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Food Sensitivities and Hashimoto’s

DR. IZABELLA WENTZ / MAY 10, 2015


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The Role of Food in Your Health Journey

When I first set out in search of lifestyle interventions that could change the course of my
autoimmune thyroid condition, I came across a promising Italian study.

This researcher followed people who had subclinical hypothyroidism, Hashimoto’s and Celiac
disease, as they embarked on starting a gluten-free diet.

The study found that when most of the people with subclinical hypothyroidism were placed
on a gluten-free diet, their thyroid function normalized! In 71% of people who strictly
followed a 1-year gluten withdrawal (as confirmed by intestinal mucosa recovery), there was
a normalization of subclinical hypothyroidism. Another 19% of people who followed the
gluten-free diet were able to normalize their thyroid antibodies. “In distinct cases, gluten
withdrawal may single-handedly reverse the abnormality,” the researchers concluded.
Various studies have looked at the rates of Celiac disease in people with Hashimoto’s. All of
the studies have found Celiac disease to me more common with Hashimoto’s, but the
incidence rates have varied. While a 2006 Brazilian study found an incidence rate of Celiac
disease at only 1.2% of people with Hashimoto’s, a 2007 Dutch study found that 15% of
Dutch people with Hashimoto’s had Celiac disease.

I took these studies to my endocrinologist who reluctantly glanced over them, and told me
that I shouldn’t worry about gluten, that I just needed to take Synthroid or Levoxyl and that
was the end of the story to the treatment of Hashimoto’s. I was also told that my dose would
continue increasing as my thyroid continued to burn itself out and that I would need to be
tested for additional autoimmune disease now and then, as having one autoimmune disease
put me at greater risk for having additional ones.

I ended up finding another doctor on my insurance who was willing to test me for celiac
disease, but to my relief (and disappointment), I was negative. Discouraged, I didn’t attempt
the gluten free diet until a little over a year later when I saw my first integrative/functional
medicine doctor, who tested me for food sensitivities. Functional medicine doctors are often
not covered by insurance, and it took me a long time to understand that I needed to invest in
myself, that I was worth it. I paid for the consult out of pocket. It was a Christmas/New
Year’s gift to myself, and the equivalent of 10 of my usual shopping trips. Giving up my
shopping budget was difficult for me, as I was quite the shopping addict. Shopping kept me
distracted from the feelings of sadness, fatigue, acid reflux, pain in my arms, IBS, hair loss
and panic attacks. I compromised and decided to shop at second-hand stores.

The rest my friends is history. After a three-day avoidance of the reactive foods (gluten and
dairy being my top triggers), my acid reflux, bloating, irritable bowel syndrome and lifelong
stomach pains went away within 3 days. The pain in my arms went away after a few weeks.
Figuring out that I had food sensitivities was my first step into the world of natural health-
and healing- and I haven’t looked back ever since.

Since that time, I’ve learned that there’s much more than Celiac disease to the gluten-thyroid
connection… a 2002 study in the journal of European Endocrinology found that 43% of
people with Hashimoto’s showed activated mucosal T cell immunity, which is usually
correlated with gluten-dependent enteropathy, or gluten sensitivity.

I’ve received numerous success stories from people who felt better gluten-free, and some
have been able to get into remission from Hashimoto’s by going gluten free. In surveying my
readers and clients, I’ve found that about 93% feel better on a gluten-free diet.

I also learned that it’s not just gluten that can be a triggering food for Hashimoto’s! The most
common food sensitivities are going to be to gluten, dairy (this was my biggest one), soy,
grains (especially corn), nightshades (like potatoes, tomatoes, and peppers), nuts and seeds.

Furthermore, another 75% of my clients and readers reported feeling better on a dairy free
diet, 73% reported feeling better grain free, and another 60% or so said they felt better soy
free. Egg and nightshade free diets were helpful 40% and 35% of the time, respectively.
Role of Food Sensitivities in Hashimoto’s

The most common triggers in Hashimoto’s are nutrient deficiencies, food sensitivities,
intestinal permeability (leaky gut), stress, an impaired ability to get rid of toxins and in some
cases, infections.

Food sensitivities are different than food allergies. Food allergies are generated by the IgE
branch of the immune system and are going to be immediate, occurring within minutes after
eating a reactive food. The person may present with anaphylaxis; hives, facial swelling,
difficulty breathing; this type of reaction can be life threatening. Shellfish and nuts are the
most commonly implicated foods.

Food sensitivities, on the other hand, are going to be governed by different branches of the
immune system, IgA, IgM and IgG have been implicated, but the IgG branch has been the
most interesting to me. This is because the IgG branch is also thought to be responsible for
creating thyroid antibodies in many cases of Hashimoto’s. These reactions may take as long
as hours or even a few days to manifest and may manifest as acid reflux, bloating, irritable
bowel syndrome, palpitations, joint pain, anxiety, tingling or headaches.

I’ve found that recognizing and eliminating reactive foods can be a life-changer for most
people with Hashimoto’s.

Reactive foods trigger an inflammatory response in the GI tract, leading to malabsorption of


nutrients (gluten sensitivity, in particular, has been implicated in causing a Selenium
deficiency, a well-known risk factor for Hashimoto’s), and can also produce intestinal
permeability whenever they are eaten.

Most people will see a dramatic reduction in gut symptoms, brain symptoms, skin breakouts,
and pain by eliminating the foods they are sensitive to. Some will also see a significant
reduction in thyroid antibodies! An additional subset of people will be able to get
their Hashimoto’s into complete remission just by getting off the foods they react to,
normalizing their thyroid antibodies, and some even normalizing their thyroid function!

Others may need to dig deeper, looking at infections, toxins, and stress, but getting off
reactiveA foods almost always helps the healing process. For example, if a leaky gut is caused
by a gut infection such as a parasite, to heal the gut, we not only have to get rid of the
infection, but we also need to stay off the reactive foods for at least 3-6 months. Thus, I
always recommend starting with food.

Testing for Food Sensitivities

When I was working as a pharmacist, we were always on the look-out for “true, IgE-related,
allergies” to foods and medications. These were the life-threatening reactions that could cause
anaphylaxis! While I learned about reactions mediated by the other immune branches in
Immunology during my first year in pharmacy school, somehow, calling the IgE-related
reactions as “true” led me to believe that the other types of reactions didn’t matter.
Unfortunately, most conventional medical professionals and insurance companies hold that
same misconception, and food sensitivity tests are considered “experimental.” This was, of
course, fine with me, as when I “experimented” with removing the foods the tests found to be
reactive for me, I felt dramatically better!

The other challenge with food sensitivities is that when we eat the foods that our body is
sensitive to on a daily basis, it is very difficult to connect the foods with the symptoms we are
having. For example, people who have a dairy sensitivity but continue to eat dairy multiple
times a day might be tired, have joint pain, congestion, bloating and acid reflux on a daily
basis, but won’t be able to pinpoint the symptom to the foods. I was personally a bread and
dairy addict and had no idea that they were causing me issues.

This is because every time we eat this food, the body becomes depleted in its ability to protect
itself from the antigenic food, and the reactions become less specific and more chronic. If the
food continues to be given, the body will become sensitive to more and more things.

However, once the sensitizing food is eliminated for a few days to a few weeks, the person
should feel better and experience less bloating, less reflux, normal bowel movements, more
energy, etc.

When the person is exposed to the food again, the body will produce a stronger, more specific
reaction, allowing the person to recognize which particular food is problematic to him/her.
This is known as an Elimination Diet and is the gold standard for food sensitivity testing. My
friend and go-to Nutritionist Tom Malterre just wrote an amazing book on the Elimination
Diet, to help walk you through the process.

My Recommended Food Sensitivity Test

I thought about eliminating gluten and dairy for over a year before I took the plunge. I ate a
whey protein/yogurt shake for breakfast, tuna melt bagels for lunch and loved snacking on
crackers, bread, cookies, donuts, and cottage cheese at every chance I got. I was an avid baker
and always attacked the bread basket at restaurants. I loved fruit but was not a big fan of meat,
or vegetables.

I didn’t know how I could possibly go gluten and dairy free. Besides fruit, what was I going
to eat?

It took seeing my test results in black and white to make the change, and all of a sudden,
something shifted in me. I went out to an all-you-can-eat big Polish buffet with Pierogi (made
from dough and farmer’s cheese), kopytka (dumplings), kotlety (breaded pork tenderloins)
and a smorgasbord of cookies and cakes and said my goodbyes to the foods I had grown up
with. And then I started the gluten-free dairy-free diet the next day. Acid reflux was my
biggest, most noticeable symptoms that had been with me daily, multiple times a day for over
3 years, starting in January of 2008. I eliminated my reactive foods in February 2011, and I
haven’t had acid reflux since that day unless I accidentally ate one my reactive foods.
Here’s my Hashimoto’s and Acid Reflux Story

My test results showed that I was sensitive to both gluten and dairy. But I wasn’t reactive to
just the usual suspects, of “gluten, dairy, soy…” I also had strange reactions to pineapples,
peaches and began avoiding those as well, noticing that they too, triggered my acid reflux.

There is a multitude of food sensitivity tests out there, and none of them are perfect. Some
may have false negatives; others may have false positives or a combination of both.

The test that I found to be very highly accurate for myself and my clients is the Alletess Lab
food sensitivity test. If a food comes up positive on that test, I know that it is a reactive food
for that person. In some cases, especially if the person has been off the foods for some time,
this test may have false negatives, so in the case that people come up negative for one of the
big reactive foods, I recommend trying to go off it, and introducing it. Again, the gold
standard, most accurate test for food sensitivities is going to be an elimination diet, but if you
are someone that is not quite ready to do one, or needs to see things in black and white, you
may want to look into food sensitivity testing.

Alletess Lab works primarily through integrative and functional medicine physicians, so if
you’re working with a doctor like that, you can ask him/her to order the test for you. I’m also
really excited to let you know that I’ve worked with MyMedLab to offer the food sensitivity
testing for people to self-order, without a doctor’s prescription. The test kit comes with a
little blood spot collection paper, and can be mailed to just about anywhere in the world!

MyMedLab offers two options to test for the most commonly eaten foods.

 184 Food Panel (Click here to view)


 96 Food Panel (Click here to view)

I started with the 96 food panel; it was enough to uncover most of my food triggers, and now
repeat the 184 food panel on an annual basis to be sure that I’m staying on top of potential
triggers, as our sensitivities and reactions to foods can change with time.

The lab will also send me trends (i.e. most reactive foods) for people with Hashimoto’s that
get the tests so that I’ll be able to share this info with you in future newsletters. This way
people who can afford the testing can help those that may not be able to afford it at this time.

Hope this information helps you on your journey!

PS. You can also download a free Thyroid Diet Guide, 10 Thyroid friendly recipes, and the
Nutrient Depletions and Digestion chapter by signing up for my weekly newsletter. You will
also receive occasional updates about new research, resources, giveaways and helpful
information.

For future updates, make sure to follow us on Facebook!


References

1. Hadithi, M (03/21/2007). “Coeliac disease in Dutch patients


with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and vice versa.” World journal of gastroenterology:
WJG (1007-9327), 13 (11), 1715.
2. Velentino, R, et.al. Markers of Potential Coeliac disease in patients with Hashimoto’s
Thyroiditis. European Journal of Endocrinology (2002) 146; 479-483
3. Sategna-Guidetti C, et.al. Prevalence of thyroid disorders in untreated adult celiac
disease patients and effect of gluten withdrawal: an Italian multicenter study. Am J
Gastroenterology; 2001, Mar; 96(3):751-756

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FILED UNDER: DIET, GUT TAGGED WITH: ELIMINATION DIET, FOOD


ALLERGIES, FOOD PHARMACOLOGY, FOOD SENSITIVITIES, GLUTEN-
FREE, IBS, LEAKY GUT
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Truths!

eader Interactions

Comments
1. Nancy B. says
March 23, 2015 at 5:59 AM

I looked up both Alletess and MyMedLab and neither one


showed the list of foods tested for in the 96 and 184 panels.
Did I miss it?
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 24, 2016 at 11:49 AM

Nancy- Thank you so much for letting me know, I will


look into it. Here is some information in the meanwhile
that you may find interesting!

The gold standard, or the most accurate test for


uncovering reactive foods and individual food sensitivities
is actually the Elimination Diet.

It works better than trying a recommended dietary


approach (i.e. gluten-free, Paleo, etc.) and even better than
food sensitivity testing (which may be helpful in many
cases, but may not be affordable for many people). The
elimination diet can work as a stand-alone or in symphony
with food sensitivity testing.
ELIMINATION DIET FOR HASHIMOTO’S
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/elimination-diet-
for-hashimotos

Reply

2. debra bush says


March 24, 2015 at 7:03 AM

I have thyroid problem and i notice that my hair is falling out


plus. Plus i am tired all the time too. I have to force myself to
get up and do something. I have been stressed out since i was
9 years old to now. When i was in 12 grade my family told me
i was adopted and and that syressed me out more. So when i
was 32 i went to the court house and i got some information
and i found my real mom but my real dad died, i went to meet
my real mom and of corse she was a drug head. When she was
pregant with me she did every drug out there. That bothers me
because because of her this is why i am stressed out really bad.
I am 49 years old now and having problems . My dr. Said that
i have diabetes but i dont want to believe in it. My friend takes
my sugar all the time it is like in the 135 or 140 but it nerve
goes up to 200. I make sure of that. I need help really bad. I
ask for help by other people but i dont get it please help about
my thyroid or give me some pointers on what i should do.
Thank you so very much.
Reply
o Dr. Izabella Wentz says
November 24, 2016 at 11:51 AM

Debra- Fatigue was the most debilitating symptom I


experienced with Hashimoto’s. It actually started 8 years
before I was finally diagnosed in 2009, after I got Mono
(Epstein-Barr Virus) in college. I needed to sleep for 12
hours each night to be able to function, and by “function”
I mean after hitting the snooze button on my alarm clock
for two hours (ask my poor husband), I would drag myself
out of bed and then had to drink 4-6 cups of caffeine
everyday to keep myself awake. I often had Red Bull and
Pepsi for breakfast, and was the epitome of “wired but
tired”. I hope my articles help you get started

OVERCOMING THYROID FATIGUE


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/top-10-tips-for-
overcoming-hashimotos-fatigue

THIAMINE AND THYROID FATIGUE


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/thiamine-and-
thyroid-fatigue

Reply

3. Joan says
March 24, 2015 at 6:18 PM

Oh my gosh. I read your posted and wanted to cry. I can tell


you that for me I had to get to a thyroid specialist before I got
rid of the fatigue, brain fog, hair loss etc got better. Start their
and make sure get all the paels done. T-4. T-3. Thyroid
stimulating immunoglobulins. Thyroglobulin antibody.
Thyroid peroxidase AB. TSH. I pray you will find comfort
soon.
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 24, 2016 at 11:54 AM

Joan- Thank you so much for following this page! Here is


an article you may find interesting!

10 MOST HELPFUL DIY INTERVENTIONS FOR


HASHIMOTO’S
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/10-most-helpful-
diy-interventions-for-hashimotosaccording-to-my-clients

Reply

4. Angela Vitale says


March 26, 2015 at 4:09 PM

I noticed that too! I wanted to see the specific foods they were
testing for.
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 24, 2016 at 11:56 AM

Angela- Here is an article you may find interesting! : )

ELIMINATION DIET FOR HASHIMOTO’S


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/elimination-diet-
for-hashimotos

Reply

5. heathet says
March 24, 2015 at 1:03 AM

Comment deleted
Reply
6. jillian says
March 25, 2015 at 7:22 PM

Comment deleted
Reply

7. Suzanne Hodgkins says


March 26, 2015 at 11:05 PM

If you buy gluten free replacements for junk food, that can be
expensive. But pound for pound you get many more meals out
of rice, lentils, beans, vegetables and meat than you would on
a standard diet. Organic can be pricey sometimes, but well
worth it on so many levels when you can afford it.Good luck
to you.
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 24, 2016 at 11:57 AM
Suzanne- Here are a couple of articles about diet that you
may find interesting or helpful.
TAILORING YOUR THYROID DIET
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/tailoring-your-
thyroid-diet-to-your-needs

BEST DIET FOR HASHIMOTO’S AND


HYPOTHYROIDISM
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/best-diet-for-
hashimotos-hypothyroidism

Reply

8. Lynnette says
March 26, 2015 at 8:01 AM

Sometimes the fight has to come from the patient, I’ve been
there was diagnosed with Chronic Fatigue / Fibro several
years back and also had to pay out of pocket to see an
Alternative Dr. And there also has to be a willingness to be
proactive with their health. What you can do is go on an
elimination diet on your own. There are several books on the
topic. And ‘m not going to fluff it, it’s can be a challenge. If
you have the ability to have an FSA or an HSA you can start
with that to have pretax dollars deducted to go to an account to
pay if doing the elimination on your own doesn’t provide you
with any relief.
Reply
o Dr. Izabella Wentz says
November 24, 2016 at 11:59 AM

Lynnette- Thank you so much for following this page! I


personally struggled with pain in the form of body aches
and stiffness as well as carpal tunnel in both arms in 2010,
when I was first diagnosed with Hashimoto’s. It was
awful, I had to wear braces on both arms all day and even
at night for about 6 months.

I took NSAIDs every day to deal with the pain so I could


get through my workday.

I hope these articles help you get started.

PAIN AND HASHIMOTOS


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/pain-and-
hashimotos

PAIN HASHIMOTOS AND FIBROMYALGIA…


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/pain-hashimotos-
and-fibromyalgia/

TURMERIC FOR YOUR THYROID AND


HASHIMOTO’S
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/turmeric-for-your-
thyroid-and-hashimotos

Reply
9. Theresa Covey says
March 26, 2015 at 10:10 PM

You don’t have to pay for tests! Just cut the foods out of your
diet for a couple of weeks and then try adding them back in,
one at a time, for three days and see what kind of reaction you
have. I am starting a garden and buying bountiful baskets to
eat cleaner. It’s not nearly as exensive as doctors after eating
processed junk.
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 24, 2016 at 12:01 PM

Theresa- Thank you so much for following this page!


Hashimoto’s is a complicated condition with many layers
that need to be unraveled. While conventional medicine
only looks at each body system as a separate category, and
is only concerned with the thyroid’s ability to produce
thyroid hormone, Hashimoto’s is more than just
hypothyroidism. I wanted to pass along these articles that
I wrote. I hope they help
WHERE DO I START WITH HASHIMOTO’S
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/where-do-i-start-
with-hashimotos/

OVERCOMING HASHIMOTO’S
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/overcoming-
hashimotos-in-the-new-year/

Reply

10. irma says


March 24, 2015 at 1:55 AM

I like your story because it’s sounds like me


Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 24, 2016 at 12:03 PM

Irma- Do you have Hashimoto’s or a thyroid condition?

Hashimoto’s is a complicated condition with many layers


that need to be unraveled. While conventional medicine
only looks at each body system as a separate category, and
is only concerned with the thyroid’s ability to produce
thyroid hormone, Hashimoto’s is more than just
hypothyroidism. I wanted to pass along these articles that
I wrote. I hope they help

WHERE DO I START WITH HASHIMOTO’S


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/where-do-i-start-
with-hashimotos/

OVERCOMING HASHIMOTO’S
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/overcoming-
hashimotos-in-the-new-year/

Reply

11. Mindi says


March 24, 2015 at 2:59 AM

Any experience with ELISA/ ACT Biotechnologies LRA test


for food sensitivities? My doctor would prefer that one over
Alletess.
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 24, 2016 at 12:05 PM
Mindi- The gold standard, or the most accurate test for
uncovering reactive foods and individual food sensitivities
is actually the Elimination Diet.

It works better than trying a recommended dietary


approach (i.e. gluten-free, Paleo, etc.) and even better than
food sensitivity testing (which may be helpful in many
cases, but may not be affordable for many people). The
elimination diet can work as a stand-alone or in symphony
with food sensitivity testing. Here is an article you may
find interesting!

ELIMINATION DIET FOR HASHIMOTO’S


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/elimination-diet-
for-hashimotos

Reply

12. Hazel Goodman says


March 24, 2015 at 3:36 AM

Would not let me review the lab test, keeps saying it cann’t
bring up my zip code
Reply
o Dr. Izabella Wentz says
November 24, 2016 at 12:09 PM

Hazel- Thank you for letting me know!! Here is an article


in the mean time that you may find interesting!

ELIMINATION DIET FOR HASHIMOTO’S


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/elimination-diet-
for-hashimotos

Reply

13. Kim says


March 24, 2015 at 4:58 AM

How does Alletess compare to stool tests by EnteroLab since


most of the sensitivities show up in the intestines?
Reply

14. Jackie says


March 25, 2015 at 6:42 PM
I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s, Leaky Gut as well add a
severe candida infection after being on antibiotics for 8
months for a kidney infection. My life has been completely
changed by this illness. My hair has fallen out, I’m exhausted
all the time, I have headaches on a regular basis and I have
had the worst bowel issues ever! When I have a Hashi’s flare
up, I feel like I have the worst case of flu! I sweat profusely, I
can barely pull myself out of bed, I feel horribly sick, joint
aches, brain fog, nausea, muscle weaknesses, breathless,
anxiety, depression. It also makes my blood sugar go way up
(I’m a diabetic. Hate it!) I’m having flare ups often (at least 2
per month). It can last a few days or a couple of weeks. I’m on
15mg of Armour Throid and 20mcg of Liothyronine. I feel
lousy most of the time and at the end of my rope. Because of
serious gut issues, I ate the same thing everyday for 2yrs(
homemade chicken soup and baked chicken and green beans.
All organic) I’ve started adding new foods lately but am still
having flare ups. Not as often but just as debilitating. Is there
something I should be doing that I’m not? These flare ups are
ruining my life! Any suggestions of what I can do to decrease
them? I’ll do anything!! Thank you for the hope you give by
all the information that you provide. I really would appreciate
any information you could provide.
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 24, 2016 at 12:15 PM
Jackie- Here are a couple of articles you may find
helpful!!

ELIMINATION DIET FOR HASHIMOTO’S


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/elimination-diet-
for-hashimotos

CANDIDA AND HASHIMOTOS CONNECTION


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/candida-and-
hashimotos-connection

HASHIMOTO’S AND THE GUT


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/hashimotos-and-
the-gut

THE GUT AND AUTOIMMUNE THYROID


CONNECTION
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/the-gut-and-
autoimmune-thyroid-connection

Reply

15. Cristina says


March 27, 2015 at 6:55 AM

Jackie, if you have Hashimoto, you are not supposed to take


Armour Thyroid. Whoever prescribed it to you was WRONG.
! By taking Aromour thyroid you are feeding the antibodies
!!!!!
No wonder that you have flare ups ! As in the above
comments, stay away from all the food sensitivities (and in
particular gluten). You need to take “pure” hormones not
“glandulars”. Can you find a good doctor who understands
what Hashimoto means ?
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 24, 2016 at 12:17 PM

Cristina- Do you have Hashimoto’s or a thyroid


condition?

Hashimoto’s is a complicated condition with many layers


that need to be unraveled. While conventional medicine
only looks at each body system as a separate category, and
is only concerned with the thyroid’s ability to produce
thyroid hormone, Hashimoto’s is more than just
hypothyroidism. I wanted to pass along these articles that
I wrote. I hope they help

WHERE DO I START WITH HASHIMOTO’S


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/where-do-i-start-
with-hashimotos/

OVERCOMING HASHIMOTO’S
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/overcoming-
hashimotos-in-the-new-year/
Reply

16. Sue says


April 4, 2015 at 2:11 AM

What is your proof for saying that glandular thyroid


medication will “feed” Hashimoto antibodies? I have never
heard this and it doesn’t sound true to me.
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 24, 2016 at 12:18 PM

Sue- There are quite a few options for thyroid


medications. In my experience, what works for one person
may not work for another. If your doctor will not prescribe
the medication you are looking for, ask your local
pharmacist for doctors in your area who prescribe the
medication you are looking to try. Have you read these
articles?

WHICH THYROID MEDICATION IS BEST?


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/which-thyroid-
medication-is-best/
TOP 11 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT
THYROID MEDICATIONS
https://thyroidphramacist.com/blog/top-11-things-you-
need-to-know-about-thyroid-medications

Reply

17. Lynn says


April 6, 2015 at 4:55 AM

Cristina–I don’t know who told you that nonsense about


Armour, but it is BS. Without the Armour I am in much worse
condition and my antibodies are worse.
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 24, 2016 at 12:18 PM

Lynn- There are quite a few options for thyroid


medications. In my experience, what works for one person
may not work for another. If your doctor will not prescribe
the medication you are looking for, ask your local
pharmacist for doctors in your area who prescribe the
medication you are looking to try. Have you read these
articles?
WHICH THYROID MEDICATION IS BEST?
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/which-thyroid-
medication-is-best/

TOP 11 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT


THYROID MEDICATIONS
https://thyroidphramacist.com/blog/top-11-things-you-
need-to-know-about-thyroid-medications

Reply

18. karen says


April 6, 2015 at 9:15 AM

What ones are “pure”?


Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 24, 2016 at 12:19 PM

Karen- There are quite a few options for thyroid


medications. In my experience, what works for one person
may not work for another. If your doctor will not prescribe
the medication you are looking for, ask your local
pharmacist for doctors in your area who prescribe the
medication you are looking to try. Have you read these
articles?

WHICH THYROID MEDICATION IS BEST?


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/which-thyroid-
medication-is-best/

TOP 11 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT


THYROID MEDICATIONS
https://thyroidphramacist.com/blog/top-11-things-you-
need-to-know-about-thyroid-medications

Reply

19. Jackie says


April 7, 2015 at 2:42 AM

Cristina,
Thank you for the info. I’m not sure what “pure” thyroid
hormones are. Can you elaborate on them so I can talk to my
doctor about it or start looking for a new doctor.
Thanks!
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 24, 2016 at 12:20 PM
Jackie- There are quite a few options for thyroid
medications. In my experience, what works for one person
may not work for another. If your doctor will not prescribe
the medication you are looking for, ask your local
pharmacist for doctors in your area who prescribe the
medication you are looking to try. Have you read these
articles?

WHICH THYROID MEDICATION IS BEST?


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/which-thyroid-
medication-is-best/

TOP 11 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT


THYROID MEDICATIONS
https://thyroidphramacist.com/blog/top-11-things-you-
need-to-know-about-thyroid-medications

Reply

20. sue w says


April 6, 2015 at 4:46 AM

I am also loosing my hair and I have been eating gluten free


for 3 years and I still get sick on something. Spices, dressings,
ketchup,etc. Does the liothyronine really help
Reply
o Dr. Izabella Wentz says
November 24, 2016 at 12:21 PM

Sue- Hair loss is a distressing symptom experienced by


women with Hashimoto’s. For women, our hair represents
our femininity, and losing our hair is a constant reminder
that something is off and that we are not well. Have you
read these articles?

HASHIMOTO’S AND GETTING YOUR HAIR BACK


https://thyroidphramacist.com/blog/hashimotos-and-
getting-your-hair-back

HAIR LOSS AND YOUR THYROID


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/hair-loss-and-
thyroid

Reply

21. Lynn says


April 6, 2015 at 4:53 AM

I found out I was reactive to chicken and can no longer eat it.
Oddly enough, I can tolerate eggs in moderation, but not
chicken or chicken broth. Going gluten free, chicken free, and
cutting dairy almost completely out of my diet (certain cheeses
are okay but others are disastrous for me) have made a
gigantic difference. My flares felt like horrible cases of the flu.
Sometimes I couldn’t get out of bed. I take 60mg of Armour in
the AM and 25 of Levothyroxine at night. When I’m really
struggling to function, an additional 30 mg of Armour in the
afternoon helps but if I make sure I don’t get contaminated, I
can avoid needing that dose.
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 24, 2016 at 12:24 PM

Lynn- Here are a couple of articles about diet that you


may find interesting or helpful.
TAILORING YOUR THYROID DIET
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/tailoring-your-
thyroid-diet-to-your-needs

BEST DIET FOR HASHIMOTO’S AND


HYPOTHYROIDISM
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/best-diet-for-
hashimotos-hypothyroidism

Reply

22. Tammy Wright says


March 25, 2015 at 8:37 PM

I believe you wrote this article about ME!


It was so clearly written and has helped me to understand
exactly how/why I’m feeling the way I do right now.
Can’t wait to get your book Root Cause and Elimination Diet
too!
I enjoy your articles!
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 24, 2016 at 12:25 PM

Tammy- Thank you so much for your support. I’m


looking forward to hearing your progress on this page.
Make sure to take the book slow, take notes, highlight,
and establish a baseline when making changes.

Reply

23. Patricia says


March 26, 2015 at 3:07 AM

Your story is my story from start to finish. I like


Heathet….maybe Heather don’t have an income that would
give me the luxury of charging my food to gluten free. But I
am willing to try. I am going to call my insurance company
and talk to them to see if what I can and can not do….Thank
you for my story which is your story that I am claiming. .♡♡♡
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 24, 2016 at 12:32 PM

Patricia- I look forward to hearing your progress on this


page!

Reply

24. Jeanie says


March 26, 2015 at 6:44 PM

Just a note to those of you who say you cannot afford to eat
Gluten-free. Remember, anything processed is going to be
more expensive, however, if you make your food from scratch
it is cheaper than going out and buying mixes and such.
Scratch cooking is more healthy anyway. Processed foods,
whether they are gluten-free or not are still processed foods.
Scratch cooking may take a little longer, but it’s really not that
bad. My husband has had Celiac Disease since 2005.My
daughter was just recently diagnosed with Hashimoto’s but
does not have Celiac Disease. Like what is stated here, I
believe she has gluten sensitivities as well.
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 24, 2016 at 12:33 PM

Jeanie- Thank you so much for sharing! Here are a couple


of articles about diet that you may find interesting or
helpful.
TAILORING YOUR THYROID DIET
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/tailoring-your-
thyroid-diet-to-your-needs

BEST DIET FOR HASHIMOTO’S AND


HYPOTHYROIDISM
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/best-diet-for-
hashimotos-hypothyroidism

Reply

25. Jan says


March 26, 2015 at 7:08 PM
Does salt cause the body to retain chlorine and age to tissue
more rapidly? I’ve been reintroducing salt after eating little for
30 years and my skin is looking dehydrated and I’m not as
thirsty or urinate or drink near as much water as when I
minimize salt. I think we should use salt to retain fluids at
bedtime, but avoid it while awake and flush/hydrate more,
plus avoid chlorinated drinks, hoy tubs etc.
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 24, 2016 at 12:37 PM

Jan- In the United States and many European countries


that add iodine to salt or other foods, Hashimoto’s is the
leading cause of hypothyroidism, and not iodine
deficiency. While the average American may consume
between 6 and 10 grams of salt per day, largely due to
processed foods, it is difficult to estimate the amount of
iodine that is contained in the Standard American Diet,
due to uncertainty of whether the prepared food was made
with iodized salt or non-iodized salt. Hashimoto’s is a
complicated condition with many layers that need to be
unraveled. While conventional medicine only looks at
each body system as a separate category, and is only
concerned with the thyroid’s ability to produce thyroid
hormone, Hashimoto’s is more than just hypothyroidism. I
wanted to pass along these articles that I wrote. I hope
they help
WHERE DO I START WITH HASHIMOTO’S
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/where-do-i-start-
with-hashimotos/

OVERCOMING HASHIMOTO’S
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/overcoming-
hashimotos-in-the-new-year/

Reply

26. Lynn says


March 27, 2015 at 12:29 AM

Going gluten free is not expensive. Don’t buy any processed


junk and replace it with meats and fresh veggies. You’ll end
up spending the same amount or less. The allergy test is
covered by Blue Cross. I went gluten free when my Hubby
was not working. It seems daunting, but it can be done. I
appreciate this site for its well written info.
Reply

27. Jackie says


March 27, 2015 at 7:53 AM
I was forced to go on an elimination diet because of severe
leaky gut issues. As I said in an earlier comment, I literally ate
the same thing every single day for over 2 yrs, homemade
chicken soup and baked chicken and green beans, all organic.
I’ve also paid thousands of dollars out of pocket going to
Naturopathic doctors because my husband’s insurance doesn’t
cover “Alternative Medicine”. I’m on disability because of
this illness, so money is very tight. We don’t have a FSA/HSA
because his company got rid of that benefit last year. I’m
paying a small fortune in supplements every month, (which
means some bills aren’t getting paid) so that I can work on
getting better and healing my body. I’ve bought several books,
listened to online seminars and read tons of information from
experts to try and learn as much as I can about this disease so
that I can get a handle on it. I’m currently seeing a
Naturopathic doctor who is very nice but I feel this condition
is beyond her skill level because of how complicated it can be.
Finding a doctor that is skillful, will listen to me without being
dismissive and isn’t going to break the bank, (we gotta eat,
don’t we?) is almost impossible. I also know that any doctor
like this is going to be an out of pocket expensive, so I have to
consider that too. Like millions of other people out there, I’ve
been battling and feel like I don’t have too many options
available to me due to the expense of finding a good doctor
and the financial limitations my husband and I face daily. I’m
up for the challenge and not afraid to fight for my health but
there’s only so much I can do on my own.
Reply

28. Donna Gulyas says


March 28, 2015 at 7:19 PM

HASHIMOTO’s been nasty and has completely destroyed my


thyroid. I have been on a gluten free diet for four months. I put
myself on it since my doctor seems to be lacking a brain, so I
am looking for another doctor. How can doing all of what you
have said help my thyroid if it is completely destroyed? Do I
still have Hashimoto Disease and, if I do, what does it now do
since my thyroid is destroyed? I couldn’t find answers to that
in your book. Anything that you can tell me about
Hashimoto’s with no thyroid left and which med I should try
to get my doctor to give me when I see him in a week. I like
being proactive. Thank you so much!!!
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 24, 2016 at 12:39 PM

Donna- Most thyroid conditions result from the immune


system attacking the thyroid because the immune system
is out of balance. Even when the thyroid is taken out
surgically, is ‘dead’, or treated with radioactive iodine the
autoimmunity still persists in most cases. Many people
will have their thyroids removed, and will develop new
autoimmune disorders such as Lupus, Rheumatoid
arthritis, etc. The immune system just finds a different
target. We need to re-balance the immune system to
prevent this (sometimes the autoimmunity can be reversed
as well). The gut determines your immune system. With
the exception of discussing proper thyroid medication
dosing, the majority of my website and my book focuses
on balancing the immune system. The info I present is
based on my own research and journey for overcoming
my autoimmune thyroid condition.

HASHIMOTO’S ROOT CAUSE BOOK


http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0615825796?ie=UTF
8&camp=1789&creativeASIN=0615825796&linkCode=x
m2&tag=thyroipharma-20

Reply

29. Alice G says


March 30, 2015 at 1:48 AM

I am unable to access the food panel links. I wondered if that


is because i live in NY State??? Is there any other way to see
this link/information? Thanks!
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 24, 2016 at 12:42 PM
Alice- The gold standard, or the most accurate test for
uncovering reactive foods and individual food sensitivities
is actually the Elimination Diet.

It works better than trying a recommended dietary


approach (i.e. gluten-free, Paleo, etc.) and even better than
food sensitivity testing (which may be helpful in many
cases, but may not be affordable for many people). The
elimination diet can work as a stand-alone or in symphony
with food sensitivity testing. Here is an article you may
find interesting!

ELIMINATION DIET FOR HASHIMOTO’S


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/elimination-diet-
for-hashimotos

Reply

30. Ernestine says


April 3, 2015 at 8:35 AM

I have an underactive thyroid. I can give up some foods but I


need my dairy products. I can cut down on dairy .lately I’ve
had no appetite.
Reply
o Dr. Izabella Wentz says
November 24, 2016 at 12:43 PM

Ernestine- Here are a couple of articles you may find


interesting!

DAIRY AND HASHIMOTO’S


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/got-hashimotos-
you-may-want-to-reconsider-dairy

GOING DAIRY FREE TO REVERSE HASHIMOTOS


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/going-dairy-free-to-
reverse-hashimotos

Reply

31. Lynn says


April 6, 2015 at 5:01 AM

I once felt as you do about dairy, but is eating them worth


feeling terrible? When I went without them–drinking almond
milk or a combination of almond/coconut milk and eating
goat’s milk cheese–I felt soooo much better. Eating dairy
cheese was enough to bring back brain fog and joint pain. I
finally figured out it wasn’t worth it.
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 24, 2016 at 12:45 PM

Lynn- Thank you so much for sharing!

Reply

32. teresa says


April 5, 2015 at 9:07 AM

Yep, me too. Hashimotos, celiac, sensitive to dairy, grains,


night shades and sugar. Functional medicine doctor finally
helped, regular doc did not help, just prescribed meds. So
much more energy, depression has lifted. There are a lot of
wonderful food naturally gluten free, that don’t cost any more.
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 24, 2016 at 12:46 PM
Teresa- Thank you so much for sharing! Here is an article
you may find interesting as well!

TAILORING YOUR THYROID DIET


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/tailoring-your-
thyroid-diet-to-your-needs

Reply

33. teresa says


April 5, 2015 at 9:19 AM

Also my skin cleared after not eating dairy for a few weeks, I
had painful cystic acne for years, and my skin now is perfectly
clear.
Reply

34. Renee Pflanz says


April 6, 2015 at 3:16 AM

My biggest question is what the heck can one eat. I was


diagnosed with Hashimoto’s and noticed through many trial
and errors that I have many food allergies as well. What can
one eat with this diagnosis?
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 24, 2016 at 12:49 PM

Renee- Here are a couple of articles about diet that you


may find interesting or helpful.
TAILORING YOUR THYROID DIET
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/tailoring-your-
thyroid-diet-to-your-needs

BEST DIET FOR HASHIMOTO’S AND


HYPOTHYROIDISM
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/best-diet-for-
hashimotos-hypothyroidism

Reply

35. Sue W. says


April 6, 2015 at 4:40 AM

I have been sick since I was 13. Come to find out I had spru
and sensitivity to dairy and to gluten. I had joint pain,
headaches,reflux, stomach cramps always and very crabby
most days. Many Dr appointments and the dr.s don’t think that
is the problem. Four of the dr.s asked if it was in my head.
Now I eat cooked fresh vegetables, meats, corn noodles (the
best ones), rice and almond milk. So who will listen to us.
How long or how sick does a person have to be to get
someone to listen. Is there any other suggestion I can use to
get someone to listen to us?
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 24, 2016 at 12:50 PM

Sue- Thank you so much for sharing! You may find this
article interesting!

WHY THYROID PATIENTS NEED CHANGE


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/why-thyroid-
patients-need-change

Reply

36. Catherine Albarella says


April 6, 2015 at 11:26 AM

My daughter & I both need all the info we can get. Hashi’s is
hereditary! Not only in women either. This is the first time I
have seen this disease addressed since diagnosed 30 years ago.
Than God &;you.
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 24, 2016 at 12:52 PM

Catherine- Thank you so much for your support! Here is


some information you may find interesting.

Three things MUST be present in order for autoimmunity


to occur…

1. Genetic predisposition
2. Environmental triggers
3. Intestinal permeability (leaky gut)

Developing autoimmunity is like a three-legged stool, all


of these factors must be present for autoimmunity to
occur! When you remove one of these, you can prevent or
stop autoimmune disease. While we can’t change genes, if
we know the trigger, we can remove it and we can heal the
gut.

REVERSING AUTOIMMUNITY AND THE PERFECT


STORM
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/reversing-
autoimmunity-and-the-perfect-storm/
IS HASHIMOTO’S HYPOTHYROIDISM GENETIC
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/is-hashimotos-
genetic

Reply

37. Katrina says


April 13, 2015 at 4:13 AM

I have been told different things about avoiding gluten from


my endo and my regular doctor.. My endo said don’t worry,
even though I had a slightly positive blood test, and my doctor
said to avoid it. Then he said don’t worry if my stomach isn’t
bothering me! I got diagnosed a little over three years ago and
had a follicular tumor removed on the right side of my thyroid.
I’m currently on 137mcg/day and taking vitamin D. My
results for my blood test in 2012:
Weak Positive, Celiac diagnoses questionable. IgA, Serum –
357 (70-310 is normal) Gliadin Ab, IgA 22 (0-19 is normal)
TTG Ab, IgA 5 (0-19) TTG Ab, IgG 4 (0-19)
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 24, 2016 at 12:53 PM
Katrina- The gold standard, or the most accurate test for
uncovering reactive foods and individual food sensitivities
is actually the Elimination Diet.

It works better than trying a recommended dietary


approach (i.e. gluten-free, Paleo, etc.) and even better than
food sensitivity testing (which may be helpful in many
cases, but may not be affordable for many people). The
elimination diet can work as a stand-alone or in symphony
with food sensitivity testing. Here is an article you may
find interesting!
ELIMINATION DIET FOR HASHIMOTO’S
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/elimination-diet-
for-hashimotos

Reply

38. Erin says


April 17, 2015 at 7:00 AM

I just got my results back from the 184 panel, do I need to


avoid all foods I have low, moderate and high reactivity to? I
can’t find a lot online for the validity of these types of tests.
Do you anything to point me to? I read that IGg antibodies are
elevated just by eating certain foods and it doesn’t indicate an
allergy or sensitivity. Thanks in advance!
Reply
o Dr. Izabella Wentz says
November 24, 2016 at 12:56 PM

Erin- Most people will see a dramatic reduction in gut


symptoms, brain symptoms, skin breakouts and pain by
eliminating the foods they are sensitive to. Some will also
see a significant reduction in thyroid antibodies! An
additional subset of people, will actually be able to get
their Hashimoto’s into complete remission just by getting
off the foods they react to, normalizing their thyroid
antibodies, and some even normalizing their thyroid
function! Here are a couple of articles you may find
helpful.

GUT, BRAIN, AND AUTOIMMUNE DISORDERS:


THE ROLE OF FOOD
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/gut-brain-and-
autoimmune-disorders

TAILORING YOUR THYROID DIET


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/tailoring-your-
thyroid-diet-to-your-needs

Reply

39. Tomas says


June 17, 2015 at 12:31 PM

Try agai, we fixed it


Reply

40. Jo says
June 18, 2015 at 8:34 AM

you will find the lists


here: http://foodallergy.com/tests.html#foods
Reply

41. karen says


June 24, 2015 at 9:10 AM

I was told the best thyroid medication, which is suppose to be


“more” natural was Armour Thyroid. My naturpathic doctor
prescribed it for me at a very low dose. I know it’s not the best
but was told it was better than the others. My natural doctor
moved and I go to a great medical one and he has kept me on
the same things. I’m now starting to get joint pain. If I
increase my water intake, I mean a lot it helps. I have a big
family that I need to take care of and don’t know how I would
function if I didn’t take some medication.
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 24, 2016 at 12:57 PM

Karen- There are quite a few options for thyroid


medications. In my experience, what works for one person
may not work for another. If your doctor will not prescribe
the medication you are looking for, ask your local
pharmacist for doctors in your area who prescribe the
medication you are looking to try. Have you read these
articles?

WHICH THYROID MEDICATION IS BEST?


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/which-thyroid-
medication-is-best/

TOP 11 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT


THYROID MEDICATIONS
https://thyroidphramacist.com/blog/top-11-things-you-
need-to-know-about-thyroid-medications

Reply

42. Cheryl says


June 22, 2015 at 1:24 PM
I went Gluten free in January and I can’t believe how much
better I feel. I have Hashimoto’s and the MTHFR Gene. I just
learned about a flour that a lot of people who have gluten
sensitivities are able to digest. It is an ancient flour that has not
been modified so it is a lot easier on our digestion. The flour is
called Einkorn. I tried it last week and did not have any
reaction to it whereas I do have a terrible reaction to gluten.
Has anyone tried this flour and successfully able to use it?
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 24, 2016 at 12:58 PM

Cheryl- Thank you so much for sharing! Here is an article


you may find interesting!
MTHFR
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/mthfr-hashimotos-
and-nutrients

Reply

43. Anna Katona says


January 24, 2017 at 1:50 AM

Dear Izabella!
I’m thinking about to make a food sensitivity test. I live in the
UK. Which test do you recommend for me?
I’m on paleo diet for more than a year, and on AIP for 10
months. But I feel that something not good for me…

Thanks for your help!


Anna

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


January 24, 2017 at 12:02 PM

Anna – thank you for following this page and your


support.

Here a links to the Food Sensitivity tests I recommend:

184 Food Panel


https://thyroidrx.mymedlab.com/dr-wentz/184-food-
allergy-igg-alletess-trx

96 Food Panel
https://thyroidrx.mymedlab.com/dr-wentz/96-food-
allergy-igg-alletess-trx

You may also be interested in this article:


ELIMINATION DIET FOR HASHIMOTO’S
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/elimination-diet-
for-hashimotos

Have you read my book, Hashimoto’s The Root Cause?


Here’s the link in case you’re interested.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0615825796?ie=UTF
8&camp=1789&creativeASIN=0615825796&linkCode=x
m2&tag=thyroipharma-20

Reply

 Anna Katona says


January 25, 2017 at 12:20 PM

Dear Izabella!

Thank you for your help and your quick answer!

I have already ordered your book. It’s arrived today!:)


I can’t wait to read about your amaizing researches! I
really would like to understand what is my root
cause…

I’ve seen these two tests in your article as well, but I


thought they are not available in the UK. Now I see
they are!:) Thanks for your recommendation!
I have already written that I’m on paleo and now on
strict AIP for a while (10 months). I think the AIP
lifestyle does not give complete solution to my
problems. My anti-TPO is still high and I do not
tolerate ‘good foods’ since I’m on this diet. Of course
it has many benefits and positive effects on my life as
well.

What do you think? Should I reintroduce the avoided


foods before I make the food sensitivity test? How
should I do it? How long time/How many times
should I eat these foods before make the test to get
right results?
I would choose the 184 food panel test. I don’t want
to eat gluten or soy… I know the life is better without
these, but I’m curious if I have food intolerance to
diary, seeds and other gluten free grains (oat, rice…)
that I may reintroduce one day after the strict AIP…

I would be grateful for your thoughts and advice!

Anna

Reply

44. Alberto Piras says


February 21, 2017 at 8:15 AM
Dear Dr.Wentz, I don’t know if you’ve already received this
question, but I wanted to ask you:
If going gluten free can lead you to reduce the dose of
levothyroxine, how much time is it necessary for this to
happen? You write about a 3 month period of “trial”. Is it
enough? Can the need for less hormone replacement occur
earlier than that? And, more importantly, is it gradual or does
it happen all of a sudden?

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


February 21, 2017 at 1:06 PM

Alberto – please, understand that due to liability issues, I


am unable to answer specific medical questions.

I highly recommend that you work with a functional


medicine clinician. It’s an entire medical specialty
dedicated to finding and treating underlying causes and
prevention of serious chronic disease rather than disease
symptoms.

FUNCTIONAL MEDICINE APPROACH TO THE


THYROID
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/functional-
medicine-approach-to-the-thyroid
WHAT TYPE OF DOCTOR SHOULD YOU SEE IF
YOU HAVE HASHIMOTO’S
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/what-type-of-
doctor-should-you-see-if-you-have-hashimotos

10 THINGS I WISH MY ENDOCRINOLOGIST


WOULD HAVE TOLD ME
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/10-things-i-wish-
my-endocrinologist-would-have-told-me

CLINICIAN DATABASE
http://www.thyroidpharmacistconsulting.com/clinician-
database.html

FIND A FUNCTIONAL MEDICINE CLINICIAN


https://www.functionalmedicine.org/practitioner_search.as
px?id=117

Reply

45. Tamsyn says


April 15, 2017 at 6:03 AM

Hi Dr Izabella,
Thank you so much for your amazing hard work with regards
to all things thyroid!
I haven’t been diagnosed with a thyroid condition but I am
well aware that my thyroid is very unhappy:(
I believe I may have a dairy sensitivity and I’m going to give
up dairy to find out. I have two questions: will I eventually be
able to eat dairy again, once my gut has healed? And, can I eat
butter? I know butter is dairy but it is included in the Paleo
diet, which excludes all other dairy.
Thank you again.
Tamsyn

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


April 16, 2017 at 2:04 PM

Tamsyn- You may find this article interesting!

ELIMINATION DIET FOR HASHIMOTO’S


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/elimination-diet-
for-hashimotos

Reply

46. Dagmar Merlino says


April 22, 2017 at 8:45 AM

Thank you very much for such an interesting article, Isabella!


I have had a blood allergy test done and apparently am allergic
to hazelnuts and birch pollen, with a cross allergy to apples,
pears, cherries, walnuts, carrots and cinnamon (although I
have never noticed any of these).
I am vegan and gluten-free, and after this I am now really
desperate. What is there left to eat? I eat apples daily and
cannot imagine living without them, but will if I have to. But I
am breastfeeding and burn a lot of calories…I just feel very
limited now with what I can still eat. Does this allergy mean I
should avoid those (I have hay fever, so I guess my mucosas
do react), or not necessarily?

Reply

o Dagmar Merlino says


April 22, 2017 at 8:45 AM

Oops, sorry for spelling your name wrong, Izabella!

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


April 24, 2017 at 4:44 PM

Dagmar – thank you for following this page. Going gluten


free is always the first step that I recommend. Through my
research I’ve found that a good percentage feel better off
gluten. About 20% will actually go into remission by
doing so. Some researchers have found that three to six
months on a gluten-free diet can eliminate organ-specific
antibodies.

10 MOST HELPFUL DIY INTERVENTIONS FOR


HASHIMOTO’S
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/10-most-helpful-
diy-interventions-for-hashimotosaccording-to-my-clients

TOP 9 TAKEAWAYS FROM 2232 PEOPLE WITH


HASHIMOTO’S
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/top-9-takeaways-
from-2232-people-with-hashimotos/

Reply

47. Ingrid says


April 29, 2017 at 1:06 PM

I have been tested for foodsensitivities. I have a whole list nut


gluten is not on that list. Can i relay in that list or is it still
possible that gluten is a problemen for my thyroidproblems?
(Since I eat according to that list I have no stomacproblems or
diarree. But it is not going Well with my thyroid, muscles and
anxiety. It got worce after my best griend dyed)

Reply
o Dr. Izabella Wentz says
May 1, 2017 at 1:08 PM

Ingrid – thank you for following this page.

It depends on the person and their individualized food


sensitivities. Some people go into remission just gluten
free; others may have to go as far as autoimmune Paleo.
The most common triggers in Hashimoto’s are nutrient
deficiencies, food sensitivities, intestinal permeability
(leaky gut), stress, an impaired ability to get rid of toxins
and in some cases, infections. Optimizing your health
starts with food. Figuring out which foods nourish you,
and which ones cause you harm is the single most
important thing you can learn in your health journey.

I’ve found that recognizing and eliminating reactive foods


can be a life-changer for most people with Hashimoto’s.

Reactive foods trigger an inflammatory response in the GI


tract, leading to malabsorption of nutrients (gluten
sensitivity, in particular, has been implicated in causing a
Selenium deficiency, a well-known risk factor for
Hashimoto’s), and can also produce intestinal
permeability whenever they are eaten.

Most people will see a dramatic reduction in gut


symptoms, brain symptoms, skin breakouts, and pain by
eliminating the foods they are sensitive to. Some will also
see a significant reduction in thyroid antibodies! An
additional subset of people will actually be able to get
their Hashimoto’s into complete remission just by getting
off the foods they react to, normalizing their thyroid
antibodies, and some even normalizing their thyroid
function!

BEST DIET FOR HASHIMOTO’S AND


HYPOTHYROIDISM
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/best-diet-for-
hashimotos-hypothyroidism

TAILORING YOUR THYROID DIET


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/tailoring-your-
thyroid-diet-to-your-needs

DAIRY AND HASHIMOTO’S


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/got-hashimotos-
you-may-want-to-reconsider-dairy

Reply

48. Rowena Cheromiah says


June 17, 2017 at 11:37 AM

I’m half way through reading the Root Cause and also
purchased Hashimoto’s Protocol, which I haven’t begun yet. I
began Paleo diet about 3 weeks ago. I received results of my
96 Food Panel today, which lists sensitivity to foods that I’ve
been eating while on Paleo diet (spinach, green peas, and
pepper). I’ll remove those food now. Can I add other foods
that ARE listed on the Paleo and AIPaleo back to my diet if
sensitivity test showed no reactivity? For example, I tested 0
for gluten, 0 for rice, 0 for soybeans. OR should I still stay
away from gluten, soy, rice? From Root Cause book, there are
recommendations to steer away from gluton.

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


June 19, 2017 at 10:50 AM

Rowena – thank you for following this page. Please,


understand that due to liability issues, I am unable to
answer specific medical questions.

Going gluten free is always the first step that I


recommend. Through my research, I’ve found that a good
percentage feel better off gluten. About 20% will actually
go into remission by doing so. Some researchers have
found that three to six months on a gluten-free diet can
eliminate organ-specific antibodies.

10 MOST HELPFUL DIY INTERVENTIONS FOR


HASHIMOTO’S
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/10-most-helpful-
diy-interventions-for-hashimotosaccording-to-my-clients
TOP 9 TAKEAWAYS FROM 2232 PEOPLE WITH
HASHIMOTO’S
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/top-9-takeaways-
from-2232-people-with-hashimotos/

Reply

49. Ombretta says


July 27, 2017 at 7:42 AM

Dear Dr.Wentz, We know that a gluten sensitive person that


goes gluten free for at least a couple of weeks and then tries a
“challenge” of gluten reintroduction will likely experience
symptoms he didn’t have before, like pain or bloating. I
wanted to ask you, if someone keeps eating gluten beyond that
moment, will those symptoms be likely to persist or will they
disappear over time? I ask this as a general consideration

Reply

o Dr. Izabella says


July 27, 2017 at 10:51 AM

Ombretta – thank you for following this page. In general,


most people with autoimmunity need to find their food
sensitivities, heal from infections, and eat organic;
however, bioindividuality is important, not everyone will
respond to the same interventions. The foods that heal one
person, may not be the same for another. It might seem
like a lot to give up, but feeling your symptoms fade away
can make it feel like it’s all worthwhile. And don’t forget
it’s not forever! You will be reintroducing these foods
once your gut heals.

WHAT’S CAUSING YOUR LEAKY


GUThttps://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/whats-
causing-your-leaky

Reply

50. Ruta says


October 14, 2017 at 9:46 AM

Hi, Dr Izabella. I have read on a multiple occasions that butter


actually is O.K. to consume going dairy free diet since it is
mostly fat and does not cause intolerance particularly if
consumed in small amounts.

I am quite severely sick for almost four years, recently


developed immediate reactions to food sensitivities. Am
gluten, grain, dairy free. Found to be sensitive to nightshades,
celery, pineapple, bananas, seeds and nuts too (I am sure i
missed something). I go itchy or tingly straight away after
consuming those. However butter does not cause reaction, at
least immediate. Still having fatigue, brain fog, mood changes,
muscle issues etc. So my question is: should I totally avoid
butter? Very little of food is left that satisfies me. Anyway…

Thank you so much for your work and your enthusiasm you
share with others, I wish I back to my normal self too.

By the way, my TSH recently was 1.06mlU/L, two years ago


0.74 mlU/L. My GP says my thyroid is okey.

Thanks again, Ruta, Ireland

Reply

o Dr. Izabella says


October 14, 2017 at 2:08 PM

Ruta – thank you for reaching out! In general, most people


with autoimmunity need to find their food sensitivities,
heal from infections, and eat organic; however,
bioindividuality is important, because not everyone will
respond to the same interventions. The foods that heal one
person, may not be the same for another. It might seem
like a lot, but feeling your symptoms fade away can make
it feel like it’s all worthwhile. And don’t forget it’s not
forever! You will be reintroducing these foods once your
gut heals. Here is a link that might help:
WHAT’S CAUSING YOUR LEAKY GUT
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/whats-causing-
your-leaky

Reply

51. Alena says


November 14, 2017 at 12:59 PM

Hi Izabella, thank you for the books and the information in


General! You are doing a very important thing to the people.
I am 37 years old and I have a Hashimoto. I am eating healthy
(thank to my parents), I felt good and didn’t take my sickness
seriously. Now I decided to help my body and so I am going
to start gluten free (before I was just dairy free, no junk food,
separate meals no carbs and protein in one meal). I have got
both your books and I am reading it now. I want to make food
allergies test due to realize I can have some weird allergen like
pineapple or banana or etc. Do you recommend to pass that
test in those labs only? And how to be with the kids meals? I
try to buy organic products, I am cooking at home, but still
some milk products and pastas they asked for…is the
buckwheat, oatmeal and quinoa are better then rice, corn and
wheat? Thanks!!!

Reply
o Dr. Izabella says
November 16, 2017 at 6:04 AM

Alena – thank you for reaching out. Did you know that
reactive foods trigger an inflammatory response in the GI
tract, leading to malabsorption of nutrients (gluten
sensitivity, in particular, has been implicated in causing a
Selenium deficiency, a well-known risk factor for
Hashimoto’s), and can also produce intestinal
permeability whenever they are eaten?

Most people will see a dramatic reduction in gut


symptoms, brain symptoms, skin breakouts, and pain by
eliminating the foods they are sensitive to. Some will also
see a significant reduction in thyroid antibodies! An
additional subset of people will actually be able to get
their Hashimoto’s into complete remission just by getting
off the foods they react to, normalizing their thyroid
antibodies, and some even normalizing their thyroid
function! Here are a couple of articles you may find
helpful.

FOOD SENSITIVITIES AND HASHIMOTO’S


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/food-sensitivities-
and-hashimotos

AUTOIMMUNE PALEO DIET


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/autoimmune-paleo-
diet
Reply

52. Alena says


November 16, 2017 at 1:53 PM

Thank you Izabella, I am strongly believe I will be one of


these people with your help! How often do you think it’s
nessesery to redone the test for good allergy ? Ones a year?