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Participant Manual

2018-19
These materials are developed and produced by the Association of California School Administrators
(ACSA) for the training and support of ACSA leadership coaches and Local Programs in the California
Network of School Leadership Coaches and their candidates.

We encourage the duplication and use of these materials by coaches and candidates, provided that the
credit is attributed to ACSA. Please do not post any of the documents in this packet on public websites,
distribute copies outside of the candidate’s school, district or program or use any of these materials for
commercial professional development training.

For further information about use of this material, and other tools to support new administrator practice,
please contact ACSA Education Services office at 916-329-3839 or credentialing@acsa.org.

Association of California School Administrators


Educational Services Department
1029 J Street, Suite 500,
Sacramento, CA 95814
Phone 916-329-3839

Copyright  2018 Association of California School Administrators (ACSA) unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Do not
reproduce without permission.

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 1


Table of Contents

Program Personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Program Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
California Professional Standards for Education Leaders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Individual Induction Plan Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Section I: Coaching Agreement & Professional Experience and Work Context . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Section II: System of Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Section III: Leadership Learning Goal .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Section IV: Professional Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Section V: Progress Monitoring and Program Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Policies and Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

Appendices
Appendix A: California Professional Standards for Education Leaders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Appendix B: Coaching Agreement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Appendix C: Professional Experience and Work Context. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Appendix D: Supervisor Input Meeting Protocol and Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Appendix E: CPSEL Self-Assessment and Reflection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Appendix F: Collaborative Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Appendix G: Leadership Learning Goal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Appendix H: Professional Development Reflection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Appendix I: End of Year One Progress Check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Appendix J: Verification of Program Completion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Appendix K: Candidate Data Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Appendix L: Sample Letter of Verification Two Years Administrative Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 2


Program Personnel

Tracy Robinson, Ed. D ❏ Program orientation and oversight


Educational Services Executive
❏ Candidate acceptance and recommendations
Clear Administrative Credential Program Director
trobinson@acsa.org ❏ Local Program applications
916-329-3837
❏ Coach applications and hiring
916-709-4413 (mobile)

Joan Ruzic ❏ Coach professional development


Senior Administrative Clerk
❏ CNET and ALC scheduling and registration
jruzic@acaa.org
916-444-3843 ❏ Coach Service Agreements - ACSA Local Program

Kim Rhoden ❏ Candidate Services


Administrative Assistant
❏ Application and Enrollment
krhoden@acsa.org
916-329-3839 ❏ Registration and Program Fees

❏ Learning Management Support

Christina Cruz ❏ Coach Applications


Administrative Assistant
ccruz@acsa.org ❏ Coaching Service Fees – ACSA Local Programs
916-970-7045
❏ Coach Certification

Christina Hochleitner ❏ Learning Management System Consultant


Educational Consultant
chochleitner22@gmail.com ❏ Professional Development
626-297-7433

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 3


Program Overview

Welcome to the Association of California School Administrators’ (ACSA) Clear Administrative Credential
Program (CACP), the largest provider in California of coaching, professional development and assessment
for attaining the Clear Administrative Services Credential.
In order to be eligible to enter an Administrative Services Credential Clear Induction Program, candidates
must possess a valid California Preliminary Administrative Services Credential (Ed Code section 44270.1
(a) (1) and have verification of an offer of employment in a full or part-time administrative position in an
employing agency as defined by Title 5 of the California Code of Regulations section 80054 (g) (1).
Our Clear Administrative Credential Program is designed to identify and address the needs of all
administrators in the program while developing their administrative leadership skills. The program is
grounded in California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) Clear Induction Program Standards
and California Professional Standards for Education Leaders (CPSEL). The six CPSEL are:
1. Development of a Shared Vision
2. Instructional Leadership
3. Management and Learning Environment
4. Family and Community Engagement
5. Ethics and Integrity
6. External Context and Policy
The two-year Clear Administrative Credential Program (CACP) includes three professional learning
components required for administrator induction programs that serve candidates seeking to clear their
Administrative Services Credential. Candidates extend their leadership knowledge, skills and attitudes
through coaching, professional development and assessment. These three components are organized into
an Individual Induction Plan (IIP). The CACP components and outcomes are job embedded and not just
another thing to do.
Coaching
All ACSA Clear Administrative Credential Program (CACP) leadership coaches are well trained, certified
and informed about current research, trends and policy issues. These skilled practitioners are carefully
matched with a credential candidate and committed to supporting the candidate’s development and
leadership capacity for long-term success. Leadership coaches work with candidates side-by-side, at the
school site, on-the-job and are available via email and phone. Over the span of two years, collaborative
coaching activities are embedded in the candidate’s day-to-day work. Leadership coaches are required to
spend approximately 4-6 hours coaching per month each year or 40 hours during each of the two years.

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 4


Professional Development
Professional development is an induction program component required by the California Commission on
Teacher Credentialing (CCTC). Credential candidates must complete twenty hours of professional
development for each of the two years in the Clear Administrative Credential Program (CACP). The
professional development component consists of high quality professional learning opportunities and
choices. These professional development choices are guided by the candidate’s unique work setting, the
organization’s goals, individualized goals and the California Professional Standards for Education Leaders
(CPSEL) program outcome attainment. A candidate’s Leadership Learning Goal (LLG), action steps and
professional development choices are determined and jointly agreed upon by the candidate and
leadership coach. Professional development options are flexible and are determined by needs of each
candidate.
Assessment
Leadership coaches collaborate with candidates to assess strengths, growth and the attainment of the
Clear Administrative Credential Program (CACP) outcomes through ongoing assessment. These outcomes
are directly related to the Individualized Induction Plan (IIP). Candidates and leadership coaches collect
data regarding the candidate’s competency and application of California Professional Standards for
Education Leaders (CPSEL) elements. Candidates demonstrate their competency of CPSEL attainment
throughout the program by documenting evidence in a digital portfolio. At the end of the program, the
candidate will participate in an exit presentation or interview to share their CPSEL competency and
learning experiences.
Professional Learning

Coaching, professional development and assessment are essential components in the credential
candidate’s two-year induction program that focuses on professional learning. This growth-oriented
approach assesses the needs of each candidate and responds to their needs.
Two-Year Growth Oriented Induction Program

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 5


Program Overview and Outcomes
Candidates demonstrate competency in each of the six California Profession Standards for
Education Leaders

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 6


California Professional Standards for Education Leaders (CPSEL)

The California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) sets program standards for all approved
Administrative Services Clear Induction Programs. The CCTC program standards require Clear
Administrative Service Credential candidates to demonstrate competency in each of the six California
Professional Standards for Education Leaders (CPSEL). West Ed’s Descriptions of Practice (DOP)
describe the standards as, “The six CPSEL identify what an administrator must know and be able to do
to demonstrate effective and sustained leadership” (Kearney, 2015). The CPSEL are organized into six
broad leadership areas that address expectations for effective practice. Each standard is further
delineated by specific elements and indicators. The elements reflect administrator responsibilities and
provide examples of the action or indicators of practice (CDE, 2015; Kearney, 2015). A complete list of
the standards, elements and indicators is found in Appendix A. The six CPSEL are:
California Professional Standards for Education Leaders
● Standard 1: Development of a Shared Vision
● Standard 2: Instructional Leadership
● Standard 3: Management and Learning Environment
● Standard 4: Family and Community Engagement
● Standard 5: Ethics and Integrity
● Standard 6: External Context and Policy

Program Completion
Candidates must demonstrate competency in each of the six California Professional Standards for
Education Leaders (CPSEL). Candidates will engage in all standard elements; however, they must
select at least one element from each standard to document competency for program completion.
Documentation for program completion is collected and recorded throughout the two-year program
and housed in a candidate digital portfolio. The candidate program portfolio is shared at the end of
the program during an exit presentation or interview. Section V provides more information about
program completion, portfolio requirements and recommendation for a Clear Administrative Services
Credential.

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 7


Individual Induction Plan

The two-year induction program focuses on professional learning through a composite of three key
overlapping components: coaching, professional development and candidate assessment as
documented in an Individual Induction Plan (IIP). After gathering baseline data, candidates develop
and maintain a plan to track their personalized goals, induction experiences and progress toward
leadership competency and expected performance. Specific goals and details for each candidate
depend on what he or she needs to be successful in his or her current administrative position. The
Individual Induction Plan (IIP) is collaboratively developed by the candidate and leadership coach and
serves as an organizational and monitoring tool throughout the program. The Individual Induction Plan
(IIP) is grounded in the California Professional Standards for Education Leaders (CPSEL) and considers
employer's priorities, individual job responsibilities and prior professional experience.

The Individual Induction Plan (IIP) connects the three components of coaching, professional
development and assessment into a learning plan for the candidate. It is a working document that is
revisited to check on progress and revised when needed. The candidate and leadership coach may
choose to revise an Individual Induction Plan (IIP) at any time. The Individual Induction Plan (IIP) is
used to determine completion of the Clear Administrative Credential Program (CACP) and to
recommend candidates for a Clear Administrative Services Credential.

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 8


Individual Induction Plan Overview
Section I: Coaching Agreement and Professional Experience and Work Context

Together with the leadership coach, the candidate discusses, reviews and signs a Coaching Agreement and
then reviews his or her educational background, professional experiences as well as needed skills and
knowledge to identify specific performance outcomes. In addition, data relative to the candidate's
placement, job requirements and employer expectations are documented. This initial activity,
documented in the Professional Experience and Work Context, is intended to be a “snapshot” and offers
the leadership coach a perspective of other experiences, opportunities and guidance the candidate may
require.

Section II: Assessment

The Clear Administrative Credential Program (CACP) incorporates a system of assessment to measure
candidate competence and takes into consideration the highly variable nature of administrative
responsibilities. Our assessment tools are both quantitative and qualitative and use both traditional
paper-and-pencil instruments as well as alternative forms of assessment.

Throughout the two-year program, assessment of candidate knowledge and skills is conducted. An initial
self-assessment is the first activity in the induction program and is used to form a baseline profile of the
new administrator. Formative assessment occurs throughout the program through self-reflection,
coaching activities and individualized professional development. A benchmark self-assessment at the
midpoint of a candidate's experience allows the candidate, coach and local program coordinator to track
progress toward completion and identify additional support that might be needed. A final self-assessment,
a summative review of the candidate's work, occurs at the end of the two-year induction program,
verifying that the candidate has demonstrated competency for a clear credential recommendation.

Our program utilizes a continuum of leadership development, West Ed's, Moving Leadership Standards
Into Everyday Work: Descriptions of Practice (DOP) (Kearney, 2015) along with other forms of assessment
to determine growth, knowledge, skills and application of CPSEL competency. ACSA’s assessment system
provides flexibility for candidates to incorporate participating school, district or program assessments
already in use.

Section III: Leadership Learning Goal (LLG)

Goal development is a process that requires the best thinking of the candidate and the leadership coach
to determine growth areas to focus on in a Leadership Learning Goal (LLG) for the year. The Leadership
Learning Goal (LLG) outlines the actions a candidate engages in as he or she works toward attainment of
CPSEL competencies. Goals and activities are collaboratively set and agreed to by both leadership coach
and candidate. The action steps are continually revised to reflect added activities and related professional
development. The Leadership Learning Goal (LLG) incorporates the CPSEL to be addressed to document
progress. During the beginning of the second year, it is expected that the leadership coach and candidate
review Leadership Learning Goal(s) and activities to make appropriate adjustments.

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 9


Section IV: Professional Development

Professional development is another component of the induction experience and provides an avenue to
build leadership competencies. Professional development supports the development of professional
networks to share best practices, challenges and build collegial support.

ACSA’s Clear Administrative Credential Program (CACP) professional development offerings address the
needs common to new administrators and they are also differentiated and flexible. The professional
development learning opportunities are outlined in the candidate's Individual Induction Plan (IIP). A
minimum of 20 professional development hours for each of the two years of the program are required.
Professional development options may include:

● Reflection on current practice


● Research-based instructional best practices
● Modeling, problem-based practice
● Planning and adaptation to current leadership responsibilities
● Attendance at trainings, workshops, webinars, employer professional development,
seminars or conferences
● Visitations to schools, districts or programs
● Participation in a book study group
● Enrollment in graduate courses
● Job shadowing of another administrator
● Participation and review of online webinars or resources such the ACSA Resource Hub
● Participation in or development of a Personal Learning Network (PLN)

This list is not exclusive to other professional development needs. Additional professional development
opportunities are available within Schoology and are organized by the California Professional Standards
for Education Leaders (CPSEL). Credential candidates record professional learning on the Professional
Development Reflection Form and document hours on the Professional Development Reflection Log.
Section V: Progress Monitoring and Program Completion and Credential Recommendation

The summative assessment for program completion and credential recommendation is a review of the
observed and documented Individual Induction Plan (IIP) progress and evidence of CPSEL competency. It
is collaboratively assembled by the candidate and leadership coach, and includes the candidate’s
reflection on the induction experience and leadership practice. Candidate assessments, self-reflections
and documentation of required coaching and professional development hours are kept in the candidate’s
digital portfolio. In addition, the candidate must include, on letterhead from his or her employer, a letter
verifying successful completion of two years in a full-time administrative position. Upon completion of the
portfolio, candidates participate in an exit presentation or interview to review the portfolio with his or her
leadership coach and local program coordinator. The final recommendation is sent to the ACSA program
director.

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 10


Section I: Coaching Agreement & Professional Experience and
Work Context

Coaching Agreement IA
The Coaching Agreement is a signed commitment of expectations and responsibilities between the
candidate and the leadership coach. It should be completed within 30 days of the candidate’s
enrollment in the program and at the first meeting with a leadership coach and candidate. A copy of
the signed Coaching Agreement is placed in the candidate portfolio. A sample of the Coaching
Agreement is found in Appendix B.
Professional Experience and Work Context IB
The Professional Experience and Work Context assessment is an overview of the candidate’s prior
professional experience, skills, knowledge and areas for growth. A sample of this assessment is in
Appendix C. The Professional Experience and Work Context assessment provides an opportunity to
learn about the candidate’s preparation route for the preliminary administrative credential, areas of
strength and areas for growth. This assessment is completed at the initial meeting with the candidate
and the leadership coach. It is the foundation for building a relationship of trust and provides an
opportunity to listen to the candidate’s story.
There are three parts to the Professional Experience and Work Context assessment. The first section
contains a place to review the candidate’s prior professional experience, skills, knowledge and areas
for growth. The second section is to document the school, district or program data and the final section
provides an opportunity to enter school, district or program priorities and supervisor input.
Section IB-1: Candidate’s prior professional experiences, skills, knowledge and area(s) for
growth
o Describe the candidate’s experiences, preparation route for a preliminary administrative
credential and areas of strength and growth.
Section IB-2: School, District or Program Data
o Review and document school, district or program data relevant to the candidate’s assigned
work. Create a shared understanding of the candidates work context. A review of the data
may help develop the rationale for a Leadership Learning Goal (LLG).

Section IB-3: Supervisor Input Meeting


o The leadership coach and candidate, working in partnership with the candidate’s employer will
schedule an initial meeting with the candidate’s supervisor within the first 30 days of program
enrollment (see Appendix D). This initial meeting between the candidate, leadership coach
and supervisor (or designee) is required to provide an opportunity for the leadership coach to
introduce his or herself, share information about the Clear Administrative Credential Program

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 11


(CACP), discuss CACP outcomes and engage in a conversation about the candidate’s job
responsibilities. As the program is designed with job-embedded coaching in mind, it is essential
to find out the supervisor’s expectations, ask questions about resources and support and
discuss school, district or program priorities. The candidate, leadership coach and site
supervisor will meet again, at minimum, at the end of year one to discuss progress toward
leadership goals and at the completion of the candidate requirements at the end of year two.

o A sample protocol for the Supervisor Input Meeting is found in Appendix D.


Coaching Agreement: Professional Experience and
Appendix B Work Context: Appendix C

Include in Candidate Portfolio:


• Coaching Agreement
• Professional Experience and Work Context

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 12


Section II: System of Assessment

The Clear Administrative Credential Program (CACP) candidate participates in a system of assessment
designed to support and guide his or her Leadership Learning Goal (LLG), professional development
choices and coaching conversations. The flowchart below illustrates how the system is incorporated into
the candidate’s Individual Induction Plan (IIP) and is followed by a brief description of the assessment
purpose.

The CPSEL Self-Assessment and Reflection


The CPSEL Self-Assessment and Reflection is one piece of the system of assessment that provides a
powerful technique to define, clarify and improve leadership effectiveness. The CPSEL Self-Assessment
and Reflection is found in Appendix E. Utilized in conjunction with the WestEd’s Descriptions of Practice
(DOP), the CPSEL Self-Assessment and Reflection will:
● Provide a scaffold of knowledge, skills and dispositions to identify specific practices on which to
compare performance against proficiency standards and program outcomes;
● Identify discrepancies between actual and desired performance;
● Help to confirm strengths and identify areas of growth; and
● Provide concrete examples of desired practice and identify gaps.

The completion of the CPSEL Self-Assessment and Reflection facilitates collaborative conversations
between the candidate and the leadership coach to develop a common understanding of CPSEL

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 13


knowledge, skills and application. The conversation will focus on moving the candidate along a continuum
of practice with four levels to illustrate knowledge, skills and application of the CPESL indicators. The four
levels move from practice that is “directed toward”, “approaching”, “meeting” or “exemplifying” each
CPSEL to identify learning and growth areas and professional development needs. This conversation leads
to the development of the candidate’s Leadership Learning Goal (LLG) and action steps. The candidate
and the leadership coach complete the CPSEL Self-Assessment and Reflection three times during the two-
year program, charting progress on the Descriptions of Practice continuum.

Initial Assessment (completed in the first 90 days):


● Review professional experience and preliminary credential pathway
● Understand job expectations and school, district or program priorities
● Analyze school, district or program profile data
● Read, analyze and reflect on a continuum of CPSEL leadership development
● Examine leadership practice in relation to the CPSEL (Initial Self-Assessment and Reflection)

Benchmark Assessment (completed after the first year):


● Analyze and reflect on the continuum of CPSEL leadership development
● Examine leadership practice in relation to the CPSEL (Benchmark Self-Assessment and Reflection)
● Assist in determining candidate growth and area for growth
● Record descriptors or examples that best illustrate CPSEL attainment

Final Assessment (end of second year):


● Analyze and reflect on the continuum of CPSEL leadership development
● Examine leadership practice in relation to the CSPEL (Final Self-Assessment and Reflection)
● Record descriptors or examples that best illustrate CPSEL competency
● Exit presentation or interview to document leadership learning and impact
● Review of candidate portfolio
● Determines program completion and recommendation for Clear Administrative Services
Credential

Collaborative Summary – Formative Assessments

For each coaching session, the credential candidate and the leadership coach complete a Collaborative
Summary to document the coaching conversation, discuss successes and obstacles and determine the
focus for the next meeting. At these meetings, leadership coaches and candidates discuss the candidate’s
issues of urgency or concerns, focus on the Leadership Learning Goal (LLG), review professional
development needs and examine progress towards California Professional Standards for Education
Leaders (CPSEL) attainment. The Collaborative Summary also includes a place to record the coaching time.
Candidates keep all collaborative summaries in their learning management digital folder as a record of
their induction experience. Candidates must include a minimum of three samples in their portfolio at the
end of year two to demonstrate growth and CPSEL competency. A sample of the Collaborative Summary
is found in Appendix F.

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 14


CPSEL Self-Assessment and Collaborative Summary:
Reflection: Appendix E Appendix F

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 15


Section III: Leadership Learning Goal
A Leadership Learning Goal (LLG) is a major component of the Individual Induction Plan (IIP) and is
collaboratively developed, revisited and revised by the candidate and the leadership coach during the two
years of the program. The Leadership Learning Goal (LLG) is based on information gathered during the
beginning months of the program from the candidate’s Professional Experience and Work Context and the
CPSEL Self-Assessment and Reflection. The Leadership Learning Goal (LLG) form is found in Appendix G.
Using the initial CPSEL Self-Assessment and Reflection, the candidate and the coach work together to
develop the Leadership Learning Goal(s) and action steps for the year. The action steps will highlight one
or more standards and elements from the California Professional Standards for Education Leaders (CPSEL).
Throughout the program, the candidate collects evidence and records examples of knowledge, skills,
application and growth around CPSEL attainment. The Leadership Learning Goal (LLG) is reviewed at the
end of year one and at the end of year two.

Goal Setting
The candidate CPSEL initial Self-Assessment and Reflection should be completed within 90-days of the
start of the program to provide a clear idea of priority areas for goal setting. Other data sources for goal
setting can come from school, district or program priorities; student or climate data; or feedback from
colleagues and supervisors. The Leadership Learning Goal (LLG) should have clear and measurable
outcomes and be achievable to provide opportunities for a candidate to demonstrate growth and
attainment of CPSEL skills, knowledge and dispositions. Candidates are encouraged to focus on
Appreciative Inquiry design concepts of valuing the best of what is, envisioning what might be, dialoguing
about what should be and innovating what will be. What one focuses on becomes reality (Whitney, D. &
Trosten-Bloom, 2010).
It is advised that the candidate use SMARTER goal criteria to develop his or her Leadership Learning Goal
(LLG). The criteria for a SMARTER goal are outlined below:

● Specific - Target a specific area


● Measurable - Quantify or suggest an indicator of progress
● Achievable - Specify who will do it
● Realistic - State what results can realistically be achieved, given available resources
● Time-related - Specify when the results can be achieved
● Evaluate - Observe and learn during implementation of the goal
● Refine - Modify goal, strategies and actions based on evaluation

Goal Components
A Leadership Learning Goal (LLG) can focus directly on a school, district or program effort, or on a specific
leadership practice or competency. Regardless of the goal focus, the candidate and coach will need to
consider:

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 16


● California Professional Leadership Standards for Education Leaders (CPSEL) and the elements
that will be addressed
● Expected outcomes and how to measure progress and attainment
● Artifacts and evidence to demonstrate progress or attainment
● Strategies and actions that will help the candidate accomplish the goal
● Specific timelines for achievement and milestones
● Professional development and resources available to accomplish the goal
● Reflection on learning and impact

Leadership Learning Goal: Appendix G

At the end of the two-year program the candidate must 1) review each standard and select at least one
element per standard to be addressed; 2) clarify the types and the sources of artifacts or evidence to
support performance and; 3) review the professional development guidelines and criteria for action steps.

Include in Candidate Portfolio:


• Leadership Learning Goal
o Develop using CPSEL Self-Assessment and DOPS
o Review and Revise End of Year One
o Review and Finalize End of Year Two

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 17


Section IV: Professional Development
The purpose of professional development in the Clear Administrative Credential Program (CACP) is to
extend a candidate’s knowledge, skills and competencies in the California Professional Standards for
Education Leaders (CPSEL). Through coaching sessions, the candidate and the leadership coach
collaborate to determine and select appropriate professional development opportunities to support the
candidate in their Leadership Learning Goal(s) and action steps. Professional development should also
coordinate with the candidate's job assignment and responsibilities and help bridge the gap in his or her
CPSEL competencies. Each candidate is required to complete a minimum of 20 hours per year of
professional development. Professional development selections emerge over the course of time and from
a variety of tools and measures including, but not limited to, candidate prior experience, needs identified
in program self-assessments, coach observations, employer training and school district or program data.
Guidelines for Selecting Professional Development
The following guidelines for selecting professional development are used:
● Professional development must be grounded in the CPSEL
● Professional development must be documented in the Individual Induction Plan (IIP)
● Professional development must be collaboratively determined by candidate and leadership coach
● Professional development must address common beginning administrator needs
● Professional development may provide differentiated learning opportunities
● Professional development may be individualized for the candidate needs

In the Clear Administrative Credential Program (CACP) the candidate and the leadership coach have the
opportunity to choose the professional development that will best support the candidate. In addition,
they can determine how the candidate will engage in the new learning through a menu of choices
including, but not limited to, selections listed below.
Professional Development Opportunities and Choices
Within Schoology, there are optional, free professional development opportunities and units of study
aligned to the California Professional Standards for Education Leaders (CPSEL) for your convenience and
use. In addition, the following activities provide a variety of choices that may satisfy the professional
development requirements:
● Reflection on current practice
● Research-based instructional best practices
● Modeling, problem-based practice
● Planning and adaptation to current leadership responsibilities
● Attendance at trainings, workshops, webinars, district professional development, seminars
or conferences
● Visitations to other schools, districts or programs
● Participation in a book study group
● Enrollment in graduate courses

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 18


● Job shadowing of another administrator
● Participation and review of online webinars or resources such as ACSA’s Resource Hub
● Participation in or development of a Personal Learning Network (PLN)

Professional Development Reflection


Candidates complete a Professional Development Reflection for each professional development activity
they participate in that is aligned to their Leadership Learning Goal or job responsibilities to document the
application of the new learning. Professional development reflections span over the two years of the Clear
Administrative Credential Program (CACP) and should reflect a minimum of 20 hours per year (40 hours
over two years). Professional development is in addition to coaching and activities related to assessments
and goal development. Below you will find a sample of the Professional Development Reflection Form as
well as the Professional Development Log. Each of these documents are to be included in the candidate
portfolio. The Professional Development Reflection Form is also found in Appendix H.
Professional Development Reflection: Professional Development Log:
Appendix H (Online)

UPDATE

Include in Candidate Portfolio:

• Three Professional Development Reflections


• Professional Development Log of Hours for Year 1 (20 hours)
• Professional Development Log of Hours for Year 2 (20 hours)

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 19


Section V: Progress Monitoring and Program Completion
In order to ensure a quality program for candidates and allow for collaboration across statewide programs,
there are several methods of progress monitoring to determine candidate competency in the California
Professional Standards for Education Leaders.

Throughout the program, the leadership coach and local program coordinator work closely with
candidates to monitor attainment of the required number of professional development and coaching
hours as well as progress toward mastery of CPSEL elements. Formative assessments include the planning,
implementation and assessment of Leadership Learning Goal(s), Collaborative Summary reflections and
feedback on candidates’ CPSEL Self-Assessment and Reflections.

End of Year One Portfolio


At the end of year one, candidates submit an End of Year 1 Portfolio as part of a progress review. This
digital portfolio contains preliminary and benchmark documents required for program completion and is
used to assess candidate progress toward successful program completion (For required documents, see
Credential Candidate Portfolio Documents on p.22). Leadership coaches include a reflection on candidate
progress and both leadership coaches and local program coordinators provide feedback to each candidate
on his or her progress. Candidates are also required to complete an End of Year 1 Survey as part of our
ongoing program effectiveness and quality of coaching services review.

End of Year 1 Progress Check: Appendix I

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 20


Program Completion
At the end of the program, candidates participate in a final reflection through an exit presentation or
interview and present their portfolio to the local program coordinator and leadership coach. This process
is the summative assessment for the program and a time when the candidate presents evidence from
completed work throughout the program of his or her competency and growth in the California
Professional Standards for Education Leaders (CPSEL). Candidates discuss evidence and provide examples
of growth and competency from any of the program components. The Verification of Program Completion
Form shown below lists all required documents as well as an end of program reflection (see Appendix I).
Verification of Program Completion: Appendix J

Letter of Verification of Two Years as a Successful Administrator


Another required component for program completion and credential recommendation is a letter verifying
two years of successful experience in a full-time administrative position. This letter must be on district
letterhead from the candidate’s employer and it must be signed by either the superintendent, assistant
superintendent or the director of human resources (see sample in Appendix L).

Candidate Portfolio
The portfolio is designed to have a candidate present his or her leadership experiences and to reflect in a
manner that represents his or her thinking and professional learning. A completed portfolio is required
for each candidate and is used to verify CPSEL growth and competency. It is also used to validate that
candidates have completed all required program components for the Clear Administrative Services
Credential recommendation. The chart below lists the documents to be included in the candidate
portfolio.

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 21


Credential Candidate Portfolio Documents
Section Portfolio Components Information End of Year 1 Final
Portfolio Portfolio
I Coaching Agreement First coach meeting x x
I Professional Experience and First month x x
Work Context
II CPSEL Self-Assessment and Initial – first 90 days x x
Reflection Benchmark – end of year 1 x x
Final – end of program x
II Collaborative Summaries Minimum of 3 1-2 3-5
II Coaching Logs 40 hours year 1; 40 hours year 2 x x
III Leadership Learning Goal First 90 days x x
Review end of year 1 x x
Review end of program x
IV Professional Development Minimum of 2 1-2 2-4
Reflections
IV Professional Development 20 hours year 1; 20 hours year 2 x x
Log
V CACP Surveys Available at conclusion of each year EOY 1 Graduate
V Verification of Program Exit interview or presentation x
Completion
V Verification Letter of Employer letterhead and signed by x
Successful Administrative Superintendent, Assistant Superintendent or
Employment Human Resources personnel

Exit Presentation or Interview


One of the strengths of the Clear Administrative Credential Program (CACP) is the reflective process built
into the program. The exit presentation or interview is designed for the candidate to reflect and celebrate
his or her learning, growth and CPSEL competency as an educational leader. Local programs determine if
candidates participate in an exit presentation or interview and are responsible for submitting the final
paper work to the ACSA office for a credential recommendation.
Exit Interview or Presentation Prompts
During the exit presentation or interview, the candidate will use the Verification of Program Completion
form to address the following prompts.
1. Identify portfolio contents
2. Demonstrate California Professional Standards for Education Leaders (CPSEL) mastery
3. Celebrate knowledge, skills and behaviors of two elements in two standards:
o Share evidence of competency in two CPSEL and corresponding elements
o Provide examples or evidence of CPSEL knowledge, skills, behaviors and dispositions
o Reflect on CPSEL and induction experience
o Describe growth and impact as a leader
o Discuss future learning goals and intended actions toward achieving goals

These prompts are found on the Verification of Program Completion exit form in Appendix J which is to
be completed by the candidate prior to the exit presentation or interview.

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 22


Clear Administrative Services Credential Recommendation Rubric
After completion of the program, candidates will be recommended to the California Commission on
Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) for a Clear Administrative Services Credential. Successful completion of the
program is measured using the rubric below. Candidates who are not recommended for a credential have
the opportunity to appeal the process and may work with the local program coordinator to develop a plan
of support for credential recommendation (see Appeal Process under “Grievance and Appeal” p. 28).
Clear Administrative Services Credential Rubric
Meets Does Not Meet
Portfolio ● Complete portfolio: all documents ● Missing/incomplete required documents
included and hours met ● Incomplete professional development or coaching
● Clearly articulated reflections noted on hours
the Leadership Learning Goal and ● Little or no evidence of reflections on Leadership
Professional Development Reflection Learning Goal or PD Reflections documents
documents ● Little or no evidence of reflection or learning
● Reflections directly linked to CPSEL related to CPSEL
Exit Presentation ● Examples or evidence provided for two ● Unable to provide examples or evidence in at
or Interview CPSEL knowledge, skills or behaviors least two (2) CPSEL standards
● Clearly articulates growth and learning ● Does not articulate growth or learning over the
over course of program course of the program
● States future learning goals/actions ● No future learning goals or actions identified

Candidate Data Sheet

The Candidate Data Sheet (Appendix K) is completed by the candidate and returned to the Local Program
Coordinator at the exit interview or presentation. The information on the Candidate Data Sheet is
required by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) and used to process the
recommendation for a Clear Administrative Services Credential. A recommendation for the Clear
Administrative Services Credential is determined by the candidate’s successful demonstration of meeting
the Clear Administrative Credential Program (CACP) outcomes. The information on the Candidate Data
Sheet is submitted to the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) database in July by the
ACSA credentialing office. Candidates must hold a valid Preliminary Credential with CCTC to be
recommended for a Clear Administrative Services Credential.

End of Program Survey

Candidates and leadership coaches complete an End of Program Survey to provide feedback about their
experiences in the Clear Administrative Credential Program (CACP). The survey is a valuable tool and is
used to make program enhancements. Candidates must include verification that they have completed the
survey in their portfolio. This may be accomplished by printing or capturing a screen shot of the message
indicating they have completed the survey and include it in the portfolio.

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 23


Policies and Procedures
Acts of Dishonesty
Participants are expected to act with integrity and engage in honesty in all aspects of their credential work.
Dishonestly, including plagiarism; falsification of information, records or documents; or personal
misinterpretation or evasion of ACSA’s financial obligations will be considered cause for removal from the
Clear Administrative Credential Program.
Adequate Progress Toward Completion of Program Requirements
All Clear Administrative Credential Program (CACP) candidates are expected to successfully complete all
required program components.

• Fulfillment of coaching agreement commitment (40 hours for each of the two years = 80 total)
• Regularly attend scheduled coaching sessions and participate in documentation
• Timely completion and collaboration of:
o Professional Experience and Work Context
o Initial, Benchmark and Final CPSEL Self-Assessment and Reflection
o Development and Implementation of Leadership Learning Goal and action steps
o Documentation of Professional Development
▪ (20 hours for each of the two years = 40 hours)
• Development of candidate portfolio and participation in exit interview or presentation

If, at any time, it is discovered that a candidate is not making adequate progress toward program
completion, a meeting with the leadership coach and the local program coordinator will be held to
determine mutually agreed upon support.

In the event the candidate continues to not make adequate progress toward program completion, the
candidate will be provided up to one additional year to fulfill program requirements. This will result in the
candidate’s placement on administrative probation, their progress towards adequate completion will be
monitored and additional coaching and program fees may apply. While on administrative probation, if a
candidate is not demonstrating adequate progress toward completion, he or she can be dismissed from
the Clear Administrative Credential Program (CACP).
Administrative Experience
Two years of successful experience in a full-time administrative position on a California public school, non-
public school, or private school of equivalent status, while holding the Preliminary Administrative Services
Credential. Verification of experience must be on the district or employing agency letterhead and signed
by the superintendent, assistant superintendent, director of personnel, or director of human resources.
School or district personnel other that the applicant must verify all experience.

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 24


Attendance
Regular attendance is required and expected. Prompt attendance is required at all organized meetings by
leadership coaches, school, district or county representatives. Missing a coaching session, pre-planned
professional development or any other activity must be communicated to your coach and local program
coordinator.

Business Procedures
Refunds will be given to individuals who are formally dis-enrolled in the program. Attendance and
participation in the program for more than 50% will disallow a candidate for a refund. Participants who
are not able to participate in a required activity due to personal or family illness, maternity or paternity
leave, death in the immediate family, relocation, relocation due to job transfer, or other family or personal
crisis that prevents them from successfully participating in and completing the program, may receive
credit for participation in a future program activity with a different cohort. It is the responsibility of the
participant to communicate all challenges, issues and concerns that might prevent them from completing
the program to the coach and local program coordinator. The local program coordinator and the ACSA
Clear Administrative Credential Program (CACP) office are responsible for documenting issues and
concerns upon notification by the candidate.

Certificate of Eligibility
An individual who has completed the requirements for a Preliminary Administrative Services Credential
but does not have an offer of employment in an administrative position may apply for a Certificate of
Eligibility which verifies the completion of the requirements and authorizes the holder to seek
employment as an administrator. The Certificate of Eligibility has no expiration date. Once securing an
offer of employment, the holder of a Certificate of Eligibility may apply for the preliminary credential by
submitting an application (form 41-4) and processing fee to CCTC.
Coach Change Request
Every attempt is made to make an appropriate and successful match between the candidate and a
leadership coach. However, it may be necessary to request a coach reassignment. In this event, the
candidate or coach contacts the local program coordinator to inform him/her of their request for a coach
reassignment. The local program coordinator may assign a new coach. The Request for a Change in
Coaching Assignment form may be filled out by the candidate or the coach.

Complaint Procedure
All attempts will be made to resolve complaints. Complaints may be submitted to the local program
coordinator first. If an attempt to resolve issues and concerns is unsuccessful, then the local program
coordinator will arrange to meet with all parties to resolve issues and concerns. A formal complaint will
be investigated by ACSA’s Clear Administrative Credential Program (CACP) Director (or designee) and the
local program coordinator. To resolve the complaint, a meeting may be scheduled to develop a mutually
agreed upon plan of action. Submit complaints in writing to:
Association of California School Administrators (ACSA)
Attention: Educational Services/CACP
1029 J Street, Suite 500
Sacramento, CA 95814

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 25


Completion of the Program

Program participants are expected to fulfill the requirements of the Clear Administrative Credential
Program (CACP) in a timely and professional manner. All requirements outlined in the program will be
subject to review by assigned leadership coaches and local program coordinators. Evaluations, surveys
and questionnaires may be requested electronically and documentation will be considered as part of
program completion. The Clear Administrative Credential Program is a two-year, job-embedded induction
program and there is not an option for early completion.
Disability
Candidates who are unable to perform the essential functions of their job because of a disability or
qualified medical condition should notify the local program coordinator and ACSA program director of the
need for an accommodation. The candidate may be required to provide medical certification regarding
the disability or medical condition and need for accommodation. All medical information is kept in a
confidential file and shared only on a need-to-know basis. While ACSA welcomes candidate suggestions
for accommodations to complete the program, ACSA will make the final decision as to what, if any,
accommodations will be provided.

Employer Support
Employers are expected to provide support to all candidates accepted into the Clear Administrative
Credential Program (CACP). Opportunities for support include guidance, providing opportunities for
candidates to demonstrate California Professional Standards for Education Leaders (CPSEL) competencies
and arranging time and locations for coach meetings. Local program coordinators are expected to
facilitate all meetings and activities with assigned leadership coaches and candidates.

Emergency Medical Procedures


All participants are required to provide necessary medical information or documentation that may cause
interference with program progress or completion of the program to his or her local program coordinator
prior to the start of the program, or at the time it becomes known during the program.
Fees
All candidates pay two annual program fees. The first is the Clear Administrative Credential Program
(CACP) Fee of $1,000.00 per year which can be paid in full at registration, or in two payments each year,
with $500.00 due at official registration and $500.00 due in six-month increments. The CACP Fee is paid
to ACSA. A separate Leadership Coach Fee and Local Program Fee, determined by the local program, is
paid to the local program and varies depending on each local program.
Program Fees and Coaching/Local Program Fees can be paid by the candidate, by the employer, or an
agreed upon split. Many districts throughout California support new administrators through a variety of
funding sources to offset costs.

Full-Time Service
Full-time service means service for a minimum of four hours per day for at least three-fourths of the total
days in the school year. Substitute or part-time service does not apply.

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 26


Grievance and Appeal
All candidates are offered an appeal process if there is a question about the completion or non-completion
of the requirements. To appeal, the candidate must inform the Clear Administrative Credential Program
local program coordinator and the ACSA CACP Director in writing. Upon receipt of the notice, the Clear
Administrative Credential Program office will review and investigate the complaint and determine
appropriate action.
Leave of Absence
A candidate may request a leave of absence. The leave may be granted upon review of the request by the
local program coordinator and ACSA CACP Director. The leave will be in accordance with the employer
and follow the conditions afforded to the candidate in their local contract and in collaboration with the
Clear Administrative Credential Program (CACP) agreements. Candidates request a leave of absence by
submitting the Candidate Request for Program Extension, Withdraw, Transfer of Leave of Absence form.
Non-Discrimination
ACSA considers all applicants for the Clear Administrative Credential Program without regard to race,
color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital or veteran status, the presence of non-job related medical
conditions or disabilities or any other legally protected status. The ACSA Clear Administrative Credential
Program employee charged with coordinating efforts to comply with this practice and investigate
complaints regarding non-compliance is the Educational Services Executive and Clear Administrative
Credential Program Director.
Probation and Review of Progress
During the program, established requirements will be made available to the candidates. If at any time
during the program and/or at the end of the first year of the program, the candidate is not meeting
requirements, a review meeting will be conducted by the local program coordinator and leadership coach
to determine further participation and possible probation. After a 30, 60 and 90-day review, progress will
be evaluated and either a participant’s probation will be lifted, additional support provided or the
candidate will be asked to withdraw from the program.
Program Extension Request
A candidate may request a Clear Administrative Credential Program (CACP) extension. After review by the
local program coordinator and the ACSA CACP Director the program extension request will be approved
or denied. The extension period may be granted in increments for up to one year. It should be noted that
approved extensions may require additional fee payment. All costs associated with an approved extension
are the responsibility of the candidate.
Program Withdraw Agreement
A candidate can request a withdrawal from the Clear Administrative Credential Program (CACP) at any
time under certain conditions. The nature of the withdrawal request must be described in detail and
submitted to the local program coordinator for initial review and approval. The ACSA Program Director
grants final approval. Candidates are to complete the request to withdraw, transfer or extend form and
submit it to their local program coordinator. It should be noted that any and all costs associated with a
withdrawal are the responsibility of the candidate. Additional payments may be incurred upon further
review and assessment.

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 27


Record Retention
Student records are maintained at the local program level as well as at the ACSA credential office.
Candidates have access to records to provide verification of attendance and program completion upon
request. All candidate records are maintained at the ACSA office and kept securely in locked cabinets or
on a server located in a room not accessible by the public.

Candidates who wish to have access to their records may request in writing from the ACSA office for a
copy of verification of program completion or attendance. The Candidate Record Sheet is used to verify
program components should a candidate request to withdraw, transfer or leave the program prior to
completion of the two years. Student records maintained in the learning management system will be
accessible to the candidate for up to six months upon program completion. Candidates are encouraged to
download all completed work from their digital folders and portfolio.
Term of the Preliminary Credential
The Preliminary Administrative Services Credential is valid for five years from the date of issuance. The
valid period of the Preliminary Administrative Services Credential is limited by the expiration date of the
prerequisite credential. The preliminary credential may be renewed for any time remaining up to the five
full years allowed at the same time of renewing the prerequisite credential by submitting an application
(form 41-4) and processing fee to CCTC. By the end of the five-year preliminary period, the holder must
meet the requirements for the Clear Administrative Services Credential.

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 28


Definitions
Adult Learning
Adult learning is the process by which adults gain knowledge and expertise. Adults learn best when they
participate in activities from six key principles: 1) the learners need to know, 2) self-directed learning 3)
prior experience of the learner 4) readiness to learn 5) orientation to learning and problem solving and 6)
motivation to learn (CTC, 2014).

Appreciative Inquiry
Appreciative Inquiry is a way of thinking, seeing and acting for powerful and purposeful change in
organizations. The Appreciative Inquiry process (discover, dream, design, destiny) works on the
assumption that whatever you want more of already exists and can be amplified.

Assessment
A system of assessment is utilized to provide the candidate information on the skills and knowledge
throughout the two-year program. Initial assessments provide baseline information. Formative
assessments occur throughout the program through self-reflection, coaching and individual professional
development. A benchmark assessment takes place at the midpoint of the program to track progress and
a summative assessment occurs at the end of year two. Assessments are a collaborative measurement of
a candidate’s competence and impact on student achievement and are aligned to outcomes described in
the California Professional Standards for Education Leaders (CPSEL) (CTC, 2014; CTC, 2016).

California Professional Standards for Educational Leaders (CPSEL)


Adopted by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC), the CPSEL describe standards for
site and district leaders and provide an overview of how successful leaders perform. Achievement of these
standards is required for licensure as an administrator in California (CCTC, 2014). The six CPSEL are 1)
development and implementation of a shared vision, 2) instructional leadership 3) management and
learning environment 4) family and community engagement 5) ethics and integrity and 6) external context
and policy. The CPSEL are organized into three levels: the standard, the elements and the indicators.
Standards address broad categories of leadership competency. The elements reflect administrator
responsibilities and the indicators provide examples of the leader action (CDE, 2015; Kearney, 2015).
Candidates must demonstrate development and growth in all six standards and provide documentation
in at least one element of each CPSEL for a minimum of six areas of competence.

California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC or CTC)


The California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) is the agency responsible for: setting the
standards for educator preparation, accrediting the programs that offer it, licensing educators and, when
necessary, disciplining license holders.

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 29


Clear Administrative Credential Program (CACP)
The primary purpose of a clear administrative credential program is focused on job-embedded, real-life
experiences of education leaders. The program is a coaching-based professional induction process
contextualized for whatever job the administrator currently holds. A Clear Administrative Services
Program builds on the work done in the preliminary credential program and is driven by an Individual
Induction Plan (IIP). Professional development and reflection of practice are also required (CTC, 2014).

Credential Candidates
Credential candidates are novice administrators in an initial administrative assignment seeking a clear
administrative services credential (ASC) and licensure as an administrator by completing a two-year
individualized, job-embedded, coaching-based program that provides opportunities for the candidate to
demonstrate growth and competence as a leader. The administrator may be employed in a variety of roles
such as assistant principal, principal, director, coordinator or superintendent (CCTC, 2014).

California Network of Leadership Coaches (CNET)


The California Network of Leadership Coaches (CNET) is an ongoing professional learning community of
administrators engaged in providing face-to-face coaching and support to new administrators. Leadership
coaches in CNET are engaged in a community of practice to deepen their skills using ACSA leadership
coaching strategies. CNET meetings occur two times during the year throughout California. Attendance
at CNET training is required for all practicing ACSA leadership coaches and those seeking certification.

Coaching
Coaching is a formal professional relationship between a credential candidate and a coach. The
relationship is directed toward the attainment of professional goals and focused on leadership to
positively impact learning and teaching. Coaching can lead to change in practice of thinking and transform
dispositions, behavior and communication (CTC, 2014). ACSA leadership coaching focuses on the
candidate’s understanding and application of CPSEL-based outcomes.

The program requires 40 hours per year at a minimum of job-embedded coaching activities including: site
visits, face-to-face meetings and electronic conversations to support the development of leadership
competencies and the Leadership Learning Goals. Coaching is regular, consistent and takes place ongoing
throughout two years. Coaching is confidential, non-evaluative and focused on action planning and
attainment of goals (CTC, 2014).

Descriptions of Practice (DOP)


The Descriptions of Practice (DOP) describe effective leadership by enhancing the CPSEL and mapping out
what practice looks like along a developmental continuum. The DOP may be used as one of several
formative assessment tools to guide development and serve as a guide for planning learning goals and
self-reflection. The structure of the DOP is arranged in a four-part continuum to illustrate increasing levels
of knowledge, skills and application. The four levels are: 1) directed toward the standard, approaching the
standard, meeting the standard and exemplifying the standard (CTC, 2016; Kearney, 2015).

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 30


Evocative Coaching
Evocative Coaching is a research based coaching model grounded in trust and is both person-centered and
strength-based. There are “Two Turns,” (No-Fault and Strength-Based) and “Four Steps,” (Story, Empathy,
Inquiry, and Design) in this model (Center for School Transformation, 2016).

Individual Induction Plan (IIP)


An Individual Induction Plan (IIP) is a fluid document that guides coaching and professional learning of the
induction program. The IIP is developed and revised based on assessments and self-reflection. An
Individual Induction Plan (IIP) allows for differentiation of induction experiences for each candidate. The
IIP serves as an inquiry-based formative assessment plan developed using summative information for
preparation. It describes goals and delineates activities to reach goals.

Induction
Induction is comprised of individualized coaching, professional learning opportunities, and assessment of
CPSEL application and competency. The induction experience is informed by assessment and includes an
initial assessment, goal setting, a place to incorporate coaching and learning experiences, ongoing
formative assessments and reflection as well as benchmark and summative assessments. A minimum of
60 hours and a maximum of 90 hours are to be completed annually, which includes 40 hours of
individualized coaching plus 20 hours of professional development (CTC, 2014).

Leadership Coach
ACSA leadership coaches are trained in one of two foundational, researched-based coaching models: the
ACSA Leadership Coaching Model, grounded in Evocative Coaching/Appreciated Inquiry, or the Blended
Coaching Model. Requirements to be a leadership coach include: 1) successful service as an administrator
for 4 or more years, 2) training in either ACSA Leadership Coaching or Blended Coaching, 3) training in a
New Coach Orientation, 4) participation in CNET, ongoing coach training, and 5) completion of a portfolio
for certification.

Local Program Coordinator (LPC)


A local program coordinator aids ACSA leadership coaches, credential candidates and Local Educational
Agencies. Local program coordinators facilitate the professional learning community of practice for
coaches and candidates by arranging for professional learning and meetings as well as matching credential
candidates with coaches.

Professional Development
A minimum of 20 hours annually of professional development offerings are required and made available
to candidates. Professional development can address the common needs for beginning administrators,
provide individualized learning opportunities, and provide opportunities to network and share best
practices and challenges.

Professional Learning
Professional learning is a required component of the two-year induction process for candidates seeking
their Clear Administrative Services Credential. Professional learning provides opportunities to learn and
grow and is individualized and responsive to the needs of each candidate. The opportunity to practice
pertinent skills while working alongside other candidates increases collaboration (CTC, 2014). Professional

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 31


learning may be individual or group, in-person or online, a workshop, book/article study or networking to
name a few. Components of professional learning include initial assessment, goal setting, an IIP, ongoing
formative assessment and reflection, and benchmark and summative assessment. Candidates are to
complete a minimum of 60 hours per year of professional learning activities each year of the program
aligned to their IIP goal and or identified area of growth; 40 hours of individualized coaching plus 20 hours
of professional development.

Quality Professional Learning Standards (QPLS)


The QPLS lay the foundation for consistent professional learning to improve educator knowledge, skills,
and dispositions and ultimately increase student achievement. The standards describe the criteria for
quality professional learning with evidence-based indicators. The seven standards include: data; content
and pedagogy; equity; design and structure; collaboration and shared accountability; resources and
alignment; and coherence (Learning Forward, 2011; CDE, 2015).

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 32


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*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 33


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*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 34


APPENDICES

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 35


Appendix A - California Professional Standards for Educational Leaders

California Professional Standards for Educational Leaders


Standard 1 Standard 2

DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP


OF A SHARED VISION
Education leaders shape a collaborative culture of
Education leaders facilitate the development and teaching and learning informed by professional
implementation of a shared vision of learning and growth standards and focused on student and professional
of all students. growth.

Element 1A: Student–Centered Vision Element 2A: Professional Learning Culture

Element 1B: Developing Shared Vision Element 2B: Curriculum and Instruction

Element 1C: Vision Planning and Implementation Element 2C: Assessment and Accountability

Standard 3 Standard 4

MANAGEMENT AND LEARNING FAMILY AND COMMUNITY


ENVIRONMENT ENGAGEMENT
Education leaders manage the organization to Education leaders collaborate with families and other
cultivate a safe and productive learning and working stakeholders to address diverse student and
environment. community interests and mobilize community
resources.
Element 3A: Operations and Facilities
Element 4A: Parent and Family Engagement
Element 3B: Plans and Procedures
Element 4B: Community Partnerships
Element 3C: Climate
Element 4C: Community Resources and Services
Element 3D: Fiscal and Human Resources

Standard 5 Standard 6

ETHICS AND INTEGRITY EXTERNAL CONTEXT AND POLICY

Education leaders make decisions, model, and behave Education leaders influence political, social,
in ways that demonstrate professionalism, ethics, economic, legal and cultural contexts affecting
integrity, justice, and equity and hold staff to the same education to improve education policies and
practices.
standard.
Element 6A: Understanding and
Element 5A: Reflective Practice
Communicating Policy
Element 5B: Ethical Decision-Making
Element 6B: Professional Influence
Element 5C: Ethical Action Element 6C: Policy Engagement

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 36


Appendix B - Coaching Agreement

Section I:
Coaching Agreement

Candidate Agrees:
• To take advantage of and be open to the support offered by the coach;
• To be honest and open in the coaching relationship;
• To be accessible and on time for the coaching sessions;
• To participate fully in the coaching sessions,
• To arrange for observations of real work situations agreed upon with coach to would allow for targeted
coaching, including;
o Classroom observations of teaching and learning;
o Facilitation of staff and/or parent meeting as appropriate;
o Other as determined between coach and candidate.
• To keep time commitments and protect the coaching time;
• Maintain confidentiality within and after coaching sessions;
• To fully participate and be responsible in completing all assignments and activities as outlined;
• To develop, implement and assess meaningful goals and action plans;
• To provide honest feedback to the coach and to the CACP for continuous improvement; and
• To participate in coach facilitated off-site meetings as mutually agreed upon.
• To reflect on the Individual Induction Plan (IIP) - coaching, professional development & assessments
Coach Agrees:
• To maintain confidentiality of his or her work with the candidate.
• To provide a minimum of 40 hours per year of one-to-one, job-embedded support (3-6 hours per month);
• To be available via phone and email;
• To be accessible and on time for the coaching sessions;
• To support the candidate by providing information and/or linking them to resources as appropriate;
• To use the CPSEL as a central guide in leadership coaching and impact on school improvement and student
learning;
• To model a reflective and ethical practitioner who is open to feedback and engages in a two-way learning
relationship;
• To ask questions that encourages the candidate to examine and reflect on his or her assumptions, actions,
learning and innovative solutions to problems;
• To disclose any situation with safety or ethical implications to the candidate, or district representative (if
legally required);
• To monitor and maintain required documentation and required program hours that lead to candidate
recommendation for Clear Administrative Services Credential;
• To collaborate with candidate on professional development needs and choices and approve professional
development hours;
• To follow up on commitments from the coaching sessions;
• To engage the school, district or program representative in CACP outcomes and requirements that lead to the
success of the candidate; and
• To approve candidate’s professional development requests, records and hours.
______________________________ ______________________________ ____________________
Candidate Signature Coach Signature Date

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 37


Appendix C - Professional Experience and Work Context

Section I:
Professional Experience and Work Context

Candidate: Coach: Date:

Candidate's prior professional experience, skills, knowledge and area of growth:

School, District or Program Data:

Supervisor Input and School, District or Program Priorities:

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 38


Appendix D- Supervisor Input and Meeting Protocol Guidelines

Supervisor Input Meeting Guidelines


(Coach, Candidate and Supervisor)

The purpose of the supervisor input meeting is to establish a partnership, communicate program
outcomes and establish coach, candidate and supervisor roles. This conversation includes school, district
or program goals, candidate job expectations and CACP outcomes and alignment to the Leadership
Learning Goal (LLG). Meetings should be scheduled in advance and last about 30-40 minutes. A minimum
of two partnership meetings will take place: one within the first 60 days of the program and the second at
the end of the first year to review the candidate’s progress. The following is a sample agenda and may
vary based on the candidate's assigned duties.
AGENDA ITEM PURPOSE

Introductions
• To understand partner roles and to begin
• Explain that you are a certified CACP coach and participate in ongoing coach
dialogue regarding mutual support for the
training
candidate.
• Learn about supervisor's role in the school, district or program and his or
her responsibility to the candidate
• Clarify school, district or program priorities and goals • To emphasize a partnership in supporting
• Review candidate’s job responsibilities and duties the candidate success.
Purpose and Elements of the CACP and Coaching Support

• A CTC approved two-year program to obtain a Clear Administrative Services • To describe what the candidate will be
Credential responsible for and define support a coach
• Based on CTC and CPSEL (California Professional Standards for Education provides in the areas of problem solving,
Leaders) guidance and non-judgment feedback to
• Professional Learning Component: build leadership capacity.
o 40 hours coaching (annually)
o 20 hours PD (annually)
• Use of formative and self-assessment assessment tools • To field questions that the supervisor may
• Leadership Learning Goal(s) have about the Clear Administrative
• Coaching support (3-6 hours per month) Credential Program.
Partnership and Communication

• How can the Leadership Learning Goals be aligned with the school, district • To connect the school, district and program
and program goals? initiatives/expectations with CACP goals and
• What leadership experiences or skills would you like to see emphasized to candidate growth.
build the candidate’s capacity?
• Maintain communication with the supervisor while maintaining
confidentiality with the candidate (Provide the supervisor with a copy of the • To emphasize the desire for a partnership
Coaching Agreement). and the confidentiality in the agreement.
Input and Other Helpful Information from the Supervisor
• To learn more about the school, district or
• Ask about school, district/program professional development.
program context from the supervisor’s point
• What information is important to know about the school, district/program
of view.
context in relation to the candidate’s work?
• Candidate’s view of what they are looking forward to in the year and in
• Appreciation
their role.
** Thank the supervisor for his or her time and
• Explain that, at the end of the program, the candidate will need a letter
input**
indicating two years of successful, full-time work as an administrator

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 39


Appendix E- CPSEL Self- Assessment & Reflection

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 40


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*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 42
*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 43
*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 44
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*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 46
Appendix F- Collaborative Summary

Section II:
Collaborative Summary

Candidate: Coach: Date:

Check In (professional/personal):

Success and Obstacles:

Focus of meeting - Candidate Goal(s) and CPSEL Attainment:

CPSEL(s) discussed in Coaching Session:


CPSEL 1 _____ CSPEL 2 _____ CSPEL 3 _____ CPSEL 4 _____ CPSEL 5 _____ CPSEL 6 _____

Candidate’s and Coach’s Next Steps:

Focus for next meeting:

Next meeting: Number of Hours Coached:


(Date and Time) (Be sure to log hours on Google Form)

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 47


Appendix G- Leadership Learning Goal

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 48


Appendix H- Professional Development Reflection

Section IV:
Professional Development Reflection

Candidate: Coach: Date:

Title of Professional Development:

Reflection on new learning:

Application and/or implications for your work and/or CPSEL Standard:

Next Steps:

Number of PD Hours: Date Reviewed by


Coach:

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 49


Appendix I – End of Year 1 Progress Check

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 50


Appendix J – Verification of Program Completion

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 51


*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 52
Appendix K – Candidate Data Sheet

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 53


Appendix L – Sample Letter of Verification of Two Years Administrative Service

Verification of Two Years Administrative Service

To Whom It May Concern:

This letter is to request a formal letter of verification of two years of successful experience in a full-time
administrative position for a credential candidate enrolled in the Association of California School
Administrators (ACSA)’s Clear Administrative Credential Program (CACP). The two-year induction program
is a California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) approved program and upon successful
completion the credential candidate may be recommended for a Clear Administrative Services Credential.

Program components included professional learning opportunities in the form of individualized coaching,
professional learning and assessment. At the end of the two-year program, candidates participate in an
exit presentation or interview to present work completed as evidence of competency in the six California
Professional Standards for Education Leaders (CPSEL). In addition to the requirements completed in an
individualized induction plan, the candidate must have verification of two years of successful experience
in a full-time administrative position in a California public school, nonpublic school, or private school of
equivalent status, while holding the Preliminary Administrative Services Credential. The formal letter of
verification of experience must be on the district or employing agency letterhead and signed by the
superintendent, assistant superintendent, director of personnel, or director of human resources. School
or district personnel other than the candidate must verify all experience.
A letter indicating successful completion of two years may be returned directly to the credential candidate
or to the ACSA local program coordinator for the credential candidate.
Thank you in advance for your support. Please do not hesitate to contact our credential office at the
Association of California School Administrators should you have any further questions.

Sincerely,

Tracy Robinson, Ed. D.


Educational Services Executive
Director, Clear Administrative Credential Program

ACSA* Educational Services * Credential Office* 1029 J Street, Suite 500


Sacramento, CA 95814
916- 329-3839

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018 54


2018-2019

Leadership Coach Guide


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These materials are developed and produced by the Association of California School
Administrators (ACSA) for the training and support of ACSA leadership coaches and Local
Programs in the California Network of School Leadership Coaches and their candidates.

We encourage the duplication and use of these materials by coaches and candidates,
provided that the credit is attributed to ACSA. Please do not post any of the documents in
this packet on public websites, distribute copies outside of the candidate’s school, district or
program or use any of these materials for commercial professional development training.

For further information about use of this material, and other tools to support new
administrator practice, please contact ACSA Education Services office at 916-329-3839 or
credentialing@acsa.org.


Association of California School Administrators
Educational Services Department
1029 J Street, Suite 500,
Sacramento, CA 95814
Phone 916-329-3839


Copyright © 2018 Association of California School Administrators (ACSA) unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Program Personnel ..................................................................................................................................... 6

Introduction to Leadership Coaching................................................................................................... 7

What is Leadership Coaching? ................................................................................................................ 7

Leadership Coaching vs Mentoring ....................................................................................................... 8

Leadership Coaching is Professional Learning ................................................................................ 8

Leadership Coaching Activities ............................................................................................................... 8

Leadership Coach Job Description and Responsibilities ............................................................... 9

Non-Discrimination ................................................................................................................................... 10

Leadership Coach Qualifications ......................................................................................................... 11

Confidentiality ............................................................................................................................................. 12

Collaboration ............................................................................................................................................... 12

Selection, Training and Hiring of Leadership Coaches ............................................................... 12

Leadership Coach Assignment to a Candidate ................................................................................ 13

Coach Re Assignments .............................................................................................................................. 13

Coach Communication .............................................................................................................................. 13

Coach Leave of Absence ............................................................................................................................ 14

Payment for Coaching Services ............................................................................................................. 14

Leadership Coach Certification Process ............................................................................................ 15

Leadership Coach Certification Notification.................................................................................... 16

Leadership Coach Portfolio Rubric...................................................................................................... 16

Leadership Coach Certification Time Frame ................................................................................... 16

Coaching Model and Training ............................................................................................................... 17

Evocative Coaching Model ...................................................................................................................... 17

LEAD Strategies for Strengths-Based Coaching ............................................................................. 18

Moving Leadership Standards into Everyday Work ..................................................................... 19

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Purpose of the Descriptions of Practice ............................................................................................. 19

Developmental Continuum of Practice .............................................................................................. 19

Developmental Continuum of Practice Chart .................................................................................. 20

Leadership Coach Training Model ....................................................................................................... 21

ACSA Leadership Coach Training – Foundational Coach Training ......................................... 21

Program Orientation – Initial Coach Training ............................................................................... 21

CNET: California Network of Leadership Coaches – Ongoing Training ................................ 21

Local Program Professional Learning and Networking – Ongoing Training .................... 22

Leadership Coach Training Overview ................................................................................................ 22

Leadership Coaching Practice ............................................................................................................... 22

Leadership Coaching Observation Tool - CNET .............................................................................. 23

Assessment of Coaching Services ......................................................................................................... 24

Coach Professional Development Assessments .............................................................................. 24

Coach Session Feedback Form ............................................................................................................... 25

Coach Session Feedback Questions...................................................................................................... 26

Clear Administrative Credential Program Overview ................................................................... 27

Program Overview and Outcomes ....................................................................................................... 28

SMARTER Goal Resources ....................................................................................................................... 33

Smart Goal Template ................................................................................................................................ 34

Frequently Asked Questions ................................................................................................................... 35

References ..................................................................................................................................................... 37

APPENDICES ................................................................................................................................................. 39

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PROGRAM PERSONNEL

Tracy Robinson, Ed. D o Program coordination, implementation and


Educational Services oversight
Executive o Candidate Acceptance and Admission
Program Director o Advisement to Local Program Coordinators
trobinson@acsa.org o Coach applications and hiring
916916-329-3837 o CNET scope and sequence
916-709-4413 (mobile) o Candidate credential recommendation
o Program Evaluation
Joan Ruzic o CNET scheduling and registration
Senior Administrative Clerk o ALC scheduling and registration
jruzic@acaa.org o Program Orientation scheduling and
916-444-3843 registration
o ACSA LPC coach agreements and payment
o Local Program MOU’s
o Employer MOU’s
o Coach Service Agreements
Kim Rhoden o Candidate Application, Enrollment,
Administrative Assistant Registration
krhoden@acsa.org and Program Fees
916 329-3839 o Candidate Program Fees
o Candidate completion of program
o Schoology
Christin Cruz o Coach Portfolios
Administrative Assistant o Coach files
ccruz@acsa.org o Candidate coaching service payments (ACSA
916-970-7045 LPC’s)

Christina Hochleitner o Learning Management Consultant
Consultant o Professional Development
Chochleitner22@gmail.com
626-297-7433
Arturo Flores o Program Oversight
Consultant o Coach Curriculum and Certification
arturomflores@gmail.com o Program Overview
916-478-1113 o Program Evaluation

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INTRODUCTION TO LEADERSHIP COACHING


The ACSA Clear Administrative Credential Program (CACP) is focused on developing
leadership skills of current site and district administrators and is grounded in the
California Professional Standards for Educational Leaders (CPSEL). As a leadership
coach, you will guide your candidate in the two-year program toward competency
in the CPSEL. The job-embedded induction program involves face-to-face meetings
with credential candidates in their work setting. A leadership coach is the most
pivotal piece in a credential candidate’s program, providing support in meeting
program requirements, self-assessment, goal setting, reflection and evidence of
growth in the CPSEL.

WHAT IS LEADERSHIP COACHING?


Quality coaching is foundational in helping candidates translate theory into
practice. Leadership coaching engages candidates in a continuous cycle of
improvement while providing support with challenges in the field of education. The
California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) defines leadership
coaching as follows:

Coaching is a formal, professional relationship between a candidate and


a coach directed toward the attainment of professional and
organizational goals focusing, consistently, upon leadership that
positively impact learning and teaching practice. A coach is a trained and
skilled in applying a variety of coaching strategies, skills and resources to
the context and needs of the candidate. Coaching is a complex process
which can lead to changes in practice, in rethinking/re- strategizing
leadership and transforming the leader’s dispositions, behaviors, and
communication to build leadership capacity, instructional improvement,
and growth in student learning. Administrative coaches focus on the
candidates’ understanding and application of CPSEL-based leadership
outcomes. (CCTC, 2014, p. 34)

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LEADERSHIP COACHING VS MENTORING


Leadership coaching differs from mentoring. Mentoring is an informal relationship
where a mentor provides nonjudgmental listening when asked on topics that are
selected by the administrator being mentored. In contrast, leadership coaching
focuses on professional development and capacity building by guiding the
candidate through activities and conversations that invite rethinking and
application of leadership strategies and dispositions for the most successful impact.

LEADERSHIP COACHING IS PROFESSIONAL LEARNING

Finally, coaching is one of the three professional learning


components of the Clear Administrative Credential Program.
Candidates develop their leadership skills, knowledge and
attitudes through coaching, professional development and
assessment organized into an Individual Induction Plan.
Research has shown that traditional professional
development is not as effective as coaching. Coaching impacts student learning and
focuses on instructional leadership.

LEADERSHIP COACHING ACTIVITIES


Leadership Coaches provide 40-60 hours annually per candidate. Coaching is job
embedded and includes coaching activities such as:

• Site visits • One – on – one support


• Face – to – Face Meetings • Trust building
• Electronic conversations • Non-evaluative support
• Data gathering and analysis • Providing guidance (not direction)
• Goal Setting • Providing leadership reflection
• Observations at staff meetings • Classroom walk throughs
• Build leadership confidence • Build leadership independence

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LEADERSHIP COACH JOB DESCRIPTION AND RESPONSIBILITIES


Under the direction of the Local Program Coordinator, the Leadership Coach will
provide coach service and support to Clear Administrative Services Credential
candidates participating in the ACSA Clear Administrative Credential Program.
Leadership Coaches regularly collaborate with the credential candidate to set
school or site and leadership goals, then determine action steps grounded in the
California Professional Standards for Educational Leaders (CPSEL). Leadership
Coaches use research-based strategies and skills to assist credential candidates to
master reflective practices and develop complex skills necessary for effective
educational leaders.

Responsibilities:

● Under the direction of the Local Program Coordinator: review general


administrator requirements and proficiencies for CPSEL with candidate;
collaborate on initial, benchmark, formative and summative assessments;
plan, develop, monitor, and revise the Individual Induction Plan.
● Maintain the integrity and confidentiality of his or her work with the
candidate.
● Provide 40 hours per year of individualized, one-on-one support to candidate
through regularly scheduled coaching sessions, email, and phone contact.
● Schedule and attend regular coaching activities and meetings.
● Prepare and maintain records of coaching sessions.
● Attend, participate and conduct a variety of meetings as assigned:
orientation, coaching sessions, observations, exit interview, etc.
● Serve as the principle contact and liaison between the candidate and
program.
● Stay current on educational research and demonstrate knowledge of
California Professional Standards for Education Leaders (CPSEL); school and
district office administrative procedures and operations; federal and state
accountability systems; instructional practices; research and trends in
education.
● Analyze situations accurately and adopt an effective course of action.

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● Work in an independent capacity at multiple work locations with varied


hours.
● Work collaboratively and develop effective lines of communication with all
members of the team, program personnel, school and district staff, and
outside agencies. This includes working directly and first with the candidate
to resolve issues that may occur in the coaching relationship.
● Participate in the California Network of Leadership Coaches (CNET) training.
● Participate in annual program evaluation and improvement processes.
● Perform related duties as assigned.

QUALIFICATIONS

• Demonstrated successful experience as an instructional leader, supervision,


curriculum, instruction, collaboration, and school climate
• Minimum of 4 full school years of administrative experience
• Current Clear California Administrative Services Credential
• Demonstrated commitment to personal professional growth and learning
• Foundational training a research based coaching model (ACSA Leadership
Coaching)
• Earn and maintain ACSA Leadership Coach Certification
• Positive candidate evaluation and Local Program Coordinator reviews

NON-DISCRIMINATION
ACSA Administrative Credential Program considers all applicants for leadership
coaching without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital or
veteran status, the presence of non-job-related medical conditions or disabilities
or any other legally protected status. The ACSA Administrative Credential Program
employee charged with coordinating the efforts to comply with this practice and
investigate complaints regarding non-compliance is the program director.

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LEADERSHIP COACH QUALIFICATIONS


All Leadership Coaches will meet or exceed the qualifications established by ACSA
which include:

● Possession of a valid California Clear Administrative Services Credential.


● Minimum of four years successful administrative experience.
● Professional experience conducive to successful coaching, which may include
a range of administrative experiences, in urban, suburban, rural, or county
settings, at varying grade spans, and/or previous training as a leadership
coach.
● Foundational professional development in ACSA Leadership Coaching (ALC)
two-day training.
● Participation in the ACSA Leadership Coaching Program Orientation in the
year the applicant enters the leadership coaching program.
● Attend twice yearly California Leadership Coaching Network (CNET) trainings
every year.
● Commitment to provide support to credential candidates consistent with the
ACSA Leadership Coaching program expectations and timelines.
● Actively coach credential candidates using ACSA Leadership Coaching tools
and protocols.
● Commitment to become fully certified as a leadership coach within one year.
● Completion of a leadership coach portfolio with all required components
outlined on the Portfolio Checklist.
● Adhere to the ACSA Leadership Coach Code of Ethics and Leadership Coach
Requirements.

*Local programs may have additional criteria based on their Local Program
requirements.

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CONFIDENTIALITY
Confidentiality and collaboration are essential elements to develop a positive
relationship between the leadership coach and credential candidate. In order to
maintain confidentiality, foster open and honest relationships between leadership
coach and candidate, and avoid conflicts of interest, it is ACSA’s practice to match
candidates with a leadership coach who does not directly supervise or evaluate
their candidate. Coaches and Candidates sign a Coaching Agreement.

COLLABORATION
Ongoing collaboration between the leadership coach and credential candidate on
the work of self-assessment, data gathering of progress, goal setting and
application of CPSEL elements is expected and essential to candidate success in the
program. The focus is on reflection and evidence-based growth of leadership in the
job context utilizing the CPSEL-related action steps and results defined in the
Leadership Learning Goal. Coaches and Candidates record conversations on a
Collaborative Summary.

SELECTION, TRAINING AND HIRING OF LEADERSHIP COACHES


Local programs advertise, recruit and select coaches for local programs.
Advertisement may take place through the local program website, internal
recruitment or external recruitment. All ACSA leadership coaches are required to
submit an application, resume and two letters of recommendation to a local
program coordinator. Additional requirements are determined by each local
program. These requirements are consistent and maintained to ensure quality
coaching services.

A list of Local Programs and Local Program Coordinators is found on the ACSA Website

at www.acsa.org

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LEADERSHIP COACH ASSIGNMENT TO A CANDIDATE


Local program coordinators carefully review coach applications, preparation,
letters of recommendation and resumes to make an appropriate match to a
credential candidate. Leadership coaches complete an ACSA Leadership Coach
Profile which is used to assess the need for additional recruitment of coaches.
Leadership Coach and credential candidate matches are made within 30 days of the
candidate’s enrollment in the program. Coaching begins once the candidate
completes registration with ACSA and the candidate’s first payment is made for
ACSA program fees.

Whenever possible, coaches are assigned to candidates who have had


responsibilities consistent with the candidate’s assigned responsibilities. Although
employer’s may request specific coach and candidate matches, the local program
coordinator makes the final decision to determine an appropriate match.

COACH RE ASSIGNMENTS
Coaches and candidates may request a reassignment if the coaching match is not a
good fit. The coach and candidate may first try to resolve the coaching issues
between them, however, the candidate or coach may contact their local program
coordinator or ACSA at any time to request a change in coaching assignment.

COACH COMMUNICATION
The leadership coach serves as the primary liaison for communication between the
credential candidate, local program coordinator, employer and ACSA office. As
such, it is the responsibility of a leadership coach to maintain regular
communication about changes to a candidate’s employment circumstance or
program status. Candidates are expected to complete appropriate forms regarding
a change to their status and submit them to the ACSA office. Leadership coaches
must also notify the local program coordinator if any of the following situations
arise so that proactive measures to support the candidate can occur:
● Change of a candidate’s job or role
● Candidate needs to take a leave of absence from job, program or both
● Candidate wishes to drop the program
● Candidate wishes to transfer to another program

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● Candidate is making insufficient progress


● Candidate does not respond to Coach’s attempts to contact the candidate

COACH LEAVE OF ABSENCE


Leadership coaches need to inform the local program coordinator and ACSA office
when they plan to take a leave of absence from coaching. The coach must submit
a request in writing to the Local Program Coordinator indicating the reason for the
requ4st and the approximate duration of absence. The Local Program Coordinator
will forward the notification to the ACSA office. In most cases, a leave of absence
may be granted for up to two years, but each request is handled on a case by case
basis. Upon returning to the program, the coach may be required to attend
additional training to ensure they are apprised of program changes and new
professional learnings.

PAYMENT FOR COACHING SERVICES


Each Local Program determines the coaching service fees and therefor the amount
paid to leadership coaches. Leadership coaches interested in coaching should
contact a local program coordinator to inquire about the amount paid t for their
coaching services.

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LEADERSHIP COACH CERTIFICATION PROCESS


Leadership coaches for the Association of California School Administrators (ACSA)’s
Clear Administrative Credential Program (CACP) participate in a rigorous
professional learning community grounded on a research based coaching model to
become certified as an ACSA Leadership Coach. The following steps are required to
become an ACSA Certified Leadership Coach.

1. Complete the two-day ACSA Leadership Coach (ALC) training.


2. Complete the one-day Coach Program Orientation.
3. Participate in the two-day CNET professional learning community.
4. Submit an ACSA Leadership Coach Portfolio with the following documents
● Application for ACSA Leadership Coach Certification
● Résumé
● Two (2) Letters of Recommendation describing experience/ability as
an effective coach
● Leadership Coach Requirements - Signed Form
● Code of Ethics for Leadership Coaches - Signed Form
● Coaching Hours Log (minimum 25 hours w/same candidate)
● Initial Leadership Coach Reflection
● Audio/Video or Peer Observation Reflection
● Leadership and Learning Goal (SMARTER goal format)
● Ten (10) Collaborative Summaries (7 related to the Leadership
Learning Goal)
● Two (2) CNET Coaching Observation Forms
● Final Leadership Coach Reflection
● Local Program Coordinator Signature
5. Submit a portfolio to the ACSA Office during the following times:

January 15 through January 31 or June 15 through June 30


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LEADERSHIP COACH CERTIFICATION NOTIFICATION

ACSA staff review portfolios for completeness and notify applicants if any
documents are missing. Portfolios are scored by team of local program
coordinators and upon successful completion the applicant will receive a letter of
recognition, a certificate and a copy of the scoring rubric mailed to their home
address. The notification will take place four to six weeks after the submission
window.

LEADERSHIP COACH PORTFOLIO RUBRIC



The rubric below is used to score ACSA Leadership Coach Portfolios. Reviewers
pay close attention to the story through the collaborative summaries and the
attention to the development of leadership skills and competencies related to
the leadership learning goal.

ACSA Leadership Coach Portfolio


Review and Certification

Applicant Name: Local Program(s):


(Last Name, First Name)
Item
Portfolio Content Checklist Present Documented Evidence Rubric Score Reviewer/Scorer Comments:
Max score
Application § Completed all required training x
§ References listed
Resume § Principal or higher experience x
§ (4+ years of admin experience)
Letters of Recommendation § 2 or more letters x
(Minimum of 2) § At least one letter recommends coaching
skills
Leadership Requirements § Signed x
Code of Ethics § Signed x
Coaching Hours § 25 or more hours of coaching experience x
(Minimum of 25 hours) § Hours on Collaborative Summaries match
coaching logs
Initial Coach Reflection [Rubric] § Clearly describes professional background 3
and work context (Including demographics
and responsibilities) of the candidate who
was coached
§ Explains Candidate’s challenges
§ Identifies and describes specific coaching
strategies to be applied
Audio/Video/Peer Reflection § Describes session of audio, visual, or peer 3
[Rubric] observation
§ Describes coaching skills and strategies
used with reflections on effectiveness
§ Describes observations, insight and areas
for future growth
Leadership Learning Goal (LLG) § Goal is job embedded 4
§ At least one outcome is identified
§ Actions are aligned to goal with reasonable
timelines identified
§ CPSEL standards and elements aligned to
actions are cited
10 Collaborative Summaries § Includes at least 7 Collaborative 6
( 7 of 10 related to the LLG) Summaries related to LLG
§ Distributed over time (throughout year)
§ References Job embedded situations

LEADERSHIP COACH CERTIFICATION TIME FRAME



ACSA Leadership Coaches must complete the Leadership Coach certification
portfolio and review prior to a credential candidate completing the Clear
Administrative Credential Program.

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COACHING MODEL AND TRAINING


ACSA’s leadership coaching model emphasizes the application of adult learning
theory, the importance of building and maintaining trust and rapport, the value of
being a good listener, and the need to ask questions and provide feedback to
promote reflection and growth in new educational leaders.
EVOCATIVE COACHING MODEL
ACSA’s Leadership Coaching is designed to focus on the candidate’s leadership
development using a job-embedded coaching approach relevant to the candidate’s
job context rather than a classroom theoretical model. The coaching methodology
is based on the work of Megan and Bob Tschannen-Moran written in the book
Evoking Greatness: Coaching to Bring Out the Best in Educational Leaders (2016).
This researched-based model focuses on the coaching skills and moves to LEAD –
Listen, Empathize, Appreciate, and Design and support the candidate’s growth as a
leader and attainment of leadership outcomes. Through Appreciative Inquiry
questioning, the coach helps candidates recognize strengths and possibilities that
exist to envision an ideal future to develop goals and action steps. This approach
builds the candidate’s capacity as a leader by modeling inquiry for problem solving
that extends beyond their current administrative position.

“Through Evocative Coaching, we hope to shift the energy in the conversations in


schools by focusing our attention on what we call the 5Cs. First, we hope to have
conversations that raise consciousness. We want to foster connections, enhance
competence, honor contribution, as well as to promote a playful spirit of
creativity.”

Megan Tschannen-Moran

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LEAD STRATEGIES FOR STRENGTHS-BASED C OACHING

L Listen to their • Tell me the story of how you came to be a leader


Story..... • Tell me a story that illustrates what has been working well for you
• Tell me a story about a time when you handled a tough situation well
• Mindfully • Tell me a story about a time when you felt you made a real contribution
• Calmly • Tell me a story that illustrates what you love most about your work
• Openly • Tell me a story about a time when you had a lot of fun as a leader
• Attentively • Tell me a story that illustrates how your values come through in your leadership
• Quietly • Tell me a story about a time when you tried something new.
• Reflectively • Tell me a story about a time when your staff meeting went surprisingly well.
• Imaginatively

E Empathize... Feelings When Needs


Are Not Being Met:
Feelings When Needs
Are Being Met:
• Make
Hostile (animosity, appalled, disdain, cold, scorn, Exhilarated (ecstatic, elated, enthralled,
observations
vengeful) exuberant, giddy)
• Clarify feelings
Angry (enraged, furious, irate, Excited (alive, amazed, animated, eager,
• Understand needs livid, incensed, mad, outraged) energetic, enthusiastic)
• Make requests Annoyed (aggravated, impatient, cross, grouchy, Inspired (amazed, astonished, awed,
irritated, bitter) dazzled, thrilled, radiant)
Upset (agitated, alarmed, restless, disturbed, Joyful (amused, delighted, elated, ecstatic,
rattled, unsettled) pleased, gleeful, happy)
Tense (antsy, anxious, distressed, Relaxed (at ease, carefree,
stressed, overwhelmed, nervous) open, comfortable)
Afraid (apprehensive, dread, fear, Curious (adventurous, alert
hesitant, mistrustful, wary, timid) Interested, intrigued, fascinated)

A Ask Appreciative •What would you like to pay more attention to in your school?
Questions •What possibilities do you see for yourself in the next few months?
•What changes do you think your staff would really appreciate?
(Inquiry)....
•What variables do you think matter most?
•How could your needs and the needs of your school be more fully met?
• Discover strengths
•What kind of environment would you like to create for your school?
• Observe vitalities
•What things are most important to you right now in life? In work?
• Frame aspirations
•What changes would excite you and make you feel great?
• Invite possibilities •How would you describe your intentions over the next few months?
• How would your life be like if you realized those intentions?
• What are the best things that could happen in your school in the near future?
• What do you think are the best possible outcomes of our work together?

D Design Next BEFORE EXPERIMENT: AFTER EXPERIMENT:


Steps.... • What ideas stand out as the best? • What parts of the experiment can we
• Which ones would be the most fun? The celebrate?
• Brainstorm ideas most rewarding? • What skills were you using well?
• Frame designs as • What would it take to succeed with this idea? • What approaches worked for teachers?
experiments • What strengths might you leverage? • What hopes did you have for the school?
• Increase • What kind of impact might they have? • What might have happened if you had
confidence • Which ones do you want to try first? chosen to do something different?
• Secure • How would you rate your confidence? • How can you build on this experience for
commitment • What will you do? even better results next time?

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MOVING LEADERSHIP STANDARDS INTO EVERYDAY WORK


Our program utilizes a continuum of leadership development, West Ed's, Moving


Leadership Standards into Everyday Work: Descriptions of Practice (DOP) (Kearney,
2015) along with other forms of assessment to determine growth, knowledge, skills
and application of California Professional Standards for Educational Leaders
(CPSEL).

PURPOSE OF THE DESCRIPTIONS OF PRACTICE


The Descriptions of Practice (DOP) expand on each


standard element and describe what the elements look
like across a continuum of practice. This continuum of
practice moves from practice that is directed toward
standard to practice that exemplifies the standard. The Descriptions of Practice
(DOP) are a formative assessment tool to guide candidate behaviors and action.

DEVELOPMENTAL CONTINUUM OF PRACTICE


The four-part continuum of practice describes actions for each element of the six
California Professional Standards for Educational Leaders (CPSEL). The continuum
describes increasing levels of a candidate’s knowledge, skills and application and
moves from fundamental skills to highly accomplished skills. The chart on the next
page provides a brief summary.

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DEVELOPMENTAL CONTINUUM OF PRACTICE CHART


Directed Toward Approaches Meets Exemplifies

Basic knowledge Emerging Execute vision Generate


skills and strategic vision driven action innovative
attitudes strategies
Activity by activity Connected Know the what, Understand
activities why and how of interrelationship
activities with shared goals
Engage in starter Initiate actions Build on Commitment form
activities and build pattern leadership staff because of
of success capacity of others results
Efforts may not Reflect on lesson Shared goals and Distributive
be strategic or learned planning leadership
productive
Lead by self Increasingly Staff and student Accountability and
engage others growth continuous
improvement

The CPSEL Self-Assessment and Reflection facilitates a collaborative conversation


focused on moving the candidate from “directed toward” to “meets” or
“exemplifies” in each CPSEL to identify growth areas and professional development
needs. This conversation will lead to the development of the candidate’s
Leadership Learning Goal (LLG) and action steps.

The progression of practices in the DOP reflect the following developmental


intentions, with the administrator and his or her work reflecting a shift.

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LEADERSHIP COACH TRAINING MODEL


Leadership Coaching Training is comprised in foundational, initial and ongoing
professional learning opportunities for a community of leadership coaches.

ACSA LEADERSHIP COACH TRAINING – FOUNDATIONAL COACH TRAINING


The ACSA Leadership Coaching Training (ALC) is required for all coaches hired after
2016. This current foundational research-based coach training is focused on
Evocative Coaching skills and the moves of Listening, Empathizing, Appreciative
Inquiry, and Design (LEAD). ACSA Leadership Coach training emphasizes the
development of knowledge and skills of coaching; coaching instruments utilized in
the program; goal setting and reflective practices. This two-day training is offered
throughout California and registration information is on the ACSA website.

PROGRAM ORIENTATION – INITIAL COACH TRAINING


Program Orientation for Coaches is a one-day, face-to-face training. This initial
training provides support for Evocative Coaching strategies and coaching skills
specific to the program, coaching instruments and the process of formative and
summative assessment designed to support candidate growth. Coaches receive
training on how to use West Ed’s Descriptions of Practice to help candidates
measure growth in leadership competencies.

All coaches assigned to a candidate participate in ACSA Program Orientation. There


is no cost for Program Orientation and enrollment is coordinated through Local
Program Coordinators and the ACSA CACP Director.

CNET: CALIFORNIA NETWORK OF LEADERSHIP COACHES – ONGOING TRAINING


Ongoing professional learning provides an opportunity for ACSA leadership coaches
to engage in a professional community of leadership coaches. Leadership coaches
participate in CNET training every year by attending one session in the fall and one
session in the spring. The purpose of CNET is to provide opportunities for leadership
coaches to receive support with individual coaching challenges, reflect on their
coaching practice and network with peers. CNET also provides professional
learning in current education trends, research and policy changes.

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LOCAL PROGRAM PROFESSIONAL LEARNING AND NETWORKING – O NGOING TRAINING


Leadership coaches participate in ongoing networking and professional learning
within their local program a minimum of four times per year. The goal is to support
and extend the network of professional learnings from CNET, address local
coaching challenges and problems of practice, and to calibrate on the level of
candidate work and success. Each local program determines the delivery model of
professional learning according to the unique demographics of the district or
consortium. Single school district local programs focus on needs and requirements
specific to the district and consistent with CACP outcomes. Consortia that cover a
large geographical area and multiple districts tailor opportunities and may conduct
meetings via WebEx online meetings/chat or newsletters. Dates, times and
locations are published at the local program level.

LEADERSHIP COACH TRAINING OVERVIEW

LEADERSHIP COACHING PRACTICE


In all professional development offerings coaches dialogue around coaching
challenges and opportunities. Coaching triads afford coaches the opportunity to
practice skills around new content, coach on specific CPSEL-related scenarios, and
coach to current problems of practice. Coaches receive and provide feedback on
applied coaching strategies and reflect upon new learning gleaned from the CNET
training as well as their development and growth in coaching skills. Coaches may
use the Evocative Coaching Tools Style Point hand out or the CNET observation
form for feedback.

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LEADERSHIP COACHING OBSERVATION TOOL - CNET


Date: _________________________________ CNET: ___ 1 ____2

Name: _________________________________ Observer: ____________________

Evocative Coaching Strategies Coaching Moves and Language

L – Listen to their Story……..

• Mindfully
• Calmly
• Openly
• Attentively
• Quietly
• Reflectively
• Imaginatively

E – Emphasize…

• Make observations (not evaluations)


• Clarify Feelings
• Understand Needs
• Make requests (not demands)

A – Ask Appreciative Questions (Inquiry)

• Discover Strengths
• Observe Vitalities
• Frame Aspirations
• Invite Possibilities

D – Design Next Steps..


• Brainstorm Ideas
• Frame designs as experiments
• Increases confidence
• Secure Commitment

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ASSESSMENT OF COACHING SERVICES


The quality of coaching services is assessed through formative and summative
assessments at both the ACSA office and local program. Although methods of
assessment vary by local program all leadership coaches are provided with
feedback. Methods for feedback may include direct consultation from a local
program coordinator, credential candidate surveys of leadership coaching services,
leadership coach network coaching triad feedback and individual coach reflections.

Local program coordinators provide formative feedback to coaches through


progress monitoring of candidate growth and quality and growth displayed in End
of Year One Candidate Progress Monitoring and Candidate End of Program
Interviews or Presentation and Portfolios.

Leadership coaches self-assess their growth through dialogue and discussion with
colleagues during CNET workshops and local program meetings. Every CNET
workshop provides an opportunity to receive feedback from colleagues in a role
play coaching session and a time for reflection on coaching skills.

Candidates provide feedback about leadership coaching skills on a formal and


informal basis. Coaches may use the Coach reflection form or ask their candidate
questions such as, “What was the best part of this coaching session? Finally, ACSA
distributes a survey to candidates twice per year to gain insight into the quality of
coaching services as well as the program.

COACH PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT ASSESSMENTS


Entry and First Year Ongoing Mid-Program and Conclusion
(Initial) (Formative) (Summative)
Advisement Coach Self-Reflection Candidate feedback and surveys
Application Screening CNET Coaching Triad peer and Candidate growth on CPSEL self-
or presenter feedback assessment
Interview Candidate feedback and survey Coaching Hours Completed
Leadership Coach Collaborative Summaries; End Professional Development hours aligned
Profile and Inventory of Year 1 Reflection with Leadership Learning Goals
(online)
Leadership Coach Coach Assessment
Certification

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COACH SESSION FEEDBACK FORM


Coach’s Name: ______________________Date:

As one of many ways to encourage coaching proficiency, please give your coach feedback using this form after a
coaching session. On a five-point scale, to what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements?

1 = Totally Disagree, 2 = Somewhat Disagree, 3 = Partly Agree, 4 = Mostly Agree, 5 = Totally Agree

Proficiencies Indicate Rating

Story Listening 1 2 3 4 5

1. My coach listened carefully and fully to me.

2. My coach explored what I had to say and opened up new understandings.

Expressing Empathy 1 2 3 4 5

3. I felt accepted and respected by my coach.

4. My coach helped me to understand the things I need and value most.

Appreciative Inquiry 1 2 3 4 5

5. My coach asked powerful, strengths-based questions.

6. My coach explored the upside of observational data (what is going on).

7. I developed a larger sense of my aspirations and potential through this conversation.

Design Thinking 1 2 3 4 5

8. My coach brainstormed ideas and possibilities with me.

9. Something new came out of this conversation that I am confident I will follow through
on.

10. We talked about ways to make the environment in which I work more supportive.

Coaching Presence 1 2 3 4 5

11. My coach worked with me as a curious collaborator rather than as an expert advisor.

12. I did not feel pushed to do what my coach wanted me to do.

13. I really enjoyed, appreciated, and valued this conversation.

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COACH SESSION FEEDBACK QUESTIONS

14. What was the best part of this coaching session?

15. What was your biggest take-away from this coaching session?

16. How has your thinking or plans changed as a result of this coaching session?

17. How could your coach be even more helpful to you in the future?

©2016 Center for School Transformation, Lead Learner Associate

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CLEAR ADMINISTRATIVE CREDENTIAL PROGRAM OVERVIEW



ACSA’s Clear Administrative Credential Program (CACP) is designed to identify and
address the needs of all administrators in the program while developing their
administrative leadership skills. The program is grounded in California Commission
on Teacher Credentialing (CCTC) Clear Induction Program Standards and California
Professional Standards for Educational Leaders (CPSEL). The six Standards are:

● Standard 1: Development of a Shared Vision


● Standard 2: Instructional Leadership
● Standard 3: Management and Learning Environment
● Standard 4: Family and Community Engagement
● Standard 5: Ethics and Integrity
● Standard 6: External Context and Policy

The CPSEL are organized into six broad leadership areas to address expectations for
effective practice. West Ed’s Moving Leadership Standards into Everyday Work:
Descriptions of Practice (DOP) (Kearney, 2015) further delineates the CPSEL by
specific elements and indicators. Used in conjunction with the program elements,
the Descriptions of Practice assist the leadership coach and candidate to develop
candidate competency in the CPSEL during the course of the program.

This two-year Clear Administrative Credential Program (CACP) includes three


professional learning components which help candidates extend their leadership
knowledge, skills and attitudes through coaching, professional development and
assessment. These three components are job-embedded and organized into an
Individual Induction Plan (IIP). For detailed instructions, forms and information,
please refer to the Participant Manual.

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PROGRAM OVERVIEW AND OUTCOMES


Candidates demonstrate competency in each of the six California Professional Standards for Educational
Leaders

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Quick Reference of Individual Learning Plan Documents


The following documents and processes will help coaches plan, pace and review the coaching
process and Individual Learning Plan requirements. ALL documents below are placed in the
Candidate Portfolio once they are completed. Please refer to the CACP Participant Manual for a
complete description of each of the program components and required documents.

Required Document When to Include in


Complete Portfolio

Section I: Coach Agreement First or Second X


● Reviewed and signed within the first few meetings in Year 1. Coach Meeting
● Placed in Candidate Portfolio
● Complete a new Coach Agreement If there is a change of
coach for Year 2
● Both Coach Agreements should be included in the Candidate
Portfolio

Section I: Professional Experience and Work Context First month of X


● Guides discussion between coach and candidate about the coaching
candidate’s back ground and experiences to understand what
has brought them to their current position
● The data section helps the coach understand the
demographic context in which coaching will occur
● The supervisor input and district/site priorities are completed
during a meeting with the candidate, supervisor and the
coach. See guidelines for sample protocol and questions.
● Provides opportunity to collaborate with employer
● This document is a collaborative effort. It is suggested that the
candidate is the author of this document.

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Section II: CPSEL Self-Assessment and Reflection Initial X


● Candidate and leadership coach collaboratively review the within the first
Descriptions of Practice (DOP) and Indicators for each CPSEL 90 days
● Candidate highlights areas on the DOP rubric that reflect
his/her areas of strength Benchmark X
● Candidate puts “X” in the column on the Self-Assessment that End of Year One
matches their placement at that time of assessment
● Each of the three times this document is completed, the Final X
candidate writes a reflection that is meaningful and tells a End of Year 2
story using evidence and ideas to describe the reasoning for
the placement on the scale
● This activity and discussion should drive the candidates
Leadership Learning Goal and reference CPSEL on an ongoing
basis as it relates to the context of the coaching and the
candidate’s responsibilities

Section II: Collaborative Summaries


● A Collaborative Summary must be completed each time a One for each Candidate
coach and candidate meet coaching session includes all
● The Collaborative Summary should be completed soon after in portfolio
the meeting to keep pace
● The purpose of the Collaborative Summary is to: Coach
○ capture the ongoing conversations, perceptions and Certification
current successes and challenges. submit
○ focus on the LLG actions/goals being worked on and minimum of
professional development needs. 10
○ ensure CPSEL are embedded in coaching (7 aligned to
conversations and current work. LLG)
○ serve as a springboard to guide the next coaching and dates
session. match
**It is helpful to review a group of Collaborative Summaries with the Coaching
candidate to look for patterns of successes or challenges, helping Hours
drive the next steps in conversation and actions. submission

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Section II: Coaching Hours Log X


• Coach logs hours immediately on the Coaching Hours Log Include final
each time a coaching session is completed in addition to screenshot
completing the Collaborative Summary of hours for
• Coaching hours MUST be logged by the coach ONLY each year
• Coach Hours Log links are found in the learning
management system under the course Cohort assigned
to the candidate

Section III: Leadership Learning Goal (LLG) Begin work X


As you work with your candidate on the development of the within the first
Leadership Learning Goal, consider the following: four (4) months
● The initial CPSEL Self-Assessment results and reflection of coaching
(including indicators in each CPSEL)
● School and/or district priorities
● Goal follow the S.M.A.R.T.E.R. format and the impact of the
results can be measured
● LLG may be broad enough to span two years work or can be
written for each year the program. If a candidate changes
job and/or districts, a new LLG must be completed
● The LLG development process addresses areas of leadership
development in context of the candidate’s job
● Candidate must complete End of Year 1 and 2 LLG comment
section including artifacts, reflections and evidence
● Candidates are encouraged to focus on Appreciative Inquiry
design concepts of valuing the best of what is, envisioning
what might be, dialoguing about what should be and
innovating what will be

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Section IV: Professional Development Reflections and PD Hours Timing is up to A minimum


Log candidate and of two (2)
● Selection of approved professional development is coach. are required
collaborative between the coach and the candidate 20 hours in the
● PD chosen must align with the CPSEL needs and LLG required each Portfolio.
● Coach and candidate have a conversation about the impact year
of the professional development activity
● A single PD session cannot be counted for more than 6 hours
on the PD Reflection Form. e.g. if attending a conf. – include
only the hours for the sessions that are pertinent to the LLG
● Hours are logged by the candidate on the PD Log

Section V: Program Monitoring and Completion End of Year One X


Program Monitoring and End of Year
● Review LLG and PD reflections with candidate Two
● Candidate is to complete End of Year one CPSEL – Self
Assessment and write reflections
● Coach and candidate have a conversation about impact
● Discuss additional coaching needs with LPC
Successful Completion of Administrative Experience
● Schedule meeting with candidate and employer to discuss
progress
● Candidate requests a letter on employer letterhead indicating X
they have two years of successful employment
Portfolio Support:
● Review Portfolio items with candidate periodically to ensure
alignment with requirements and relevancy with their CPSEL
growth.
● When completing Year Two portfolio, guide the candidate to
put the items in the order on the list provided starting with
the Coaching Agreement. Add additional evidence to expand
on CPSEL competency. X
Exit Interview/Event:
● Review candidate evidence to be used in Exit Event
● Ensure there is a story of growth and evidence of CPSEL
competency in at least two CPSEL (at least one element each)
in their presentation.

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SMARTER GOAL RESOURCES


Incorporate each element in development of a SMARTER goal following the suggested prompts.

S
• What do you want to accomplish?
Make it Specific • Who will be involved? Where will this take place?
Identify and target • Why do I want to accomplish the goal?

M
• How will you know when you have accomplished your
Make it Measurable goal?
Quantify or provide a • How will I know I am successful?
tangible indicator of • How much change needs to come?
results that can be • How many accomplishments or actions will it take?
tracked.

A
• How can the goal be accomplished?
Make it Achievable • Do I have or can I get the resources needed to achieve
Define a purpose or an the goal?
impact that is feasible and • IS the goal a reasonable stretch for me?
within scope • Are the actions I plan to take Likely to bring Success?

Make it Realistic
R
• Is the goal worth working hard to accomplish it?
State results which can • Explain
realistically be achieved
given time and resources

Make it Timely
T
• By when will the goal be accomplished?
Specifies when results will
be attained

Evaluate
E
• How will progress towards the goal and final outcomes
Include a process to be evaluated?
monitor progress during
implementation and
analysis of results

Refine
R
• Are there mechanisms in place to accommodate
Provide for revision to changes, revisions, or adjustments along the way?
actions measures or
outcomes based on
progress monitoring

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SMART GOAL TEMPLATE


Crafting S.M.A.R.T. Goals are designed to help you identify if what you want to achieve is
realistic and determine a deadline. When writing S.M.A.R.T. Goals use concise language but
include relevant information. These are designed to help you succeed, so be positive when
answering the questions.

Initial Goal (Write the goal you have in mind):

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

1. Specific (What do you want to accomplish? Who needs to be included? When do you want
to do this? Why is this a goal?)

2. Measurable (How can you measure progress and know if you’ve successfully met your
goal?):

3. Achievable (Do you have the skills required to achieve the goal? If not, can you obtain
them? What is the motivation for this goal? Is the amount of effort required on par with what
the goal will achieve?):

4. Relevant (Why am I setting this goal now? Is it aligned with overall objectives?)

5. Time-bound (What’s the deadline and is it realistic?):

S.M.A.R.T. Goal (Review what you have written, and craft a new goal statement based on
what the answers to the questions above have revealed)

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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS


1. What if a candidate changes districts between year one and year two?

If a candidate moves district mid-program, they need to submit a new Verification of Employment
from their new district to the Local Program Coordinator and ACSA.

2. Can a candidate finish in less than two years?

The program is designed to span two years and the candidate is required to participate in
reflections, goal setting, self-assessment and leadership coaching for the full two years.
Candidates take the CPSEL Self-Assessment three times during the program and participate in an
exit interview or presentation at the end of year two. California Commission on Techer
Credentialing program standards require all Clear Administrative Credential Programs to be two-
year induction programs.

3. What happens if a candidate does not have an administrative position for year two of the
program?

Candidates may apply for a leave of absence from the clear administrative credential program.
Candidates have five years to clear their preliminary services credential once it has been
activated. During their leave of absence candidates should keep a copy of the work completed
during their program enrollment should they reenter a Clear Administrative Credential Program
within the five-year period. Candidates may request a letter from the ACSA office verifying
completion of course work.

4. If a candidate only works part time, what is the percent they need to work in order to
qualify for the program?

Full-time service means service for a minimum of four hours per day for at least three-fourths of
the total days in the school year. Substitute or part-time service does not apply. Candidates must
work 75% of a school year in a position that requires an administrative services credential to
participate in the CACP program.

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5. What if a candidate changes positions between year one and year two?

If a candidate changes positions during the program they need to participate in another
supervisors meeting and add the information to the Professional Experience and Work Context
section of their Individual induction Plan. The Leadership Learning Goal will also be revised to
ensure it is relevant to the new position or rewritten with the new role in mind.

6. Must the leadership coach review candidate portfolios before they are sent to the LPC?

Yes, the coach reviews each candidate exit portfolio to be sure all components are present and
the candidate has included evidence of meeting the program outcomes of demonstrating
competency in all of the six of the California Professional Standards for Educational Leaders.

7. Does ACSA need the original Verification of Program Completion and Candidate Data Sheet
or are digitally signed copies acceptable?

Digitally signed copies are acceptable; however, the Candidate Data Sheet should not be
uploaded to the digital portfolio, but rather handed in hard copy during the exit interview for
confidentiality reasons.

8. How do candidates show their coaching hours and PD hours as evidence for the portfolio?

A screenshot of the grades page in the learning management system may be taken show the
completion of required coaching and PD hours and then uploaded into the candidate portfolio.

9. Can a candidate enter ACSA’s program for year two after completing year one in another
program?

Yes, candidates may transfer to the ACSA program and acceptance may be granted initially
through the local program coordinator and finally by the ACSA program director upon verification
of program components which may include: 40 hours of coaching for year one, 20 hours of
professional development for year one, goals and action steps from year one, CPSEL Assessment
and any other work completed that demonstrates growth in shills, knowledge and application of
CPSEL competency. Candidates are enrolled in the learning management system in the cohort
indicating their anticipated completion date.

10. What do I do if I cannot attend CNET?

Contact your Local Program Coordinator ASAP and the ACSA office. You may request a change of
location. If an unforeseen circumstance occurs an alternative assignment may be provided by
your local program coordinator. Coaches contact their local program coordinator to discuss.

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REFERENCES

Backor, K. & Gordon, S. (2015). Preparing principals as instructional leaders: Perceptions of


university faculty, expert principals, and expert teacher leaders. NASSP Bulletin, 99(2),
105-126.
Burkhauser, S., Gates, S., Hamilton, L., & Ikemoto, G. (2012). First year principals in urban school
districts: How actions and working conditions relate to outcomes. Santa Monica, CA:
RAND Corporation.
California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. (2014a). Administrative services credential
program standards. Sacramento, CA: Author. Retrieved from
http://www.ctc.ca.gov/educator-prep/stadads/SVC-Admin-Handbook-2014.pdf
California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. (2014b). California professional standards for
educational leaders (CPSEL) [Booklet]. Sacramento, CA: Author. Retrieved from
http://www.ctc.ca.gov/educator-prep/standards/CPSEL-booklet-2014.pdf California
Task Force on Educator Excellence. (2012). Greatness by design: Supporting outstanding
teaching to sustain a golden state. Sacramento, CA: California Department of Education.
Retrieved from http://wwwcde.ca.gov/eo/in/documents/greatnessfinal.pdf
California Department of Education (2015). California State Plan to Ensure equitable access to
excellent educators. Professional Learning Support Branch.
Connelly, G. (2013, November/December). School leadership matters: In an interview with
NAESP’s Gail Connelly, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan shares his vision for pre-
K-8 education. Principal. Retrieved from
http://www.naesp.org/sites/default/files/School_Leadership_Matters_ND13.pdf
Darling-Hammond, L., LaPointe, M., Meyerson, D., Orr, M. T., & Cohen, C. (2007). Preparing
school leaders for a changing world: Lessons from exemplary leadership development
programs. Stanford, CA Davis, S., Darling-Hammond, L., LaPointe, M., & Meyerson, D.
(2005). School leadership study: Developing successful principals (Review of research).
Stanford, CA: Stanford University, Stanford Educational Leadership Institute.

37
Association of California School Administrators - Revised June 2018

Gray, C., Fry, B., Bottoms, G., & O’Neill, K. (2007). Good principals aren’t born –they’re
mentored: Are we investing enough to get the school leaders we need? Atlanta, GA:
Southern Regional Education Board.

Kearney, K. (2010). Effective principals for California schools: Building a coherent leadership
development system. San Francisco, CA: WestEd.
Kearney, K. (Ed.). (2015). Moving Leadership Standards into Everyday Work; Description of
Practice (Second Edition). San Francisco, CA: WestEd
Learning Forward. (2011). Standards for professional learning. Oxford, OH: Author.
Lochmiller, C. (2014). Leadership coaching in an induction program for novice principals: A 3
year study. Journal of Research on Leadership Education, 9(1), 59-84. doi:
10.1177/942775113502020
Mizell, H. (2010). Why professional development matters. Oxford, OH. Learning Forward.
Mourshed, M., Chijioke, C., & Barber, M. (2010). How the world’s most improved school systems
keep getting better. London, England: McKinsey & Company.
Tschannen-Mooran, M., & Tschannen-Moran, B. (2018). Evoking Greatness: Coaching to bring
out the best in educational leaders. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin
Wallace Foundation. (2013). The school principal as leader: Guiding schools to better teaching
and learning. New York, NY: Author. Retrieved from:
http://www.wallacefoundation.org/knowledge-center/school-leadership/effective-
principal-leadership/Documents/The-School-Principal-as-Leader-Guiding-Schools-to-
Better-Teaching-and-Learning.pdf
Whitney, D., & Trosten-Bloom, A. (2010). The Power of Appreciative Inquiry, a Practical guide
to Positive Change. San Francisco, CA: Berrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc.

38
Association of California School Administrators - Revised June 2018

APPENDICES

39
Association of California School Administrators - Revised June 2018

Evoking Greatness, authored by Megan and Bob Tschannen-Moran, is the text that is used in the
ACSA Coaching Training and the model of coaching that ACSA supports. Their first book,
Evocative Coaching, reflects the same model; Evoking Greatness is focused on bringing out the
best in our educational leaders through inspiring coaching conversations that contribute to the
improvement of the leadership practice of our candidates.

The evocative coaching model is a person-centered, no-fault, strengths-based coaching model,


which emphasizes the practice of Appreciative Inquiry in the approach. Each chapter provides
concrete guidance and specific suggestions for questions to ask, things to listen for, and ways to
generate ideas and motivation in the leaders we coach.

The Appendix brings together lists of coaching questions from each phase of the coaching model
to serve as a resource for coaches as they plan their coaching sessions.

40
Association of California School Administrators - Revised June 2018

41
Association of California School Administrators - Revised June 2018

Individual Induction Plan Form Snap Shot


IIP Form Candidate Appendix Schoology Notes and Suggested time frame
Manual Page Location

CPSEL Overview • Candidates are to demonstrate


competency in all six standards (choice of
element)

Coaching Pg 9 B Section 1 • Sign at First Meeting


Agreement Pg 35

Professional Pg 8 C Section 1 • Formative Assessment


Experience and • Triad Meeting
Work Context Pg 36
• First 30 days
• Guidelines Available

Collaborative Pg 11 F Section II • Documents coaching focus


Summary • Every Coaching Session
Pg 45
• Guidelines Available

CPSEL Self- Pg 10 E Section III • Completed first 90 days


Assessment & • Review End Year 1
Reflection Pg 38
• Finalize End Year 2

Leadership Pg 13 G Section III • Sample Available


Learning Goal • Review Writing goal hand outs
Pg 46

Professional Pg 15 H Section IV • Guidelines Available


Development • Aligned to LLG
Reflection Pg 47

End of Year One Pg 17 I Section V • Bench Mark Assessments


Progress • Coach and Candidate Reflection
Pg 48

Verification of Pg 18 J Section V • Evidence of CPSEL Competencies


Program • Review with candidate prior
Completion Pg 49

42
Association of California School Administrators - Revised June 2018

43
Association of California School Administrators - Revised June 2018

How Do I Become an ACSA Certified Leadership Coach?
Prerequisites
o Four years of experience as a successful school administrator
o Valid Clear Administrative Services Credential
o Commitment to ongoing professional Learning
Process
o Attend the two - day ACSA leadership coach training
o Contact a local program coordinator in your area and let them know you are
interest in coaching

o Complete leadership coach application


o Complete coach profile link
o Provide copy of administrative services credential

o Complete other requirements as determined by local program

o Attend coach program orientation if hired by a local program coordinator

o Attend the two-day California Network of School Leadership Coaches (CNET)


workshop - one day is in the fall and one day is in the spring

o Complete leadership coaching portfolio for certification as an ACSA certified


leadership coach

o Attend CNET and local programs coach meetings regularly to maintain


certification

ACSA* Educational Services * Credential Office* 1029 J Street, Suite 500
Sacramento, CA 95814
916- 329-3839

Leadership Coach Certification Process


Leadership Coaches for the Association of California School Administrators (ACSA)’s Clear Administrative
Credential Program(CACP) participate in a rigorous professional learning community grounded on a
research based coaching model to become certified as an ACSA leadership coach.
The following steps are required to become an ACSA certified leadership coach:

1. Complete the two-day ACSA Leadership Coach (ALC) training.


2. Complete the one-day Coach Program Orientation.
3. Participate in the two-day CNET, (California Network of Leadership Coaches) professional learning
community.
4. Submit an ACSA leadership coach portfolio with the following documents:

o Application for ACSA Leadership Coach Certification


o Resume
o Two (2) Letters of Recommendation describing ability to work effectively as a coach
o Leadership Coach Requirements - Signed Form
o Code of Ethics for Leadership Coaches - Signed Form
o Coaching Hours Log (minimum 25 hours w/same candidate)
o Initial Leadership Coach Reflection
o Audio/Video or Peer Observation Reflection
o Leadership and Learning Goal (SMART goal format)
o Ten (10) Collaborative Summaries (7 related to the Leadership Learning Goal)
o Two (2) CNET Coaching Observation Forms
o Final Leadership Coach Reflection
o Local Program Coordinator Signature

5. Submit a portfolio to the ACSA Office during the following times.:

January 15 - January 31st or June 15th - June 30th

Address:

ACSA* Educational Services * Credential Office*


1029 J Street, Suite 500
Sacramento, CA 95814

Email to trobinson@acsa.org

*Association of California School Administrators* July 2018


ACSA Leadership Coach
Certification Portfolio

Submission Guidelines

1. Type information requested on forms


2. Do not staple documents
3. Submit documents in the order listed on checklist
4. Save a copy of your portfolio for your records
5. Submit your completed portfolio by US mail or email

U. S. Mail Email
Email to Tracy Robinson, Ed. D.
ACSA Leadership Coach Certification
c/o Educational Services at trobinson@acsa.org
1029 J Street, Suite 500
Sacramento, CA 95814 Subject Line: ACSA Leadership
Coach Certification

Allow 4-6 weeks for notification of results

Submission Window

Winter: January 15th - 31st


Spring: June 15th - 30th

8/21/2017 1
ACSA Leadership Coach Portfolio Check List

Coach Name ____________________________________

Required Documents for ACSA Leadership Coach Certification

_____ ACSA Leadership Coach Certification Application


(Must include dates of ACSA Leadership Coach training, Program Orientation and two CNETS)

_____ Resume (attach to application)

_____ Two (2) Letters of Recommendation


(Current letters describing applicant's experience and ability to work effectively as a coach)

_____ ACSA Leadership Coach Requirements - Signed Form

_____ Code of Ethics for ACSA Leadership Coaches - Signed Form

_____ Coaching Hours Log (minimum 25 hours w/same candidate)

_____ Initial Leadership Coach Reflection

_____ Audio/Video or Peer Observation Reflection

_____ Leadership Learning Goal (SMART goal format)

_____ Ten (10) Collaborative Summaries (7 must document meetings


related to the Leadership Learning Goal and match dates on Coaching Hours
Log.)

_____ Two (2) CNET Coaching Observation Forms

_____ Final Leadership Coach Reflections Form

_____ Local Program Coordinator Signature on ACSA Leadership


Coach Certification Application

8/21/2017 2
ACSA Leadership Coach Certification
Application

Name: Date:
Current Position: District:
Work Address: Home Address:

Work Phone: Mobile Phone:


Work Email: Home Email:
Local Program:

Please list attendance locations and dates for required coach training sessions
Location Date
ACSA Leadership Coaching*
CLASS training*
Program Orientation
CNET (Fall)
CNET (Spring)
*Must attend either ACSA Leadership Coaching or CLASS training, Program Orientation and two CNET

References: Please submit two letters of recommendation from individuals who are familiar with your
leadership and coaching skills, knowledge and ability. It is suggested that one letter come from an
individual you have coached.
Reference Reference
Name
Position
Organization
Phone

Applicant Signature Local Program Coordinator Signature

Date Date:

8/21/2017 3
ACSA Leadership Coach Requirements

Coach Name ____________________________________

All Leadership Coaches will meet or exceed the qualifications established by


ACSA which include:

 Possession of a valid California Administrative Services Clear Credential.

 Minimum of four years successful administrative experience.

 Professional experience conducive to successful coaching, which may


include a range of administrative experiences, in urban, suburban, rural,
or county settings, at varying grade spans, and/or previous training as a
Leadership Coach.

 Participation in the ACSA Leadership Coaching Program Orientation and


all CNETs scheduled in the year the applicant enters the leadership
coaching program.

 Commitment to provide support to school leaders consistent with the


ACSA Leadership Coaching program expectations and timelines.

 Actively coach a new school leader using ACSA Leadership Coaching tools
and protocols.

 Commitment to become fully certified as a Leadership Coach within one


year.

 Completion of a Leadership Coach portfolio with all required components


outlined on the Portfolio Checklist.

I understand and agree to the above requirements.

Leadership Coach Signature Date

8/21/2017 4
Code of Ethics for ACSA Leadership Coaches

Coach Name ____________________________________

 My goal as I provide coaching to a school leader will be to consistently


maintain a focus on students.

 I will commit to develop in school leaders the leadership skills aligned to


the California Professional Standards for Educational Leaders.

 I will be sincere in my communication and reliable in meeting my


commitments with the school leaders I coach.

 I will maintain complete confidentiality of information while coaching,


except as otherwise requested by the school leader, or as required by law.

 I will support the goals for school leaders shared with me by their
supervisors, guarding confidentiality and fostering collaboration.

 I will ensure school leaders I coach understand all aspects of the coaching
agreement.

 I will be sensitive to noting when a coaching relationship is not


productive and will recommend another coach be considered by the
candidate.

Leadership Coach Signature Date

8/21/2017 5
Coaching Hours Log for ACSA Leadership Coach Certification
Coach Name ____________________________________

Minimum of 25 hours required for Leadership Coach Certification.


Use this log to record the dates and hours of the coaching sessions.

Face-to-Face Coaching
Number of Hours
Dates

Total Hours:

8/21/2017 6
Initial Leadership Coach Reflection
Coach Name ____________________________________
Directions: Complete this after the initial meeting. Use the Professional Experience and Work Context
(Section 1B) to respond to the first two questions.

1. Description of School Leader and Work Context. Provide a summary of the 1) School Leader’s
professional background and current position, and 2) his or her school, district or program data
including; student demographics, enrollment, grade spans, socio-economic data, and any current
issues.

2. What coaching challenges do you foresee in working with this School Leader? Be specific.
Explain challenges the school leader is facing as well as those you might anticipate in coaching
him/her.

3. What coaching skills do you plan to practice and develop to be effective when working
with this school leader? Identify the specific coaching strategies in the ACSA Leadership Coaching
model which you intend to apply.

8/21/2017 7
Audio or Video Reflection or
Peer Observation Reflection
Coach Name ____________________________________
Directions: Reflect on your coaching by recording a 60 minute session, choose either audio or video.
Replay the recording and respond to the following questions. An alternative is to invite a peer coach to
observe a 60 minute coaching session and debrief using the same questions.

1. Provide a brief description of your coaching conversation to provide context to the reviewer.

2. Describe coaching skills and strategies that were effective for you. How do you know they
were effective? Provide an example.

3. What observations or insights do you have about your coaching? What areas you would like
to grow or develop further?

8/21/2017 8
Leadership Learning Goal
Directions: Include one Candidate Leadership Learning Goal (LLG) in your Leadership Coach
portfolio. The Leadership Learning Goal must include one SMARTER goal and include the action steps
or strategies related to the goal. The Leadership Learning Goal form is located in Schoology in Section
III a sample of the form is also found in the participant manual.

The criteria for a SMARTER goal are outlined below:

● Specific - Target a specific area


● Measurable - Quantify or suggest an indicator of progress
● Achievable - Specify who will do it
● Realistic - State what results can realistically be achieved, given available resources
● Time-related - Specify when the results can be achieved
● Evaluate - Observe and learn during implementation of the goal
● Refine - Modify goal, strategies and actions based on evaluation

8/21/2017 9
Collaborative Summary
Directions: Include ten (10) Collaborative Summaries. Seven (7) of the Collaborative
Summaries must be directly linked to the candidate Leadership Learning Goals or action steps
and strategies. The Collaborative Summary form is located in Section II in Schoology. A sample
Collaborative Summary is below. It is important to address the California Professional
Standards for Education Leaders (CPSEL), connection to the candidate goals, professional
development needs and opportunities as well as future actions.

o Include Ten Collaborative Summaries in the ACSA Leadership Coach Certification Portfolio

8/21/2017 10
CNET Coaching Observations
Directions: Include two (2) CNET Coaching Observations. These are provided at CNET trainings
and part of the professional learning practice for coaches.

Local Programs may also provide opportunities to complete Coaching Observations

8/21/2017 11
Final Leadership Coach Reflections
Coach Name ____________________________________

1. Reflect on the professional learning you attended and the tools which you used while
coaching your School Leader. Professional learning experiences include ACSA Leadership Coach
two day training, Program Orientation and CNET. Coaching tools include: the CPSEL Self-
Assessment, Collaborative Summaries and Leadership Learning Goal. Which had the
greatest impact on you as a Coach? Describe the impact? Be specific and detailed in your
response.

2. Reflect on your development as a Leadership Coach and describe the challenges you
encountered. How did you approach the challenges and what progress did you make? Tell
about the insights you gained around effective coaching practices as a result of those
challenges. Your response should include references to specific ACSA Leadership Coaching
skills, strategies, and tools.

3. Identify specific ACSA Leadership Coaching skills and strategies you feel competent using,
and skills and strategies you are still working to master. What are your next steps to develop
these skills and strategies?

8/21/2017 12
ACSA Leadership Coach Portfolio
Review and Certification

Applicant Name: Local Program(s):


(Last Name, First Name)
Item
Portfolio Content Checklist Present Documented Evidence Rubric Score Reviewer/Scorer Comments:
Max score
Application § Completed all required training x
§ References listed
Resume § Principal or higher experience x
§ (4+ years of admin experience)
Letters of Recommendation § 2 or more letters x
(Minimum of 2) § At least one letter recommends coaching
skills
Leadership Requirements § Signed x
Code of Ethics § Signed x
Coaching Hours § 25 or more hours of coaching experience x
(Minimum of 25 hours) § Hours on Collaborative Summaries match
coaching logs
Initial Coach Reflection [Rubric] § Clearly describes professional background 3
and work context (Including demographics
and responsibilities) of the candidate who
was coached
§ Explains Candidate’s challenges
§ Identifies and describes specific coaching
strategies to be applied
Audio/Video/Peer Reflection § Describes session of audio, visual, or peer 3
[Rubric] observation
§ Describes coaching skills and strategies
used with reflections on effectiveness
§ Describes observations, insight and areas
for future growth
Leadership Learning Goal (LLG) § Goal is job embedded 4
§ At least one outcome is identified
§ Actions are aligned to goal with reasonable
timelines identified
§ CPSEL standards and elements aligned to
actions are cited
10 Collaborative Summaries § Includes at least 7 Collaborative 6
( 7 of 10 related to the LLG) Summaries related to LLG
§ Distributed over time (throughout year)
§ References Job embedded situations
ACSA Leadership Coach Portfolio
Review and Certification

§ Includes details specific for each session


§ Reflects balance of job related learning
and evidence of work related to LLG
actions
§ Concrete next steps are outlined
§
CNET Coaching Observations § Two (2) or more completed observation x
(Minimum of 2) tools from CNET
Final Reflection § Includes reflection on: 4
1. coach’s professional learning
2. CACP tools used and description of
impact
3. coaching challenges, approaches and
insights
4. self assessment of coaching
competency level and future goals
related development of coaching skills
Content Total Score: /20

1st Reviewer’s Name: Recommendation:


2nd Reviewer’s Name:
Application Certification Approved Scoring Instructions: Circle the points that count and Slash (/) the points that do not count
Determination
QuickStart Guide to Schoology
The Schoology Learning Management System will be used to house all resources, forms, and assignments for
ACSA’s Clear Administrative Credential Program. Many help documents can be found at the Schoology Website,
however, this document covers the operations specific to our credential program displayed as they appear in
our courses. In addition, video tutorials specific to our program can be found in the Getting Started with
Schoology folder in your CACP course.

1. Course Overview
a. Login and Profile
b. Course Navigation
2. Shared Folders
3. Collaborative Summary: Creating and Sharing
4. Coaching Hours: Logging and Viewing
5. Professional Development
a. Resources
b. Creating Reflections and Logging Hours
6. Program Completion: Portfolios
7. Messaging and Help Center

Login
1. In your web browser (Safari, Firefox, Chrome) URL field, navigate to acsa.schoology.com.
2. Enter your Username and Password. If you have not received this information, contact the ACSA office.
3. Click “Login”

4. INSIDER’S TIP: Bookmark the Schoology URL in your web browser or add it to your “Favorites”.
5. REAL INSIDER’S TIP: If your computer is not accessible to others (for security purposes), set your
computer to save your username and password for your Schoology account.

ACSA Clear Administrative Credential Program - Revised: July 2017 1


QuickStart Guide to Schoology
Profile
In order to personalize your user account, you will need to click on the arrow to the right of your name on the
upper navigation bar. Click on your name to go to your “profile” page where you can upload your photo and/or
house any portfolios you create. To change your picture, hover over the photo until an “Edit Picture” button
appears. Click on the button and “Attach File” from your computer.

Course Navigation
The following tabs and features will be used most often for the credential program.

Home Page (top menu bar): On this page you can view course updates. Coaches can access the “Advisee” tab
to see their candidate’s (or “Advisee’s”) progress toward completion of the coaching and professional
development hours.

Courses (top menu bar): This page hosts the main content of the course and all necessary documents. Clicking
on this tab will display all courses for which you are enrolled.
1) Select the course you want to access. Within a course, click on any folder/icon in the menu
to open/access the content. Double click on the arrow to the left of the folder to preview
contents in a list format.

ACSA Clear Administrative Credential Program - Revised: July 2017 2


QuickStart Guide to Schoology
Groups (top menu bar): This is a way of creating a shared forum of resources for certain “groups” of users.
Candidates may belong to a group with other candidates or their coach. All coaches belong to the CACP Coaches
Group (all coaches program wide).
1. Creating a Group: Click on the “Groups” tab and click on the “create” button in the bottom
left of the pop-up window.
a. Add members to your group (with or without invitation) by clicking the “members”
tab on the left navigation bar and search for the participants your wish to add.
b. Add resources to your group by clicking on the “resources” tab on the left
navigation bar and selecting “Add Resources”.

Resources (top menu bar): There are four types of Resources in Schoology:
• Personal: these are your personal documents to which only you have access
• Public: these resources are public on the web for anyone to access
• Group: these resources may include forms, handouts or any other materials that all members of the
group need access to and only members may access
• Apps: these resources allow you to link external apps such as Google Drive to your Schoology account
for seamless integration between resources.

Grades (left hand navigation bar): For the CACP purposes, “grades” are the candidate’s progress toward the
required number of coaching hours (40 per year) and the required number of professional development hours
(20 per year). In order to keep track of this, Coaches log all coaching hours using a Coaching Log Form.
Candidates are responsible for logging professional development hours using a Professional Development Log
Form. Candidates, coaches and local program coordinators can view these hours at any time.
Viewing hours as a Candidate:
• From the Home Page, click on the “Grades/Attendance” tab on the left navigation bar
• Next, click on the course or local program in which you are enrolled

ACSA Clear Administrative Credential Program - Revised: July 2017 3


QuickStart Guide to Schoology
Viewing Hours as a Coach:
• Use the arrow on the name drop down menu to select the candidate you wish to view
• Select the “grades” tab
• Click on the title of the course (e.g. Shasta COE: 2015-16)
• You will see the total number of hours for coaching logged out of 40 and the total number of
hours logged for professional development out of 20.

Viewing hours as an LPC:


• Within the course, click on the “gradebook” tab along the left hand navigation bar to view
candidate grades (Coaching Hours and PD Hours)
• Using the “all members” drop down menu, you can select: all members (includes coaches),
candidate only, or Winter candidates only.

Shared Folders
Shared Folders enable members such as coach and candidate to upload documents that can be viewed, edited
and downloaded by both parties. These shared folders are stored under the Resources tab. For this program,
you will be using the “Personal Resources” and “Group Resources”. All candidates will create a folder in Personal
Resources to share with his or her coach. This is where they can keep all documents until uploaded to the
portfolio. The folder is private and only the candidate and coach can view and access documents unless the
candidate chooses to share the folder with the local program coordinator as well.

ACSA Clear Administrative Credential Program - Revised: July 2017 4


QuickStart Guide to Schoology
Personal Resources: Within these resources are “collections” or
personal resources set up for coaches and candidates to share
the Collaborative Summaries and any other work or documents
you wish to share confidentially. Clicking on the title of the
shared resource (for example: Shared with Joe Smith) takes you
to the content shared within that collection. You may wish to
add folders to organize the various documents. If you need to
add additional collections or resources, see this Create a
Resource tutorial. Click here for Sharing Resources.

Creating a Shared Folder: Shared folders must be created by either the candidate or the coach to establish a
share point for all CACP work. The shared folder should be set up right away so that the candidate may begin
storing and organizing all of the documents needed to verify program completion. To set up a shared folder,
follow these steps:
1. From the “Resources” drop down menu, select “Personal”
2. Click on the file cabinet icon to the right of HOME and “add a collection”

3. Title your shared folder with both the coach and candidate name

ACSA Clear Administrative Credential Program - Revised: July 2017 5


QuickStart Guide to Schoology
4. Once the folder is created, click on it so that the title is bold and then click on the “Share” button
5. Search for the person with whom you wish to share the folder, highlight their name (turns green)
and click “Add People”

6. Click on the “share” button again to give them editing privileges

Collaborative Summary
For each coaching session, the candidate and coach will work together to complete a Collaborative Summary
to document goals and progress.

Creating and Sharing your Collaborative Summary: To access the Collaborative Summary:
1. Open the Section II: Assessments folder
2. Click on the Collaborative Summary document
3. Scroll to the bottom of the page and Download the Collaborative Summary Template to your computer

4. The template need only be downloaded once and can be stored on your computer and used over again
5. Once you have filled out the Collaborative Summary, go to Personal Resources in Schoology and select
the Shared Folder created between coach and candidate.

ACSA Clear Administrative Credential Program - Revised: July 2017 6


QuickStart Guide to Schoology
6. Click on the “Add Resources” drop down menu and select “Add File”

7. Navigate to the Collaborative Summary on your computer, select it and click “Attach Files” and “Add”

8. Once the file has attached, you will see that the file has been “Successfully Added” and it will be
available for both coach and candidate to view, download and edit.

Logging Coaching Hours (COACHES ONLY)


For each coaching session, the coach will log the hours spent during the session. Hours will accumulate
toward the 40 hours per year requirement and the total hours can be viewed by the coach, candidate or local
program coordinator at any time. Coaches will receive a link to the Coaching Hours Log via email. In addition,
it can be found in the CACP Coaches Group Resources.

1. Click on the Coaching Log link you received via email


2. You will be directed to an online form that you will use to log
hours. These hours are populated to the candidate’s grades.
3. Once you have submitted the hours, both coach and candidate will
receive a verification email. Keep these for your records as they
are the method by which you can verify missing/duplicate entries.
4. NOTE: Filling out the Collaborative Summary Word document and
uploading it to the Shared Folder in Resources does NOT log hours.
Hours must be logged after each coaching session using the online
Coaching Log.
5. INSIDER’S TIP: Once you have opened the Coaching Hours Log in
your web browser, bookmark the address so that you can return to
it at any time without having to login to Schoology.
6. REAL INSIDER’S TIP: Send the URL link of the Google Form to your
smartphone and “add” it to your home screen so that you can log hours on your smart phone.

ACSA Clear Administrative Credential Program - Revised: July 2017 7


QuickStart Guide to Schoology
Professional Development

Professional Development Resources: As part of the requirements for certification, each candidate must
complete at least 20 hours of professional development per year. This is decided upon collaboratively between
the candidate and leadership coach, and linked to the goals and CPSEL the candidate is working on for the
year. For your convenience, ACSA has compiled a resource bank of Professional Development units aligned to
the CPSEL. To access these units:
a. Click on the Section IV: Professional
Development folder
b. Open the CPSEL Professional Development and
Resources folder
c. Review the options to select resources by
learning style (book, webinar or web articles
and short videos).
d. Click on the CPSEL Folder to access content by
standard.

Professional Development Reflections: For each professional development activity completed, the candidate
will complete a Professional Development Reflection form. To access the Professional Development
Reflections form:
1. Open the Section IV: Professional Development folder in Schoology
2. Click on the Professional Development Reflections Form document
3. Scroll to the bottom of the page and Download the Professional Development Reflections to your
computer

4. The template need only be downloaded once and can be stored on your computer and used over again
5. Once you have filled out the Professional Development Reflections, upload the completed form to
your Shared Folder in Personal Resources (see instructions above in Creating the Collaborative
Summary)

Logging Professional Development Hours: (CANDIDATES ONLY)


For each professional development event attended, the candidate will log the hours spent during the activity.
Hours will accumulate toward the 20 hours per year requirement and the total hours can be viewed by the
coach, candidate or local program coordinator at any time.

ACSA Clear Administrative Credential Program - Revised: July 2017 8


QuickStart Guide to Schoology
1. Click on the Professional Development Hours Log link
located in Section IV of Schoology.
2. You will be directed to an online form that you will use to log
hours. These hours are populated to your grades.
3. Once you have submitted the hours, you will receive a
verification email. Keep these for your records so that you
can verify missing/duplicate entries.
4. NOTE: Filling out the Professional Development Reflection
Word document and uploading it to the Shared Folder in
Resources does NOT log hours. Hours must be logged for
each activity using the online Professional Development Log.
5. INSIDER’S TIP: Once you have clicked on and opened the
Professional Development Hours Log in your web browser,
bookmark the address so that you can return to it at any time without having to login to Schoology.

End of Year 1 and Final Portfolios


Candidates create a portfolio at the end of year one to demonstrate satisfactory progress toward program
completion. At the end of the second year, candidates will add culminating documents to the portfolio to
showcase work exemplifying competency in the CPSEL. To locate Portfolios, click on your name in the upper
right-hand corner. This will take you to your profile page. Click on the “Portfolios” tab along the left-hand
navigation menu.

Creating Your Portfolio: To create a new portfolio, click on the “New Portfolio” button. Add a picture of
yourself, a title and description, and documents to your portfolio by clicking on the “Portfolio Items” button.
You may also drag documents into the portfolio to upload them more quickly.

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QuickStart Guide to Schoology
Sharing Your Portfolio: To share the portfolio, go back to the main portfolio page and click the three dots in
the bottom right hand corner of the portfolio you wish to share. Select “Share Portfolio”. Copy the link to the
portfolio and submit your portfolio link by completing the Portfolio Submission Form located in Schoology
Section V.

Messaging
Within Schoology, members can message individual “members” (candidates and coaches) or members and
admin” (all members of the course including the local program coordinator and all leadership coaches and
candidates). There are several places to access messages:

1. Click on the “envelope” on the Top Navigation Bar from any screen
2. Click on “Messages” on the Left Navigation Bar while in the “Home Screen”

3. Click on the arrow next to “Course Options” directly under the “Credential” logo in the upper
left hand corner

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QuickStart Guide to Schoology
Program Completion
Once the program is complete and candidates have received verification of their Clear Administrative Services
Credential, all Schoology courses will be archived within 30 days. All candidates must download any and all
documents and portfolios that they have stored in Schoology and wish to keep as candidates will no longer
have access. To download portfolios:

1. Click on your name in the upper right-hand corner to access your portfolios
2. Click “Portfolios” in the left hand navigation menu
3. Click on the three dots located in the lower right hand corner of your portfolio and select “Export to
ZIP”
4. Once the ZIP file has been generated, click the download arrow and download your portfolio.

Help Center

If you encounter difficulties while working with Schoology, click on the “?” in the upper right hand corner.

You can access the “Help Center” which will take you to a Schoology help page. On the help page you can
search various topics and you will be directed to video tutorials to help you solve your problem. In addition,
you can click on the “Credential Support” email button to direct you to support specific to the Credential
Program. If your question is technical in nature, you may also click on the “Technical Support” email button.

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