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Christian Generosity This ac T ivi T y shows the participants how a biblical text can
Christian Generosity This ac T ivi T y shows the participants how a biblical text can
Christian Generosity This ac T ivi T y shows the participants how a biblical text can
Christian
Generosity
This ac T ivi T y shows the participants how a biblical
text can shed light on our role in the fight to end hunger.
tim E
r E quir E d :
3 0
t O
50 minut E s
int E n d E d
FO r
G r A d E s
9-12
» Bibles, one for each participant
» index cards, six for each participant
» pens or pencils, one for each participant
Activity Steps
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Dis T ribu T e to each participant three index cards and a pen or pencil. Tell everyone to imagine
they have been granted three wishes. They must wish for things for themselves, although it is okay
if their wishes would benefit others too. Allow a few minutes for them to write each wish on an
index card. Then collect the cards and read a few random wishes to the group.
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i nvi T e T he par T icipan T s to form small groups of three. Then ask them to discuss each of
the following questions:
» What would you take to the top floor of your house if floodwaters were rising?
» What would you take onto the roof?
» What would you put in a helicopter?
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n o T e T he following:
» Psychologist Abraham Maslow’s hierarchy of needs says that humans need these things, in
this order:
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Materials
Needed
» Biological and physiological needs: air, food, water, shelter, warmth, intimacy, sleep, etc. » Safety needs:
» Biological and physiological needs: air, food, water, shelter, warmth, intimacy, sleep, etc.
» Safety needs: protection from the elements, security, order, law, limits, stability, etc.
» Belongingness and love needs: work group, family, affection, relationships, etc.
» Esteem needs: self-esteem, achievement, mastery, independence, status, dominance, prestige,
managerial responsibility, etc.
» Self-actualization needs: realizing personal potential, self-fulfillment, seeking personal growth
and peak experiences.
» So, for instance, a person needs food before status. A person will seek safety from harm
before improving her or his relationships.
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a sk T he small groups to compare Maslow’s list with the wishes they made earlier. How
many of the things on their lists are really wants rather than needs? Allow some time for the small
groups to discuss.
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n ow rea D Philippians 4:10–13. Then use the following questions to lead a large-group
discussion:
» What would Paul put on his list?
» What might it mean to be content in all circumstances?
» How might a person achieve that?
» Is it possible to be content even though your life might be full of disappointments or difficul-
ties? How?
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Dis T ribu T e bibles to the participants. Ask them to conduct a search for Scripture passages
that pertain to generosity and the needs of the poor. The following is a list of some options if the
small groups have difficulty locating passages:
» Deuteronomy 15:1–11
» Proverbs 14:31, 17:5, 19:1, 22:2, 22:9, 22:16, 28:6, 28:27
» Amos 2:6b–7a; 8:5,6
» Matthew 6:1–4, 6:19–21, 26:11
» Acts 6:1–7, 9:36, 10:4, 24:17
» Galatians 2:10
» James 2:1–13
» John 3:17
» 2 Corinthians 8:9
Allow time for the small groups to locate at least one passage.
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7 i nvi T e each small group to share its chosen passage and the message.
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i nvi T e each small group to share its chosen passage and the message.
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Dis T ribu T e three new index cards to each participant. Ask the participants to revisit the three
wishes they asked for at the beginning of the activity. Knowing what they know now, how would
they change those wishes? Invite them to take a few moments to write down three new wishes.
Collect the cards and select a few to share aloud with the large group.
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c onclu D e the activity by inviting everyone to join in prayer:
» Lord, we have so much. Most of us have food, shelter, people who love us, jobs, nice clothes
to wear, safety, and opportunities for growth and development. May we never take your
good gifts for granted. Help us to use our position of relative luxury to meet the needs of
those less fortunate. Amen.
(The above activity is drawn from Beat Poverty: We’ve Got What It Takes: An Educational Resource for
Young People in Grades 9–12. Copyright © 2008 by World Vision Resources, Mail Stop 321, P.O. Box 9716,
Federal Way, WA 98063-9716 wvresources@worldvision.org. All rights reserved.)
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About World Vision w orl D v ision is a Christian relief, development, and advocacy organization
About World Vision
w orl D v ision is a Christian relief, development, and advocacy organization dedicated to helping
children and their families break free from poverty. Our work is motivated by our faith in Jesus Christ. We
see a world where each child experiences “fullness of life” as described in John 10:10. And we know this can
be achieved only by addressing the problems of poverty and injustice in a holistic way. That’s how World
Vision is unique: We bring nearly sixty years of experience in three key areas needed to help children and
families thrive: emergency relief, long-term development, and advocacy. And we bring all of our skills across
many areas of expertise to each community we work in, enabling us to care for children’s physical, social,
emotional, and spiritual well-being.
w orl D v ision r esources educates Christians about global poverty, inspires them to social justice,
and equips them with innovative resources to make a difference in the world. By developing biblically-based
materials for educators and ministry leaders on the causes and consequences of global poverty, World Vision
Resources supports the organizational mandate to move the church in the United States to more fully embrace
its biblical responsibility to serve the poor.
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About World Vision w orl D v ision is a Christian relief, development, and advocacy organization

For more information about our resources, contact:

World Vision Resources www.worldvision.org wvresources@worldvision.org