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What was/were the objective(s) of this lesson?

What National Standard(s) do you think


was/were addressed in this lesson? (Please be specific (e.g., Anchor Standard 4: Analyze,
interpret, and select artistic work for presentation).)
The students practiced singing in their high and low register. They were also working on
learning English, Russian, and Spanish . They were learning rhythmic sight reading and
dictation, as well copying solfege. They sang alone and with a group.
The objectives of this lesson could be based on anchor 2; organize and develop artistic ideas
and work, at the novice level.
MU:Cr2.1.E.5a Select and develop draft melodic and rhythmic ideas or motives that
demonstrate understanding of characteristic(s) of music or text(s) studied in rehearsal.
This is the only anchor/level that I feel applies in the least to what happens in Hagy’s classroom.
The first anchor stated in common core, I feel, is already way too advanced to be what is
considered to be beginning to learn music. Why would they not list out the basics of listening to
music and identifying note names and rhythms. Also, the very first anchor in common core,
under novice, talks about building off of things that students have studied in rehearsal, and I
think saying the word rehearsal is much too specific.
What Virginia Standards) of Learning for Music do you think was/were addressed in this
lesson? (Again, please be specific (e.g., K.6: The student will demonstrate a steady beat, using
body percussion, instruments, and voice).)
K.2 The student will investigate various uses of the voice by 1. demonstrating the difference
between the singing voice and the speaking voice; 2. matching pitches within an appropriate
range; and 3. demonstrating expressive qualities of music, including loud/soft and fast/slow. K.3
The student will sing a variety of songs of limited range alone and with others, including 1.
singing two-pitch (sol, mi) songs, using echo and ensemble singing; and 2. singing at the
appropriate time following a musical introduction.
K.7 The student will respond to music with movement, including 1. matching locomotor and
nonlocomotor movements to rhythmic patterns; 2. demonstrating expressive qualities of music,
including loud/soft and fast/slow; 3. illustrating moods and contrast in music and children’s
literature; 4. performing dances and other music activities from various cultures; and 5.
exhibiting respect for the personal space of others when moving.
K.7 The student will respond to music with movement, including 1. matching locomotor and
nonlocomotor movements to rhythmic patterns; 2. demonstrating expressive qualities of music,
including loud/soft and fast/slow; 3. illustrating moods and contrast in music and children’s
literature; 4. performing dances and other music activities from various cultures; and 5.
exhibiting respect for the personal space of others when moving.
K.10 The student will participate in music activities that involve sharing, taking turns, and other
behaviors that demonstrate good citizenship. K.11 The student will recognize the relationships
between music and other fields of knowledge.

How did the teacher accomplish her/his objectives?


Through games. When they were learning rhythm they were cop metering; “teacher vs student”,
so see who could get it right the fastest. They also played a game where one student would
come up to the front and turn their back on the classroom. They pretended to be a dog and
sang a song by themselves asking who took their bone. Then they would go around the class
and sing-ask their classmates if they had their bone, their classmates would have to sign back if
they did or did not. Everything Ms. Hagy taught was taught in the form of a game.
How did the teacher assess individual students’ understanding?
When they played the dog-bone game as mentioned in the previous response, that was when I
saw the most individual assessment going on, because I saw Ms. Hagy listen intently and write
things down on a clipboard for each student. , although there were many other instances of
assessment. When the students played a game where they had to name things in the
classroom, that was another assessment, as they raised their hands and pointed out things by
themselves. However that was an assessment of English language learning. Comprehension.
There were many, many points throughout the class where student shad to sign something on
their own as part of the game.I didn’t see too much individual assessment when they were
learning rhythm, but students go the change to raise their hands and answer questions, so that
could have been a form of assessment.
What does the teacher do that seems to help student learning in this classroom?
Ms. Hagy’s transition were always very quick and well orchestrated. She also stopped any
distraction that was going on in the classroom quickly and effectively. She used a happy tone of
voice. She complimented students that are doing well. She let student that had a meltdown sit
out for a little while so that other students could keep on learning and the distressed student
could get a break. She made everything into a game. She played guitar for some of the songs
they sang. Everything was very well organized and there were many things to do.
What does the teacher do that seems to hinder student learning in the classroom?
There was one point where they were translating from english lyrics to spanish and she didn’t
know one of the words in Spanish so she had to look it up which took a couple seconds away
from their time, but I don’t think that’s really something that could be counted as hindering.
What do students do that seems to help their learning in the classroom?
They are all very eager and have a lot of energy. They are all participating fully. They do not
usually get discouraged, and respected Ms. Hagy’s authority.
What do students do that seems to hinder their learning in the classroom?
There were a couple of students that had a hard time staying focused and would distract the
other students by being disruptive. There was one girl who got out of a game very quickly and
started crying and didn’t want to play, but she just sat out for a while and then was able to keep
participating. They also did a Russian dance with singing, and some of the kids didn’t listen
when Ms. Hagy was giving instructions on how to do the dance and so they had a really hard
time doing one activity.
What action(s) on the part of the teacher do you think would improve student learning in this
classroom?
Making sure that all of the students were listening and attentive when she was giving
instructions. When the students were copying her singing, none of them were matching her
pitches, and she never addressed that or asked them to try harder. I didn’t hear any instance of
matched pitch throughout the lesson, and I don't know if it was because they really didn't know
how, or if they are embarrassed to sing.
What action(s) on the part of the students do you think would improve student learning in this
classroom?
I think it would be great if the students would try to be more musical when they were singing.
However, they might not know how to do that.
What other comments/observations do you have?
The transitions were lightning fast which to me is very impressive. Mr. Hagy sang in her high
register for the whole class which I Was also impressed with because I feel like I would get tired.
She also never seemed nervous. I work with a sixteen year old boy who has very debilitating
autism, and I wouldn't say I get nervous, but my voice often does not make me sound like I’m
sure of myself. Ms. Hagy always sounded confident and clear. She also had a lot of emotion in
her voice at all times, which is something I cannot do. When I talk to kids my voice just sounds
norma. I don’t know if either way is better.