Você está na página 1de 9

Dr.

 J.S.Lavelle,  University  of  Edinburgh  


MOOC  –  Introduction  to  the  Philosophy  of  Mind  (January  2013)  

Introduction  to  the  Philosophy  of  Mind


 
Introduction  

Part  one:  Theories  of  Mind  

i. Cartesian  dualism  

ii. Identity  theories  

iii. Functionalism  

Part  two:  Mind  as  Computer  

iv. Turing  machines  

v. Searle’s  Chinese  Room  argument    

Conclusions  

Introduction  
What  is  it  to  have  a  mind?    We’re  certain  that  anyone  reading  this  handout  has  a  mind.    But  
what  are  the  special  properties  we  consider  ‘minded’  beings  to  have,  and  are  these  properties  
shared  by  other  animals,  or  even  infants?  In  this  lecture  I  introduce  some  of  the  approaches  
contemporary  philosophers  have  taken  to  the  question  of  what  it  is  to  have  a  mind.        

Some  terminology:    I  will  use  the  term  ‘mental  state’  to  refer  to  any  mental  phenomenon,  e.g.  
thoughts,  emotions,  sensations.    So  the  thought  that  beaver  dams  are  cool,  and  the  joy  I  feel  
when  I  see  beavers  building  a  dam  are  examples  of  mental  states  that  I  can  have.  

Further  reading  

Clark,  A.  (2001).  Mindware.  Oxford  University  Press.  (Introduction  and  chapter  1)  

i.    Cartesian  (or  Substance)  Dualism  


Cartesian  dualism  is  the  idea  that  the  mind  is  made  of  a  fundamentally  different  substance  to  
the  body.    The  mind  is  made  of  immaterial  stuff  and  the  body  is  made  of  material  stuff.        

Material  substances  

• Have  extension.    Extension  =  occupies  a  certain  amount  of  space.  

Immaterial  substances  

• Do  not  have  extension  

1  
 
Dr.  J.S.Lavelle,  University  of  Edinburgh  
MOOC  –  Introduction  to  the  Philosophy  of  Mind  (January  2013)  

According  to  Cartesian  dualism,  minds  are  made  of  immaterial  ‘thinking’  substance  which  
does  not  occupy  a  place  in  space.    The  part  of  me  that  thinks  exists  independently  of  the  body.  

>>  To  find  out  more  about  how  Descartes  argued  for  this  position,    see  Appendix  1.  

Princess  Elizabeth  of  Bohemia  &  the  problem  of  causation  

Princess  Elizabeth  of  Bohemia  was  one  of  Descartes  pupils.    She  pointed  out  that  physical  
things  can  only  be  changed  by  interaction  with  other  physical  things.    If  the  mind  is  
immaterial  (i.e.  not  physical)  then  how  can  it  instigate  changes  in  the  body,  which  are  
physical?  It  is  clear  that  minds  cause  behaviours  –it  is  my  desire  for  juice  that  causes  me  to  
walk  to  the  fridge  –  but  how  can  this  be  on  Descartes’  position?  She  challenged  Descartes  to…  

[…Explain]  how  the  mind  of  a  human  being,  being  only  a  thinking  substance,  can  
determine  the  bodily  spirits  in  producing  bodily  actions.    For  it  appears  that  all  
determination  of  movement  is  produced  by  the  pushing  of  the  thing  being  moved,  by  
the  manner  in  which  it  is  pushed  by  that  which  moves  it,  or  else  by  the  qualification  
and  figure  of  the  surface  of  the  latter.    Contact  is  required  for  the  first  two  conditions,  
and  extension  for  the  third.    [But]  you  entirely  exclude  the  latter  from  the  notion  you  
have  of  the  soul,  and  the  former  seems  incompatible  with  an  immaterial  thing.  

Princess  Elizabeth  of  Bohemia,  1643.    Cited  Kim  (2006,  41  -­‐2)  

Descartes  faces  the  problem  of  explaining  how  minds  can  cause  bodies  to  move  if  they  are  
made  of  substances  which  do  not  occupy  a  place  in  space.    Similarly,  he  will  also  need  to  
explain  how  physical  substances  that  we  ingest  can  affect  our  minds,  as  is  the  case  with  
hallucinogens.  

Further  reading  

Descartes’  2nd  and  6th  Meditations.    Many  editions  available.      

ii.    Identity  theory  

Physicalism  is  the  view  that  all  that  exists  is  physical  stuff,  that  is,  stuff  which  has  extension.    
Therefore,  whatever  our  explanation  of  mental  phenomena  is,  it  can’t  go  around  citing  
immaterial  stuff!  This  gets  around  the  problem  of  causation,  because  if  mental  phenomena  
consist  in  physical  stuff,  just  like  our  bodies,  then  they  can  interact  with  our  bodies  to  cause  
various  behaviours.  

On  one  view  of  physicalism  mental  phenomena,  like  thoughts  and  emotions  etc.,  are  identical  
with  certain  physical  phenomena,  e.g.  a  cocktail  of  chemicals  in  our  heads.    This  is  known  as  
the  identity  theory.    The  identity  theory  of  physicalism  with  regards  to  mental  states  claims  
that  having  a  mental  state  consists  in  being  in  a  particular  physical  state.    For  example,  being  
in  pain  is  identical  to  your  C-­‐fibres  firing  and  there  is  nothing  else  to  it  than  that.    Identity  
theory  is  a  reductive  account  of  mental  states:  it  is  reducing  them  to  physical  processes.  

There  are  two  ways  of  spelling  out  the  identity  theory,  which  rely  on  the  token/type  
distinction.  

2  
 
Dr.  J.S.Lavelle,  University  of  Edinburgh  
MOOC  –  Introduction  to  the  Philosophy  of  Mind  (January  2013)  

The  token/type  distinction  

‘How  many  dogs  were  at  Crufts  last  year?’  

This  question  could  be  interpreted  in  two  ways.    The  questioner  might  be  asking  about  how  
many  types  of  dogs  (i.e.  breeds)  were  at  Crufts  last  year,  and  the  answer  would  be  ‘around  
300’.    Alternatively,  she  could  be  asking  about  how  many  individual  dogs  were  at  Crufts  last  
year,  in  which  case  the  answer  would  be  ‘around  3,000’.    In  the  second  case,  philosophers  
would  say  she  is  asking  about  how  many  dog  ‘tokens’  there  were  at  Crufts.    If  I  were  looking  at  
two  Bassett  hounds,  we  would  say  that  I  was  looking  at  two  tokens  of  the  same  type:  I  am  
looking  at  one  type  of  dog  (namely,  the  Bassett  hound  type)  and  two  instances  of  that  type,  
referred  to  as  ‘tokens’.  

This  matters  for  our  discussion  because  when  an  identity  theorist  says  that  mental  
phenomena  are  identical  with  physical  phenomena,  we  want  to  know  whether  she  thinks:  

a) That  types  of  mental  phenomena  (e.g.  the  type  ‘feeling  sad’,  or  the  type  ‘feeling  happy’)  
are  identical  with  types  of  physical  phenomena  (e.g.  that  ‘feeling  sad’  can  be  reduced  a  
particular  chemical  cocktail).    This  is  known  as  type-­‐  identity  theory.  1  
Or  
b) That  instances,  or  tokens,  of  mental  phenomena  are  identical  with  physical  
phenomena.    On  this  view,  you  can  just  claim  that  the  happy  feeling  I  had  yesterday  at  
15:10  was  identical  with  a  physical  state.    This  is  known  as  token-­‐  identity  theory.  

Type-­‐  identity  theory  claims  that  for  every  type  of  mental  phenomenon  (feeling  sad;  feeling  
happy;  wanting  something  or  hating  something)  there  is  a  corresponding  physical  state.  So  
pains  are  identical  with  C-­‐fibre  activation2:  my  pain  is  identical  with  my  C-­‐fibres  activation,  
and  your  pain  is  identical  with  your  C-­‐fibres  activation;  my  pain  now  is  identical  with  C-­‐fibre  
activation  and  my  pain  yesterday  lunch  time  was  also  identical  with  the  activity  of  my  C-­‐fibres.  

By  contrast,  token-­‐identity  theorists  say  that  my  pain  yesterday  was  definitely  identical  with  a  
physical  state.    And  my  pain  today  is  definitely  identical  with  a  physical  state.    And  your  pain  
is  identical  with  a  physical  state.    But  these  physical  states  might  all  be  different:  the  first  
might  be  neuron  24  firing,  whilst  the  second  is  neuron  408  firing.    All  the  token-­‐identity  
theorist  is  committed  to  is  that  every  mental  phenomenon  is  identical  with  some  physical  
phenomenon.  

Type-­‐  identity  theory  offers  a  stronger  research  program.    It  says  that  types  of  physical  states,  
e.g.  a  surge  in  endorphins,  are  identical  with  types  of  mental  state,  e.g.  feeling  happy,  and  that  
this  is  the  case  for  all  humans.  

A  problem  for  type-­‐  identity  theory  

                                                                                                           
1
 Strictly  speaking  ‘type-­‐type’  identity  theory  because  it  says  types  of  mental  phenomena  are  identical  
with  types  of  physical  phenomena.  
2
 Philosophers  love  to  talk  about  C-­‐fibres  as  being  identical  with  pain.    But,  really,  we  know  that  the  
neural  correlates  of  pain  are  much  more  complicated.    We  also  like  discussing  pain  a  lot,  which  gives  a  
worrying  insight  into  the  profession.    

3  
 
Dr.  J.S.Lavelle,  University  of  Edinburgh  
MOOC  –  Introduction  to  the  Philosophy  of  Mind  (January  2013)  

Hilary  Putnam,  in  his  1967  paper  ‘The  Nature  of  Mental  States’  raised  the  following  objection  
to  type-­‐identity  theory,  arguing  that  it  is  too  narrow.    Imagine  that  we  find  the  cocktail  of  
chemicals  which  we  are  certain  is  type-­‐identical  to  the  mental  state  of  feeling  pain.    Putnam  
says  that  all  we’ve  done  is  find  out  the  identity  relation  between  pain  and  its  physical  
realisation  in  humans.    Let’s  say,  for  the  sake  of  argument,  that  octopus  brains  are  made  up  of  
totally  different  chemicals  to  human  brains,  but  that  we  have  good  reason  to  believe  that  these  
critters  feel  pain,  e.g.  they  withdraw  from  hot  stimuli,  they  engage  in  avoidance  behaviour  
around  those  stimuli,  we  see  a  spike  in  their  brain  activity  when  they  touch  hot  things.    Do  we  
want  to  deny  them  pain  because  their  brains  are  made  up  of  different  stuff  to  ours?  Of  course  
not,  says  Putnam.  

Multiple  realisability  

The  key  point  for  Putnam  is  that  mental  states  are  multiply  realisable.    This  just  means  that  
any  mental  state,  e.g.  the  mental  state  of  wanting  a  pet  beaver,  can  be  instantiated  in  a  variety  
of  different  physical  systems.    It  could  be  in  a  physical  system  made  out  of  H2O  and  other  
chemicals  (like  us)  or  a  system  made  out  of  something  totally  different,  like  the  chemicals  in  
an  octopus  brain.  

To  take  a  different  example:  in  our  society,  money  is  made  of  bits  of  paper  and  metal.    But  in  
other  societies  shells  are  used  to  trade  with,  and  the  value  of  various  things  is  measured  in  
terms  of  how  many  shells  they  are  worth.    In  other  societies  still  livestock  serve  the  function  
that  metal  and  paper  serve  in  our  society.    But  cows,  shells  and  bits  of  paper  and  metal  are  all  
recognisable  as  currency  in  virtue  of  them  all  playing  a  particular  role  (being  traded  for  other  
objects,  and  being  a  unit  of  value).    Currency  is  thus  multiply  realisable:  there  are  lots  of  
different  things  that  are  currency  in  different  cultures,  but  they  all  share  a  common  role.  

iii.    Functionalism  

Putnam’s  insight  had  a  considerable  impact  on  contemporary  philosophy  of  mind.    He  was  
saying  that  rather  than  thinking  about  mental  phenomena  in  terms  of  what  they  might  be  
made  of  physically  (because  this  leads  to  all  sorts  of  problems  when  it  comes  to  non-­‐humans)  
we  should  be  thinking  about  them  in  terms  of  what  they  do.    This  led  to  the  functionalist  
account  of  mental  states.    Functionalists  claim  that  trying  to  give  an  account  of  mental  states  
in  terms  of  what  they’re  made  of  is  like  trying  to  explain  what  a  chair  is  in  terms  of  what  it’s  
made  of.    What  makes  something  a  chair  is  whether  that  thing  can  function  as  a  chair:  can  it  
support  you  sitting  on  it;  does  it  have  support  for  your  back;  does  it  raise  your  sitting  position  
up  from  the  ground?    Chairs  can  be  made  of  lots  of  different  things,  and  look  completely  
different,  but  what  makes  them  identifiable  as  chairs  is  the  job  that  they  do.  

Putnam’s  big  claim  was  that  we  should  identify  mental  states  not  by  what  they’re  made  of,  but  
by  what  they  do.    And  what  mental  states  do  is  they  are  caused  by  sensory  stimuli  and  current  
mental  states  and  cause  behaviour  and  new  mental  states.  

4  
 
Dr.  J.S.Lavelle,  University  of  Edinburgh  
MOOC  –  Introduction  to  the  Philosophy  of  Mind  (January  2013)  

The  belief  that  tigers  are  dangerous  is  distinct  from  the  desire  to  hug  a  tiger  in  virtue  of  what  
that  belief  does.    The  desire  to  hug  a  tiger  would  cause  me  to  rush  towards  the  tiger  with  open  
arms,  and  it  might  be  caused  by  the  belief  that  tigers  are  harmless  human-­‐loving  creatures.    
Whereas  the  belief  that  tigers  are  dangerous  is  caused  by  my  previous  knowledge  that  tigers  
eat  people  and  that  creatures  with  big  teeth  are  dangerous,  and  causes  running  away  
behaviour  as  well  as  new  mental  states  such  as  the  dislike  of  the  person  who  let  the  tiger  into  
the  room  in  the  first  place.    To  make  the  contrast  with  type-­‐identity  clearer:  on  a  type-­‐identity  
view  what  makes  the  belief  that  tigers  are  dangerous  distinct  from  the  desire  to  hug  a  tiger  is  
the  different  chemical  cocktails  which  those  states  consist  in.    But  functionalists  say  that  this  
is  wrong:  what  makes  each  of  these  states  distinct  is  their  different  functional  roles.    They  
might  also  be  made  of  different  chemicals,  but  that’s  by-­‐the-­‐by.    The  interesting  difference  lies  
in  what  causes  them  and  what  they  do.  

Part  two:  Mind  as  Computer  

Functionalism  provides  the  segue  to  the  next  aspect  of  this  lecture,  namely,  that  it  has  become  
very  popular  to  think  about  the  mind  as  analogous  to  a  computer.    Computers  are  information  
processing  machines:  they  take  information  of  one  kind,  e.g.  an  electrical  pulse  caused  by  the  
depression  of  a  key,  and  turn  it  into  information  of  another  kind,  e.g.  displaying  a  number  on  
a  screen.    And  one  could  argue  that  minds  are  also  information  processing  machines:  they  take  
information  provided  by  our  senses  and  other  mental  states  which  we  have,  process  it  and  
produce  new  behaviours  and  mental  states.    We  individuate  mental  states  by  the  processes  
that  they  can  engage  in,  processes  which  require  certain  starting  conditions  (particular  mental  
states  and  sensations)  and  result  in  end  conditions  in  the  form  of  new  mental  states  and  
behaviours.    The  similarity  goes  further:  what  allows  us  to  identify  something  as  a  computer  or  
a  mind  is  what  that  thing  does,  and  not  what  it  is  made  of.    In  this  next  part  of  the  lecture,  
we’ll  look  at  some  of  the  consequences  of  the  view  that  minds  are  computers.  

iv.    Turing  machines  

Computers  come  in  varying  degrees  of  complexity.    There  is  a  computer  in  my  washing-­‐
machine  which  controls  the  various  cycles.    There  are  also  computers  which  can  generate  
complex  probabilistic  models  which  we  use  to  predict  all  kinds  of  phenomena:  weather  cycles,  
biological  degradation,  wave  formations  etc.    If  minds  are  computing  machines,  then  how  
complex  does  an  information-­‐processing  system  need  to  be  before  it  counts  as  a  mind?    In  his  
landmark  paper  ‘Computing  Machinery  and  Intelligence’  (1950)  Alan  Turing  (1912  –  1954)  
proposed  the  following  thought  experiment  as  a  response  to  this  question.  

5  
 
Dr.  J.S.Lavelle,  University  of  Edinburgh  
MOOC  –  Introduction  to  the  Philosophy  of  Mind  (January  2013)  

Turing  asks  us  to  imagine  three  people,  a  questioner  and  two  respondents,  a  man  and  a  
woman.    The  questioner  is  in  a  different  room  to  the  respondents,  and  can  communicate  with  
them  via  an  ‘instant  messenger’  style  set-­‐up:  the  questioner  types  questions  which  appear  on  
screens  in  front  of  the  responding  man  and  woman,  who  in  turn  can  type  messages  back.    The  
task  set  to  the  questioner  is  to  determine  which  of  the  respondents,  labelled  only  as  X  and  Y,  is  
the  man,  and  which  is  the  woman.    The  man’s  task  is  to  mislead  the  questioner  into  believing  
that  he  is  the  woman,  and  the  woman’s  task  is  to  help  the  questioner.  

The  next  stage  of  the  game  is  very  similar,  except  that  the  man  is  replaced  by  a  computer,  and  
the  questioner’s  task  is  to  determine  which  of  the  respondents  is  the  human,  and  which  is  the  
computer.    As  before,  the  computer’s  task  is  to  mislead  the  questioner  into  believing  it  is  the  
human,  and  the  human-­‐respondent’s  task  is  to  help  the  questioner.    Turing’s  hypothesis  was  
this:  if  a  computer  can  consistently  fool  the  interrogator  into  believing  that  it  is  a  human,  then  
the  computer  has  reached  the  level  of  functional  complexity  required  for  having  a  mind.  (For  a  
cinematic  interpretation  of  the  Turing  Test,  take  a  look  at  Ridley  Scott’s    Bladerunner  ).  

There  are,  as  ever,  objections  to  the  hypothesis.    It  might  be  possible,  for  example,  that  a  
machine  with  an  extremely  large  database  with  a  powerful  search  engine  passes  the  test.    
Thus,  when  asked  what  84  –  13  is,  the  machine  whizzes  to  its  set  of  files  labelled  ‘possible  
subtraction  sums’,  pulls  out  the  file  labelled  ’84  –  13’  (perhaps  it  is  nestled  between  the  files  
labelled  ‘84  –  14’  and  ‘84  –  12’)  and  displays  whatever  it  finds  in  that  file.    And  it  does  the  same  
for  questions  like  ‘do  you  prefer  your  martinis  shaken  or  stirred’  or  ‘what  are  your  views  on  
Tarantino  films?’    We  would  be  reluctant  to  label  such  a  machine  a  ‘thinking’  machine.    This  
suggests  that  Turing’s  test  is  not  sufficient  for  finding  thinking  machines,  because  it  does  not  
take  into  account  the  internal  structure  of  the  machine.    This  example  is  intended  to  show  
that  the  internal  structure  of  a  processing  machine  matters  when  it  comes  to  determining  
whether  it  is  minded.  

In  addition  to  this  concern,  one  might  wonder  if  the  Turing  test  is  too  limited:  surely  there  
might  be  beings  who  cannot  persuade  the  questioner  that  they  are  human  but  who  we  
nevertheless  want  to  count  as  minded.    The  Turing  test  relies  on  language,  and  it  sets  very  
narrow  criteria  for  minds,  namely,  that  they  must  be  like  human  minds.    But  it  is  not  a  very  
big  stretch  of  the  imagination  to  conceive  of  aliens  who  appear  to  act  intelligently  but  who  
would  not  be  able  to  pass  the  Turing  test.  

Further  reading  

Turing,  A.  (1950).  Computing  Machinery  and  Intelligence.    Mind,  59,  433  –  460.    There  are  also  
lots  of  free  versions  of  the  paper  available  on-­‐line,  and  it  pops  up  in  lots  of  philosophy  of  mind  
anthologies.  

v.    John  Searle’s  Chinese  Room  

The  idea  that  the  mind  is  a  computing  machine  is  certainly  an  attractive  one.    However,  there  
are  problems  with  the  view,  and  to  finish  I’d  like  to  point  to  some  of  these  using  John  Searle’s  
Chinese  Room  thought  experiment  (1980).    Searle  asks  us  to  imagine  the  following  situation:    
you  are  in  a  sealed  room  whose  walls  lined  with  books  containing  Chinese  symbols.    For  the  

6  
 
Dr.  J.S.Lavelle,  University  of  Edinburgh  
MOOC  –  Introduction  to  the  Philosophy  of  Mind  (January  2013)  

sake  of  the  experiment,  we  shall  assume  that  you  do  not  understand  any  Chinese  at  all,  in  fact,  
you  are  so  ignorant  of  Chinese  that  you  do  not  even  know  that  the  patterns  in  the  book  are  
linguistic  symbols.    There  is  a  slot  leading  into  the  room,  through  which  occasionally  come  
pieces  of  paper  with  patterns  on.  You  have  a  ‘code-­‐book’  which  contains  a  set  of  rules  (written  
in  English)  which  tells  you  what  to  do  when  particular  patterns  are  posted  through  the  slot;  
usually  this  means  going  to  one  of  the  books  in  the  library,  opening  it  to  a  particular  page,  and  
copying  the  pattern  you  see  there  onto  the  piece  of  paper  you  have  received,  and  posting  it  
back  out  through  the  slot.    The  code-­‐book  covers  all  possible  combinations  of  patterns  that  
you  might  receive.  

Now  let’s  suppose  that  outside  of  the  room  is  a  native  speaker  of  Chinese.    Unbeknownst  to  
you,  she  is  posting  questions  in  Chinese  through  the  slot,  and  you  are  giving  her  coherent  
answers  to  these  questions.    Although  believes  she  is  conversing  with  someone  who  
understands  Chinese,  you  actually  do  not  understand  any  Chinese  at  all,  you  don’t  even  know  
that  you  are  engaged  in  a  communicative  act!  

Searle  is  pointing  to  a  fundamental  issue  facing  the  view  that  the  mind  is  a  computing  
machine.    Computers  work  by  processing  symbols.    Symbols  have  syntactic  and  semantic  
properties.    Their  syntactic  properties  are  their  physical  properties,  e.g.  shape.    Their  semantic  
properties  are  what  the  symbol  means,  or  represents.    Thus,  if  I  were  to  say  “let    be  the  
symbol  for  ‘start  dancing’”,  then  its  syntactic  properties  are  that  it  has  four  right  angles  and  
four  equilateral  sides,  and  its  semantic  property  is  that  it  represents  the  instruction  ‘start  
dancing’,  and  that  in  certain  contexts  when  we  perceive  this  symbol  we  should  start  to  dance.  

Calculators,  computers,  etc.  are  symbol  manipulating  machines.    But  importantly,  they  are  
only  sensitive  to  the  syntactic  properties  of  symbols.    We  program  machines  with  rules  that  
operate  on  the  syntactic  structure  of  the  symbols  it  receives.    One  rule  might  be  If  input  ‘A’  and  
input  ‘B’  produce  output  ‘A&B’.    The  computer  can  do  this  operation  just  by  ‘looking’  at  the  
physical  structure  of  the  shapes.  

The  problem  is  that  the  computer  does  not  ‘know’  that  it  is  manipulating  symbols  that  have  
semantic  content  any  more  than  the  person  inside  Searle’s  Chinese  room  knows  she  is  
manipulating  Chinese  characters.    This  leads  to  a  fundamental  issue  with  the  claim  that  the  
mind  is  a  computing  machine:  what  part  of  the  machine  understands  the  symbols  that  it  is  
manipulating?  With  a  computer  it  doesn’t  matter  that  the  machine’s  processing  has  nothing  
to  do  with  the  semantic  content  of  the  symbols,  because  it  is  the  humans  who  use  the  
machine  that  have  this  information,  we  are  the  ones  who  give  meaning  to  those  symbols.    But  
if  the  mind  is  just  a  processor  which  operates  on  the  syntactic  properties  of  symbols,  then  how  
can  it  produce  a  being  who  can  understand  the  meaning  of  the  symbols?  How  can  a  mind  
think  about  dogs,  when  all  it  recognises  are  the  syntactic  properties  of  that  symbol?  Where  is  
the  ‘programmer’  who  deciphers  the  meaning  of  all  the  symbols?  

The  Chinese  Room  argument  throws  up  all  sorts  of  tricky  questions,  discussion  of  which  we  
shall  have  to  leave  for  another  day.    I’ll  leave  you  with  one  last  puzzle.  

   

7  
 
Dr.  J.S.Lavelle,  University  of  Edinburgh  
MOOC  –  Introduction  to  the  Philosophy  of  Mind  (January  2013)  

Representation  is  a  three  way  relation  

What  makes  something  a  symbol  or  representation?  We  say  that  something  is  a  
representation  or  symbol  if  it  functions  as  one.    When  I’m  at  the  pub,  I  might  use  beer-­‐mugs  
and  coasters  to  represent  a  particular  football  formation  on  the  table,  and  move  them  around  
to  demonstrate  what  happened  in  a  game.    The  beer-­‐mug  is  functioning  to  represent  me  on  
the  football  pitch.          

What  we  need  to  grasp  here  is  that  representation  (including  symbolic  representation)  is  a  
three  way  relation:  X  represents  Y  to  Z;  the  beer-­‐mug  represents  my  position  on  the  field  to  my  
friends.    But  when  it  comes  to  minds,  it’s  not  clear  what  fills  the  place  of  Z:  this  neural  activity  
represents  a  dog  to  ???    

Conclusions  
The  aim  of  this  lecture  was  to  introduce  some  of  the  core  topics  in  contemporary  philosophy  
of  mind.    We  began  by  looking  at  the  merits  of  physicalism  over  Cartesian  Dualism.    We  then  
turned  to  how  the  physicalist  position  has  played  out,  first  through  identity  theories  and  then  
through  functionalism.    Functionalist  was  the  catalyst  for  the  popular  move  to  start  thinking  
of  minds  as  computers,  information  processing  machines  which  operate  on  the  syntactic  
structures  of  symbols.        By  thinking  about  our  minds  containing  symbols  which  can  represent  
states  of  affairs,  we  begin  to  address  one  of  the  fundamental  questions  in  the  philosophy  of  
mind:  how  can  thoughts  be  about  things?  

We  have  not  touched  on  how  a  symbol-­‐crunching  machine  could  possess  consciousness.    
Indeed,  we  have  side-­‐stepped  the  issue  of  consciousness  altogether.  That  would  be  a  topic  for  
another  day.    We  have  also  passed  over  the  intricacies  of  these  debates:  each  of  these  topics  
would  be  discussed  over  two  or  three  weeks  in  our  undergraduate  classes!    Despite  this,  I  hope  
the  MOOC  has  given  you  some  insight  into  some  of  the  puzzles  which  have  inspired,  and  
continue  to  intrigue,  philosophers  of  mind.    

Further  reading  
Clark,  A.  (2001)  Mindware:  an  introduction  to  the  philosophy  of  cognitive  science  O.U.P.  

Crane,  T.  (1995)  The  Mechanical  Mind  Penguin    

D.  Hofstadter  and  D.  C.  Dennett  (Eds.)  The  Mind’s  I:    Fantasies  and  Reflections  on  Self  and  Soul  
Basic  Books  

   

8  
 
Dr.  J.S.Lavelle,  University  of  Edinburgh  
MOOC  –  Introduction  to  the  Philosophy  of  Mind  (January  2013)  

Appendix  1:    The  argument  from  doubt  

There  are  several  arguments  which  Descartes  offers  for  his  dualistic  account  of  the  mind,  but  
the  most  famous  is  the  argument  from  doubt  (Discourse,  second  meditation):  

1. I  can  doubt  the  existence  of  everything  around  me  

2. I  cannot  doubt  the  existence  of  my  thoughts  (my  mind)  

3. Therefore,  my  mind  must  be  made  of  something  fundamentally  different  from  
everything  else  around  me.  

Descartes  believed  that  this  argument  shows  that  the  mind  must  be  made  of  a  different  
substance  to  his  body  and  other  things  found  in  the  physical  world.    This  is  because  it  has  a  
property  which  physical  things  do  not:  its  existence  cannot  be  doubted.    To  put  it  another  
way:  I  can  imagine  that  the  physical  world  does  not  exist,  but  it  is  impossible  for  me  to  
imagine  that  I  don’t  exist  because  there  has  to  be  something  which  is  doing  the  imagining!  
Hence  the  famous  Cogito:  ‘I  think  therefore  I  am’.    In  order  to  think,  there  must  be  something  
which  is  doing  the  thinking  (namely,  me).  

There  are  significant  problems  with  this  argument.    Most  pressing,  as  pointed  out  by  Leibniz  
(in  his  Philosophical  Papers)  and  Arnauld  (a  contemporary  of  Descartes)  the  argument  is  
revealing  about  the  nature  of  the  imagination  (or  doubt),  but  not  necessarily  about  the  nature  
of  the  mind.    ‘Doubt’  is  such  that  we  cannot  apply  it  to  our  own  minds  but  this  does  not  tell  us  
anything  about  the  nature  of  the  mind.  

An  example  might  help  here.3    Let’s  imagine  that  I  am  unaware  that  Dr.  Jekyll  is  Mr.  Hyde.    I  
can  imagine  a  scenario  where  Dr.  Jekyll  apprehends  Mr.  Hyde  and  leaves  him  in  the  custody  of  
the  police,  going  home  to  a  warm  supper  whilst  Mr.  Hyde  languishes  in  the  cells  cursing  
Jekyll.    Yet  this  imagining  does  not  inform  me  of  what  is  in  fact  possible.    Rather,  it  reveals  a  
limitation  on  my  knowledge  which  cannot  be  appreciated  from  my  current  perspective.  It  is  
perfectly  logical  to  state  that  if  two  things  have  different  properties  then  those  two  things  
distinct.    But  this  doesn’t  hold  once  we  throw  psychological  terms  in  there:  ‘If  I  believe  two  
things  to  have  different  properties  then  they  are  distinct’.    This  is  because  my  belief  might  not  
match  on  to  how  the  world  actually  is.    I  believe  that  Dr.  Jekyll  has  the  property  of  being  kind,  
and  that  Mr.  Hyde  lacks  this  property  (being  a  murdering  psychopath),  and  I  infer  from  this  
that  because  Dr  Jekyll  has  a  property  that  Mr.  Hyde  lacks,  they  must  be  distinct  people.    This  
believing,  however,  does  not  preclude  the  possibility  that  they  are  identical.      

                                                                                                           
3
 My  thanks  to  Dr.  Paul  Sludds  who  thought  of  this  example!  

9