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Format No. QSP/7.1/01.

F01 (C)
IssueNo.04 Rev. No 4 Dated: June 7, 2014

UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM & ENERGY STUDIES


College of Legal Studies
Dehradun

COURSE PLAN

Programme : BA., LL.B. (HONS.) Criminal Law/ BA., LL.B. (HONS.) Energy Laws,
BBA, LL.B. (Hons.) Corporate Laws/ B.COM., LLB. (Hons.)
Taxation Laws/ BBA, LL.B. (Hons.) International Trade & Investment
Law
Course : Legal Language & Legal Writing
Semester : II
Session : Jan to May 2017
Batch : 2016 -21
Subject Code : LLBG 105
No. of credits : 4
Prepared by : Dr. Sujata Bali/ Ms. Monica Rani,VF/ Dr. Shikha Dimri/ Ms.
Pooja Gautam/ Ms. Priyanka Choudhary/Ms Shambhavi Sinha
Email : sbali@ddn.upes.ac.in, Shikha@ddn.upes.ac.in,
pgautam@ddn.upes.ac.in, pchoudhary@ddn.upes.ac.in,
monicasinha_01@yahoo.com, ssinha@ddn.upes.ac.in

Approved By

_______________________ _______________________
HOD Dean
UPES Campus Tel : +91-135-2102647/2102760
“Knowledge Acres”, Kandoli Campus Fax : +91 135- 27760904
P.O. Bidholi, Via Prem Nagar Website : www.upes.ac.in
Dehradun -248 007 (U K)
COURSE PLAN

Subject: Legal Language & Legal Course:


Writing BA., LL.B. (HONS.) Criminal Law/BA., LL.B. (HONS.) Energy
Laws 2016
BBA, LL.B. (Hons.) Corporate Laws/B.COM., LLB. (Hons.) Taxation
Laws
BBA, LL.B. (Hons.) International Trade & Investment Law 2016

Duration: Jan 2017–May 2017 Subject code: LLBG 105

A. OBJECTIVES:

The course objectives are:

 Developing Global Lawyering Skills: One aspect of globalization has been the
internationalization of law, so today’s lawyers increasingly need to be international lawyers.
Law plays an important role in the global legal environment. The familiarity with English
legal writing and analysis skills that you will gain through this course will provide you with a
solid background for working with clients, co-counsel, opposing counsel and judges.
 This subject is one of the most important subjects in law as it makes the student to learn about
the command of the language and it being essential quality for presentation of not only
pleading but also arguments before a court of law. This subject has so much of practicalities
and just reading book will not help. It therefore becomes necessary that the students should be
given the knowledge of the subject through lecture method and other methods with illustration
for better understanding and group discussion so that the student may also inculcate the
analytical approach of understanding the subject matter and can practically apply in life.
 Objective of this course is also to prepare good lawyers with broad professional vision as a
wise counselor, good advocacy skills etc..

College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017


B. Learning Outcomes:

1. Identify and be able to structure legal citations to case law and statutes & Brief case law.
2. Will develop analytical approach of understanding the subject matter and can practically apply
in life.
3. Structure fact statements relevant to an issue from an array of facts. Construct an internal
memorandum of law and memorandum of law to the court
4. Identify legalese versus relevant law and how to use the two.
5. Identify and understand the sources and bodies of law. Identify and understand the hierarchy
of court system and laws
6. Know the difference between precedent, persuasive and mandatory authorities and how and
when to use the two when constructing a legal memorandum
7. Write in a grammatically correct manner, using topic sentences and correct paragraph
construction.\

C. COURSE OUTLINE

It has five modules which are as follows:

MODULE I LEGAL LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION

 Modes and Modules of Legal Communication.

MODULE II LEGAL LANGUAGES & LEGAL VOCABULARY


 Legal English Words and Legal Phrases;
 Law Latin and Legal Phrases;
 Proverbs and their use in Legal Language.
MODULE III LEGAL LANGUAGE AND LEGAL ESSAYS
 Precise, Concise (art of Precise)
MODULE IV LEGAL LANGUAGE AND PREPOSITIONS
 Use of Preposition for effective Legal Writing.
MODULE V LEGAL LANGUAGE AND COMPREHENSION
 Passages & Paragraphs from leading cases.

D.PEDAGOGY

 Lecture/Discussions
 Term Paper/Project
 Reading Groups
 Workshops

College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017


 Viva Voce
 Presentations (Paper/ Project)
 Case Study
 Chalk and talk
 Random Questioning
 Reflections
 Course room exercise
 Case Analysis

E. COURSE COMPLETION PLAN

Sessions: 4 lectures of 1 hour each.


Total hours per week: 4 hours per week.

F. EVALUATION & GRADING

Description Weight age Schedule

1. Continuous Assessment 30% Detailed Below

2. Mid-term Exam 20% Academic Calendar

3. End term Exam 50% Academic Calendar

Internal Assessment: 100 Marks (shall be done based on the following five components):

Description Weight age Schedule:-

1. Continuous Assessment 30% Detailed Below

Continuous Assessment: (Marks 100) shall be done based on the following five components:
a. Two class tests 20 Marks
b. Assignment / Reaction Paper 20 Marks
c. Project work 20 Marks (Abstract, Synopsis, final Draft,
Presentation)
d. Subject grand viva 20 Marks
e. Attendance 20 Marks

Five components will be used for internal assessment for this course (Total 100 marks), the details of
each component is as follows:

a) Home Assignment/ Reaction Paper:


Assignment will be given on the pattern of End Term Examination and it must be hand
written, to submit/present on a definite date. The assignment is attached with the course plan
as Annexure-I. It will have 20% weightage.
b) Projects: Weightage 20 %. Each student is asked to prepare a topic from the Project List
attached as Annexure-II herewith and finally prepare a project. Students are encouraged to
write research papers and publish them.

College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017


c) Class Tests: There will be two class tests which may be surprise tests. Tests carry 20%
weightage.
d) Viva: A viva of the whole syllabus and the project will be conducted towards the end of the
semester. It will have 20% weightage.
e) Attendance: It has 20% weightage. Formula for award of marks on attendance shall be as
under:

67-75 % 0 Marks
76-80% 5 Marks
81-85% 10 Marks
86-90% 15 Marks
91%-100% 20 Marks

Mid- Sem Examination: 20% Weightage

Mid- Sem examination shall be of two hour duration and shall be a combination of objective, short,
analytical and problem based questions.

End -Sem Examination: 50% Weightage

End-Sem examination shall be of three hours duration. The examination paper shall have objective,
short, analytical and problem based questions.

Passing Criterion: minimum 40% of the highest marks in the class

Student has to secure minimum 40% marks of the “highest marks in the class scored by a student
in the subject (in that class/group class)” individually in both the ‘End-Semester examination’
and ‘Total Marks’ in order to pass in the paper.

Attendance

Students are required to have minimum attendance of 75% in the subject. Students with less than
said percentage shall NOT be allowed to appear in the end semester examination. The student
obtaining 100% attendance would be given 5% bonus marks for internal assessment.

Cell Phones and other Electronic Communication Devices: Cell phones and other electronic
communication devices (such as Blackberries/Laptops) are not permitted in classes during Tests or the
Mid/Final Examination. Such devices MUST be turned off in the class room.

E-Mail and LMS: Each student in the class should have an e-mail id and a password to access the
LMS system regularly. Regularly, important information – Date of conducting class tests, guest
lectures, syndicate sessions etc. to the class will be transmitted via e-mail/LMS. The best way to
arrange meetings with us or ask specific questions is by email and prior appointment. All the
assignments preferably should be uploaded on LMS. Various research papers/reference material will
be mailed/uploaded on LMS from time to time.

G. DETAILED SESSION PLAN

College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017


SESSIO PEDAGOG
TOPIC READINGS
N Y
Introductory
Lecture
Introduction to the Chalk &
Course Plan
1. course Talk
ASSIGNMENT & PROJECTS
Examples
Discussion

S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing &


MODULE 1 General English (2009) pp. 5-15.
:LEGAL
LANGUAGE K.L.Bhatia, Legal Language and Legal Writing (2010) PPT
AND pp.1-10 Presentation
COMMUNICATI
ON B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing &
2. Reflections
Meaning of General English (2009) pp.1-4. Examples
Language and
Evolution of "Our Meanings Can Never Be the Same": Reflections
language, on Language and Law Author(s): James Boyd White
Importance of Source: Rhetoric Society Quarterly, Vol. 21, No. 3
language (Summer, 1991), pp. 68-77.

S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing &


General English (2009) pp. 5-15

Relation of B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & PPT


Language with General English (2009) pp.1-4. Presentation
law,
3 K.L. Bhatia, Legal Language and Legal Writing (2010) Reflections
Meaning of Legal pp.1-10 Examples
Language
"Our Meanings Can Never Be the Same": Reflections
on Language and Law Author(s): James Boyd White
Source: Rhetoric Society Quarterly, Vol. 21, No. 3
(Summer, 1991), pp. 68-77.

Importance of legal Whiteboard


language, S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Examples
4. General English (2009), pp. 5-15. Discussion
Presentation
Scope of Legal Reflections
B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing &
Language
College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017
General English (2009) p.4-24.
Problems of legal
language http://www.indianetzone.com/39/english_language_indi
a.htm

K.L. Bhatia, Legal Language and Legal Writing (2010)


p.1-10

Language and the Law by : Margaret M. Bryant

S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing &


General English (2009), pp. 159-217.

Legal and ordinary B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing &
5. meaning of words General English (2009) pp.4-24, 165-195.

K.L.Bhatia, Legal Language and Legal Writing (2010)


pp.1-10.

B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing &


General English (2009) p.4-24.

Hints for effective S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing &
Legal Writing General English (2009), pp. 3,356-358.
6.
K.L.Bhatia, Legal Language and Legal Writing (2010)
pp.1-10.

Effective Legal Writing and Speaking Author(s):


GEORGE D. GIBSON Source: The Business Lawyer,
Vol. 36, No. 1 (November 1980), pp. 1-9.

Language and the


http://law.uoregon.edu/wp-
Constitution of Whiteboard
content/uploads/2011/11/stetson_rowe1.pdf Examples
India
Discussion
http://www.goashipyard.co.in/pdf/constitutional_provisi
7. Presentation
Constitutional on.pdf Random
Provisions relating Questions
to language The Constitution of India,

Article 29, 30, 51A, 120, 210, 343- 351.

College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017


Discussion
Communication PPT
B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Presentation
8. Skills and Methods
General English (2009) pp. 119-164. Random
of Acquisition Questions

Harvard Series of Audio


9. Visual Aids,
Lectures- 1 Lectures by Michael Sandel
Discussion

Module 2: LEGAL
Examples
LANGUAGE &
Discussion
LEGAL
Reflections
VOCABULARY B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing &
Reference to
10. General English (2009) pp-249-314. Relevant
Legal Latin words
legal
and phrases –
provisions
Part I
and cases
Legal Terminology

Examples
B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Discussion
Legal Latin words General English (2009) pp-249-314 Reflections
and phrases in Reference to
11. English Legal Proverbs Author(s): Donald F. Bond
Legal Terminology Relevant
Source: PMLA, Vol. 51, No. 4 (Dec., 1936), pp. 921- legal
935 provisions
and cases

Lecture,
Examples,
Discussion,
Legal Latin words B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing &
Reference to
and phrases in General English (2009) pp-249-314
12. Relevant
Legal Terminology
legal
provisions
and cases

Lectures
Examples
Legal Latin words B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Discussion
and phrases in General English (2009) pp-249-314 Reference to
13.
Legal Terminology Relevant
legal
provisions
and cases

College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017


Lecture,
Examples
Discussion
Legal Latin words B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing &
And
and phrases in General English (2009) pp-249-314.
14. Reference to
Legal Terminology
Relevant
legal
provisions
and cases

Improving Our Legal Writing: Maxims from the


Legal Maxims- Masters Author(s): Eugene C. Gerhart Source: Lecture,
American Bar Association Journal, Vol. 40, No. 12 Whiteboard
-Volenti non fit
(December 1954), pp. 1057-1060. Discussion
injuria
And
-Res ipsa loquitur Broom’s Legal Maxim (2011) Reference to
15. Relevant
S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & legal
-Ubi jus ibi
General English (2009), pp. 218-246. provisions
remedium
and cases
B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing &
General English (2009) p.251-322.

Lecture,
S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Whiteboard
Legal Maxims General English (2009), pp. 218-246. Discussion
-Injuria sine
And
damnum Broom’s Legal Maxim (2011) Reference to
16
Relevant
-Damnun sine Improving Our Legal Writing: Maxims from the legal
injuria
Masters Author(s): Eugene C. Gerhart Source: provisions
American Bar Association Journal, Vol. 40, No. 12 and cases
(December 1954), pp. 1057-1060.

Lecture,
Whiteboard
Legal Maxims -- Discussion
The Doctrine of Respondent Superior Source: Harvard
qui facit per alium Reference to
facit per se Law Review, Vol. 17, No. 1 (Nov., 1903), pp. 51-52. Relevant
17.
legal
-Respondeat Broom’s Legal Maxim (2011) provisions
Superior and cases

Lecture,
18. -Delegatus non
S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Whiteboard
potest delegare
Discussion

College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017


General English (2009), pp. 218-246. Reference to
Relevant
-Nemo dat quad legal
non habet provisions
Broom’s Legal Maxim (2011) and cases

Improving Our Legal Writing: Maxims from the


Masters Author(s): Eugene C. Gerhart Source:
American Bar Association Journal, Vol. 40, No. 12
(December 1954), pp. 1057-1060.

Legal Maxims -- S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing &


caveat emptor, qui General English (2009), pp. 218-246. Lecture,
ignorare non Whiteboard
debuit quod jus Improving Our Legal Writing: Maxims from the Discussion
alienum emit Masters Author(s): Eugene C. Gerhart Source: Reference to
19. American Bar Association Journal, Vol. 40, No. 12 Relevant
(December 1954), pp. 1057-1060 legal
-Sic Utere Tuo Ut provisions
Alienum Non "Sic Utere Tuo ut Alienum Non Laedas"Author(s): G. and cases
Laedas A. I.Source: Michigan Law Review, Vol. 5, No. 8 (Jun.,
1907), pp. 673-675

S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Lecture,


General English (2009), pp. 218-246. Whiteboard
Legal Maxims
Discussion
-qui sensi Broom’s Legal Maxim (2011) Reference to
commondun debet
20. Relevant
et sentire onus Improving Our Legal Writing: Maxims from the legal
-Ex nudo pacto non Masters Author(s): Eugene C. Gerhart Source: provisions
oritur actio
American Bar Association Journal, Vol. 40, No. 12 and cases
(December 1954), pp. 1057-1060

Legal Maxims
-ut lite pendente S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing &
nihil innovetur General English (2009), pp. 218-246. Lecture,
Whiteboard
-Actio Personalis A Selection of Legal Maxim by Herbret Broom 5th Ed., Discussion
Moritur Cum Reference to
Persona Improving Our Legal Writing: Maxims from the Relevant
legal
21. Masters Author(s): Eugene C. Gerhart Source:
-Ex turpi causa provisions
non oritur action American Bar Association Journal, Vol. 40, No. 12 and cases
(December 1954), pp. 1057-1060.

College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017


Lecture,
Whiteboard
S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Discussion
Legal Drafting
General English (2009) p. 292 Reference to
What are Pleadings Relevant
22. B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & legal
Function and
General English (2009) p.218-220 provisions
object of Pleading
and
Fundamental rules
Learning by
of pleading
Doing

Model Form of Lecture,


Plaints: S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Whiteboard
Discussion
Suit for breach of General English (2009) pp. 292-296, 270-291. Reference to
23. Contract Relevant
B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing &
legal
Suit for specific General English (2009) p.218-220. provisions
performance of and learning
Contract by doing

Lecture,
Model form of S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Whiteboard
Plaints: General English (2009) pp. 292-296, 270-291. Discussion
Suit for ejectment Reference to
24. of tenant B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Relevant
General English (2009) pp.218-220. legal
Suit for provisions
cancellation of sale and learning
by doing

INTERNAL ASSESSMENT-TEST-1

Lecture,
Whiteboard
S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing &
Application of Discussion
General English (2009) pp. 292-296, 270-291. Reference to Relevant
25. Legal language
legal provisions and
B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing &
Drafting of Plaint learning by doing
General English (2009) pp.218-220.

MID-SEMESTER EXAMINATION

Harvard Series of Audio


26. Visual
Lecture- 2 Lectures by Michael Sandel
Discussion

College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017


Lecture,
B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Whiteboard
Written Statement
General English (2009) p.223-225. Discussion
Hints and rules
Reference to
27. General Defences
S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Relevant
Written Statement
General English (2009), pp. 292. legal
provisions
and learning
by doing

Lecture,
Whiteboard
B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Discussion
Written Statement
General English (2009) pp.223-225. Reference to
28. :Prescribed Forms
Relevant
legal
provisions
learning by
doing
Lecture,
Whiteboard
Discussion
Conveyancing S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & And
Meaning General English (2009) pp 297-336. Reference to
29.
Description of Relevant
Deed B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & legal
General English (2009) pp.242-248. provisions
and learning
by doing
Application of Legal
language Learning by
S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing &
Doing Exercise
Model Deeds General English (2009) pp. 302-305, 336-339.
30. on
-Gift Deed
-Sale Deed B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Drafting
General English (2009) pp.242-248. Skills

Application of Legal Learning by


language S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Doing-
General English (2009) pp. 310-328. Exercise
31.
Drafting of Deeds on
-Mortgage Deed B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Drafting
-Lease Deed General English (2009) pp.218-220. Skills

College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017


Learning by
S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Doing-
Coveyancing
General English (2009), pp. 306-310. Exercise
32. Power of Attorney,
on
Wills
S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Drafting
General English (2009), pp. 328-334. Skills

Lecture,
Legal Latin words S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Discussion,
and phrases - General English (2009) p159-217. Examples,
33. relevant
Part-II B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing &
General English (2009) p.251-322 provisions
and cases
Oxford Law Dictionary

S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Lecture,


General English (2009) pp.159-217. Discussion,
B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Examples,
Legal Latin words
34. General English (2009) pp.251-322.
and phrases relevant
Oxford Law Dictionary provisions
and cases
GLOSSARY OF LEGAL TERMS Source: Complete
Lawyer, Vol. 10, No. 1 (WINTER 1993), pp. 41-45.

S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing &


General English (2009) pp.159-217. Lecture,
Discussion,
B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing &
Legal Latin words
General English (2009) pp.251-322. Examples,
35. and phrases
relevant
Oxford Law Dictionary
provisions
GLOSSARY OF LEGAL TERMS Source: Complete and cases
Lawyer, Vol. 11, No. 2 (SPRING 1994), pp. 18-24

College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017


Legal Maxims
Lecture
-actus non facit Examples
The Concept of Mens Rea in the Criminal Law Discussion
reum nisi mens sit
Author(s): Eugene J. Chesney Source: Journal of Presentation,
36. rea Criminal Law and Criminology (1931-1951), Vol. 29, Relevant
-In jure non remota No. 5 (Jan. - Feb.,1939), pp. 627-644 provisions
and cases
causa sed proxima
spectator

Legal Maxims--audi
alteram partem
Lecture
-Nemo debit esse S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Examples
judex in propria sua General English (2009), pp. 218-246. Discussion
Presentation
causa B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Relevant
37.
General English (2009) p.251-322 provisions
Salus populi est and cases
suprema lex http://www.inrebus.com/legalmaxims_a.php

Leges posteriores
priores contrarias
abrogant

Legal Maxims---
S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Lecture
actus dei nemini Examples
General English (2009), pp. 218-246.
Discussion
facit injuriam
Relevant
B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing &
38. -Ignorantia facit provisions
General English (2009) p.251-322 and cases
execusat ignorantia
juris non execusat http://www.inrebus.com/legalmaxims_a.php

-Ignorantia juris
non excusat

Legal Maxims--de S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing &


Lecture
General English (2009), pp. 218-246. Examples
minimus non curat
Discussion
lex B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing &
39. Relevant
General English (2009) pp.251-322. provisions
-nemo debit bis
and cases
vexari pro una et http://www.inrebus.com/legalmaxims_a.php

College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017


eadem causa
-Cessante ratione
legis cessat ipsa lex

INTERNAL ASSESSMENT- TEST-2

S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Lecture


General English (2009) pp. 60-66. Examples
40. Legal Abbreviations Discussion

S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing &


Legal One word Lecture
General English (2009) pp. 114-118.
Examples
substitution
41. Discussion
K.L.Bhatia, Legal Language and Legal Writing (2010)
pp.454-461.

Lecture,
Discussion,
Module 3 : LEGAL
S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Reference to
LANGUAGE AND General English (2009) pp. 247-255, 350-355. relevant
42 LEGAL ESSAYS laws and
B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & cases &
Art of Precis General English (2009) pp.119-128.
Writing Learning by
doing

Lecture,
Discussion,
S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Reference to
General English (2009) pp.359-442. relevant
Legal Essays laws and
43.
B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & cases &
General English (2009) pp.425-496.
Learning by
doing

Lecture,
Legal Essays Discussion,
S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing &
44. Reference to
General English (2009) pp.359-442.
relevant
B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & laws and
College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017
General English (2009) pp.425-496. cases &

Learning by
doing

Lecture,
Discussion,
S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Reference to
Legal Essays General English (2009) pp. 359-442. relevant
45. laws and
B.M. Gandhi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & cases &
General English (2009) pp.425-496.
Learning by
doing

Lecture,
S.C. Tripathi, Legal Language, Legal Writing & Discussion,
Module 4: LEGAL Reference to
General English (2009) pp. 92-94.
LANGUAGE AND relevant
K.L.Bhatia, Legal Language and Legal Writing (2010) laws and
46. PREPOSITIONS
p.437. cases &
Use of Prepositions
Learning by
for effective Legal doing
Writing
Lecture,
Discussion,
Reference to
Module 5: LEGAL relevant
LANGUAGE AND Passages & Paragraphs from leading cases laws and
47.
COMPREHENSIO cases &

N Learning by
doing

Lecture,
Discussion,
LEGAL Reference to
LANGUAGE AND relevant
Passages & Paragraphs from leading cases laws and
48. COMPREHENSIO
cases &
N
Learning by
doing

College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017


INTERNAL ASSESSMENT- GRAND VIVA

College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017


H. SUGGESTED READINGS:

S.No. Title Author Publisher

a) Legal Language, Legal Writing & S.C. Tripathi Central Law


General English, Publications

b) Outlines of Legal Language in India Anirudh Prasad Central Law Publication

c) Legal Language and Legal Writing K.L.Bhatia Universal Law


Publishers

d) Legal Language, Legal Writing & B.M. Gandhi Eastern Book Company
General English

e) Learning the Law Glanville Williams Universal Law


Publishers.

f) Introduction to Law Atul Setelwad Butterworths

g) The Concept of Law HLA Hart Oxford University Press

h) Indian Legal System Joseph Minattur Indian Law Institute

i) Legal System and Lawyers’ Julius Stone Universal Law


Publishing Co.
Reasoning

College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017


REFERENCE BOOKS:

Plain English for Lawyers, Richard C. Wydic, Universal Law Publishers.

Legal Writing in Plain English, Bryan A. Garner.

Plain Language for Lawyers: Michale M. Aspray, Universal Law Publishers.

Law as Culture, (2009), Kathy Laster, Universal Law Publishers.

Law and Social Norms, Eric A. Posne, Universal Law Publishers.

Precedent in English Law, Cross and Harris, Oxford publication.

Legal Maxims, Herbert Broom, Universal Law Publishers.

Legal Language, Peter M. Tiersma.

Oxford Law Dictionary.

Wharton’s Law Dictionary.

Black’s Law Dictionary.

RESEARCH PAPERS:

1. Legal theory lexicon: legal theory, jurisprudence, and the Philosophy of law by lawrence b. Solumt
2. "Our Meanings Can Never Be the Same": Reflections on Language and Law Author(s): James
Boyd White Source: Rhetoric Society Quarterly, Vol. 21, No. 3 (Summer, 1991), pp. 68-77
3. Effective Legal Writing and Speaking Author(s): GEORGE D. GIBSON Source: The Business
Lawyer, Vol. 36, No. 1 (November 1980), pp. 1-9
4. Improving Our Legal Writing: Maxims from the Masters Author(s): Eugene C. Gerhart Source:
American Bar Association Journal, Vol. 40, No. 12 (December 1954), pp. 1057-1060
5. English Legal Proverbs Author(s): Donald F. Bond Source: PMLA, Vol. 51, No. 4 (Dec., 1936),
pp. 921-935
6. GLOSSARY OF LEGAL TERMS Source: Complete Lawyer, Vol. 11, No. 2 (SPRING 1994), pp.
18-24
7. GLOSSARY OF LEGAL TERMS Source: Compleat Lawyer, Vol. 10, No. 1 (WINTER 1993),
pp. 41-45
8. "Sic Utere Tuo ut Alienum Non Laedas"Author(s): G. A. I.Source: Michigan Law Review, Vol. 5,
No. 8 (Jun., 1907), pp. 673-675

College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017


9. The Concept of Mens Rea in the Criminal Law Author(s): Eugene J. Chesney Source: Journal of
Criminal Law and Criminology (1931-1951), Vol. 29, No. 5 (Jan. - Feb.,1939), pp. 627-644
10. Language and the Law by Margaret M. Bryant available at
http://www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/10.2307/453053.pdf?acceptTC=true
11. What is Language and Law? And does anyone care by Professor Peter M. Tiersma
12. Rights and Rites: Initiation, Language and Performance in Law and Legal Education by Jonathan
Yovel
13. A movement to simplify legal language by Christopher Staughton & Justice Michael Kirby
Vagueness and legal language by George C Christie
14. Introduction to legal writing by judgemark p. Painter
15. The pragmatics of reading: a new theory of language and literature by Michel Meyer
16. How Legal Language Works By Louis E. Wolcher
17. Some Thoughts on Free Speech, Language, and the Rule of Law by Thomas Streeter
18. Legal Education and Legal Profession in India by Chandra Krishnamurthy
19. Ambiguity and Misunderstanding in the Law by Sanford Schane
20. The study of the Indian legal profession by Marc Galanter
21. Varieties of Vagueness in the Law; by Andrei Marmor

College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017


I: DETAILED CASES

S.No. Title Source Module Session


No. No.
1. Hall v Brookland Auto Racing club (1933) 1 K.B.297 2 15

2. Woodrige v Sumner 1963 2 QB 43 2 15

3. Chasemore v Richards (1859)7 HLC349 2 15

4. Municipal Corporation of Delhi v 1966 AIR 1750, 2 15


Shubhagwanti, 1966 SCR (3) 649

5. Harrison v Knowles and Froster, [1918-19] All ER 2 19


Rep 306
6. Nichols v Marshall (1876) 2Ex D 1 2 19

7. Ward v Hobbs (1878) A.C. 13 2 19

8 Bhim Singh v State of J & K AIR 1986 SC 494 2 15

9 Rylands v Fletcher L R.3 H.L 330 2 19

10 Haynes v Harwood (1935)KB 146 2 15

11 Baldry v Marshall, (1925) 1 KB 26 2 19

12 Grant v Australian Knitting Mills, [1936] A.C. 562) 2 19

13 R v. Tolson, (1889) 23 QBD 168 2 36

14 R v. Prince (1875) LR 2 CCR 2 36


154
15 Moghul Steamship Co v Mc Gregor and [1892] AC 25 2 36
Co.

16 Byrne v Boadle (1863) 2 H & C 722 2 15

17 Ashby v White, (1703) 92 ER 126 2 15

College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017


18 Scott v Shepheard, (1773) 2 W BL 892 2 36

19 Re Polemis and Furness,Withy & Co (1921)3 KB562 2 36

20. Overseas Tankship (UK) Ltd v Morts (1961) AC 388 2 36


Dock and Engineering Co. Ltd

G: 4 WEB SOURCES:

 http://judis.nic.in/
 http://www.legalindia.in/
 http://www.indianetzone.com/39/english_language_india.htm
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_legal_Latin_terms
 http://www.inrebus.com/legalmaxims_a.php
 http://www.rightsandwrong.com.au/MAXIMS.pdf
 http://www.rightsandwrong.com.au/MAXIMS.pdf
 http://www.plainlanguagenetwork.org/Legal/legalwriting.pdf
 http://www.plainlanguage.gov/whatisPL/definitions/Kimble.cfm
 http://www.amazon.com/Legal-Writing-Plain-English-
Exercises/dp/0226284182/ref=pd_sim_b_5#reader_0226284182
 http://www.scienzepolitiche.uniba.it/area_docenti/documenti_docente/materiali_didattici/116_
Williams.pdf
LIST OF CASES
Hall v Brookland Auto Racing club,(1933) 1 K.B.297

Woodrige v Sumner,1963 2 QB 43

Chasemore v Richards,(1859)7 HLC349

Municipal Corporation of Delhi v Shubhagwanti, 1966 AIR 1750, 1966 SCR (3) 649

Byrne v Boadle,(1863) 2 H & C 722

Haynes v Harwood,(1935)KB 146

Rylands v Fletcher, L R.3 H.L 330

R v. Prince, (1875) LR 2 CCR 154

R v. Tolson, (1889) 23 QBD 168

College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017


Gloucester Grammar School Case

Moghul Steamship Co v Mc Gregor and Co., [1892] AC 25

Baldry v Marshall, (1925) 1 KB 26

Harrison v Knowles and Froster, [1918-19] All ER Rep 306

Ward v Hobbs, (1878) A.C. 13

Burney v Bollet

Grant v Australian Knitting Mills, [1936] A.C. 562)

Ashby v White, (1703) 92 ER 126

Bhim Singh v State of J & K, AIR 1986 SC 494

Scott v Shepheard,(1773) 2 W BL 892

Re Polemis and Furness,Withy & Co. (1921)3 KB562

Overseas Tankship (UK) Ltd v Morts Dock and Engineering Co. Ltd, (1961) AC 388

Nichols v Marshall,(1876) 2Ex D 1

Meneka Gandhi v Union of India, 1978 SCR (2) 621

Abdul Azeez v Mauzum Ali, AIR1914 All.22

Kallulal v Hemchand, AIR 1958 MP 48

Raffles v Wichelhaus,(1864) 2 H&C 906

NOTE: The above-mentioned list of cases is not exhaustive and final. The course delivery shall cover
many more cases than these.

Databases:

JSTOR
SCCONLINE
Westlaw

Instructions

a) Students need to submit individual projects.


b) Students are expected to read the concerned session’s contents in advance before coming to
the class.
c) The session will be made interactive through active participation from students. The entire
session will be conducted through question-answer, discussion, current practices, examples,
problem solving, brain storming activities, role plays, group discussions & presentations etc.

College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017


d) All schedules/announcements must be strictly adhered to.

e) Plagiarism, in any form, will be least tolerated. Student, if found plagiarized, will be
subject to disciplinary action. To avoid plagiarism, the instructor recommends the
following:
1. Acknowledge by way of a citation whatever is borrowed.
2. Put in quotation any sentence in which there are more than 12 words in a
sequence
3. To the maximum extent possible, paraphrase others’ ideas and then
acknowledge them through citations.
4. Make all borrowings, which are more than 50 words in a sequence, into a
block quote.
However,

1. Copying lines (more than 12 words in a sequence) or passages from other


sources, not citing them, and writing the name of the source as reference in the
end of the paper will be deemed plagiarism
2. After copying lines in which there are more than 12 words in a sequence and
providing a citation at the end of a line or paragraph will also be deemed
plagiarism
3. Copying others assignment, though they are original, will be considered
plagiarism

Say no to plagiarism! Let’s develop a fine research culture in CoLS.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017


Annexure-I

UNIVERSITY OF PETROLEUM & ENERGY STUDIES


COLLEGE OF LEGAL STUDIES

B.Com., LL.B. (HONS.)

SEMESTER

ACADEMIC YEAR: 2015-16 SESSION: JAN-MAY, 2016

ASSIGNMENT

FOR

Legal Language & Legal Writing

(LLBG 105)

Under the Supervision of: Dr. Sujata Bali

(TO BE FILLED BY THE STUDENT)

NAME: _______________________

SAP NO: _______________________

ROLL NO ______________________

College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017


Section A (10 Marks)

(Attempt all questions. Each question carries equal marks)

Give the meaning of the following words and make sentences using the words:

Q.1 Bona fide


Q.2. De jure
Q.3 De facto
Q.4. Ipso facto
Q.5 Locus Standi
Section B (20 marks)-
(Attempt all questions. Each question carries equal marks)

Q.6 Write an essay on any one of the followings in about 750 words:
a) Present and Future of Legal Education in India
b) Independence of Judiciary
Q.7 Draft a Power of attorney with imaginary facts and names of the parties to give it a complete
shape.

Section C (20 marks)- Analytical question


(Attempt all questions. Each question carries equal marks)

Q.8. Read the paragraph and answer the following questions:

This Writ Petition has been filed for the enforcement of the fundamental rights of working women
under Articles 14, 19 and 21 of the Constitution of India in view of the prevailing climate in which the
violation of these rights is not uncommon. With the increasing awareness and emphasis on gender
justice, there is increase in the effort to guard against such violations; and the resentment towards
incidents of sexual harassment is also increasing. The present petition has been brought as a class
action by certain social activists and NGOs with the aim of focusing attention towards this societal
aberration, and assisting in finding suitable methods for realization of the true concept of 'gender
equality'; and to prevent sexual harassment of working women in all work places through judicial
process, to fill the vacuum in existing law. The immediate cause for the filing of this writ petition is an
incident of alleged brutal gang rape of a social worker in a village of Rajasthan. That incident is the
subject matter of a separate criminal action and no further mention of it, by us, is necessary. The
incident reveals the hazards to which a working woman may be exposed and the depravity to which
sexual harassment can degenerate; and the urgency for safeguards by an alternative mechanism in the
absence of legislative measures. In the absence of legislative measures, the need is to find an effective
alternative mechanism to fulfill this felt and urgent social need.

College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017


Each such incident results in violation of the fundamental rights of 'Gender Equality' and the 'Right to
Life and Liberty'. It is clear violation of the rights under Articles 14, 15 and 21 of the Constitution.
One of the logical consequences of such an incident is also the violation of the victim's fundamental
right under Article 19(1)(g) 'to practice any profession or to carry out any occupation, trade or
business'. Such violations, therefore, attract the remedy under Article 32 for the enforcement of these
fundamental rights of women. This class action under Article 32 of the Constitution is for this reason.
A writ of mandamus in such a situation, if it is to be effective, needs to be accompanied by directions
for prevention; as the violation of fundamental rights of this kind is a recurring phenomenon. The
fundamental right to carry on any occupation, trade or profession depends on the availability of a
"safe" working environment. Right to life means life with dignity. The primary responsibility for
ensuring such safety and dignity through suitable legislation, and the creation of a mechanism for its
enforcement, is of the legislature and the executive. When, however, instances of sexual harassment
resulting in violation of fundamental rights of women workers under Articles 14, 19 and 21 are
brought before us for redress under Article 32, an effective redressal requires that some guidelines
should be laid down for the protection of these rights to fill the legislative vacuum.

In the absence of domestic law occupying the field, to formulate effective measures to check the evil
of sexual harassment of working women at all work places, the contents of International Conventions
and norms are significant for the purpose of interpretation of the guarantee of gender equality, right to
work with human dignity in Articles 14, 15 19(1)(g) and 21 of the Constitution and the safeguards
against sexual harassment implicit therein. Any International Convention not inconsistent with the
fundamental rights and in harmony with its spirit must be read into these provisions to enlarge the
meaning and content thereof, to promote the object of the constitutional guarantee. This is implicit
from Article 51(c) and enabling power of the Parliament to enact laws for implementing the
International Conventions and norms by virtue of Article 253 read with Entry 14 of the Union List in
Seventh Schedule of the Constitution. Article 73 also is relevant. It provides that the executive power
of the Union shall extend to the matters with respect to which Parliament has power to make laws. The
executive power of the Union is, therefore, available till the parliament enacts to expressly provide
measures needed to curb the evil. Thus, the power of this Court under Article 32 for enforcement of
the fundamental rights and the executive power of the Union have to meet the challenge to protect the
working women from sexual harassment and to make their fundamental rights meaningful.
Governance of the society by the rule of law mandates this requirement as a logical concomitant of the
constitutional scheme. The exercise performed by the Court in this matter is with this common
perception shared with the learned Solicitor General and other members of the Bar who rendered
valuable assistance in the performance of this difficult task in public interest. The progress made at
each hearing culminated in the formulation of guidelines to which the Union of India gave its consent
College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017
through the learned Solicitor General, indicating that these should be the guidelines and norms
declared by this Court to govern the behaviour of the employers and all others at the work places to
curb this social evil.

Gender equality includes protection from sexual harassment and right to work with dignity, which is a
universally recognized basic human right. The common minimum requirement of this right has
received global acceptance. The International Conventions and norms are, therefore, of great
significance in the formulation of the guidelines to achieve this purpose.

The obligation of this Court under Article 32 of the Constitution for the enforcement of these
fundamental rights in the absence of legislation must be viewed along with the role of judiciary
envisaged in the Beijing Statement of Principles of the Independence of the Judiciary in the
LAWASIA region. These principles were accepted by the Chief Justices of the Asia and the Pacific at
Beijing in 1995 as those representing the minimum standards necessary to be observed in order to
maintain the independence and effective functioning of the judiciary. The objectives of the judiciary
mentioned in the Beijing Statement are:

(a) to ensure that all persons are able to live securely under the Rule of Law;

(b) to promote, within the proper limits of the judicial function, the observance and the
attainment of human rights; and

(c) to administer the law impartially among persons and between persons and the State."

(1) Suggest a suitable title for the above passage and justify the title. [2 Marks]

(2) Write the précis of above paragraph in your own words as plainly as possible. [6 Marks]

(3) Explain the following terms according to their meaning and context: [12 Marks]

(a) remedy under Article 32


(b) gender justice
(c) class action
(d) 'Right to Life and Liberty'
(e) writ of mandamus
(f) legislative vacuum
(g) International Conventions
(h) Seventh Schedule
(i) Rule of Law
(j) human rights
(k) right to work
(l) judicial activism

College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017


Section D (50 marks)
(Attempt all questions. All questions carry equal marks)
Q. 9. Draft a Plaint in a suit for defamation using imaginary names and figures to give it a complete
shape. [10 Marks]

Q. 10 Draft a Plaint and a written statement on behalf of plaintiff & defendant in case of eviction of a
tenant; using imaginary names and figures to give it a complete shape.

[10 Marks]

Q. 11 Explain the following Legal Maxims with the help of legal provisions, case laws and examples:
[3 X 10 Marks]

a) action personalis moritur cum persona.


b) ignorantia facit execusat ignorantia juris non execusat.
c) Actus non facit reum, nisi mens sit rea.

College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017


INSTRUCTIONS TO STUDENTS

ON ASSIGNMENT SOLVING

1. All the questions of the assignment must be handwritten.


2. To answer your assignment questions you need to access multiple information
sources like
a. Your own prior experience.
b. Regular reading of Books, Law Journals, magazines and News papers
c. Reference Books
d. Browsing the internet for latest updates.

3. Please remember that due to the dynamic and rapidly changing global legal
environment and the continuously realigning geopolitical situation, your answers should
capture and depict the current contemporary information.
4. As a student of Law, we encourage to have a contrary point of view. But do ensure
that you can provide a logical justification to this view supported by verifiable facts,
figures, statues and decided cases by various higher courts.
5. Caution: Remember to provide original answers only.
f) Plagiarism, in any form, will be least tolerated. Student, if found plagiarized, will be
subject to disciplinary action. To avoid plagiarism, the instructor recommends the
following:
1. Acknowledge by way of a citation whatever is borrowed.
2. Put in quotation any sentence in which there are more than 12 words in a sequence
3. To the maximum extent possible, paraphrase others’ ideas and then acknowledge
them through citations.
4. Make all borrowings, which are more than 50 words in a sequence, into a block
quote.
However,

5. Copying lines (more than 12 words in a sequence) or passages from other sources,
not citing them, and writing the name of the source as reference in the end of the
paper will be deemed plagiarism
6. After copying lines in which there are more than 12 words in a sequence and
providing a citation at the end of a line or paragraph will also be deemed plagiarism
7. Copying others’ assignment, though they are original, will be considered plagiarism.
Say no to plagiarism!
Let’s develop a fair research culture in CoLS.

College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Annexure-II

PROJECT TOPICS

1. Application of ejusdem generis 25. Judicial Review


2. Application of precedents 26. Jurisprudential background of the
3. Application of res gestae study of language and law
4. Basis of legal language 27. Language and the Constitution
5. Bhopal Gas Tragedy 28. Language in making of laws
6. Communal Violence 29. Language problem in drafting of the
7. Comparative study of Historical and documents
Analytical School 30. Law as an instrument of social
8. Constitutional provisions relating to engineering
language 31. Law and social change
9. Criminalisation of Politics in India 32. Law, State and Justice in the Pure
10. Economic justice: India Perspective Theory of Law
11. Education and Fundamental Rights in 33. Lawyers and Language of the Law
India 34. Legal Education and Legal Profession
12. Emergence of Public Interest 35. Legal education
Litigation and its contribution 36. Legal language and the profession of
13. Euthanasia law
14. Feminism and Equality 37. Legal Language: meaning, scope and
15. Freedom of expression and its problem.
restriction 38. Legal Profession in India
16. Fundamentals of conveyancing 39. Maxims of Equity
17. Gender Justice in India 40. Maxims of Equity used under transfer
18. Historical evolution of legal profession of Property Laws
19. Impact of technology on the practice 41. Maxims supplying some basics to the
of law principle of law of torts
20. Importance of maxims, words and 42. Meaning, importance, scope and
idioms in legal writing problems of Legal Language
21. Independence of judiciary 43. Necessity and background of study of
22. Indian languages and literature legal language in India
23. Indian Legal System 44. Plain Language and the Law
24. Integration of language and literature 45. Population and India
College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017
46. Position of legal profession and 57. Role of Conveyancing in Law: Sale
necessity of professional ethics Deed
47. Poverty and India 58. Role of Maxims and Legal
48. Principle of Estoppel: An analysis terminology under law of Crimes
49. Principles of Pleading 59. Role of Maxims and Legal
50. Problem of legal language in drafting terminology under law of torts
51. Protection of environment and 60. Separation of Power under the
sustainable development Constitution of India
52. Relation of law and language 61. Social – Economic Laws and their
53. Law and Literature relevance in India
54. Justice, law and society 62. Secularism and India
55. Law and morality 63. The Doctrine of Precedent or Stare
56. Role and usage of Maxims and legal Decisis as a Source of Law
terminology under law of Contracts. 64. The Idea of Law: An analysis
65. Terrorism

NOTE: The above-mentioned list of project topics is suggestive and allotment of project topics to
students is subject to approval by the instructor.

GUIDELINES FOR PROJECT WORK

The project will be completed as follows:


1. Abstract: One page in around 300 words

It may be in 3 paragraphs

a. Highlighting the topic


b. Areas of concern and expected solution
c. Scheme of research
d. Key words
2. Submission of synopsis

Synopsis should contain the following:

a. Statement of the Problem


b. Survey of the existing literature
c. Identification of the issues
d. Objective and scope of the research
e. Research Methodology adopted
f. Probable outcome
g. Chapterisation

College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017


3. Submission of Final Project report after approval of synopsis.

a. Excluding the Cover page, index page and bibliography the main write up should be
around 20 pages. 1.5 Space, Times New Roman, Font Size 12. The project should be
printed both sides to save paper.
b. Project must have- Cover page stating Subject name, Title of the Project, Supervisor
name, Student details etc.
c. Students have to follow a uniform method of citation (the suggested method is Blue Book
19th Edition) and must mention the same in the research methodology).
d. The main body of the project must contain- Introduction, different chapters, conclusion,
suggestions, along with foot notes and bibliography.
4. The project work shall

a. Be focused on the problem


b. Include current status of knowledge in the subject (literature review);
c. Embody the result of studies carried out by him/her;
d. Show evidence of the student’s capacity for critical examination and judgment; and
e. Be satisfactory in presentation so far as language, style and form are concerned
5. The student shall indicate clearly and extensively in his/her project, the following:

a. The source from which referred information is taken;


b. The extent to which he/she has availed himself/herself of the work of others and the
portion of the /project work he/she claims to be his/her original work; and
c. Whether his/her project work has been conducted independently or in collaboration with
others.
6. A certificate to the effect that the project work carried out by the student independently or in
collaboration with other student(s) endorsed by the student shall form the part of the
submission for evaluation.
7. Every student who spends a specified period of time in an industry/organization/institute for
reasons of work related to his/her project work, with prior permission from the Coordinator
concerned will explicitly acknowledge working in the relevant industry/organization/institute.
8. All projects submitted by the students will go through the process of plagiarism check through
the anti-plagiarism software (Turnitin). The report produced by the software will necessarily
be as per the standards prescribed by the university. If the report is below standards the
supervisor will reject the project and award zero marks.
Annexure-III

CONTINUOUS ASSESSMENT SHEET


Programme
Name Semester II
Faculty Name
Legal Language and Legal
Subject Writing
LLB
Subject Code G105
College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017
Quiz/Class Assignment/ Project Work Subject Total
Test/ Snap Case Grand Viva Attendance 100
Test Analysis/Cou Marks
rt Room
Nam Exercise
Enrl. No. e 20% 20% 20% 20% 20%
weightage weightage weightage weightage weightag
e
I II Report / Viva
10 10 /PPT
1
2
3
4

Annexure-IV

Class test Class test 2/ Abstract Synopsis Assignment Final Project Project
1/quiz Quiz submission submission Submission Presentations+ Grand
Viva

Snap Snap On or Before On or Before On or Before On or Before April 4-12, 2017

(Before (Before End February 13, February 27, March 20, April 3, 2017
Mid Term) term) 2017 2017 2017

College of Legal Studies Jan.-May. 2017