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ME-221 Tutorial Sheet-1

1. Derive the following equations

a) CV = -T ( ∂2a/∂T2 )V b) Cp = - T (∂2g/∂T2)p
c) CV = -T (∂p/∂T )v (∂V/∂T)s d) Cp= T (∂V/∂T)P (∂P/∂T)S
e) (∂CV/∂V)T = T (∂2p/∂T2)v f) (∂u/∂V)T = T ( ∂p/∂T)V –P

2. Derive third Tds equation


Tds = CV (∂T/∂p )v dp + Cp (∂T/∂v)P dv

3. Show that for Vander waal’s gas

a) (s2-s1)T = R ln [ (v2-b)/(v1-b) ]
b) (h2- h1)T = (p2v2-p 1v1) +a (1/v1-1/v2)
c) β = Rv2(v-b)/ [ RTv3-2a(v-b)2]
d) kT = v2(v-b2)/ [ RTv3-2a(v-b)2]

4. Show that change of entropy of a gas following Clasius equation of state at constant temperature
p(v-b) = RT is R ln[(v2-b)/(v1-b)]

5. Determine the sublimation pressure of water vapour at -60° C using data available in the steam tables.
1   v   RT 2  Z 
6. Show that the Joule-Thomson coefficient  J is given by equation:  J   
T   v   
CP   T p  PCp  T  p

7. Propane is compressed in a reversible isothermal steady-flow process from 1 MPa pressure, 120 0C to 5
MPa pressure. Determine the work of compression and heat transfer per kg of propane.

8. Propane is compressed in a reversible adiabatic steady-flow process from 1 MPa pressure, 120 0C to 5
MPa pressure. Determine the work of compression per kg of propane.

9. Propane gas expands in a turbine from 2.8 MPa, 150 0C to 350 kPa, 100 0C. Assume the process to be
adiabatic. Using the generalized charts determine: (a) the work done per kg of propane entering the
turbine. (b) the increase of entropy per kg of propane as it flows through the turbine. (c) the isentropic
turbine efficiency.

10. Carbon dioxide enters an adiabatic nozzle at 8 MPa and 450 K with a low velocity and leaves at 2 MPa
and 350 K. Using the generalized enthalpy departure chart, determine the exit velocity of CO2.

11. Nitrogen enters a turbine operating at steady state at 100 bar and 300 K and exits at 40 bar and 245 K.
Using the enthalpy departure chart, determine the work developed, in kJ/kg of nitrogen flowing, if heat
transfer with the surroundings can be ignored. Changes in kinetic and potential energy from inlet to exit
can also be neglected.