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EXPERIMENT 1

COMPOSITE WALL

LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS:

JAY ADROJA 1643003

PREYASH PATEL 1643004

VIRAJ RAVAL 1643005

RAHUL BHIMANI 1643006

ANOKHEE CHOKSHI 1643007


INTRODUCTION

Many engineering applications of practical utility involve heat transfer through a medium
composed of two or more materials of different thermal conductivities arranged in series or
parallel. Consider for example the walls of a refrigerator, hot cases, cold storage plants, hot water
tanks etc., which always have some kind of insulating materials between the inner and the outer
wall. A hot fluid flow inside the tube covered with a layer of thermal insulation is an example of
composite system because in this case the thermal conductivities of tube metal insulation are
different. The problem of heat transfer through the composite system can be solved by the
application of thermal resistance concept. The procedure for solving one dimensional, steady
state heat conduction problems for composite system comprising parallel plates, co-axial
cylinders or concentric spheres are dealt here.

The apparatus consists of three slabs of different materials namely Cast Iron, Press wood and
Bakelite. The heater is provided to supply heat input across these composite walls. Total heater
assembly comprises of a heater bound between two aluminum plates, on both side of these heater
identical structures of composite walls are placed. Thermocouples are provided at proper
positions in the composite walls to record desired inside temperature of composite wall.
Multi-channel temperature indicator is used to measure this temperature. Small hand press
provided to press the wall on each other and ensure that no air gap remaining between two plates.
Heat input to heater is given through a dimmer stat variance and measured by Voltmeter and
Ammeter. By varying heat input & combination of the composite structure, wide range of
experiment can be performed.
OBSERVATIONS

1. Number of pulses (P) = 1

2. Time of pulses (t​p​) = 70.03 sec

3. T​0 ​ = 50​ ° ​C

TEMPERATURE OBSERVATIONS
SENSORS
1. 2. 3. 4.

T​1 50.7 °​ ​C 50.8 °​ ​C 50.7 °​ ​C 50.7 °​ ​C


T​2 48.5 °​ ​C 48.7 °​ ​C 48.8 °​ ​C 49.0 °​ ​C
T​3 48.3 °​ ​C 48.5 °​ ​C 48.6 °​ ​C 48.7 °​ ​C
T​4 41.0 °​ ​C 41.6 °​ ​C 42.2 °​ ​C 42.5 °​ ​C
T​5 40.4 °​ ​C 40.9 °​ ​C 43.3 °​ ​C 41.7 °​ ​C
T​6 33.3 °​ ​C 33.8 °​ ​C 34.4 °​ ​C 35.0 °​ ​C
T​7 31.4 °​ ​C 31.8 °​ ​C 32.3 °​ ​C 32.8 °​ ​C

TABLE 1.1 MEASURED VALUES OF TEMPERATURE SENSORS


CALCULATIONS

P 3600
1. Q = tp
× EM C
× 1000

1 3600
= 70.03
× 3200
× 1000

= 16.06 W

Q
2. q = A
16.06
= π
( 4 ) ×(0.25) ×(0.25)

= 327.17 W/m​2

3. ∆ T​3​ = (T​4​ – T​6​) + (T​5​ – T​7​)


= (41.0 - 33.3) + (40.4 – 31.4)
= 8.35 °​ ​C

∆T 3
4. R​3​ = q
8.35
= 327.17

= 0.0255 °​ ​C m​2​/ W

q × ∆x3
5. K​3 =
​ ∆T 3
327.17 × 0.012
= 8.35

= 0.470 W/ m​2​ °​ ​C

6. ∆ T = (T​0​ – T​6​) + (T​1​ – T​7​)


= 12.85 °​ ​C

∆T
7. R​t​ = q

= 5.65 × 10​-3​ °​ ​C m​2​/ W

q × ∆x
8. K​overall​ = ∆T
327.17 × 0.047
= 12.85

= 1.196 W/ m​2​ °​ ​C
RESULTS

1. R​t​ = 5.65 × 10​-3​ °​ ​C m​2​/ W

2. R​3​ = 0.0255 °​ ​C m​2​/ W

3. K​overall​ = 1.196 W/ m​2​ °​ ​C

4. K​3​ = 0.470 W/ m​2​ °​ ​C

5.

∆T
GRAPH 1.1 ∆x
CONCLUSION

Depending upon our necessity, we can use different materials depending on their thermal
resistance. As per results thermal resistance increase heat transfer decrease. We can use high
thermal resistive material for insulation of body. And low thermal resistive material can be used
in application.
REFERENCES

1. http://files.gj297.webnode.com/200000121-e5bd7e6bb7/HMT%20lab%20manual.pdf