 mirror 8 compass 9 map 10 penknife
B Five Siberian tigers and a white rhino! 11 hat 12 rope 13 lighter
A Can you list fifty-six ships?
B Give me a minute to think! Extra idea: Find pictures of each item
of emergency equipment (you could
13 Put students in pairs to talk about the download them from the internet) and
questions and make notes for the next make a memory game with word and
exercise. Encourage students to use relative picture cards. Put students in pairs and tell
pronouns in their answers. You could give this them to spread the cards face down on the
activity to students as homework so they can table. They then take turns to turn over
spend some time researching information. two cards. If the words and pictures match,
they keep them and have another turn. If
14 Put students in groups to report to the rest of they don’t match, they turn them back over
the class what they talked about. Monitor pairs and their partner takes a turn. The person
as they talk, making a note of any common with the most cards at the end wins.
problems with grammar, pronunciation or
intonation. Get class feedback and find out the 2 To introduce the topic, you could show a short
most interesting and surprising facts. movie trailer of the film Cast Away with Tom
Hanks (you can find this on YouTube).

Unit 6 113
Ask students to imagine they’re lost in a very
remote and dangerous place. Ask: What Extra idea: If you have a strong class and
kind of things would be most important? have done work with phonemic script,
Put students in groups of three and tell them write a selection of words for emergency
to look at the list of emergency equipment equipment on the board in phonemic
in exercise 2 on SB page 52 and the list in script. Put students in teams. The first team
exercise 1 on SB page 58 and choose the to shout out the word correctly gets a
most important objects. Set a time limit of point. The team with the most points at the
three minutes and get them to agree on three end is the winner.
things. Remind them that they must all agree
on the three things. Get feedback from the Wordbuilder Nouns from verbs
groups and find out which three items most
people chose. a Explain that sometimes nouns and verbs have
exactly the same form. As an example, ask:
3 Go through the Survival quiz first and check What’s the noun form of the verb ‘aim’?
comprehension of a positive attitude, shelter, (aim). Then tell students that there are also
and high-energy. Ask students to do the quiz exceptions and get them to find the one with a
and compare their answers with a partner. different form.
Remind them that sometimes there’s more
than one correct answer. Go through the Answer
answers with the class and, if you want to, survive (noun = survival)
give them the extra information shown in the
answer key.
b Read out the example and point out the verb
and noun change. Ask students to choose a
Answers
word from the list and write sentences with
1 b) a positive attitude, followed by both nouns and verbs. Ask them to share their
d) training. sentences together afterwards.
2 Order: 1c) find shelter 2d) find water
3a) light a fire 4b) find food (Survival’s Extra idea: Tell students to write the
rule of three: In extreme conditions we sentences but leave gaps where the key
can live three hours without shelter, words should be. Their partner has to guess
three days without water and three which word goes in the sentence from the
weeks without food. With fire, we can list in exercise a.
boil water to make it safe to drink.)
(Note: If you have any injuries, you
4 P 2.36 Do the first one as an example and
should treat those first.)
elicit where the stress is (atmosphere – first
3 b) Animals – you can eat all of them.
syllable). Students then work individually to
Most fish are OK, as are many insects.
do the activity. Play the audio for students to
(And they all provide protein.) Animals
check their answers, then play it again, pausing
are safer to eat than plants because
for students to repeat each word.
many plants (especially brightly
coloured ones) are poisonous and can
Transcript and answers
make you sick or even kill you.
4 c) Getting too cold (hypothermia – atmosphere, condition, connection, disappear,
when your body temperature falls energy, example, important, mosquito,
below 35º) can kill you because your positive, temperature
organs stop working, though the other 5 P Ask students which of the three-syllable
things are dangerous and painful. words are very similar in their own language
5 All of them except tight clothes, which and which are very different. Tell them to say
can reduce circulation. any words that are similar and decide if the
stress is the same or different.
MA For greater support, play the audio
again rather than asking students to say
the words.
114 Unit 6
Focus on: keep Transcript
A OK. First you need to check if the person is
a Explain that keep is used in lots of different
breathing or not. To do that, lift their chin
phrases. If students aren’t sure about an
and move their head back. Like this. OK.
answer, encourage them to complete the
Then put your ear close to their mouth and
ones they know first and guess the final few
listen. You can see if their chest is moving
options.
at the same time. Are you with me so far?
Yes? Good.
Answers
OK then … here’s the next step. If the
1e 2d 3f 4c 5a 6b person is breathing, turn them onto their
side and move their head back. This is the
b Students fill in the gaps with the correct ‘recovery’ position. Then, if you’re in the
preposition. Get them to check their answers UK, call 999. Otherwise call the emergency
with a partner afterwards. Ask: Can you number for the country you’re in. Keep an
imagine when you might see or say ‘Keep eye on the person until help arrives. Is that
off the grass!’? Elicit ideas, eg in a park. Put clear? OK.
students in pairs to come up with a situation If the person isn’t breathing, call 999
for each one, then ask them to share their right away, and start to work on the heart
ideas with the class. immediately. Put one hand on top of the
other – just like this – push down strongly
Answers here – with the heel of the hand – about
1 off 2 away 3 out 4 on 5 up 6 on 7 in 100 times a minute. Like I’m doing now.
And you need to keep doing this until help
arrives. OK? That’s very important. Because
Everyday English p59 if you stop, the person could die. Do you
understand? Do you have any questions?
You first! B Yes, sorry, I’m a bit confused about what to
Check students understand unconscious, then do if the person isn’t breathing. Could you
elicit a few ideas from the class for what they explain it again?
would do in this situation. A Yes, sure. Let’s do it again.

3 Tell students to read through the sentences


Giving instructions; checking first so that they know what to listen for. Play
understanding the video or audio again while students watch
1 Ask students to look at the photos and work or listen and complete the instructions.
out what’s happening in each one. Ask: Do you
know what order we do them in if someone Answers
needs first aid? Don’t check answers yet. 1 breathing or not
2 chin; head back
2 2.37 6 Decide whether you’re going to
3 ear; mouth; listen
use the video or simply play the audio. If you 4 their side and move their head back
can, it would be useful to see the video in this 5 999
lesson, as it contains useful visual information. 6 999 right away
The video shows how to give first aid and 7 heart immediately
also highlights useful language for explaining 8 the other
things, sequence instructions and checking 9 down strongly with the heel of the hand
that people understand what we’re trying to about 100 times a minute.
show them. 10 doing this until help arrives.
Play the video or audio for students to check
their ideas from exercise 1. 4 Ask students to look at the phrases in the box.
Ask: Can you remember what the instructor
Answers said? Students tick the questions they can
A3 B1 C2 remember, then watch or listen again to check.
Unit 6 115
Answers
De-stress!
Read through the short text. Ask students to stand
Are you with me so far? Yes? Is that clear?
up – it’s easier – put their hands on their stomach
Do you understand? Do you have any
and take a couple of deep breaths. As they
questions?
breathe in, their stomach should push their hands
out (and their shoulders stay still).
5 Get students to explain what’s happening
Note: One or two breaths is plenty – too many
in the photos and match them with the
could cause them to feel dizzy.
situations.
we don’t say … / we say …
Answers
This section focuses on the following areas:
1A 2B • incorrect use of a future tense in a zero
conditional sentence
6 Ask students to look at the instructions and • incorrect tense use in a first conditional
match them with each situation in exercise 5. sentence
Ask: Can you remember what 999 is? (The • incorrect choice of a relative pronoun
number for the emergency services in the UK). Ask students to cover the green we say … side
Do you know what number to call in other and see if they can correct the mistakes themselves
countries? If they don’t know the number for before they look and check.
many countries, it would be useful for them to
look it up online.

Answers
burn: b, d, e/f
choking: a, c, f

7 Tell students to try to put the instructions in


the correct order and compare with a partner.
Point out that one item may not be used, as it
depends on the severity of the injury (Call 999
immediately).

Answers
burn: 1d 2b 3f/e
choking: 1c 2a 3f

8 Tell the class to look at the phrases in exercise


3 again, then take turns to give each other
instructions for one of the situations in exercise
5. Encourage them to use the expressions
to sequence things correctly – first, then,
here’s the next step – and check their partner
understands well.

Extra idea: Ask students to talk with a


partner about a time when they were
hurt or injured. Get them to explain what
happened and how people helped them.
Encourage them to ask extra questions for
more detail and information.

116 Unit 6
Units 5&6 Review pp60–61

Warm-up so they read for gist. It’s also helpful to write a


Tell students you’re going to describe a famous focus question on the board so that they have
person. They have to listen carefully and try to a clear reason to read, eg What does Nadal do
guess who it is. When they think they know, they between games? (He drinks from both bottles
have to put their hands up. Give points to students of water). Ask students to talk about the article
who guess early on in the list of sentences – the and things they found surprising. Get class
more information they have, the easier it becomes. feedback about their reaction to the article.
He was born on the island of Mallorca in Spain on 3 Ask students to close their books and get them
3rd June, 1986. to complete the sentences from memory if
He still lives there with his family. they can. They don’t have to write the exact
He started playing his sport when he was three words and it’s OK if they have to look. After
years old. they’ve finished, get them to compare their
He won the Spanish and European titles when he answers with a partner, then check the article
was 12. again to see if they were correct.
He won his first grand-slam title in Paris when he
was just 19. Answers
He won a gold medal at the Beijing Olympics in
1 will see that he has a lot of
2008.
2 can’t concentrate
He has an advertising contract with Nike.
3 mustn’t walk on
He has won 14 grand slam titles.
4 must be exactly the same
His nickname is Rafa.
5 different heights; won’t
6 can have them in his mind while he’s playing
Tip: This type of guessing game provides a nice
introduction to reading activities. It
encourages prediction and activates students’ 4 Put students in groups of five if possible
background knowledge so they’re more and assign one person or thing in the list to
engaged and motivated to read the text. each student. Tell them to share their facts
with the others in the group, then read the text
again and check their answers.
Reading
1 If you didn’t do the warm-up, ask the class
Speaking and writing
what they know about Rafael Nadal (it’s 5 Do an example with the class first. Say: I always
OK if they say Nothing!), then get them to close my eyes and breathe deeply for a minute
answer the questions in pairs. Check students before I do something difficult. Put students in
understand the words in question 3. small groups to talk about any rituals, routines
or superstitions they have. If they don’t have any
Suggested answers routines, they could talk about someone they
2 standing / sitting, noisy / quiet, working / know or make something up.
resting, hot / cool, fast / slow …
6 Ask students to write about their (or somebody
else’s) routines or rituals. This provides a reason
MA To give more help in question 3, point to
to listen closely to each other in exercise 5, as
the items in the photos and elicit the correct
well as ask extra questions for more detailed
words.
information. You may want to start this
2 Quickly check that students understand what activity in class and ask students to finish it for
routines and rituals are. Set a short time limit homework.

Units 5&6 Review 117


Grammar Things people do vary, but might include
repeatedly checking that things like lights /
7 Go through the list of items. If necessary, the oven are turned off, washing their
review each piece of language by looking at hands several times before they can go out,
the grammar reference section for Unit 6 on SB etc.
page 78.
Ask students to read the article again and Preposition Park
underline examples of relative pronouns, modal
verbs and conditional sentences. You could put a Students complete the sentences with the
them in groups of three to do this, each person correct prepositions. Check answers by asking
looking for a different item. eg: What words are before and after the first
gap? (get; the airport) Which preposition do
Answers we use to talk about movement? (to)
1 uncle Toni who taught … and who
is still his coach … courts which were Answers
terrible … routines which help him 1 to; in 2 at; at 3 to; on 4 to; to 5 to; on
… rituals which create order … two
bottles, which he puts down b Have students read the sentences and discuss
2 you have to be in the right mental their travel preferences together.
state … He has to do them … he
believes he has to do … He must walk Cross Culture: Giving presents
… He mustn’t walk … He can’t put
a Start by asking: When do you give somebody a
… he must put … His socks must be
present? Elicit words like birthday, anniversary,
… he has to check … He always has
wedding. Ask: What kind of presents do you
to have … The labels must face … he
give when you go to somebody’s house? Elicit
must drink … he must look up … he
a few ideas, then tell students to read the
can have them
information and try to complete it with the
3 If you aren’t, you won’t win. … If you
correct presents. Tell them that it’s fine to make
watch Rafa play a match, you will see
a guess – but there are some clues in the article
… if he doesn’t do them, he can’t
to help them. Elicit ideas from the class, then
concentrate. … If they are different
tell them the correct answers.
heights, he won’t play well.

Answers
8 Have students read the text about Wendy and
1 clock 2 book 3 flowers 4 cakes 5 fruit
circle the correct words. Encourage them to
6 scissors 7 knife 8 gloves 9 handkerchief
compare their answers with a partner and get
10 shoes
feedback. Ask them to explain the reasons for
their choices, then find out how many people
are like Wendy. b Students discuss their reactions to the text with
a partner, then make a list of tips and advice
Answers for giving presents in their country. Write
should and must on the board and encourage
1 who 2 might 3 goes 4 has 5 must
students to use the modal verbs. Get class
6 mustn’t 7 has to 8 mustn’t 9 may
feedback.
10 must 11 will
c Go through the situations first and check
understanding of roses and scarf. Put students
Background information: Obsessive
in pairs to talk about the questions. Tell them
Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a
to write a different question about cross-
psychological condition which we all have
cultural differences when giving presents, and
to some extent, but some people find it
ask them to work with a different partner and
very difficult to do anything without going
answer each other’s questions.
through certain rituals a number times.

118 Units 5&6 Review


Extra material

Photocopiable games
Teacher’s notes 121
Getting to know you 123
Unit 1 124
Unit 2 125
Unit 3 126
Unit 4 127
Unit 5 128
Unit 6 129
Tasks
Teacher’s notes 130
Tasks Units 1–6 132
Technique banks
Using the video 135
Using stories 136
Using memory games 137
20 easy games 139
Five fun techniques to use with a flagging class 141
Extra questions and tasks for Art & Music 142
Working with mixed-ability classes 143
Ensuring learner autonomy and using technology 143
De-stress! cartoons 145

120 Extra material


Photocopiable games

Teacher’s notes
Unit Game Players Language focus
Getting to know you Bingo rows C Vocabulary: alphabet (listening)
1 Do or make? (B) C/G Vocabulary: nouns which go with verbs
2 Find the differences P/G Present and past continuous
3 Future plans (B) G going to / present continuous for future plans
4 I’ve already done that! (B) G Present perfect with yet / just / already
5 The holiday game (B) G Vocabulary: travel items
6 It’s a thing which … P/G Relative pronouns / Vocabulary: survival items
7 Compare (B) G Comparison
8 The name game C something, somewhere, someone
9 Matchmaker C Passive / Verb + -ing / Vocabulary: health
10 Report it! (B) C / G /P Reported speech
11 If … (B) C / G /P Conditional sentences
12 Celebrations C Vocabulary: celebrations

B = board game, C = whole class, G = groups, P = pairs

These games are all photocopiable. Alternatively, 2 As a whole-class team game, dividing the
you can download them from the e-zone. class into two teams. Before the lesson, write
Remember, you don’t have to play the games just numbers to correspond to the number of
once in the particular unit – you can return to squares on pieces of paper and put them in a
them any time to replay them, or else have them hat, box or plastic bag. Call out the number of
handy as an option for early finishers. If you do a square to each team in turn. The team gets
want to keep the games and re-use them, it’s a points for correct answers. If one team can’t
good idea to put them in individual plastic folders answer, it goes to the other team. Keep a score
so you’ve always got them when you need them. (or have a student keep a score) on the board.
3 In pairs. One person shuts their eyes and puts
Board games their finger on the board before opening their
(Marked ‘B’ in the above table; they include all the eyes again, and the other answers. (If they
games except Getting to know you, Unit 2.) don’t point to a particular square, they have
You can set these games up in several ways: another go.) Points as above.
1 As a normal board game using dice and 4 As an interactive whiteboard activity with the
counters, with students in pairs or small whole class, or played either individually or in
groups of three or four. You’ll need to make pairs on the e-zone.
sure you have enough dice for the number of
groups. Students place their counters (or coins, Important notes
paperclips, etc) on START and take turns to 1 You can change the instructions or rules for
throw the die and move. any game, or ask your students if they can
In many of these games, players get points for suggest more interesting ways of playing a
their answers. The first person to reach FINISH game!
gets an extra 2 points and the game stops. The 2 MA If you want to make a game more difficult
winner is the player with the most points. for some (or all) your students, say that a
square already used by one player cannot be
re-used by another.
Jetstream Pre-intermediate Teacher’s Guide © Helbling Languages PHOTOCOPIABLE 121
Answers for Report it! (Unit 10) Unit 2 – Find the differences
1 He said (that) he would always love Lucy. There are various ways of doing this.
2 He said (that) they were playing tennis with MA With a mixed-ability class, you might want to
their friends. use a variety (1 is easiest, 3 is more difficult).
3 He said (that) he lived in a flat in London. 1 Students have the whole sheet so they can see
4 He said (that) she had given her mum a both pictures and make statements.
present.
2 Students have one picture each so they can
5 He said (that) he was going on holiday.
only see theirs and have to ask each other
6 He said (that) she didn’t like spiders.
questions.
7 He said (that) Karen was very happy with her
car. 3 Student A looks at a picture, student B doesn’t
8 He said (that) there was a game that John have one. A describes the street scene for B to
wanted to buy. draw, or B asks questions and sketches it.
9 He said (that) he loved to visit Istanbul. 4 Use one or both pictures as a memory game.
10 He said (that) he drove to work every day. Students look at it / them for 30 seconds, then
11 He said (that) he flew to many countries on write down (or draw) all the things they can
business. remember.
12 He said (that) she was very good at painting. 5 Use one of the pictures as the basis for a true /
13 He said (that) they didn’t want to come. false drill – either with students looking at the
14 He said (that) the film wasn’t very good. picture as you do so, or from memory. You
15 He asked why he was dressed like that. could do this as a prelude to any of the other
16 He asked if she was a journalist. activities.
17 He asked if they had liked the festival.
18 He asked what they wanted to buy. Unit 6 – It’s a thing which …
19 He asked how many trains to Rome there were.
20 He asked how they could do that. Before the lesson
Photocopy the page and cut it into 30 pieces of
Non-board games paper or card. If you have a large class, you may
want to make more than one copy so that students
Getting to know you – Bingo rows can play the game in smaller groups. With a
Before the lesson weaker class, you may wish to elicit and / or write
1 Photocopy the page and cut it into ten the names of the 30 objects on the board first.
separate grids – one grid for each student. (It Playing the game
doesn’t matter if some students have the same 1 Place the pile of cards face down in the middle
grid if you have more than ten students.) of the group. Students take turns to pick a
2 Write the letters of the English alphabet (A–Z) card from the top of the pile.
on small pieces of paper and put them in a bag 2 The student looks at the card and describes
or box. the item without saying what it is. They can
Playing the game describe what it looks like (eg It’s flat and
Take a piece of paper out of the bag or box, and made of paper, They’re brown and made of
call out the letter. Students cross the letters off as leather), but encourage them to use relative
they hear them. They shout Bingo! for a complete pronouns to describe what it’s used for (eg It’s
line of letters horizontally or vertically. They don’t a thing which you use to find your way, They’re
have to wait for the whole card! things which you put on your feet to keep
An alternative easy way of playing this is to have them warm and dry).
students choose and write down between five and 3 The first student to correctly guess the item
ten letters. You’ll still need to write the letters of wins the card. If no one correctly guesses the
the alphabet on small pieces of paper beforehand item after one minute, the card is returned to
and put them in a bag or box, so you can call the bottom of the pile.
them out. 4 The game continues until all the cards have
Once they get the idea, invite individuals or pairs been won. The winner is the student with the
of students to do the calling out instead of you. most cards.

122 Jetstream Pre-intermediate Teacher’s Guide © Helbling Languages PHOTOCOPIABLE


Getting to know you


Bingo rows
S D T A H H N Y O Z
N R E M C E S T A W
Y U I O Q G R F X Q
B G T K L M U L B P


O E R N U C U R F B
Y S L I D M H D O T
T A Q M K V E K L W
V B G W H A N I X Z


O N H A T Y A E N B
S M J I D S U I V O
E Y F P W D M H J C
G U Q V K P K Z R T


U P G Y S A S Z F E
E C O R N M R N T B
A D I H B K D O Y X
T W Q F L G J C U H

Jetstream Pre-intermediate Teacher’s Guide © Helbling Languages PHOTOCOPIABLE 123


Unit 1
Do or make?
You need
1
‘ An appointment – make – I made an

a die and counters ’


appointment at the dentist this morning.

Playing the game ‘


4 The cooking – do – I never do the cooking at the

When you land on a square:


weekend.

The winner is the player with the most points
1 say make or do. (1 point)
when the first player gets to FINISH.
2 say when you last made or did that particular
thing. (1 point)

1 2 3

START an appointment a cake coffee

8 7 6 5 4

homework exercise an excuse a decision the cooking

9 10 11 12

a mistake a noise a phone call Pilates

17 16 15 14 13

Sudoku sport the shopping a reservation the ironing

18 19 20

a test yoga your hair


FINISH

124 Jetstream Pre-intermediate Teacher’s Guide © Helbling Languages PHOTOCOPIABLE


Unit 2
Find the differences
Work with a partner or in small groups. How many differences can you find between
these two pictures? Give yourselves a point for each one.
A Yesterday


B Today

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Unit 3
Future plans
You need 2 say when and / or why you’re going to do it.
a die and counters (1 point)
Before you begin 1
‘I’m having a party on Saturday because it’s my
Go through the words and decide what verb you birthday.

can use in circles that don’t have one, eg party =
go to a party / have a party, and what nouns or
3
‘ I’m going to watch a film on TV this evening.

The first player who gets to FINISH gets an extra
phrases you can use in circles that just have a verb, two points and the game ends. The winner is the
eg fly = fly a plane / fly to Rio. player with the most points when that happens.
Playing the game
When you land on a circle:
1 talk about a future plan you have using the
word / phrase in the circle. (1 point)

1 2 3

START party jazz TV

15 16 17 18 19 4

shopping qualifications classical football fly housework


music

14 25 26 20 5

travel pop music learn another FINISH rap the cinema


language

13 24 23 22 21 6

a job a computer a newspaper cricket coffee the theatre


game

12 11 10 9 8 7

tennis work start colleagues a business a magazine

126 Jetstream Pre-intermediate Teacher’s Guide © Helbling Languages PHOTOCOPIABLE


Unit 4
I’ve already done that!
You need You get an extra point if you use yet, just or
a die and counters already correctly.
Playing the game ‘
1 make – made – I’ve just made a mistake in my
When you land on a square: ’
homework.

1 say the past participle of the verb. (1 point) ‘ Well done! Three points!

The first player who gets to FINISH gets an extra
2 make up a true sentence (affirmative or
two points and the game ends. The winner is the
negative) or a question using the present
player with the most points when that happens.
perfect of the verb. (1 point)

1 2 3

START make be use

8 7 6 5 4

understand call give spend do

9 10 11 12

watch read show write

17 16 15 14 13

share break work teach live

18 19 20

buy own clean


FINISH

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Unit 5
The holiday game
You need
a die and counters 2 justify your decision if you want to take the
Playing the game item.
You’re going on holiday to the Maldives. It’ll 1
‘ I have to take swimming things with me so
be hot and sunny, and there are lots of lovely I can swim in the sea.

beaches, but not much else. You need to choose If the other players agree with your reason, you
five things to take with you. can write the item on your list.
When you land on a square: The first player who gets to FINISH with five
1 decide if you want to take the item shown on suitable items is the winner.
the square.

1 2 3 4 5
START

6
7
8
9
10
11

12

13
14
15
16
17
18

19
20
21
22
23
24

25

26
27
28
29
30

FINISH

128 Jetstream Pre-intermediate Teacher’s Guide © Helbling Languages PHOTOCOPIABLE


Unit 6
It’s a thing which …


1 2 3 4 5


6 7 8 9 10

11 12 13 14 15

16 17 18 19 20

21 22 23 24 25

26 27 28 29 30

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Tasks

General teacher’s notes Specific task notes


1 You can either read the task instructions to Unit 1
the students, or photocopy the task notes and Read out the task and highlight the phrase help
hand them out. you learn, as this is a useful structure for this task.
2 For some tasks, students can produce a printed STAGE 1: Read out the four questions and briefly
document if they have access to computers. elicit some answers from students. Teach
Decide if you want them to do this and the phrases important / helpful to (write
organise the task accordingly. words down).
3 If the task requires certain things, eg a stapler, STAGE 3: Elicit suggestions, eg Vocabulary is a
supply these. very important part of a language. How
4 Make sure students understand each stage can you improve your vocabulary and
of the task. As you go through the stages, memory? Here are some useful tips.
check students understand the examples and STAGE 4: If you want, add a final stage, where the
elicit more where necessary. Remember that class has to agree on the top ten tips.
when students are in their pairs or groups,
Unit 2
they’ll need language for suggestions,
agreement, etc. Where there are dialogues or STAGE 1: Check students understand the language
conversations, it’s often a good idea to model in the example answers, eg each other,
them first with confident students. love at first sight (when you see someone
and fall in love immediately), the one
5 Tell students that when they need new
(the right partner for you). Encourage
language, they can use a dictionary, or ask
students to use the past continuous at
each other or you for help.
least once.
6 As students do the task, monitor them and
STAGE 2: Model the question-and-answer process
help them with language. Check their written
with a confident pair. They should ask the
work so they have a correct final version.
questions in stage 1, but can ask other
7 It can be a good idea to do the unit task as
questions as well.
revision after you’ve finished the unit.
STAGE 5: Bring in a stapler to create the files.
8 Students will need a certain amount of help to
Alternatively, students could print their
do the tasks, but at the same time encourage
descriptions for homework, and the files
them to be as independent as possible, as this
could be created in the next lesson.
promotes learner autonomy.
Unit 3
STAGE 1: Encourage students to talk about their
problems with their work or studies and
to give advice about other students’
problems. Teach vocabulary where
necessary.
STAGE 4: Encourage students to use future tenses
here.

130 Tasks Jetstream Pre-intermediate Teacher’s Guide © Helbling Languages PHOTOCOPIABLE


Unit 4
STAGE 1: Go through the language in the examples
and elicit more ideas. Point out that work
(It worked ...) in this context means ‘do
the work that it should do’. Encourage
students to use the present perfect where
possible. Make sure students understand
that the sales assistant must decide what
to do about the fact that the customer
doesn’t have a receipt.
STAGE 3: You could ask groups to act out one of
their role-plays for the whole class.
Unit 5
STAGE 2: Go through the kinds of thing students
could take, eg a water bottle, a waterproof
jacket, a first-aid kit. Point out that we use
could for possibility.
Unit 6
STAGE 1: Make sure that students understand the
names of the different types of holiday
and can say them. Encourage students to
use sentences with if.

Jetstream Pre-intermediate Teacher’s Guide © Helbling Languages PHOTOCOPIABLE Tasks 131


Unit 1 TASK: Make a list of ten tips to help you learn vocabulary in a foreign language.

STAGE 1 Work in pairs. Talk about these questions STAGE 2 Work with two more pairs and compare
and make notes of your answers. notes. Then agree on your top ten tips
• When you’re in class, what do you do and make a list of them. Choose a title
to memorise vocabulary? for your list.
STAGE 3 Write a short introduction of two
I write the words in my notebook.
I think that’s very impor tant. or three sentences.
• What do you do to remember the STAGE 4 Work with the whole class. Someone
stress in words and phrases? from each group reads out their group’s
introduction and tips. Have a class
I underline the stressed syllable.
discussion about which tips are most
• What do you do at home to improve useful.
your vocabulary and help your
memory?
‘I think it’s very important / helpful to …’
I do the Workbook exercises. That
helps a lot.

I repeat words. That helps me


remember them.

• What else can you do to improve your


vocabulary?
You can keep a vocabulary book. That’s
very helpf ul.

Unit 2 TASK: Create a file describing the best moment of your life so far.

STAGE 1 What’s been the best moment of your life STAGE 2 Work in pairs and ask questions to find
so far? Think about these questions and out about your partner’s ‘best moment’.
make notes. STAGE 3 Work with two other pairs. Take turns
• When was the best moment of your to tell each other about your partner’s
life? experience. Your partner must correct you
It was about ten years ago.
if you make a mistake.
STAGE 4 Write a description of your own
• What exactly happened?
experience. Exchange your description
I met my par tner for the first time. with your partner and help each other
• Where were you, and what were you with language mistakes. Then write a
doing? final version.
I was at a par ty and I was talking STAGE 5 Create a file of your group’s experiences.
to a friend. I was a bit bored. Give it to other groups to read.
• Can you describe what happened?
A guy came and said hello. We looked
at each other. He had great eyes. It
was love at first sight! I knew he was
‘the one’ – and he knew too!

132 Tasks Jetstream Pre-intermediate Teacher’s Guide © Helbling Languages PHOTOCOPIABLE


Unit 3 TASK: Find solutions for problems at work.

STAGE 1 Work in groups of between four and six. STAGE 3 Take turns to describe the problem and
Each describe a problem that you have your solution to the group.
with your work or studies. If you don’t
have a problem, invent one.

‘ I’m going to talk about Maria’s problem. She
likes her job, but her pay isn’t good. My solution /

‘My manager is very disorganised and blames

advice is this: I think Maria needs to ...


me for problems. But it’s often his fault!
Discuss solutions to each of the problems
’ After your talk, ask other members of the
group for their opinion.
and give advice.
‘So that’s my advice. What do you think?
Do you agree, or do you have a different

‘ When your manager asks you to do something,
suggestion?


I think you should write down his instructions.
STAGE 4 Think about your own problem again.

‘ email and ask for confirmation.
That’s a good idea. Then you could send him
Decide what you’re going to do about it.
STAGE 2
an

Sit in a circle and think about the problem
Take turns to tell the group.
of the student on your left. Decide on
‘Thanks for your advice. It’s very helpful. I’m
seeing my manager next week. I’m going to ask
your advice / solution and make notes in
preparation for a talk. ’
for a rise.

Unit 4 TASK: Role-play returning something to a shop.

STAGE 1 Work in pairs. You’re going to do a role- Student B: You’re the sales assistant.
play where a customer returns something, • Ask the usual questions a salesperson
eg a household or technological item, to asks when a customer wants to return
a shop. Each choose a role – A or B – and something.
read the notes for it below. Then write
notes for your role.

‘Can I help you?

Student A: You’re the customer.

‘ What’s wrong with it? / What’s the
problem?

• Decide what the item is, eg electric
kettle, mobile phone.

‘Do you want a refund or’ would you like to
Do you have a receipt?


• Decide how to begin the conversation
with the sales assistant at the shop. •
exchange it?

When the customer looks for their
• Say when you bought the item and receipt, they can’t find it. They tell you
what the problem is. that you served them. Decide what to

‘It worked on the first day, but it hasn’t do.


worked since then.
‘I’ll talk to the manager. Can you wait a
• Decide if you want a refund or if you
want to exchange the item. STAGE 2
moment, please?

Act out the role-play. Then discuss how


‘You
I’d like to exchange it, please.

have the receipt but when you STAGE 3
you can improve it and act it out again.
Work with two other pairs and perform
look for it, you can’t find it. your role-play for them.
• You bought the item from the sales
assistant and they remember you. Try
to persuade them to either give you a
refund or exchange the item.

‘Look, I’ve only had the phone for a week!
You served me – you remember me!

Jetstream Pre-intermediate Teacher’s Guide © Helbling Languages PHOTOCOPIABLE Tasks 133
Unit 5 TASK: Make a list of the things you need for a one-week walking holiday.

STAGE 1 Work in pairs. You’re going on a one- STAGE 3 Make a list of what each of you is going
week walking holiday in hilly country to take.

STAGE 2
together. Decide where.
You’ll each carry a backpack. Remember STAGE 4
‘I’ll carry the blanket.

Work with another pair and read out
that you don’t want to carry too much or your lists. Explain why you’re taking these
your backpacks will be heavy. Agree on: things.
• the things that you need to take.
‘We’re packing a groundsheet because we need


We have to have really good walking to sit on something comfortable!

shoes, obviously. I need to buy a pair.
’ STAGE 5 After listening to the other pair’s list,

‘ of sticking plasters.
We’ll definitely get blisters. We must take discuss whether you should change your
lots
’ list in any way.

‘ chocolate.
We could pack a blanket. And definitely
some


‘theI don’t think there’ll be enough room for
blanket – but chocolate, yes!



‘It may rain. Should we take umbrellas?
what to do about lunch and snacks.

You don’t have a big budget. Decide
what to pack, if anything.

‘Let’s pack some plastic food boxes.’

Unit 6 TASK: Persuade another pair to come on an adventure holiday with you.

STAGE 1 Work in pairs and choose an adventure STAGE 2 Find a pair of students who’ve chosen a
holiday from the list below. Think about different holiday to you. Try and persuade
the problems that each holiday may the other pair to come on holiday with
have. You have a budget of $2,000. If you instead. Take turns to do this.
you spend more than that, you can’t buy

Come on the safari holiday. You’ll see lions
something that you really want. None of
the holidays includes flights.
and tigers, it’ll be wonderful.

• a trekking holiday in Nepal / 13 days /
‘holiday, I can’t afford a new computer and
Yes, but it’s very expensive. If I go on the safari

$900 I really need one.



• a safari holiday in Tanzania / 9 nights / ‘We can have a really good time.
The holiday will be more fun with four people.
$1,550 ’
• a white-water rafting holiday in Idaho,
STAGE 3
‘OK, we’ll come with you!

In your groups, take turns to tell the class
USA / 6 days / $1,665
what happened in stage 2.
• a survival holiday in the jungle in
Guyana / 10 days / $1,300 ‘We weren’t successful. Ali and Mehmed aren’t

‘If we go on the trekking holiday, we must be


coming on holiday with us.


very fit. I’m not at all fit!

‘I’m not sure. I think Tanzania is a country that’


I think we should choose the safari holiday.

‘ be dangerous.
could

134 Tasks Jetstream Pre-intermediate Teacher’s Guide © Helbling Languages PHOTOCOPIABLE


Technique banks

Using the video


You won’t necessarily want to work through • Play the video sequence with sound
all three stages described here every time, nor only (SO) (or just play the audio) and ask
will you always want to work through all the students to guess:
sub-stages. It depends how fast you and your o how many characters there are
students want to go and how much practice they o where they are
need. But if your goal is for students to act out a o what they look like
conversation, then – especially in the early days – o what the situation is.
you’ll need to build up their confidence (and take Then play the sequence S+V so they can
away their support) gradually rather than suddenly. check, or look at the photo if you’re using
This structure of gently developing a conversation audio.
from reception to production is ideal for exploiting • Play part of the video / audio sequence
many of the conversations in Everyday English, (S+V / VO / SO) and pause it. Ask students
but it’ll also work well with other conversations to guess:
in the book. (See also Shadow reading in Five fun o what X is going to say next
techniques on page 142.) o what’s going to happen next.
Play the next part for students to see if they
Stage 1 were right.
Watch, listen to and / or read the conversation. Note: Any time you play the video S+V, you can
• Students watch or listen to* and / or do so with or without the subtitles and you can
(silently) read the conversation once or vary the order you do this, ie first without, then
twice. Make sure they understand any new with, or first with, then without. It’s very flexible!
words or expressions.
• They listen to and repeat sentences from
Stage 2
the conversation, either after you or the Practise using the ‘Look, look up and speak’
audio / video. technique.
• You read one part of the conversation, This is a great technique to help students
students read the other in chorus. Swap move from listening / reading to acting out a
roles. conversation.
• Divide the class in half, each with one role. Working in pairs, students ‘read’ the conversation
Open pairs: Two students read the conversation in the following way.
while the rest of the class listens. • A looks at their line, then looks up at B,
Closed pairs: Students read the conversation in makes eye contact and says it.
pairs. • B then looks at their line, looks up at A,
makes eye contact and says it.
*Different ways of using video / audio And the conversation continues in this way. It
• Play the video sequence with sound and takes a little longer than just reading it, but it helps
vision (S+V) in the normal way. You can do to gently take students away from the support of
this with or without the subtitles. the written word and build up their confidence.
• Play the video sequence with vision only You’ll need to demonstrate this technique with a
(VO) and ask students to imagine what’s student in front of the whole class the first few
being said. Then play the sequence S+V so times you use it.
they can check.

Technique banks 135


Stage 3
Act it out. If some students are happy to come to the front
When you and your students feel they’re ready, and ‘perform’ in front of the class, that’s great. If
students can close their books and have a go on not, don’t pressurise them. Let them ‘perform’ in
their own. They can do this first sitting down, small groups.
then standing up and adding gestures. It doesn’t Variations
matter if the words aren’t exactly the same as in 1 Suggest students take on different moods
the video. At this stage, fluency is more important or ways of behaving: quiet and shy / noisy
than accuracy. (If students are making a lot of and enthusiastic / happy / grumpy / angry /
mistakes, go through stages 1 and 2 again.) confused / tired, etc.
2 Bring props into the classroom if you think
they’re appropriate (and you can get hold of
some).

Using stories
You can use the stories at the back of the • mime (you mime part of the story)
Student’s Book in an unstructured or a structured • words from the story (in order or out of
way: order, especially any new ones likely to
Unstructured: Suggest students read them as and cause difficulty)
when they feel they’d like to. • the first or last line(s)
Structured: Set a particular story to be read • possible message(s): This is a story about X
outside class by the whole class. (The stories can • one or more of the characters
come after every third unit, so after Units 3 and 6.) • the setting(s)
• question(s)
If you choose the second way, then you may
• a synopsis.
or may not wish to introduce the story in class
beforehand and do some work on it afterwards.
But be careful! Stories are for pleasure and
Exploiting a story after students have
motivation. If you do too much ‘work’ on them, read it
you’re in danger of killing them dead and putting In the next lesson, you could ask students to give a
students off reading altogether. Do enough to help personal response:
them, but no more. Did you like the story? Why? / Why not?
You might also encourage students to keep a Which part did you like best / least?
vocabulary notebook for useful words, expressions Could this story take place in your country? If
and idioms they find in the stories. not, why not?
Is there anything you would like to change in
Introducing a story before students the story? What?
read it Imagine you’re making a film. Which famous
actors would you like to play the roles? What
Here are some of the things you could use with
theme song or music would you like for the
the stories (or any other stories) to elicit ideas from
film?
students before they read. Not only does this help
You could also ask students to do one or more of
to prepare them for reading, but it also motivates
the following:
them to want to read and gives them a reason for
• answer questions (but not too many)
reading. Because of this, it’s important that you
• decide on true / false statements (again, not
don’t tell students if their predictions are correct or
too many)
not. Let them read the story and find out.
• complete sentences from the story, eg We
You can use …
called her Pinky because …
• the picture(s) illustrating the story
• tell you who said a particular thing
• the title of the story
• write a question on the story for the rest of
• music, song, sound effects
the class to answer
• real object(s)
• retell the story or write it – possibly using
key words as guidance
136 Technique banks
• tell chain stories around the group / class, • create a movie poster or book cover design
with each student adding a sentence • rewrite it as a conversation / play
• retell or rewrite the story from the point of • retell the story in their mother tongue – or
view of one of the characters translate key words (for monolingual classes
• continue the story – what do you think only)
happened next (or five / ten years later)? • stand up for their word (see page 235)
• change the ending (or the beginning or Note: The stories are too long to do this for
middle) and create their own ending the whole story, so maybe just take the first
• fill in gaps in the story, eg What happened paragraph. Suitable words might be:
between X and Y? Pinky / rabbit
• mime or act out part of the story (or a word
crash landing / wedding
or a character from the story) for other
weekend / beach
students to guess and describe
• suggest similar stories they know second chance / dream
• draw a picture or abstract painting

Using memory games


Use it or lose it! That’s what fitness instructors say Variations
about our muscles. And it’s what psychologists say 1 Students write a list of people or objects in the
about our memory, too. If we want to be good at picture.
remembering things, then we need to practise as
2 Students do a sketch of the picture. (We use
often as possible. The more we practise, the better
the word sketch rather than drawing because
we get. And as remembering is a very large part
it’s somehow less stressful. Some people find
of successful language learning, it’s crucial that
the word drawing a bit scary!)
we give our students plenty of opportunities to
3 Students test each other in pairs. One has their
exercise their memory.
book open, the other has their book shut.
Some memory games are already indicated in the
lessons, wherever you see this symbol: .
Here are some more, very simple, ideas if you’d
Using texts
like to do more. You can do them as whole-class 1 Students re-read a text they’ve already worked
activities or, once they’re familiar to students, in on in class, perhaps a while ago, then close
pairs or small groups. They need only take a few their books.
minutes, so make them a regular part of your 2 Ask them questions on the text or make true /
routine if you can. false statements for them to confirm or correct.
Variations
Using pictures Can they remember the following?
1 Ask students to look at a picture in the book • the title
for 30 seconds, then close their books. • the very first word in the text
• the last word
2 Ask them questions about the picture.
• the first line
Obviously the questions you ask will be
• the last line
dependent on the picture, but here are some
• the most frequent word
possibilities:
• any words that occur more than once
Is there a …? Are there any …s? How many
…s are there? Using conversations
Where’s X? What’s in / on / under / behind 1 Students re-read a conversation or listen to it
the …? What’s on the left / right? again, then close their books.
What colour is X? What’s Y wearing? 2 Say a line from the conversation. Students reply
with the line that comes next.

Technique banks 137


Variations Note: According to memory experts, we readily
1 Read the conversation, saying just the first part forget 70% of what we learn in 24 hours unless
of each line. Students complete the rest of the we recycle it before that 24-hour period is up. You
line. can facilitate that as a teacher by doing two things
2 Choose lines from a conversation and ask (which you may already be doing!):
students who says them. 1 Make sure you leave five minutes at the
end of a lesson for students to recap what
Using vocabulary they’ve learnt in the lesson.
Ask questions, eg Can you remember ten words 2 Tell students to take just five or ten minutes
from the last lesson? to go through the lesson at home that
How many words can you remember beginning evening … and tell them why it’s important
with …? to do that.
How many places / countries / adjectives / irregular You have control over the first of these but not
verbs, etc can you remember? the second! Because of that, revising the previous
lesson at the beginning of the next one is also
A couple of other activities crucial.
Repeat my sentence
This is an exercise in very careful listening as well
as remembering. Students work in pairs. Student
A says a sentence (or reads one from a text or
conversation). Student B must repeat it word for
word. They swap. They should do this five or six
times, with the sentences getting a little longer
every time.
I, I, I, you, you, you!
Another exercise in careful listening as well as
remembering. Students work in pairs. Student A
makes statements about themselves beginning
with I. Student B listens carefully. After five or
six statements, student B must repeat as many
of student A’s statements as they can remember,
beginning with you. Then they swap over.
This exercise can have a grammatical focus and
function as a very personal repetition drill – it lends
itself to many different structures. Some possible
kinds of statement:
I like + noun
I like + activity
Every day I + present simple
Last year I + past simple
I’ve never + past participle (= present perfect)
In the future I’d like to …

138 Technique banks


20 easy games – no preparation required
These games are useful whenever you have some time to spare or notice that the group needs a change of
activity. Many of them will already be familiar to you, but it’s nice to have them all in one place.
The suggestions here are written for a teacher playing the game with the whole class, but once students
know the games, they can of course be played in pairs or small groups, and as such are useful for early
finishers.

Game Focus Instructions


1 Introductions Memory game Students introduce themselves round the class:
I’m / He’s / She’s … A I’m Mary.
My / His / Her name’s … B My name’s John, her name’s Mary.
C I’m Frank, he’s John, she’s Mary.
2 Simon says … Following instructions Students follow instructions only if you say Simon
says, eg Simon says put your hands on your head.
3 Hangman Alphabet / spelling Think of a word and write a line for each letter
on the board, eg cat = _ _ _
Students guess the word by asking questions
about letters, eg Is there an ‘e’? If they’re correct,
write the letter. If they’re incorrect, the student
loses one of their ten lives.
4 I went to the Memory game One student starts by saying what they went to
supermarket and I This can be used for a buy (or what they like, etc), then each student
bought … variety of tenses and adds something else to the list.
vocabulary sets, eg I like A I went to the supermarket and I bought a
dancing. I like dancing lettuce.
and eating pasta. … The
B I went to the supermarket and I bought a
example here is for past
lettuce and some potatoes.
simple and food and drink
C I went to the supermarket and I bought a
vocabulary.
lettuce, some potatoes and …
5 Ten questions Asking questions in the Think of a person (alive or dead) or an object.
present or past Students ask ten yes / no questions to find out
who or what it is.
6 What’s my job? Asking present simple Think of a job and mime a typical action.
questions with Do …? Students ask ten yes / no questions to guess it.
7 Where’s the Prepositions Imagine a mosquito somewhere in the classroom.
mosquito? Students guess where it is.
Is it in my bag? Is it under your foot? …
8 Don’t say yes or no! Short answers Students must answer questions without using
the words yes or no.
A Do you like broccoli?
B I don’t. Not at all.
A Are you enjoying this?
B I am. Very much!
9 Whose is it? Possessive adjectives and Two students go out of the room. Other students
pronouns decide on an object belonging to one of them.
Students come back in and must find the owner.
Is it Pedro’s phone?
Is it his ...?

Technique banks 139


10 Describe someone Be, have, descriptive Each student writes a short description of
adjectives, parts of the someone in the class, then reads it out for others
body to guess who it is.
11 Mime an action Present, past and future Students mime an activity that they like doing
tenses (or do every day / did last night / are going to do,
etc). Others ask yes / no questions to guess.
12 What’s he / she Present continuous Students mingle and stand back to back with
wearing? someone. They describe what the other person’s
wearing, then look and check.
13 I spy Vocabulary: classroom (or Say: I see something beginning with B. Students
based on a picture) must guess: Is it a bee? Is it a bin?
14 Word hunt Prepositions Decide on a specific word on a page and
students must ask yes / no questions to guess it.
Is it at the top of the page?
Is it a long word?
Is it in the third line?
Is it a noun?
15 Change of Present perfect A student leaves the classroom, alters something
appearance in their appearance and comes back in. Other
students ask yes / no questions to find out.
Have you taken off a ring?
Have you undone your shoelace?
16 Banana Numbers Students count (fairly quickly) around the class
but must not say any number which has a 3 in
it or is a multiple of 3 (eg 3, 6, 9, 12, 13, etc).
Instead of these numbers, they must say banana.
If they make a mistake, they’re out.
17 Jetstream! Make Vocabulary How many words can students make from the
ten (or 20!) words word Jetstream in a given time limit? You can
use any other long word or choose a word from
the lesson you’re working on, eg conversation,
information, grandmother.
18 Words that begin Memory game How many words beginning with a given letter
with … can students list in a given time limit?
19 Name ten! Vocabulary: countries, Students say or write a list of ten things from a
sports, types of transport, particular lexical set – and get a point for every
etc item nobody else has thought of.
20 Potato ping-pong Vocabulary: vegetables (or Divide the class into two teams. Team A says the
any other lexical set) name of a vegetable, then team B says one. They
continue back and forth until one team runs out
of ideas and can’t hit it back! The other team
wins the point.

140 Technique banks


Five fun techniques to use with a flagging class
You can use these techniques again and again 3 Stand up for your word
over time in different ways – students always enjoy This is a great way of raising energy in a group
them and feel energised by them. when you notice students are getting tired – and a
good way of revising, too. Take a text that they’ve
1 ‘True for me’ drills read or listened to recently and select a word from
Make true statements about yourself. You can link it, eg SB page 11 (intelligence(s) in Shelflife) or
the statements to your teaching focus or else use page 18 (kayak in Around the world in 13 years!).
a variety of language, eg present simple + adverbs Tell students to close their books and tell them the
of frequency: I always get up early. I sometimes go word. Then read them the text. They must stand up
jogging before breakfast. every time they hear the word.
Students must repeat only those statements that What’s the point? Apart from being lots of fun,
are also true for them. This means that they need it’s a great way of ensuring unconscious learning
to listen carefully and think before they speak – – another feature of Accelerated Learning (see
and they get lots of repetition practice. And when page 20). While consciously listening out for a
they get it wrong, it usually causes lots of laughter. specific word, students are unconsciously exposed
These drills are a great way to start a lesson: I’m to the whole text without the stress of having
feeling tired today. I had trouble getting here. to do anything particular with it. These are ideal
I missed the bus! conditions for the unconscious mind to acquire
They’re also brilliant for breaking the ice and get- language.
ting to know a new group of students and for
Variations
letting them know a bit about you: My name’s Pat.
1 If standing up is too disruptive or noisy, then
I’m a woman. I’m a teacher. I was born in March.
just get students to raise one or both arms.
I like dancing.
2 Select two or three words and give different
groups of students a different word. At the
2 True / false drills end of this activity, ask the groups what words
You can do this with any picture in the Student’s the other groups had.
Book, eg page 10 (multi-tasking), page 18 (Fauja
Singh). 4 Dictopuzzles
Make true and false statements about the picture.
These are like dictations – with a purpose.
If what you say is true, students repeat it. If it’s
false, they must say: That isn’t true! You could do 1 Students note down what you say in order to
this first with books open, then with them closed, find the answer(s) to a question. It’s important
as a memory game. to tell them not to shout out the answer once
You can continue the activity by getting students they’ve found it, but just to put up their hand
to provide the sentences themselves. Each student (or stand up) to let you know they know. That
writes one sentence about the picture, which can way, other students can go on thinking.
be true or false. Students take turns to read out In fact, the example below has four possible
their sentence and the rest of the class responds. answers, so you can ask students to go on
Variations searching for the others. (Make sure they
1 Instead of using a picture, you can make true realise that the name of both the country and
or false statements about real things, especially its capital are the names in English.)
relating to a topic you’ve been dealing with in It’s a country in Europe. It’s in the EU, but it
class, eg They speak French in Canada. / They isn’t one of the countries in the UK. There
speak Dutch in Germany. are seven letters in the English name of this
2 Students could also or instead be asked to use country and six letters in the English name of
some kind of physical movement, eg they raise its capital city. What country is it?
their right hand if something’s true, their left if (Ireland / Dublin, Germany / Berlin, Austria /
it’s false. Vienna, Croatia / Zagreb)
2 As soon as enough students have put their
hand up, check their answers. If they haven’t
found the correct answer – or all the answers –
Technique banks 141
rather than tell them, give clues to help them, 5 Shadow reading
eg The first letter is A, It’s near Italy. Not only is this a great revision exercise, it’s
3 Elicit a correct version of the text to write on challenging and a lot of fun.
the board.
1 Go back to a listening conversation you’ve
4 Using the model text on the board, students done recently and play the recording so
work individually or in pairs to create a similar students can listen to it again.
text about another country – not necessarily in
2 Divide the class into the number of roles and
Europe.
allocate each half (or group) one of the people
5 Students work in small groups and take turns in the conversation.
to dictate their puzzle for the others to solve.
3 When you play the conversation again (quite
Other possible subjects: loudly), students should speak (quite softly) at
• famous people, contemporary or historical the same time as their character (so they can
• well-known places: cities, buildings, still hear the conversation even while they’re
monuments speaking).
• everyday objects This is quite a challenge – and usually causes a lot
• animals of laughter because although the speakers in the
• sports and games conversations speak reasonably slowly, their speed
• words (It’s an adjective. It begins with a B.). will still be faster than that of the students.

Extra questions and tasks for Art & Music


Given the motivational impact of this section, • Can you find one or two other paintings /
there are deliberately very few questions on the sculptures by the artist / sculptor that you
page. A few more questions are always suggested particularly like? Say why.
in the unit-by-unit teacher’s notes, which you can • Do you like this artist’s / sculptor’s work?
use or ignore as you see fit. And here you can find
a full range of questions that could apply to almost Music
any picture or song.
Note: A good website for lyrics is
Art www.metrolyrics.com or just type the title or first
line into a search engine.
• Do you know this picture / sculpture? Do you
• Do you know this song? Do you like it?
like it?
• What’s the name of the song?
• What’s the title of the picture / sculpture in
• Who’s the singer / group? Do you like him /
your language?
her / them?
• Who’s the painting / sculpture by?
• Who wrote the song? When?
• Describe the picture / sculpture. What’s the
• What’s the next line?
artist trying to say?
• What word occurs more than ten times in the
• If there are people in the picture, what can you
song?
say about them?
• What’s the chorus?
• What do you think the painting tells us about
the artist / sculptor? • What other songs do you know by this singer /
group / songwriter?
• What nationality was the artist / sculptor, and
in which century did they paint / sculpt? • Read the lyrics and listen to the song. Sing the
chorus if you want to.
• Do you know anything else about the artist /
sculptor? • Watch a video clip of the song and give your
opinion of it.
• Find out two or three extra pieces of
information about the picture / sculpture. • What’s the message of the song – in one
sentence?
• Find out two or three extra pieces of
information about the artist / sculptor.

142 Technique banks


Working with mixed-ability classes
It’s inevitable that there will be students with being the group ‘scribe’ and keeping a written
different levels of English (though not necessarily record, for example.
ability) in your class, especially in larger classes. • When appropriate, give weaker students
Some students will need extra support, some will slightly easier tasks. The teacher’s notes may
need less. So here are some ideas to help you suggest these – look for the MA icon.
tackle this issue. You’ll also find ideas in the unit-
• Note weaker students’ errors and give them
by-unit notes where you see this symbol: MA.
extra homework
Note: We’ve used the terms ‘stronger’ and
‘weaker’ for the sake of convenience, but of Fast finishers
course those terms are not completely accurate. If some students complete an exercise more
• Use stronger students to correct weaker quickly than others, have some extra activities
students. Make sure that you praise weaker ready that they can do. Ideally, these activities
students for their successes just as much as should be short, fun things that are easy to set
stronger ones. up. Students shouldn’t feel punished for finishing
• Direct more difficult questions at stronger quickly by being given something boring to do!
students and easier ones at weaker students. • Many of the 20 easy games on page 139
• Sometimes pair and group students of the would work, especially games 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8,
same ability so they feel comfortable with each 13, 14, 17, 18 and 19.
other. • Also suitable are the Memory games using
• And sometimes pair up students of different pictures on page 231, once students have
levels and encourage the stronger student to played them in class and know how they work.
help the weaker one. • Online research is another task you can give,
• Group weaker students together for an activity using the Art & Music box or an Explore
and give them extra attention, leaving stronger suggestion, for example.
students to work alone. • And finally, you can offer them lots of different
• Use stronger students as group leaders and e-zone activities to choose from.
give them more responsibility for activities, like

Ensuring learner autonomy and using technology


What is learner autonomy? Jetstream on e-zone offers a wealth of digital tools
As defined by Henri Holec in 1981, learner for this purpose, giving students plenty of options:
autonomy is ‘the ability to take charge of one’s • Online Training on e-zone provides hundreds
own learning’. It’s crucial because when you of online practice activities for extra
give learners more choices (and therefore more listening, reading, grammar, vocabulary and
responsibility) in how and what and how fast they pronunciation, as well as practice activities that
learn, then they’re also a lot more motivated and help to prepare for a range of international
they learn better. In addition, they gain more self- exams.
awareness about their skills and more awareness • Cyber homework lets you assign homework
of the learning process itself. to students. You have the capability to allow
students to see their score after they complete
How can we provide it? the tasks. They can keep practising and
One of the key tools we have nowadays of course improving their score until a deadline. This
is technology, which can take students beyond way, homework becomes more of a learning
the limits of the classroom and allow them the experience and students can take on more
freedom to choose what topics they want to responsibility for their results. Students can
explore, and what language areas they want to do cyber homework offline and submit their
focus on. results once they go back online.
Technique banks 143
• Projects enable students to learn What else can you do?
collaboratively. They can vote and comment
• Ask students to keep a record of their
on each other’s work, and thus learn from and
problems and successes. They might do this
with each other. They can choose to take on a
as a written diary or logbook or else keep an
more or less active role in this collaboration.
online diary or write a blog. Dedicate some
• Cloud Book allows students to download the classroom time for them to compare notes
Student’s Book and the Workbook, as well as with a partner from time to time.
the audio and video, by using the access code
• Give students choices in classroom tasks, even
at the back of the Student’s Book. This way,
in a small way. If an exercise has six questions,
students can practise any time, anywhere,
for example, ask them to choose four. (They
offline on their desktop computers as well as
still have to read all of them to make that
their mobile devices. These devices will sync
decision.)
with each other once students go online.
• If they’re having a discussion or playing
In the Student’s Book and the Workbook, there’s
a game, encourage them to change the
also scope for learner autonomy.
instructions sometimes.
• In the Student’s Book, both the Explore and
the Art & Music sections invite students to go
online and use their language skills to find out
more about particular subjects if they want to.
• In the Workbook, the Check your progress
pages give students the opportunity to assess
themselves.
• The DIY (Do It Yourself) wordlist at the back of
the Workbook allows students to make choices
about which words they translate and record.
(It’s not intended that they should write down
every single word – unless they want to, of
course!)

144 Technique banks


De-stress! cartoons

Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3

Unit 4 Unit 5 Unit 6

De-stress! cartoons 145


HELBLING LANGUAGES
www.helblinglanguages.com

JETSTREAM Pre-intermediate Teacher’s Guide A


by Terry Prosser
with Jane Revell and Mary Tomalin

© HELBLING LANGUAGES 2015

First published 2015

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic,
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ISBN 978-3-99045-013-0

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Illustrated by Davide Besana, Oscar Celestini, Giovanni Da Re, Giovanni Giorgi Pierfranceschi
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