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Factors Affecting Grade 10 Students in Choosing Their Preferred Tracks for

Senior High School

A Research Paper Presented to the Faculty of the High School Department

UNIVERSITY OF THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION Bajada, Davao City

Cervera, Ma. Adriah Therese D.

Divino, Daniel Fil B.

Verjom, Syluck Joseph B.

March 2016
Factors Affecting Grade 10 Students in Choosing Their Preferred Tracks for

Senior High School

A Research Paper Presented to the Faculty of the High School Department

UNIVERSITY OF THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION Bajada, Davao City

In partial fulfillment of the clustered requirements

in mathematics english and social studies

Cervera, Ma. Adriah Therese D.

Divino, Daniel Fil B.

Verjom, Syluck Joseph B.

March 2016
Acknowledgement

We would like thank these following people in sharing their thoughts and
knowledge for us to complete the performance task which was given to all Grade
10 students. These people helped us in making some of the chapters within our
research paper:

Mr. Ronald Allan Zeta – for giving us advices and corrections about the
format and computations in our thesis.

Ms. Phoebe Ostique – for correcting our grammatical errors and in


constructing some parts of our thesis.

Ms. Sheila Bagaman – for correcting the errors in the contents of our
research.

Ms. Blessica Morana – for giving us her moral support and personal
advices in our research as our class adviser.

Ma. Araceli Bello-Verjom – for sharing her knowledge about our study and
for helping us in constructing our the introduction for our chapter 1.

Mr. & Mrs. Cervera – for the financial support in completing our research
papers and for allowing us to use their house as a meeting/ working place.
Abstract

With the changes that are needed to be faced by our country in terms of
educational curriculum, the researchers have made a move to pursue this study.
In our study, we concluded four (4) major factors which was the basis of this
study, Parental Influence, Aptitude, Interests and Environmental Factors. This
study aims to find out the significant differences between the career choice
factors and the gender of our respondents. The research was conducted at the
University of the Immaculate Conception and its respondents were selected
Grade 10 students, ranging from 20-23 per section. It was performed using the
descriptive survey method, thus, the researchers formulated a questionnaire
based on the four (4) different indicators, with six (6) statements each. The
questionnaires were distributed in 8 sections, with 172 respondents all in all
which was verified through the Slovin’s formula. The researchers then encoded
the data to be able to get the mean scores, as well as, the p-value or the
significant difference. It was then formulated by the SPSS, and obtained a p-
value of 0.144. Therefore, it was implied that there was a significant difference
between the career choices of grade 10 students with their gender. The
proponents’ decision was to accept the alternative hypothesis and reject the null
hypothesis. There are diverse and several factors which can also affect the
career choice of an individual. For the improvement of further studies, the
researchers highly recommend that there should be other factors that will be
looked upon since career choice is essential in one’s future way of life.
Table of Contents
Title Page
Acknowledgement i
Abstract ii
Table of Contents iii-iv
List of Tables
List of Figures

CHAPTER I. THE PROBLEM AND ITS SETTINGS


Introduction 1
Statement of the Problem 2
Hypothesis 3
Theoretical Framework 4
Conceptual Framework 5
Scope and Limitation of the Study 6
Definition of Terms 6
Significance of the Study 7-8

CHAPTER II. REVIEW RELATED OF LITERATURE


Review of Related Literature 9
Parental Influence 9-13
Environmental Factors 13-17
Interests 17-18
Aptitude 18-20
CHAPTER III. METHODOLOGY
Research Design 21
Research Locale 21
Research Respondents 22
Research Instruments 23
Data Gathering Procedure 23
Data Analysis 24

CHAPTER IV. RESULTS AND DISCUSSIONS


Results and Discussions 25-34

CHAPTER V. SUMMARY, CONCLUSIONS, RECOMMENDATIONS


Summary 35-37
Conclusions 37-38
Recommendations 38-39

BIBLIOGRAPHY 40-43
APPENDICES 44-47
CURRICULUM VITAE 48-50
List of Tables Page

CHAPTER III
Table 1 Distribution of Respondents 22

CHAPTER IV
Table 2 Profile of the Grade 10 students in terms of section 25
Table 3 Indicator 1 (Parental Influence) 26
Table 4 Indicator 2 (Aptitude) 28
Table 5 Indicator 3 (Interests) 30
Table 6 Indicator 3 (Interests) 31
Table 6 The T-test Results 32

List of Figures Page

Figure 1 Conceptual Framework 5


Chapter 1
The Problem and Its Setting

The K-12 Program implementation started on batch 2011-2012, and the first
batch of students to go through K-12 will graduate in March 2018. The K-12
Program is found to be adequate period for learning under basic education and
its distinction requirement of professionals and non-professionals in our country
and in foreign Asian or Non-Asian countries. It offers a balanced approach to
learning that will enable children and students to acquire, know and learn more
skills in different fields of education taking up the vocational and later
professional degree courses.(Ma. Araceli Bello Verjom)

The number of educated is now decreasing because of the different


circumstances that they face during the days that they are trying to step up in
their lives. A survey from the DepEd shows that out of 100 students studying in
elementary, only 80 of them will graduate and those 80 students may be
deducted and will become 50-60 students to go to high school. In 50 students,
there might only be 30 of them can only proceed to college and only a few of
them can finish college and/or masteral degree courses.(Ma. Araceli Bello
Verjom)

The K-12 program of the government will allow students to having mastery of
competence and enable them to cope up with the lessons. The curriculum are
enriched to the local needs of students to be responsive to choose specialization
that will suit their field of interests. The present curriculum offers a more balanced
approach that students may acquire and master their life long interests and
Learning skills for livelihood income approaching 21st century. With the K-12
education also help graduated students the skills needed in the labor market and
prepare responsibilities and opportunity to be accepted and work to the skills they
acquired.(Ma. Araceli Bello Verjom)
After finishing the K-12, particularly in the senior year of schooling, graduates
are awarded certificate of competence and national certificate showing of proof
allowing them to have middle level skills and will be offered a better opportunity
to be employed and later become young entrepreneur.(Ma. Araceli Bello Verjom)

Statement of the Problem

This study aims to deduce the perception of grade 10 students regarding the
Senior High School Program of the DepEd. Furthermore, the study aims to
determine the plans of the grade 10 students with regard to the K to 12 academic
program and their opinion about its implementation. Specifically it answers the
following questions:

1. What is the Profile of the responding grade 10 students? In terms of:


1.1. gender?
2. What are the factors affecting the students in choosing their preferred track for
senior high school? In terms of:
2.1. Parental Influence;
2.2. Environment;
2.3. Interests and
2.4. Aptitude?
3. Is there a significant difference between the factors affecting a student’s choice
of senior high school track when analyzed according to gender?
Hypothesis

Taking the variables into mind, multiple hypotheses were made. Each
hypothesis tackles a different set of variables yet very similar. Each of them shall
be tested at 0.05 level of significance.

H0 : There is no significant difference between the respondents when


classified according to gender.
Theoretical Framework

DEVELOPMETNAL THEORY OF CAREER DEVELOPMENT


According to Super’s (1990) Developmental Theory of Career Development,
high school students are at the exploration stage of career development, which
involves crystallizing and specifying their occupational preferences, while also
making preliminary decisions about their career choice. The review of the
literature showed the areas of a student’s life affect the plans, decisions, and
career choice they make: Gender, Parental Influence, and Peer Influence. The
study attempted to identify and differentiate to what extent these factors played
varying roles in future career choice.
Conceptual Framework

Figure 1. Conceptual Framework of the study

FACTORS TRACK
CHOICE FOR SENIOR
HIGH SCHOOL

Parental Influence
Environment
Personality
Aptitude

PROFILE

 Gender
Scope and Limitations

This study was an investigation on the factors affecting the choices of the
students under K-12 on which track they would take for senior high school. The
study was only limited to the Grade 10 students of the University of the
Immaculate Conception. This study mainly focused on the factors such as the
profile of the students, Parental Influence, Peer Influence, Environment,
Personality, Interests, Aptitude, and Opportunity. There may be more factors
however, those would not be within this study.

Definition of Terms

Parental Influence- this is the affect of the parents to their students in choosing
their preferred academic tracks in senior high school.
Environment- the feeling of the student in his/her surroundings which makes
him/her think of the things that he/she could help in the community.
Personality- these personality factors to be considered includes their mental
abilities, special abilities and interest if they are going to make intelligent
career plans.
Aptitude- these are the factors which defines the choice of the student based on `
their own abilities, skills, talents, and specialties.
Significance of the Study

One of the parts of direction and guiding is to make it feasible for a


person to see and investigate his or her boundless enriched alternatives.
Professional direction advising, one of the significant administrations of
direction and directing is to think of vocation advancement program which
empowers direction instructors to help people to distinguish and take in the
aptitudes by which they can be more successful in getting ready for and in
picking employments, in making compelling moves and changes in
accordance with work and in dealing with their own particular vocations and
vocation moves adequately.
He further added that the National Career Development Association
(NCDA) in the United States in 1993 noted that “Helping individuals increase
self-understanding of their abilities, interests, values and goals is a vital
foundation of the career development process”

Dismal to say however not very many studies are made to examine
achievement of vocation way utilized as a part of the understudies of the
Philippines, even the components that influence the profession decision of
Filipino understudies. This furnishes us with constrained data on the most
proficient method to offer our understudies some assistance with identifying
the best possible vocation choices and course decision they need to seek
after later on.

Given that the Philippines can't give enough employments to maintain an


informed workforce, there are a few difficulties for profession directing in the
Philippines today. Initially, the matter of picking a vocation in the Philippines is
a family issue. Filipino families immovably trust that a training is the
"immense equalizer." Approaching instruction as the "colossal equalizer"
presumes that the instruction framework depends on a meritocracy in which
capacity, diligent work, and "rough independence" can prompt achievement;
this, without underscoring the best possible profession way that will lead
them to succeed.
Chapter 2
Review Related Literature

High School is an important period of time in an adolescent’s life. It is the

time that students are making decisions about their course taking and future

educational and career plans. Every students carries the unique history of their

past and this determines how they view the world. In fact, one of the tasks of high

school students is to explore and plan for their post secondary career options.

According to Super’s (1990) Developmental Theory of Career

Development, high school students are at the exploration stage of career

development, which involves crystallizing and specifying their occupational

preferences, while also making preliminary decisions about their career choice.

The review of the literature showed the areas of a student’s life affect the plans,

decisions, and career choice they make: Gender, Parental Influence, and Peer

Influence. The study attempted to identify and differentiate to what extent these

factors played varying roles in future career choice.

PARENTAL INFLUENCE

Parental influence has been implicated in the career choice of children

(Roe 1987, Adigwe 1981, Okeke 1996, Gesinde 1986). Okeke for example also

studied the relationship between parental occupations and their children’s

occupational preferences. Okeke found that 60% of the children were willing to

take after their father’s occupations (medicine) while 23% were willing to follow

their mother’s occupations (nursing). Gesinde on the other hand posits that
parents influence is much more intricate and more pervasive than is shown.

Students of secondary and tertiary institutions are often not aware of these

influences and may accept the choice of their parents as theirs. The situation

owes its origin to early childhood when the child grabs his parent’s attitude

towards different vocations. A conflict therefore occurs when the child submits to

his parent’s choice while at the same time deeply resenting his submissions as

he becomes aware of his loss of independence and finds his area of interest.

(Taylor, Harris, 2004) Families, parents and guardians in particular, play a

significant role in the occupational aspirations and career goal development of

their children. Without parental approval or support, students and young adults

are often reluctant to pursue—or even explore—diverse career possibilities.

Although parents acknowledge their role and attempt to support the career

development of their children, parental messages contain an underlying message

of “don’t make the same mistakes that I did.” These interactions may influence

adolescents and young adults to select specific collegiate majors or pursue

particular occupations. Numerous studies (Knowles, 1998; Marjoribanks, 1997;

Mau and Bikos, 2000; Smith, 1991; Wilson and Wilson, 1992) have found that

college students and young adults cite parents as an important influence on their

choice of career. Yet parents may be unaware of the influence they have on the

career development and vocational choice of their children. University career

services of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNCChapel Hill)

decided to survey parents of incoming freshmen in order to learn more about


parents’ beliefs regarding their college-age children’s career choice and the

influences on that choice.

Studies find that the family appears to play a critical role in a child’s career

development (Guerra and Braungart-Rieker, 1999; Lankard, 1995; Mickelson and

Valasco, 1998; Otto, 2000; Mau, Hitchcock and Calvert, 1998). Researchers

have attempted to understand the variables that influence students’ occupational

goals (e.g. family, level of parental education, school, peers, personality, and

socioeconomic status).

There have been varying opinions and findings, however, as to which

specific family characteristics influence career aspirations. For instance,

conflicting data exist regarding the influence of socioeconomic variables. Some

research (Crockett and Binghham, 2000; Mau and Bikos, 2000; Teachman and

Paasch, 1998) suggests that both parent education and income influence career

aspirations, whereas other research (Hossler and Stage, 1992; Sarigiani, Wilson,

Peterson, and Vicary, 1990; Wilson and Wilson, 1992) indicates only parent

education is an influence. Other family variables that have been shown to

influence career aspirations include the parents’ occupation (Trice, 1991) and

family size (Downey, 1995; Marjoribanks, 1986; Schulenberg, Vondracek, and

Croutter, 1984; Singh, et al., 1995). The father’s occupational status is highly

correlated with his son’s occupation (Blau, 1992; Blau and Duncan, 1967;

Conroy, 1997). Family size also appears to influence adolescent career

aspirations because parents with large families tend to have less money to aid
the older children in attending college, while younger children may receive more

financial assistance since the financial strain is less once the older children leave

home (Schulenberg, et al., 1984).

Yet, in other studies (Boatwright, Ching, and Parr, 1992; Mau and Bikos,

2000), each of these family variables has also been found to be insignificant in

influencing aspirations. Nevertheless, families appear to influence, at least to

some extent, career aspirations of adolescents and young adults. If these family

factors are influential in career decision making, then it becomes difficult to

explain how an impoverished student from a broken home can go on to become

a wealthy, financially successful worker. As the paradigm of research shifts, it

becomes clear that family interactions are just as important as physical

descriptors.

Over the years, research has moved from examining family demographics

and their relationships to career development to examining the dynamics of

family interactions. One consistent finding in research suggests that adolescents’

own aspirations are influenced by their parents’ aspirations or expectations for

them. When adolescents perceive their parents to have high educational

expectations for them, adolescents are likely to have higher aspirations for

themselves. A 1998 Sylvan Learning Center report indicates that parents’ and

childrens’ views about career aspirations are more compatible than incompatible.

Parents are influential figures with whom, whether intentionally or unintentionally,

children become aware of and get exposed to occupations or career


opportunities and implied expectations.

Other studies have separately examined the influences of each parent on

the career choices of their sons or daughters and have found that mothers tend

to have more influence on the career decisions/aspirations of their children than

fathers. For instance, Mickelson and Velasco (1998) cited their interviews

conducted with 70 young adults in 1986. They found that mothers were the most

influential and that daughters’ occupational aspirations were often similar to their

mothers’ chosen professions (Mickelson and Velasco, 1998). In similar studies,

students were asked items such as, “What do you want to do with your life?” and

to indicate if they agree or disagree with statements such as “My mother (father)

encouraged me to make my own decisions.” The students’ responses were

similar to those of their parents. These studies also found that students wanted to

discuss career planning primarily with their mothers. Overall, research supports

the influence of parental expectations and aspirations on the career decisions

and aspirations of their children. These expectations lay a foundation for parents’

behaviors and interactions with their children, which then indirectly or directly

influence choices they make in the future.

ENVIRONMENT

Throughout a career, an individual seeks to accommodate the

surroundings with one’s goals, while at the same period of time being assimilated

into the environment, (Kroll, et al., 1970). Career development is stabilizing or

recognizing and meeting requirements of the individual while at the same time
answering to the outer forces and realities of life. Career decision factors involve

to sets of input, the self and the world of work. The individual in a career has

permanently stabilized one’s aspirations and how they have fitted into the reality

of the workforce. “Man’s occupation determines the kind of persons he becomes

since, through his working hours, his cognitions about himself, his wants and

goals, and his interpersonal response traits are molded”, (Kroll et al., 1970, p.

19). The author went on to say that much of the informal and formal knowledge

provided through the society and the environment has focused on acquisition,

retention, and utilization of information pertaining to the world. The researcher

observed that both of the self and world emerge as important factors in the

constructs, that it would have attained, that it would have become the important

features in the acquisition, retention, and translation of information about one’s

self, (Kroll et al., 1970).

Environmental play a significant role in the career position. The students

attains in many ways, the environment that is spoken about here is a factor that

is to nurture decisions in career choice. Availing a better environment for a

student who wants to cross gender lines while choosing a career, skills present in

males and females alike have been indicative of their vocational interests. Grace

Lalerger, in her Ph. D dissertation set out to ascertain the skill levels of girls as

they applied to interest that the girls had. The conclusion showed that there was

a disappointingly low correlation of skills to interest, (Lalerger, 1942). These kinds

of studies have shown how difficult it is to break the code of motivation that
students may possess. The fact that Lalerger’s study was done on 1942 shows

that gender bias and the study of it is nothing new, and may continue to be an

always present part of the career choice process. One means of prompting

students to participate in the career choice planning is a mandated to require

Southern California’s San Fernando Valley, District C’s students to submit a

description of their plans for some post secondary education or training to school

officials; or atleast explain their future career paths in detail.

Under this first year trail policy, the graduates need to spell out those

goals, which could include college, trade school, the military or other options,

even if they have not met the requirement to graduate, (Cavanagh, 2002). The

intent of the career explanation was to have students with low expectations talk

with counselors about option for advancing their careers in the future. However, it

has been shown that counselors cannot “Do it All”. In a chapter titled “Career

counseling realities” , discusses what counselors can and cannot do. Counselors

can draw career preferences to the forefront, in reflecting of student’s

preferences clarifying career preferences, summarizing and encouraging

student’s career preferences. Counselors should not be engaged with the

evaluation for example, telling the students what they are or are not capable of

doing counselors should not moralize or tell the students what they should do,

what their motives should be, or persuade the student to adopt a different point of

view. Career counselors are ineffective if they try to dictate, judge or decide the

student’s values and finally, counselors should not make predictions that go
beyond tha capability of their training, (Weiler, 1977). For students to provide

themselves with answers to career choice questions, decision- making has

become a tool to form career choice, (Kroll et al., 1970). Cited Super’s (1990)

own research, which indicates that the decision making process concerning one’s

career is not so much a function of the information amend to the individuals, but

more the process of maturity and planning. Kroll cites Clarke, Gelatt and Levine

in which they stressed that good decision- making relied upon adequate

information and effective strategies for making choice. Students can help

themselves in to decide with from reality, communication, and learning to operate

autonomously are fundamental building blocks used in effective career planning.

In order to succeed in obtaining their goals, students must know what they want

and instead concentrate on meeting other people’s expectation. In doing this we

end up spending most of our time making to other people’s drums, (Weiler, 1077,

p. 57).

Kroll has provided models of the decision making process, John Dewey’s

Model describes five noticeable steps: perfective state, suggestion,

intellectualization, hypothesis, and then reasoning, (Kroll et al., 1970). Another

from Poyla,( cited in Kroll et al., 1970) describes four basic areas in the decision

making process: First, Understanding the problem, second, seeing how various

items of the problem are linked in order to formulate a plan, third, carrying out the

plan, and fourth is reviewing and discussing the completed solution. Brim, Glass,

Lavin, and Goodman work from different point of view utilizing a exact scientific
method exploring how people make decisions. Their decision making model

includes problem identification, information acquisition, solution production,

solution evaluation, strategy selection, and actual performance with subsequent

learning and revision cited in, (Kroll et al., 1970). Tiedman and D’Haro have their

process in phases: Personal, Value, and Desires have seldom been realized

without the active and conscious efforts of the part of the students. The students

must be motivated to the outcome. If the student wants to work in the career

choice, the student must know and understand the realities of that process. Only

when the student has developed awareness, can they begin to avoid deciling wit

the myths within the process as a whole. It is at the point that the student

develops a practical plan of action to get what they want from the decisions of

their career choice. Most students be rather on the reality of what is so stated,

( Weiler, 1977).

INTERESTS

It is important for students to have a good understanding of themselves,

their personality, if they are to make intelligent career plans. What they would like

to be, and what they are like, is determining factors in their career. The

personality factors to be considered include their mental abilities, special abilities

and interest, (Slaver, 1977, p.13). Considered factors of mental abilities to be

verbal comprehension, word fluency ability, spatial ability, numerical ability,

reasoning ability, and memory. Splaver matched careers with abilities in backing
up her reasoning. Students become familiar with their personality in order to

guide their career choice. A developed career plan included evaluation of

personality through self assessment, and communication with others another trait

that depended heavily on personality, according to Harris and Jones (1997).

There have been numerous career clusters, as well as career clashers

that coincide with abilities. The students should become knowledgeable in these

areas while searching for career interests. Personality has been a tough quality

for parents and teachers to mold into the individual especially if the career in

question is not in agreement with student. In addition contacts are a major job

seeking method. The student’s personality must match the criteria for their

chosen career. Personality is defined as the collection or impressions in the

appearance of the student’s body and the impressions believed to have been

made on others good.

APTITUDE

When choosing a career you should also take your own abilities into

consideration. For example, if you do not perform well in an academic setting, it

would be best to avoid hierarchical occupations where continuing education is

essential to success. Seek a career that will maximize your strengths and

minimize your weaknesses.

Everyone has unique talents that can be used in a career of some type. For

many, these talents have been present since childhood; for others they are

learned over time. Skills can be broken down by types and matched up with
specific career paths. In order to determine what career you should choose,

begin by looking at skills that can be used on the job or look at career paths that

compliment your current skills and talents.

Considering your skills and abilities and how they may fit a particular occupation

comes out of one of the earliest career development fields, Trait-

Factor theories, and is still used today. These theories recommend creating

occupational profiles for specific jobs as well as identifying individual differences,

matching individuals to occupations based on these differences. You can identify

activities you enjoy and those in which you have a level of competency though a

formal assessment.

In John Holland’s Theory of Vocational Choice, he stated that people who choose

to work in an environment compatible to their personality type are more likely to

be satisfied and be successful in the future. He also identified that there are six

personality types: Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising, and

Conventional. Also, there are six basic types of work environments that come

hand in hand with each personality type. The theory is based from the phrase,

"Birds of the same feather flock together.", which means that people are more

likely to choose a career path in an environment which is suitable to their

personalities and to work with people who are more similar to them. (Holland,

1985) It shows that the personality of each Grade 9 students can affect their

choice in their career. Everyone has unique talents that can be used in a career

of some type. For many, these talents have been present since childhood; for
others they are learned over time. Skills can be broken down by types and

matched up with specific career paths. In order to determine what career you

should choose, begin by looking at skills that can be used on the job or look at

career paths that compliment your current skills and talents. Also, with the theory

of Lent, Brown and Hackett which is The Social Cognitive Career Theory. It states

that there are influences in an individual’s career choice which connects to self-

efficacy, outcome expectations and personal goals and on how these variables

interact with other aspects of the person and his or her environment (e.g.,

gender, ethnicity, social supports, and barriers.). Also with Roe (1987), Adigwe

(1981), Okeke (1996), Gesinde (1986) they had said that Parental influence has

been implicated in the career choice of children. Adding up with Gesinde (1976)

statement, that gender can play a big part in their career choice. Therefore, the

abovementioned factors affect the career choice of grade 9 students.

In Lent, Brown, and Hackett’s Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT)

The Social Cognitive Career Theory states that there are influences in an

individual’s career choice which connects to self-efficacy, outcome expectations

and personal goals. SCCT focuses on several cognitive-person variables (e.g.

self efficacy, outcome expectations, and goals), and on how these variables

interact with other aspects of the person and his or her environment (e.g.,

gender, ethnicity, social supports, and barriers.)


Chapter 3
Methodology

In this chapter the researcher discussed the methodology and the procedure
engaged in the study. The following part includes the research design used in the
conduct of the study, the locale, the participants, procedure followed and
statistical tool.

Research Design
The research design used the statistical information to see if dependent
variables relating to Parental Influence, Peer Influence, environment, personality,
aptitude, and personality were significant factors influencing grade 10 students in
choosing their track for senior high school. In the grade 10 of approximately 304
students, 173 were chosen through random selection to be the respondents. The
control group consisted of subject-based students intending to graduate within
the year. Internal validity was not guaranteed, however the subjects surveyed
were unaffected by environmental qualities that may skew results. The external
validity in general terms was applicable to other seniors of similar school
populations.

Research Locale and Environment


The study was conducted in the University of the Immaculate Conception
High School, Bajada, Davao City. It has been accredited by the PAASCU as
Level III. Founded on 1905 with only primary and intermediate courses offered
but later on in 1934 they opened the high school for all. The university has all the
facilities running. Utilizing every technology and books they can for better
teaching for each student. There are two, 3-storey, buildings for the High school ,
the Beaterio building, formerly called Annex, and the Immaculate Heart, formerly
called the Main building, wherein the different year levels are distributed. The
Beaterio building was composed of the Grades 7, 8 and some the Grade 9
students while the Immaculate Heart had some of the Grade 9 and all of the
Grade 10. Recently in 2012, the University had implemented the K-12 program,
which made this year’s batch of Grade 10 Students, the first ever batch to enter
the Senior High School Next Year.

Respondents
The respondents were chosen through Statistical Random Selection. All
the 8 sections from Grade 10 will be the focus of the study. This was because
they were the first batch to have the K-12 program. Another reason to this is
because they will be taking up their first year in senior high school next year,
which would also make them the first to enter grade 11. In senior high school,
they need to choose a track to study. With this thought in mind, they were chosen
as the respondent.
Table 1. Distribution of Respondents.

SECTIONS No. of Students No. of Percentage


Respondents
ST. ANNE 41 23 13%

ST. LORENZO 36 20 12%

ST. MONICA 39 23 13%

ST. AUGUSTINE 36 20 12%

ST. THOMAS 36 20 12%

ST. THERESE 38 21 12%

ST. JUDE 39 23 13%

ST. ANTHONY 39 23 13%

TOTAL 304 173 100%


Research Instrument
A poll was made by the specialists. The scientists utilized the elucidating
review system to accumulate information and break down the data and will
appropriate it to every segment in the Grade 10 understudies. Related inquiries
were utilized as a part of request to get the data required for the study. The
survey had three sections which had 6 questions for every component
specifically: identity, aptitude and parental impact. The respondents were
requested that rate their response to the announcement as indicated by how it
influenced their vocation decision.

Data Gathering Procedure

1.Ask for approval. The researchers asked for approval from their
respective teachers who are in charge of the thesis. It was to know whether or
not the study will be accepted. They checked if there were further corrections and
revisions to be made before the conducting of research.
2.Make questionnaire. When the study was approved, the researchers
started working on their questionnaire basing their questions on the theories
they’ve found. The researchers used related questions to be able to achieve the
respective goal of their study.
3.Distributing. After the questionnaire has been made, the researchers
distributed the questionnaire to each section in the Grade9 level. The number of
students chosen in each class was retrieved using statistical random sampling
method.
4.Analyze data. The researchers collected the questionnaire distributed
from the Grade 9 respondents. Each questionnaire was checked by the
researchers and have the data gathered. Also, they analyzed the results and had
the answers.
Data Analysis

The researchers used the mean scores of the results of the questionnaires,
answered by the grade 10 students, to identify the factors being researched.
They also used t-Test in order to track wether there is a significant difference
between the factors affecting a student’s choice of senior high school track when
analyzed according to year level .
CHAPTER 4

Results and Discussions

This chapter presents the findings of the study, along with the

interpretations and discussion on the implications of findings.

The Profile of the Students in terms of Gender


Table 2 below shows the frequency and percentage of the gender of the
respondents coming from the Grade 10 level of the University of the Immaculate
Conception.

Table 2. Profile of the Grade 10 Students in terms of Gender

Gender Frequency Percentage


Male 88 75.58
Female 84 74.42
Total 172 100

The table 2 above presented the profile of the students in terms of gender, the
total number of male and female respondents and the percentage.

Discussion:
The table above shows that there are a total of 172 grade 10 students who
will be chosen as respondents in the survey that was recently conducted. The
highest frequency is 88 or 75.58% which are the males and the lowest frequency
is 84 or 74.42% are the females.
Factor Affecting the Students in Choosing their Preferred Track in terms of
Parental Influence.
The table 3 below entails the results of the survey on indicator 1 which is the
Parental Influence.

Table 3. Factor affecting the Students in Choosing their Preferred track in


terms of Parental Influence
Parental Influence Mean Qualitative Description
1. My parents expect me to succeed in a 3.80 High
business.
2. My parents chose my track. 2.45 Moderate
3. My parents want me to take up a certain 3.33 Moderate
course.
4. My parents always give an advice in 4.26 High
decisions I make.
5. I always try to make my parents proud 4.35 High
of me.
6. I want to follow my parents work. 2.85 Moderate
Total 3.51 High

The 3rd table entails the results of the first indicator under the Parental
Influence. There are 6 statements under the first indicator. The statement with the
highest mean is statement number five: “I always try to make my parents proud
of me.” has a mean score of 4.35 and described as High. On the other hand, the
statement with the lowest mean score is number two which states that: “My
parents chose my track.” has a mean score of 2.45 and described as moderate.
Parental influence as an indicator gained an overall mean of 3.51 and describe
as high.

Discussion:

Reflected on the chapter 2 on this study, Hashim et al; (2015) as

adolescents are invariably impressionable, their decisions could be very much

influenced by their parents. Parental effects on the educational pursuit and

attainment of an individual is highly supported and validated in many studies,

namely by the study conducted by who found that parental guidance exerts

effects on the learning achievement of an adolescent, particularly the socio-

economic status of parents. Most of the parent influences their children for

choosing their care path in the future. In other words adolescents want to ensure

that the track they chose in the future would suit to their personality, ability and

intellect to be successful.
Factor Affecting the Students in Choosing their Preferred Track in terms of
Aptitude

The table 4 below entails the results of the survey on indicator 2 which is the
Aptitude

Table 4. Factor Affecting the Students in Choosing their Preferred track in


terms Aptitude
Aptitude Mean Qualitative Description
1. I based my choice on my 2.62 Moderate
NCAE result.
2. I based my choice in 3.95 High
alignment on my skills.
3. I chose my track based on 3.95 High
the subject in which I excel
most.
4. I am good in the track I 3.62 High
chose.
5. The track i chose is easy for 3.46 Moderate
me.
6. I based my choice on how 3.51 High
high my IQ/creativity is.
Total 3.52 High

The 4th table entails the results of the second indicator, Aptitude. There are 6

statements under the second indicator. The statement with the highest mean is

statement number two and three with the same mean score, It states that in an

Aptitude would be my parents chose my track and my parents want me to take

up a certain course has a mean score of 3.95 and described as High. On the
other hand, the statement with the lowest mean score is number one which

states that my parents want me to succeed in the business, has a mean score of

2.62 and described as Moderate. With the overall total of mean is 3.52 and

described as High.

Discusion:

The students applied intra-individually to determine what tasks a given

individual is more skilled at performing. Inter-individual aptitude differences are

typically not very significant due to IQ differences. According to Gladwell and

Colvin (2008), often it is difficult to set apart an outstanding performance merely

because of talent or simply because of hard training.


Factor Affecting the Students in Choosing their Preferred Track in terms of
Interests

The table 5 below entails the results of the survey on indicator 3 which is the
Interests of the students.

Table 5. Factor Affecting the Students in Choosing their Preferred track in


terms of Interest
Interests Mean Qualitative Description
1. I want to excel on the track I 4.62 Very High
chose.
2. I like the track I chose. 4.24 High
3. I enjoy my track. 4.08 High
4. I think my track is good for 4.15 High
me.
5. I chose my track because I 3.99 High
idolize this kind of work.
6. My habits were somehow 3.72 High
related to my track.
Total 4.13 High

The 5th table entails the results of the third indicator under the Interest. There

are 6 statements under the third indicator. The statement with the highest mean

is statement number one which states that in an Interest would be my parents

expect me to succeed in a business, has a mean score of 4.62 and described as

very high. On the other hand, the statement with the lowest mean score is

number six which states that I want to follow my parents work, has a mean score

of 3.72 and described as high. With an overall total mean of 4.13 and described

as High.
Discusion:

The study also stated that relevant interest has given to the students an

upper hand in building a career choice. An interest of a student choose the career

that suits them can be done by integrating career plan with the curriculum so that

students can make good decisions in what course to take in their future life

Factor Affecting the Students in Choosing their Preferred Track in terms of


Environmental Factor

The table 6 below entails the results of the survey on indicator 4 which is the
Environmental factor

Table 6. Factor Affecting the Students in Choosing their Preferred Track in


terms of Environmental Factor
Environmental Factor Mean Qualitative Description
1. The career I want can help the 4.20 High
community.
2. I want to help someone in his/her 3.96 High
job.
3. The career I chose can help in 3.70 High
solving some environmental
problems.
4. I think someone will benefit on 4.22 High
the track I want.
5. The career i want can improve 4.20 High
our economy.
6. My career has a great 4.24 High
contribution in the society.
Total 4.09 High
The 6th table entails the results of the second indicator under the

Environmental Factor. There are 6 statements under the fourth indicator. The

statement with the highest mean is statement number six which states that in an

Environmental Factor should want, has a mea my parents work, has a mean

score of 4.24 and described as High. On the other hand, the statement with the

lowest mean score is number three which states that my parents want me to take

up a certain course, has a mean score of 3.70 and described as High. With an

overall total of mean is 4.09 and described as High.

Discussion

The students attains in many ways, the environment that is spoken about

here is a factor that is to nurture decisions in career choice. Availing a better

environment for a student who wants to cross gender lines while choosing a

career, skills present in males and females alike have been indicative of their

vocational interests.
The table 7 below shows the difference between the factors
affecting the Grade 10 students in choosing their preferred tracks for senior high
school according to gender.

Table 7. Determining the significant difference of the factors affecting the


Grade 10 students in choosing their preferred tracks for senior high school
between the male and female.

Gender Mean Std. Deviation P-Value Decision

Male 3.7477 .46087 .144 Reject H0

Female 3.8462 .41957

Table 7 above presented the comparison between the mean score of the

male which is 3.7477 between the mean score of the female which is 3.8462.

The female have higher mean than of the male and both mean scores are under

the description of fair. The table also presented the standard deviation for both

male and female which are .46087 and.41957, respectively. The p-value which is

-1.465 is also indicated above, is used in determining the decision. Since the p-

value is greater than 0.05,then there is significant difference between the factors

affecting female grade 10 students and male grade 10 students in their preferred

track on senior high school. Thus, the decision is to reject Ho and accept HA.
Discussion

A Grade 10 varies greatly in track choice readiness, in their tendency to

anticipate choices which they will have to make in their exploration of

alternatives, and in their tendency to acquire relevant information. This suggests

that educators need relevant data on these characteristics when planning

curriculum; researchers need them in evaluating programmes and counselors

need them as a means of assessing their characteristics as a preliminary to

education counseling.
Chapter 5

Summary, Conclusions, and Recommendations

This chapter presents the summary of the findings in this research along

with the conclusions made by the proponents and some recommendations for

those who want to conduct a similar study.

Summary

With the changes that are needed to be faced by our country in terms of

educational curriculum, the researchers have made a move to pursue this study.

During the final two years of high school of the K to 12 program, the students

would be called senior high school students. During this span of time the

students would be separated by their tracks. For each track, they would have

different skills to specialize and lessons to learn. These tracks emulate almost

the same way of learning as it is for college. As the current grade 10 students are

the first batch to be entering the senior high school, there is no one with

experience in which they could rely on for their choice of track. The conducted

study aims to determine the factors of the choice of grade 10 students in

choosing their preferred tracks on senior high school. For this purpose, the study

would be able to help the grade 10 students in choosing their track for senior high

school as well as help future counseling services in terms of giving advices to

students.

The researchers administered a survey using the questionnaires they


made, and validated by their project advisers. These survey questionnaires were

what paved the way to achieving the results of this study. The researchers went

to every classrooms of the grade 10 students of the University of the Immaculate

Conception to conduct their survey with 172 respondents. Each questionnaire

had 4 indicators with 6 statements each. The four indicators were Parental

Influence, Interests, Aptitude, and Environmental Factors. The respondents only

had to rate each statement from 1 to 5. With the use of the T-test method, with

0.05 margin of error, the researchers were able to determine the demographic

profile of the respondents of grade 10 students in terms of gender.

With the processes used in this research, the following were found in the

study:

1. The research had a total of 172 respondents. Among those

respondents 88, or 51%, of them were males while 84, or 49%,

of them were females.

2. In Parental Influence, the total mean is 3.51 and had descriptive

equivalent of high ,In the environmental factor ,the mean is 4.09

and had a descriptive equivalent of high ,In the Personality ,the

total mean is 4.13 with a descriptive equivalent of high and the

aptitude,the total mean is 3.52 and had a descriptive equivalent

of high.

3. Among all indicators, the third indicator, Interests, was able to

get the largest mean score.


4. The profile of the respondents were compared and was then

judged that there was a significant difference between them.

Conclusion

On the basis of the foregoing findings, the following conclusions were

drawn:

1. The Factor affecting the students in choosing their preferred

track in terms of Parental influence, Aptitude, Interests, and

Environmental Factors all had a descriptive equivalent of High.

This shows that the influence of parents, the aptitude of the

students, their interests, and factors that are from their

surroundings all play a big role in the student’s choice for their

preferred track in senior high school.

2. Among the indicators, the greatest, factor is the interests of the

students. This is then followed by environmental factors. Next is

their aptitude and then the influence of their parents.

Finally, it has been concluded that there is a significant difference between

the mean scores of the male students and female in terms of their choice for a

track in senior high school. The p-value garnered from the data is 0.144, thus,

the researchers rejected the null hypothesis. The researches then conclude

that there is a significant difference between the choices of senior high school

track given the following factors: Parental Influence, Aptitude, Interests, and
Environmental Factors.

Recommendation

Based on the findings and the conclusions drawn from this research, the

proponents offer these recommendations for the following:

1. Students

1.1. The choice of a track should be considered with many

other factors, not just those from the study.

1.2. When choosing a track in senior high school, students

should also consider the relationship of their track and

the career they want in life.

1.3. The career plan for students must be made in a

continuous manner and should start from an earlier

grade level. This is in order to help the students to

thoroughly identify the track suited for them

2. Parents

2.1. Parents should also be included in the career program

development of students so that they themselves

could understand and help the students choose the

best track suited for their child.


2.2. Parents should be very understanding and

considerate to be able to give proper guidance to their

children when the time comes for them to choose their

track.

3. Teachers

3.1. The educators should provide a quality education that

will prepare the students to face adequately the

challenges as they grow and take the mantle of

leadership in the future.


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Appendices

Name:____________________________ Yr & Section:____________________


Gender: Male: Female:

Legend:
5 - highly agree 4 - agree 3 -neutral 2 - disagree 1 -
highly disagree

PARENTAL INFLUENCE RATE


1. My parents expect me to succeed in a business.
2. My parents chose my track.
3. My parents want me to take up a certain course.
4. My parents always give an advice in decisions I make.
5. I always try to make my parents proud of me.
6. I want to follow my parents work.
TOTAL

APTITUDE RATE
1. I based my choice on my NCAE result.
2. I based my choice in alignment on my skills.
3. I chose my track based on the subject in which I excel most.
4. I am good in the track I chose.
5. The track i chose is easy for me.
6. I based my choice on how high my IQ/creativity is.
TOTAL

INTERESTS RATE
1. I want to excel on the track I chose.
2. I like the track I chose.
3. I enjoy my track.
4. I think my track is good for me.
5. I chose my track because I idolize this kind of work.
6. My habits were somehow related to my track.
TOTAL

ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS RATE


1. The career I want can help the community.
2. I want to help someone in his/her job.
3. The career I chose can help in solving some environmental problems.
4. I think someone will benefit on the track I want.
5. The career i want can improve our economy.
6. My career has a great contribution in the society.
TOTAL
University of the Immaculate Conception
High School Department
Bajada, Davao City

March 02, 2016

Dear Mrs. Rhodora Gamboa,

Praised be Jesus and Mary!


The Fourth year level is tasked to create a descriptive research for the fulfillment of
their third and fourth grading performance task. In line with this, the researchers would
like to conduct a study on, “Factors Affecting Grade 10 Students in Choosing Their
Preferred Tracks for Senior High School”. We are asking for your permission for us to
conduct our survey on the grade 10 students of the University of the Immaculate
Conception as our respondents in complying the data that we need in completing our
calculations.
We are hoping for your kind consideration.

Respectfully yours,

Jelh Cervera,

Daniel Divino,

Syluck Verjom.

Researchers

Noted by:

Mr. Ronald Allan Zeta

Ms. Phoebe Ostique


Ms. Sheila Bagaman

Project Advisers

Approved by:

Mrs. Rhodora Gamboa, RND, MAST-Bio


High School Principal
Scoring guide to interpret the Factors affecting grade 10 students in
choosing their preferred track for senior high school

Scale Range Description Interpretation


5 4.00 – 5.00 Strongly Agree Very High
4 3.25-4.00 Agree High
3 2.51-3.25 Neutral Fair
2 1.76-2.50 Disagree Poor
1 1-1.75 Strongly Disagree Very Poor

T-Test
Curriculum Vitae

Ma. Adriah Therese D. Cervera

Gate 2 Sison Subdivision Buhangin, Davao city


Contact number: (+63)932-432-3489
Email Address: jelhcervera@gmail.com

PERSONAL INFORMATION__________________________________________
Nickname: Jelh, jel-jel, jelex, bajekjek
Birthday: July 28
Birthplace: Davao City, Philippines
Age: 15 years old
Nationality: Filipino
Religion: Roman Catholic
Civil Status: Single

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND

Elementary: University of the Immaculate Conception


Bajada, Davao City, Philippines
2006-2012

Secondary: University of the Immaculate Conception


Davao City, Philippines
2012-2016
Syluck Joseph B.Verjom

#5 Pasig Street Rivera Village Bajada,


Davao City

Contact number: 09163476403

Email Address: syluck.sl@gmail.com

PERSONAL INFORMATION______________________________________
Nickname: Sy, Luck
Birthday: October 16, 1999
Birthplace: Davao City, Philippines
Age: 16 years old
Nationality: Filipino
Religion: Alliance
Civil Status: Single

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND

Elementary: Seventh Day Adventist Elementary School, Davao City,


Philippines
2006-2012

Secondary: University of the Immaculate Conception


Davao City, Philippines
2012-2016
Daniel Fil B. Divino

345 Palm Drive Buhangin, Davao City

Contact Number: 09223160222

Email Address: divinodanielfil@hotmail.com

PERSONAL INFORMATION
Nickname: dan, div, dane
Birthday: October 17, 1999
Birthplace: Davao City, Philippines
Age: 16 years old
Nationality: Filipino
Religion: Roman Catholic
Civil Status: Single

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND___________________________________

Elementary: University of the Immaculate Conception


Bajada, Davao City, Philippines
2006-2012

Secondary: University of the Immaculate Conception


Davao City, Philippines
2012-2016