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Miss Alexis Smith’s Lesson Plans for Monday, October 1st, 2018

Standards: ELAGSE9-10RL3: Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or
conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and
advance the plot or develop the theme; ELAGSE9-10RL4: Determine the meaning of words and
phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the
cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes
a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone); ELAGSE9-10RL5: Analyze
how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel
plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or
surprise.

Essential Questions (EQ): Does society make flamboyant or dull people feel inferior? How and
why? What are mental, physical, social, and environmental battles people face? What elements
must a song contain to move you emotionally? How do you react to someone being glorified? At
what point in a movie do you pay close attention? At what point in a movie do you stop paying
close attention?

Learning Targets: I understand my protagonist must struggle before achieving their goal. I can
create a story that closely follows plot outline. I can differentiate between tone and mood/simile
and metaphor.

Hook: Miss Smith will hand notecards to each student. The notecards will have terms and
definitions, examples, and fill-in-the-blank statements. Students must find their pair, which will
eventually lead to them finding their group members. The terms, definitions, examples, and fill-
in-the-blank statements will involve protagonist, antagonist, the types of conflict, tone, mood,
and plot outline. Students will be given 3 minutes to assemble their groups (4 groups of 7
people). Below are examples of what will be on the notecards:

1.) I am the main antagonist in “Spider-Man: Homecoming.” (Vulture)

2.) In Captain America: Civil War, Iron Man v. Captain America is an example of this type
of conflict. (Man v. Man)

3.) What is the tone in Maroon 5’s lyric, “You spent the weekend getting even?” (Petty,
vengeful)

4.) “Can’t take it back, it’s too late, we’ve reached the________.” This is the title of an old
Usher song. (Climax)

Activity, Application, and Assessment: Miss Smith will project Kahoot! on the board, and
students will create their group name and their individual names on Kahoot!. A series of
questions will be asked on Kahoot! pertaining to protagonist, antagonist, the types of conflict,
tone, mood, and plot outline. The teams must answer the questions correctly in order to receive
points for their team. The team with the most points will win.
Activity: Miss Smith will project a vocabulary game via Vocabulary.com. Students will be
placed in teams randomly through the website. Miss Smith will scaffold students days ahead of
when the students will be exposed to Kate Chopin’s “The Story of an Hour.” This vocabulary
will be mixed in with the terms practiced from this day. This will cause students to have
knowledge of the vocabulary words for Wednesday.

Closing and Assessment: Miss Smith will have students do a Four Corners assessment. Each
corner in the room will represent an answer on a Likert Scale. One corner will represent Strongly
Agree, one will be Agree, another corner will be Disagree, and the last corner will be Strongly
Disagree. Miss Smith will say a series of statements that pertain to the day’s terms (protagonist,
antagonist, tone, mood, and plot outline). Examples of the statements are below:

1.) The protagonist typically takes on the role of the good guy. (Strongly Agree)

2.) The exposition is an event that hooks the reader into the story and stirs the pot. (Strongly
Disagree, inciting incident)

3.) Man v. Supernatural is when a person battles a ghost or spirit. (Strongly Agree)

4.) Mood is when the writer wants me to know something. It’s all about them. (Strongly
Disagree, tone)
Miss Alexis Smith’s Lesson Plans for Tuesday, October 2nd, 2018
Standards: ELAGSE9-10RL1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of
what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text; ELAGSE9-10RI6:
Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric
to advance that point of view or purpose.

Essential Questions (EQ): When is it beneficial to have all sides of a story, and when is it not
beneficial? What classifies an interesting read? Why is it important to consider others’ thoughts?
What would it be like to not have all five senses?

Learning Targets: I can use my five senses to create visually descriptive language. I can argue
the difference between 3rd Person Limited and 3rd Person Omniscient. I understand having a
consistent point of view in a story is important.

Hook: Miss Smith will hand notecards to each student. The notecards will have terms and
definitions, examples, and fill-in-the-blank statements. Students must find their pair, which will
eventually lead to them finding their group members. The terms, definitions, examples, and fill-
in-the-blank statements will involve point of view and imagery. Students will be given 3 minutes
to assemble their groups (4 groups of 7 people). Below are examples of what will be on the
notecards:

1.) Introduces I, we, me, my, mine. (1st Person)

2.) Introduces you and your. (2nd Person)

3.) The series of Vines titled “Narrating People’s Lives” is a great example of this point of
view. (3rd Limited)

4.) Visually descriptive or figurative language is ________. (Imagery)

Activity, Application, and Assessment: Miss Smith will project Kahoot! on the board, and
students will create their group name and their individual names on Kahoot!. A series of
questions will be asked on Kahoot! pertaining to point of view and imagery. The teams must
answer the questions correctly in order to receive points for their team. The team with the most
points will win.

Activity, Closing, and Assessment: On Schoology.com, students will be asked to do an online


scavenger hunt of examples of point of view and imagery. There will be a document explaining
that students are allowed to copy and paste links of YouTube videos and insert images and gifs
as examples of point of view and imagery. Students must submit their examples on
Schoology.com.
Miss Alexis Smith’s Lesson Plans for Wednesday, October 3rd, 2018
Standards: ELAGSE9-10RL4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in
the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of
specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and
place; how it sets a formal or informal tone); ELAGSE9-10RL5: Analyze how an author’s
choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and
manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise;
ELAGSE9-10RI6: Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an
author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.

Essential Questions (EQ): How would the story change if it were written in Mr. Mallard’s
perspective? What is Chopin attempting to tell the reader through Mrs. Mallard’s death? How
would you rewrite the ending of the story? How common is it for women to undergo this same
treatment today?

Learning Targets: I can define vocabulary used in “The Story of an Hour.” I can explain the
tone Chopin introduces in “The Story of an Hour.” I can compare and contrast the differences in
women in “The Story of an Hour” and women in the modern-day.

Hook: Miss Smith will ask students to group themselves based on their birthdays. Students will
be grouped together based on how close their birthdays are. They will have 5 minutes to do so.
Miss Smith will then form 5 groups of 5 and 1 group of 4. Students will be seated at a station per
group.

Activity, Application, and Assessment: Miss Smith will arrange the desks around the
classroom. There will be 6 groups of 5 desks. Each group of desks will represent a station. Each
station will involve students fulfilling different tasks and applying different terms relating to
Kate Chopin’s “The Story of an Hour.” For most stations, students will need a sheet of paper and
a pen or pencil.

o Station 1: Students will create a sign expressing their definition of freedom. Students will
be given sheets of paper and markers to do so.

o Station 2: Students will write the tone that is represented through the highlighted parts of
“The Story of an Hour.”

o Station 3: Students will choose whether to rewrite a scene in “The Story of an Hour” in
the perspective of the protagonist or the antagonist.

o Station 4: Students will write the mood that is represented through the highlighted parts
of “The Story of an Hour.”

o Station 5: Students will choose whether to rewrite a scene in “The Story of an Hour” in
1st person in Josephine’s perspective or 3rd person limited in Richards’ perspective.
o Station 6: Students will draw a plot outline and label the exposition, inciting incident,
rising action, climax, falling action, and resolution.

Each station will be 5 minutes long. There will also be multiple copies of Chopin’s “The Story of
an Hour” provided.

Activity, Closing, and Assessment: Miss Smith will project a vocabulary game via
Vocabulary.com. Students will be placed in teams randomly through the website. Vocabulary
and terms from this week will be used in the game.

If the vocabulary game is completed before dismissal, Miss Smith with project Kahoot! on the
board. Students will create their group name and their individual names on Kahoot!. A series of
questions will be asked on Kahoot! pertaining to the terms learned this week. The teams must
answer the questions correctly in order to receive points for their team. The team with the most
points will win.
Miss Alexis Smith’s Lesson Plans for Thursday, October 4th, 2018
Standards: ELAGSE9-10RL1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of
what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text; ELAGSE9-10RL3:
Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop
over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the
theme; ELAGSE9-10RL4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the
text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific
word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place;
how it sets a formal or informal tone); ELAGSE9-10RL5: Analyze how an author’s choices
concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate
time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise; ELAGSE9-
10RI6: Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses
rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.

Essential Questions (EQ): Does society make flamboyant or dull people feel inferior? How and
why? What are mental, physical, social, and environmental battles people face? What elements
must a song contain to move you emotionally? How do you react to someone being glorified? At
what point in a movie do you pay close attention? At what point in a movie do you stop paying
close attention? When is it beneficial to have all sides of a story, and when is it not beneficial?
What classifies an interesting read? Why is it important to consider others’ thoughts? What
would it be like to not have all five senses? How would the story change if it were written in Mr.
Mallard’s perspective? What is Chopin attempting to tell the reader through Mrs. Mallard’s
death? How would you rewrite the ending of the story? How common is it for women to undergo
this same treatment today?

Learning Targets: I understand my protagonist must struggle before achieving their goal. I can
create a story that closely follows plot outline. I can differentiate between tone and mood/simile
and metaphor. I can use my five senses to create visually descriptive language. I can argue the
difference between 3rd Person Limited and 3rd Person Omniscient. I understand having a
consistent point of view in a story is important. I can define vocabulary used in “The Story of an
Hour.” I can explain the tone Chopin introduces in “The Story of an Hour.” I can compare and
contrast the differences in women in “The Story of an Hour” and women in the modern-day.

Hook: Miss Smith will use this opportunity to get-to-know students for the last time since it is
her last day. Miss Smith will ask students to write 2 truths and 1 lie on a sheet of paper. Each
student will have the opportunity to share their 2 truths and 1 lie, including Miss Smith.

Activity, Application, and Assessment: Miss Smith with project Kahoot! on the board.
Students will create their group name and their individual names on Kahoot!. A series of
questions will be asked on Kahoot! pertaining to the terms learned this week. The teams must
answer the questions correctly in order to receive points for their team. The team with the most
points will win.

Miss Smith will project a vocabulary game via Vocabulary.com. Students will be placed in teams
randomly through the website. Vocabulary and terms from this week will be used in the game.
Closing and Assessment: Since it is Miss Smith’s last day, the remaining 30 minutes of the
class will be for students to take part in a scavenger hunt that reveals Miss Smith’s goodbye
message. Miss Smith will then pass out individualized cards to each student. These notes will
express why Miss Smith enjoyed teaching each individual. After students read the cards, Miss
Smith will provide time for students to ask any questions or make any statements they feel the
need to.
Miss Alexis Smith’s Lesson Plans for Friday, October 5th, 2018
Standards: ELAGSE9-10RL1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of
what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text; ELAGSE9-10RL3:
Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop
over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the
theme; ELAGSE9-10RL4: Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the
text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific
word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place;
how it sets a formal or informal tone); ELAGSE9-10RL5: Analyze how an author’s choices
concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate
time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise; ELAGSE9-
10RI6: Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses
rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.

Essential Questions (EQ): How can I apply my knowledge of the terms learned in this unit on a
test?

Learning Targets: I can differentiate between the terms learned this unit on a test.

Hook: Students will not have a bell ringer due to testing.

Activity, Application, and Assessment: Students will apply their knowledge from this unit on a
midterm exam.

Closing and Assessment: Students will not have a closing activity due to testing.