Você está na página 1de 173

Jetstar Asia

SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM


MANUAL

SMS

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED
Distribution List Control

Copy No. Holder Location ___________________


001 Master Corporate
002 CAAS CAAS Flight Operations
003 Flight Operations Operations Centre

Distribution Control
The distribution list of registered holders of this manual can be found in
the front of this manual.
A controlled document is a copy that is complete and always
maintained up to date, for use by, and guidance to all staff.
An uncontrolled document is a copy of a manual used for personal
reference for which no amendments will be provided.

Manual Title: Safety Management System Manual - SMS Control No. 001

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


SMS INDEX

0. Introduction

1. Safety Management System

2. Policy, Objectives and Safety Goals

3 Roles and Responsibilities

4. Safety Reporting

5. Hazard Identification & Risk Management

6. Performance Indicators

7. Investigations

8. Flight Data Analysis Program (FDAP)

9. Safety System Training

10. SMS Audit and Safety Review

11. SMS Data and Records Management

12. Handling Storage and Processing

13. Change Management

14. Emergency Response Plan

15. Safety Governance

16. Forms

Updated 03 Jan 18

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 0 - Introduction
Jetstar Asia Table of Contents

0. Introduction ............................................................................................. 0-1


0.1 SMS Regulatory Requirements .................................................................................. 0-1
0.2 Scope and Integration of the Safety Management System ..................................... 0-2
0.3 Conditions of Use ........................................................................................................ 0-3
0.4 Safety Policy ................................................................................................................ 0-4
0.5 Authorisation Statement ............................................................................................. 0-5
0.6 Amendment Record Sheet ......................................................................................... 0-6
0.7 Record of Temporary Revisions ................................................................................ 0-8
0.8 Controlled Document Revision Request................................................................... 0-9
0.9 Warnings, Cautions and Notes ................................................................................ 0-14
0.10 Terminology ............................................................................................................... 0-15
0.11 Master Table of Contents ......................................................................................... 0-19

03 January 2018 Safety Management System Manual Revision 19


0-i

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Intentionally blank

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 0
Jetstar Asia Introduction

0. Introduction
A Safety Management System (SMS) is a systematic, explicit and proactive
process for managing safety that integrates operations and technical
systems with financial and human resource management to achieve safe
operations with as low as reasonably practicable risk.
Safety management may be also described as the systematic application of
specific technical and managerial skills to identify and control hazards and
related risks. By identifying, assessing and eliminating or controlling safety-
related hazards and risks, acceptable levels of safety will be achieved.

0.1 SMS Regulatory Requirements


With effect from 20 December 2006, all Singapore AOC Holders are
recommended to initiate the implementation of a safety management
system. This system includes, as a minimum, the following elements:
1. A safety policy on which the system is based;
2. Clearly defined lines of safety accountability for all members of senior
management, including a direct accountability for safety on the part of
the Accountable Manager;
3. Setting of safety objectives and goals;
4. Documentation of all SMS components, procedures and activities
including their relevant integration;
5. An emergency response plan;
6. Hazard identification and risk management process;
7. Audit and continuous improvement of the SMS;
8. Safety performance monitoring and an acceptable level of safety;
9. Management of change; and
10. Personnel SMS training, communication and promotion of SMS
outcomes.
AOC Holders are free to build their SMS to the complexity of their
operations to meet their individual circumstances. The key to a successful
SMS is to develop and grow the SMS based on the company’s needs and
customised to its operations.
SMS implementation will be incorporated as a mandatory requirement for
all Singapore AOC Holders by 1 January 2009.

18 July 2008 Safety Management System Manual Revision 0


0-1

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 0
Introduction Jetstar Asia

0.2 Scope and Integration of the Safety Management System


As an airline Safety and Quality Management is of the highest priority to
JSA. All activities are conducted in accordance with industry best practice,
thus ensuring the safety of operations and the personal health and safety of
staff, customers, contractors, and other third parties.
The Safety Management System at JSA is built on three foundations:
1. Culture (in particular the creation of a ‘Reporting Culture’)
2. Supporting software
3. Processes
Culture
As defined in Chapter 4 the JSA Safety Reporting Policy is a non punitive
one. Whilst good software tools can help reduce risk, they can only do so in
an environment where the Safety Policy and associated processes are
clearly published, championed and adhered to. No tools can redress the
shortcomings of poor policy and process. Airline staff should embrace a
‘collective attitude’ towards safety.
Supporting Software
The supporting software in use is the Safety Data Management System.
The SDMS was designed to reduce risk by:
 Supporting accident/incident reporting, analysis and investigation.
 Facilitating internal audit programs across all airline departments.
 Tracking corrective and preventive actions.
 Integrating external audit requirements into safety and quality
processes.
 Reporting on key quality indicators.
Processes
The Safety Management System is supported by the following processes:
 Capturing occurrence data (Safety Reporting)
 Safety investigation management
 Audit administration and management.
 A Hazard Identification and Risk Management Register where all
hazards identified during the above functions are recorded and risk
assessed.

Revision 13 Safety Management System Manual 28 February 2014


0-2

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 0
Jetstar Asia Introduction

0.3 Conditions of Use


The purpose of the Safety Management Systems Manual is to specify
Company policy and procedures for safety management of Jetstar Asia
operations.
The contents of this manual are applicable to all Jetstar Asia staff and
contractors who are involved with Jetstar Asia aircraft.
Authority to deviate from the policies and procedures specified in this
manual shall be granted only by the Head of Flying Operations.
The Safety Management Systems Manual is made available to staff as a
guide to the correct discharge of their duties in all phases of operations and
should be used in conjunction with other Company documentation and
policy instructions.
The Safety Management Systems Manual is, and remains, the property of
Jetstar Asia Pte Ltd and is provided to the recipient in the course of his/her
employment.
The Safety Management Systems Manual contains proprietary information
and under no circumstances should it be provided, or disclosed, to third
parties. When not in use the Safety Management Systems Manual should
be securely stored.
All appropriate staff are expected to be thoroughly conversant with the
contents of the Safety Management Systems Manual.
Hard copies of the Safety Management Systems Manual are issued to
specific staff members for their personal use and must not be transferred
from one to another without the approval of the Document Control Officer.
From time to time revisions will be issued to the Safety Management
Systems Manual. These may be reissues, revisions or temporary revisions
depending upon the urgency. Such documents must be incorporated
without delay, and details entered in the appropriate Record Sheet.
Amended pages or chapters should be destroyed or rendered unusable.
Distribution of the Safety Management Systems Manual and its revisions is
the responsibility of the Document Control Officer department to which it
must be returned when no longer required.
All enquiries regarding the Safety Management Systems Manual must be
addressed to the Head of Flying Operations.

Chief Executive Officer


Jetstar Asia Pte Ltd

N.B. No signature required.

18 June 2012 Safety Management System Manual Revision 9


0-3

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 0
Introduction Jetstar Asia

0.4 Safety Policy


Jetstar Asia is dedicated to ensuring the provision of a safe and efficient air
transport system for both passengers and employees. All necessary
resources shall be provided for the implementation and embodiment of our
safety policy throughout the company.
A safe operation is the result of combining qualified staff, well maintained
equipment, appropriate procedures, adequate training and supervision.
As safety is everyone’s responsibility, your feedback is important in
ensuring all anomalies and deficiencies are investigated and that
procedures are reviewed and amended to enhance the company’s overall
safety and efficiency.
To encourage healthy feedback, the company is committed to inculcating a
non-punitive open-reporting culture.
Safe airlines are economically healthy and bring benefits to the travelling
public, the company, its employees and the community at large.
Accordingly Jetstar Asia expects your total commitment to this Safety
Policy by ensuring you act in a professional manner and adhere to the
authorised procedures contained within.

Chief Executive Officer


Jetstar Asia Pte Ltd

N.B. No signature required.

Revision 9 Safety Management System Manual 18 June 2012


0-4

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 0
Jetstar Asia Introduction

0.5 Authorisation Statement

The Safety Management Systems Manual is one of a series of manuals


forming the Jetstar Asia internal documentation suite.
All Company staff must comply with the directions, instructions and
procedures contained in this manual in the performance of their duties
unless information or instructions in any other company documentation
overrides such advice.
This manual is a living document. As a result of experience, legislative
change or new technology, it may need revision from time to time. I
encourage all staff to contribute ideas for the improvement of the content or
the work practices covered by procedures in this manual. Submit any ideas
you may have to the Head of Flying Operations by completing a Revision
Request Form (Form # DCM.001) in accordance with the procedures
provided on Page 0-9.

Head of Flying Operations


Jetstar Asia Pte Ltd

N.B. No signature required.

18 June 2012 Safety Management System Manual Revision 9


0-5

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 0
Introduction Jetstar Asia

0.6 Amendment Record Sheet


The Head of Flying Operations or his/her delegate is the only person who
can authorise revisions to the Safety Management Systems Manual after
such changes have been formally approved by the appropriate committee
or personnel. Any staff member can initiate amendments to the manual
using the controlled document Revision Request Form (Form # DCM.001)
provided on Page 0-10.
The first issue of the Safety Management Systems Manual is shown in the
footer as Revision 0. Subsequent revisions are shown as Revision 1,
Revision 2 etc. Should at anytime the manual be completely re-issued the
Revision number will revert to Revision 0.
Amendments are marked with revision bars beside the text and the
insertion of revisions is to be recorded in the Amendment Record Sheet
table shown below and overleaf. The List of Effective Pages shows which
pages have changed.
Amendments are by page replacement or addition.
Insert or replace pages as instructed in the Revision Instruction Sheet.
Then complete the table below, indicating the revision number and its date,
sign in the ‘Amended by’ column and record the date on which you inserted
the updated pages.
Amendment Record Sheet

Revision No Revision Date Amended By Date of Insertion

1 21 Apr 09 Poon 29 Apr 09


2 05 Mar 10 Poon 10 Mar 10
3 09 May 10 Ming Hooi 10 May 10
4 11 Jun 10 Heng Xiang Xin 21 Jun 10
5 18 Dec 10 Ming Hooi 22 Dec 10
6 13 Jan 11 Gerald Cheong 28 Jan 11
7 11 Mar 11 Ming Hooi 21 Mar 11
8 09 Sep 11 Ming Hooi 11 Jan 12
9 18 Jun 12 Gerald Cheong 04 Jul 12
10 26 Jul 12 Gerald Cheong 27 Jul 12
11 20 Nov 12 Gerald Cheong 28 Nov 12
12 17 Jul 13 Gerald Cheong 06 Aug 13
13 28 Feb 14 Gerald Cheong 28 Feb 14
14 21 Jul 14 Gerald Cheong 27 Aug 14
15 09 Oct 14 Gerald Cheong 11 Nov 14
16 08 Jul 15 Gerald Cheong 20 Jul 15
17 08 Feb 16 Gerald Cheong 18 Feb 16

Revision 19 Safety Management System Manual 03 January 2018


0-6

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 0
Jetstar Asia Introduction

Revision No Revision Date Amended By Date of Insertion

18 04 Sep 17 Gerald Cheong 13 Sep 17


19 03 Jan 18 Gerald Cheong

03 January 2018 Safety Management System Manual Revision 19


0-7

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 0
Introduction Jetstar Asia

0.7 Record of Temporary Revisions


The Head of Flying Operations or his/her delegate is the only person who
can authorise Temporary Revisions to the Safety Management System
Manual.
Temporary Revisions are amendments to the Safety Management System
Manual that are issued out of the normal amendment cycle. Temporary
Revisions are distinguishable from manual content as they are published
on yellow paper. Temporary Revisions are to be summarised in the Record
of Temporary Revisions Table shown below and overleaf.
Insert Temporary Revision pages facing the page to which they refer. Then
complete the Record of Temporary Revisions table below, indicating the
temporary revision details, title and insertion date. The next amendment
supersedes temporary revisions issued in this amendment cycle. Hence,
when instructed in a subsequent Temporary Revision, or when a white
page amendment is received all Temporary Revisions are to be removed,
and the removal date recorded.
Record of Temporary Revisions
T/R Details Temporary Revision Title Insertion Removal
Date Date
No Chap Page

Revision 19 Safety Management System Manual 03 January 2018


0-8

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 0
Jetstar Asia Introduction

0.8 Controlled Document Revision Request


Input concerning the structure and layout of the Safety Management
Systems Manual, or any policies and procedures detailed therein is
encouraged.
Use the Revision Request Form (Form # DCM.001), on the following page,
to suggest changes to the Safety Management Systems Manual or any
other Company Manual. To do this, photocopy the form, complete the
Originator section and send the copy to the address listed below. Do NOT
send the original of this page.
Please send a copy of the completed form, together with any attachments,
via internal mail to:
Document Control Officer
Jetstar Asia Airways Pte Ltd
Singapore Changi Airport Terminal 1
P.O. Box 115
Singapore 918144
Upon receipt, the Document Control Officer will register each individual
Revision Request Form, and issue it with a number for tracking purposes,
before forwarding it to the applicable Manual Approval Authority for
consideration. Accepted requests will be incorporated into the next manual
revision. Where a request is declined the Manual Approval Authority will
provide a written explanation, which will be copied by the Document Control
Officer to the Originator for their feedback.

03 January 2018 Safety Management System Manual Revision 19


0-9

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 0
Introduction Jetstar Asia

Jetstar Asia
REQ NO:
REVISION REQUEST FORM
(Technical Library use only)

ORIGINATOR USE
MANUAL TITLE:
SECTION / PAGE NO. / PARA / REV:
REQUESTED CHANGE:

Additional information attached


REASON FOR CHANGE:

Additional information attached


ORIGINATOR (PRINT & SIGN): DATE:
DEPARTMENT: POSITION:
Send Revision Request Form to Document Control Officer for registering & distribution
MANUAL APPROVAL AUTHORITY USE

APPROVAL AUTHORITY NAME ___________________________DATE REC’D _______


DEPARTMENTS CONSULTED REGARDING THE CHANGE HUMAN FACTOR SME
Who Who

Signature/Date
Who Signature/Date

Signature/Date
DEPARTMENT COMMENTS UPON REVIEW

DECLINED – Reason Provided

APPROVED – Details of Approved Revision

Sample amended page attached

APPROVAL AUTHORITY SIGNATURE _______________________ DATE ___________

INCORPORATED IN REVISION NO.: DATE:


Send completed signed Revision Request Form to Document Control Officer for filing Form # DCM.001
Issue 0, 01/03/13

Revision 19 Safety Management System Manual 03 January 2018


0-10

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED
UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED
UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED
Chapter 0
Introduction Jetstar Asia

0.9 Warnings, Cautions and Notes


This page has been included to provide information about the use of
warnings, cautions and notes.

Warning

A warning immediately precedes an operating


procedure or maintenance practice, which, if not
correctly followed, could result in loss of life or
personal injury.

CAUTION

A caution immediately precedes an operating


procedure or maintenance practice which, if not
correctly followed, could result in damage to or
destruction of equipment, or corruption of data.

NOTE
A note immediately precedes or follows an operating
procedure, maintenance practice or condition that
requires highlighting.

Revision 0 Safety Management System Manual 18 July 2008


0-14

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 0
Jetstar Asia Introduction

0.10 Terminology
Accident (ICAO Definition)
“Accident” means an occurrence associated with the operation of an aircraft
which takes place between the time any person boards the aircraft with the
intention of flight until such time as all persons have disembarked, in which:
 A person is fatally or seriously injured as a result of:
a. Being in the aircraft;
b. Direct contact with any part of the aircraft, including parts which
have become detached from the aircraft; or
c. Direct exposure to jet blast;
except where the injuries arise from natural causes, are self-inflicted or
inflicted by other persons, or where the person injured is a stowaway hiding
outside the areas normally available to passengers and crew; or
 The aircraft sustains damage or structural failure which:
a. Adversely affects the structural strength, performance or flight
characteristics of the aircraft; and
b. Would normally require major repair or replacement of the
affected component;
except for engine failure or damage which is limited to the engine, its
cowlings or accessories, or for damage limited to propellers, wing tips,
antennas, tyres, brakes, fairings, small dents or puncture holes in the
aircraft skin; or
 The aircraft is missing or completely inaccessible.

NOTE
An aircraft is considered missing when official search
has been terminated and the wreckage has not been
located.

Consequence
The outcome of an event expressed qualitatively or quantitatively, being a
loss, injury, disadvantage or gain. There may be a range of possible
outcomes associated with an event.
Hazard
A situation or condition, which if left untreated, could lead to negative
consequences.

18 July 2008 Safety Management System Manual Revision 0


0-15

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 0
Introduction Jetstar Asia

Incident (ICAO Definition)


An incident is an occurrence, other than an accident associated with the
operation of an aircraft that affects or could affect the safety of the
operation of the aircraft.
Likelihood
Used as a qualitative description of probability or frequency.
Risk
The chance of something happening that will have an impact upon
objectives. It is measured in terms of consequences and likelihood.
Risk Analysis
The systematic application of management policies, procedures and
practices to the task of analysing, evaluating and controlling risk.
Safety
A general term denoting an acceptable level of risk of, freedom from, and
the low probability of harm. Freedom from the conditions that can cause
death, injury, occupational illness or damage to or loss of equipment or
property.
Safety Culture
Culture is defined by what people do and the decisions they make. A safety
culture is an informed culture:
 People understand the hazards and risks involved in their own
operation.
 Staff work continuously to identify and overcome threats to safety.
 A safety culture is a just culture:
 Errors must be accepted but wilful violations cannot be tolerated.
 The workforce knows and agrees on what is acceptable and what is
not acceptable.
 A safety culture is a reporting culture:
 People are encouraged to report safety concerns.
 When safety concerns are reported, they are analysed and
appropriate action is taken.
 A safety culture is a learning culture:
 People are encouraged to develop and apply their own skills and
knowledge to enhance organisational safety.
 Safety reports are fed back to staff so that everyone learns the
lessons.

Revision 0 Safety Management System Manual 18 July 2008


0-16

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 0
Jetstar Asia Introduction

Safety Management
The systematic management of the risks associated with flight operations
and related ground operations to achieve high levels of safety performance.
Corporate Safety
A Corporate Safety is a business like approach to safety. The system
provides a systematic, explicit and comprehensive process for managing
safety risks. It encompasses goal setting, planning, and measuring
performance.
Serious Incident (ICAO definition)
“Serious incident” means an accident involving circumstances and
indicating that an accident nearly occurred. Examples are as follows:
 A near collision requiring an avoidance manoeuvre to avoid a
collision or an unsafe situation or where an avoidance action would
have been appropriate.
 A controlled flight into terrain only marginally avoided.
 An aborted take-off on a closed or engaged runway.
 A take-off from a closed or engaged runway with marginal separation
from an obstacle.
 A landing or an attempted landing on a closed or engaged runway.
 A gross failure to achieve predicted performance during take-off or
initial climb.
 Fire or smoke in the passenger compartment, in the cargo
compartment or engine fire, even though such a fire was extinguished
by the use of extinguishing agents.
 An event requiring the emergency use of oxygen by the flight crew.
 An aircraft structural failure or engine disintegration not classified as
an accident.
 Multiple malfunction of one or more aircraft systems seriously
affecting the operation of the aircraft.
 Flight crew incapacitation during flight.
 Fuel quantity requiring the declaration of an emergency by the pilot.
 A take-off or landing incident such as undershooting, overrunning or
running off the side of runways.
 A system failure, weather phenomenon, an operation outside the
approved flight envelope or other occurrence which could have
caused difficulties controlling the aircraft.
 A failure of more than one system in a redundancy system mandatory
for flight guidance or navigation.
Serious Injury
“Serious injury”, in relation to a person, means an injury which:
 Requires hospitalisation for a period of more than 48 hours, such period
commencing within 7 days from the date of the injury;
 Results in a fracture of any bone other than a simple fracture of any
finger, toe or the nose;

18 July 2008 Safety Management System Manual Revision 0


0-17

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 0
Introduction Jetstar Asia

 Involves lacerations which cause severe haemorrhage, nerve, muscle


or tendon damage;
 Involves injury to any internal organ;
 Involves second or third degree burns or any burns affecting more than
5% of the surface of the body; or
 Involves verified exposure to infectious substances or injurious
radiation.

Revision 0 Safety Management System Manual 18 July 2008


0-18

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 0
Jetstar Asia Introduction

0.11 Master Table of Contents


CHAPTER 0: INTRODUCTION

0.1 SMS Regulatory Requirements


0.2 Scope and Integration of the Safety Management System
0.3 Conditions of Use
0.4 Safety Policy
0.5 Authorisation Statement
0.6 Amendment Record Sheet
0.7 Record of Temporary Revisions
0.8 Controlled Document Revision Request
0.9 List of Effective Pages
0.10 Warnings, Cautions and Notes
0.11 Terminology
0.12 Master Table of Contents

CHAPTER 1: SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

1.1 Introduction
1.2 Major System Modules
1.2.1 Safety Policy/Principles/Objectives and Goals
1.2.2 Roles and Responsibilities
1.2.3 Safety Reporting
1.2.4 Risk Management and Hazard Identification
1.2.5 Performance Indicators
1.2.6 Investigations
1.2.7 Flight Data Analysis Program (FDAP)
1.2.8 Safety System Training
1.2.9 SMS Audit and Safety Review
1.2.10 SMS DATA and Records Management
1.2.11 Handling, Storage and Processing of Reports
1.2.12 Change Management
1.2.13 Emergency Response Plan
1.2.14 Safety Governance
1.2.15 Forms
1.2.16 Communication System
1.3 Safety Management System Diagram

CHAPTER 2: POLICY, OBJECTIVES AND SAFETY GOALS

2.1 Introduction
2.2 Safety Policy
2.3 Jetstar Asia Safety Principles
2.4 Just Culture
2.4.1 Just Culture Policy
2.4.2 Just Culture Process
2.4.3 The Just Culture Decision Tree
2.5 Long Term Objectives
2.6 Short Term Objectives

03 January 2018 Safety Management System Manual Revision 19


0-19

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 0
Introduction Jetstar Asia

CHAPTER 3: ROLES & RESPONSIBILITIES

3.1 Safety, QA & Security Department


3.2 Organisation Chart
3.3 Responsibility
3.3.1 CEO
3.3.2 Head of Safety, QA & Security
3.3.3 Manager Safety
3.3.4 Head of Flying Operations
3.3.5 Other Staff in Safety, QA & Security Department
3.3.6 External Resources

CHAPTER 4: SAFETY REPORTING

4.1 Non Punitive Open Reporting Policy


4.2 Reporting Forms and Process
4.2.1 Reporting Forms
4.2.2 Samples of Reporting Forms
4.2.3 Safety Reporting – Air Crew Process
4.3 Mandatory Reports to Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore
(CAAS) and Transport Safety Investigation Bureau (TSIB)
4.4 Definitions of Accident or Serious Incident
4.5 Safety Reports Required by Jetstar Asia
4.6 Special Reporting Requirements
4.7 Hazard Reporting Procedures
4.8 Processing Safety and Quality Reports
4.8.1 Processing of an Occurrence Report – Pilot (SMS001) Which
Needs to be Reported to CAAS/TSIB
4.8.2 Processing of Other Reports
4.9 Reporting of High Risk Occurrences or Accidents to the Board
Safety and Security Committee (BSSC) Members)

CHAPTER 5: HAZARD IDENTIFICATION AND RISK MANAGEMENT

5.1 Introduction
5.2 Risk Management Policy
5.3 Hazard Identification and Risk Management
5.4 Risk Management Process
5.4.1 Introduction
5.4.2 Definitions
5.4.3 Roles and Responsibilities
5.4.4 Risk Management Process Activities
5.5 Documenting the Risk Process
5.6 Fatigue Risk Management System (FRMS)
5.6.1 Principle and Objective
5.6.2 Fatigue Risk Management Policy
5.6.3 Identification of Fatigue Hazard
5.6.4 Types of Fatigue
5.6.5 Continuous Assessment of Fatigue
5.6.6 Use of Controlled Rest on the Flight Deck
5.6.7 Implementation of FRMS

Revision 19 Safety Management System Manual 03 January 2018


0-20

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 0
Jetstar Asia Introduction

CHAPTER 6: PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

6.1 Safety Performance Indicators


6.2 Safety Performance Monitoring
6.3 Acceptable level of Safety (ALS)

CHAPTER 7: INVESTIGATIONS

7.1 Introduction
7.2 Company Investigation Policy
7.3 Notification of Investigation
7.4 Internal Investigation Procedure
7.5 Internal Investigation Activity
7.5.1 Introduction
7.5.2 Initial Actions of Investigator in Charge
7.5.3 Interviewee Participation
7.5.4 Conduct of Interview
7.5.5 Investigation Reports
7.6 External Observers
7.7 Confidentiality of Information
7.8 Flight Data Recorders
7.9 Cockpit Voice Recorders
7.10 External Investigations
7.11 Investigator Training and Qualification Requirements

CHAPTER 8: FLIGHT DATA ANALYSIS PROGRAM (FDAP)

8.1 Introduction
8.2 FDAP Policy
8.3 Objectives of FDAP
8.4 Definitions
8.5 Data Analysis Process
8.6 Investigation Process
8.7 FDAP Review
8.8 Data Storage and Security Policy

CHAPTER 9: SAFETY SYSTEM TRAINING

9.1 Introduction
9.2 Safety System Training
9.3 SMS Training – SMS Practitioners
9.4 Safety System Training – Senior Management
9.5 Safety System Training – Pilots
9.6 Safety System Training – Cabin Crew
9.7 Safety Awareness Training – Support and Corporate Staff
9.8 Miscellaneous Training
9.9 Recurrent Safety Training

CHAPTER 10: SMS AUDIT AND SAFETY REVIEW

10.1 Audit Program


10.2 Types of Audit
10.3 Audit Schedule
10.4 Auditor Qualification

03 January 2018 Safety Management System Manual Revision 19


0-21

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 0
Introduction Jetstar Asia

10.5 Audit Procedures


10.6 Termination of Audit
10.7 Confidentiality

CHAPTER 11: SMS DATA AND RECORDS MANAGEMENT

11.1 Control of Documents


11.2 Control of Records
11.3 Management Safety and Security Committee (MSSC)
11.4 Investigation Files

CHAPTER 12: HANDLING STORAGE AND PROCESSING

12.1 Introduction
12.2 Initial Handling and Processing of Reports
12.3 Safety Database
12.4 Line Management Responsibilities in Regard to Safety Related
Reports
12.5 Communication of Safety Information to Operational Personnel

CHAPTER 13: CHANGE MANAGEMENT

13.1 Introduction
13.2 Aim
13.3 Change Management Committee
13.4 Change Management Process

CHAPTER 14: EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN

14. Emergency Response Plan

CHAPTER 15: SAFETY GOVERNANCE

15.1 Introduction
15.2 Review and Continual Improvement of SMS
15.3 MSSC
15.4 Board Safety Committee
15.5 FDAP
15.6 CMD
15.7 Group Airline Safety Committee (GASC)
15.8 Safety Sub-committees

CHAPTER 16: FORMS

16.1 SMS001 – OSCAR (Paper Form for Occurrence Report) Issue 2,


04/09/17
16.2 SMS002 – Change Control Form Issue 0, 08/07/15
16.3 SMS003 – Special Air Report of Volcanic Activity Issue 0, 08/07/15

Revision 19 Safety Management System Manual 03 January 2018


0-22

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 1 – Safety Management System
Jetstar Asia Table of Contents

1. Safety Management System .................................................................. 1-1


1.1 Introduction.................................................................................................................. 1-1
1.2 Major System Modules ............................................................................................... 1-1
1.2.1 Safety Policy/Principles/Objectives and Goals .............................................. 1-2
1.2.2 Roles and Responsibilities .............................................................................. 1-2
1.2.3 Safety Reporting ............................................................................................... 1-2
1.2.4 Risk Management and Hazard Identification ................................................. 1-2
1.2.5 Performance Indicators .................................................................................... 1-2
1.2.6 Investigations .................................................................................................... 1-2
1.2.7 Flight Data Analysis Program (FDAP) ............................................................. 1-3
1.2.8 Safety System Training .................................................................................... 1-3
1.2.9 SMS Audit and Safety Review ......................................................................... 1-3
1.2.10 SMS DATA and Records Management ........................................................... 1-3
1.2.11 Handling, Storage and Processing of Reports .............................................. 1-3
1.2.12 Change Management ........................................................................................ 1-3
1.2.13 Emergency Response Plan .............................................................................. 1-4
1.2.14 Safety Governance ............................................................................................ 1-4
1.2.15 Forms ................................................................................................................. 1-4
1.2.16 Communication System ................................................................................... 1-4
1.3 Safety Management System Diagram ....................................................................... 1-6

03 January 2018 Safety Management System Manual Revision 19


1-i

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Intentionally blank

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 1
Jetstar Asia Safety Management System

1. Safety Management System

1.1 Introduction
The Jetstar Asia safety management system comprises a number of modules
all interlinked and interrelated to make up the complete safety system. This
volume of the Jetstar Asia Safety Management Systems Manual provides a
top level interpretation of the safety management system and should itself be
subject to review and amendment from time to time. This is to ensure that it
continues to meet changes to any company, operational or legislative
requirement.

1.2 Major System Modules


The major system modules have been identified as the essential elements of
the safety management system and are designated such that they may be
viewed in totality or divided into sub-modules. The major modules of the
system consist of the following:
1. Safety Policy/Principles, Objectives and Goals
2. Roles and Responsibilities
3. Safety Reporting
4. Risk Management and Hazard Identification
5. Performance Indicators
6. Investigations
7. Flight Data Analysis Program (FDAP)
8. SMS/Safety System Training
9. SMS Audit and Safety Review
10. SMS Data and Records Management
11. Handling Storage and Processing of Reports
12. Change Management
13. Emergency Response Plan
14. Safety Governance
15. Forms
Each module is outlined below.

18 July 2008 Safety Management System Manual Revision 0


1-1

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 1
Safety Management System Jetstar Asia

1.2.1 Safety Policy/Principles/Objectives and Goals

This module outlines the safety policy/safety principles, long and short term
objectives and safety goals.

1.2.2 Roles and Responsibilities

This module outlines the roles and responsibilities of the CEO, Head of Flying
Operations and the Head of Safety, QA and Security as the custodian of the
Safety, QA and Security Department and the staff under his jurisdiction. It also
defines the role of the Management Safety and Security Committee (MSSC)

1.2.3 Safety Reporting

The organisation has established a safety occurrence reporting process which


consists of a reporting mechanism, acknowledgement to the reporter and
wherever possible, feedback to the reporter of those reports that are the
subject to investigation. Not all reports are investigated; however, all safety
related reports shall be recorded and used for proactive analysis and trend
monitoring. This module shall incorporate aspects such as personnel tasked
with safety duties and responsibilities in addition to the facilities and
equipment necessary for such tasking. The company has provided appropriate
forms to enable staff to report safety hazards and occurrences. The
procedures and processes for reporting safety hazards and occurrences are
detailed in chapter four of this manual.

1.2.4 Risk Management and Hazard Identification

The hazard identification and risk management process seeks to identify,


analyse, assess and control hazards and risks incurred in airline operations so
that corrective and preventive measures can be implemented to maintain high
standard of safety. The hazard identification and risk management process is
detailed in chapter five of this manual.

1.2.5 Performance Indicators

This module outlines the various parameters deployed in safety performance


monitoring and the Acceptable Level of Safety (ALS)

1.2.6 Investigations

The accident and incident investigation module shall define the processing of
operational safety occurrence reports that have been accepted for
investigation. Factual information collected shall be analysed by the assigned
investigator with findings and safety actions normally incorporated in the report
for distribution to relevant management in draft format prior to finalising the
report. This module should also be capable of interacting with the safety

Revision 19 Safety Management System Manual 03 January 2018


1-2

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 1
Jetstar Asia Safety Management System

inspections and audits module. The accident and incident investigation


processes are detailed in chapter seven of this manual.

1.2.7 Flight Data Analysis Program (FDAP)

This module consists of the routine downloading and systematic analysis of


quick-access recorder, or QAR data. The purpose of FDAP is the detection of
latent patterns of behaviour among flight crews, weaknesses in ATC systems
and anomalies in aircraft performance which may prevent potential aircraft
accidents. The main objective of FDAP is to improve safety by identifying
trends, not individual acts.

1.2.8 Safety System Training

This module outlines the SMS training requirements for the SMS Manager and
Safety System training for corporate staff, technical and cabin crew.

1.2.9 SMS Audit and Safety Review

This module shall define the way in which safety inspections and audits are
scheduled and conducted. The purpose of this module is to ensure that safety
is continuously assured by a systematic process of workplace inspections and
safety audits. The safety inspections and audit module shall also interact with
the accident and incident investigation module. The processes are detailed in
Chapter ten of this manual.

1.2.10 SMS DATA and Records Management

This module outlines the records management of SMS data, MSSC minutes
and Investigation Files.

1.2.11 Handling, Storage and Processing of Reports

The reports handling, storage and processing management facility module


defines the software and hardware facilities essential for collecting, collating,
analysing and reporting on all operational safety reports submitted to the
company via the internal reporting processes. The facilities shall also be
capable of accepting and exchanging safety related reports that have
originated externally to the company that have a direct link to or potential
impact upon the operational safety of the airline. These processes shall be
subject to internal review and audit for effectiveness and timeliness of safety
outputs.

1.2.12 Change Management

This module outlines the processes and procedures for change of


management issues. Functions of the CMC committee are also detailed.

18 July 2008 Safety Management System Manual Revision 0


1-3

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 1
Safety Management System Jetstar Asia

1.2.13 Emergency Response Plan

This module outlines the Emergency Response Plan of the organisation. It


encompasses Disaster Management and the Business Continuity Plan.

1.2.14 Safety Governance

This module outlines the jurisdiction and agenda of the MSSC and BSSC.

1.2.15 Forms

This module contains the various reporting forms that are in use by the
organisation.

1.2.16 Communication System

To support the proper functioning of the SMS, the Company shall have a
communication system that facilitates:
 The reporting of hazards, occurrences (incidents or accidents) and
concerns, with the aim of highlighting hazards and risks as well as
opportunities for improvement to the appropriate management level for
deliberations and actions as required.
 The dissemination of Safety information, including Safety Alert messages,
periodic updates of FDAP, safety related materials etc, to enhance
professional knowledge and increase safety and security awareness.

Safety Reporting
The reporting of any safety or security concerns, hazards, as well as
occurrences can be done by means of completing an appropriate Occurrence
Report Form which is available at the Ops Control Centre, Crew lounge,
Safety Department, as well as the Tech Crew Flight Satchel. Electronic
versions are also available on Jetstar Employee Net (JEN). Upon receipt of
such occurrence reports, an acknowledgement will be sent to the reporter by
email, and the report will be recorded in the Safety Data Management System
(SDMS). Chapter 4 details the workflow of such reports.
Reports arising from investigations or audits are entered directly into SDMS by
the investigating officer or the auditor.

Dissemination of Safety Information


Safety information may be disseminated by means of:
 Immediate email broadcast of any critical or urgent safety or security
updates. The recipients of such email broadcast could also include
GHA/THA or other service provider where necessary;

Revision 13 Safety Management System Manual 28 February 2014


1-4

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 1
Jetstar Asia Safety Management System

 Results of occurrence assessments, investigations, audits and other


relevant information can also be disseminated to internal or external
recipients using the company email system;
 Periodic updates for air crew, such as monthly FDAP update, quarterly
Cabin Crew Bulletin;
 Periodic update for the entire company, such as the 4-monthly Safety
Newsletter;
 Weekly and monthly safety report to the management; and
 Safety and operations meetings.

18 June 2012 Safety Management System Manual Revision 9


1-5

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 1
Safety Management System Jetstar Asia

1.3 Safety Management System Diagram

Occurrence
reporting
system
FDAP or
FOQA

Review of
safety
Safety performance
inspections
& audits

Safety, QA
Feedback of
& safety
Security information
Accident &
incident
Department
investigation

Exchange of
Safety safety data
data with external
storage Hazard agencies
identification
& risk
management

Management commitment Employee commitment


and responsibility and responsibility

Revision 11 Safety Management System Manual 20 November 2012


1-6

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 2 – Policy, Objectives & Safety Goals
Jetstar Asia Table of Contents

2. Policy, Objectives & Safety Goals......................................................... 2-1


2.1 Introduction.................................................................................................................. 2-1
2.2 Safety Policy ................................................................................................................ 2-1
2.3 Jetstar Asia Safety Principles .................................................................................... 2-1
2.4 Just Culture.................................................................................................................. 2-2
2.4.1 Just Culture Policy............................................................................................ 2-2
2.4.2 Just Culture Process ........................................................................................ 2-3
2.4.3 The Just Culture Decision Tree ....................................................................... 2-4
2.5 Long Term Objectives................................................................................................. 2-5
2.6 Short Term Objectives ................................................................................................ 2-5

18 June 2012 Safety Management System Manual Revision 9


2-i

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Intentionally blank

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 2
Jetstar Asia Policy, Objectives & Safety Goals

2. Policy, Objectives & Safety Goals

2.1 Introduction
The company’s safety objectives consist of both long and short term objectives
aimed at ensuring that the airline is effective in maintaining a level of defined safety
performance criterion that are specific, measurable, achievable, and realistic and
have a timely target timeframe within which they are to be achieved. This section
specifies the safety planning to achieve the objectives listed in Sections 2.4 and
2.5.

2.2 Safety Policy


Jetstar Asia is dedicated to ensuring the provision of a safe and efficient
air transport system for both passengers and employees. All necessary
resources shall be provided for the implementation and embodiment of
our safety policy throughout the company.
A safe operation is the result of combining qualified staff, well maintained
equipment, appropriate procedures, adequate training and supervision.
As safety is everyone’s responsibility, your feedback is important in
ensuring all anomalies and deficiencies are investigated and that
procedures are reviewed and amended to enhance the company’s
overall safety and efficiency.
To encourage healthy feedback, the company is committed to inculcating
a non-punitive open-reporting culture.
Safe airlines are economically healthy and bring benefits to the travelling
public, the company, its employees and the community at large.
Accordingly Jetstar Asia expects your total commitment to this Safety
Policy by ensuring you act in a professional manner and adhere to the
authorised procedures contained within.

2.3 Jetstar Asia Safety Principles


The Jetstar Asia Safety Principles is approved by the CEO.
At Jetstar Asia, safety forms the basis of all sound actions and decisions. The
safety of our employees, customers, contractors, assets, business and the wider
community is reliant on our continued commitment to identify and manage risk,
prevent injuries and disease, and achieve compliance.
Our measure of success depends upon the following:
 Demonstration of continual safety commitment and duty of care obligations by
management, employees and third parties;

18 June 2012 Safety Management System Manual Revision 9


2-1

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 2
Policy, Objectives & Safety Goals Jetstar Asia

 Responsibility and accountability for safety by everyone through awareness,


understanding and compliance with regulatory and company safety standards
and requirements;
 Continuous monitoring, measurement and improvement of safety management
as an integral part of effective business practice;
 Managers demonstrating leadership through continual review of safety key
result areas and key performance indicators;
 The integration of safety, quality, risk and compliance principles as part of
normal business activities, including development and changes to operational
practices;
 Education and training based on clearly defined safety competencies;
 The effective management of fatigue and other critical risk factors;
 Open communication, analysis and dissemination of information to reinforce
and maintain a positive safety culture;
 A safety culture in which employees are free to report errors without fear of
retribution. Human error must be managed and safety hazards identified and
controlled;
 Engaging employees in developing innovative solutions to eliminate unsafe
organisational conditions and behaviour; and
 Periodically reviewing and updating policy.
The Jetstar Asia objective is to be a recognised leader in the prevention of injuries,
accidents and incidents through dedication to safety system principles and quality
processes.

2.4 Just Culture


Jetstar Asia fully embraces Just Culture, which actively seeks out risks both at an
individual and organizational level, so they can be managed before they cause
harm. More than encouraging open reporting and learning from incidents, a Just
Culture is about managing behavioural choices, promoting organisational values
and beliefs, and ensuring fair and consistent treatment of all employees. The four
areas of focus within the framework of Just Culture are:
a. Create a Learning Culture.
b. Create an Open and Fair Culture.
c. Design Safe Systems.
d. Manage Behavioural Choices.

2.4.1 Just Culture Policy

Jetstar Asia recognises:


 Management and employees share accountability and responsibility for their
behavioural choices in line with Jetstar Asia’s values.

Revision 9 Safety Management System Manual 18 June 2012


2-2

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 2
Jetstar Asia Policy, Objectives & Safety Goals

 Every employee is encouraged to continuously evaluate the risks inherent in


their behavioural choices and not to causing unjustified risks or harm to oneself
of others.
 Managers must recognize that human error will occur and must be managed.
Blame and disciplinary actions for isolated incidents of unintentional errors are
counterproductive.
 Risks and unintentional errors can be reported without fear of disciplinary
actions. Staff who identify a risk or are involved in safety occurrences or near
misses have a duty to report. In principle, under the non-punitive open
reporting policy, those who open-report unintentional errors shall not face
reprisal, unless (i) such act is against the laws or regulations under the
jurisdiction within which the act is committed; (ii) such occurrence has been
caused by gross negligence.
 The organisation must learn from mistakes and share this learning in a manner
that supports system design and continued safe behaviours.
 Learning from incidents must consider the need to design systems which
anticipate human error and support safe behavioural choices.
 An effective investigation process seeks to identify the cause of human errors
and ‘at risk’ behaviours to prevent them from re-occurring.
 The organisation sets clear boundaries for the consistent application of
behavioural management processes which applies an objective standard for
decision making based on Just Culture principles.
 An employee who has committed a series of human errors or ‘at risk’
behaviour, whose cause does not originate within the system, may be subject
to disciplinary action in accordance with the Jetstar Asia human resources
policy when remedial action effective in changing behaviour.
 Reckless behaviours are unacceptable behaviour and will not be tolerated.
Employees who engage in reckless behaviour, persistent breaches of company
standards, policies or procedures, or a deliberate failure to report will be
subject to disciplinary action in accordance with Jetstar Asia policy.

2.4.2 Just Culture Process

The detailed process for determining the correct ‘Just Culture’ action is contained
in the Just Culture Decision Tree for determining the culpability of unsafe acts.
Broadly, the process considers an employee’s duty from 5 perspectives:
1. Intended act: The first question in the decision tree relates to intention, and if
both actions and consequences were intended, then it is possible criminal
behaviour which is likely to be dealt with outside of the company (such as
sabotage or malevolent damage).
2. Under the influence of alcohol or drugs known to impair performance at the
time that the error was committed: A distinction is made between substance
with and without “reasonable purpose (or Mitigation)”, which though is still
reprehensible, is not as blameworthy as taking drugs for recreational purposes.

18 June 2012 Safety Management System Manual Revision 9


2-3

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 2
Policy, Objectives & Safety Goals Jetstar Asia

3. In the case of deliberate violation of the rules, did the system promote the
violation or discourage the violation? Had the behaviour become automatic or
part of the local working practices?
4. Substitution test: Could a different person (well motivated, equally competent,
and comparatively qualified) have made the same error under similar
circumstances? If “yes” the person who made the error is probably not to
blame; if “no”, were there system-induced reasons (such as insufficient
training, selection, experience)? If not, then negligent behaviour should be
considered.
5. Repetitive errors: The final question asks whether the person has committed
unsafe acts in the past. This does not necessarily presume culpability but it
may imply that additional training or counselling is required.
Once an occurrence is processed via the Just Culture decision tree, there is a
determination of the behaviour category and suggested action to be taken.
In instances where there are repetitive Human Errors or ‘at-risk’ behaviours, further
actions are suggested.
In all cases where reckless behaviours or repetitive at-risk behaviours are evident,
it is the line manger’s responsibility to determine, in conjunction with the Safety
Department, whether a breach of Company policy and procedures has occurred
which requires the matter to be investigated.

2.4.3 The Just Culture Decision Tree

Revision 9 Safety Management System Manual 18 June 2012


2-4

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 2
Jetstar Asia Policy, Objectives & Safety Goals

2.5 Long Term Objectives


The long-term objective shall be to achieve the following:
 Continuous safe aircraft operations and transportation for operational crew
members and passengers respectively; and
 Quantitative objectives in terms of injuries and reportable incidents at a rate to
be determined, equal to or better than industry standard.
 Maintain a hazard identification and risk assessment program.

2.6 Short Term Objectives


The short-term objectives shall be to achieve the following:
 Constant and consistent evaluation of threats, mitigation of risks within both the
internal and external operational environments that are assessed as likely to
affect safe aircraft operations;
 Safe operations and air transportation for operational crew members and
passengers respectively; and
 Quantitative objectives in terms of injuries and reportable incidents at a rate to
be determined, equal to or better than industry standard.
 Follow the current risk management program.

18 June 2012 Safety Management System Manual Revision 9


2-5

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 2
Policy, Objectives & Safety Goals Jetstar Asia

Intentionally blank

Revision 9 Safety Management System Manual 18 June 2012


2-6

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 3 – Roles & Responsibilities
Jetstar Asia Table of Contents

3. Roles and Responsibilities .................................................................... 3-1


3.1 Safety, QA & Security Department ............................................................................ 3-1
3.2 Organisation Chart ...................................................................................................... 3-2
3.3 Responsibility .............................................................................................................. 3-3
3.3.1 CEO..................................................................................................................... 3-3
3.3.2 Head of Safety, QA & Security ......................................................................... 3-4
3.3.3 Manager Safety.................................................................................................. 3-6
3.3.4 Head of Flying Operations ............................................................................... 3-7
3.3.5 Other Staff in Safety, QA & Security Department .......................................... 3-8
3.3.6 External Resources ........................................................................................... 3-8

03 January 2018 Safety Management System Manual Revision 19


3-i

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED



.

Intentionally blank

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 3
Jetstar Asia Roles & Responsibilities

3. Roles and Responsibilities

3.1 Safety, QA & Security Department


The primary role of the Safety, QA & Security Department is to provide
independent support and assistance to the CEO and senior management
team in monitoring and continuously improving the safety and environmental
health of the company. This function is designed to ensure safe, efficient and
expeditious operations in conformance with prescribed operational standards,
procedures and practices.
The Safety, QA & Security Department will be responsible for the introduction
of safety systems/programs and in conjunction with senior management, the
establishment of appropriate procedures and resources to manage those
programs. Standard operating procedures to be incorporated into the
Operations Manual suite addressing accident prevention and flight safety
programs are an ICAO and CAAS requirement and the implementation of
such programs is intended to produce positive safety benefits and outcomes.
The introduction of such a program is likely to lead to efficiencies flowing from
the necessary in-house and ongoing assessment of operating, maintenance
and airworthiness standards and operating procedures by pro-active analysis
of safety hazards and deficiencies.
The CEO shall ensure that all personnel involved in tasking by or for the
Safety, QA & Security Department have the required knowledge, skills and
experience to competently perform their prescribed duties as defined in the
following sections.
The Safety, QA & Security Department shall ensure that all management and
operational personnel have access to pertinent operational safety system
program information that allows them to carry out their tasks effectively and
safely.

18 July 2008 Safety Management System Manual Revision 0


3-1

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 3
Roles & Responsibilities Jetstar Asia

3.2 Organisation Chart


The chart below is provided to indicate the generic structure and reporting lines
of JSA’s Safety Organisation. For a detailed and updated organizational
structure of the Safety, QA & Security Department, please refer to JSA QMS
Manual.

Senior
Safety
Executive

QA
Executive

Revision 18 Safety Management System Manual 04 September 2017


3-2

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 3
Jetstar Asia Roles & Responsibilities

3.3 Responsibility

3.3.1 CEO

The Chief Executive Officer leads and directs all functions across the
company. The CEO has the freedom to act and make decisions on behalf of
the Board of Directors for all matters including safety and compliance.
The CEO is also designated as the Accountable Manager for Jetstar Asia’s
operations under the Air Operator Certificate Requirement. The CEO is
responsible and accountable for:
 Ensuring the implementation and maintenance of the safety management
system of the company;
 Ensuring operations are conducted in accordance with conditions and
restrictions of the Air Operator Certificate (AOC) and in compliance with
applicable regulations and standards of the operation;
 Ensuring in his authority that all operations, training and maintenance
activities under the AOC have adequate facilities and resources, as well as
suitable work environment, meeting safety and security requirements, and
in compliance with existing law and regulations;
 Ensuring that all persons performing functions relevant to the safety or
security of aircraft operations have the essential qualifications, training,
knowledge and skills required for the job;
 Establishing and monitoring the effectiveness of the safety management
system, including safety policy, objectives and planning, and safety
management reviews;
 Specify roles, responsibilities and accountabilities of the management and
executive staff;
 Providing leadership by example in identifying safety hazards and pro-
actively pursuing solutions to maintain a safe working environment;
 Ensuring all direct reports understand their safety responsibilities and
manage employee performance to meet relevant safety responsibilities;
 Maintaining and promoting an open safety culture conducive for the free
flow of safety information; and
 Complying with workplace safety.
In accordance with the AOCR, the CEO nominates the following person to
discharge, on behalf of Jetstar Asia, the duties and responsibilities as
stipulated in the Air Navigation Order (ANO), AOCR, as well as other relevant
national and international aviation regulations:
 Head of Flight Operations
 Head of Engineering and Maintenance
 Chief Pilot
 Head of Safety QA & Security

04 September 2017 Safety Management System Manual Revision 18


3-3

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 3
Roles & Responsibilities Jetstar Asia

 Head of Ground Operations


 Manager Training
 Manager Quality Engineering

3.3.2 Head of Safety, QA & Security


Role
 Assist the CEO in monitoring and continuously improving the operational
safety and compliance performance of the airline.
 Maintain and administer the Safety Management System.
Responsibility
Act as Head of Safety, QA & Security as required by CAAS. Responsible to
the CEO for developing, implementing and monitoring the airline’s safety
management, accident prevention and flight safety programs.
Functions
The Head of Safety, QA & Security is responsible to the CEO for the following:
 Providing information, advice and direct feedback on material flight safety
matters to the CEO;
 Developing, implementing and monitoring the airline’s safety management,
accident prevention and flight safety programs;
 Ensuring that all persons performing functions relevant to the safety or
security of aircraft operations have the requisite qualifications, training,
knowledge and skills required for the job.
 Developing, implementing and maintaining the Safety Management
System in all areas of the organisation and ensuring its performance in
accordance with specified requirements, in addition to making sure that all
employees are familiar with this Manual and comply with the same;
 Ensuring the updating and continuous improvement of the Safety
Management System;
 Establishing a Quality Assurance System to monitor compliance with the
airline procedures required to ensure safe operational practices and
airworthiness of the aircraft;
 Maintaining a reporting system which provides for a timely and free flow of
safety-related information;
 Maintaining the air safety occurrence reporting database;
 Monitoring corrective actions and flight safety trends;
 Co-ordinating with CAAS Mandatory Occurrence Reporting requirements;
 Soliciting and processing safety improvements suggestions; developing
and maintaining a safety awareness programme;
 Liaising with the heads of all departments company-wide on flight safety
matters;

Revision 17 Safety Management System Manual 08 February 2016


3-4

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 3
Jetstar Asia Roles & Responsibilities

 Acting as Chairman of the Management Safety and Security Committee,


arranging its meetings and keeping records of such meetings;
 Disseminating flight safety-related information company-wide;
 Maintaining an open liaison with manufacturers’ customer flight safety
departments, government regulatory bodies and other flight safety
organisations;
 Assisting with the investigation of accidents and conducting and
coordinating investigations into incidents;
 Carrying out safety audits and inspections;
 Maintaining familiarity with all aspects of the Company’s activities and its
personnel;
 Reviewing and evaluating adequacy of the emergency response plan
(ERP);
 Managing or maintaining oversight of the Flight Data Analysis Program
(FDAP);
 Participating in corporate strategic planning as appropriate;
 Maintaining regulatory compliance with CAAS flight operations and
engineering requirements through a progressive audit programme;
 Overseeing the security aspects of air operations;
 Maintaining the currency and accuracy of the Quality Management System
Manual; and
 Managing the Safety, Security and QA annual budget.
Qualifications and Training
The Head of Safety, QA & Security should hold an ATPL and appropriate
ratings for at least one of the aircraft used by the operator, or he/she should
have experience working in an airline or equivalent organisation on aviation
safety in a similar capacity. The suggested minimum attributes and
qualifications required for a Head of Safety, QA & Security are as follows:
 A broad aviation/technical education;
 A sound knowledge of commercial operations, in particular flight
operations procedures and activities;
 Experience as a flight crew member or engineer;
 Clear expression in writing;
 Good presentation and interpersonal skills;
 Computer literacy;
 Ability to communicate at all levels, both inside and outside the Company;
 Organisational ability;
 Capable of working alone;
 Good analytical skills;

08 February 2016 Safety Management System Manual Revision 17


3-5

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 3
Roles & Responsibilities Jetstar Asia

 Ability to exhibit leadership and an authoritative approach; and


 Be worthy of commanding respect among peers and management
officials.
The Head of Safety, QA & Security would be expected to become familiar with
all aspects of the AOC holder’s organisation, activities and personnel. This will
be achieved in part by in-house induction training but such knowledge is best
supplemented by self-education and research.
In-company training in basic computer skills such as word-processing,
database management and spreadsheets should be undertaken. A Head of
Safety, QA & Security if appointed from an engineering background should be
given a condensed ground school and full-flight simulator course which
teaches the basics of aircraft handling, navigation and the use of aeronautical
charts.
External training at the very least should cover the management of the flight
safety program and basic accident investigation and crisis management.
Minimum training should consist of courses of instruction in basic air safety
management and air accident investigation.
Authority
Reports directly to the CEO and has responsibility for developing robust safety
and quality systems within Jetstar Asia. Also responsible for identifying and
reporting on operational hazards and risks to the company. To effectively
manage the flight safety program, the Head of Safety, QA & Security must
have access to all departments at all levels.

3.3.3 Manager Safety

 Reports to Head of Safety, QA & Security.


 Position Summary - Responsible for implementing and monitoring the
airline’s safety management, accident prevention and flight safety
programs to ensure compliance with AOCR or applicable regulations and
company standards.
 Responsibilities and Accountabilities – Decision making and Working
Relationships:
1. Maintain the established safety reporting system which provides for a
timely and free flow of safety-related information;
2. Provide timely information on flight safety matters to Head of Safety for
resolution;
3. Ensure that all employees are familiar with the Safety Management
System Manual and ensure manual is updated timely;
4. Maintain the air safety occurrence reporting database and manage the
Flight Data Analysis Program (FDAP);
5. Monitor corrective actions and flight safety trends;
6. Co-ordinate with CAAS and TSIB and ensure compliance with the
Mandatory Occurrence Reporting requirements;

Revision 19 Safety Management System Manual 03 January 2018


3-6

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 3
Jetstar Asia Roles & Responsibilities

7. Process safety improvements suggestions;


8. Develop and maintain a safety awareness programme;
9. Act as secretary to the Management Safety Committee and Board
Safety Committee, arranging its meetings and keeping records of such
meetings;
10. Disseminate flight safety-related information company-wide;
11. Assist with the investigation of accidents and conducting and co-
ordinating investigations into incidents;
12. Carry out safety audits and inspections;
13. Maintain the Safety Management System;
14. Publish the quarterly Safety Newsletter (both Pilots and Cabin Crew);
15. Review and evaluate the adequacy of the corporate emergency
response plan (ERP); and
16. Ensure communication and coordination with appropriate operational
managers throughout the company.
 Person Specifications - Knowledge, Skills and Experience:
1. Ability to work successfully in a team environment;
2. Interpersonal and communication skills;
3. Possess high levels of judgment;
4. Well-organised and great attention to detail;
5. Ability to influence the thinking of others;
6. Commitment to delivery of company’s service standards;
7. Tertiary qualification preferred;
8. Extensive application of ICAO and CAAS requirements to maintain
AOC; and
9. Extensive experience in flying operations.

3.3.4 Head of Flying Operations

The detailed description of the roles and responsibilities for the Head of Flying
Operations is promulgated in the Quality Management System (QMS) Manual.
Where safety is concerned, the Head of Flying Operations is vested with the
authority, delegated by the CEO, to make management decisions which may
have ramifications on the safety and/or security of aircraft operation. Such
decisions are made with the professional advice of the Chief Pilots or his
delegate, in consultation with the Safety QA and Security Department, and
guided by all relevant regulatory requirements and existing laws and
regulations. All major decisions affecting safety and/or security of aircraft
operations should be deliberated at the Management Safety & Security
Committee Meeting. At the operator level, aircraft commanders are delegated
with the responsibility and authority to make day-to-day operational decisions

03 January 2018 Safety Management System Manual Revision 19


3-7

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 3
Roles & Responsibilities Jetstar Asia

based on the OM in accordance with the relevant orders, laws and


regulations.

3.3.5 Other Staff in Safety, QA & Security Department

Refer to the Quality Management System Manual (QMS) as well as the Job
Description Manual for the description of roles and responsibilities of the other
staff members in the Safety, QA & Security Department.

3.3.6 External Resources

External contractors and technical subject matter experts may be


seconded as required by the Head of Safety, QA & Security. This will
occur when audit requirements cannot be satisfied or addressed by the
existing personnel within the Safety, QA & Security Department.

Revision 19 Safety Management System Manual 03 January 2018


3-8

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 4 – Safety Reporting
Jetstar Asia Table of Contents

4. Safety Reporting ..................................................................................... 4-1


4.1 Non Punitive Open Reporting Policy......................................................................... 4-1
4.2 Reporting Forms and Process ................................................................................... 4-2
4.2.1 Reporting Forms ............................................................................................... 4-2
4.2.2 Samples of Reporting Forms ........................................................................... 4-2
4.2.3 Safety Reporting – Air Crew Process ............................................................. 4-2
4.3 Mandatory Reports to Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS) and
Transport Safety Investigation Bureau (TSIB) ......................................................... 4-5
4.4 Definitions of Accident or Serious Incident ............................................................. 4-8
4.5 Safety Reports Required by Jetstar Asia ................................................................ 4-13
4.6 Special Reporting Requirements ............................................................................. 4-18
4.7 Hazard Reporting Procedures .................................................................................. 4-19
4.8 Processing Safety and Quality Reports .................................................................. 4-21
4.8.1 Processing of an Occurrence Report – Pilot (SMS001) Which Needs to be
Reported to CAAS/TSIB.................................................................................. 4-21
4.8.2 Processing of Other Reports ......................................................................... 4-22
4.9 Reporting of High Risk Occurrences or Accidents to the Board Safety and
Security Committee (BSSC) Members) ................................................................... 4-22

03 January 2018 Safety Management System Manual Revision 19


4-i

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Intentionally blank

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 4
Jetstar Asia Safety Reporting

4. Safety Reporting

4.1 Non Punitive Open Reporting Policy


The principal objective of open safety reporting is to identify deficiencies in our
systems in order to prevent incidents and accidents. A positive safety culture
relies on the ability of employees to freely report incidents, accidents and
errors without fear of retribution.
The company accords confidentiality and anonymity for reporter of
occurrences, safety hazards and/or concerns, to the extent possible under the
existing laws and regulations. In handling any such reports or feedback, effort
will be made in de-identifying the identity of the reporter by means of blocking
or removing the name and other identifying data that will reveal the identity of
the reporter, unless such information is required for the conduct of full-scale
investigation by the company or by the regulators.
Effective safety reporting relies on the commitment of all employees and their
willingness to learn and participate in the continuous improvement of the
Jetstar Asia safety culture.
The policy supports company and regulatory reporting requirements for all
incidents and risk exposures that may pose a hazard to Jetstar Asia
employees, customers or operations.
A comprehensive open reporting process is a fundamental element of safety
management at Jetstar Asia. It is recognised that human error will occur and
must be managed.
Staff have a duty of care to report all safety issues through the designated
channels. This includes staff who observe, identify, or are involved in safety
occurrences. Employees who report unintentional errors will not suffer
retribution or disciplinary action.
For the effective use of Crew Resource Management (CRM) as an error
countermeasure, the nature and sources of error within the operational
environment must be identified and understood. This relies heavily on flight
and cabin crew reporting any situation or condition that has the potential to
affect safety. Jetstar Asia has an “open and honest” reporting policy that will
be applied in these instances.
Safety issues raised in reports may still need to be addressed on the spot,
directly with the person(s) involved. Good CRM and communications are an
important part of directly addressing these safety issues and errors. In these
situations, tact and diplomacy will often be required to ensure both a positive
learning experience and a positive safety outcome.
This policy is issued under the authority of the Jetstar Asia Safety, QA &
Security Department.

09 October 2014 Safety Management System Manual Revision 15


4-1

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 4
Safety Reporting Jetstar Asia

4.2 Reporting Forms and Process

4.2.1 Reporting Forms

The following forms can be used to report safety and quality issues.
These are:
 Operational Safety and Company Advisory Report (OSCAR) – Form
SMS001, which is required for reporting any accident, incident, hazards
and concerns. This report is used to fulfil mandatory reporting to CAAS.
Completed SMS001 forms are to be submitted to JSA SSQA Department.
 Change Control Form – Form SMS002, which is required whenever
change proposals are tabled at Change Management Committee
meetings.
 Special Air Report of Volcanic Activity – Form SMS003, which is required
where an aircraft observes volcanic activity in flight. This report is used to
fulfil mandatory reporting to CAAS. Completed SMS003 forms are to be
transmitted to the Singapore Met Office.

4.2.2 Samples of Reporting Forms

Samples of the above forms are contained in Chapter 16 of this manual.

4.2.3 Safety Reporting – Air Crew Process

The following flowcharts outline the process to be used by air crew


members to report safety and quality issues.

Revision 19 Safety Management System Manual 03 January 2018


4-2

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 4
Jetstar Asia Safety Reporting

Accident/Serious Incident Reporting


Event which meets definition
of Accident or Serious Incident
OM (A) 11.3

Complete SMS001

Advise Duty Captain

Submit or Fax to
JSA OCC

Immediately phone to
confirm receipt

Has Jetstar
Yes
Management
advised CAAS, TSIB
(and for accident in
Singapore, the
police)?

No

Phone TSIB
(65) 98262359

Fax SMS001 to CAAS


(65) 6545 7615

For accident in Singapore,


notify the police

End

04 September 2017 Safety Management System Manual Revision 18


4-3

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 4
Safety Reporting Jetstar Asia

Reporting of Other Safety Occurrences


Event

Meet definition of Yes Refer to Accident /


Accident or Serious Serious Incident
Incident OM (A) Reporting flow
11.3 chart

No

Described in OM (A) No
11.5 or Aircraft ACR at Aircraft
Commander considers Commander’s
it a safety issue discretion

Yes

Complete SMS001

Are there any additional Yes


reporting requirements Refer to OM (A)
e.g. volcanic, ATS, 11.5 & 11.6
birdstrike?

No

Yes
Need to contact Duty
Contact Duty
Captain.
Captain
Refer to OM (A) 11.5

No

Submit or Fax to
JSA OCC

Contact Safety &


No QA Dept or Jetstar
Report
FLTOPS Mgt to
acknowledged in
confirm
24 hours

End

Revision 18 Safety Management System Manual 04 September 2017


4-4

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 4
Jetstar Asia Safety Reporting

4.3 Mandatory Reports to Civil Aviation Authority of


Singapore (CAAS) and Transport Safety Investigation Bureau
(TSIB)
In the event of an accident or serious incident (as defined in section 4.4 of this
chapter), the Aircraft Commander must complete a SMS001. It is a
requirement that CAAS and TSIB are notified as soon as reasonably
practicable. The Aircraft Commander will follow the following procedure:
 Complete a SMS001.
 Advise the Duty Captain.
 Submit or fax to JSA Ops Control Centre.
 Unless the Aircraft Commander can verify that CAAS and TSIB have been
notified by Jetstar Asia management, he/she must notify:
a. CAAS, by faxing the SMS001 to (65)65457615; and
b. TSIB, by calling the Duty Officer on (65)98262359.

NOTE
In the case of an accident occurring in Singapore,
there is a requirement to notify a police officer of the
accident and the place where it occurred.

1. Pursuant to paragraph 88 of the Air Navigation Order the Authority may


require reports regarding the airworthiness condition of an aircraft to be
made to him.
This Chapter prescribes the requirements for reporting the occurrence or
detection of defects, failures or malfunctions in an aircraft, its components or
equipment, which could jeopardise the safe operation of an aircraft or cause
it to become a danger to persons or property.
2. Reports shall, as applicable, be submitted by:
a. The holder of an Air Operator Certificate, or the owner or operator of the
aircraft, following the occurrence to their aircraft of a potentially
hazardous defect, failure or malfunction during any flight time period or
the detection of such problems during maintenance or other work on an
aircraft;
b. Approved persons or organisations who during maintenance or other
work become aware of serious or hazardous defects, failures or
malfunctions on aircraft, components or equipment;
c. The holder of an Air Operator Certificate in respect of each interruption to
a scheduled flight that resulted from a known or suspected defect, failure
or malfunction not classified as potentially hazardous; and
d. The holder of an Air Operator Certificate in the form of a periodical
summary of technical delays, systems defects, failures or malfunctions,
component premature removals, and investigations made by the holder
into important technical problems.

04 September 2017 Safety Management System Manual Revision 18


4-5

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 4
Safety Reporting Jetstar Asia

3. Potentially hazardous occurrences referred to in Paragraph 2(a) are defects,


failures or malfunctions of aircraft, components or equipment that result in:
a. Fire or operation of fire or smoke warning systems;
b. Significant leakage of fuel, oil or other fluid;
c. Smoke, vapour, toxic or noxious fumes inside the aircraft;
d. Malfunction, stiffness, slackness or reduced range of movement of any
controls;
e. Incorrect assembly of components, causing possible malfunction;
f. Engine malfunction resulting in partial loss of power, engine shutdown,
enroute diversion, or air, ramp turnback;
g. Failure or malfunction of the thrust reverser system;
h. Failure of a propeller feathering system to shut down an engine or to
control thrust;
i. Use of incorrect fuel, oil or other fluid;
j. Fuel system malfunction affecting fuel supply, distribution and jettison.
k. Fuel spillage on ground;
l. Significant failure or malfunction of electrical, instrument, hydraulic,
pneumatic, flight control, pressurisation or ice protection systems or of
the radio and navigation equipment;
m. On a multi-engine rotocraft, loss of drive of one engine;
n. Operation of any rotocraft transmission condition-warning system;
o. Failure of any required emergency equipment to operate or inadvertent
operation that causes a hazardous situation;
p. Failure of aircraft primary structure;
q. Cracks, permanent deformation or corrosion of aircraft structure or major
aircraft components that exceed specified limits, defects found as the
result of a mandatory inspection;
r. Structural damage resulting from any cause which requires any
permanent or temporary repair before the aircraft can fly;
s. Failure or malfunction of ground equipment used for testing/checking
aircraft systems or equipment; and
t. Any other occurrence that has jeopardised or may endanger the safe
operation of an aircraft, or cause a danger to persons or property.
4. Defects, failures or malfunctions shall be reported to the Authority in
accordance with the following:
a. Potentially hazardous occurrences specified in paragraph 3, within 24
hours of the occurrence or its detection or such other period approved to
the Authority; and
b. Statistical summaries of defects, failures, malfunctions and premature
removals of components and equipment, within a period acceptable to
the Authority.

Revision 7 Safety Management System Manual 11 March 2011


4-6

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 4
Jetstar Asia Safety Reporting

5. The reports shall be provided in an acceptable format, except that initial


report made in accordance with paragraph 4(a) may be telephoned to the
Airworthiness/ Flight Operations Division, Civil Aviation Authority of
Singapore provided a written report is submitted within 24 hours. Reports
shall include as much of the following data that is available at the time:
a. Aircraft type and registration marks;
b. Name of the operator or owner;
c. The date, flight number, and stage of the flight or the maintenance being
performed when the defect, failure or malfunction occurred or was
detected;
d. Any precautionary or emergency procedures used;
e. A description of the defect, failure or malfunction;
f. The identification of the component, equipment or system involved,
including the make, serial number and part number(s) of the major
component(s) involved;
g. The total time in service since new and/or overhaul and the time in
service since the last maintenance on the items involved;
h. The apparent cause of the occurrence;
i. The action taken to rectify the defect, failure or malfunction and any
action to preclude its recurrence;
j. Whether the aircraft was grounded; and
k. Other pertinent information necessary for more complete identification,
seriousness of the defect etc., corrective action taken etc.
6. Reports shall not be withheld because all the required information is not
available.
7. When all the pertinent data is not available or the cause of the occurrence
cannot be determined without further investigation, a supplementary report
shall be submitted detailing the missing data and any additional information
that becomes available since the initial report such as:
a. The total number of flights since new if a primary structural component is
affected;
b. Details of damage which indicates the pattern of sequence of failure; and
c. A brief summary of any pertinent data that could assist in identification or
determination of the seriousness, cause, associated effects of the
occurrence.

11 March 2011 Safety Management System Manual Revision 7


4-7

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 4
Safety Reporting Jetstar Asia

4.4 Definitions of Accident or Serious Incident


Accident
An occurrence associated with the operation of an aircraft which takes place
between the time any person boards the aircraft with the intention of flight until
such time as all such persons have disembarked, in which:
a. A person is fatality or serious injury as a result of
 being in the aircraft; or
 direct contact with any part of the aircraft, including parts which have
become detached from the aircraft; or
 direct exposure to jet blast
except where the injuries arise from natural causes, self-inflicted or
inflicted by other persons, or when the injures are to stowaways hiding
outside the areas normally available to passengers and crew; or
b. the aircraft sustains damage and/or structural failure which:
 adversely affects the structural strength, performance or flight
characteristics of the aircraft; and
 would normally require major repair or replacement of the affected
component, except for engine failure or damage when the damage is
limited to the engine, its cowlings or accessories; or for damage limited
to propellers, wing tips, antennas, tires, brakes, fairings, small dents or
puncture holes in the aircraft skin; or
c. the aircraft is missing* or completely inaccessible.

NOTE
An aircraft is considered missing when official search
has been terminated and the wreckage has not been
located.

NOTE
For statistical uniformity only, an injury resulting in
death within thirty days of the date of the accident
is classified as a fatal injury by ICAO.

NOTE
An aircraft is considered missing when the official
search has been terminated and the wreckage has not
been located.

Serious Incident
An incident involving circumstances indicating that an accident nearly
occurred.

Revision 7 Safety Management System Manual 11 March 2011


4-8

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 4
Jetstar Asia Safety Reporting

Incident
An occurrence, other than an accident, associated with the operation of an
aircraft which affects or could affect the safety of operation.
Reporting Time
The reporting period is classified into the two categories below:

A. IMMEDIATE NOTIFICATION

 Accident / Media Notify as soon as possible through phone


Sensitive Incident call
AND
SMS the "Time / Date / Flight Number /
Aircraft Registration/Accident Place / Brief
description"
to the following number:
Tel: 96604698 (A/FO Duty Officer)

B. INITIAL NOTIFICATION
(To complete Part 1 of CAAS Reporting Form)

 Accident Submit Part 1 of CAAS Reporting Form not


later than 3 hrs from immediate notification.
(Submission of Part 2 & 3 of Reporting Form is
required by AOC as soon as the case is
closed.)

 Serious Incident Submit Part 1 of CAAS Reporting Form within


12 hrs from time upon landing / discovery.
(Submission of Part 2 & 3 of Reporting Form is
required by AOC as soon as the case is
closed.)

 Incident Submit Part 1 of CAAS Reporting Form within


next working day from time upon landing /
discovery.
(Submission of Part 2 & 3 of Reporting Form is
NOT required by AOC unless requested.)

11 March 2011 Safety Management System Manual Revision 7


4-9

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 4
Safety Reporting Jetstar Asia

LIST OF REPORTABLE (exclude aircraft under maintenance)


ACCIDENT (refer to ICAO definition below)

1 Death or serious injury to a person

2 Aircraft sustains structural damage or structural failure

3 The aircraft is missing or completely inaccessible

4 Collision

SERIOUS ACCIDENT (refer to ICAO definition below)

5 Near Collision

Serious incidents that occur during critical phases of flight such as


Takeoff or Landing that may have high potential of causing accidents.
Examples of these incidents, but not restricted to the list, are reflected
below:
 Under shooting
 Over running
6
 Incursion
 Excursion
 Aborted take-offs on a closed or engaged runway
 Take-offs from a closed or engaged runway with marginal
separation from obstacle(s)
 Landings or attempted landings on a closed or engaged runway)

7 Controlled Flight into Terrain (CFIT) only marginally avoided

Difficulties in controlling the aircraft due to (i) Weather phenomena, (ii)


8 operations outside the approved flight envelope or (iii) other
occurrences

9 Flight Crew incapacitation that impact flight operations

10 Evacuation of crew and passenger

Fires and smoke even though such fires were extinguished by the use of
11
extinguishing agents

12 Events requiring the emergency use of oxygen by the flight crew

Gross Failures to achieve predicted performance during takeoff or initial


13
climb

14 Emergency declared (PAN, MAYDAY) due to system malfunctions

Revision 7 Safety Management System Manual 11 March 2011


4-10

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 4
Jetstar Asia Safety Reporting

LIST OF REPORTABLE (exclude aircraft under maintenance)


ACCIDENT (refer to ICAO definition below)

Failure of aircraft primary structure (i.e. airframe failure) or engine


disintegration not classified as an accident (e.g. any occurrences including
15
significant damage to aircraft or engine; internal or external part of the
aircraft or engine becomes detached

16 An engine malfunction requiring or resulting shutdown of an engine in flight

Failures of more than one system in a redundancy system mandatory for


17 flight guidance and navigation requiring backup system for the completion
of flight (exclude systems that can be dispatch under MEL)

18 Violation of Singapore's Air Navigation Order, AOCR and SAR

INCIDENT (refer to ICAO definition below)

19 TCAS (RA) Warning

Fires and smoke even though such fires were extinguished by other
20
means other than extinguishing agents

21 Activation of (E)GPWS

22 Hard Landing as confirmed by the operators

23 Windshear requiring pilot to initiate recovery action

24 Activation of stall warning or Stick shaker

ATC related
25 (e.g. poor communication, lost communication, misinterpretation by
flight crew member of information, instructions, etc.)

Unintentional deviation of airspeed, intended track or altitude


26 deviation that resulted in the activation of 'altitude deviation'
notification and that does not result in any conflict with another aircraft

27 Lightening strike or Birdstrike

Cabin crew incapacitation that render him/her unable to perform


28
critical safety duties

29 High (abnormal) aircraft or engine vibration

30 Blown tyre / Wheel failure

31 Aircraft damaged due to foreign objects

Use of incorrect fuel (include under fuel, contaminated fuel), oil or other
32
fluid

11 March 2011 Safety Management System Manual Revision 7


4-11

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 4
Safety Reporting Jetstar Asia

LIST OF REPORTABLE (exclude aircraft under maintenance)


ACCIDENT (refer to ICAO definition below)

Loading or load sheet error that does not result gross failures for the
33
aircraft to achieve the predicted performance during take-off or climb

34 Significant spillage or leakage of oil, fuel, dangerous goods or other fluid

When the safety of the aircraft or passenger is jeopardized by an


35
occurrence related to the transport or the loading of Dangerous Goods

The carriage of dangerous goods that does not conform to the legislation
36
and regulations

Any other occurrence that has jeopardised or may endanger the safe
37
operation of an aircraft, or cause a danger to persons or property

Media Sensitive Event (Safety & Security related)


Examples:
 Bomb threat or hijack or similar threats
 Security breaches / stowaway
38  Severe turbulence encounter resulting in injury to passengers or
crew
 Air turn-back
 Diversion
 Reject Takeoff

Revision 16 Safety Management System Manual 08 July 2015


4-12

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 4
Jetstar Asia Safety Reporting

4.5 Safety Reports Required by Jetstar Asia

The following events are included as examples of occurrences that need to be


reported to Jetstar Asia Safety, QA & Security Department. This list is not
exhaustive and any event that affects or could affect the safety of the aircraft
or subsequent services must be reported using a SMS001. The events are as
follows:
 The use of any procedure for overcoming an emergency;
 System malfunctions and partial systems malfunctions, including;
a. Hydraulic systems failure, including all failures which require
emergency systems for lowering the landing gear;
b. Landing gear system, brake system, tyre or wheel failure and/or
malfunctions;
c. Flight control system defects;
d. Failure or significant malfunction of pneumatic, pressurisation or ice
protection systems; and
e. Failure or significant malfunction of electrical, avionics, navigation,
communication or other systems;
 Engine failure/malfunctions;
 Structural defects;
 Aircraft control problems, including aircraft handling difficulties, excessive
pitch attitude, aircraft trim problems, uncommanded roll, or uncommanded
turn;
 Unintentional and significant loss of airspeed or deviation from intended
track or altitude;
 Stall or stall warning;
 Rejected takeoff or air – turn back caused by a technical reason;
 An aircraft does not land at its planned destination due to technical
deficiency, including fuel shortage;
 Any fuel related safety occurrence including when fuel quantity does not
comply with fuel policy, fuel is contaminated, incorrect fuel quantity loaded,
or low fuel quantity;
 Engine power loss or aircraft not meeting performance expectations;
 Arrival of aircraft with an open service panel;
 Suspected electronic interference;
 Bird or animal strikes; and
 Near bird strike or near animal strike.
Operational Occurrences
 All Ground Proximity Warning System (GPWS) warnings and alerts;

03 January 2018 Safety Management System Manual Revision 19


4-13

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 4
Safety Reporting Jetstar Asia

 Human performance deficiencies such as incorrect or inadvertent


operation of controls or systems or non-compliance with ATC instructions,
etc.; and
 Exceedances of an operational limitation including those applicable to he
airframe, flaps and engines;

NOTE
A Technical Log entry must also be made providing
the best estimation of the exceedance.

 Diversion – aircraft does not land at its planned destination due to (but not
limited to):
a. Airport closure (including curfew);
b. Medical emergency; and
c. Unforecast weather;
 An approach is discontinued from below decision height including any
missed approach caused by wind speed, ATC requirement, obstructed
runway, windshear, or wake turbulence;
 Emergency equipment or procedures are used (intentionally or
inadvertently), or when an emergency is declared;
 Ground facilities or services fail, are not available or are inadequate,
including coverage or range problems, calibration deficiency, readability
deficiency, or interference causing substantial degradation of operating
standards (including navaids, aerodromes, met facilities, etc.);
 Ground contact during landing or takeoff, including tail strike/over rotation
and pod or wing strike;
 Landing events which could affect safety, including long landing, off
centreline, and hard landing;
 Warning or alert, including flight control warnings, door warnings, stall
warning (stick shaker), fire/smoke/fumes warning;
 A crew member becomes incapacitated for any reason;
 Taxiway excursion; and
 Aircraft charts or operational documents incorrect or out-of-date.
Airspace/ATS Occurrences
 Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) alerts:
a. all Resolution Advisories (RA); and
b. all Traffic Alerts (TA), which involve a breakdown in separation;
 Known or suspected separation breakdown or near collision with another
aircraft, a vehicle, or balloon/kite/model aeroplane;

Revision 16 Safety Management System Manual 08 July 2015


4-14

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 4
Jetstar Asia Safety Reporting

 Flight crew must report all flight level deviations of 300’ or more from the
aircraft’s assigned cruise level, irrespective of the cause of the deviation,
including those due to TCAS, turbulence and contingency events;
 ATS deficiency involving ATS coordination deficiency, ATS flight
information deficiency, ATS clearance/instruction deficiency, and ATS
flight planning system deficiency;
 Failure to comply with clearances involving Standard Terminal Arrival
Route (STAR), Standard Instrument Departure (SID), instructions, or non-
controlled airspace procedures;
 Centreline infringement - parallel runway operations;
 Tracking deviation;
 Takeoff or landing without clearance;
 Reduced Vertical Separation Minima (RVSM) airspace incident;
 Runway incursion;
 Wake turbulence; and
 Violation of controlled airspace.
NOTE
An initial report must be made as outlined in AIP ENR
1.14. CAAS Air Traffic Incident Report Form is also
required. This form is held in the multifile.

Weather Related
 Severe turbulence encounter;

NOTE
Refer to 11.6 of the OM (A) for special instructions
concerning turbulence reporting.

 Severe windshear encounter;


 Lightning strike;
 Diversion – aircraft does not land at its planned destination due to
unforecast weather; and
 Forecast deficiency including unforecast weather, inaccurate forecasts,
and Automatic Terminal Information Service (ATIS) deficiencies.
Ground Safety Occurrences
 Significant spillage of fuel, leak of fuel, oil or other fluid from an aircraft
system when on apron;
 Collisions on ground including collisions between aircraft and equipment,
including aerobridge, catering vehicles, mobile stairs, or loading vehicles;

08 July 2015 Safety Management System Manual Revision 16


4-15

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 4
Safety Reporting Jetstar Asia

 Near collision/conflict on ground, including near collisions between aircraft


and buildings/fixtures, vehicles, equipment, or taxi conflicts causing near
collision with another aircraft;
 Potential conflict between people and aircraft on ground, including aircraft
approached by a person during start-up, breach of equipment limit line,
and jet blast;
 Foreign Object Damage (FOD) on runway, taxiway, or apron;
 Pushback deficiency, including deficiencies involving pushback
procedures, pushback communications, pushback clearance, and
occurrences of the tug disconnecting during pushback; and
 Nose in guidance system deficiency.
Loading Occurrences
 Unrestrained cargo;
 Cargo restraint deficiency;
 Container lock deficiency;
 Load sheet or loading error;
 Incorrect loading; and
 Fumes or leakage from, or damage caused by, cargo or baggage.
Dangerous Goods
 Carriage of undeclared dangerous goods; and
 Spills or leakage from dangerous goods.
Cabin Safety
 Cabin crew standing for landing/takeoff;
 Door related occurrence, including door armed during transit, door opened
in armed mode, and passenger interference with door;
 Unlawful interference;
 Injury or potential injury to persons, including injuries from
unrestrained/loose objects or equipment, during turbulence, during abrupt
manoeuvres, from being struck by a cart, or struck by luggage from
overhead bin;
 Medically hazardous materials or dangerous goods found in the cabin; and
Cabin baggage incident.
Security
 Prohibited Items – Guns / Bullets, Knife / Blades, Sharp Objects;
 Intoxicated, violent (verbal or physical) or disruptive passengers, including
passengers smoking, sexual behaviour, and passengers not complying
with instructions;
 Pax aboard wrong aircraft;
 Pax failed to board aircraft;

Revision 16 Safety Management System Manual 08 July 2015


4-16

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 4
Jetstar Asia Safety Reporting

 Suspicious package;
 Airfield security;
 Act of Violence;
 Theft;
 Unauthorised / Unlawful access;
 Bomb Threat / Warning; and
 Sabotage.
Other
 Volcanic encounter;
NOTE
Refer to 11.6 of the OM (A) on special instructions for
Special Air Report of Volcanic Activity.

Submitting Safety and Quality Reports


All reports should be submitted to JSA Ops Control Centre. If time is critical,
they can be faxed. When submitting a report that is a mandatory report to
CAAS/TSIB, the Duty Captain must be advised. For other reports, the Duty
Captain may be advised at the Aircraft Commander’s discretion. The Duty
Captain should be advised when the event is likely to:
 Require a prompt response from management;
 Present a threat to the public image of Jetstar Asia; or
 Generate a public expectation for Jetstar Asia to respond.
If a confirmation of receipt of the Safety Report is not received within 24 hours,
the Aircraft Commander must contact the Safety, QA & Security Department
to confirm receipt.
When received, Safety Reports are entered into a database and are then used
to investigate the circumstances surrounding incidents with a view to
establishing the significant contributing factors, and for monitoring statistical
safety trends over time and across fleets, ports operational conditions, etc.

04 September 2017 Safety Management System Manual Revision 18


4-17

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 4
Safety Reporting Jetstar Asia

4.6 Special Reporting Requirements

Suspected Electronic Interference Reporting


Avionic/flight instrument irregularities, which may be attributed to a passenger
operated electronic device, require a Technical Log entry, giving full details of
the occurrence, and the submission of a SMS001.
The following details should be included:
 Device name, manufacturer, model number and serial number;
 Passenger details (using the Pax Details section);
 Aircraft latitude and longitude, or VOR/DME radial/distance at time of
interference; and
 Full details of the irregularities.
In addition to the existing Technical Log and Safety Reporting requirements, if
operationally acceptable, flight crew should attempt to identify the interference
source, by positively asking the passenger to turn the device on again to
establish if the symptoms reoccur. If a link is confirmed, device and passenger
details are to be included in the Safety Report.
Incidents of this nature are not considered ‘electronic interference’ until an
Engineering inspection has deemed the aircraft to be serviceable. In accepting
an aircraft with this entry, maintenance action should then reflect that
appropriate systems checks have been performed.
Turbulence Reporting
If severe turbulence is encountered, a SMS001 should be raised and a
Technical Log entry made.
Severe turbulence must be reported to ATC giving position, time (UTC), flight
level/altitude, aircraft type, intensity, in or near cloud and duration: Levels of
turbulence are defined as follows:
 Light
Conditions less than moderate turbulence. Changes in accelerometer
readings less than 0.5g at the aircraft’s centre of gravity.
 Moderate
Conditions in which moderate changes in aircraft attitude and/or altitude may
occur but the aircraft remains in positive control at all times.
Usually, small variations in airspeed. Changes in accelerometer readings of
0.5g to 1.0g at the aircraft’s centre of gravity. Difficulty in walking. Occupants
feel strain against seat belts. Loose objects move about.
 Severe
Conditions in which abrupt changes in aircraft attitude and/or altitude occur;
aircraft may be out of control for short periods. Usually, large variations in
airspeed. Changes in accelerometer readings greater than 1.0g at the
aircraft’s centre of gravity. Occupants are forced violently against seat belts.
Loose objects are tossed about.

Revision 16 Safety Management System Manual 08 July 2015


4-18

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 4
Jetstar Asia Safety Reporting

NOTE
High-level turbulence (normally above 15,000 feet
ASL) not associated with cumuliform cloud, including
thunderstorms, should be reported as Clear Air
Turbulence (CAT) preceded by the appropriate
intensity, or light or moderate chop.

Flight in Icing Conditions


If prolonged flight in moderate or severe icing conditions has taken place, a
Technical Log entry must be made indicating the conditions and duration of
exposure.
The following describes how to report icing conditions:
 Light
Conditions less than moderate icing.
 Moderate
Conditions in which change of heading and/or altitude may be considered
desirable.
 Severe
Conditions in which immediate change of heading and / or altitude is
considered essential.
Special Air Report of Volcanic Activity (CSM003)
A Special Air-Report (AIREP) shall be transmitted and a Special Air Report of
Volcanic Activity shall be completed whenever:
 Pre-eruption volcanic activity or volcanic eruptions are observed; and
 Volcanic ash cloud is observed or encountered.
Upon arrival at the destination, the completed form should be transmitted to
Jetstar Asia Flight Dispatch or JSA Ops Control Centre by the fastest means
available. Ops Control Centre will forward the report to Singapore Met Office
by fax (65425026) without delay.

4.7 Hazard Reporting Procedures


The Safety Report is also used to report situations or conditions which may
represent a hazard. Alternatively, the report can be used to identify good
safety examples, which can be applied elsewhere. These reports are used by
Jetstar Asia Safety, QA & Security Department to identify hazards so they can
be controlled or eliminated before they result in a safety incident or accident.
Any safety hazard can be reported using a Safety Report. Anyone can
complete a Safety Report, including all air crew and support personnel. Safety
Reports are used for safety trend monitoring, and may be investigated or
forwarded to a third party for investigation. When the Safety Report is
received, it is entered into the database. Once entered, information is
forwarded to affected managers, and an acknowledgment sent to the reporter.

08 July 2015 Safety Management System Manual Revision 16


4-19

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 4
Safety Reporting Jetstar Asia

The Safety Report forms are available in a number of ways:


 In crew lounges and sign-on counters;
 In the multifile;
 On the intranet site; and
 The samples of the reporting forms can be found in Chapter 16 of this
manual.
 Additional copies are available from Jetstar Asia Safety, QA & Security
Department.
Safety Reports are to be sent to Jetstar Asia Safety, QA & Security
Department either by submitting or faxing to JSA Ops Control Centre. Where
confidentiality is required, the Safety Report should be placed in a sealed
envelope marked “CONFIDENTIAL” and addressed to Jetstar Asia Safety, QA
& Security Department.
Safety Reports Related to a Flight
As a general rule, all air crew members have a responsibility to bring any
issue, which affects or could affect the safety of a flight to the attention of the
Aircraft Commander. If a crew member wishes to file a Safety Report, which is
concerned with the safety of a particular flight, it is a requirement to make the
Aircraft Commander aware of the issue at the same time. This could be done
by:
 Verbally raising the issue with the Aircraft Commander and asking that a
Safety Report be submitted;
 Completing a Safety Report and passing to the Aircraft Commander for
forwarding to the Jetstar Asia Safety, QA & Security Department; or
 Completing a Safety Report and providing the Aircraft Commander with a
copy.
In the first two cases, it is the responsibility of the Aircraft Commander to
ensure that the Safety Report is passed on to the Jetstar Asia Safety, QA &
Security Department. If the Aircraft Commander does not agree that the issue
is in fact an operational safety issue or has a different view of what happened,
that should be indicated on the form itself, in a covering note or some other
form of communication. The Safety Report completed by the Air Crew member
must not be changed.
If the Safety Report covers more general issues not affecting the safety of the
flight, the Aircraft Commander is not required to be informed.

Revision 16 Safety Management System Manual 08 July 2015


4-20

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 4
Jetstar Asia Safety Reporting

4.8 Processing Safety and Quality Reports

All safety related occurrence reports will be processed as follows:


a. Risk-assessed using the Risk Matrix in Chapter 5 of this manual;
b. Categorised according to the categories, incident types and subtypes as
classified in the safety database management system being used by the
company;
c. Determine whether the report needs to be submitted to CAAS or TSIB or
other agencies;
d. Analysed for any clear and present hazards or potential future hazards so
as to inform decisions on mandatory reporting to the authorities and higher
management, follow-up assessment and investigation or Risk
Management actions;
e. Assign follow-up actions to Manager Responsible (MR) or log the
occurrence as statistics for future analysis;
f. Consolidate occurrence report data and highlight significant events on a
monthly basis for discussion or escalation through FSC, MSSC, GASC or
BSSC.

4.8.1 Processing of an Occurrence Report – Pilot (SMS001) Which


Needs to be Reported to CAAS/TSIB

On receipt of OSCAR regarding accidents or serious incidents, the procedure


is to:
 Forward copy of OSCAR to CAAS on (65) 65456519;
 Call TSIB duty officer on (65) 98262359; and
 In the case of an accident in Singapore, notify the police.
Advise Jetstar personnel as required by the Crisis Management Plan and if
necessary take steps to secure recorded and other data.

NOTE
Duty safety personnel must be aware of the
requirement under applicable legislation not to
interfere with an aircraft following an accident and for
the preservation of records.

If immediate remedial actions are required by management or the crew is to


be withheld from duty, Safety and QA will provide details to the Head of Flying
Operations for a decision on these matters.
The occurrence is then entered in the database and the investigation
procedure is followed.

03 January 2018 Safety Management System Manual Revision 19


4-21

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 4
Safety Reporting Jetstar Asia

4.8.2 Processing of Other Reports

On receipt of all other Occurrence Reports, the procedure is to:


 Check that the occurrence does not fall under the definition of an Accident
or serious incident. (If it does, follow procedure outlined in 4.4).
 Fulfil any special reporting requirements such as birdstrike or ATS incident
reports.
 Acknowledge occurrence, enter in the database and follow investigation
procedure.
If report is marked CONFIDENTIAL, the following procedure is used: Contact
reporter to determine expectations. If possible, de-identify report, transcribe
the information and destroy the original. The report is then entered in the
database and graded for possible investigation.

NOTE
Anonymous reports cannot be processed.

On receipt of an Air Crew Report the procedure is to:


 Decide whether or not report is safety related. If it is, follow safety report
procedure. If not, it is entered in the database, acknowledged and
forwarded to appropriate managers for action or information.

4.9 Reporting of High Risk Occurrences or Accidents to the


Board Safety and Security Committee (BSSC) Members)
In the event of a high risk occurrence or accident, Safety, QA & Security will
notify BSSC members as soon as reasonably practicable. The procedure to
adopt is as follows:

Revision 19 Safety Management System Manual 03 January 2018


4-22

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 4
Jetstar Asia Safety Reporting

Reporting to BSSC – High Risk Occurrences or Accident

High Risk Occurrence


or Accident

Head of Safety, QA &


Security informs CEO
and
Head of Flying Ops

Head of Safety, QA &


Security broadcasts
to BSSC members via
SMS

BSSC
Yes (Within 24 hrs)
members
acknowledge
receipt via
SMS

No (After 24 hrs)

Phone BSSC members

End

BSSC Members

Board Members
CEO

08 July 2015 Safety Management System Manual Revision 16


4-23

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 4
Safety Reporting Jetstar Asia

SMS001
With box ticked for mandatory report

Report to TSIB, CAAS & for accident


in Singapore notify police

Advise Jetstar personnel as required


by crisis management plan

Immediate Yes Head of Flying


management Operations
actions required or responsibility
crew to be
withheld from duty

No

Enter occurrence in database

Yes
Investigation by Appoint Jetstar
external agency investigator for
liaison

No

Appoint investigator
Conduct investigation

Report to Jetstar management,


external agencies as required, and
originator

End
Data entry

Revision 18 Safety Management System Manual 04 September 2017


4-24

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 4
Jetstar Asia Safety Reporting

SMS001
(for non-mandatory reportable
occurrence)

Check mandatory reporting


requirements (Section 4.3)

Redesignate
Is SMS001 Yes and process
required to be as
sent to mandatory
CAAS/TSIB? report

No

Is report No
marked
confidential?

Yes

Contact reporter to determine


expectation

If possible, de-identify,
transpose data, & destroy
original

Fulfil additional reporting


requirements:
 Birdstrike
 Air traffic incident

Cont’d

04 September 2017 Safety Management System Manual Revision 18


4-25

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 4
Safety Reporting Jetstar Asia

Cont’d

Enter occurrence in database

No
Is event to be Acknowledge report
investigated? within 24 hrs

Yes
Forward to relevant
Acknowledge report within manager(s) for
24 hrs action/information

Advise management for


information

Conduct investigation

Report results to management


& originator

Data entry

End

Revision 16 Safety Management System Manual 08 July 2015


4-26

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 5 – Hazard Identification & Risk Management
Jetstar Asia Table of Contents

5. Hazard Identification & Risk Management ............................................ 5-1


5.1 Introduction .................................................................................................................. 5-1
5.2 Risk Management Policy ............................................................................................ 5-1
5.3 Hazard Identification and Risk Management ............................................................ 5-1
5.4 Risk Management Process ......................................................................................... 5-2
5.4.1 Introduction ....................................................................................................... 5-2
5.4.2 Definitions .......................................................................................................... 5-2
5.4.3 Roles and Responsibilities .............................................................................. 5-4
5.4.4 Risk Management Process Activities ............................................................. 5-4
5.5 Documenting the Risk Process ..................................................................... 5-10
5.6 Fatigue Risk Management System (FRMS) .................................................. 5-10
5.6.1 Principle and Objective .................................................................................. 5-10
5.6.2 Fatigue Risk Management Policy .................................................................. 5-10
5.6.3 Identification of Fatigue Hazard .................................................................... 5-11
5.6.4 Types of Fatigue .............................................................................................. 5-12
5.6.5 Continuous Assessment of Fatigue .............................................................. 5-12
5.6.6 Use of Controlled Rest on the Flight Deck ................................................... 5-13
5.6.7 Implementation of FRMS ................................................................................ 5-13

03 January 2018 Safety Management System Manual Revision 19


5-1

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Intentionally blank

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 5
Jetstar Asia Hazard Identification & Risk Management

5. Hazard Identification & Risk Management

5.1 Introduction
This chapter lays out the policy and procedures on the management of risk.
Management of risk is an integral part of the management process. Risk
management is a formal process through which hazards are controlled. It can
apply to new, changed or existing procedures, policies, regulations or
equipment.
The process involves identifying hazards and evaluating the level of risk they
pose to the operation. These risks are then treated through assigning actions,
which are continuously monitored, in order to minimise the risk and maximise
the safety of the operation.

5.2 Risk Management Policy


Jetstar Asia recognises the importance of identifying hazards and managing
risks in the delivery of safe, efficient air transport services.
Any new or changed process, procedure or use of equipment that meets the
requirements stated below will be formally risk managed in accordance with
the procedures laid out in this chapter.

5.3 Hazard Identification and Risk Management


A formal process of hazard identification and risk management is required for
all activities meeting one or more of the following criteria:
 Proposed changes in operating policies and procedures which:
i. change a safety critical operation for a significant portion of the fleet;
and
ii. change a basic operating philosophy;
 The introduction of a new or substantially different operating aircraft into
the fleet;
 Substantial changes in aviation safety regulatory provisions or aviation
service provider levels of service affecting company operations;
 Implementation of new or substantially revised methods of work or support
systems which affect or have the potential to affect the operation of
aircraft;
 Hazards to safety as identified through the safety management or internal
audit process e.g. incident investigation, hazard reports, and Flight Data
Analysis Program (FDAP);

03 January 2018 Safety Management System Manual Revision 19


5-1

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 5
Hazard Identification & Risk Management Jetstar Asia

 Any activity for which an executive manager requires a risk management


process to be run.
 Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment (HIRA) Program – all activities,
processes and operations as identified above shall be recorded in the
Jetstar Asia Risk Management System (JARMS) register to be risk
assessed.

5.4 Risk Management Process


5.4.1 Introduction
Jetstar Airways recognises the importance of identifying and managing
operational risk in the delivery of air transport services.
The Jetstar Asia Risk Management System (JARMS) processes adopt risk
management practices that are consistent with the Qantas Group Risk
Assessment Guide. The scope of Risk Management encompasses
operational risks from safety, security and environmental management
perspectives to adequately treat risks that may adversely affect Jetstar and
capitalise on opportunities to improve performance. Risk Management is
an integrated element of Jetstar’s Management System.
A Risk Assessment (RA) is required to be performed when:
 Required by the Change Management Process.
 There is a significant change to the external operating environment.
 Requested by a Risk Owner.
 Requested by the Head of Safety.

5.4.2 Definitions
Consequence – Outcome or impact of an event.
Control – an existing process, policy, device, practice or other action that
acts to minimise negative risk and enhance positive opportunities.
Control assessment – systematic review of processes to ensure that
controls are still effective and appropriate.
Control owner – an individual who holds management responsibility for
the management of a particular Control.
Event – occurrence of a particular set of circumstances.
Frequency – a measure of the number of occurrences per unit of time.
Hazard – a source of potential harm.
Likelihood – used as a general description of probability or frequency.
Loss – any negative consequence or adverse effect, financial or
otherwise.
Monitor – to check, supervise, observe critically or measure the progress
of an activity, action or system on a regular basis in order to identify
change from the performance level required.

Revision 19 Safety Management System Manual 03 January 2018


5-2

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 5
Jetstar Asia Hazard Identification & Risk Management

Probability – a measure of the chance of occurrence expressed as a


number between 0 and 1.
Residual risk – risk remaining after the implementation of risk treatment.
Risk – the chance of something happening that will have an impact on
objectives.
Risk analysis – systematic process to understand the nature of and to
deduce the level of risk.
Risk Assessment (RA) – the overall process of hazard identification, risk
analysis and risk evaluation.
Risk assessment facilitator – an individual trained and qualified to
facilitate an RA session.
Risk avoidance – a decision not to become involved in, or to withdraw
from, a risk situation.
Risk criteria – terms of reference by which the significance of risk is
assessed.
Risk evaluation – process of comparing the level of risk against risk
criteria.
Risk identification – the process of determining what, where, when, why
and how something could happen.
Risk management – the culture, processes and structures that are
directed towards realising potential opportunities whilst managing adverse
effects.
Risk management process – the systematic application of management
policies, procedures and practices to the tasks of communicating,
establishing the context, identifying, analysing, evaluating, treating,
monitoring and reviewing risk.
Risk owner – an individual who holds management responsibility for the
management of a particular risk.
Risk reduction – actions taken to lessen the likelihood, negative
consequences, or both, associated with a risk.
Risk retention – acceptance of the burden of loss, or benefit of gain, from
a particular risk.
Risk sharing – sharing with another party the burden of loss, or benefit of
gain, from a particular risk.
Risk sponsor – an individual, normally designated by risk owner, who
registers a risk in the JARMS and organises an RA session by involving all
stakeholders.
Risk treatment – process of selection and implementation of measures to
modify risk.
Stakeholders – those people and organisations who may affect, be
affected by, or perceive themselves to be affected by a decision, activity or
risk.
Worst Foreseeable Case Scenario – it may be possible to identify a
sequence of events, possibly involving multiple independent failures

03 January 2018 Safety Management System Manual Revision 19


5-3

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 5
Hazard Identification & Risk Management Jetstar Asia

(termed ‘worst case scenario’). The objective of a risk assessment is to


identify the potential event representing a single failure, that is realistic and
conservative (termed ‘worst foreseeable case scenario’ or Plausible
Maximum Outcome).

5.4.3 Roles and Responsibilities

5.4.3.1 Risk Owner

Has overall responsibility for the risks they own. Responsibility extends to
ensuring that the risk is appropriately recorded in the Risk Management
register, is periodically reviewed and controls have been assigned an
owner.

5.4.3.2 Risk Sponsor

Has responsibility for registering the identified hazard and arranging for RA
session with all stakeholders. Risk sponsor will assist Risk Owner in
monitoring the implementation of risk-mitigating controls by Control
Owners.

5.4.3.3 Control Owner

Has responsibility for the Controls they own. Responsibility extends to


ensuring that the Control is implemented and maintained, is appropriately
recorded in the Risk Management register, and is periodically reviewed.

5.4.3.4 Risk Assessment Facilitator

Has responsibility for facilitating risk assessments and reviews. This


extends to the completion and forwarding of all reports that result from risk
assessments and reviews to the Safety Manager.

5.4.3.5 Safety Manager

Has responsibility for maintaining the operational risk management system,


including maintaining the database, providing periodic reports and
maintaining the risk review schedule.

5.4.4 Risk Management Process Activities


The risk management process consists of the following activities:
 Involve
 Define
 Discover
 Understand

Revision 19 Safety Management System Manual 03 January 2018


5-4

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 5
Jetstar Asia Hazard Identification & Risk Management

 Decide and Act


 Monitor
Figure 5.1: Risk Management Process Activities

5.4.4.1 Involve

 The management of risk starts by identifying the stakeholders who


should be involved.
 Understand their objectives, what they know and how to involve and
collaborate with them throughout each step in the process to source
information and manage any potential for bias.
 Develop a plan to continue to involve and collaborate with the
stakeholders throughout the risk management process.

5.4.4.2 Define

 Working with stakeholders, define the decision the risk assessment is


supporting and what you are aiming to achieve.
 An example of a decision would be “Which option will provide the safest
outcome for aircraft loading on Jetstar’s A320s?”
 Consult stakeholders and confirm the scope of the risk assessment. The
scope will influence your understanding of the consequence and
likelihood of each risk event (e.g.: if a scope relates to a particular
port/route/business unit or location).
 Generate a list of hazards (or sources of uncertainty) — the list will
provide structure to support the discovery of risks.

03 January 2018 Safety Management System Manual Revision 19


5-5

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 5
Hazard Identification & Risk Management Jetstar Asia

5.4.4.3 Discover

 Continue to work with stakeholders, brainstorm and document what


might happen in the future and what it might lead to (i.e.: the
consequences). These are your risk events. The outcome of a risk event
may be negative or positive such as an opportunity.
 Describe each risk event as an event in the future using the format:
“(Something occurring) leading to… (a consequence)”.
 Explore what might cause the risk event to happen — what could cause
us to lose control of the hazard?
 Structure your approach to avoid missing any events by referring to the
list of hazards developed in “Define”.

5.4.4.4 Understand

 Understand the significance of each risk event to determine and


prioritise action.
 Firstly, identify what we are doing now, the current suite of controls that
act upon the causes and seek to mitigate the consequences of the risk
event.
 Using Figure 5.1, describe the effectiveness of the current suite of
controls. This is the Control Effectiveness Rating. Additional guidance
on the Control Effectiveness Rating is provided in Figure 5.2.
Figure 5.1: Control Effectiveness Rating

Figure 5.2: Control Effectiveness Rating Guidance

Revision 19 Safety Management System Manual 03 January 2018


5-6

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 5
Jetstar Asia Hazard Identification & Risk Management

 Once we understand the current suite of controls and their


effectiveness, we can determine the Level of Risk.
 With reference to experience, subject matter expertise and operating
history, consider the effectiveness of the existing controls and select
from the Consequence Rating Scale in Figure 5.4 the consequence
description that best fits the Expected Consequence for the risk event
(considering all potential consequence types e.g. safety, reputation
and/or financial).
 Next, determine the likelihood of the Expected Consequence occurring.
To do this, confirm the context of the assessment (as the context will
influence the estimation of the likelihood rating). Understand our history,
the last time a similar incident occurred and the effectiveness of the
current control suite, and apply this knowledge to estimate the likelihood
of the expected consequence using the Likelihood Rating in Figure 5.5.
 Combine the expected consequence and the likelihood of the expected
consequence occurring in Figure 5.6 to determine the Level of Risk.
This is the residual level of risk as it acknowledges the effectiveness of
the current control suite.
 To further develop your understanding of the risk event, refer again to
Figure 5.4, and with reference to experience, subject matter expertise
and operating history, select from the Consequence Scale the
consequence descriptor that best fits the plausible worst case
consequence for the risk event (ie.: the maximum impact on the
business arising from the risk event).
 This is the Plausible Maximum Outcome.
 Combining our understanding of the Control Effectiveness, the Level of
Risk and the Plausible Maximum Outcome can support our decision
making process.

5.4.4.5 Decide and Act


 Decisions to act to address a risk event involve comparing the total
‘cost’ of the risk against the ‘cost’ of control.
 One exception is prescriptive legislation which may override any cost-
benefit analysis and may impose the business to adopt particular
controls.
 Cost in both cases may go beyond pure monetary value in order to
understand the net business benefit of action. With our understanding of
each risk event, the causes and effects of the existing controls:
a. Explore the characteristics of the risk event including the causes
and consequences and seek options that act against the leading
causes and/or the consequences
b. Explore options to improve the design and operating
effectiveness of existing controls or the design of new controls
where a control gap has been identified.

03 January 2018 Safety Management System Manual Revision 19


5-7

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 5
Hazard Identification & Risk Management Jetstar Asia

 Develop an understanding of the net business benefit of each option


and engage with the Decision Maker in Figure 5.3 to decide and act.
 Where a decision to act is taken, document the control (its purpose and
design intent) and those accountable, allocate resources, agree
deadlines, and agree how those accountable will demonstrate that the
control is operating as intended when required.
 As the action is implemented, continue to monitor, assess and update
the control effectiveness rating for the risk event.

Figure 5.3 Priority and Decision Maker Guidance

5.4.4.6 Monitor
 It is important to regularly monitor and review the effectiveness of
current controls to ensure they are fit for purpose and continue to work
as intended. Consider if current controls still treat the root causes of the
risk event and if there are any new risks that have been introduced that
are currently not being controlled.
 With limited time and resources available, monitoring activities should
be prioritised to focus on the most critical controls (i.e.: controls that are
most effective in treating root causes and reducing the highest level of
exposure and risk).
 Some examples of monitoring activities include the observation of
personnel or procedures, analytical review, inquiries or interviews with
relevant personnel, review of periodic reporting, testing of controls and
conducting of audits.
 Information produced from monitoring activities can be useful in
providing learnings and feedback on whether control effectiveness
ratings require any adjustment and/or if there is a need to implement
additional controls to reduce the level of risk and opportunities to
improve controls to enhance operational discipline and reliability.

Revision 19 Safety Management System Manual 03 January 2018


5-8

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 5
Jetstar Asia Hazard Identification & Risk Management

Figure 5.4 Consequence Rating

Figure 5.5 Likelihood Rating

Figure 5.6 Level of Risk

03 January 2018 Safety Management System Manual Revision 19


5-9

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 5
Hazard Identification & Risk Management Jetstar Asia

5.4 Documenting the Risk Process


Documentation of each step of the risk management process is an
important requirement. It is important that an appropriate level and
standard of documentation be maintained as part of the process to:
1. Demonstrate that the process has been done correctly;
2. Enable decisions or processes to be reviewed; and
3. Demonstrate accountability.
Each Risk Assessment must have a report prepared and copies of
completed risk assessment forms and reports must be forwarded to the
Safety Department.

5.6 Fatigue Risk Management System (FRMS)

5.6.1 Principle and Objective


Fatigue Risk Management System (FRMS) is an important subset of the
company’s overall risk management system. The objective of FRMS is to
ensure that every flight and cabin crew member is adequately rested and
sufficiently alert throughout his/her duty period to operate to a satisfactory
level of performance and safety under all circumstances, including normal
and abnormal situations. This principle of the FRMS may be generally
applicable to other non-aircrew members of the airline, except the Flight
Duty Period as outlined in the FRMS is strictly meant for the aircrew, while
non-aircrew members are governed by the respective stipulations in the
Labour Law.

5.6.2 Fatigue Risk Management Policy


Fatigue risk management is a shared responsibility throughout the
company, with management and staff all playing equally important and
complementary parts.

5.6.2.1 Management Responsibilities

Jetstar Asia Fatigue Risk Management policy requires the management to:
a. Provide adequate resources for the implementation of FRMS;
b. Provide adequate crewing level to support flight rosters that minimizes
fatigue risk;
c. Provide flight and cabin crew with adequate opportunity for recovery
sleep between duties;
d. Create an environment that promotes open and honest reporting of
fatigue related hazards and incidents;
e. Provide fatigue risk management training to flight, cabin crew and
other FRMS support staff;
f. Demonstrate active involvement in and understanding of the FRMS;

Revision 19 Safety Management System Manual 03 January 2018


5-10

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 5
Jetstar Asia Hazard Identification & Risk Management

g. Ensure that the fatigue risks within their area(s) of responsibility are
managed appropriately;
h. Consult regularly with flight and cabin crew regarding the effectiveness
of the FRMS; and
i. Demonstrate continuous improvement and providing annual review of
the FRMS.

5.6.2.2 Flight and Cabin Crew Responsibilties

Conversely, Flight and Cabin Crew are required to:


 Make appropriate use of their rest periods (between shifts or periods of
duty) to obtain sleep;
 Participate in fatigue risk management education and training;
 Report fatigue-related hazards and incidents as described in the
relevant chapters in OM(A);
 Comply with the Fatigue Risk Management Policy; and
 Inform their manager or supervisor immediately prior to or during work
if:
i. They know or suspect they or another crew member are suffering
from unacceptable levels of fatigue; or
ii. They have any doubt about their own or another crew member’s
capability to accomplish their duties in such physiological state.

5.6.3 Identification of Fatigue Hazard


JSA uses 3 fundamental processes for fatigue hazard identification:
a. Predictive
A predictive process to identify fatigue hazards by examining crew
scheduling and taking into account factors known to affect sleep and fatigue
and their effects on performance. Methods of examination may include but
are not limited to:
 Operator or industry operational experience and data collected on
similar types of operations;
 Evidence-based scheduling practices; and
 Bio-mathematical models.
b. Proactive
A proactive process to identify fatigue hazards within current flight
operations. Methods of examination may include but are not limited to:
Self-reporting of fatigue risks;
 Crew fatigue surveys;
 Relevant flight and cabin crew performance data;

03 January 2018 Safety Management System Manual Revision 19


5-11

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 5
Hazard Identification & Risk Management Jetstar Asia

 Available safety databases and scientific studies; and


 Analysis of planned versus actual time worked.
c. Reactive
A reactive process to identify the contribution of fatigue hazards to reports
and events associated with potential negative safety consequences in order
to determine how the impact of fatigue could have been minimised. This
process could be triggered by any of the following:
 Operational Safety and Company Advisory Report (OSCAR);
 Confidential reports;
 Audit reports;
 Flight data analysis events.

5.6.4 Types of Fatigue


FRMS shall take into account 2 types of fatigue, namely, Transient Fatigue
and Cumulative Fatigue. Transient Fatigue may be described as fatigue that
can be dispelled by a single sufficient period of rest or sleep. Cumulative
Fatigue occurs after incomplete recovery from Transient Fatigue over a
period of time. To safeguard against both these types of fatigue, the FRMS
shall address:
a. The necessity to limit flight duty periods with the aim of preventing both
kinds of fatigue;
b. The necessity to limit the duty period where additional tasks are
performed immediately prior to a flight or at intermediate points during a
series of flights in such a way as to prevent transient fatigue;
c. The necessity to limit total duty time and flight time over specified
periods, in order to prevent cumulative fatigue;
d. The necessity to provide crew members with adequate rest opportunity
to recover from fatigue before commencement of the next flight duty
period; and provision of extended rest periods (Days Off) to recover
from cumulative fatigue
e. The necessity of taking into account other related tasks the crew
member may be required to perform in order to guard particularly
against cumulative fatigue.

5.6.5 Continuous Assessment of Fatigue


a. The Company shall establish a mechanism to assess fatigue risk on an
on-going, continuous basis. The appropriate methodology and the tools
to be adopted shall be established in OM(A).
b. Fatigue Risk Assessment shall form part of Risk Assessment for the
application of new routes. Where material fatigue risks exist in any new
routes, the company shall furnish an analysis of fatigue assessment to
the authority every 3 months, unless such a requirement is no longer
required by the authority.

Revision 19 Safety Management System Manual 03 January 2018


5-12

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 5
Jetstar Asia Hazard Identification & Risk Management

5.6.6 Use of Controlled Rest on the Flight Deck


a. When properly applied, Controlled Rest can be an acceptable fatigue
mitigation strategy that Tech Crew may employ, provided always that all
relevant rules and procedures concerning Controlled Rest as stipulated
in OM(A) are strictly adhered to.
b. Controlled Rest shall not be used as a scheduling tool. It is not a
substitute for proper pre-flight sleep but is only designed to address
unexpected fatigue experienced during flight operations.
c. The operator shall monitor the use of Controlled Rest on the Flight Deck
to evaluate whether existing mitigation strategies are adequate.
d. The regulations state that whenever flight crew employ this strategy the
Pilot-in- Command shall report the fact to the Company. The Company
shall regularly report such occurrences to the authority.

5.6.7 Implementation of FRMS


The implementation of FRMS shall be in accordance to the stipulations in
Chapter 7 of the OM(A), with the AOCR as the authoritative reference.

03 January 2018 Safety Management System Manual Revision 19


5-13

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 5
Hazard Identification & Risk Management Jetstar Asia

Intentionally blank

Revision 19 Safety Management System Manual 03 January 2018


5-14

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 6 – Performance Indicators
Jetstar Asia Table of Contents

6. Performance Indicators .......................................................................... 6-1


6.1 Safety Performance Indicators .................................................................................. 6-1
6.2 Safety Performance Monitoring ................................................................................. 6-1
6.3 Acceptable Level of Safety (ALS) .............................................................................. 6-1

03 January 2018 Safety Management System Manual Revision 19


6-i

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Intentionally blank

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 6
Jetstar Asia Performance Indicators

6. Performance Indicators

6.1 Safety Performance Indicators


Safety Performance indicators are measured on an occurrence rate of per
1000 number of hours flown by JSA Aircraft. The following are the
occurrences that are measured.
a. Aerodromes and airways facilities
b. Air traffic services
c. Aircraft airworthiness
d. Aircraft maintenance
e. Animal strike
f. Cabin operations
g. Dangerous goods
h. Flying operations
i. Ground operations
j. Human factors
k. OHS hazard
l. Opportunity for improvement (OFI)
m. Security

6.2 Safety Performance Monitoring


The Safety Performance indicators are monitored and reviewed monthly by
the Management Safety and Security Committee for any abnormal breach of
Acceptable Level of Safety (ALS) which would warrant appropriate
investigation into potential hazards or risks associated with such deviation.

6.3 Acceptable Level of Safety (ALS)


The Acceptable Level of Safety is reflected in terms of Weighted Occurrence
Risk Index, in which all safety reports are given a risk rating, each rating with
different weightage which is based on the type of occurrence as well as
empirical data. The weighted score is summed according to occurrence
type, and the total is then normalized based on per 1000 flights. The result is
then compared against the Target Risk Index, also known as Risk Budget.

17 July 2013 Safety Management System Manual Revision 12


6-1

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 6
Performance Indicators Jetstar Asia

The target Risk Index of each occurrence type is as follows:

Flying operations 34

Cabin operations 15

Ground operations 15

Engineering 11

Grand total (Risk budget): 75

Monthly Risk Index should be below the Risk Budget. If the Risk Budget is
exceeded, it is the responsibility of the Safety Department and Flight Ops
Department to determine the causes for the exceedance and, if necessary,
implement corrective actions and risk mitigating measures to reduce the risk
index subsequently. The MSSC will also be informed accordingly.
The target risk indices may be amended from time to time to reflect new
conditions or changes.

Revision 19 Safety Management System Manual 03 January 2018


6-2

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 7 – Investigations
Jetstar Asia Table of Contents

7. Investigations .......................................................................................... 7-1


7.1 Introduction.................................................................................................................. 7-1
7.2 Company Investigation Policy ................................................................................... 7-1
7.3 Notification of Investigation ....................................................................................... 7-4
7.4 Internal Investigation Procedure ............................................................................... 7-4
7.5 Internal Investigation Activity .................................................................................... 7-5
7.5.1 Introduction ....................................................................................................... 7-5
7.5.2 Initial Actions of Investigator-in-Charge......................................................... 7-5
7.5.3 Interviewee Participation .................................................................................. 7-6
7.5.4 Conduct of Interview......................................................................................... 7-6
7.5.5 Investigation Reports ....................................................................................... 7-7
7.6 External Observers ..................................................................................................... 7-7
7.7 Confidentiality of Information .................................................................................... 7-8
7.8 Flight Data Recorders ................................................................................................. 7-8
7.9 Cockpit Voice Recorders ............................................................................................ 7-9
7.10 External Investigations ............................................................................................... 7-9
7.11 Investigator Training and Qualification Requirements ........................................... 7-9

04 September 2017 Safety Management System Manual Revision 18


7-i

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Intentionally blank

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 7
Jetstar Asia Investigations

7. Investigations

7.1 Introduction
The primary purpose of this chapter is to foster a common understanding of the
practices and procedures that will be followed during an internal investigation. The
paragraphs highlight to all staff the procedures to follow or that will be followed
subsequent to an accident or incident.
When an internal investigation is initiated by the Safety, QA & Security Department
it is not intended to be accusatory or punitive. However, it is often unavoidable that
the investigation highlights or reveals unsafe acts, errors or omissions by an
individual, the organisation, a service provider or the regulatory authority. In such
cases the Head of Safety, QA & Security has a responsibility to ensure that all
such matters are identified and reported to the Chief Executive Officer and the
appropriate heads of department.
It should be emphasised that any investigation is focused upon the facts of an
occurrence, to identify the contributing factors underlying the occurrence and to
facilitate the development of agreed actions to either prevent or reduce the
probability of a recurrence. Active failures and local factors need to be identified.
However, from the perspective of safety enhancement, it is more important to
identify inadequate defences and organisational factors. Any such investigation
should be aimed at minimising the stress on individuals who may be involved,
either directly or indirectly.

7.2 Company Investigation Policy


The responsibility for the initiation, continuation or cancellation of an internal
investigation rests with the Head of Safety, QA & Security. The scope of the
investigation should be based on the actual outcome, potential for future risk and
opportunity for learning from the occurrence.
All occurrences received via the company reporting system are risk rated to assist
in determining the level of investigation priority. The investigation priority matrix
below should be used to determine the appropriate level of priority.

18 July 2008 Safety Management System Manual Revision 0


7-1

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 7
Investigations Jetstar Asia

Investigation Priority Matrix


Investigation Characteristics Process Involved
Parties

High Level Fatalities, serious Consult Line Safety & QA


Investigation injuries or Management Crew
substantial (decide crew
damage continuance TSIB
High probability and/or CAAS
Level 1 (Major) requirement for
of safety actions Security
will be required pastoral care) (as required)
High probability Initial crew
of significant contact (Safety &
threat to the QA)
safety of Arrange crew
operations interview
Likely In-depth
involvement of investigation
including formal
regulators and/or crew interview
external
Safety action
agencies; and/or dissemination
likely to result in
large scale Report issued
media attention / and database
public interest entry

Revision 18 Safety Management System Manual 04 September 2017


7-2

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 7
Jetstar Asia Investigations

Investigation Characteristics Process Involved


Parties

Medium Level Serious injuries Consult Line Safety & QA


Investigation or significant Management Crew
damage (decide crew
Level 1 (Major) continuance TSIB
Probability that
safety actions will and/or CAAS
or requirement for
result
pastoral care)
Level 2 (Minor) Concern for the
safety of Initial crew
(The contact (Safety &
operation
categorisation QA)
of Level 1 or Possible Arrange crew
Level 2 involvement of interview.
investigation is regulators and/or Conduct
at the discretion external investigation
of the Head of agencies; and/or Safety action
SSQA or likely to result in dissemination
Manager Safety media
based on the attention/public Report issued
severity of the interest and database
event and its entry
ramifications)

Low Level Minor or no Advise Line Safety & QA


Investigation injuries and/or Management Crew
minor or no Crew contact
damage (Safety & QA)
Level 2 (Minor) Primarily of Face-to-face
statistical interest interview (if
but may need to required).
gather more
information to Conduct
ascertain investigation
whether safety Safety action
action or trend dissemination
monitoring Report issued
recording is and database
required, and/or entry
unlikely to attract
public attention

Assessment Value is in Possible crew Safety & QA


statistical and contact Crew
trend monitoring Database entry
analysis,
supplementing Disseminate
results of other information as
investigations required
and audits

04 September 2017 Safety Management System Manual Revision 18


7-3

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 7
Investigations Jetstar Asia

NOTE
If a violation is detected during the safety investigation of
any of the above levels, Management will be advised.

Examples of occurrences requiring a low priority level would be:


 Bird strike causing damage;
 Incorrect weather forecasts; and
 Technical failures.
Examples of occurrences requiring a medium priority level would be:
 Flight crew does not follow an airways clearance;
 Aircraft takes off without a clearance; and
 Repeated technical failures.
Examples of occurrences requiring a high priority level would be:
 Runway overrun;
 Passenger fatality from in-flight turbulence; and
 In-flight load movement resulting in flight control interference.

7.3 Notification of Investigation


As soon as possible after a decision has been made to investigate an occurrence,
the appropriate managers and the individuals involved shall be notified by the
Head of Safety, QA & Security.

7.4 Internal Investigation Procedure


If an occurrence or hazard warrants investigation, the Head of Safety, QA &
Security will assign an investigator-in-charge (IIC) who will be responsible for the
day to day conduct of investigative activities. The investigator-in-charge is the
person who is responsible for the organisation, control and conduct of the
investigation. The investigator-in-charge will chair all interviews, manage the
investigation and be responsible for the production of the investigation report.
Once the draft report has been completed, it will be distributed to all stakeholders
for review and comment. Stakeholders will be given a timeframe, usually 14 days,
in which to review the report and submit any request for changes to the
investigator-in-charge. At the completion of this period, the Head of Safety, QA &
Security will arrange an occurrence review meeting involving the appropriate
heads of department and the investigator-in-charge. The purpose of this meeting is
to agree on any changes and to agree on suitable actions in response to the
findings and causes identified in the investigation report. This meeting will be
minuted by the investigator-in-charge with the minutes being stored with the
investigation file.
All agreed actions and agreed changes will be incorporated into the final report
which will then be distributed to all stakeholders. Agreed actions, along with

Revision 16 Safety Management System Manual 08 July 2015


7-4

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 7
Jetstar Asia Investigations

findings and causes, will be entered into safety database and tracked for
implementation. It is the responsibility of the head of department to implement the
agreed actions and to advise the action tracker accordingly.

7.5 Internal Investigation Activity

7.5.1 Introduction

The purpose of internal investigations is to determine the facts of an occurrence


and make recommendations on actions required to either prevent a recurrence or
to reduce the probability of a recurrence. Furthermore, an internal investigation
seeks to enhance the safety potential of the airline by uncovering underlying
contributing factors.
The principle questions that the investigator-in-charge will seek to answer are,
“What is this occurrence telling us about the system?”, “What safety deficiencies
exist in the system and why?”, “What safety action should be recommended to
reduce or eliminate these deficiencies and make the airline’s operation safer?”
Investigations will focus on these systemic factors rather than on the errors that
might be made by the individuals involved.
All investigations or parts of an investigation assigned to personnel shall be
recorded in the safety database as well as the role of each person in the
investigation.

7.5.2 Initial Actions of Investigator-in-Charge

When an internal investigation has been assigned, the investigator-in-charge will


initiate the formation of an investigation team and will contact any other relevant
external agencies that may be able to assist in the provision of data for the
investigation team. As an example voice or radar data may be requested from the
appropriate authorities.
Before any interviews commence, the investigator-in-charge will liaise with any
specialist advisers and review the initial status and details of information already
collected and establish whether any additional data is required and when it may be
made available.
The investigator-in-charge may then reconstruct the events surrounding the
occurrence and obtain a briefing of the reported, including the involvement of any
other internal or external parties. In some instances the investigator-in-charge will
also access information such as rosters, training records, etc.
Reconstruction and briefings are intended to assist the investigator-in-charge in
orientation of the circumstances of the occurrence only.
The reason for placing priority on these actions is that at this early point in the
investigation, the investigator-in-charge needs to assimilate the knowledge that the
various parties have of the circumstances and events associated with the
occurrence so that he or she can effectively plan the course of the investigation.
The investigator-in-charge will then negotiate a timetable and list of personnel to
be interviewed.

08 July 2015 Safety Management System Manual Revision 16


7-5

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 7
Investigations Jetstar Asia

At this stage of the investigation activity, personnel to be interviewed should be


made aware that the investigation is for the purposes of accident prevention and
enhancing safety, not for the establishment of blame or liability. They should be
assured that the investigation report is not provided for punitive purposes or for any
other purpose other than enhancing safety.

7.5.3 Interviewee Participation

All personnel have a responsibility to cooperate during the conduct of an


investigation. Normally, the investigator-in-charge will have no objection to
interviewees having another crew member of their choice present at the interview.
However, it is vital to the success of the investigation that the interview is between
the investigator-in-charge and the interviewee only.
The interviewee may discuss any matter or question with his or her colleague but
any/all responses are to be that of the interviewee alone.
In the case where another crew member does attend, they may be required to sign
a confidentiality agreement prior to attendance. The confidentiality agreement is
designed to protect the integrity of the investigation and to ensure that information
is not divulged to any unauthorised parties. This could include airline management,
the media or persons who would use the information for malicious or mischievous
purposes.
The investigator-in-charge will not permit other airline management or personnel
(except those that are part of the investigation team) to attend an interview unless
the interviewee originates a specific request for such attendance.

7.5.4 Conduct of Interview

The purpose of an interview is to obtain information about an occurrence, an event,


a person or what a person knows, saw or heard. The information from an
interviewee is an important element in the investigation process and may affect the
direction of the investigation.
Wherever practically possible, each interviewee will be interviewed individually.
The reason for doing so is that a person’s recall of events can be distorted by
others who may have a slightly different perception of events. In most cases, the
interview will be conducted by two interviewers consisting of the investigator-in-
charge and a team member who has the relevant technical background.
An investigator-in-charge is very mindful of the stress that the interview process
may place upon interviewees. An interviewee is the best person to monitor his or
her own stress. They should be aware that the investigator-in-charge will be aiming
for a relaxed atmosphere where the interviewee does not feel intimidated or
threatened otherwise pertinent safety information that could help to prevent future
occurrences may remain uncovered.
An interview will commence with the investigator-in-charge providing introductions
and an overview of the time frame of the events to be considered by the
investigation. The interviewee will then be given the opportunity to describe, in their
own words and their own time, their best recollections of the events surrounding
the occurrence. The interviewee may ask for a break for any reason at any time
and for any duration if they feel it is required.

Revision 16 Safety Management System Manual 08 July 2015


7-6

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 7
Jetstar Asia Investigations

Prepared notes are often a great assistance to the interviewee at this stage of the
investigation. The earlier the notes are prepared after the occurrence, the more
detailed and helpful they are likely to be in an interview situation. These notes are
not required to be submitted and remain the property and in the custody of the
interviewee at all times unless the interviewee wishes to tender them to assist the
investigator-in-charge.
The investigator-in-charge will then ask specific questions for clarification and/or
amplification. The interviewee may consider that many of the questions may have
already been covered but it is important that the investigation personnel clearly
understand what it is that they have been told. Interviewees are not required to
sign any statements given or taken by the -or investigation team member.

7.5.5 Investigation Reports

Whenever an investigation is conducted that results in a formal investigation


report, the report shall conform to the basic ICAO Annex 13 investigation format as
far as possible in that it shall comprise the following sections as a minimum:
 Synopsis
 Factual information
 Analysis
 Conclusion and findings
 Safety actions
 Any hazards that may warrant follow up risk evaluation
All stakeholders involved in an investigation shall be provided with a draft copy of
the investigation report. Any factual errors or omissions that the stakeholders
consider are evident in the draft report must be forwarded to the investigator-in-
charge within 14 days of the release date of the draft report. Any requests for
changes will be tabled at the occurrence review meeting. Agreed changes and
safety actions will then be incorporated into the final report. The final report will
then be distributed to all stakeholders.
The report shall be entered into a data management system which allows
investigation findings and corrective actions to be tracked.

7.6 External Observers


Individuals from other relevant organisations may be considered for specific
occurrences to join an internal investigation as part of the investigation team as an
observer. This section details the implications of utilising such individuals.
An observer is a person who has a legitimate reason, as determined and approved
by the investigator-in-charge, to observe the conduct of the investigation. The
observer’s access to the various areas of the investigation is also subject to the
approval of the investigator-in-charge.
The investigator-in-charge will decide if observers are to be accepted on the
investigation team. If the decision is in favour of observers, the investigator-in-

08 July 2015 Safety Management System Manual Revision 16


7-7

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 7
Investigations Jetstar Asia

charge will also determine who is acceptable and the precise stages of the
proceedings in which the observers may participate.
An observer will be able to monitor the processes and progress of the investigation
and to observe any evidence specified by the investigator-in-charge. There may be
limitations on the evidence an observer will be permitted to view. Observers will not
be permitted to seek out independent information or interview any of those directly
or indirectly involved in the investigation. An observer will also not be permitted to
actively participate in any interview process unless invited to do so by the
investigator-in-charge.
As a general rule, observers may be allowed under the supervision of a person
approved by the investigator-in-charge:
 To attend the occurrence site.
 At the discretion of the investigator-in-charge, observers may be permitted to
view evidence pertaining to the following:
a. Company personnel activity at the time of the occurrence;
b. Company personnel involved; and
c. Any other material as determined by the investigator-in-charge.
In order to ensure confidentiality during an investigation, an agreement between
the company and each observer must be signed. The agreement also implies that
if an observer discloses information to a third party, then they will be in breach of
their agreement.
The investigator-in-charge, with the written approval of Head of Flying Operations,
may be granted the authority to remove an observer from the investigation if:
 An individual contravenes the conditions imposed on his/her presence; and
 The investigator-in-charge or any other employee of the company believes that
an individual has a conflict of interest which may impede the conduct of the
investigation.

7.7 Confidentiality of Information


Dissemination of any information to the public regarding any company related
incident or accident is to be carried out by the Office of the CEO.

7.8 Flight Data Recorders


There may be occasions when data recorded by an aircraft’s digital flight data
recorder or quick access recorder is required to be recovered by the Head of
Safety, QA & Security for investigation of operational and/or technical parameters.
Authorised personnel from CAAS or the TSIB may also request the DFDR and/or
QAR or data recovered from either the removal of the data recorder itself or a data
download. Whenever a DFDR or QAR record is required, the Head of Safety, QA &
Security shall make every effort to advise the relevant flight crew members. Where
more immediate and/or urgent priorities exist, such as possible data over write due
to actual or pending flight cycles, and the relevant flight crew members cannot be
contacted, the Head of Safety, QA & Security must ensure that the Head of Flying

Revision 18 Safety Management System Manual 04 September 2017


7-8

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 7
Jetstar Asia Investigations

Operations is informed. The flight crew members affected must be notified as soon
as possible after the recorder has been recovered and given the opportunity to
examine the data extracted. A complete record of all actions taken in the recovery
and replay of the DFDR data shall be recorded in the investigation log and in the
Safety database under the occurrence investigation record.

7.9 Cockpit Voice Recorders


Handling of on board recorders is governed by the Air Navigation (Investigation of
Accidents and Incidents) Order 2003. Following an accident or serious incident, no
cockpit voice recorder audio or transcript material shall be recovered or replayed
by any person other than an authorised investigator from the appropriate
government agency without formal approval by the Head of SSQA. Where in the
event of an accident or serious incident where it is probable that on board recorder
data will be required for an investigation, the Head of Safety, QA & Security will
arrange for the necessary recorders to be quarantined.

7.10 External Investigations


In the case of an occurrence where the government authority exercises its right to
investigate, the following procedure will be used. The Head of Safety, QA &
Security will assign an investigator who will be responsible for coordination with the
TSIB and CAAS or investigating agency. The assigned investigator will be the
point of contact for investigating personnel and will handle any requests for data,
information or interviews. The assigned investigator will also be responsible for the
provision of regular updates of investigation progress to the Head of Safety, QA &
Security and other senior management personnel. It is important that all
information be channelled through the assigned investigator.
The Safety, QA & Security Department may be given the opportunity to review a
draft of the investigation report. During the review period, the Head of Safety, QA &
Security will arrange a meeting with the appropriate heads of department and the
assigned investigator. The purpose of this meeting is to coordinate company
responses to the draft investigation report. The company responses will then be
forwarded to the investigating agency.
Upon receipt of the final report, the Head of Safety, QA & Security will ensure that
it is distributed to applicable company personnel and that the safety database is
updated.

7.11 Investigator Training and Qualification Requirements


Safety Investigator Training & Development
The SSQA Department is required to ensure investigators are adequately qualified
and trained to undertake investigation activities. The training needs of investigators
should be periodically assessed to ensure that investigators maintain and improve
investigation skills to consistently meet the requirements of investigation standards
and all investigation stakeholders. The performance of investigators should be
monitored, evaluated and may be completed by any of the following methods:

04 September 2017 Safety Management System Manual Revision 18


7-9

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 7
Investigations Jetstar Asia

 The conduct of investigation observations


 Feedback surveys;
 A performance appraisal system;
 Results of investigator key performance indicators (KPIs);
 Investigator training workshops;
 Investigator performance comparisons; and
 Review of investigation reports.
This methodology may be used to:
 Continuously improve the development and training of investigators;
 Measure and compare investigator performance; and
 Achieve consistency among investigators.
There are two types of investigators in JSA:
 Lead Investigator; and
 Qualified Investigator.
Lead Investigator Qualifications
Lead Investigators should possess the following competencies in conducting an
investigation:
 Knowledge and understanding of the company's SMS, QMS and other
applicable policies and procedures against which investigations may be
performed;
 Assessment techniques for examining, interviewing, evaluating and reporting;
and
 Sufficient management skills required for completing investigations, such as
planning, organising, communicating and leading/directing investigations.
Assessment of these competencies may be carried out by Head of Safety or his
delegates using any of the following methods or combinations thereof:
 Observation of investigation carried out by Lead Investigator;
 Review of investigation reports;
 Feedback by other investigators; and
 Interviewing the Lead Investigator.
Lead Investigator should have completed the following training:
 Investigator course conducted by any national authority such as TSIB or NTSB
(may be waived by Head of Safety based on investigator’s relevant experience
but highly preferred); and
 SMS course endorsed by CAAS, ICAO or IATA.
Lead Investigator shall have the following experience:
 Minimum 3 years of full-time working experience;
 Completed a minimum of 6 months as an investigator; or

Revision 18 Safety Management System Manual 04 September 2017


7-10

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 7
Jetstar Asia Investigations

 Participated in at least 2 investigations as an observer or investigator.


Lead Investigator must have conducted at least one investigation in the capacity of
Lead Investigator Under Training (LIUT), under the guidance and observation of
either the Head of Safety, his delegate or another investigator. This can be part of
the two investigations required of him as mentioned above. An observer report
with satisfactory rating shall be submitted and endorsed by Head of Safety or his
delegate before the LIUT is qualified to be a Lead Investigator.
Lead Investigator may lead or participate in any investigation into accidents or
serious incident.
Qualified Investigator Qualification
Qualified Investigators should possess the following competencies in conducting
an investigation:
 Knowledge and understanding of the company's SMS, QMS and other
applicable policies and procedures against which investigations may be
performed; and
 Assessment techniques for examining, interviewing, evaluating and reporting.
Assessment of these competencies may be carried out by Head of Safety or his
delegate as well as any Lead Investigator using any of the following methods or
combinations thereof:
 Observation of investigation carried out;
 Review of investigation reports;
 Feedback by other investigators; and
 Interviewing the investigator.
Qualified Investigator should have completed the following training:
 CRM/HF or equivalent training as approved by Head of SSQA; and
 SMS Training conducted by SSQA Department or other providers as approved
by Head of SSQA.
Qualified Investigator shall have the following experience:
 Minimum 1 year of full-time working experience; and
 Participated in at least two investigations of which he must be either an OJT
(On-job Training) investigator or investigating team member in one of them.
An observer report with satisfactory rating from a Lead Investigator shall be
submitted and endorsed by Head of Safety or his delegate before the OJT
Investigator can function as a fully-fledged Qualified Investigator.
Qualified Investigator may independently carry out investigation into any incidents
other than serious incidents and accidents. Investigator may participate as an
investigating team member in serious incidents and accidents.
Investigator Currency Requirement
All investigators must conduct at least one investigation per year (from the time of
closure of an immediate past investigation) to remain current. In the event that
investigator currency has lapsed, the affected investigator may regain currency by

08 July 2015 Safety Management System Manual Revision 16


7-11

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 7
Investigations Jetstar Asia

conducting an investigation under the supervision of a current Lead Investigator


and be given satisfactory rating.
Investigator qualification and currency record shall be maintained by SSQA
Department.

Revision 16 Safety Management System Manual 08 July 2015


7-12

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 8 – Flight Data Analysis Program (FDAP)
Jetstar Asia Table of Contents

8. Flight Data Analysis Program (FDAP) ................................................... 8-1


8.1 Introduction.................................................................................................................. 8-1
8.2 FDAP Policy ................................................................................................................. 8-1
8.3 Objectives of FDAP ..................................................................................................... 8-1
8.4 Definitions .................................................................................................................... 8-3
8.5 Data Analysis Process ................................................................................................ 8-3
8.6 Investigation Process ................................................................................................. 8-3
8.7 FDAP Review ............................................................................................................... 8-1
8.8 Data Storage and Security Policy .............................................................................. 8-1

03 January 2018 Safety Management System Manual Revision 19


8-i

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Intentionally blank

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 8
Jetstar Asia Flight Data Analysis Program (FDAP)

8. Flight Data Analysis Program (FDAP)

8.1 Introduction
The Company FDAP program entails the analysis of aircraft data recorded during
all flights for the purpose of identifying any trends that may be precursors to future
incidents or accidents. FDAP data are also used to assist in safety investigations.
In keeping with the Jetstar Asia safety policy, the purpose of investigating
incidents is to enhance the safe operation of the airline. It is not meant to be
punitive nor to allocate blame. As the FDAP process involves the routine recording
of pilot actions, it is imperative that safeguards are in place to protect the
confidentiality of flight crew identities in a manner that ensures confidence in the
safety focus of the program.
This chapter on FDAP should be read in conjunction with the Jetstar Group Flight
Data Management System (FDMS) Interface Procedures Manual (IPM), which is
deemed as an extension of this chapter. In the event of any conflict between this
chapter and the IPM, the document with the latest effective date on the issue of
contention shall take precedence.
The FDMS IPM may be accessed at:
https://jen.jetstar.com/groupoperations/GroupSafetyandStandards/GroupSafetySy
s.html

8.2 FDAP Policy


FDAP is a proactive, non-punitive program for gathering and analysing data
recorded during routine flights to improve flight crew performance, operating
procedure, flight training, air traffic control procedures, air navigation services, or
aircraft maintenance and design.
The FDAP should:
 Provide for regular and consistent recording and analysis of flight data for the
purpose of improving the safety of flight operations;
 Implement safeguards to protect the confidentiality of flight crew identities from
all unauthorised persons.

8.3 Objectives of FDAP


The objectives of FDAP include:
 Enhancing airline outcomes by facilitating continual improvement under a
Just Culture;
 Controlled dissemination of data and information to the reactive, proactive,
predictive, monitoring and continuous improvement functions of airline
management programs;
 Identifying areas of existing or potential operational hazards and attendent
risks as well as safety trends;

03 January 2018 Safety Management System Manual Revision 19


8-1

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 8
Flight Data Analysis Program (FDAP) Jetstar Asia

 Verification and validation of operational risks by highlighting nonstandard,


unusual or unsafe circumstances;
 Under a Just Culture, identifying unreported flight events that deviate from
airline SOPs or expectations;
 Assisting with identifying opportunities for training improvements;
 Confirming the effectiveness of any remedial action by continued monitoring
of flight data to ensure identified risks have been appropriately managed and
that the risk has not been transferred to another part of the operation;
 Provision of flight data and information to predictively inform engineering and
maintenance activities and aircraft Reliability Programs; and
 Provision of flight data and information to inform flight efficiency, operational
cost savings and operations delivery programs.

8.4 Definitions
 Raw data means the data stored or the original recording media and
includes, but is not limited to, flight data acquisition/recording systems, QAR,
flight data recorders, on-board servers.
 FDAP data means the data derived from Raw data which is used in the
context of the FDAP program and includes any or all of the following:
a. Flight data, which is unidentified data derived by ground station analysis
of the Raw data that is used in the context of the FDAP program and
includes, but is not limited to, transcriptions, listings, graphical plots,
computer files and animations;
b. Identification data, which means any information used either collectively
or individually to assist in the disclosure of the identity of a particular
flight. This information may include, but is not limited to, aircraft
registration, flight number, date and time; and
c. Identified data, which means information containing details of both Flight
data and the associated Identification data.
 FDAP events means the parameters as agreed by the Head of Safety, QA &
Security and Head of Flying Operations for the purpose of the FDAP
program.
 FDAP limits means the range of acceptable operational boundaries, as
agreed by the Head of Safety, QA & Security and Head of Flying Operations,
applying to FDAP events.
 FDAP occurrence means an exceedance of FDAP limits.

Revision 19 Safety Management System Manual 03 January 2018


8-2

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 8
Jetstar Asia Flight Data Analysis Program (FDAP)

8.5 Data Analysis Process


Raw data will normally be downloaded from the Quick Access Recorder (QAR) on
board the aircraft automatically by Wireless Ground Link (WGL). When WGL is
used the data is compressed and encrypted for security purposes. If WGL is not
available, portable download equipment is used by engineering staff and the raw
data is sent via the company network. In both cases, the raw data is delivered to
the analysis facility. This process may be performed on behalf of Jetstar Asia by
an approved contractor.
The Flight Data Analyst will then transfer the raw data to an analysis computer
where the raw data is analysed against parameters. This process reports any
exceedence of the agreed parameters at four levels. The four levels are
Information, Low, Medium and High alerts. These may be represented as
Category 1, 2, 3 and 4, or equivalent.
Information and Low alerts are generally used to build a database of historical
data for statistical analysis and are therefore not generally investigated to any
extent. This statistical data is not able to be used to identify particular flights but is
used to analyse trends in order to help identify potential hazards and risks.
Medium and High alerts are assessed and validated by the analyst to ascertain
the circumstances of the event. A predefined list of High alerts are considered
immediate hazards and therefore immediately notifiable and an email is
automatically sent to the Safety Department regarding the alert. The recipients of
the email alerts include the Head of Safety, QA & Security, Manager Safety, as
well as the Flight Ops QA Manager. These emails do not contain information that
will identify the crew. The Safety Department Representative will assess the flight
data and determine whether any investigative action is required. If investigation is
warranted, the Flight Ops QA Manager will be informed to carry out the task. For
events that fit the criteria for Mandatory Reports to CAAS and TSIB, Safety
Reporting Procedures as outlined in this SMS will be followed.
In the event that an alert refers to an airworthiness issue, the Safety Department
will inform Maintenance Control of the alert, who in turn will assess aircraft
inspection or maintenance requirements.
The list of persons authorised to request for flight data, and the access rights for
the various types of flight data are contained in the IPM.

8.6 Investigation Process


If, in the assessment of the Head of Safety, QA & Security, or Manager Safety,
along with the Flight Ops QA Manager, an FDAP occurrence warrants further
investigation, the Flight Ops QA Manager will usually be given the task to obtain
and further analyse the data, and interview the crew involved for further
clarifications. The investigation will be carried out in accordance to the processes
as outlined in Chapter 7 of this SMS. While the investigation is being carried out,
the identities of the flight crew involved will be kept confidential within the Safety,
QA & Security Department. If there is evidence that the crew wilfully operated
outside SOPs or the investigator has serious concerns about crew competence,
the crew details will be provided to the Head of Flying Operations. Otherwise, the
investigator will report the investigation results without divulging the crew identities.

03 January 2018 Safety Management System Manual Revision 19


8-3

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 8
Flight Data Analysis Program (FDAP) Jetstar Asia

Initial evaluation of
High alert

Consultation between
Safety Dept and Flight
Ops QA to assess
whether investigation
warranted

Is No
investigation Data entry
warranted?

Yes

Provide identity data to


assigned investigator

Conduct investigation
(Crew identity
confidential within
Safety, QA & Security
Department)

Does evidence
No
show that crew Report investigation
willfully operated findings
within SOPs or Data entry
serious concerns?

Yes

Crew details to Head of


Flying Operations for
action

Revision 18 Safety Management System Manual 04 September 2017


8-0

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 8
Jetstar Asia Flight Data Analysis Program (FDAP)

8.7 FDAP Review


FDAP meeting is held monthly. The members of this meeting include:
1. Head of Safety, QA & Security (Chair);
2. Manager Safety (Alternate Chair); and
3. Flight Ops QA Manager.
Invitees to the meeting include:
1. Chief Pilot; and
2. Manager Training.
Minimum quorum of two is required. This includes either the Head of Safety, QA
and Security or the Manager Safety, as well as the Flight Ops QA Manager. The
agenda of the meeting includes the following:
 Review of open actions
 Review of FDAP results from previous months
 Overview of occurrence reports
 Investigative findings
A summary of discussion will be disseminated to all pilots through the monthly
FDAP Report. Any significant issues arising from FDAP review will also be
reported to the MSSC and FSC for further deliberations if necessary.

8.8 Data Storage and Security Policy


The Head of Safety, QA & Security will ensure that a secure facility is provided for
the storage and analysis of FDAP data. Downloaded data will be kept for 28 days.
If data is required for an investigation, the data is subject to the requirements
outlined in Chapter 11 of this manual.
Flight data (which are unidentified) may be kept indefinitely for the purposes of
safety management.
If FDAP data is required to be stored or analysed by an external provider, the
necessary data security provisions will be detailed in a service level agreement or
equivalent document.

03 January 2018 Safety Management System Manual Revision 19


8-1

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 8
Flight Data Analysis Program (FDAP) Jetstar Asia

Intentionally blank

Revision 18 Safety Management System Manual 04 September 2017


8-2

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 9 – Safety System Training
Jetstar Asia Table of Contents

9. Safety System Training .......................................................................... 9-1


9.1 Introduction.................................................................................................................. 9-1
9.2 Safety System Training............................................................................................... 9-1
9.3 SMS Training – SMS Practitioners ............................................................................ 9-1
9.4 Safety System Training – Senior Management ........................................................ 9-1
9.5 Safety System Training – Pilots................................................................................. 9-2
9.6 Safety System Training – Cabin Crew....................................................................... 9-2
9.7 Safety Awareness Training - Support and Corporate Staff .................................... 9-2
9.8 Miscellaneous Training............................................................................................... 9-3
9.9 Recurrent Safety Training .......................................................................................... 9-3

08 July 2015 Safety Management System Manual Revision 16


9-i

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Intentionally blank

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 9
Jetstar Asia Safety System Training

9. Safety System Training

9.1 Introduction
The Safety, QA & Security Department will be responsible for development of a
training program to familiarise all personnel with the company safety management
system. This training may be either incorporated into existing training programs or
be given separately by a nominee of the Head of Safety, QA & Security or other
aviation safety specialists approved by the company.

9.2 Safety System Training


All personnel within Jetstar Asia shall receive safety system training appropriate to
each individual’s involvement in the SMS. This can be roughly divided into 5
groups:
 SMS Practitioners: These include the Head of Safety QA & Security, safety
managers and QA practitioners;
 Senior Management: This includes the CEO and Heads of Departments;
 Pilots;
 Cabin Crew; and
 All support and corporate Staff.

9.3 SMS Training – SMS Practitioners


It is a requirement for all SMS practitioners to have undergone a full SMS training
program as approved by the Head of Safety QA & Security. Such training program
may be conducted by external organizations approved/endorsed by CAAS or IATA,
or internally by SMS trainers approved by Head of Safety QA & Security. If not
already trained upon assuming the appointment, the training should preferably be
completed within 6 months, but no later than 12 months. As an interim measure
before formal training takes place, a Safety System Training pitched at Senior
Management level shall be given within the first month.

9.4 Safety System Training – Senior Management


This training should be completed within 3 month of joining the company.
The syllabus is outlined below:
 Concept of Safety
 Safety Organisation
 Safety Policy
 Safety Management System

08 July 2015 Safety Management System Manual Revision 16


9-1

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 9
Safety System Training Jetstar Asia

 Emergency Response Plan (GCMP)


 Audit Program
 Safety Updates

9.5 Safety System Training – Pilots


A Safety System Training is to form part of each pilot’s induction training.
The syllabus is outlined below.
 Introduction to Safety Management and Discussion of Safety Culture
 Jetstar Asia Safety Objectives
 Jetstar Asia Safety Policy and Principles
 Jetstar Asia Reporting Policy and Procedures
 Investigation Processes
 Flight Data Analysis Program (FDAP)

 Overview of Jetstar Asia Safety Management System

9.6 Safety System Training – Cabin Crew


A Safety System Training is to form part of each cabin crew’s induction training.
The syllabus is outlined below:
 Introduction to Safety Management
 Safety Culture
 Jetstar Asia Safety Objectives
 Jetstar Asia Safety Policy and Principles
 Jetstar Asia Reporting Policy and Procedures
 Investigation and Audit Procedures
 Overview of Jetstar Asia Safety Management System

9.7 Safety Awareness Training - Support and Corporate Staff


All other support and corporate staff are to receive Safety Awareness Training
within 6 months of joining the company, either in the form of briefing or self-
administered computer-based training, covering the following areas:
 Introduction to Safety Management
 Jetstar Asia Safety Objectives

Revision 16 Safety Management System Manual 08 July 2015


9-2

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 9
Jetstar Asia Safety System Training

 Jetstar Asia Safety Policy and Principles


 Jetstar Asia Reporting Policy and Procedures
 Investigation and Audit Procedures
 Safety Governance and Review
 Overview of Jetstar Asia Safety Management System

9.8 Miscellaneous Training


From time to time, it may be necessary for operational personnel to undertake
specialised courses of training. The Safety, QA & Security Department is able to
arrange this specialised training on request.
Examples of courses available from external providers are as follows:
 Introduction to Risk Management
 Facilitating Risk Management
 Introduction to Investigation
 Immediate Response Investigation Team Training
 Human Factors Training

9.9 Recurrent Safety Training


Recurrent safety training shall be provided once every 3 years via the web-
based Learning Management System (LMS).

08 July 2015 Safety Management System Manual Revision 16


9-3

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 9
Safety System Training Jetstar Asia

Intentionally blank

Revision 10 Safety Management System Manual 26 July 2012


9-4

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 10 – SMS Audit & Safety Review
Jetstar Asia Table of Contents

10. SMS Audit and Safety Review .............................................................. 10-1


10.1 Audit Program ........................................................................................................... 10-1
10.2 Types of Audit ........................................................................................................... 10-1
10.3 Audit Schedule .......................................................................................................... 10-2
10.4 Auditor Qualification................................................................................................. 10-2
10.5 Audit Procedures ...................................................................................................... 10-2
10.6 Termination of Audit ................................................................................................. 10-2
10.7 Confidentiality ........................................................................................................... 10-3

08 July 2015 Safety Management System Manual Revision 16


10-i

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Intentionally blank

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 10
Jetstar Asia SMS Audit & Safety Review

10. SMS Audit and Safety Review

10.1 Audit Program


The company shall maintain an audit program with the primary aim of ensuring
conformance with safety standards and compliance with regulations. In addition,
such a program is also designed to ensure that the company maintains the
desired standards in our flight, ground and maintenance operations, identify
areas requiring improvement and unmask any safety hazards or security
concerns. All operational functions relevant to Safety and Security, including
flight operations, operational control/dispatch, maintenance operations, cabin
operations, ground handling and cargo operations are subjected to periodic
audits. The audits can be carried out on external entities such as GHA and other
service providers, or on internal business units. The audit program will be
administered by Safety, QA and Security Department as part of its responsibility
in the oversight of safety and compliance, but appropriately qualified auditors
may be drawn from resources from business units within or outside of the
company.
This chapter shall be read in conjunction with JSA QMS manual. Should there
be any difference between SMS and QMS in terms of procedural details, QMS,
being the most current working document, shall prevail.

10.2 Types of Audit


The types of audit, their purposes, scope, procedures as well as recommended
checklists are detailed in the Quality Management System (QMS). The general
types of audits are:
1. Operational Records and Operations Manual Audit;
2. Load control, Flight Planning & Performance;
3. En Route Flying Operations Audit;
4. En Route Cabin Safety Audit;
5. Training and Checking Audits;
6. Operational Resource Audit;
7. Station Audit;
8. Safety Program and Reporting System Audit;
9. Safety Performance Indicator Audit;
10. Quality Management System Audit;
11. Pre-Operations Audit;
12. Aircraft Wet-lease Audit;
13. Line Operations Safety Audit; and
14. JSA Engineering & Quality Assurance Audits.

08 July 2015 Safety Management System Manual Revision 16


10-1

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 10
SMS Audit & Safety Review Jetstar Asia

10.3 Audit Schedule


The audit schedule is developed based on the requirements of the audit program and
approved by the MSSC. The planned audit schedule is maintained in the public folder
of the company computer server.
To ensure the effectiveness of audits conducted by Safety Department, the frequency
of audits for operational areas is determined on a risk based analysis of each audit
area. To determine the appropriate audit frequency, several risk factors are
considered, including:
1. The significance and impact of the performance of the audit area to the
company’s stated aim;
2. The past performance of the audited area in terms of significant findings;
3. Significant changes in organisational structure, accountabilities, responsibility or
operating procedures since the last audit;
4. Internal or external feedback; and
5. Significant or serious occurrence.
Audit frequency is divided into the following categories:
1. Category 1: As soon as possible, or no later than 6 months.
2. Category 2: Annual.
3. Category 3: 18 months
4. Category 4: 2 years
At the end of each audit, the lead auditor may recommend the subsequent audit
frequency for the audit area for endorsement by Head of Safety, QA and Security.

10.4 Auditor Qualification


The auditor qualification shall be in accordance with the requirement as stipulated in
JSA QMS Manual Chapter 4.

10.5 Audit Procedures


For all procedural details pertaining to SMS audit, JSA QMS MANUAL Chapter 4
shall be the standard.

10.6 Termination of Audit


The Lead Auditor may terminate the audit at any time if:
1. The auditee is exerting undue influence on the audit team;
2. The auditee is being obstructive;
3. There is inadequate participation of relevant personnel/management during any
part of the audit process; and

Revision 16 Safety Management System Manual 08 July 2015


10-2

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 10
Jetstar Asia SMS Audit & Safety Review

4. Unforeseen circumstances significantly affect the ability of the audit to continue.

10.7 Confidentiality
Audit reports prepared by the Audit Team Leader are the property of Jetstar Asia
Airways Safety, QA & Security Department and the contents of such reports should
be treated with confidentiality. All external requests for the audit report must be
directed to The Head of Safety, QA & Security Department.

08 July 2015 Safety Management System Manual Revision 16


10-3

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 10
SMS Audit & Safety Review Jetstar Asia

Intentionally blank

Revision 16 Safety Management System Manual 08 July 2015


10-4

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 11 – SMS Data & Records Management
Jetstar Asia Table of Contents

11. SMS Data and Records Management.................................................. 11-1


11.1 Control of Documents............................................................................................... 11-1
11.2 Control of Records.................................................................................................... 11-1
11.3 Management Safety and Security Committee (MSSC) .......................................... 11-2
11.4 Investigation Files ..................................................................................................... 11-2

18 July 2008 Safety Management System Manual Revision 0


11-i

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Intentionally blank

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 11
Jetstar Asia SMS Data & Records Management

11. SMS Data and Records Management

11.1 Control of Documents


The Safety, QA & Security Department shall ensure that any form of procedural
notes, SMS Data or instructions required are kept current to ensure that personnel
perform functions in a consistently safe and accountable manner. These include all
documents that are prepared to identify the requirements of the Safety
Management System program. Any procedural notes and/or instructions not
included in this manual shall be held by the Safety, QA & Security Department in
hard and/or soft copy format so that all personnel who need to use the documents
can readily access and use the information and follow the prescribed procedures
or instructions.
When Safety Management System program documents are updated, an archive
copy of the superseded document will be stored in order to maintain an update
history.

11.2 Control of Records


The Safety, QA & Security Department, or its nominee, shall retain all original
(received) hard copy safety related forms (except those replaced under the
confidential reporting provisions) in a secure location, adequately filed, labelled
and stored for a period of at least three years in a manner that prevents
deterioration and enables access by appropriately authorised personnel. This shall
be in addition to any occurrence record(s) entered, stored or published in any
format by the safety database. All soft copy safety database records shall be
retained and secured on the nominated server or tape storage device for the
duration of the life of the safety database system. Any hard copy output records
from the safety database system.
Disposal of hard copy records shall only be via the written approval of the Head of
Safety, QA & Security. A copy of any disposal approval notice shall itself be
retained for a period of at least three years as if it were an original record. Where
the Safety, QA & Security Department is satisfied that duplicate soft copy records
are available via the safety database system and stored on two diverse servers, or
equivalent storage devices, the hard copy original records may be shredded and
destroyed with the written approval of the Head of Safety, QA & Security.
The Safety, QA & Security Department, or its nominee, shall retain all investigation
reports in hard and/or soft copy format for at least three years. If in hard copy, it
should be retained in a secure location, adequately filed, labelled and stored in a
manner that prevents deterioration and enables access by appropriately authorised
personnel.
Disposal of investigation reports will be in accordance with the requirements for the
disposal of hard copy records as outlined elsewhere in this section.

18 June 2012 Safety Management System Manual Revision 9


11-1

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 11
SMS Data & Records Management Jetstar Asia

11.3 Management Safety and Security Committee (MSSC)


Meeting Minutes
The minutes of each MSSC meeting shall be retained in hard copy and/or soft
copy format for a period of at least five years. If in hard copy, the minutes shall be
adequately filed, labelled and stored in a manner that prevents deterioration and
enables access by appropriately authorised personnel.
Disposal of hard copy MSSC meeting minutes shall be in accordance with the
requirements for disposal of hard copy records outlined in section 11.2.

11.4 Investigation Files


Investigation files shall be retained in hard and/or soft copy format for a period of at
least three years. If in hard copy, the investigation files shall be adequately filed,
labelled and stored in a manner that prevents deterioration and enables access by
appropriately authorised personnel.
For the purposes of this section, an investigation file consists of the following:
1. The investigation log
2. The final investigation report
3. Copies of any meeting minutes relating to the investigation
4. Copies of any technical information relating to the investigation
Disposal of hard copy investigation files shall be in accordance with the
requirements for disposal of hard copy records outlined in section 11.2.

Revision 9 Safety Management System Manual 18 June 2012


11-2

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 12 – Handling, Storage & Processing of Reports
Jetstar Asia Table of Contents

12. Handling, Storage & Processing of Reports ...................................... 12-1


12.1 Introduction................................................................................................................ 12-1
12.2 Initial Handling and Processing of Reports............................................................ 12-1
12.3 Safety Database......................................................................................................... 12-1
12.4 Line Management Responsibilities in Regard to Safety Related Reports .......... 12-2
12.5 Communication of Safety Information to Operational Personnel ........................ 12-2

18 July 2008 Safety Management System Manual Revision 0


12-i

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Intentionally blank

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 12
Jetstar Asia Handling, Storage & Processing of Reports

12. Handling, Storage & Processing of Reports

12.1 Introduction
This chapter details the manner in which the Safety, QA & Security Department will
handle, store and process staff reports. Only Occurrence Report - Pilot and Safety
Reports affecting the operational safety of the company will be actioned and stored
by the Safety, QA & Security Department.

12.2 Initial Handling and Processing of Reports


Any report that is anonymous, malicious or mischievous in nature may have all
processing terminated upon receipt by the Safety, QA & Security Department.
All non-safety related reports will not be processed by the Safety, QA & Security
Department apart from the recording of the reporter’s name for the purposes of
providing an acknowledgement receipt. Non-safety related reports will be
forwarded directly to the appropriate manager.
On receipt of all safety-related reports, the Head of Safety, QA & Security will:
1. Verify the existence of the occurrence or hazard;
2. Categorise the occurrence according to the criteria listed in section five of this
manual;
3. Assign a risk rating to the occurrence; and
4. Determine whether the occurrence is to be the subject of an internal
investigation.
If an internal investigation is not initiated by the Safety, QA & Security Department,
the report will be routed to the appropriate manager for action, resolution and
feedback.

12.3 Safety Database


Data from safety related reports will be entered into the safety database which will
be used to store and analyse the data and provide reports on a regular basis. The
purpose of the analysis is to identify trends and areas requiring management
action.
Outputs from the safety database will also be used to provide reports for MSSC
and preparation of feedback to operational personnel.

18 July 2008 Safety Management System Manual Revision 0


12-1

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 12
Handling, Storage & Processing of Reports Jetstar Asia

12.4 Line Management Responsibilities in Regard to Safety


Related Reports
The reporting culture of Jetstar Asia can be positively influenced by timely,
appropriate feedback to the reporter of management actions resulting from reports.
To this end, managers receiving reports will:
1. For non-safety related reports: use judgement as to the appropriate level of
feedback given to the reporter in view of maintaining the reporting culture. The
Safety, QA & Security Department will provide the report acknowledgement
receipt to the reporter.
2. For safety-related reports (not the subject of an internal investigation): line
management is responsible for advising the reporter of any actions taken in
response to a report. The Safety, QA & Security Department may request a
response from line managers in regard to a report submitted. The details of the
response will be recorded in the safety database.
3. For safety-related reports (subject to an internal investigation): after the
investigation process is complete and agreed actions determined, the Safety,
QA & Security Department will ensure that all stakeholders are informed in
writing of the results of the investigation. Additionally, information on lessons
learnt will be promulgated to appropriate staff through internal safety
publications.

12.5 Communication of Safety Information to Operational


Personnel
Effective communication is vital in promoting a safe culture. The objective of
communicating safety information is the modification of behaviour to eliminate
factors known to cause accidents. Communication also assists in developing a
common understanding of safety and the nature of hazards experienced in the day
to day operations.
The Safety, QA & Security Department is responsible for the communication and
feedback of safety information to all operational personnel. This can take the form
of:
1. Four-monthly updates of internal operational safety occurrences;
2. Input to company newsletter with a selection of internal and external
operational safety related material pertinent to all line areas;
3. Ad hoc special purpose bulletins as appropriate to the circumstances and
dependent upon operational urgency;
4. Ad hoc operational safety related reports from external sources; and
5. Special purpose external reports from national and international government
agencies.

Revision 9 Safety Management System Manual 18 June 2012


12-2

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 13 – Change Management
Jetstar Asia Table of Contents

13. Change Management ............................................................................ 13-1


13.1 Introduction................................................................................................................ 13-1
13.2 Aim .............................................................................................................................. 13-1
13.3 Change Management Committee............................................................................. 13-1
13.4 Change Management Process ................................................................................. 13-2

03 January 2018 Safety Management System Manual Revision 19


13-i

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Intentionally blank

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 13
Jetstar Asia Change Management

13. Change Management

13.1 Introduction
Change is defined as anything internal or external that requires an amendment to a
published policy, procedure or manual. Formalising change management
processes is necessary when managing a safe and efficient airline. The focus
highlighted in this chapter is on operational change rather than commercial
change. However, at some stage, commercial proposals may result in operational
changes within the airline and will have to be put through the appended change
management processes prior to implementation. It is, therefore, required that
managers of non-operational areas are included even though they may not be
active participants on a regular basis.

13.2 Aim
The aim of establishing the change management process is to improve and assist
management decisions based upon the following:
 Ensuring compliance with state laws, regulations and company policy
(particularly on the risk management framework);
 Facilitating inter-departmental awareness, consultation and decision making;
 Creating a permanent repository of change documentation made and the
associated considerations and decisions that were made.
 Closing out of all areas like documentation and communication once the
change has been approved; and
 Conducting a Post Implementation Review (PIR), if and when required.

13.3 Change Management Committee


As a selection criteria, the Chair of the Change Management Committee (CMC)
will be nominated among the operational Heads of Department based upon
experience level as well as overview of operations at various areas like flight
operations, ground operations, commercial considerations, etc. Currently, the CMC
is chaired by the Head of Flying Operations. The committee consists of
representatives from:
 Head of Safety, Security & QA
 Manager, Safety
 Chief Pilot
 Manager, Network Operations
 Head of Ground Ops
 Head of Engineering & Maintenance

08 February 2016 Safety Management System Manual Revision 17


13-1

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 13
Change Management Jetstar Asia

 Head of Customer Service & Experience


 Head of Commercial
 Head of People (if required)
 Manager, IT (if required)
A minimum quorum of three is required and a delegate of a committee member
should carry the authority of the person they represent. It should be noted that
committee members are not expected to attend if there is no likelihood that
decisions will be taken concerning their areas of responsibility. This particularly
applies to non-operational managers. They do, of course, retain the right to attend
any meeting or part thereof and will be copied in on all correspondence.
Other personnel will be invited to attend to contribute to discussion and decision-
making as required e.g. AFEs, EP instructors, QA manager.

13.4 Change Management Process


Change Management meetings will be held monthly where possible, or on an as
required basis if priority dictates. Currently, the Manager, Flight Operations is
nominated to be responsible for the maintenance of the Change Management
Register. Members proposing a change shall ensure the change is logged in the
Change Management Register prior to the next Change Management Meeting.
Change is registered under 3 different categories. They are as follows:
a. Category A Change – A business level change that has significant
impact to the business as a whole. This category requires CMC
endorsement followed by the CEO’s final approval.
b. Category B Change – An operational level change affecting more than
one department significantly. This category requires department level
endorsement followed by the CMC Chair’s final approval.
c. Category C Change – An operational level change affecting a single
department. This category only requires Change Sponsor approval
normally from the head of the affected department.
The Change Management adopts the following process:
a. The Change Implementer (who is normally a manager of the department
intending to propose a change) will submit either a paper based Change
Control Form (SMS002) or through the electronic Change Management
Register, stating the Category of Change for the submission. The change
can be submitted while all relevant documents listed in the Change
Control Form are being compiled and submitted for review by the
respective departments for their awareness once the submission is
complete. The Change Sponsor will then approve the change and the
process ends here for a Category C change before the necessary
implementation actions can proceed.
b. For Category B changes, the submission will need endorsements from all
affected departments and further approval from the CMC Chair before
proceeding with the necessary implementation actions. Similarly for
Category A changes, further approval from the CEO will need to be
obtained after the CMC chair endorses the change.

Revision 19 Safety Management System Manual 03 January 2018


13-2

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 13
Jetstar Asia Change Management

c. During the implementing stage, deviation from the originally approved


documents will need to be highlighted and documented in the Change
Management Register so that all relevant departments are made aware
of them. The change is still being monitored by the Change Management
Committee at this stage to ensure that implementation processes and
timelines are met.
d. Once the implementation is complete, the committee then decides on a
Post Implementation Review period if required and the change is
subsequently monitored and closed after this is completed.
The change management process is not intended to inhibit normal management
communications or vary existing policies and procedures from its implementation
timelines, particularly on time critical projects and publications like Flight Standing
Orders. It is meant to be a document repository and tracking tool to ensure that all
departments are aware of changes that are made throughout the company as well
as ensuring that there are no gaps in the implementation process that is not being
addressed.
It is not necessary to discuss every change at the CMC. If there is no apparent
interdependency with another department the change should simply be notified
and registered as a Category C Change. Some changes will require a Risk
assessment to be done as per current policy outlined in the Safety Management
Systems Manual. This can be referred to the Management Safety and Security
Committee (MSSC) or request that Head of Safety, QA and Security or delegate
facilitate at a CMC meeting or a side meeting.
There may be a need for some items to remain open until final proposals have
been endorsed, committee decisions made and the change fully implemented. The
intent is to ensure issues and documentation as well as the PIR process are
followed through and closed appropriately.

08 July 2015 Safety Management System Manual Revision 16


13-3

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 13
Change Management Jetstar Asia

Intentionally blank

Revision 16 Safety Management System Manual 08 July 2015


13-4

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 14 – Emergency Response Plan
Jetstar Asia Table of Contents

14. Emergency Response Plan.................................................................. 14-1

18 July 2008 Safety Management System Manual Revision 0


14-i

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Intentionally blank

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 14
Jetstar Asia Emergency Response Plan

14. Emergency Response Plan


The Emergency Response Plan and The Business Continuity Plan Checklists are
incorporated in the Group Crisis Management Plan (GCMP) Enclosure 6.
Chapters
1 Introduction
2 Crisis Management Overview
3 Crisis Management Centre (CMC)
4 Crisis Management Team Checklist
5 CAAS Crisis Management Centre
6 Site Command Team (SCT)
7 Passenger Holding Area (PHA)
8 Relative Holding Area (RHA)
9 Private Matching Area (PMA)
10 Hospital & Hotel Liaison
11 Telephone Enquiry Centre (TEC)
12 Finance Liaison Officer
13 Threat Plans
14 Station Emergency Response Plan
15 List

18 June 2012 Safety Management System Manual Revision 9


14-1

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 14
Emergency Response Plan Jetstar Asia

Intentionally blank

Revision 9 Safety Management System Manual 18 June 2012


14-2

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 15 – Safety Governance
Jetstar Asia Table of Contents

15. Safety Governance ............................................................................... 15-1


15.1 Introduction................................................................................................................ 15-1
15.2 Review and Continual Improvement of SMS .......................................................... 15-1
15.3 MSSC .......................................................................................................................... 15-1
15.4 Board Safety Committee ........................................................................................... 15-3
15.5 FDAP ........................................................................................................................... 15-4
15.6 CMC ............................................................................................................................ 15-4
15.7 Group Airline Safety Committee (GASC) ................................................................ 15-4
15.8 Safety Sub-committees ............................................................................................. 15-5

03 January 2018 Safety Management System Manual Revision 19


15-i

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Intentionally blank

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 15
Jetstar Asia Safety Governance

15. Safety Governance

15.1 Introduction
Jetstar Asia management is responsible for the safety performance of the airline.
Ultimately this responsibility lies with the CEO. Effective management of safety
performance is achieved through identifying and managing operational risks. This
requires a system of measuring and analysing airline safety health, identifying
risks, management review of performance and corrective/preventative actions.
The following section describes the systems and processes Jetstar Asia has
established to effectively manage risk and safety performance.

15.2 Review and Continual Improvement of SMS


The Company shall ensure the continual improvement of the SMS by regularly
reviewing its effectiveness through the following forums:
 Management Safety & Security Committee (MSSC, monthly except on months
when BSSC is held)
 Board Safety & Security Committee (BSSC, 4-monthly)
 Flight Data Analysis Program (FDAP, monthly)
 Change Management Committee (CMC, monthly, normally held immediately
after MSSC)
Where possible, these meeting should be planned before year end for the whole of
the subsequent year, so as to maximize participation by various heads of
department and senior managers.
Attendance of MSSC will be noted and monitored over a 12-month period.

15.3 MSSC
The MSSC shall be the primary forum for the monitoring and reviewing of the
health and effectiveness of the SMS implementation in achieving the operational
safety objectives of the company. Such indicators of health may be gleaned from
all available sources, including occurrence reports, investigations, Flight Data
Analysis Program, audits, and other direct or indirect feedback. The meeting will
review the safety of all aspects of operations, including flying, despatch, cabin,
passenger service, ramp, technical and maintenance operations, with security and
quality assurance being integral parts of the review.
Any deficiency in the SMS or shortfall in its implementation shall be identified and
corrective actions taken to rectify them. Where additional resources or higher
decisions need to be taken, the issues will be escalated to higher management or
to the BSSC.

17 July 2013 Safety Management System Manual Revision 12


15-1

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 15
Safety Governance Jetstar Asia

The agenda of MSSC meeting shall include the following:


 Review of action items
 Meeting attendance record
 Occurrence risk profile
 Occurrence report rate
 Regulatory issues
 Safety and Security highlights
 Highlights from Safety Sub-committees
 Review of outstanding actions from investigation, Risk Assessment & Crisis
Management.
 Review and analysis of monthly occurrence reports
 Review and analysis of FDAP data
 Highlight of selected significant occurrence and investigation
 Review of Quality Assurance Program
 Review of security status throughout the network
 SMS/QMS review (Q2 of calendar year)
 GCMP review (Q3 of calendar year)
 Any other matter
The Head of Safety, QA and Security is delegated as chairman of MSSC by the
CEO.
The following positions comprise the Management Safety and Security Committee:
 Head of Safety, QA & Security (Chairman)
 Head of Flying Operations
 Chief Pilot
 Head of Engineering & Maintenance
 Head of Ground Ops
 Head of Customer Service & Experience
 Manager, Ground Operations
 Manager, Network Operations
 Manager Safety
 Security Manager
The MSSC shall have a quorum of three members. If a member is unable to attend
a meeting of the MSSC, they may nominate a delegate to attend the meeting in
their place.
From time to time, each member of the MSSC may elect to bring a guest (or
subject matter expert) to the meetings for the purposes of presenting specialist
information. The guest may be an employee of Jetstar Asia who is able to provide

Revision 19 Safety Management System Manual 03 January 2018


15-2

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 15
Jetstar Asia Safety Governance

input to the committee on a particular matter. The presence of any guest is at the
discretion of the chairperson.

15.4 Board Safety Committee


A sub-committee of the Jetstar Asia board known as the Board Safety and Security
Committee (BSSC) assists the Jetstar Asia Board fulfil its corporate governance
responsibilities in regards to operational safety, operational security, operational
risk management and compliance with all operational and regulatory obligations
under the AOC.
This committee normally meets three times a year. The committee is composed of
a number of Jetstar Board members as decided by the board and the BSSC may
at its discretion appoint an external expert advisor. Jetstar Asia Safety and QA
personnel may be required to act as secretariat and will provide the necessary
reports to Board Safety Committee meetings.
The agenda of BSSC includes the following:
 Review of action items
 Escalated issues from MSSC
 Regulatory issues
 Security highlights
 Safety highlights
 Summary of Safety & Security reports
 Summary of QA audit findings
 Other matters
The BSSC is chaired by Group CEO or his nominee, or any person appointed by
the Board of Director.
The members of this meeting are:
 Jetstar Asia CEO
 Qantas Rep/Board Rep
 Head of Flying Ops
 Head of Safety
 Manager Safety (Secretary)
Additional attendees by invitation are:
 Head of Engineering & Maintenance
 Head of Ground Ops
 Manager QA Engineering
 Security Manager
 Jetstar Group Head of Safety

08 February 2016 Safety Management System Manual Revision 17


15-3

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 15
Safety Governance Jetstar Asia

 Jetstar Asia Chief Pilot


The BSSC shall have a quorum of three members. If a member is unable to attend
a meeting of the MSSC, they may nominate a delegate to attend the meeting in
their place.

15.5 FDAP
The purpose and processes of FDAP is outlined in Chapter 8 of the SMS.

15.6 CMC
The purpose and processes of CMC is outlined in Chapter 13 of the SMS.

15.7 Group Airline Safety Committee (GASC)


GASC is a monthly meeting of executive safety groups from all Jetstar Group
Airlines across the region via teleconference, to review safety performance, to
share lessons learnt and exchange security information. The GASC is normally
chaired by Jetstar Group CEO or his delegate. Members from each airline include
the respective CEO, Head of Safety and other relevant Department Heads. The
representatives from Jetstar Asia are:
 CEO;
 Head of Safety, QA & Security;
 Head of Flying Ops;
 Manager Safety; and
 Security Manager.
Additional attendees by invitation are:
 Chief Pilot;
 Head of Ground Ops;
 Head of Engineering and Maintenance.

Revision 17 Safety Management System Manual 08 February 2016


15-4

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 15
Jetstar Asia Safety Governance

The inter-relations between BSSC, MSSC and GASC may be seen as follows:

Board Safety &


Security
Committee

Formal
reporting
through
normal Jetstar Group Head of
management Safety advises BSSC as
lines in JSA required.

Management Group Airline Safety


Safety & Security Committee (GASC)
Committee
Exchange of
information and services

15.8 Safety Sub-committees


The following safety sub-committees should be established:
 Flight Safety Sub-committee – Formed by Flying Operations and
Customer Service departments.
 Ground Safety Sub-committees – Formed by Ground Ops and E & M
departments.
The sub-committee should conduct monthly meetings to review respective
operational safety matter for reporting or escalation to MSSC.
Each department should maintain a risk profile/register applicable to the
respective business unit.

08 February 2016 Safety Management System Manual Revision 17


15-5

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 15
Safety Governance Jetstar Asia

Intentionally blank

Revision 16 Safety Management System Manual 08 July 2015


15-6

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 16 – Forms
Jetstar Asia Table of Contents

16. Forms ..................................................................................................... 16-1


16.1 SMS001 – OSCAR (Paper Form for Occurrence Report) Issue 2, 04/09/17 ........ 16-1
16.2 SMS002 – Change Control Form Issue 0, 08/07/15 ............................................... 16-1
16.3 SMS003 – Special Air Report of Volcanic Activity Issue 0, 08/07/15.................... 16-1

04 September 2017 Safety Management System Manual Revision 18


16-i

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Intentionally blank

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 16
Jetstar Asia Forms

16. Forms

16.1 SMS001 – OSCAR (Paper Form for Occurrence Report)


Issue 2, 04/09/17

16.2 SMS002 – Change Control Form Issue 0, 08/07/15

16.3 SMS003 – Special Air Report of Volcanic Activity Issue 0,


08/07/15

04 September 2017 Safety Management System Manual Revision 18


16-1

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Chapter 16
Forms Jetstar Asia

Intentionally blank

Revision 0 Safety Management System Manual 18 July 2008


16-2

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


OSCAR (Operational Safety and Company Advisory Report)
THIS SECTION FOR JETSTAR ASIA SSQA OFFICE USE ONLY

Risk Incident Title: SSQA Comments:


Rating: Type:

CAAS/TSIB StarSafe MR: Info:


Reportable N/A

Note: If confidentiality is desired, please indicate here and we will follow up with you. Confidential? Yes No
Reporter’s particulars

Company: Based In: Department:

*Name: Mobile Number:

*Staff Number: *Position: Email(optional):

Others To
Notify(optional):
Site Information

JSA Dept Responsible(optional): Sub-Dept(optional):


*Country/Port Of Occurrence:

Incident Details

*Occurrence *Occurrence *Occurrence


Location: Date: Time (UTC/LT):
Flight Information

*Flight Number: *Departure Port: *Arrival Port:

*Phase of Flight: Result of *Aircraft


Occurrence: Registration:

*Event Title:

Details of Occurrence:

Form SMS001 Issue 2 (04/09/17) 1


UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED
Additional Flight Information (for pilots only)
PF: PM:
CSM: Number of Crew:
Flight Phase: POB:
Runway in Use Type of Approach:

Aircraft Configuration (for pilots only)


Flap Setting:
Flight Director Mode: Autopilot: A/THR: Speedbrake: Gear:
Latral: On On Extended Up A/C Weight:
Vertical Off Off Retracted Down

Weather Conditions (if applicable)


Wind
Turbulence: Light Moderate Severe Extreme Met: VMC IMC (deg/kt):
Vis / RVR
Precipitation: Rain Snow Hail Fog Light: Day Night (m):
Temp
Precipitation Severity: Light Moderate Heavy Runway Condition (deg):

Cloud Cover: Few Scattered Broken O/cast Dry Damp Wet Ice Slush QNH:

(Incident description: continued from page 1)

Filing Instructions:
ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION THROUGH STARSAFE IS THE PREFERRED MODE OF OSCAR SUBMISSION.
For those submitting OSCAR using this form, please do so either by submitting directly to SSQA department, or by depositing into
OSCAR collection boxes in JSA OCC/crew-room. If faxing, send to +65 65439689 and follow up with a call to +65 63180907/8 to
confirm receipt. For submission by email, please save under appropriate new filename and send to safety.security@jetstarasia.com.

Form SMS001 Issue 2 (04/09/17) 2


UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED
Change Control Form

1. Define Change:
Change Title:

Implementation
Change Sponsor:
Date:
A – CEO Approval
Type Approval B – CMC Approval
Functional Area:
Required:
C – Head of the
relevant department

PLEASE READ INSTRUCTIONS ON LAST PAGE OF THIS FORM BEFORE COMPLETING

2. Change Process:
A. Description of Change:
CHANGE SPONSOR TO COMPLETE

Reason for Change:

Stakeholders:

Risk Profile Assessment:


B. (in consultation with Safety
Department)

Extreme
CHANGE SPONSOR TO COMPLETE

High

Medium

Low

Very Low
Risk Assessment Attachments:

Form SMS002 Issue 0 (08/07/15) Page 1 of 4

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Change Control Form

C. Overview of the Implementation Plan:


CHANGE SPONSOR TO
COMPLETE

3. Change Management Portfolio Documentation:


Other Attachments (as applicable): Attachment No.

Business Case/Project Plan

Risk Assessment

Draft Document Amendments

CAAS Certification

Compliance Statement/Impact Review

Other (please specify)

NAME and TO BE FORWARDED


SIGNATURE: ..............................................................................................................
TO MANAGER

Form SMS002 Issue 0 (08/07/15) Page 2 of 4

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Change Control Form

4. Stakeholder Endorsement:
(CROSS OUT IF NOT APPLICABLE)

Endorsed By:

........................................................................................................................................................
Chief Pilot (or delegate)

Endorsed By:

........................................................................................................................................................
Head of Operations (or delegate)

Endorsed By:

........................................................................................................................................................
Head of Ground Operations (or delegate)

Endorsed By:

........................................................................................................................................................
Head of Cabin Crew (or delegate)

Endorsed By:

........................................................................................................................................................
Head of Commercial (or delegate)

Endorsed By:

........................................................................................................................................................
Head of Finance (or delegate)

Endorsed By:

Head of Engineering (or delegate)

Endorsed By:

........................................................................................................................................................
Head of Safety (or delegate )

Form SMS002 Issue 0 (08/07/15) Page 3 of 4

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Change Control Form

5. Approval:
Category B
Approved By: ........................................................................................................................................................
Chair Change Management Committee

Category A
Approved By: ........................................................................................................................................................
Chief Executive Officer

6. Regulatory Application/Notification:
(Applicable for Major or Moderate Changes identified in Safety Risk Endorsement) DATE

Prepared By:

Forwarded To:

Regulator Approval/Acceptance:

7. Document Control:
INITIALS DATE

Close change on Change Management Forum

Uploaded to Intranet

Compliance Statement Updated

Master Risk Register updated

INSTRUCTIONS FOR COMPLETION


1. Change Sponsor to drive the Change Management process and complete Sections 1 and 2.
2. Change Sponsor to identify Change Management Portfolio documentation in Section 3. All attachments
to be compiled numbered and forwarded with submission to Department Head for endorsement.
3. Upon gaining endorsement, Change Sponsor to forward submission to Safety Department for
endorsement.

Form SMS002 Issue 0 (08/07/15) Page 4 of 4

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED


Special Air Report of
Volcanic Activity
Flight No. ................................................ Captain: .............................................

Departure from: ...................................... Date and Time: ..................................

Arrival at: ................................................. Date and Time: ..................................

1 Aircraft Identification

2 Aircraft Position

3 Time

4 Flight Level

5 Volcanic Activity Observed –


Name and No. as per RMS or
position or bearing and distance
from aircraft
6 Air Temperature

7 Wind

8 Supplementary Information –
Brief description including
The following information is not transmitted. Tick  the appropriate box:

9 Density of ash cloud Wispy Moderate dense Very dense


10 Colour of ash cloud White Light grey Dark grey
Black
11 Eruption Continuous Intermittent Not visible
12 Position of activity Summit Side Single
Multiple Not observed
13 Other observed Lightning Glow Large rocks
features of eruption
Ash fall out Mushrooming cloud Nil
14 Effect on aircraft Communications Nav systems Engines

Pilot Static Windscreen Windows


Nil
15 Other effects Turbulence St. Elmos Fire Fumes
Ash deposits
16 Other Information -

Form SMS003 Issue 0 (08/07/15) Completed Form SMS003 is to be faxed to


Singapore Met Office at +65-65425026

UNCONTROLLED WHEN PRINTED OR DOWNLOADED