Você está na página 1de 11

State of the

Gear Industry
Results of Research on Trends in Employment,
Outsourcing, Machine Tool Investment and
Other Gear Industry Business Practices

In October, Gear Technology conducted an anonymous survey tured. They work for gear manufacturing job shops (42%), captive
of gear manufacturers. Invitations were sent by e-mail to thousands shops at OEMs (48%) and shops manufacturing gears for maintenance,
of individuals around the world. More than 400 individuals at gear spares and their own use (10%).
manufacturing locations responded to the online survey, answering The survey covers gear manufacturing around the world, with
questions about their manufacturing operations and current chal- 58% of respondents working in the United States, and 42% outside the
lenges facing their businesses. United States.
The respondents considered here all work at locations where A full breakdown of respondents can be found at the end of this
gears, splines, sprockets, worms and similar products are manufac- article.

52 GEARTECHNOLOGY November/December 2007 www.geartechnology.com


91% of Gear Industry Respondents are Optimistic
About their Ability to Compete over the next 5 Years
2%
Fairly Pessimistic 1%
3%
Slightly Pessimistic Extremely Pessimistic

6%
Undecided

31%
14% Extremely Optimistic
Slightly Optimistic

44%
Fairly Optimistic

Note: All percentages in this article are rounded


to the nearest whole number. Some totals do
not equal 100% as a result.

Most in the gear industry would tell you it’s been another From reading through the responses, our editors got the feel-
good year. Based on our research, gear manufacturers around ing that growth would be even faster in 2008 if the materials,
the world clearly remain optimistic about their future. In fact, machines and workers were available to make more gears.
the number who are slightly optimistic or better about their “Finding the capital to support growth” was one of the
ability to compete over the next five years is 88% (essentially major challenges facing a corporate executive at a company that
equivalent with last year’s 91%). manufactures timing gears in Mexico.
Employment increased at 55% of gear industry operations, “Getting new machines fast enough” was the significant
roughly the same as last year. Most expect that employment at challenge cited by a corporate executive at a gear manufacturing
their operations will increase again next year—if they can find job shop in Denmark.
and keep qualified employees—an issue which continues to be “Having difficulty in finding skilled help is slowing the
one of the most significant facing the industry. growth of the company,” said a manufacturing production
“Developing and retaining a skilled workforce to support the worker for an aerospace gear manufacturer in California.
increased complexities in current and future processes” is one Sales rose for most in 2007, and most expect them to con-
of the biggest challenges facing a manufacturing engineer at a tinue to rise in 2008. 71% saw sales volumes rise in 2007 (the
U.S. material handling equipment manufacturer. Many others same percentage as last year). 75% expect further increases next
had similar comments. year (slightly higher than last year).
Most respondents at gear manufacturing locations also Thanks to the weak dollar, most U.S. respondents are seeing
saw large increases in their production volumes in 2007. 69% increases in exports, and their concerns aren’t so much about
reported at least some increase, with more than 20% of respon- foreign competition as they are about increased competition
dents indicating their production volumes increased by more from their fellow U.S. manufacturers. Corporate executives
than 20% over 2006. at more than one gear manufacturing job shop cited domestic
And it doesn’t appear to be slowing down in 2008, either. In competition as the most significant challenge facing their busi-
fact, more respondents predicted production increases for 2008 nesses.
(79%) than experienced production increases in 2007. A number of Canadian respondents indicated their difficulty
“Can’t make stuff fast enough,” said a design engineer for a in selling to America because the weak U.S. dollar makes their
U.S. manufacturer of wind turbine gears. products more expensive.

www.geartechnology.com November/December 2007 GEARTECHNOLOGY 53


% of Respondents % of Respondents
% of Respondents % of Respondents

54
% of Respondents % of Respondents
% of Respondents % of Respondents % of Respondents
% of Respondents
% of Respondents % of Respondents
% of Respondents % of Respondents

0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
% of Respondents
% of Respondents

0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%

0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%
40%
45%
50%

79%
0%
10%
20%
30%

0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%
40%
45%
50%
0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%

0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%

0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%
40%
45%
50%

0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
40%
45%
50%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%

0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
Increased

0%
60%5%
40%10%
50%15%
25%
30%
35%

0%
60% 5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%

61%
Increase Increase Increased Increase
Increase Increased Increased more than Increase Increased

21%
Increase more than more than Increase Increase more Increased

21%

16%
3%
more than more than more than more

35% 16%
20% Increased Increased

3%

21%
more than

7%

21%
more than more than 20% 20% more

16%
more than

3%
more

7%

16%
3%
20% 20% 20% than 20% than 20% more than

7%
more than 20%

7%
20% 20%

Employment
than 20% than 20% 20%
Increased 20% 20%
Increase Increase Increase
Increased Increased Increased Increase

22%
Increase Increased

18%
Increase 11-20%

8%
11-20% Increase

22%
Increase Increased

18%
11-20%

8%
11-20%

22%
15%

18%
11-20%

22%
11-20% Increased Increased

8%

18%
11-20% 11-20%

8%
11-20% 11-20%

15%
11-20% 11-20% 11-20% 11-20%

15%

Change
11-20% 11-20%

Change
Increased

at their
Increase Increase Increase

in
26%
Increase Increased Increased Increased Increase Increased

45%
Increase

71%0%Saw Production
Expected

GEARTECHNOLOGY
1-10% 1-10% Increase Increase Increased

15% 50%

Change45%
1-10%

26%

Expect Production
26%
1-10%

Change

45%
1-10% Increased Increased

50%

45%
1-10%
33%

1-10% 1-10% 1-10%

Change
1-10% 1-10%

Expected 50%
50%
1-10%
33%

1-10% 1-10%

33%
1-10% 1-10% 33%

in
Stay the Stayed the Stay the

Change
Stay the Stayed the Stayed theStayed the

16%
Stay the Stay the Stay the Stayed the

14%
same same Stay the Stay the

16%
Stayed the

28%

14%
16%
in

16%

14%
same same same Stayed the Stayed the

Production

14%
28%
29%

same same same

28%
same same same

28%
same
29%

Location
same

29%
same
29%

same same

Change in Employment
Decrease Decreased

in Employment
Decrease

Employment
Decrease

5%
DecreaseDecrease

9%
Decreased DecreasedDecreased Decrease Decreased

9%
Decrease Decrease

5%
1-10%

9%

Volume

5%
1-10%

9%

5%
9%
7%

9%
9%
1-10% Decreased Decreased Decreased

9%
1-10% 1-10% 1-10% 1-10% 1-10%
7%

1-10% 1-10%

7%
1-10%

vs.
1-10%
7%
1-10% 1-10% 1-10% 1-10%

vs.
Expected Change in Employment
Employment
vs. 2006

Decrease

vs. 2006

2006
Decreased

Change in Employment vs. 2006


Decrease DecreaseDecrease Decrease

in Production Volume vs. 2006


Decreased

Change in Employment 2008

3%
Decreased DecreasedDecreased Decrease

1%

1%
Decrease Decrease

Change in Production Volume vs. 2006

2006
11-20%

Expected Change in Employment 2008

3%

in Production Volume vs. 2006


2008

3%
2008

3%
1%

1%
1%

1%
11-20%
5%

1%

1%
11-20% 11-20% 11-20% 11-20% Decreased Decreased Decreased

Expected Change in Production Volume 2008


11-20%
5%

5%
11-20% 11-20% 11-20% 11-20% 11-20%
5%

11-20% to Increase

Expected Change in Production Volume 2008


Expected Change in Production Volume 2008
11-20% 11-20%

Expected Change in Production Volume 2008


11-20%
Decrease DecreaseDecrease Decrease Decrease
more than Decreased DecreasedDecreased Decreased Decrease Decrease Decrease Decreased Decreased Decreased Decreased

2%
2%
20% of Gear Industry Respondents Expect

more

2%
more than more thanmore than

2%
2%
2%
55% of Gear Industry Respondents Work at

more than

2%
more

2%

2%
4%

more than more than more than more than

2%
more

2%
more

2%
4%
20% more than more than more than
4%

4%

20% 20% 20% 20% 20% than 20% than 20% 20%

26% Volumes Increase in 2007


20% 20% than 20% than 20% 20%

November/December 2007
Volume to Increase in 2007
20% 20%
Locations Where Employment Increased in 2007

in 2008

% of Respondents
% of Respondents % of Respondents
% of Respondents
% of Respondents % of Respondents
% of Respondents % of Respondents
% of Respondents
% of Respondents % of Respondents
% of Respondents Respondents
% of% of Respondents % of%Respondents
of Respondents

0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%
40%

0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
30%
35%
40%
0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%
40%
45%

0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%
40%
45%
0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%

0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%
40%
0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%

0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%
40%

0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%
40%

0%
5%
10%
15%
25%
30%
35%
40%
0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%
40%
45%

0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%
40%
45%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%

0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%
40%
0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%

0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%
40%
75%

Increase Increase IncreasedIncreased


Increase
Increase Increased
Increased Increase Increase IncreasedIncreased

20% 9%
more thanmore than Increase Increased
Increased

9%
more thanmore than Increase more than more thanmore than

16%
more than
more than more than

16%

9%
9%
more than
more than
13%
21%

13%

20%
21%

20% moremore
than than moremore
thanthan

16%
16%
20% 20%
13%
20%
13%

20%
21%
21%

20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20%


20% 20% 20%20%
Increase Increase IncreasedIncreased
Increase
Increase Increased
Increased Increase Increase IncreasedIncreased

16%
16%
Increase
Increase Increased
Increased

14%
14%
11-20% 11-20%

16%

16%
18%

25%
18%

14%
25%

14%
11-20%11-20% 11-20%11-20%11-20% 11-20% 11-20% 11-20% 11-20% 11-20%
18%

25%
18%

25%

11-20%
11-20% 11-20%
11-20%

www.geartechnology.com
48% Work

Locations
Increase Increase
Expected
Increase

Expected
IncreasedIncreased
Sales

Increase Increased
Increased Increase
Increase Increase Increase Increased
Increased IncreasedIncreased

19%
19%

19%
18%

19%
18%
1-10% 1-10%

18%

18%
32%

1-10% 1-10%
37%
32%

32%

1-10%1-10% 1-10% 1-10%


37%

1-10% 1-10%
37%

1-10% 1-10% 1-10%


32%

1-10%
37%

1-10% 1-10%
Capital Spending
atSales
Sales
StayStay
Stay the the the Stay the StayedStayed the
the Stayed the
Stayed the Stayed Stayed the
Stay Stay
the the Stay the Stay the Stayed the the Stayed the

38%
38%
38%

38%
same 42%
17%

18%

same same same

42%
17%

18%

same
Sales Volume17%
17%

same same same same


18%
Sales Volume18%

samesame same same same same same


Volume
Expected Sales Volume

Volume

to Increase
Locations

Decrease
Decrease DecreaseDecrease Decreased
Decreased Decreased Decreased
Decreased Decrease Decreased Decreased

4%
Decrease DecreaseDecrease Decreased
Change8%

4%
3%

4%
4%
8%

Increased
8%

3%
6%

3%
8%

6%

1-10%
3%

1-10% 1-10% 1-10%


6%

42% Change

1-10% 1-10% 1-10%1-10% 1-10% 1-10% 1-10% 1-10%


Change

1-10% 1-10% 1-10% 1-10%


Expected Sales Volume Change

Expected Capital Spending Change


Change in 2007

in
Sales Volume Change in 2007
in 2007

Capital Spending Change in 2007

Capital Spending Change in 2007


Capital Spending Change in 2007
Capital Spending Change in 2007
Decrease
Decrease Decreased Decrease Decreased
Decreased

3%
Decreased

in 2008
DecreaseDecrease Decrease
Where

Decreased Decreased

4%
in 2008

Decreased

in3%
DecreaseDecrease Decreased
2%

1%

3%
4%
in 2008

3%
11-20%

Expected Capital Spending Change in 2008


11-20%
Volume Change in 2007 2%

1%

11-20%
4%
42% Change in 2008

11-20%11-20%
4%
6% in 2008
2%

1%

11-20%

Expected Capital Spending Change in 2008


11-20%
2%

1%

11-20% 11-20% 11-20%

Expected Capital Spending Change in 2008


11-20% 11-20%

2008
11-20% 11-20% 11-20% 11-20%
2007

Decrease

25% 44% Expect Capital Spending at Their


Decrease Decreased
Decreased Decrease
Decrease Decreased
Decreased
Decrease
71% Saw Sales Volume Increase in 2007

more than Decrease Decreased


more than Decreased DecreaseDecrease Decreased
Decreased
3%
2%

2%

11%
more than more than moremore moremore
thanthan
0% Expect Sales Volume Increase in 2008

3%
2%

2%

11%
more thanmore than than than more than more thanmore than
3%

more thanmore than more than


2%

2%

11%
3%
2%

2%

20% 20%

11%
20% 20% 20% 20% 20%20%
20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% 20%
Not a single U.S. respondent mentioned any worries about
China. But more than a few outside the U.S. did.
“The biggest challenge beyond finding good skilled labor
is cheap competition who have low overhead cost and worth- �������
less machinery but are ready to give you the challenge,” said a �����������������������
manufacturing engineer at an Indian gearbox manufacturer.
“The Chinese currency is not free floating,” said a purchas-
ing agent at a transmission manufacturer in India, “which makes
Chinese imports cheaper.” ������
A significant number of respondents (43%) reported that
capital spending increased at their locations in 2007, and about
the same number (44%) expect that the increases will continue
in 2008.
We also asked respondents specifically about their biggest
manufacturing and engineering challenges. Overwhelmingly,
the responses came back: reduce costs, shortening lead time and
improve quality.
When respondents mentioned quality, they weren’t so much
concerned about the quality of individual parts or specific qual-
ity levels. Rather, they are becoming acutely aware of the need
for improved quality systems. Lean manufacturing seemed to be
of the most interest.
While sales and production are up, and most gear manufac-
turing operations are growing, it’s clear from the responses of
this survey that most gear manufacturers are under enormous
pressure. They need to reduce lead times, they need to improve
throughput. They’re looking at automation and quality manage-
ment programs. They’re desperate for qualified employees.
But still, they’re hopeful.
������
Current Delivery Time for New Orders

33%
35%
% of Respondents

30%
25% 18% 18%
20% 33%
12%
35%
15%
% of Respondents

10%
30%
10%
4% 3% 2%
25%
5% 18% 18%
0%
20%
12%
15%
15 than 15
than 2 weeks

2-4 weeks2-4 weeks

1-3 months1-3 months

3-6 months3-6 months

6-9 months6-9 months

9-12 months

12-15 months

10%
10%
months months

4% 3% 2%
5%
0%
More than More
2 weeks

9-12 months

12-15 months
Less than Less

Current Delivery Time for New Orders

60% Delivery Time55% vs. 2006


% of Respondents

Current Delivery Time for New Orders


50%
40%
30% 55%
60%
% of Respondents

17%
20%
50% 6% 12% 7% 3%
10%
40% 1%
0%
30%
17%
���������������
Faster by 1-10%

Faster by 11-20%

Faster by more
11-20%by 11-20%
more by more

1-10% by 1-10%

About the same

20% �������������������������������
6% 12% 7% 3%
than 20% than 20%
than 20% than 20%

10%
0%
1% ����������
Slower by Slower

Slower by Slower

Faster by 1-10%

Faster by 11-20%

Faster by more
About the same
Slower by Slower

�����������
Delivery Time vs. 2006
������� �����������������
�������� ����������������� ������������
�����

Delivery Time vs. 2006

www.geartechnology.com November/December 2007 GEARTECHNOLOGY 55


Extent of Quality Measures

80% In Place
% of Respondents
70%
60% Partially
50% Implemented
40% Planned
30%
20%
Nonexistent
10%
0%

Statistical Process
Manufacturing
ISO 9000

Six Sigma

5s
Control (SPC)
Lean

“QC American” Gear Grinders


Quality Experienced Delivery
ISO TS-16949 - 2002
(max. d ks)

Call For Info


(734) 761-5021
� � � � �

Form Wheel Gear Grinder Worm Wheel Gear Grinder


YK7332-A YK7236-A
$336,000 � $392,000
Limited Time Sale Price Limited Time Sale Price
(Lease options starting at $5,931/mo.) (Lease options starting at $6,290/mo.)

www.qcamerican.com
American Broach & Machine Co. is to offer sales, tech support, service
and engineering for these world class gear grinding machines in North America.

56 GEARTECHNOLOGY November/December 2007 www.geartechnology.com


I
What Factors Are Presenting
Significant Challenges als,” K
to Your Business? which
ly rep
“Awareness of career potential in metal cutting being gear s
presented by the current educational systems.” gearin
—A manufacturing engineer for a major off-road equipment

OEM

“Can’t make stuff fast enough.” Th


—Design engineer for a U.S. manufacturer of wind turbine and m
gears that is
Ha
“Domestic competition.”
lifetim
—Corporate executive for a NY-based gear manufacturing
job shop more
Th
“Keeping up with demand and freeing up sufficient machining and s
capacity to reduce leadtimes. Reduce the amount of sub- powe
contracted parts currently produced.” ation
—Design engineer for a U.K. manufacturer of measuring are al
devices ing.
Th
“Lack of upper management with leadership and change
Boein
agent abilities.”
time,
—Employee at a U.S. gearbox manufacturer
system
“Poor management and scheduling of production, also poor
choice in equipment purchasing.” Pro
—Employee at a CA-based aerospace gear manufacturer Am
Global Solutions from a Truly Global Company
nume
“Shortened lead time requirements.” The only company of its kind with a truly global Yo
—Corporate executive at an OH-based gear manufacturing manufacturing presence in all three areas of its
job shop customer's production: Europe, United States, Far
East.
miniGears is the first name worldwide in providing
“So many continuous improvement challenges of various
small and mid-size precision transmission com-
names.” ponents in high volumes produced with consistently
—Corporate executive at a gear manufacturing job shop exceptional quality, both by traditional steel
in MI machining and highly innovative powder
metallurgical PM processes.
“The cost of training new employees with no experience and A team of highly motivated and qualified indi-
viduals, recognized for their competence, account-
the increase in scrap and rework due to new employees.” ability, innovation capability and responsiveness
Yogend

—Corporate executive at a gear manufacturing job shop to customers' needs, have established miniGears
in IL as the reliable partner in gear calculation, en-
gineering design and development, testing and
“Exceptionally poor management.” production of gears and complete kinematic mech-
—Design engineer for a U.S. Tier 1 automotive component anisms.
supplier ISO/TS 16949:2002 certified

“Finding skilled engineers.” mG miniGears North America


John So
—Marketing manager at a U.S. manufacturer of aerospace 2505 International Parkway
gears Virginia Beach, VA 23452 U.S.A. tion.
ph.: (757) 233-7000 Ch
“Gear manufacturing quality level.” fax: (757) 627-0944 opera
—Design engineer for an automotive OEM with global opera- e-mail: mg_usa@minigears.com Ot
tions internet: www.minigears.com of exe
ductio

www.geartechnology.com48 JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2005


November/December 2007• GEAR TECHNOLOGY
GEAR • www.geartech
TECHNOLOGY 57
What Factors Are Presenting
Significant Challenges
Vol. 8 Vol. 4 Vol. 6
March November March Issue
Issue Issue Year 2005
Year 2007 Year 2003

Publication for the Publication for the Publication for the


Peening, Blasting, Peening, Blasting and Peening, Blasting and

to Your Business?
Cleaning and Vibratory Finishing Vibratory Finishing
Vibratory Finishing Industries
Industries
Industries

Shot Peening
Services Made In Italy MFN Shot Peening
Workshop in Dusseldorf,
page 22 Germany has to enlarge
MFN its Trade Show

European Shot page 18


SAESL Celebrates

how strong
500 Rolls-Royce
th

Trent Engine Peening Workshop


What Could Possibly
page 39 12-14th May 2004
would you like
Go Wrong?
page 14-15 page 22

this to be?
SCIENCE UPDATE:
Improvement Of Marag-
ing Steel Tools With From Basic Shot
Roto Peening Peening Knowledge to
Boron carbide Basic Blasting
page 48-50 nozzles that will Applications
blast you away!
page 12-13 page 34
Let Surface Reveal
The Enhanced Quality
Shot Blast Systems for !
& German
Mechanical Descaling English
of Wide Strip
page 32-33

10th International Introduction of the 2nd European


MFN Shot Peening MFN Scientific Adviser Shot Peening
Dr. Chris Rodopoulos
Workshop & Trade
(Ph.D.)and MFN G
Workshop &
Show in Florida uest
15th-17th May 2007 Trainer Paul H
uyton
Trade Show

“Good quality on time for the best price.”


10-12th May 2005
page 16 (see page 19)
peening and surface
ng engineeri
www.mfn.li solutions from the Wheelabra
Vol. 8 www.mfn.l
Vol. 5 i www.mfn.li tor Group
Vol. 6
May May Issue September
Issue Year 2004 Issue

—Manufacturing engineer at a gear manufacturing job shop


Year 2007 Year 2005

Publication for the Publication for the Publication for the


Peening, Blasting, Peening, Blasting and Peening, Blasting and
Cleaning and Vibratory Finishing Vibratory Finishing
Vibratory Finishing Industries Industries
Industries

Diversity, Development
And Innovation 4th Asian
Shot Peening
Workshop
8-10th Nov 2004
in Belgium
5th Asian
page 15 Shot Peening
7th Asian MFN
Shot Peening Workshop &
Workshop & Trade Trade Show
Show in Singapore 24-26th Oct. 2005
12th-14th Nov. 2007 The Shot (see page 19)
(see page 19) Peening Process:
A Provider Of Abrasives
And Solutions

“Having difficulty in finding skilled help is slowing the growth of the


Developing Prediction

Nadcap COLUMN: page 32-33 The Metallic Abrasives


Industry And Market
Root Cause Corrective Worldwide Study Has
Action: The Key to Now Been Published!
Nadcap Sucess
The MFN page 30
page 18 Trainer Column:
Peening in the Age of
Damage Tolerance Interview with Dr. Harald
GLOBAL OUTLOOK: Reinach, Vice President
page 34 Technique in

company.”
Multicultural
Management Issues In Schaffhausen and Hubert
The Global Economy Prokopp, Managing
Director in Hagen
page 23 SCIENCE UPDATE:
page 34-36
Fatigue Response of
the Various Titanium
OFF THE BEATEN TRACK: Alloy Classes to
The Emperor's Flying Shot Peening MN:
TRAINER COLU
Machine Globalisation Of MFN’s
page 38-40 Shot Peening Training
page 33 Machine at Airbus
World's Largest Shot Peening page 38

—Manufacturing production worker for a CA-based aero-


www.mfn.li
www.mfn.li www.mfn.li
Vol. 8 Vol. 6
Vol. 5
September July Issue
January
Issue Year 2005

space gear manfacturer


Issue
Year 2007
Year 2004
Publication for the Publication for the
Peening, Blasting, Publication for the Peening, Blasting and
Cleaning and Peening, Blasting and Vibratory Finishing
Vibratory Finishing Vibratory Finishing Industries
Industries Industries

Foreign Exhibitors Confirm Low Plasticity Burnishing


MFN Superb Run Of Show
HANNOVER FAIR 2005,
Enters the Operating Room

“Heavy turnover of good engineers.”


European Shot 11 April To 15 April
page 26-27, 30-31
Peening Workshop
7 Asian MFN
th
12-14th May 2004 INTERVIEW:
Shot Peening Surface Preparation
Workshop & Trade page 14-15 Made In India
Show in Singapore page 34-35
12th-14th Nov. 2007
(see page 19)

—Corporate executive at a large gear manufacturing job shop


The DISA Foundry And Shot
Joint Blast Group Has Been
Industry-Government
Collaboration Garners Acquired By
Procuritas Partners A/S
Best Paper Honors
page 41
page 13
Nadcap COLUMN:
Reducing Residual
Stress During Audits DISA Italia S.r.l.:
Strengthening the local
page 20 Presence in Italy

in India
page 29
HANNOVER MESSE 2007

page 42-44 5th Asian


Super-Polishing of Shot Peening
small Compressor Workshop &
GLOBAL OUTLOOK: Blades „made easy“
Multicultural Management Trade Show
Issues In The Global page 42 24-26th Oct. 2005
Economy (see page 19)
page 23
Pangborn's new RAPID-LOC™ www.mfn.li
Wheel significantly reduces
www.mfn.li maintenance time
www.mfn.li

“Implementation of labor savings strategies.”


—Marketing manager for a Midwest manufacturer of gearmo-
Vol. 5 Vol. 7 Vol. 7
November March July Issue
Issue Issue Year 2006
Year 2004 Year 2006

tors
Publication for the Publication for the
Publication for the
Peening, Blasting
and Peening, Blasting and
Peening, Blasting and
Vibratory Finishing Vibratory Finishing
Vibratory Finishing Industries
Industries Industries

an!
Germ
sh &
Engli

Peening
2nd European Shot 8th International
MFN Shot Peening
Show
Workshop & Trade Workshop &
page 19
10-12th May 2005, Trade Show in Florida
6th Asian Shot Peening
courses! 9th-11th May 2006
FAA approved training Workshop & Trade

“Lack of upper management with leadership and change


Shot Peening Course (see page 18 and 39)
#AGL/0704/0001/8,
MFN Basic
MFN Intermediate
Shot Peening Course
Course
Show in Singapore
13th-15th Nov. 2006
#AGL/0704/0002/8, MFN Advanced Shot Peening
#AGL/0704/0003/8,

(see page 18)


ROSLER Signs Definite
Agreement To Acquire
The Assets Of Jet Wheel- Nadcap Column:
Interview with blast Equipment And An Auditor and
Wolfgang Kratschmer, Kleiber & Schulz a Gentleman
Sales Manager
at Flugzeug-Union page 11 page 19

agent abilities.”
Süd GmbH

page 24-26
GLOBAL ABRASIVES
MARKET OUTLOOK: Atlas Holdings LLC
How To Tackle
Announces Acquisition
Globalization?
of Pangborn Corporation
MFN Shot Peening
page 37 page 11 Stress Measurement:
Workshop in Dusseldorf
X-Ray Diffraction Residual
to be simultaneously Where it Counts
translated! Quantify Your Peening...
page 18 using Ceramic Shot

—Employee at a U.S. gearbox manufacturer


Titanium
Shot Peening of MFN's International
Shot Peening Workshop
and Trade Show in the
Shot Two MFN Trainers to U.S.A. attracted
1st Conference of 81 Participants
Peening in China become Nadcap
page 40 Auditors Trainees page 28-29
page 42 of shot-peening
the science and technology
DISA makes an impact on
Vol. 5 i Vol. 7 www.mfn.li Vol. 7
n.liIssue
www.mfJuly www.mfn.l
May Issue November
Year 2004 Year 2006 Issue
Year 2006

Publication for the Publication for the Publication for the


Peening, Blasting and Peening, Blasting and Peening, Blasting,
Vibratory Finishing Vibratory Finishing

“Management approving manpower request.”


Cleaning and
Industries Industries Vibratory Finishing
Industries

Nadcap Column:
Preparing a Nadcap

—Manufacturing engineer for a U.S. bearings manufacturer


4th Asian Shot Peening Audit
Workshop & Trade Show page 18
8-10th Nov 2004, page
15
6th Asian Shot Peening
INTERVIEW:
Workshop & Trade Laser Peening – An
Show in Singapore Affordable Solution to
13th-15th Nov. 2006 Metal Fatigue "What kind of particle is
(see page 18) it? See page 12"
page 6-8
Trade Fairs in Transition: Nadcap Column: Corrosion and Galvanic
Hannover Messe 2004 Nadcap Customer Compatibility for Metal
sets new Standards Support Initiative Shot Blasting Media
page 26-28 page 19 page 39

“Material and tooling supply times.”


New XRD Technology
can Eliminate Abusive INTERVIEW:
Machining of Drilled It's Not Just About
Holes Glass Beads
page 23-24 page 36-39
MFN introduces a new
Training Program for
Abrasive Blast Cleaning 10th International
Asia Pacific Region
System For Train

—Manufacturing engineer for a U.S. OEM of automotive


MFN Shot Peening
page 32 Passenger Carriages Workshop & Trade
Show in Florida
page 49 15th-17th May 2007

Rösler introduces its ROBOBLASTER New European Order in


Customers Look To Clemco the
www.mfn.li www.mfn.li o For Creative Air-blast
Solutions www.mfn.li Metallic Abrasives Industry

transmissions
Vol. 5 Vol. 7 Vol. 8
September January January
Issue Issue Issue
Year 2004 Year 2006 Year 2007

Publication for the Publication for the Publication for the


Peening, Blasting and Peening, Blasting and Peening, Blasting,
Vibratory Finishing Vibratory Finishing Cleaning and
Industries Industries Vibratory Finishing
Industries

“Outsourcing.”
Nadcap and MFN to
sign agreement!
page 21
4th Asian Shot Peening
Workshop & Trade Show
15
8-10th Nov 2004, page
GLOBAL ABRASIVES
New: FAA approved MARKET OUTLOOK:

—Manufacturing engineer at a U.S. OEM of actuators


training courses! What Does The Metallic
10th International
#AGL/0704/0001/8, MFN
Basic Shot Peen Course Abrasives Industry Teach
MFN Shot Peening
Course
Intermediate Shot Peen
#AGL/0704/0002/8, MFN
#AGL/0704/0003/8, MFN
Advanced Shot Peen Course Us About Globalization?
Workshop & Trade
page 37 Show in Florida
15th-17th May 2007

FAA approves MFN Crack Arrest Of


Training Courses! Nadcap COLUMN:
Controlled Shot Peening
page 20 On Fatigue Damage Of Nadcap Auditor
Recruitment
High Strength
Aluminium Alloys
page 18
page 48-50
Vibratory Finishing
Process for stainless GLOBAL MARKET
Steel Spectacles OUTLOOK:
Finding Inspiration
page 40-41 in History

page 33

“Poor management and scheduling of production, also poor


Mass Finishing Job Shop with Laser Peening
Association (MFJSA)
MFN TRAINER COLUMN:
Benefits & Targets For Preventing Fatigue Failures
8th International
page 33 MFN Shot Peening
In-House Training
Workshop &
Technology page 45
h counts!
finish Trade Show in Florida The Ultimate In Glass Bead
Straaltechniek, when the 9th-11th May 2006
(see page 18 and 39)

choice in equipment purchasing.”


www.mfn.li www.mfn.li
www.mfn.li

—Employee at a CA-based aerospace gear manufacturer

By now, MFN (Metal Finishing News) is probably the “Staffing.”


world's only publication entirely focusing on peening, —Manufacturing engineer at a gear manufacturing job shop
blasting, cleaning and vibratory finishing! in South Africa
MFN has a circulation of over 5300 issues, is “Talent retention.”
distributed in 64 countries and published 6 times a
—Corporate executive at a gear manufacturing job shop in
year. Contact info@mfn.li for 2 free sample issues!
India

www.mfn.li “The biggest challenge beyond finding of good skilled labor is


cheap competition who have low overhead cost and worthless
machinery but ready to give you the challenge.”
New: A subscription of MFN includes the magazine IST,
which is published twice a year (September and March). —Manufacturing engineer at a gearbox manufacturer in
IST covers all aspects of surface technology such as liquid coating, India
powder coating, automotive finishing, electroplating, parts cleaning,
paint removal, blasting, conveyor technology and measuring.

58 GEARTECHNOLOGY November/December 2007 www.geartechnology.com


What are your company’s greatest manufacturing/
engineering challenges for 2008?
“Automation and Increased inspection.” “Knowing where new and existing customers need us to
—Quality control manager at a U.S. plastic gear manufacturer be in terms of services offered.”
—Corporate executive for a NC-based gear manufacturing
“Cost reduction & quality improvement.” job shop
—Design engineer at a NY-based gear manufacturing job
shop “Lack of time and capacity. Engineering throughput.”
—Marketing manager at a MI-based gear manufacturing
“Cost reduction without affecting the quality of end product.” job shop
—Manufacturing production worker at an OEM of gearmotors
in India “Machine uptime.”
—Manufacturing engineer at a U.S.-based OEM of auto-
“Cross training lean implementation.” mobile transmissions
—Corporate executive at an IL-based gear manufacturing job
shop “Maintaining quality.”
—Design engineer for a U.S.-based manufacturer of
“Face gear manufacturing.” locomotives
—Design engineer at a MI-based manufacturer of geared
systems “Material availability.”
—Manufacturing production worker for a gear manufac-
“Finding skilled labor and designers.” turing job shop in New Zealand
—Marketing manager at an OEM of transmissions in Canada
“Materials.”
“Increased throughput.” —Corporate executive at a U.S.-based gear drives OEM
—Corporate executive for an IL-based gearbox manufacturer
“Meeting customer requirements at current or reduced
“Increasing machining capacity by looking at „lights out“ costs.”
technology. To continue to develop new products for a more —Manufacturing engineer for a U.S.-based aerospace
diverse market.” OEM
—Design engineer at a manufacturer of measuring devices in
the U.K. “Mfg: Reducing labor costs and shortening lead time.
Eng: Developing lower cost gearmotors in shorter time-
“To continue to develop new products for a more diverse frames.”
market.” —Marketing manager for an IL-based OEM of gearmo-
—Design engineer at a manufacturer of measuring devices in tors
the U.K.
“New customer development.”
“Improving lead time.” —Manufacturing engineer for a NC-based gear manu-
—Design engineer at a WI-based gear manufacturing job facturing job shop
shop
“New product designing.”
“International site start-up.” —Manufacturing engineer for a gear manufacturing job
—Manufacturing engineer for a major U.S. OEM of transmis- shop in India
sions
“New product evolution and revolution, new market
“Involving staff in modern philosophies.” introduction, elimination of waste in manufacturing pro-
—Manufacturing engineer at a gear manufacturing job shop cesses.”
in the U.K. —Consultant to a major U.S. manufacturer of power
transmission components
“Just trying to keep the doors open and the lights on.”
—Design engineer at a major U.S. Tier 1 automotive supplier “Planetary gearboxes, windmill gearboxes of 1MW and
above.”
“Keeping our overheads low and hopes high to stay in busi- —Corporate executive at a gear manufacturing job shop
ness.” in India
—Marketing manager for a gear manufacturing job shop in
Malaysia

www.geartechnology.com November/December 2007 GEARTECHNOLOGY 59


“Process controls.”
—Prchasing agent at a major U.S. OEM of jet engines Primary Method of Manufacture

“Process improvement.”
—Quality control manager at an OEM of gear drives in
Taiwan 60
“Raising skill level of inexperienced employees, and then 1% 2% Roll-Forming
being able to keep them.”
Plastic Injection
Molding 50
—Design engineer for an OH-based OEM of gear drives 4% Other
0.5%
“Reducing lead times.”
Powder
40

# of Respondents
Metal
—Manufacturing engineer at a WI-based OEM of heavy
equipment

“Reducing lead times.”


30
—Corporate executive for a gear manufacturing job shop
in Brazil 20
“Reducing overhead cost and this comes with new modern 92%
machinery which give better productivity but the competi-
tion does not allow you to do this.”
Cut Metal
10
—Manufacturing engineer for an OEM of gearboxes in
India 0
“Securing new orders to replace existing orders which are
coming to an end.”
—Manufacturing engineer for a gear manufacturing job
shop in the U.K.

Age of
AgeManufacturing Location
of Manufacturing Location

60
ming
50
40
# of Respondents

30
20
10
0
1850s

1860s

1870s

1880s

1890s

1900s

1910s

1920s

1930s

1940s

1950s

1960s

1970s

1980s

1990s

2000s

Original Age of Facility

Half of gear industry respondents work in facilities originally built before 1967

60 GEARTECHNOLOGY November/December 2007 www.geartechnology.com


How Do Respondents Describe Their
Capital Spending for 2007
Manufacturing Operations and Technology?
6% 1% 5%
Facilities and Equipment It's Amazing We Still Have $50 million+
Beginning to Show their Age Customers

18% 16%
World-Class, 13%
21st Century $0-99,999
$10-49.99
million
27%
Good, But Room for
Improvement

28%
47% $100,000-
39% 999,999
Competitive with $1-9 million
Most in Our Industry

Next Generation! Next Generation!


New Neidlein New Neidlein
Face Drivers. Ultra Live Centers.
From the inventors Industry’s best
of the mechanical performance and
face driver… run-out. Period.

• Now even tighter tolerances for • STILL completely sealed,


improved runout and durability. now with new endcap that adds
No other face driver is manufactured further protection against chips, coolant,
to this precision! and grinding swarf
• New springs for even longer life • New end cap placement improves tooling clearance
• Special applications, hard turning, grinding, • Available in carbide or half carbide
HEAVY cuts – let us prove it! • Industry leading TIR down to .00008"
(or +/- .00004" the way our competitors do the math)

www.logan-mmk.com
574-735-0225

www.geartechnology.com November/December 2007 GEARTECHNOLOGY 61


State
State of of
thethe Gear
Gear Industry:
Industry: Who
Who Responded
Responded Sales
Sales Volume
Volume of of Company
Company
State of the Gear Industry: Who Responded Sales Volume of Company

10%
10%
State of the Gear Industry: Who Responded Type16% 16%
of Operation $100,000- $100,000-
Sales $1Volume of$100,000-
Company
$0-99,000
10%
$0-99,000
$499,000
$499,000
16% billion+
$1 billion+
$0-99,0005%5%
$499,000 $500,000-
$500,000-
$1 billion+
Outside
Outside 5% $500,000-
4%
$999,000
$999,000
USA
USA 13% 13% 4% $999,000
Outside
thethe
USAUSA USA58%
58% 13%
$100$100 million-
million- 4%
10%
Other$100
$999$999 million 16%
million $0-99,000 $1$100,000-
the42%
USA42% 58% million-
12% 12% $1 million-
million-
$499,000 million
10% $999 million OEM
$1 billion+ $4.99$4.99
$15%
million
42% million-
12% $4.99 million $500,000-
8% 8% 48%
Outside USA 13%
$50 million-
$50 million- 9%9% 4%
$999,000

$998%$99 million
million 9% $9.99
$5 million-
$5 million-
the USA 58% $100 million-
$50 million-
24% 24% $5$9.99 million
million
million-
$999 million
$99 million
42% 24% million 12% $4.99 million
$10 million-$49
$10 million-$49 $9.99
million
$1 million-
million

$10 million-$49 million


8%
9%
$50 million-
$99 million
Job Shop $5 million-
42%24% $9.99 million

$10 million-$49 million

Type
Type of of Operation
Operation Job
Job Title/Function
Title/Function of of Respondent
Respondent
d Type
SalesofVolume
Operation
of Company Job Title/Function
4% of Respondent
4% Other
Quality Other
Quality 1% 1%
5% 5% Consultant
Size
Control
Quality 4% Company
Control
of Other Consultant
1%
5%
3% 3% Control Consultant
Other
Other Job Title/Function of Respondent
Purchasing
Type of Operation 10% 3%
Purchasing
Other
10%10% 16% OEM OEM
$0-99,000 $100,000-
Purchasing
OEM
$499,000
Quality 4%11%
Other 1%25%
10% $1 billion+
48% 5%
48% 19%
5%9% 9% 25%
$500,000- Control Consultant
0-19 Corporate Ve
48% 9%Marketing 25%Corporate
3% 1000+
$999,000 Marketing
13% 4% & Sales Management
Management
Corporate
Other $100 million- & Sales
Marketing
Purchasing
16%
OEM 9% 9%
& Sales Management
20-49
10% $999 million 12% $1 million- Manufacturing
Manufacturing
11%9%
48% $4.99 million
Production
Production
Manufacturing 9% 25%
24%24%
8% Job Job Shop
Shop 500-999
Production
Marketing Corporate
9% 20%20% 24% Design
Design
13%
Management
$99 million Job 42%
Shop
$50 million-
42% & Sales Engineering
Manufacturing Engineering
$5 million-
20%
Manufacturing Design
50-99
42%24% $9.99 million
9%
Manufacturing Engineering
Engineering
Engineering
Manufacturing
$10 million-$49 million 31%
Production
Engineering
100-499 24%
Job Shop
20% Design
42% Manufacturing Engineering
Engineering

Size
Size of of Company
Company Prime
Prime Industry
Industry
Size of Company Prime Industry
3% 3%
WindWind Energy
Energy
Job Title/Function of Respondent 3%
19% 4% Other 11%
11% 5% 5% Wind Energy
19% Vehicles Other
thanthan Prime 8% 8%
Quality of
Size Company
11% 0-19 1% Vehicles
5% Other 14%14%
Industry
5%
19% 1000+ 0-19
1000+
Control Consultant Automotive
Automotive
Vehicles Other than
Other
Other
8% Aerospace
Aerospace
14%
0-19 16% 16% Other
3% 1000+ Automotive Aerospace
16% 20-49
20-49 3% Wind Energy
Purchasing 9% 9%
11% 11% 20-49
11% 1% 1%
5% Motion Motion
9% Control8%
Control
19% 24%24%
11%500-999
500-999 1000+ 0-19 25% 1%Medical
Medical
Vehicles Other than 14%
Automotive
Motion Control Other Automotive
9% Automotive
Medical 24%
500-999 Marketing 13%13%
Corporate 2% 2% Aerospace
Automotive
16% Marine
Marine
& Sales 13%
Management
50-99
50-99 2% 25% 25%
20-49 Marine Heavy
9%
Heavy Industry
Industry
9% 31% 31% 50-99 1% 25%
11%
Manufacturing Heavy
MotionIndustry
Control 24%
500-999 31% 100-499
100-499
Production
Medical
Automotive 10%10%
100-499 24% 2%
13% Construction/
Construction/
10%
20% Design Marine 25% Off-Highway
Off-Highway
Manufacturing
50-99
Engineering Construction/
Heavy Industry Off-Highway
31%
Engineering
100-499
10%
Construction/
Off-Highway
62 GEARTECHNOLOGY November/December 2007 www.geartechnology.com

Interesses relacionados