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THE PHILIPPINE CIVIL SERVICE SYSTEM:

HISTORY, STRUCTURE &


PHILIPPINE
ADMINISTRATION
PREPARED BY:
ARNEL D. LASPIÑAS
Master in Public Administration
SEQUENCE
PHILIPPINE CIVIL SERVICE
COMMISSION
The Civil Service Commission (CSC) is the central
personnel agency of the Philippine government. One
of the three independent constitutional commissions
with adjudicative responsibility in the national
government structure, it is also tasked to render final
arbitration on disputes and personnel actions on Civil
Service matters.
PHILIPPINE CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
The civil service refers to the body of employees in any
government including all employees of the government
general. It covers the Congress, the Judiciary, and the
Executive Department. Thus, it embraces all branches,
subdivisions, instrumentalities, and agencies of the
government, including government-owned or controlled
corporations with original charters. It is basically the
workforce of the state in the Philippines, the administration of
civil service is provided in this legal framework.
PHILIPPINE CIVIL SERVICE
COMMISSION
SPECIFIC FUNCTIONS
leading and initiating the professionalization of the civil
service;
promoting public accountability in government service;
adopting performance-based tenure in government; and
implementing the integrated rewards and incentives
program for government employees.
CSC’s MANDATED FUNCTIONS
Under Executive Order No. 292, the Civil Service Commission shall perform
the following functions:
 Administer and enforce the constitutional and statutory provisions on the
merit system for all levels and ranks in the Civil Service;

 Prescribe, amend and enforce rules and regulations for carrying into effect
the provisions of the Civil Service Laws and other pertinent laws;

 Promulgate policies, standards and guidelines for the Civil Service and
adopt plans and programs to promote economical, efficient and effective
personnel administration in the government;
CSC’s MANDATED FUNCTIONS
 Formulate policies and regulations for the administration, maintenance and
implementation of position classification and compensation and set
standards for the establishment, allocation and reallocation of pay scales,
classes and positions;

 Render opinion and rulings on all personnel and other Civil Service matters
which shall be binding on all head of departments, offices and agencies and
which may be brought to the Supreme Court on certiorari;

 Appoint and discipline its officials and employees in accordance with law
and exercise control and supervision over the activities of the Commission;
CSC’s MANDATED FUNCTIONS
 Control, supervise and coordinate Civil Service examinations. Any entity or
official in government may be called upon by the Commission to assist in
the preparation and conduct of said examinations including security, use of
buildings and facilities as well as personnel and transportation of
examination materials which shall be exempt from inspection regulations;

 Prescribe all forms for Civil Service examinations, appointment, reports and
such other forms as may be required by law, rules and regulations;

 Declare positions in the Civil Service as may properly be primarily


confidential, highly technical or policy determining;
CSC’s MANDATED FUNCTIONS
 Formulate, administer and evaluate programs relative to the development
and retention of qualified and competent work force in the public service;

 Hear and decide administrative cases instituted by or brought before it


directly or on appeal, including contested appointments, and review
decisions and action of its offices and of the agencies attached to it.
Officials and employees who fail to comply with such decisions, orders, or
rulings shall be liable for contempt of the Commission. Its decisions, orders
or rulings shall be final and executory. Such decisions, orders, or rulings
may be brought to Supreme Court on certiorari by the aggrieved party within
thirty (30) days from receipt of the copy thereof;
CSC’s MANDATED FUNCTIONS
 Issues subpoena and subpoena duces tecum for the production of
documents and records pertinent to investigations and inquiries conducted
by it in accordance with its authority conferred by the Constitution and
pertinent laws;

 Advise the President on all matters involving personnel management in the


government service and submit to the President an annual report on the
personnel programs;

 Take appropriate actions on al appointments and other personnel matters in


the Civil Service including extension of service beyond retirement age;
CSC’s MANDATED FUNCTIONS
 Inspect and audit the personnel actions and programs of the departments,
agencies, bureaus, offices, local government including government-owned
or controlled corporations; conduct periodic review of the decisions and
actions of offices or officials to whom authority has been delegated by the
Commission as well as the conduct of the officials and the employees in
these offices and apply appropriate sanctions whenever necessary.

 Delegate authority for the performance of any functions to departments,


agencies and offices where such functions may be effectively performed;
CSC’s MANDATED FUNCTIONS
 Administer the retirement program of government officials and employees,
and accredit government services and evaluate qualification for retirement;

 Keep and maintain personnel records of all officials and employees in the
Civil Service; and

 Perform all functions properly belonging to a central personnel agency such


as other functions as may be provided by law

SOURCE:
http://www.csc.gov.ph/new-updates/8-about-us/3-mandate.html
HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT OF PHILIPPINE
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
Historically, the Philippine civil service traces its roots a hundred years
ago, when the Americans, who then wielded and exercised political
sovereignty over the country by virtue of their having annexed the
Philippines under the Treaty of Paris, installed a civil service system
patterned after their own. As the Americans endeavored to cultivate an
administrative culture based on the ethos of professionalism and
competence, they established an entity entrusted with the protection and
safeguard of meritocracy in the Philippine bureaucracy. Known as the
Civil Service Board, but later reorganized into a Bureau, its main tasks
involved the administration of civil service examinations, and the
promulgation of standards for appointment in the government service.
HISTORY OF THE PHILIPPINE CIVIL
SERVICE
The Philippine Civil Service was
established in 1900 by the Second
Philippine Commission during the
American colonial rule. Under the
leadership of American William Howard
Taft, the Second Philippine
Commission passed a law, Public Law
The Second Philippine Commission, from left:
No. 5, on the establishment of a system
Dean C. Worcester, Henry Clay Ide, William to secure an efficient civil service in the
Howard Taft, Bernard Moses, and Luke Wright.
Source: 
http://aglipayan.wordpress.com/2011/07/05/320/
country on March 16, 1900
 Civil service system in the Philippines was formally established
under Public Law No. 5 ("An Act for the Establishment and
Maintenance of Our Efficient and Honest Civil Service in the
Philippine Island") in 1900 by the Second Philippine Commission.
A Civil Service Board was created composed of a Chairman, a
Secretary and a Chief Examiner. The Board administered civil
service examinations and set standards for appointment in
government service. It was reorganized into a Bureau in 1905.
 1935 Philippine Constitution firmly established the merit system
as the basis for employment in government. The following years
also witnessed the expansion of the Bureau’s jurisdiction to
include the three branches of government: the national
government, local government and government corporation
 Republic Act 2260, otherwise known as the Civil Service Law,
was enacted. This was the first integral law on the Philippine
bureaucracy, superseding the scattered administrative orders
relative to government personnel administration issued since
1900. This Act converted the Bureau of Civil Service into the
Civil Service Commission with department status
 Presidential Decree No. 807 (The Civil Service Decree of the
Philippines) redefined the role of the Commission as the central
personnel agency of government. Its present mandate is
derived from Article IX-B of the 1987 Constitution which was
given effect through Book V of Executive Order No. 292 (The
1987 Administrative Code).
 The Code essentially reiterates existing principles and policies in
the administration of the bureaucracy and recognizes, for the
first time, the right of government employees to self organization
and collective negotiations under the framework of the 1987
Constitution.
 The Philippine Civil Service has undergone a great number of
reforms in terms of structure, size, leadership, position
classification, and pay scheme, among others, under the
management and regulation of the CSC. Presently, CSC’s
mandate is based on Executive Order No. 292 or the Revised
Administrative Code of 1987.
 Through the years, the CSC has initiated various programs and
issued policies towards building a highly competent, credible,
and motivated bureaucracy. Its latest agenda is to elevate itself
as “Asia’s leading center of excellence for strategic human
resource and organization development by 2030” and to make a
lingkod bayani out of every civil servant. “Lingkod bayani” is a
play on the terms “lingkod bayan” (public servant) and “bayani”
(hero), thus associating state workers with their capacity to be
heroes in their own right. The CSC manages and develops the
bureaucracy’s most important resource—its people—through five
HR initiatives:
HUMAN RESOURCES initiatives
 Recruitment
Hiring of high-performing, competent, and credible civil
servants through the Competency-Based Recruitment and
Qualification Standards (CBRQS);
 Performance Management
Performance review and appraisal through the Strategic
Performance Management System (SPMS);
 HR Coaching
Coaching to improve employee performance, as well as develop
leadership skills of supervisors and managers;
HUMAN RESOURCES initiatives
 Learning and Development
Direct training and personnel development interventions in the
areas of governance and leadership, human resource and
organizational development, public service reforms, and values
and culture building through the Civil Service Institute; and
 Agency Accreditation
Accreditation of agencies for the establishment of their own
human resource management systems and standards through
the Program to Institutionalize Meritocracy and Excellence in
Human Resource Management (PRIME-HRM).
PHILIPPINE CIVIL SERVICE
COMMISSION
RESPONSIBILITY
Recruitment, building, maintenance and
retention of a competent, professional and
highly motivated government workforce truly
responsive to the needs of the government's
client - the public.
CATEGORY OF CIVIL SERVICE
CAREER SERVICE
a.Open career positions for appointment which prior qualification in an
appropriate examination is required.
b.Closed career positions which are scientific and highly technical in nature
these include the faculty members of state and colleges and universities,
scientific and technical positions among others.
c.Career Executive Service, namely: department secretary, undersectary,
bureau director, assistant bureau director, regional director and other offices or
ranks as identified by the Career Executive Service board:
d.Permanent laborers, whether skilled or semi-skilled or unskilled.
CATEGORY OF CIVIL SERVICE
CAREER SERVICE
e.Personnel or government owned or controlled corporation, whether
performing governmental or proprietary function, who do not fall under the non-
career service and
f.Commissioned officers and enlisted men of the Armed Forces, which shall
maintain a separate merit system.
CATEGORY OF CIVIL SERVICE
NON-CAREER SERVICE
a.Elective officials, and their personal and confidential staff;
b.Department heads and officials with cabinet ranks who hold office at the
pleasure of the president and their personal or confidential staff;
c.Chairmen and members of commissions and boards with fixed terms of office
and other personal or confidential staff;
d.Contractual personnel to undertake a specific work or job, requiring special or
technical skills not available in the employing agency to be accomplished within
a specified period in no case shall exceed one year under their own
responsibility with the minimum direction and supervision and;
e.Emergency and seasonal personnel
CSC’s GOALS & OBJECTIVES
Six Strategic Priorities were identified:

1.Developing Competent and Credible Civil Servants


2.Integrity and Excellence in Public Service
3.Harmony, Morale and Wellness in the Workplace
4.Efficient Performance of Quasijudicial Functions
5.Building Partnerships and Strengthening Linkages
6.Managing Support Mechanisms
1. DEVELOPING COMPETENT AND CREDIBLE
CIVIL SERVANTS
Competent and Credible Civil Servants Ensure High Quality Public Service
A. Examination, Recruitment and Placement
1. Test Development - Enriching Test Bank - Development of test forms
and preparation of answer keys
2. Examination administration, evaluation and SPEEDY release of
results - Administration of examinations * CSE-PPT/CAT (Career
Service Examination-Paper & Pencil Test/Computer Assisted Test *
RSPG (Redefined Scholarship Program for Government) * Exam for
Executive/Managerial (Entry Level) * EOPT (Ethics Oriented
Personality Test)
3. Review/Development of Policies * Recruitment System
4. Grant of Eligibilities under special laws and CSC Issuances
5. Development of Generic Occupation-based QS
B. Human Resource Development
1. Character/Integrity Building Program
a.probee stag- Public Service Values Program
b.residency stage
Modules:
* Team Building
* Performance Management
* Mentoring & Coaching
* Critical Incident Detection & Improvement
* Future Leadership Program
2. Talent Development and Management a. Workplace Performance Learning b.
Credentialing of Experts on Human Resource Mgt Competency Based Training for
HRMPs:
I - Basic Knowledge on Civil Service Law & Rules
II - Performance Management
III - Organizational Development
3. Accreditation of Training Institutions
4. Establishment of Civil Service Academy Capacity Building
2.INTEGRITY AND EXCELLENCE IN PUBLIC SERVICE
Excellent Public Service Results in Citizen's Trust and Satisfaction
Programs/Projects/Activities
A.Inspection and Audit
▪ PMAAP (Personnel and Management Assessment & Assistance
Program)
Accreditation of Agencies
a. HR Roadmap/Plan
b. Enhanced Models of Personnel Mechanisms
c. CPDP (Career Personnel and Devt Plan)
d. Wellness Program
e. Talent Development and Management
f. Character Integrity Building Program
▪ Special Audits
▪ Personnel Inventory
▪ 100 day check of newly minted LGU Officials "LGU HR Wellness Project"
B. Honor Awards
Implementation of the Honor Awards Program (HAP)
Organizational Category
C. HR Developer Award (Accreditation of Agencies)
D. Increase cash and non-monetary Incentives to HAP Awardees and exemplary
performers
E. Mamamayan Muna Program (MMP)
F. eKiosks (CSCIS-CSC Information System) ▪ Organizational Category ▪
electronic feedback (call center)
G. ARTA Interventions
▪ Phase 1 RCS (Report Card Survey)
▪ Phase 2 RCS ▪ Citizen's Satisfaction Center (Seal of Excellence) ▪ Enhanced
SDEP (Service Delivery Excellence Program)
H. ISO (International Organization
H. ISO (International Organization for Standardization)
I. PGS-BSC (Performance Governance System-Balanced Scorecard)
J. PMS-OPES vis-à-vis Performance Based Benefits/Incentives
K. Strengthening Integrity Portfolio
L. Modelling Stage
▪ Honor Society (Badge of Honor Membership)
▪ Caravan of Public Services
▪ Leaders Forum on Ethics and Accountability
3. HARMONY, MORALE AND WELLNESS IN THE WORKPLACE
Harmony, Morale and Wellness In The Workplace Enhance Workforce Productivity
Programs/Projects/Activities
1. Management Employee Partnership
- PSLMC Concerns
- Registration/accreditation of unions
- Conciliation and Mediation
- Registration of C N A (Collective Negotiations Agreement)
- Education on Employees Rights & Responsibilities
- Institutionalized Agency General Assembly Agency Climate &
Satisfaction Level and Morale Survey
2. Health and Wellness Program
INTERNAL
-Expanded Welfare Fund Benefits
-Executive Bonding
-Social Housing (CSC housing)
BUREAUCRACY WIDE
-Healthy & Safe Working Conditions (HSWC)
.Disaster Preparedness Plan
.Security Plan
.Compliance with Safety Requirements
- Reiteration of Physical Fitness Program (Great Filipino Workout)
-Tobacco and Drug Free Work Environment
-Supplemental Health Insurance for State Workers
-Family Visit for Executives -Social Insurance (GSIS Concerns)
4. EFFICIENT PERFORMANCE OF QUASI-JUDICIAL FUNCTIONS
Fair and Expeditious Disposition of Cases Affirms Citizen's Faith In The
Administrative Justice System
Programs/Projects/Activities
1. Preventing Ageing of Cases
▪ Creation of Special Task Force
▪ Deputization of Government Lawyers
2. Strengthening of CSC's contempt power
▪ Partnership with COA on Implementation of CSC Resolutions and Contempt Power
3. Anti-Corruption Efforts
4. Adjudication of cases within 40 days -capacity-building - incentives system
5. Formulation of Opinions and Rulings within 15 days
6. Conduct of Legal Research
7. Development and Enhancement of Systems: -CSC wide Case Tracking System (CTS) -
IT Confidential Reporting - Case Digest
8. Revision of Rules on Administrative Cases in the Civil Service (RRACCS) -Settlement of
Personal Disputes through Conciliation and Mediation
4. EFFICIENT PERFORMANCE OF QUASI-JUDICIAL FUNCTIONS
Fair and Expeditious Disposition of Cases Affirms Citizen's Faith In The
Administrative Justice System
Programs/Projects/Activities
1. Preventing Ageing of Cases
▪ Creation of Special Task Force
▪ Deputization of Government Lawyers
2. Strengthening of CSC's contempt power
▪ Partnership with COA on Implementation of CSC Resolutions and Contempt Power
3. Anti-Corruption Efforts
4. Adjudication of cases within 40 days -capacity-building - incentives system
5. Formulation of Opinions and Rulings within 15 days
6. Conduct of Legal Research
7. Development and Enhancement of Systems: -CSC wide Case Tracking System (CTS) -
IT Confidential Reporting - Case Digest
8. Revision of Rules on Administrative Cases in the Civil Service (RRACCS) -Settlement of
Personal Disputes through Conciliation and Mediation
5.BUILDING PARTNERSHIPS AND STRENGTHENING LINKAGES
Interdependence Optimizes Organizational Performance and Good Governance
Programs/Projects/Activities
A.Anti-Corruption Efforts
-Partnership with Private Sector on Combating Corruption
- Partnership with COA on Implementation of CSC Resolutions and Contempt Power
- CSC Nationwide Case Tracking
B. Human Resource Development
1. Character/Integrity Building Program
2. Talent Development and Management
3. Establishment of the CSA
- Constitution of Board of Trustees (BOT)
C. Improvement of Service Delivery
- IT Systems (▪ ePMS ▪ electronic feedback (call center)
D. ARTA Interventions
▪ Phase 1 RCS (Report Card Survey)
▪ Phase 2 RCS
▪Enhanced SDEP (Service Delivery Excellence Program)
Strengthening Integrity Portfolio
PGS-BSC
- Communication Plan
Presentation of Roadmap to:
- Office of the President
- Members of Committee on Civil Service (HOR & Senate)
D. Health, Wellness & Employee Welfare Program
- Healthy & Safe Working Conditions
- Maintenance medicines, laboratory work up treatments for work
related illnesses for government workers and retirees * Botika
100
INTERNAL Social Housing (CSC housing)
E. Financial Portfolio - Maximization of Fiscal Autonomy
6. MANAGING SUPPORT MECHANISMS
Leveraging Internal and External Resources Improve Quality Management of
CSC Programs
Programs/Projects/Activities
1. Restructuring the CSC
▪ Review of Organizational Structure & Staffing (OSS)
- FO Staffing
- RO Staffing
- CO Staffing
2. Communication Plan
▪ Presentation of the CSC Roadmap
▪ Social Marketing of CSC Programs and Projects
- Media blitz on exemplary deeds of contemporary heroes and HAP awardees and service
values
- Regular TV/Radio Programs
3. IT Strat Plan
▪ Infra Upgrading (CSCIS-CSC Information System)
▪ Development/Enhancement
▪ Development/Enhancement of IT Systems
▪ Data Security (Defend Back-up and restore data program)
▪ website management
▪ eMonitoring (GForge & Dashboard)
▪ eKnowledge
▪ Nationwide Teleconferencing (Voice over internet protocol)
▪ Digitization
▪ eReportorial System (Data Sharing of Reports)
▪ PIDS (Personnel Information Database System)
▪ Financial IT Systems (Engas, eReceipt)
▪ DTMS (Data Tracking Management System)▪ Database Buildup
▪ ePMS * CSC-wide
*CSC-wide case tracking system
4. Manual of Operations
▪ Delegation of Authority (RO/CO Authority)
▪ Protocol
▪ Delineation of Functions
5. Internal Control
6. Records Management
7. Construction of RO/FO Buildings
ARMM
* FOs in club 20
* FOs with lots
* FOs without lots
8 .Improvement and maintenance of building/grounds/facilities
9. Policy Research, Formulation and Review 10. Financial Portfolio ▪ Fiscal
Autonomy Maximization
CSC's SERVICES ARE CLASSIFIED INTO 6 KEY
REFORM AREAS
1. Effective and Efficient Administrative Justice
Speedy disposition of cases
Develop a monitoring mechanism to check aging of cases,
Institute mechanisms to declog case dockets
Intensify conciliation and mediation as modalities for resolving non-
disciplinary cases
Strengthen CSC's contempt power to ensure implementation of CSC
Resolutions
Take a lead role in the Inter-Agency Anti-Graft Coordinating Council
Enhance CSC's quasi-judicial functions
implement special project on "Women Against Graft"
Ensure consistency of decisions
CSC's SERVICES ARE CLASSIFIED INTO 6 KEY
REFORM AREAS
2. Professionalizing the Civil Service
 Strengthen the Third Level
 Develop policies granting CSC authority to appoint and discipline those
below ASEC level
 Implement HRD Interventions
 Re-thinking HRD interventions/trainings to correspond to specific needs
of 1st, 2nd and 3rd level
 Improve the Ethical/Moral Standards of Key Sectors through
 Design incentive packages to encourage the young professionals and
the best to join government service and to retain competent workers
 Integrate gender development concepts in CSC policies and programs
 Rationalize policies on contractuals, job orders, consultancy services
CSC's SERVICES ARE CLASSIFIED INTO 6 KEY
REFORM AREAS
3. Improving Public Service Delivery
 Enhance Rewards and Sanctions
 Implement "Text CSC Project"
 Monitor Process Flow Chart, Service Pledge and Service
Standards by agencies
 Strengthen the "Mamamayan Muna, Hindi Mamaya Na Program“
 Create a Common Data Base for CSC, GSIS, DBM and BIR for
easy access on government personnel information
 Develop programs for LGUs to improve services at the local levels
and to increase awareness of CSC rules
CSC's SERVICES ARE CLASSIFIED INTO 6 KEY
REFORM AREAS
4. Harnessing Public Sector Unionism
 Strengthen coordination and partnership with other agency members of
PSLMC
 Review rights and privileges as well as existing mechanisms with
respect to labor-management relations
 Intensify education and information campaign on responsible Public
Sector Unionism
 Strengthen PSUs to serve as watchdog in every agency
 Encourage unions to register and accredit with CSC
 Implement more effective conciliation and mediation services
 Develop proactive and quick reaction mechanisms for resolving labor-
management conflicts
CSC's SERVICES ARE CLASSIFIED INTO 6 KEY
REFORM AREAS
5. Strengthening External Relations
 Strengthen advisory role to the President on all matters pertaining to
human resource management in government
 Take a lead role in inter-agency committees involved in good governance
 Develop and implement a Civil Service Public Information Communication
Plan
 Develop programs that will follow through our "jump start" programs for
LGUs
 Devolve personnel management functions to agencies particularly at the
regional, provincial and municipal levels
 Actively participate in legislations pertaining to civil service matters
 Review relationship between CSC and the OSG re: handling of appealed
cases before the CA and SC
CSC's SERVICES ARE CLASSIFIED INTO 6 KEY
REFORM AREAS
6. Managing Support Services
 Reorganize CSC structure
 Develop Prudent Expenditure Management Program
 Strengthen the Internal Audit System
 Enhance/streamline internal systems and procedures
 Develop an efficient and effective model of governance within CSC
 Create feedback/monitoring mechanism
 Develop and implement an Organization Public Information and Education
Plan for CSC (OPIEC)
 Expand the use of Information Technology in all CSC Operations
 Rationalize fiscal policies
 Revisit Performance Evaluation Monitoring System (PEMS)
 Ensure passage of Civil Service Code
 Review structure of and support to field offices
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
PHILIPPINE ADMINISTRATION
The civil service shall be administered by the Civil Service
Commission composed of the Chairman and two
Commissioners who shall be a natural born citizen of the
Philippines and at the time of their appointment at least 35
years of age with proven capacity for public administration,
and must not have been candidate for an elective position in
the elections immediately preceding their appointment (Art.
IX, Sec. 1, 1987 Philippine Constitution)
CSC’S ADMINISTRATION FROM 1987-2015
NAME TERM START TERM END TENURE TENURE POSITION LINE
START END

February 2, February 2, January 22, Commission


Mario D. Yango May 31, 1991 3rd
1987 1990 1985 er
Patricia A. Sto. February 2, February 2, January 30,
March 4, 1995 Chairman 1st
Tomas 1987 1994 1988
Samilo N. February 2, February 2, January 30, March 04, Commission
2nd
Barlongay 1987 1992 1988 1993 er
February 2, February 2, November 26, February 02, Commission
Ramon P. Ereñeta 3rd
1990 1997 1991 1997 er
February 2, February 2, February 2, Commission
Thelma P. Gaminde June 11, 1993 2nd
1992 1999 2000 er
Corazon Alma G. de February 2, February 2, February 2,
March 5, 1995 Chairman 1st
Leon 1994 2001 2001
February 2, February 2, February 3, Commission
Jose F. Erestain, Jr. March 2004 3rd
1997 2004 1997 er
CSC’S ADMINISTRATION FROM 1987-2015
NAME TERM START TERM END TENURE TENURE POSITION LINE
START END

J. Waldemar V. February 2, February 2, September September Commission


2nd
Valmores 1999 2006 2000 2007 er
February 2, February 2, February 23, February 1,
Karina C. David Chairman 1st
2001 2008 2001 2008
February 2, February 2, February Commission
Cesar D. Buenaflor July 2004 3rd
2004 2011 2011 er
Mary Ann Z.
February 2, February 2, February Commission
Fernandez- May 2006 2nd
2006 2013 2013 er
Mendoza
February 2, February 2, September
Ricardo L. Saludo April 1, 2008 Chairman 1st
2008 2015 30, 2009
Francisco T. Duque February 2, February 2, February 3,
2015 Chairman 1st
III 2008 2015 2010
CSC’S ADMINISTRATION FROM 1987-2015
NAME TERM START TERM END TENURE TENURE POSITION LINE
START END

February 2, February 2, Commissio


Rasol L. Mitmug April 4, 2011 2012 3rd
2011 2018 ner

February 2, February 2, Commissio


Robert S. Martinez July 6, 2012 3rd
2011 2018 ner

February 2, February 2, March 20, Commissio


Nieves L. Osorio 2nd
2013 2020 2013 ner

Alicia dela Rosa- February 2, February 2, September


Chairman 1st
Bala 2015 2022 15, 2015
CSC’s PHILIPPINE ADMINISTRATION 2017

CHAIRPERSON
ALICIA DELA ROSA-BALA
CSC’s PHILIPPINE ADMINISTRATION 2017

COMMISSIONER
ROBERT S. MARTINEZ
CSC’s PHILIPPINE ADMINISTRATION 2017

COMMISSIONER
LEOPOLDO ROBERTO W. VALDEROZA, JR.
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
PCS VS. ASEAN
More than half of the civil
servant population in
Cambodia and Laos are
male. In Thailand, the male
population is only slightly
higher than the female
population. In the Philippines,
more women are in the civil
service than men.
COMPARISON OF 4 COUNTRIES
Country Total Male Female
Population (%) (%)

Cambodia 166,381 69 31

Lao PDR 70,354 64 36

Philippines 1,445,498 47 53

Thailand 1,296,688 52 47
EMPLOYMENT
 The main qualifications cited as basic requirements for eligibility
to become a civil servant in the countries studied include
nationality, the age requirement, education, physical and mental
capabilities, experience, training and professional eligibility.
 One of the basic qualifications for employment in government in
Cambodia, the Philippines and Thailand is nationality.
 Two countries, Cambodia and Thailand, have a minimum age
requirement. In both countries, one must be at least eighteen
years of age.
 In three of the countries studied, specifically in Laos, the
Philippines and Thailand, the recruitment system is
decentralized.
PAY RANGES
 All of the six countries studied had existing pay structures / wage
scales on which they base the pay of the civil servants. The pay
structures correspond to different factors, such as the salary
grades indicated in their specific schemes, job classifications,
current levels / rank of the civil servant in the pay structure.

 In Indonesia, seniority is also a consideration. Aside from their


base wage, civil servants also receive allowances, which
depend, not only on their level in the pay structure, but on the
function of their jobs as well. In Laos, the government does not
have a government wide job classification system. It allows
individual ministries to develop their own system.
BENEFITS
 In the Philippines, Singapore and Thailand, the employees are
also entitled to non-financial benefits such as leave benefits
(vacation, sick / medical leave, maternity and study leaves). In
the Philippines and Singapore, aside from maternity leave, civil
servants may apply for paternity leave.

 Singapore grants childcare leave, marriage leave (3 days) and


unrecorded leave. In Thailand, civil servants may also avail
themselves of religious and military leave. In these countries,
civil servants also enjoy health insurance, disability and housing
loan benefits.
RETIREMENT
 There are compulsory ages for retirement in Cambodia, Laos, the
Philippines and Thailand. However the age requirements vary between 55
to 65 years old.
 In Cambodia, the higher the educational attainment, the more years of
service are required. In the Philippines, the compulsory age for retirement
for uniformed personnel – police and the military – is 55. For civilian
employees, the compulsory retirement age is 65. In Laos, the compulsory
age requirement depends on the gender. Females are required to retire by
the age of 55, while the males can only retire by the age of 60.
 Civil servants must render a minimum number of years of service to be
eligible for retirement benefits. In Cambodia and Thailand, civil servants
are required to render at least 25 years to receive retirement benefits. In
Laos, they are required to render at least 30 years of service.
WORKING HOURS
In Cambodia and in the Philippines,
civil servants are required to render
eight (8) hours of work per day. In
the Philippines, it is exclusive of time
for lunch. In Thailand, civil servants
only have to accomplish 7 hours a
day.
CONCLUDING NOTES
The massive developments that are now taking place and
transforming the face of human society only serve to emphasize the
fundamental point that administrative reform should not be a one-shot
deal but rather a continuing endeavor. Thus, it is incumbent upon the
Philippine Civil service Commission to ceaselessly push through with
its innovation. It is only in doing so will it be able to secure to the
Filipino people the envisioned Philippine civil service of the 21 st
century.
QUOTED from the report of: Ms. Corazon Alma G. de Leon, Former
Chairman Philippine Civil Service Commission (1995-2001)
News on the Philippine Civil Service
published in the New York Times
on September 20, 1903.
REFERENCES
WEBSITES:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_Service_Commission_of_the_Philippines
http://www.csc.gov.ph/2014-02-20-02-22-48/2014-02-20-02-27-24.html
http://www.csc.gov.ph/8-about-us.html?start=20
https://www.slideshare.net/jobitonio/the-philippinr-civil-service-commission?qid=53f9916f-4ee8-4c44-aade

BOOKS:
Lazo, Ricardo S., Principles and Practices of Public Administration in the Philippines. 1 st edition,
Rex Book Store, c2011. pages 73-74.