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© 2010 Math TutorDVD.

com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1


Section 1 – Real Numbers

Supplemental Worksheet Problems To Accompany:

The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Volume 1


Section 1 – Real Numbers

Please watch Section 1 of this DVD before working these problems.

The DVD is located at:

http://www.mathtutordvd.com/products/item66.cfm

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© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

Part 1: Real Numbers

1) Identify the real numbers below.

2) Identify the real numbers below.

3) Identify the real numbers below.

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© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

Part 2: Rational Numbers

4) Which of the following is a rational number?

5) Which of the following is a rational number?

6) Which of the following is a rational number?

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© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

Part 3: Irrational Numbers

7) Which of the following is an irrational number?

8) Which of the following is an irrational number?

10.10, − 0.12, 18, π

9) Which of the following is an irrational number?

2
− , 30, 1.25698712302....., − 0.666
3

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© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

Part 4: Integers

10) Which of the following is not an integer?

11) Which of the following is not an integer?

12) Which of the following is not an integer?

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© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

Part 5: Whole Numbers

13) Identify the whole number(s) below.

14) Identify the whole number(s) below.

15) Identify the whole number(s) below.

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© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

Part 6: Natural Numbers

16) Identify the natural number(s) below.

17) Identify the natural number(s) below.

18) Identify the natural number(s) below.

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© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

Part 7: Prime Numbers

19) Identify the prime number(s) below.

20) Identify the prime number(s) below.

21) Identify the prime number(s) below.

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© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

Part 8: Putting it all together

For each of the numbers below, identify which group they belong to.
(Real, Irrational, Rational, Integer, Whole, Natural and/or Prime number)

Example: Is both a Real and a Rational number.

22)

23)

24)

25)

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© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

Question Answer

1) Identify the real numbers below.

Begin.

First, we need to remember the definition


of a real number. This is any number that
can be located on a number line. This
excludes imaginary numbers.

All of the numbers mentioned can be


plotted onto a number line even if they
are fractions or have numerous decimal
places, they can still be plotted
somewhere on a number line.

All of them are real numbers Since all of the numbers meet the
definition of a real number they are all by
definition “real numbers.”

Ans: All are considered real numbers

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© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

2) Identify the real numbers below.

Begin.

First, we need to remember the definition


of a real number. This is any number that
can be located on a number line. This
excludes imaginary numbers.

All of the numbers mentioned can be


plotted onto a number line even if they
are fractions or have numerous decimal
places, they can still be plotted
somewhere on a number line.

All of them are real numbers Since all of these numbers meet the
definition of a real number they are all by
definition “real numbers.”

Ans: All are considered real numbers

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© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

3) Identify the real numbers below.

Begin.

First, we need to remember the


definition of a real number. This is
any number that can be located on
a number line. This excludes
imaginary numbers.

All of the numbers mentioned can


be plotted onto a number line even
if they are fractions or have
numerous decimal places, they
can still be plotted somewhere on
a number line.

All of them are real numbers Since all of these numbers meet
the definition of a real number they
are all by definition “real numbers.”

Ans: All are considered real


numbers

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© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

4) Which of the following is a rational


number?
Begin.

First, we need to remember the definition


of a rational number. This is any number
that can be expressed as a fraction.

We see as we express the numbers in


fraction form that all but one can be
expressed as a fraction. If we type the
square root of two into a calculator we
notice that the result is a non repeating
decimal pattern. The rest of the numbers
can be expressed as a fraction and
therefore are rational numbers.

Ans:

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© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

5) Which of the following is a rational number?

Begin.

First, we need to remember the


definition of a rational number.
This is any number that can be
expressed as a fraction.

We see as we express the


numbers in fraction form that all
but one can be expressed as a
fraction. We notice right away
that has a non
repeating infinite pattern.
Therefore, there is no way to
express this number as a
fraction. The rest of the
numbers can be expressed as a
fraction and therefore are
rational numbers.

Ans:

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© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

6) Which of the following is a rational


number?
Begin.

First, we need to remember the definition


of a rational number. This is any number
that can be expressed as a fraction.

We see as we express the numbers in


fraction form that all but one can be
expressed as a fraction. If we type
into a calculator we notice that pi has a
non repeating decimal pattern that goes
on forever. Therefore, there is no way to
express this number as a fraction. The
rest of the numbers can be expressed as
a fraction and therefore are rational
numbers.

Ans:

Page 15
© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

7) Which of the following is an irrational


number?
Begin.

First, we need to remember the definition


of an irrational number. This is any
number that can’t be expressed as a
fraction.

All of the numbers mentioned can be


written as a fraction.

Since all of these numbers can be


expressed as fractions, none of these
numbers are considered irrational

Ans: None of the numbers listed are


irrational numbers

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© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

8) Which of the following is an irrational


number?
Begin.
10.10, − 0.12, 18, π

First, we need to remember the


definition of an irrational number. This
is any number that can’t be expressed
as a fraction.

The first three numbers mentioned can


be written as a fraction.

Since Pi = 3.141592654… is an infinite


non repeating decimal, it cannot be
written as a fraction.

π = 3.141592654........ Ans: Pi is an Irrational Number

Page 17
© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

9) Which of the following is an irrational number?

Begin.
2
− , 30, 1.25698712302....., − 0.666
3

First, we need to remember the


definition of an irrational
number. This is any number
that can’t be expressed as a
fraction.

All of the numbers can be


written as a fraction except for
the infinite non repeating
decimal. This is the only
irrational number in our list.

1.25698712302.....

Ans: 1.25698712302..... is
irrational

Page 18
© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

10) Which of the following is not an integer?

Begin.

First, we need to remember the


definition of what an integer is. This
is, any number that is positive,
negative or zero, but has no decimal
point.

…,-5, -4, -3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5…

Right away, we look at the list of


numbers and notice that all but one
falls under this definition.

Ans:

Page 19
© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

11) Which of the following is not an


integer?
Begin.

First, we need to remember the definition


of what an integer is. This is, any number
that is positive, negative or zero, but has
no decimal place.

…,-5, -4, -3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5…

Right away, we look at the list of numbers


and notice that all but one falls under this
definition. The negative fraction will
provide a result with a decimal place
when we divide 15 by 16. Since the
square root of 9 is exactly 3, this is an
integer as well.

Ans:

Page 20
© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

12) Which of the following is not an


integer?
Begin.

First, we need to remember the definition


of what an integer is. This is, any number
that is positive, negative or zero, but has
no decimal place.

…,-5, -4, -3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5…

Right away, we look at the list of numbers


and notice that all but one falls under this
definition.

Ans:

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© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

13) Identify the whole number(s) below.

Begin.

First, we need to remember the definition


of what makes a whole number. A whole
number is any positive number including
zero that does not have a decimal place.

By simply applying the definition we see


that the two negative numbers are not
whole numbers.

Zero and one hundred do fit the definition.

Ans:

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© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

14) Identify the whole number(s) below.

Begin.

First, we need to remember the definition


of what makes a whole number. A whole
number is any positive number including
zero that does not have a decimal place.

First we see that the negative number


does not meet our definition. Then we
see that the fraction will give us a decimal
place as well as the square root of 2.

The number fifteen is the only whole


number.

Ans:

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© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

15) Identify the whole number(s) below.

Begin.

First, we need to remember the definition


of what makes a whole number. A whole
number is any positive number including
zero that does not have a decimal place.

We see that 640 is both positive and does


not contain a decimal place.

The negative 640 however does not meet


our definition so it is not a whole number.

The one half will give us a decimal place,


0.5 so it is not a whole number.

The number 1.1 is positive but has a


decimal place and therefore is not a
whole number.

The only whole number from the list is


640.

Ans:

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© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

16) Identify the natural number(s) below.

Begin.

First, we need to remember the definition


of what makes a natural number. This is
any number that can be used to
physically count something. This
includes:

1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9………..

Based on our definition, we see that the


negative numbers are not natural
numbers because I can’t physically count
something I don’t have so the negative
numbers are not natural numbers.

The last number to consider from the list


is zero. If I have zero of something I can’t
naturally count it so zero is not a natural
number.

None. Since none of the numbers meet our


criteria of what makes a natural number
none of these are natural numbers

Ans: None

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© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

17) Identify the natural number(s) below.

Begin.

First, we need to remember the definition


of what makes a natural number. This is
any number that can be used to
physically count something. This
includes:

1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9………..

Based on our definition, we see that the


negative numbers are not natural
numbers because I can’t physically count
something I don’t have so the negative
numbers are not natural numbers.

The square root of 9 is the same as 3, so


I can physically count something if I have
3 apples or 3 pencils so the square root
of 9 is a natural number.

The last number to consider from the list


is 26. I can definitely physically have 26
of something and count it so 26 is a
natural numbers.

Ans: Are natural numbers

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© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

18) Identify the natural number(s) below.

Begin.

First, we need to remember the definition


of what makes a natural number. This is
any number that can be used to
physically count something. This
includes:

1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9………..

Based on our definition, we see that the


negative numbers are not natural
numbers because I can’t physically count
something I don’t have so the negative
numbers are not natural numbers.

We are left with 640 and 0. If I have zero


of something I can’t naturally count it so
zero is not a natural number.

The number 640 however can be used to


physically count something like the 640
pennies in my piggy bank. Therefore the
number 640 is a natural number.

The only natural number is the number


640.

Ans:

Page 27
© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

19) Identify the prime number(s) below.

Begin.

First, we need to remember the definition


of a prime number. This is a whole
number other than zero and 1, which can
only be divided by 1 and itself.

When we say divided only by 1 and itself,


we mean that those are the only numbers
that will not give you a decimal place
when you divide.

The first number we have is 32. It is by


definition a whole number and it is not
zero or 1. However, 1 and 32 are not the
only numbers I can divide 32 by. I can
divide it by 2, 4, 8, and 16. So therefore it
is not a prime number.

The number 2 is a whole number that is


not zero or 1. And I can only divide it by
1 and 2, so it is a prime number.

The number zero already violates our


definition so it is not a prime number.

The number 16 is a whole number that is


not zero or 1. However 1 and 16 are not
the only numbers I can divide 16 by. I
can divide it by 2, 4 and 8. So it is not a
prime number.

Ans:

Page 28
© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

20) Identify the prime number(s) below.

Begin.

First, we need to remember the definition


of a prime number. This is a whole
number other than zero and 1, which can
only be divided by 1 and itself.

When we say divided only by 1 and itself,


we mean that those are the only numbers
that will not give you a decimal place
when you divide.

The number 10 by definition a whole


number and it is not zero or 1. However,
1 and 10 are not the only numbers I can
divide 10 by. I can divide it by 2 and 5.
So therefore it is not a prime number.

The number 17 is a whole number and it


is not zero or 1. When we try to divide 17
by something other than 1 or 17, we find
that we can’t do it without ending up with
a decimal place. Therefore 17 is a prime
number.

The number 3 as well as 17 can only be


divided by 1 and itself therefore it is a
prime number.

The number 1 violates our definition so it


is not a prime number.

Ans:

Page 29
© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

21) Identify the prime number(s) below.

Begin.

First, we need to remember the definition


of a prime number. This is a whole
number other than zero and 1, which can
only be divided by 1 and itself.

When we say divided only by 1 and itself,


we mean that those are the only numbers
that will not give you a decimal place
when you divide.

As we look at the first two numbers, -2


and 0.8, we notice they are not whole
numbers which violates our definition of a
prime number and therefore are not
considered prime numbers.

The number 15 is a whole number and it


is not zero or 1. However, 1 and 15 are
not the only numbers I can divide 15 by. I
can divide it by the number 5 and still end
up with a natural number (no decimal or
zero). So it is not a prime number.

The number 22 is a whole number and it


is not zero or 1. However, 1 and 22 are
not the only numbers I can divide 22 by. I
can divide it by 2, and 11. So it is not a
prime number.

None. None of the numbers meet our definition


of a prime number.

Ans: None.

Page 30
© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

22)

Begin.

First, we need to remember our


definitions and how each type of
number is related to the other types
of numbers.

Remember that “Real numbers” is


at the top of the umbrella.
Everything else falls under it. Then
it breaks off into “Irrational” and
“Rational numbers.” Then under
Rational numbers are “Integers”,
“Whole numbers”, “Natural
numbers” and “Prime numbers.”

If I know a number is Irrational, then


by definition it is not Rational or
anything that falls under a Rational
number.

This number is a real number. Next


we see if it is irrational or rational.
Since I can write it as a fraction,
then it is a rational number. Since it
is has a decimal place, it is not an
integer, a whole number, natural
number or a prime number.

Ans: Real number, Rational

Page 31
© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

number
23)
Begin.

First, we need to remember our


definitions and how each type of
number is related to the other types
of numbers.

Remember that “Real numbers” is


at the top of the umbrella.
Everything else falls under it. Then
it breaks off into “Irrational” and
“Rational numbers.” Then under
Rational numbers are “Integers”,
“Whole numbers”, “Natural
numbers” and “Prime numbers.”

If I know a number is Irrational, then


by definition it is not Rational or
anything that falls under a Rational
number.

This number is a Real number.


Next we see if it is Irrational or
Rational. Just by looking at it, we
see that it is Rational since we can
write it as 7 over 1. It has no
decimal place and it is positive so it
is an Integer, a Whole number and
a Natural number. We find that I
can only divide this number by 1
and itself so it is a Prime number.

Ans: Real number, Rational


Number, Integer, Whole number,
Natural number, and Prime

Page 32
© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

number
24)
Begin.

First, we need to remember our


definitions and how each type of
number is related to the other types
of numbers.

Remember that “Real numbers” is


at the top of the umbrella.
Everything else falls under it. Then
it breaks off into “Irrational” and
“Rational numbers.” Then under
Rational numbers are “Integers”,
“Whole numbers”, “Natural
numbers” and “Prime numbers.”

If I know a number is Irrational, then


by definition it is not Rational or
anything that falls under a Rational
number.

This number is a Real number.


Next we see if it is Irrational or
Rational. Just by looking at it, we
see that it has decimal places that
are non repeatable and infer to go
on forever. This means we can’t
represent it as a fraction and
therefore is an Irrational number.
Since it is an Irrational number it is
not Rational and not any of the
other types of numbers.

Ans: Real number, Irrational


Number

Page 33
© 2010 Math TutorDVD.com The Pre-Algebra Tutor: Vol 1
Section 1 – Real Numbers

25)
Begin.

First, we need to remember our


definitions and how each type of
number is related to the other types
of numbers.

Remember that “Real numbers” is


at the top of the umbrella.
Everything else falls under it. Then
it breaks off into “Irrational” and
“Rational numbers.” Then under
Rational numbers are “Integers”,
“Whole numbers”, “Natural
numbers” and “Prime numbers.”

If I know a number is Irrational, then


by definition it is not Rational or
anything that falls under a Rational
number.

This number is a Real number.


Next we see if it is Irrational or
Rational. Just by looking at it, we
see that it is Rational since we can
write it as -2 over 1. We also notice
that it has a negative sign but no
decimal place. This number is still
considered an Integer, but not
considered a Whole number. Since
it is not considered a whole number
it can’t be a Natural number or a
Prime number by definition.

Ans: Real number, Rational


Number, and an Integer

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