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UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS


International General Certificate of Secondary Education

MARK SCHEME for the May/June 2010 question paper


for the guidance of teachers

0625 PHYSICS
0625/31 Paper 31 (Extended Theory), maximum raw mark 80

This mark scheme is published as an aid to teachers and candidates, to indicate the requirements of
the examination. It shows the basis on which Examiners were instructed to award marks. It does not
indicate the details of the discussions that took place at an Examiners’ meeting before marking began,
which would have considered the acceptability of alternative answers.

Mark schemes must be read in conjunction with the question papers and the report on the
examination.

• CIE will not enter into discussions or correspondence in connection with these mark schemes.

CIE is publishing the mark schemes for the May/June 2010 question papers for most IGCSE, GCE
Advanced Level and Advanced Subsidiary Level syllabuses and some Ordinary Level syllabuses.
PMT

Page 2 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2010 0625 31

Notes about Mark Scheme Symbols and Other Matters

B marks are independent marks, which do not depend on any other marks. For a B mark to be
scored, the point to which it refers must actually be seen in the candidate’s answer.
M marks are method marks upon which accuracy marks (A marks) later depend. For an M mark
to be scored, the point to which it refers must be seen in a candidate’s answer. If a
candidate fails to score a particular M mark, then none of the dependent A marks can be
scored.
C marks are compensatory method marks which can be scored even if the points to which they
refer are not written down by the candidate, provided subsequent working gives
evidence that they must have known it e.g. if an equation carries a C mark and the
candidate does not write down the actual equation but does correct working which
shows he knew the equation, then the C mark is scored.
A marks are accuracy or answer marks which either depend on an M mark, or which are one of
the ways which allow a C mark to be scored.
c.a.o. means “correct answer only”.
e.c.f. means “error carried forward”. This indicates that if a candidate has made an earlier
mistake and has carried his incorrect value forward to subsequent stages of working, he
may be given marks indicated by e.c.f. provided his subsequent working is correct,
bearing in mind his earlier mistake. This prevents a candidate being penalised more
than once for a particular mistake, but only applies to marks annotated “e.c.f.”
e.e.o.o. means “each error or omission”.
brackets ( ) around words or units in the mark scheme are intended to indicate wording used to
clarify the mark scheme, but the marks do not depend on seeing the words or units in
brackets e.g. 10 (J) means that the mark is scored for 10, regardless of the unit given.

© UCLES 2010
PMT

Page 3 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2010 0625 31

1 (a) decreases / braking / decelerating )


constant / steady / nothing ) all 3 B1
increases / accelerate )

(b) speed x time in any form, symbols, numbers or words


OR any area under graph used or stated C1
13 (m/s) OR 24 (s) seen or used in correct context C1
312 m A1

(c) rate of change of speed OR gradient of graph OR 18/12 C1

18 (m/s) OR 12 (s) seen or used in correct context C1


1.5 m/s2 A1

(d) same gradient / slope OR equal speed changes in equal times OR


allow graph symmetrical B1 [8]

2 (a) ½mv2 OR ½ × 900 x 302 C1


405 000 J A1

(b) force x distance OR 2000 x 30 C1


60 000 J OR 60 kJ A1

(c) 60 000 W OR 60 000 J/s OR 60kW OR 60 kJ/s ecf from (b) B1

(d) chemical B1

(e) idea of energy loss / heat / sound / inefficiency / energy used within car /
possibility of increase in P.E. Ignore work done against against friction B1 [7]

3 (a) 2nd statement re-written to include force in first gap and inversely
proportional to mass in second gap. NOT indirectly proportional B1

(b) F = ma OR in words in any correct arrangement B1

(c) (i) nothing OR continues as before OR same / constant velocity OR


same / constant speed & direction OR no acceleration B1

(ii) idea of retardation. Ignore stop. Ignore brakes. Ignore goes in


opposite direction B1

(iii) moves in (arc of a) circle or curve OR deflected OR turns OR


changes direction B1 [5]

© UCLES 2010
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Page 4 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2010 0625 31

4 (a) matt black B1

(b) (i) L down and R up, equal amounts (by eye) B1

(ii) on black side or on left (more) energy / heat absorbed OR greater


temp rise OR heats up quicker B1

on black side or on left greater expansion of air / greater pressure of air B1 [4]

5 (a) energy / heat required to change state / phase / any example of change of
state / phase M1

with no change in temperature / at a specified temperature A1


OR energy to break bonds between molecules /atoms M1
with no change in K.E. A1

(b) any time or range of time between 1.6 (min) and 14.0 (min) inclusive [no UP] B1

(c) turns substance to gas / vapour OR causes evaporation OR escape


from liquid C1

energy to break bonds/separate molecules/overcome intermolecular forces


Ignore move faster / PE increases A1

(d) (i) Pt / 2 × 4 / 2000 × 4 / 2 × 240 / 2000 × 240 / 8 / 8000 / 480 / 480000 C1


480 000 J OR 480 kJ A1

(ii) (θ =) 43 (°C) seen anywhere C1


Q = mcθ OR 480000 = m x 1760 × 43 in any form ecf. from (i) C1
6.34 kg or 6.3 kg ecf. A1 [10]

6 (a) (i) same / unchanged / nothing B1

(ii) reduced / slows down B1

(iii) reduced B1

(b) v = fλ in any form or in words [not numbers]


OR f =1/T in any form or in words [not numbers] B1
0.12 = f × 0.08 OR T = 0.08 / 0.12 C1
1.5 Hz / cycles per sec / c.p.s. / per s
[only 2 marks if B1 mark above not scored] A1

© UCLES 2010
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Page 5 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2010 0625 31

(c)

(ignore length of waves)


waves bending in correct direction (be generous) M1
A and B correct by eye, straight and parallel A1
C and D parallel to A and B by eye A1 [9]

7 (a) idea of light travelling (much) faster than sound B1

(b) (i) 4.0 (min) B1

(ii) always a (measurable) time difference / never zero time difference


Ignore time would be less B1

(iii) distance/time in any form, symbols, words, numbers OR 1200/3.6 C1


333.3 m/s to 2 or more sig figs A1

(iv) idea of light travelling instantaneously OR no wind


OR idea of lightning at ground level OR no obstruction to sound
Ignore echoes B1

(c)
light waves sound waves
longitudinal 
transverse 
electromagnetic 
mechanical 

–1 e.e.o.o. i.e. 1 mark subtracted from 3 for each error or omission B3 [9]

© UCLES 2010
PMT

Page 6 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2010 0625 31

8 (a) (i) N1/N2 = V1/V2 in any form, symbols, words or numbers C1


12 (turns) [possible unit penalty] A1

(ii) mention of magnetic / electromagnetic field )


)
change of flux linkage / magnetism )
OR field lines being cut )
) any 3 B1 x 3
Induced current / emf / voltage )
)
Fewer coils in secondary so smaller emf / voltage
OR larger current )

(iii) heat in either coil / wires )


eddy currents in core / heat in core ) any 1 B1
magnetic leakage from core )
sound from core/coil )

(b) (i) 12 V d.c. OR low d.c.voltage B1

(ii) diode OR rectifier [Ignore extras unless wrong] B1

(c) V1I1 = V2I2 in any form, or words or numbers


OR power in = power out or equivalent C1

8A A1 [10]

9 (a) first finger – field / magnetism / flux )


second finger – current / charge flow (NOT electron flow) ) both B1

(b) (i) brush OR contact OR sliding connector B1


split ring OR commutator NOT slip ring B1

(ii) clockwise OR right side down OR left side up OR correct arrows


on figure NOT turn to the right B1

(iii) more current / more voltage / “stronger battery” / more power )


more turns on coil / more coils )
stronger magnet Ignore bigger magnets )
closer magnet / magnetic poles ) any 2 B1, B1
more magnets )
iron core ) [6]

© UCLES 2010
PMT

Page 7 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2010 0625 31

10 (a) proton number OR atomic number OR (number of) protons / electrons


OR position in periodic table OR chemical properties B1

(b) mass (number) OR nucleon number OR (number of) neutrons / nucleons


OR (number of) protons plus (number of) neutrons B1

(c) (i) mass (number) OR nucleon number OR (number of) nucleons


OR (number of) protons plus (number of) neutrons B1

(ii) proton number OR atomic number OR (number of) neutrons


OR (number of) protons / neutrons / electrons
OR position in periodic table OR chemical properties
OR a neutron changes into a proton B1 [4]

11 (a) (i) 4 Ω B1

(ii) IVt OR I2Rt OR V2t/R in any form or words or numbers


Condone t = 9 if substituted possible ecf from (i) C1
540 (s) C1
437.4 J possible ecf if 4 Ω from (i) used A1

(b) R = ρL/A OR R ∝ L/A OR R ∝ L and R ∝ 1/A or 1/d2 or 1/r2 C1

A2 = ¼A1 OR A2 = 0.25A1 C1
R2 = (0.45/0.3) × R1 OR (3/2) x R1 C1
⅜ OR 0.375 OR 37.5 % A1
OR
R = ρL/A OR R ∝ L/A OR R ∝ L and R ∝ 1/A or 1/d2 or 1/r2 C1

Resistance of thinner wire with same length as thicker wire = 4 × 4 = 16 Ω C1

Actual resistance of thinner wire = 1.8 /0.3 = 6.0 Ω C1

Ratio: L of thinner wire / L of thicker wire = 6.0 / 16 = 3/8 = 0.375 = 37.5 % A1 [8]

© UCLES 2010
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UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS


International General Certificate of Secondary Education
*7776753992*

PHYSICS 0625/31
Paper 3 Extended May/June 2010
1 hour 15 minutes
Candidates answer on the Question Paper.
No Additional Materials are required.

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

Write your Centre number, candidate number and name on all the work you hand in.
Write in dark blue or black pen.
You may use a soft pencil for any diagrams, graphs or rough working.
Do not use staples, paper clips, highlighters, glue or correction fluid.
DO NOT WRITE IN ANY BARCODES.

Answer all questions.


You may lose marks if you do not show your working or if you do not use appropriate units.
Take the weight of 1 kg to be 10 N (i.e. acceleration of free fall = 10 m / s2).

At the end of the examination, fasten all your work securely together.
The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end of each question or part question.

This document consists of 19 printed pages and 1 blank page.

DC (SHW 00380 1/09) 20284/4


© UCLES 2010 [Turn over
PMT

1 Fig. 1.1 shows the speed/time graph for a car travelling along a straight road. For
Examiner’s
The graph shows how the speed of the car changes as the car passes through a small Use

town.

35

D
30
speed
m/s
A
25

enters leaves
20 town town
here here

15

B C

10

0
0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70
time / s

Fig. 1.1

(a) Describe what happens to the speed of the car

(i) between A and B, .....................................................................................................

(ii) between B and C, .....................................................................................................

(iii) between C and D. .....................................................................................................


[1]

© UCLES 2010 0625/31/M/J/10


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(b) Calculate the distance between the start of the town and the end of the town. For
Examiner’s
Use

distance = ................................................ [3]

(c) Calculate the acceleration of the car between C and D.

acceleration = ................................................ [3]

(d) State how the graph shows that the deceleration of the car has the same numerical
value as its acceleration.

..........................................................................................................................................

.................................................................................................................................... [1]

[Total: 8]

© UCLES 2010 0625/31/M/J/10 [Turn over


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2 A car of mass 900 kg is travelling at a steady speed of 30 m / s against a resistive force of For
2000 N, as illustrated in Fig. 2.1. Examiner’s
Use

30 m / s

2000 N
resistive
force

Fig. 2.1

(a) Calculate the kinetic energy of the car.

kinetic energy = ................................................ [2]

(b) Calculate the energy used in 1.0 s against the resistive force.

energy = ................................................ [2]

(c) What is the minimum power that the car engine has to deliver to the wheels?

minimum power = ................................................ [1]

© UCLES 2010 0625/31/M/J/10


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(d) What form of energy is in the fuel, used by the engine to drive the car? For
Examiner’s
.................................................................................................................................... [1] Use

(e) State why the energy in the fuel is converted at a greater rate than you have calculated
in (c).

..........................................................................................................................................

.................................................................................................................................... [1]

[Total: 7]

© UCLES 2010 0625/31/M/J/10 [Turn over


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3 Two students make the statements about acceleration that are given below. For
Examiner’s
Student A: For a given mass the acceleration of an object is proportional to the resultant Use

force applied to the object.

Student B: For a given force the acceleration of an object is proportional to the mass of
the object.

(a) One statement is correct and one is incorrect.

Re-write the incorrect statement, making changes so that it is now correct.

For a given ..................... the acceleration of an object is ...............................................

.................................................................................................................................... [1]

(b) State the equation which links acceleration a, resultant force F and mass m.

[1]

(c) Describe what happens to the motion of a moving object when

(i) there is no resultant force acting on it,

............................................................................................................................ [1]

(ii) a resultant force is applied to it in the opposite direction to the motion,

............................................................................................................................ [1]

(iii) a resultant force is applied to it in a perpendicular direction to the motion.

............................................................................................................................ [1]

[Total: 5]

© UCLES 2010 0625/31/M/J/10


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4 (a) Four identical metal plates, at the same temperature, are laid side by side on the ground. For
The rays from the Sun fall on the plates. Examiner’s
Use

One plate has a matt black surface.

One plate has a shiny black surface.

One plate has a matt silver surface.

One plate has a shiny silver surface.

State which plate has the fastest-rising temperature when the sunlight first falls on the
plates.

.................................................................................................................................... [1]

(b) The apparatus shown in Fig. 4.1 is known as Leslie’s Differential Air Thermometer.

glass bulb
radiant heater
painted shiny
matt black glass bulb

air
T

liquid

Fig. 4.1

The heater is switched off. Tap T is opened so that the air on the two sides of T has the
same pressure. Tap T is then closed.

(i) The heater is switched on. On Fig. 4.1, mark clearly where the two liquid levels
might be a short time later. [1]

(ii) Explain your answer to (b)(i).

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................ [2]

[Total: 4]

© UCLES 2010 0625/31/M/J/10 [Turn over


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5 A certain substance is in the solid state at a temperature of –36 °C. It is heated at a constant For
rate for 32 minutes. The record of its temperature is given in Fig. 5.1. Examiner’s
Use

time / min 0 1 2 6 10 14 18 22 24 26 28 30 32

temperature / °C –36 –16 –9 –9 –9 –9 32 75 101 121 121 121 121

Fig. 5.1

(a) State what is meant by the term latent heat.

..........................................................................................................................................

.................................................................................................................................... [2]

(b) State a time at which the energy is being supplied as latent heat of fusion.

.................................................................................................................................... [1]

(c) Explain the energy changes undergone by the molecules of a substance during the
period when latent heat of vaporisation is being supplied.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

.................................................................................................................................... [2]

(d) (i) The rate of heating is 2.0 kW.

Calculate how much energy is supplied to the substance during the period
18 – 22 minutes.

energy supplied = ................................................ [2]

© UCLES 2010 0625/31/M/J/10


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(ii) The specific heat capacity of the substance is 1760 J / (kg °C). For
Examiner’s
Use the information in the table for the period 18 – 22 minutes to calculate the Use

mass of the substance being heated.

mass heated = ................................................ [3]

[Total: 10]

© UCLES 2010 0625/31/M/J/10 [Turn over


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10

6 Some plane waves travel on the surface of water in a tank. They pass from a region of deep For
water into a region of shallow water. Fig. 6.1 shows what the waves look like from above. Examiner’s
Use

boundary

waves move
this way

deep shallow
water water

Fig. 6.1

(a) State what happens at the boundary, if anything, to

(i) the frequency of the waves,

............................................................................................................................ [1]

(ii) the speed of the waves,

............................................................................................................................ [1]

(iii) the wavelength of the waves.

............................................................................................................................ [1]

(b) The waves have a speed of 0.12 m / s in the deep water. Wave crests are 0.08 m apart in
the deep water.

Calculate the frequency of the source producing the waves. State the equation that you
use.

frequency = ................................................ [3]

© UCLES 2010 0625/31/M/J/10


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11

(c) Fig. 6.2 shows identical waves moving towards the boundary at an angle. For
Examiner’s
Use
boundary

A B

waves move
this way

deep shallow
water water

Fig. 6.2

On Fig. 6.2, draw carefully the remainder of waves A and B, plus the two previous waves
which reached the shallow water. You will need to use your ruler to do this. [3]

[Total: 9]

© UCLES 2010 0625/31/M/J/10 [Turn over


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12

7 During a thunderstorm, thunder and lightning are produced at the same time. For
Examiner’s
(a) A person is some distance away from the storm. Use

Explain why the person sees the lightning before hearing the thunder.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

.................................................................................................................................... [1]

(b) A scientist in a laboratory made the following measurements during a thunderstorm.

time from start of storm / minutes 0.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 8.0 10.0

time between seeing lightning and hearing thunder / s 3.6 2.4 1.6 2.4 3.5 4.4

Fig. 7.1

(i) How many minutes after the storm started did it reach its closest point to the
laboratory?

............................................................................................................................ [1]

(ii) How can you tell that the storm was never immediately over the laboratory?

............................................................................................................................ [1]

(iii) When the storm started, it was immediately above a village 1200 m from the
laboratory.

Using this information and information from Fig. 7.1, calculate the speed of sound.

speed of sound = ................................................ [2]

(iv) State the assumption you made when you calculated your answer to (b)(iii).

............................................................................................................................ [1]

© UCLES 2010 0625/31/M/J/10


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13

(c) Some waves are longitudinal; some waves are transverse. For
Examiner’s
Some waves are electromagnetic; some waves are mechanical. Use

Put ticks (✓) in the table below to indicate which of these descriptions apply to the light
waves of the lightning and the sound waves of the thunder.

light waves sound waves

longitudinal

transverse

electromagnetic

mechanical

[3]

[Total: 9]

© UCLES 2010 0625/31/M/J/10 [Turn over


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14

8 (a) The transformer in Fig. 8.1 is used to convert 240 V a.c. to 6 V a.c. For
Examiner’s
Use
iron core

A
C

D
B

primary secondary
coil coil
(480 turns)

Fig. 8.1

(i) Using the information above, calculate the number of turns on the secondary coil.

number of turns = ................................................ [2]

(ii) Describe how the transformer works.

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................ [3]

(iii) State one way in which energy is lost from the transformer, and from which part it is
lost.

............................................................................................................................ [1]

© UCLES 2010 0625/31/M/J/10


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15

(b) Fig. 8.2 shows a device labelled “IGCSE Transformer”. For


Examiner’s
Use

Fig. 8.2

Study the label on the case of the IGCSE Transformer.

(i) What is the output of the device? ....................................................................... [1]

(ii) From the information on the case, deduce what other electrical component must be
included within the case of the IGCSE Transformer, apart from a transformer.

............................................................................................................................ [1]

(c) A transformer supplying electrical energy to a factory changes the 11 000 V a.c. supply to
440 V a.c. for use in the factory. The current in the secondary coil is 200 A.

Calculate the current in the primary coil, assuming no losses from the transformer.

current = ................................................ [2]

[Total: 10]

© UCLES 2010 0625/31/M/J/10 [Turn over


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16

9 (a) Fig. 9.1 illustrates the left hand rule, which helps when describing the force on a current- For
carrying conductor in a magnetic field. Examiner’s
Use

thumb

motion / force

first finger

second finger

Fig. 9.1

One direction has been labelled for you.

In each of the other two boxes, write the name of the quantity that direction represents.
[1]

(b) Fig. 9.2 shows a simple d.c. motor connected to a battery and a switch.

N
S

switch

battery

Fig. 9.2

© UCLES 2010 0625/31/M/J/10


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17

(i) On Fig. 9.2, write in each of the boxes the name of the part of the motor to which For
the arrow is pointing. [2] Examiner’s
Use

(ii) State which way the coil of the motor will rotate when the switch is closed, when
viewed from the position X.

............................................................................................................................ [1]

(iii) State two things which could be done to increase the speed of rotation of the coil.

1. ...............................................................................................................................

2. ......................................................................................................................... [2]

[Total: 6]

© UCLES 2010 0625/31/M/J/10 [Turn over


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18

10 A certain element is known to exist as two different isotopes. For


Examiner’s
(a) State one thing that is the same for atoms of both isotopes. Use

.................................................................................................................................... [1]

(b) State one thing that is different between atoms of these two isotopes.

.................................................................................................................................... [1]

(c) An atom of one of these isotopes is unstable and decays into a different element by
emitting a -particle.

(i) State one thing about the atom that remains the same during this decay.

............................................................................................................................ [1]

(ii) State one thing about the atom that changes as a result of this decay.

............................................................................................................................ [1]

[Total: 4]

© UCLES 2010 0625/31/M/J/10


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19

11 (a) A coil of wire is connected into a circuit containing a variable resistor and a battery. For
Examiner’s
The variable resistor is adjusted until the potential difference across the coil is 1.8 V. Use

In this condition, the current in the circuit is 0.45 A.

Calculate

(i) the resistance of the coil,

resistance = ................................................ [1]

(ii) the thermal energy released from this coil in 9 minutes.

energy released = ................................................ [3]

(b) The coil in part (a) is replaced by one made of wire which has half the diameter of that
in (a).

When the potential difference across the coil is again adjusted to 1.8 V, the current is
only 0.30 A.

Calculate how the length of wire in the second coil compares with the length of wire in
the first coil.

length of wire in second coil is ………………………… the length of wire in first coil [4]

[Total: 8]
© UCLES 2010 0625/31/M/J/10
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20

BLANK PAGE

Permission to reproduce items where third-party owned material protected by copyright is included has been sought and cleared where possible. Every
reasonable effort has been made by the publisher (UCLES) to trace copyright holders, but if any items requiring clearance have unwittingly been included, the
publisher will be pleased to make amends at the earliest possible opportunity.

University of Cambridge International Examinations is part of the Cambridge Assessment Group. Cambridge Assessment is the brand name of University of
Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES), which is itself a department of the University of Cambridge.

© UCLES 2010 0625/31/M/J/10


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UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS


International General Certificate of Secondary Education

MARK SCHEME for the May/June 2010 question paper


for the guidance of teachers

0625 PHYSICS
0625/32 Paper 32 (Extended Theory), maximum raw mark 80

This mark scheme is published as an aid to teachers and candidates, to indicate the requirements of
the examination. It shows the basis on which Examiners were instructed to award marks. It does not
indicate the details of the discussions that took place at an Examiners’ meeting before marking began,
which would have considered the acceptability of alternative answers.

Mark schemes must be read in conjunction with the question papers and the report on the
examination.

• CIE will not enter into discussions or correspondence in connection with these mark schemes.

CIE is publishing the mark schemes for the May/June 2010 question papers for most IGCSE, GCE
Advanced Level and Advanced Subsidiary Level syllabuses and some Ordinary Level syllabuses.
PMT

Page 2 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2010 0625 32

Notes about Mark Scheme Symbols and Other Matters

B marks are independent marks, which do not depend on any other marks. For a B mark to be
scored, the point to which it refers must actually be seen in the candidate’s answer.

M marks are method marks upon which accuracy marks (A marks) later depend. For an M mark
to be scored, the point to which it refers must be seen in a candidate’s answer. If a
candidate fails to score a particular M mark, then none of the dependent A marks can be
scored.

C marks are compensatory method marks which can be scored even if the points to which they
refer are not written down by the candidate, provided subsequent working gives
evidence that they must have known it e.g. if an equation carries a C mark and the
candidate does not write down the actual equation but does correct working which
shows he knew the equation, then the C mark is scored.

A marks are accuracy or answer marks which either depend on an M mark, or which are one of
the ways which allow a C mark to be scored.

c.a.o. means “correct answer only”.

e.c.f. means “error carried forward”. This indicates that if a candidate has made an earlier
mistake and has carried his incorrect value forward to subsequent stages of working, he
may be given marks indicated by e.c.f. provided his subsequent working is correct,
bearing in mind his earlier mistake. This prevents a candidate being penalised more
than once for a particular mistake, but only applies to marks annotated “e.c.f.”

e.e.o.o. means “each error or omission”.

brackets ( ) around words or units in the mark scheme are intended to indicate wording used to
clarify the mark scheme, but the marks do not depend on seeing the words or units in
brackets e.g. 10 (J) means that the mark is scored for 10, regardless of the unit given.

© UCLES 2010
PMT

Page 3 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2010 0625 32

1 (a) mgh in any form, numbers, words, symbols C1


5.4 J OR 5.297 J OR 5.292 J OR 5.3 J OR 5.29 J A1

(b) ½mv2 in any form, numbers, words, symbols C1


14.7 (J) C1

(energy given by player =) 9.3 J OR his (b) – (a) correctly evaluated A1

(c) (i) friction with floor / inside ball OR energy to deform ball OR sound OR idea of
hysteresis of rubber
ignore heat / air resistance B1

(ii) 78% OR ratio of PEs


accept (14.7 × 0.78 =) 11.47 (J) OR (0.78 × 0.9 =) 0.702 (m) C1

3.12 m to at least 2 sig figs A1

(iii) idea of (some of) energy lost / becomes / converted / transferred to heat in ball
ignore friction B1 [9]

2 (a) Mark (i) and (ii) together. Note both M1s required to score the A1 mark

(i) B M1

(ii) idea of greater / different (NOT less) increase in length for each additional load
accept load not proportional to extension or reverse argument M1

at 4th or 5th reading / value between 2.0 – 2.5 N / 11.6 – 12.6 cm A1

(b) (i) 1.0 cm B1

(ii) 5.7 cm B1

(c) 2.5 (cm) OR 1.25 (N) OR 5.0(cm) ignore 2.5N e.c.f. from (b) if clear C1
8.2 cm e.c.f. from (b) if clear A1
e.g. 10.7/2 (= 5.35) scores 0/2 [7]

© UCLES 2010
PMT

Page 4 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2010 0625 32

3 (a) M = V × D in any form OR 103 × 10-3 C1


1 kg A1

(b) mgh OR his (a) × 10 × 0.8 C1


8 J (Nm) OR 7.85 J OR 7.84 J e.c.f. from (a) A1

(c) P = E/t OR (his 8 × 90) / 60 e.c.f. from (b) C1


12 W (J/s or Nm/s) OR 11.77 W OR 11.76 W A1

(d) ρgh in any form, words, letters, numbers C1


8000 Pa (N/m2) OR 7850 Pa OR 7840 Pa A1 [8]

4 (a) (i) change in length / distance moved (accept “how much it expands”)
per unit / given temp rise OR equivalent B1

(ii) large bulb OR thin / narrow bore / tube / capillary


NOT thin / narrow thermometer B1

(b) (i) difference between the highest and lowest temperatures


ignore reference to fixed points B1

(ii) tube (sufficiently) long / not too short


OR bore wide/not too thin
OR little/not too much liquid/bulb
NOT change liquid B1

(c) (i) idea of equal size divisions/expansion for equal temperature rises
OR ∆l / ∆θ constant OR reference to l against θ graph straight line
ignore 1 division = 1 °C B1

(ii) uniform bore OR alcohol/liquid expands uniformly (with temp) B1 [6]

© UCLES 2010
PMT

Page 5 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2010 0625 32

5 Ignore upthrust throughout this question

(a) paper:
drag / air resistance / friction (upwards) (seen anywhere in (a)) B1
drag /air resistance / friction = weight / force of gravity B1
no resultant (force) / forces balance / upwards force = downwards force
AND no acceleration B1

coin:
weight / force of gravity (always) bigger than air resistance
OR force down bigger than force up
OR air resistance hasn’t time / distance to equal weight B1

(b) fall at same speed / acceleration / rate, ignore fall at same time )
hit bottom at same time/together )
paper now accelerates (all the way) ) any 1 B1
paper no longer flutters side-side )
they/paper NOT coin fall(s) faster )
the paper (ignore coin) hits sooner )
NOT constant speed/rate [5]

6 (a) single wavelength/frequency accept single colour B1

(b) refraction B1

(c) 29° unit needed B1

(d) n = sini / sinr in any form OR n = sinr / sin i in any form OR sini / sinr C1
sin 45 / sin 29 OR sin 29 / sin 45 e.c.f.from (c) C1

1.458524649 to at least 2 sig figs c.a.o.


accept incorrect rounding of answer to more than 3 S.F.
e.g. do not accept 1.4 or 1.45 do accept 1.46 or 1.5 or 1.458 A1

(e) (at B) greater than critical angle OR ray is totally internally reflected B1
less than critical angle at C B1

(f) AB continued straight by eye, to RH glass surface, drawn with ruler B1


refracted up at RH surface C1
horizontal A1 [11]

© UCLES 2010
PMT

Page 6 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2010 0625 32

7 (a) (i) approximately 330 m/s


(correct order of magnitude) B1

(ii) 300 / 5000 OR t = d/v NOT t = 2d/v C1


0.06 s A1

(b) sound through air and sound through steel NOT echo B1

speeds in air and steel are different NOT if faster in air


accept sound in steel/rail heard first B1 [5]

8 (a) same/like/similar charges repel (ignore poles repel) B1


unlike/opposite/different charges attract (ignore poles attract) B1

(b) idea of car/person (being) charged (by friction) B1


idea of charge/electrons going to/from/through person B1

(c) (i) electrons / -ve charges move towards the rod / to R (ignore just “attracted”)
ignore any mention of +ve charges moving
any mention of +ve electrons gets B0 B1

(ii) opposite charges attract OR electrons / -ve charges attracted to +ve / rod B1

attraction between opposite charges > repulsion between like charges


OR – ve charges (are) close(r) (to the rod) B1

(iii) electrons / -ve charges flow (up) from earth/wire no e.c.f. from (i)
ignore +ve charges moving, NOT +ve electrons B1
ball becomes –vely charged B1 [9]

9 (a) diode B1

(b) (i) 2 Ω B1

(ii) 24 OR 22 + 2 (Ω) seen C1


R 1R 2
1 / R = 1 / R1 + 1 / R2 (+ 1 / R3) OR (R =)
R1 + R 2
seen or used with any 2 resistors
ignore extra resistance added to expression for R in equation C1

6Ω A1

(c) N.B. marks may be scored anywhere in (c)

(current =) zero / very small M1

diode reverse biased


OR polarity wrong OR facing wrong way
OR diode only conducts R / + to L / - A1

© UCLES 2010
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Page 7 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2010 0625 32

(d) use I = V / R OR P = VI OR P=V2 / R symbols, numbers or words M1


use of R = 8 (Ω) & correct calculation to give 2W
OR R = 4 / 0.5 = 8 (Ω) OR R = 42 / 2 = 8 (Ω)
OR any other calculation(s) using (I = V / R & P = VI) OR P = V2 / R to deduce 8 (Ω)
M1

switch position B (NOTE: this is dependent on both M1s being scored)


ignore any calculations using 2 Ω A1 [10]

10 (a) waves clearly more bunched


condone poor accuracy / shape or waves not filling screen C1
3 waves drawn, with first 4 half-wavelengths having 2.0 (±0.2) cm interval A1
all waves drawn same amplitude (±0.2) cm as original AND
at least 1 peak and 1 trough drawn B1

(b) volts/cm: increased / any value > 5 (V / cm) B1


factor of 2, increase or decrease / 10 (V / cm) / 2.5 (V / cm) B1

N.B. 10 (V / cm) scores B1, B1

time base: no change / 10 ms / cm B1 [6]

11 (a) γ straight up B1
α to left AND β to right B1

(b) into or out of paper C1


into paper A1 [4]

© UCLES 2010
PMT

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS


International General Certificate of Secondary Education
*5978594060*

PHYSICS 0625/32
Paper 3 Extended May/June 2010
1 hour 15 minutes
Candidates answer on the Question Paper.
No Additional Materials are required.

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

Write your Centre number, candidate number and name on all the work you hand in.
Write in dark blue or black pen.
You may use a soft pencil for any diagrams, graphs or rough working.
Do not use staples, paper clips, highlighters, glue or correction fluid.
DO NOT WRITE IN ANY BARCODES.

Answer all questions.


You may lose marks if you do not show your working or if you do not use appropriate units.
Take the weight of 1 kg to be 10 N (i.e. acceleration of free fall = 10 m / s2).

At the end of the examination, fasten all your work securely together.
The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end of each question or part question.

This document consists of 19 printed pages and 1 blank page.

DCA (SHW 00379 1/09) 20866/7


© UCLES 2010 [Turn over
PMT

1 A ball player bounces a ball of mass 0.60 kg. Its centre of mass moves down through a For
distance of 0.90 m, as shown in Fig. 1.1. Ignore air resistance throughout this question. Examiner’s
Use

0.90 m

Fig. 1.1

(a) Calculate the decrease in gravitational potential energy of the ball as it moves down
through the 0.90 m.

decrease in PE = ................................................ [2]

(b) The ball hits the ground at 7.0 m/s.

Calculate the initial energy given to the ball by the player.

energy given = ................................................ [3]

© UCLES 2010 0625/32/M/J/10


PMT

(c) On another occasion, the player throws the ball into the air, to a height of 4.0 m above For
the ground. The ball then falls to the ground. Examiner’s
Use

During the impact, 22% of the ball’s energy is lost.

(i) Suggest one reason why energy is lost during bouncing.

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................ [1]

(ii) Calculate the height to which the ball rises after the bounce.

[2]

(iii) An observer who sees the ball bounce says, “That ball should be slightly warmer
after that bounce.”

Explain why the observer’s statement is true.

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................ [1]

[Total: 9]

© UCLES 2010 0625/32/M/J/10 [Turn over


PMT

2 Four students, A, B, C and D, each have a spring. They measure the lengths of their springs For
when the springs are stretched by different loads. Examiner’s
Use

Their results are shown in Fig. 2.1.

student A student B student C student D

load / N spring length / cm spring length / cm spring length / cm spring length / cm

0.5 6.7 9.2 9.1 10.0

1.0 7.7 10.0 9.9 11.1

1.5 8.7 10.8 10.7 12.2

2.0 9.7 11.6 11.5 13.3

2.5 10.7 12.6 12.3 14.4

3.0 11.7 13.8 13.1 15.5

3.5 12.7 15.2 13.9 16.6

4.0 13.7 16.8 14.7 17.7

Fig. 2.1

(a) (i) State which student had loaded the spring beyond the limit of proportionality.

............................................................................................................................ [1]

(ii) Explain how you obtained your answer to (a)(i).

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................ [2]

(b) For the spring used by student A, calculate

(i) the extra extension caused by each additional 0.5 N,

extra extension = ................................................ [1]

(ii) the unloaded length of the spring.

unloaded length = ................................................ [1]


© UCLES 2010 0625/32/M/J/10
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(c) Student A obtains a second spring that is identical to his first spring. He hangs the two For
springs side by side, as shown in Fig. 2.2. Examiner’s
Use

identical
springs

load

Fig. 2.2

Use the table to calculate the length of each of the springs when a load of 2.5 N is hung
as shown in Fig. 2.2. Show your working.

length = ................................................. [2]

[Total: 7]

© UCLES 2010 0625/32/M/J/10 [Turn over


PMT

3 An ornamental garden includes a small pond, which contains a pumped system that causes For
water to go up a pipe and then to run down a heap of rocks. Examiner’s
Use

Fig. 3.1 shows a section through this water feature.

water runs
down rocks

pumped water rises


through pipe
0.8 m
rocks

water inlet
pump to pump

Fig. 3.1

The density of water is 1000 kg / m3. A volume of 1 litre is equal to 0.001 m3.

(a) Calculate the mass of 1 litre of water.

mass = ................................................ [2]

(b) Calculate the work done raising 1 litre of water through a height of 0.8 m.

work = ................................................ [2]

© UCLES 2010 0625/32/M/J/10


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(c) The pump lifts 90 litres of water per minute. For


Examiner’s
Calculate the minimum power of the pump. Use

power = ................................................ [2]

(d) The pump is switched off.

Immediately after the pump is switched off, what is the value of the water pressure at
the bottom of the 0.8 m pipe, due to the water in the pipe?

pressure = ................................................ [2]

[Total: 8]

© UCLES 2010 0625/32/M/J/10 [Turn over


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4 A technician has been asked to design a liquid-in-glass thermometer, using alcohol as the For
liquid. Examiner’s
Use

(a) (i) State what is meant by the sensitivity of the thermometer.

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................ [1]

(ii) State one design feature the technician could use in order to ensure a very sensitive
thermometer.

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................ [1]

(b) (i) State what is meant by the range of the thermometer.

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................ [1]

(ii) State one design feature that would ensure that the thermometer measured the
desired range of temperatures.

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................ [1]

(c) (i) State what is meant by linearity, as it applies to the thermometer.

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................ [1]

(ii) State one design feature that would ensure linearity in the technician’s thermometer.

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................ [1]

[Total: 6]

© UCLES 2010 0625/32/M/J/10


PMT

5 The apparatus shown in Fig. 5.1 is used to demonstrate how a coin and a piece of paper fall For
when they are released from rest. Examiner’s
Use

piece of paper

coin
tube containing air

Fig. 5.1

(a) At the positions shown in Fig. 5.1, the paper is descending at constant speed but the
coin still accelerates.

In terms of the forces acting, explain these observations.

paper ................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

coin ..................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

.................................................................................................................................... [4]

(b) A vacuum pump is now connected at A and the air in the tube is pumped out.

The paper and coin are again made to fall from rest.

State one difference that would be observed, compared with what was observed when
air was present.

..........................................................................................................................................

.................................................................................................................................... [1]

[Total: 5]

© UCLES 2010 0625/32/M/J/10 [Turn over


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10

6 A ray of monochromatic light passes through the glass prism shown in Fig. 6.1. For
Examiner’s
Use
90°

45°
ray
A B

61°

45° glass
air C

Fig. 6.1

(a) State what is meant by the term monochromatic.

..........................................................................................................................................

.................................................................................................................................... [1]

(b) State the name given to what happens to the ray at A.

.................................................................................................................................... [1]

(c) Use the values on the diagram to calculate the angle of refraction at A (The angles in a
triangle add up to 180°).

angle of refraction = ................................................ [1]

(d) Calculate the refractive index of the glass.

refractive index = ................................................ [3]

© UCLES 2010 0625/32/M/J/10


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11

(e) Explain why the ray does not emerge into the air at B, but does emerge at C. For
Examiner’s
.......................................................................................................................................... Use

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

.................................................................................................................................... [2]

(f) An identical prism is stuck to the first prism using a transparent adhesive with the same
refractive index as the glass. This is shown in Fig. 6.2.

glass

ray
A B

glass
air

Fig. 6.2

On Fig. 6.2, draw the path of the ray after it has reached B and until it has passed into
the air again. [3]

[Total: 11]

© UCLES 2010 0625/32/M/J/10 [Turn over


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12

BLANK PAGE

© UCLES 2010 0625/32/M/J/10


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13

7 A disused railway line has a length of 300 m. A man puts his ear against one end of the rail For
and another man hits the other end with a metal hammer, as shown in Fig. 7.1. Examiner’s
Use

hammer railway man with ear


hits rail line against rail

300 m

Fig. 7.1

(a) (i) State an approximate value for the speed of sound in air.

................................................. [1]

(ii) Sound travels at 5000 m / s in steel.

Calculate the time it takes for the sound to travel along the rail.

time taken = ................................................ [2]

(b) The man with his ear to the railway line actually hears two sounds from the hammer,
separated by a short interval.

Explain why he hears two sounds.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

.................................................................................................................................... [2]

[Total: 5]

© UCLES 2010 0625/32/M/J/10 [Turn over


PMT

14

8 (a) State the law of attraction and repulsion between electrostatic charges. For
Examiner’s
.......................................................................................................................................... Use

..........................................................................................................................................

.................................................................................................................................... [2]

(b) Sometimes, when people have been riding in a car, they get an electric shock from the
door handle as they get out of the car.

Suggest why this happens.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

.................................................................................................................................... [2]

(c) A plastic rod is rubbed with a cloth and becomes positively charged. After charging, the
rod is held close to the suspended table-tennis ball shown in Fig. 8.1. The table-tennis
ball is covered with metal paint and is initially uncharged.

nylon thread

light
table-tennis ball
covered with metal
paint

positively
charged rod

Fig. 8.1

(i) Describe what happens to the charges on the metal-painted table-tennis ball as the
positively-charged rod is brought close to the ball.

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................ [1]

© UCLES 2010 0625/32/M/J/10


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15

(ii) The ball is attracted towards the charged rod. For


Examiner’s
Explain why this happens. Use

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................ [2]

(iii) When it is a few centimetres away from the rod, the ball is briefly touched by a wire
connected to earth.

In terms of the movement of charges, describe what happens to the charge on the
ball.

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................ [2]

[Total: 9]

© UCLES 2010 0625/32/M/J/10 [Turn over


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16

9 The circuit in Fig. 9.1 contains a 4.0 V battery, whose resistance can be ignored. For
Examiner’s
There are also three resistors, a 3-position switch, S, and another component, P. Use

22  2

A
S B 8
C

4.0 V

Fig. 9.1

(a) State the name of component P.

................................................. [1]

(b) Deduce the resistance of the circuit when switch S is connected to

(i) point A,

resistance = ................................................ [1]

(ii) point B.

resistance = ................................................ [3]

© UCLES 2010 0625/32/M/J/10


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17

(c) State the current in component P when S is in position C, and explain your answer. For
Examiner’s
current = ..................................................... Use

explanation ......................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

.................................................................................................................................... [2]

(d) The 22  resistor is removed as shown in Fig. 9.2.

2

A
S B 8
C

4.0 V

Fig. 9.2

Showing your working, decide which switch position will result in energy release from
the circuit at the rate of 2.0 W.

switch position = ................................................ [3]

[Total: 10]

© UCLES 2010 0625/32/M/J/10 [Turn over


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18

10 A student is using a cathode-ray oscilloscope to display the waveform of an alternating For


current supply. The arrangement is shown in Fig. 10.1. Examiner’s
Use

cathode-ray
oscilloscope
switch S (open)

a.c.
R Y-input
supply

Fig. 10.1

When switch S is closed, the trace seen on the screen is as shown in Fig. 10.2. To get this
trace, the settings of the oscilloscope controls are

volts / cm: 5 V / cm

time-base: 10 ms / cm

1 cm

Fig. 10.2

(a) On Fig. 10.2, carefully draw what is seen on the screen when the frequency of the
supply is increased to 1.5 times its previous value. [3]

© UCLES 2010 0625/32/M/J/10


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19

(b) What change, if any, must be made to the oscilloscope volts / cm and time-base controls For
in order to reduce the peak-to-peak height of the trace to half that shown in Fig. 10.2? Examiner’s
Use

volts / cm setting ......................................................................................................... [2]

time-base setting ....................................................................................................... [1]

[Total: 6]

© UCLES 2010 0625/32/M/J/10 [Turn over


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20

11 A radium source emits ,  and  radiations. Fig. 11.1 illustrates what happens to these For
radiations when they pass through a magnetic field. The left hand beam is actually deviated Examiner’s
a great deal less than shown on Fig. 11.1. Use

radioactive
source

Fig. 11.1

(a) On Fig. 11.1, label the three radiations by writing in the boxes provided. [2]

(b) State the direction of the magnetic field that gives the deflections shown in Fig. 11.1.

.................................................................................................................................... [2]

[Total: 4]

Permission to reproduce items where third-party owned material protected by copyright is included has been sought and cleared where possible. Every
reasonable effort has been made by the publisher (UCLES) to trace copyright holders, but if any items requiring clearance have unwittingly been included, the
publisher will be pleased to make amends at the earliest possible opportunity.

University of Cambridge International Examinations is part of the Cambridge Assessment Group. Cambridge Assessment is the brand name of University of
Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES), which is itself a department of the University of Cambridge.

© UCLES 2010 0625/32/M/J/10


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UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS


International General Certificate of Secondary Education

MARK SCHEME for the May/June 2010 question paper


for the guidance of teachers

0625 PHYSICS
0625/33 Paper 33 (Extended Theory), maximum raw mark 80

This mark scheme is published as an aid to teachers and candidates, to indicate the requirements of
the examination. It shows the basis on which Examiners were instructed to award marks. It does not
indicate the details of the discussions that took place at an Examiners’ meeting before marking began,
which would have considered the acceptability of alternative answers.

Mark schemes must be read in conjunction with the question papers and the report on the
examination.

• CIE will not enter into discussions or correspondence in connection with these mark schemes.

CIE is publishing the mark schemes for the May/June 2010 question papers for most IGCSE, GCE
Advanced Level and Advanced Subsidiary Level syllabuses and some Ordinary Level syllabuses.
PMT

Page 2 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2010 0625 33

Notes about Mark Scheme Symbols and Other Matters

B marks are independent marks, which do not depend on any other marks. For a B mark to be
scored, the point to which it refers must actually be seen in the candidate’s answer.

M marks are method marks upon which accuracy marks (A marks) later depend. For an M mark
to be scored, the point to which it refers must be seen in a candidate’s answer. If a
candidate fails to score a particular M mark, then none of the dependent A marks can be
scored.

C marks are compensatory method marks which can be scored even if the points to which they
refer are not written down by the candidate, provided subsequent working gives
evidence that they must have known it e.g. if an equation carries a C mark and the
candidate does not write down the actual equation but does correct working which
shows he knew the equation, then the C mark is scored.

A marks are accuracy or answer marks which either depend on an M mark, or which are one of
the ways which allow a C mark to be scored.

c.a.o. means “correct answer only”.

e.c.f. means “error carried forward”. This indicates that if a candidate has made an earlier
mistake and has carried his incorrect value forward to subsequent stages of working, he
may be given marks indicated by e.c.f. provided his subsequent working is correct,
bearing in mind his earlier mistake. This prevents a candidate being penalised more
than once for a particular mistake, but only applies to marks annotated “e.c.f.”

e.e.o.o. means “each error or omission”.

brackets ( ) around words or units in the mark scheme are intended to indicate wording used to
clarify the mark scheme, but the marks do not depend on seeing the words or units in
brackets e.g. 10 (J) means that the mark is scored for 10, regardless of the unit given.

© UCLES 2010
PMT

Page 3 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2010 0625 33

1 (a) mgh in any form, numbers, words, symbols C1


5.4 J OR 5.297 J OR 5.292 J OR 5.3 J OR 5.29 J A1

(b) ½mv2 in any form, numbers, words, symbols C1


14.7 (J) C1

(energy given by player =) 9.3 J OR his (b) – (a) correctly evaluated A1

(c) (i) friction with floor / inside ball OR energy to deform ball OR sound OR idea of
hysteresis of rubber
ignore heat / air resistance B1

(ii) 78% OR ratio of PEs


accept (14.7 × 0.78 =) 11.47 (J) OR (0.78 × 0.9 =) 0.702 (m) C1

3.12 m to at least 2 sig figs A1

(iii) idea of (some of) energy lost / becomes / converted / transferred to heat in ball
ignore friction B1 [9]

2 (a) Mark (i) and (ii) together. Note both M1s required to score the A1 mark

(i) B M1

(ii) idea of greater / different (NOT less) increase in length for each additional load
accept load not proportional to extension or reverse argument M1

at 4th or 5th reading / value between 2.0 – 2.5 N / 11.6 – 12.6 cm A1

(b) (i) 1.0 cm B1

(ii) 5.7 cm B1

(c) 2.5 (cm) OR 1.25 (N) OR 5.0(cm) ignore 2.5N e.c.f. from (b) if clear C1
8.2 cm e.c.f. from (b) if clear A1
e.g. 10.7/2 (= 5.35) scores 0/2 [7]

© UCLES 2010
PMT

Page 4 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2010 0625 33

3 (a) M = V × D in any form OR 103 × 10-3 C1


1 kg A1

(b) mgh OR his (a) × 10 × 0.8 C1


8 J (Nm) OR 7.85 J OR 7.84 J e.c.f. from (a) A1

(c) P = E/t OR (his 8 × 90) / 60 e.c.f. from (b) C1


12 W (J/s or Nm/s) OR 11.77 W OR 11.76 W A1

(d) ρgh in any form, words, letters, numbers C1


8000 Pa (N/m2) OR 7850 Pa OR 7840 Pa A1 [8]

4 (a) (i) change in length / distance moved (accept “how much it expands”)
per unit / given temp rise OR equivalent B1

(ii) large bulb OR thin / narrow bore / tube / capillary


NOT thin / narrow thermometer B1

(b) (i) difference between the highest and lowest temperatures


ignore reference to fixed points B1

(ii) tube (sufficiently) long / not too short


OR bore wide/not too thin
OR little/not too much liquid/bulb
NOT change liquid B1

(c) (i) idea of equal size divisions/expansion for equal temperature rises
OR ∆l / ∆θ constant OR reference to l against θ graph straight line
ignore 1 division = 1 °C B1

(ii) uniform bore OR alcohol/liquid expands uniformly (with temp) B1 [6]

© UCLES 2010
PMT

Page 5 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2010 0625 33

5 Ignore upthrust throughout this question

(a) paper:
drag / air resistance / friction (upwards) (seen anywhere in (a)) B1
drag /air resistance / friction = weight / force of gravity B1
no resultant (force) / forces balance / upwards force = downwards force
AND no acceleration B1

coin:
weight / force of gravity (always) bigger than air resistance
OR force down bigger than force up
OR air resistance hasn’t time / distance to equal weight B1

(b) fall at same speed / acceleration / rate, ignore fall at same time )
hit bottom at same time/together )
paper now accelerates (all the way) ) any 1 B1
paper no longer flutters side-side )
they/paper NOT coin fall(s) faster )
the paper (ignore coin) hits sooner )
NOT constant speed/rate [5]

6 (a) single wavelength/frequency accept single colour B1

(b) refraction B1

(c) 29° unit needed B1

(d) n = sini / sinr in any form OR n = sinr / sin i in any form OR sini / sinr C1
sin 45 / sin 29 OR sin 29 / sin 45 e.c.f.from (c) C1

1.458524649 to at least 2 sig figs c.a.o.


accept incorrect rounding of answer to more than 3 S.F.
e.g. do not accept 1.4 or 1.45 do accept 1.46 or 1.5 or 1.458 A1

(e) (at B) greater than critical angle OR ray is totally internally reflected B1
less than critical angle at C B1

(f) AB continued straight by eye, to RH glass surface, drawn with ruler B1


refracted up at RH surface C1
horizontal A1 [11]

© UCLES 2010
PMT

Page 6 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2010 0625 33

7 (a) (i) approximately 330 m/s


(correct order of magnitude) B1

(ii) 300 / 5000 OR t = d/v NOT t = 2d/v C1


0.06 s A1

(b) sound through air and sound through steel NOT echo B1

speeds in air and steel are different NOT if faster in air


accept sound in steel/rail heard first B1 [5]

8 (a) same/like/similar charges repel (ignore poles repel) B1


unlike/opposite/different charges attract (ignore poles attract) B1

(b) idea of car/person (being) charged (by friction) B1


idea of charge/electrons going to/from/through person B1

(c) (i) electrons / -ve charges move towards the rod / to R (ignore just “attracted”)
ignore any mention of +ve charges moving
any mention of +ve electrons gets B0 B1

(ii) opposite charges attract OR electrons / -ve charges attracted to +ve / rod B1

attraction between opposite charges > repulsion between like charges


OR – ve charges (are) close(r) (to the rod) B1

(iii) electrons / -ve charges flow (up) from earth/wire no e.c.f. from (i)
ignore +ve charges moving, NOT +ve electrons B1
ball becomes –vely charged B1 [9]

9 (a) diode B1

(b) (i) 2 Ω B1

(ii) 24 OR 22 + 2 (Ω) seen C1


R 1R 2
1 / R = 1 / R1 + 1 / R2 (+ 1 / R3) OR (R =)
R1 + R 2
seen or used with any 2 resistors
ignore extra resistance added to expression for R in equation C1

6Ω A1

(c) N.B. marks may be scored anywhere in (c)

(current =) zero / very small M1

diode reverse biased


OR polarity wrong OR facing wrong way
OR diode only conducts R / + to L / - A1

© UCLES 2010
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Page 7 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2010 0625 33

(d) use I = V / R OR P = VI OR P=V2 / R symbols, numbers or words M1


use of R = 8 (Ω) & correct calculation to give 2W
OR R = 4 / 0.5 = 8 (Ω) OR R = 42 / 2 = 8 (Ω)
OR any other calculation(s) using (I = V / R & P = VI) OR P = V2 / R to deduce 8 (Ω)
M1

switch position B (NOTE: this is dependent on both M1s being scored)


ignore any calculations using 2 Ω A1 [10]

10 (a) waves clearly more bunched


condone poor accuracy / shape or waves not filling screen C1
3 waves drawn, with first 4 half-wavelengths having 2.0 (±0.2) cm interval A1
all waves drawn same amplitude (±0.2) cm as original AND
at least 1 peak and 1 trough drawn B1

(b) volts/cm: increased / any value > 5 (V / cm) B1


factor of 2, increase or decrease / 10 (V / cm) / 2.5 (V / cm) B1

N.B. 10 (V / cm) scores B1, B1

time base: no change / 10 ms / cm B1 [6]

11 (a) γ straight up B1
α to left AND β to right B1

(b) into or out of paper C1


into paper A1 [4]

© UCLES 2010
PMT

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS


International General Certificate of Secondary Education
*8006088596*

PHYSICS 0625/33
Paper 3 Extended May/June 2010
1 hour 15 minutes
Candidates answer on the Question Paper.
No Additional Materials are required.

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

Write your Centre number, candidate number and name on all the work you hand in.
Write in dark blue or black pen.
You may use a soft pencil for any diagrams, graphs or rough working.
Do not use staples, paper clips, highlighters, glue or correction fluid.
DO NOT WRITE IN ANY BARCODES.

Answer all questions.


You may lose marks if you do not show your working or if you do not use appropriate units.
Take the weight of 1 kg to be 10 N (i.e. acceleration of free fall = 10 m / s2).

At the end of the examination, fasten all your work securely together.
The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end of each question or part question.

This document consists of 19 printed pages and 1 blank page.

DC (LEO/SHW) 27239
© UCLES 2010 [Turn over
PMT

1 A ball player bounces a ball of mass 0.60 kg. Its centre of mass moves down through a For
distance of 0.90 m, as shown in Fig. 1.1. Ignore air resistance throughout this question. Examiner’s
Use

0.90 m

Fig. 1.1

(a) Calculate the decrease in gravitational potential energy of the ball as it moves down
through the 0.90 m.

decrease in PE = ................................................ [2]

(b) The ball hits the ground at 7.0 m/s.

Calculate the initial energy given to the ball by the player.

energy given = ................................................ [3]

© UCLES 2010 0625/33/M/J/10


PMT

(c) On another occasion, the player throws the ball into the air, to a height of 4.0 m above For
the ground. The ball then falls to the ground. Examiner’s
Use

During the impact, 22% of the ball’s energy is lost.

(i) Suggest one reason why energy is lost during bouncing.

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................ [1]

(ii) Calculate the height to which the ball rises after the bounce.

[2]

(iii) An observer who sees the ball bounce says, “That ball should be slightly warmer
after that bounce.”

Explain why the observer’s statement is true.

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................ [1]

[Total: 9]

© UCLES 2010 0625/33/M/J/10 [Turn over


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2 Four students, A, B, C and D, each have a spring. They measure the lengths of their springs For
when the springs are stretched by different loads. Examiner’s
Use

Their results are shown in Fig. 2.1.

student A student B student C student D

load / N spring length / cm spring length / cm spring length / cm spring length / cm

0.5 6.7 9.2 9.1 10.0

1.0 7.7 10.0 9.9 11.1

1.5 8.7 10.8 10.7 12.2

2.0 9.7 11.6 11.5 13.3

2.5 10.7 12.6 12.3 14.4

3.0 11.7 13.8 13.1 15.5

3.5 12.7 15.2 13.9 16.6

4.0 13.7 16.8 14.7 17.7

Fig. 2.1

(a) (i) State which student had loaded the spring beyond the limit of proportionality.

............................................................................................................................ [1]

(ii) Explain how you obtained your answer to (a)(i).

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................ [2]

(b) For the spring used by student A, calculate

(i) the extra extension caused by each additional 0.5 N,

extra extension = ................................................ [1]

(ii) the unloaded length of the spring.

unloaded length = ................................................ [1]


© UCLES 2010 0625/33/M/J/10
PMT

(c) Student A obtains a second spring that is identical to his first spring. He hangs the two For
springs side by side, as shown in Fig. 2.2. Examiner’s
Use

identical
springs

load

Fig. 2.2

Use the table to calculate the length of each of the springs when a load of 2.5 N is hung
as shown in Fig. 2.2. Show your working.

length = ................................................. [2]

[Total: 7]

© UCLES 2010 0625/33/M/J/10 [Turn over


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3 An ornamental garden includes a small pond, which contains a pumped system that causes For
water to go up a pipe and then to run down a heap of rocks. Examiner’s
Use

Fig. 3.1 shows a section through this water feature.

water runs
down rocks

pumped water rises


through pipe
0.8 m
rocks

water inlet
pump to pump

Fig. 3.1

The density of water is 1000 kg / m3. A volume of 1 litre is equal to 0.001 m3.

(a) Calculate the mass of 1 litre of water.

mass = ................................................ [2]

(b) Calculate the work done raising 1 litre of water through a height of 0.8 m.

work = ................................................ [2]

© UCLES 2010 0625/33/M/J/10


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(c) The pump lifts 90 litres of water per minute. For


Examiner’s
Calculate the minimum power of the pump. Use

power = ................................................ [2]

(d) The pump is switched off.

Immediately after the pump is switched off, what is the value of the water pressure at
the bottom of the 0.8 m pipe, due to the water in the pipe?

pressure = ................................................ [2]

[Total: 8]

© UCLES 2010 0625/33/M/J/10 [Turn over


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4 A technician has been asked to design a liquid-in-glass thermometer, using alcohol as the For
liquid. Examiner’s
Use

(a) (i) State what is meant by the sensitivity of the thermometer.

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................ [1]

(ii) State one design feature the technician could use in order to ensure a very sensitive
thermometer.

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................ [1]

(b) (i) State what is meant by the range of the thermometer.

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................ [1]

(ii) State one design feature that would ensure that the thermometer measured the
desired range of temperatures.

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................ [1]

(c) (i) State what is meant by linearity, as it applies to the thermometer.

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................ [1]

(ii) State one design feature that would ensure linearity in the technician’s thermometer.

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................ [1]

[Total: 6]

© UCLES 2010 0625/33/M/J/10


PMT

5 The apparatus shown in Fig. 5.1 is used to demonstrate how a coin and a piece of paper fall For
when they are released from rest. Examiner’s
Use

piece of paper

coin
tube containing air

Fig. 5.1

(a) At the positions shown in Fig. 5.1, the paper is descending at constant speed but the
coin still accelerates.

In terms of the forces acting, explain these observations.

paper ................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

coin ..................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

.................................................................................................................................... [4]

(b) A vacuum pump is now connected at A and the air in the tube is pumped out.

The paper and coin are again made to fall from rest.

State one difference that would be observed, compared with what was observed when
air was present.

..........................................................................................................................................

.................................................................................................................................... [1]

[Total: 5]

© UCLES 2010 0625/33/M/J/10 [Turn over


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10

6 A ray of monochromatic light passes through the glass prism shown in Fig. 6.1. For
Examiner’s
Use
90°

45°
ray
A B

61°

45° glass
air C

Fig. 6.1

(a) State what is meant by the term monochromatic.

..........................................................................................................................................

.................................................................................................................................... [1]

(b) State the name given to what happens to the ray at A.

.................................................................................................................................... [1]

(c) Use the values on the diagram to calculate the angle of refraction at A (The angles in a
triangle add up to 180°).

angle of refraction = ................................................ [1]

(d) Calculate the refractive index of the glass.

refractive index = ................................................ [3]

© UCLES 2010 0625/33/M/J/10


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11

(e) Explain why the ray does not emerge into the air at B, but does emerge at C. For
Examiner’s
.......................................................................................................................................... Use

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

.................................................................................................................................... [2]

(f) An identical prism is stuck to the first prism using a transparent adhesive with the same
refractive index as the glass. This is shown in Fig. 6.2.

glass

ray
A B

glass
air

Fig. 6.2

On Fig. 6.2, draw the path of the ray after it has reached B and until it has passed into
the air again. [3]

[Total: 11]

© UCLES 2010 0625/33/M/J/10 [Turn over


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12

BLANK PAGE

© UCLES 2010 0625/33/M/J/10


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13

7 A disused railway line has a length of 300 m. A man puts his ear against one end of the rail For
and another man hits the other end with a metal hammer, as shown in Fig. 7.1. Examiner’s
Use

hammer railway man with ear


hits rail line against rail

300 m

Fig. 7.1

(a) (i) State an approximate value for the speed of sound in air.

................................................. [1]

(ii) Sound travels at 5000 m / s in steel.

Calculate the time it takes for the sound to travel along the rail.

time taken = ................................................ [2]

(b) The man with his ear to the railway line actually hears two sounds from the hammer,
separated by a short interval.

Explain why he hears two sounds.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

.................................................................................................................................... [2]

[Total: 5]

© UCLES 2010 0625/33/M/J/10 [Turn over


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14

8 (a) State the law of attraction and repulsion between electrostatic charges. For
Examiner’s
.......................................................................................................................................... Use

..........................................................................................................................................

.................................................................................................................................... [2]

(b) Sometimes, when people have been riding in a car, they get an electric shock from the
door handle as they get out of the car.

Suggest why this happens.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

.................................................................................................................................... [2]

(c) A plastic rod is rubbed with a cloth and becomes positively charged. After charging, the
rod is held close to the suspended table-tennis ball shown in Fig. 8.1. The table-tennis
ball is covered with metal paint and is initially uncharged.

nylon thread

light
table-tennis ball
covered with metal
paint

positively
charged rod

Fig. 8.1

(i) Describe what happens to the charges on the metal-painted table-tennis ball as the
positively-charged rod is brought close to the ball.

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................ [1]

© UCLES 2010 0625/33/M/J/10


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15

(ii) The ball is attracted towards the charged rod. For


Examiner’s
Explain why this happens. Use

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................ [2]

(iii) When it is a few centimetres away from the rod, the ball is briefly touched by a wire
connected to earth.

In terms of the movement of charges, describe what happens to the charge on the
ball.

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................ [2]

[Total: 9]

© UCLES 2010 0625/33/M/J/10 [Turn over


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16

9 The circuit in Fig. 9.1 contains a 4.0 V battery, whose resistance can be ignored. For
Examiner’s
There are also three resistors, a 3-position switch, S, and another component, P. Use

22  2

A
S B 8
C

4.0 V

Fig. 9.1

(a) State the name of component P.

................................................. [1]

(b) Deduce the resistance of the circuit when switch S is connected to

(i) point A,

resistance = ................................................ [1]

(ii) point B.

resistance = ................................................ [3]

© UCLES 2010 0625/33/M/J/10


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17

(c) State the current in component P when S is in position C, and explain your answer. For
Examiner’s
current = ..................................................... Use

explanation ......................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

.................................................................................................................................... [2]

(d) The 22  resistor is removed as shown in Fig. 9.2.

2

A
S B 8
C

4.0 V

Fig. 9.2

Showing your working, decide which switch position will result in energy release from
the circuit at the rate of 2.0 W.

switch position = ................................................ [3]

[Total: 10]

© UCLES 2010 0625/33/M/J/10 [Turn over


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18

10 A student is using a cathode-ray oscilloscope to display the waveform of an alternating For


current supply. The arrangement is shown in Fig. 10.1. Examiner’s
Use

cathode-ray
oscilloscope
switch S (open)

a.c.
R Y-input
supply

Fig. 10.1

When switch S is closed, the trace seen on the screen is as shown in Fig. 10.2. To get this
trace, the settings of the oscilloscope controls are

volts / cm: 5 V / cm

time-base: 10 ms / cm

1 cm

Fig. 10.2

(a) On Fig. 10.2, carefully draw what is seen on the screen when the frequency of the
supply is increased to 1.5 times its previous value. [3]

© UCLES 2010 0625/33/M/J/10


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19

(b) What change, if any, must be made to the oscilloscope volts / cm and time-base controls For
in order to reduce the peak-to-peak height of the trace to half that shown in Fig. 10.2? Examiner’s
Use

volts / cm setting ......................................................................................................... [2]

time-base setting ....................................................................................................... [1]

[Total: 6]

© UCLES 2010 0625/33/M/J/10 [Turn over


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20

11 A radium source emits ,  and  radiations. Fig. 11.1 illustrates what happens to these For
radiations when they pass through a magnetic field. The left hand beam is actually deviated Examiner’s
a great deal less than shown on Fig. 11.1. Use

radioactive
source

Fig. 11.1

(a) On Fig. 11.1, label the three radiations by writing in the boxes provided. [2]

(b) State the direction of the magnetic field that gives the deflections shown in Fig. 11.1.

.................................................................................................................................... [2]

[Total: 4]

Permission to reproduce items where third-party owned material protected by copyright is included has been sought and cleared where possible. Every
reasonable effort has been made by the publisher (UCLES) to trace copyright holders, but if any items requiring clearance have unwittingly been included, the
publisher will be pleased to make amends at the earliest possible opportunity.

University of Cambridge International Examinations is part of the Cambridge Assessment Group. Cambridge Assessment is the brand name of University of
Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES), which is itself a department of the University of Cambridge.

© UCLES 2010 0625/33/M/J/10


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UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS


International General Certificate of Secondary Education

MARK SCHEME for the May/June 2011 question paper


for the guidance of teachers

0625 PHYSICS
0625/31 Paper 3 (Extended Theory), maximum raw mark 80

This mark scheme is published as an aid to teachers and candidates, to indicate the requirements of
the examination. It shows the basis on which Examiners were instructed to award marks. It does not
indicate the details of the discussions that took place at an Examiners’ meeting before marking began,
which would have considered the acceptability of alternative answers.

Mark schemes must be read in conjunction with the question papers and the report on the
examination.

• Cambridge will not enter into discussions or correspondence in connection with these mark schemes.

Cambridge is publishing the mark schemes for the May/June 2011 question papers for most IGCSE,
GCE Advanced Level and Advanced Subsidiary Level syllabuses and some Ordinary Level
syllabuses.
PMT

Page 2 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2011 0625 31

Notes about Mark Scheme Symbols and Other Matters

B marks are independent marks, which do not depend on any other marks. For a B mark to be
scored, the point to which it refers must actually be seen in the candidate’s answer.
M marks are method marks upon which accuracy marks (A marks) later depend. For an M mark
to be scored, the point to which it refers must be seen in a candidate’s answer. If a
candidate fails to score a particular M mark, then none of the dependent A marks can be
scored.
C marks are compensatory method marks which can be scored even if the points to which they
refer are not written down by the candidate, provided subsequent working gives
evidence that they must have known it e.g. if an equation carries a C mark and the
candidate does not write down the actual equation but does correct working which
shows he knew the equation, then the C mark is scored.
A marks are accuracy or answer marks which either depend on an M mark, or which are one of
the ways which allow a C mark to be scored.
c.a.o. means “correct answer only”.
e.c.f. means “error carried forward”. This indicates that if a candidate has made an earlier
mistake and has carried his incorrect value forward to subsequent stages of working, he
may be given marks indicated by e.c.f. provided his subsequent working is correct,
bearing in mind his earlier mistake. This prevents a candidate being penalised more
than once for a particular mistake, but only applies to marks annotated “e.c.f.”
e.e.o.o. means “each error or omission”.
brackets ( ) around words or units in the mark scheme are intended to indicate wording used to
clarify the mark scheme, but the marks do not depend on seeing the words or units in
brackets e.g. 10 (J) means that the mark is scored for 10, regardless of the unit given.

underlining indicates that this must be seen in the answer offered, or something very similar.
OR/or indicates alternative answers, any one of which is satisfactory for scoring the marks.
Significant Answers are acceptable to any number of significant figures ≥ 2, except if specified
figures otherwise, or if only 1 sig. fig. is appropriate.
Units Deduct one mark for each incorrect or missing unit from an answer that would
otherwise gain all the marks available for that answer: maximum 1 per question.

Fractions These are only acceptable where specified.


Extras Ignore extras in answers if they are irrelevant; if they contradict an otherwise correct
response or are forbidden by mark scheme, use right + wrong = 0
Ignore Indicates that something which is not correct is disregarded and does not cause a right
plus wrong penalty.
Not/NOT Indicates that an incorrect answer is not to be disregarded, but cancels another
otherwise correct alternative offered by the candidate i.e. right plus wrong penalty
applies.

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2011


PMT

Page 3 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2011 0625 31

1 (a) all points correctly plotted ±½ small square B1


straight line of best fit for candidate’s points B1

(b) (i) candidate’s correct value with unit (± 0.2), (expect 1.2 N) B1

(ii) remains stationary / nothing happens / no acceleration NOT constant speed B1

(c) Correct data from candidates graph for ∆F and ∆m, used in ∆F/∆m B1

(d) (i) F = ma in any form, letters, words B1

(ii) gradient = F/a OR gradient = m ignore m=F/a C1


candidate’s (c) with correct unit A1

(e) straight line of positive gradient B1 [9]

2 (a) distance/height AND tape measure/(metre) rule(r) B1


weight OR load OR force
AND balance/scale(s) OR newton-meter/spring balance/force meter B1
time AND watch/clock/timer B1

(b) power = work/time OR energy/time in any form


OR Pt words or numbers seen anywhere e.g. 528 x 5 C1
(work =) force × distance in any form C1
11 A1

(c) efficiency = Eout/Ein OR Pout/Pin seen anywhere, clearly identified


OR 520 × (20/11) × 5
OR (work done =) 800 × 20 × 0.3 OR 800 × 20 × 30 OR 4800 (J) OR 720 (J) C1
(energy used =) 32,000 J A1 [8]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2011


PMT

Page 4 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2011 0625 31

3 (a) (i) smaller because area smaller B1

(ii) smaller because depth/height smaller ignore less water B1

(b) (i) hρg OR 12 × 1000 × 10 C1


1.2 × 105 Pa OR 1.1772 × 105 Pa OR 1.176 × 105 Pa accept N/m2 A1

(ii) candidate’s (i) + 1.0 × 105 Pa correctly evaluated with unit (correct value
2.2 × 105) B1

(iii) p1V1 = p2V2 in any form C1


1.1 cm3
OR 0.5 × candidate’s (ii)/105 correctly evaluated A1

(iv) value in (iii) too small OR volume larger o.w.t.t.e. B1 [8]

4 (a) rheostat/variable resistor AND control/vary/change/ limit


current /resistance/power/voltage across heater B1

(b) (i) P = VI in any form OR (I=) P/V C1


1.25 A A1

(ii) (R =) V/I in any form words or numbers C1


(voltage across X =) 2.4 (V) OR 6 - 3.6 (V) C1
1.92 Ω e.c.f. from (b) (i) A1

(c) battery running down/going flat/energy of battery used up OR V or e.m.f. less


OR more/increasing resistance (of heater) NOT resistance of X increases B1

(d) (i) transformer condone step-up OR potential divider/potentiometer NOT extras B1

(ii) diode OR rectifier OR L.E.D. NOT extras B1 [9]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2011


PMT

Page 5 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2011 0625 31

5 (a) (i) potential difference OR e.m.f. OR voltage ignore volts

(ii) frequency accept cycles/s ignore waves/s all 3 B1

(iii) power accept energy/s

(b) (i) case/frame/outside/base/parts that can be touched ignore metal parts B1

(ii) electric shock/electrocution/death by electricity o.w.t.t.e. ignore anything else B1


live wire touches case B1

(c) heaters in parallel with any supply


(M0 if no supply, clear break in circuit, short across supply or heater) M1
one switch controlling both heaters and one switch controlling one heater
OR one switch in series with each element A1

special case: heaters in series with supply and one switch shorting out one
resistor AND another switch in series with supply B2 [6]

6 (a) A and C B1

(b) (i) 4.2 × 1010 years B1

(ii) idea of decay OR changes proton/neutron/nucleon number


OR change into another nuclide/isotope/element/type of atom
OR emits α/β particle (ignore γ / radiation) B1

(iii) idea of insignificant change in activity during stated time up to 5 × 109 years
OR experiment time insignificant c.f. 1.4 × 1010 years OR long half life
OR long time to decay B1 [4]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2011


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Page 6 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2011 0625 31

7 (a) idea of fine ray/beam shone into (glass) block / pins appropriately placed
shown in diagram or described B1
angles i & r or C measured OR correct i & r or C marked on diagram B1
sini/sinr OR sinr/sini OR 1/sinC OR sinC B1
n = speed in air/speed in glass OR c/v = sini/sinr OR n = 1/sinC OR c/v = 1/sinC B1

(b) (i) v = fλ OR 240/1.9 × 105 OR T=d/s AND f=1/T B1


0.00126 Hz OR 0.0013 Hz NOT 0.0012 Hz
ignore more than 3 s.f. accept s-1 A1

(ii) distance = speed × time in any form accept s = 2d/t C1


(time for tremor =) 240 (s) or 4 mins also gives first C1 C1
(time for tsunami = ) 2500 (s) or 41 mins 40 s also gives first C1 C1
(warning time = ) 2260 (s) or 37 mins 40 s A1 [10]

8 (a) (i) total (internal) reflection OR reflection but no refraction/doesn’t emerge B1


angle (of incidence} > critical angle B1

(ii) initial reflection + 0 or 1 further reflection only, not at lower surface


must be straight and reach within 1cm of end B1

(b) (i) bends easily/less likely to break (ignore stronger) OR smaller pixels/
more detail/greater resolution/see smaller objects/wider field of view B1

(ii) light travels down/along/through fibres B1

(iii) light/image returns up/along/through fibres ignore cameras B1 [6]

9 (a) (i) down


down OR anti-clockwise both B1

(ii) BC is parallel to the field/doesn’t cut field or vice-versa/not at angle to field


ignore BC not perpendicular to field B1

(b) continues moving/turning NOT reverse/other direction M1


idea of moving things continue moving OR reference to Newton’s Laws
OR reference to momentum/KE/inertia NOT reference to force still acting A1

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2011


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Page 7 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2011 0625 31

(c) more turns/several coils


iron core
increase current/voltage
stronger magnet
smaller air gap any 1 B1
curved poles
more efficient brushes
poles closer
use split-ring commutator [5]

10 (a) release of electrons due to heating/high temperature/heater B1

(b) X- and Y-plates labelled B1


anodes either order, labelled, either plates/cylinders with holes B1
closed tube of sensible shape
AND cathode AND anode(s) AND X- & Y- plates, all three features in correct
order
labels not needed for last mark but if given must be correct B1

(c) change current in filament/cathode/heater IGNORE limit


OR change temperature/heat/power/energy of filament/cathode/heater
OR change cathode-anode p.d./voltage
OR change charge/voltage of grid B1

(d) (i) (I=)Q/t in any form C1


0.0019 A OR 1.9 × 10-3 A OR 1.9 mA A1

(ii) (E=) VIt OR VQ in any form, words, symbols, numbers (accept t=5s) C1
190 J OR candidate’s I × 100 000 correctly evaluated A1 [9]

11 (a) Pt OR 1.2 × 104 × 9 OR 1.2 × 104 × (11 – 2) C1


(l=) E/m OR E/0.36 OR Pt/m OR Pt/0.36 C1
3 × 105 J/kg A1

(b) (i) liquid ignore vapour/gas/water A1

(ii) move around more rapidly / faster / more KE


ignore start to vibrate etc but accept starts to vibrate faster
move further apart / spreads out (NOT molecules expand) any 2 B1
break free / evaporate / overcome bonds / overcome forces of
attraction /escape / change state (accept boils)
convection (current) [6]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2011


PMT

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS


International General Certificate of Secondary Education
* 9 9 7 8 9 4 1 3 2 5 *

PHYSICS 0625/31
Paper 3 Extended May/June 2011
1 hour 15 minutes
Candidates answer on the Question Paper.
No Additional Materials are required.

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

Write your Centre number, candidate number and name on all the work you hand in.
Write in dark blue or black pen.
You may use a pencil for any diagrams, graphs or rough working.
Do not use staples, paper clips, highlighters, glue or correction fluid.
DO NOT WRITE IN ANY BARCODES.

Answer all questions.


You may lose marks if you do not show your working or if you do not use appropriate units.
Take the weight of 1 kg to be 10 N (i.e. acceleration of free fall = 10 m / s2).

At the end of the examination, fasten all your work securely together.
The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end of each question or part question.

This document consists of 20 printed pages.

DC (LEO/DJ) 28843/5
© UCLES 2011 [Turn over
PMT

1 In a laboratory, an experiment is carried out to measure the acceleration of a trolley on a horizontal


table, when pulled by a horizontal force.

trolley
force

Fig. 1.1

The measurements are repeated for a series of different forces, with the results shown in the table
below.

force / N 4.0 6.0 10.0 14.0

acceleration 0.50 0.85 1.55 2.25


m / s2

(a) On Fig. 1.2, plot these points and draw the best straight line for your points. [2]

16

force / N

12

0
0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5
acceleration
m / s2

Fig. 1.2

© UCLES 2011 0625/31/M/J/11


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(b) The graph shows that below a certain force there is no acceleration.

(i) Find the value of this force. ............................................................................................ [1]

(ii) A force smaller than that in (b)(i) is applied to the stationary trolley. Suggest what happens
to the trolley, if anything.

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

(c) Show that the gradient of your graph is about 5.7.

gradient = ...........................................................[1]

(d) (i) State the equation that links resultant force F, mass m and acceleration a.

[1]

(ii) Use your gradient from (c) to find the mass of the trolley.

mass = ...........................................................[2]

(e) On Fig. 1.3, sketch a speed / time graph for a trolley with constant acceleration.

speed

0
0
time

Fig. 1.3
[1]

[Total: 9]

© UCLES 2011 0625/31/M/J/11 [Turn over


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2 Some builders decide to measure their personal power ratings using apparatus they already have
on site. Fig. 2.1 shows the arrangement they use.

pulley

rope

load

pulley

Fig. 2.1

(a) In the table below, list the three quantities they must measure in order to calculate one man’s
power, and the instrument they would use for each measurement.

quantity to be measured instrument used for measurement

1.

2.

3.

[3]

(b) One workman is measured as having a power of 528 W. His weight is 800 N.

He can develop the same power climbing a ladder, whose rungs are 30 cm apart.

How many rungs can he climb in 5 s?

number of rungs = ...........................................................[3]


© UCLES 2011 0625/31/M/J/11
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(c) The human body is only about 15% efficient when climbing ladders.

Calculate the actual energy used from the body of the workman in (b) when he climbs 20
rungs.

energy used = ...........................................................[2]

[Total: 8]

© UCLES 2011 0625/31/M/J/11 [Turn over


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3 During a period of hot weather, the atmospheric pressure on the pond in Fig. 3.1 remains constant.
Water evaporates from the pond, so that the depth h decreases.

force due to
air pressure

Fig. 3.1

(a) Study the diagram and state, giving your reason, what happens during this hot period to

(i) the force of the air on the surface of the pond,

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

(ii) the pressure at the bottom of the pond.

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

(b) On a certain day, the pond is 12 m deep.

(i) Water has a density of 1000 kg / m3.

Calculate the pressure at the bottom of the pond due to the water.

pressure due to the water = ...........................................................[2]

© UCLES 2011 0625/31/M/J/11


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(ii) Atmospheric pressure on that day is 1.0 × 105 Pa.

Calculate the total pressure at the bottom of the pond.

total pressure = ...........................................................[1]

(iii) A bubble of gas is released from the mud at the bottom of the pond. Its initial volume is
0.5 cm3.

Ignoring any temperature differences in the water, calculate the volume of the bubble as
it reaches the surface.

volume = ...........................................................[2]

(iv) In fact, the temperature of the water is greater at the top than at the bottom of the pond.

Comment on the bubble volume you have calculated in (b)(iii).

...........................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

[Total: 8]

© UCLES 2011 0625/31/M/J/11 [Turn over


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4 The circuit of Fig. 4.1 is set up to run a small immersion heater from a 6.0 V battery.

6.0 V

X A

heater

Fig. 4.1

(a) State the name and purpose of component X.

name .........................................................................................................................................

purpose .................................................................................................................................[1]

(b) The heater is designed to work from a 3.6 V supply. It has a power rating of 4.5 W at this
voltage.

(i) Calculate the current in the heater when it has the correct potential difference across it.

current = ...........................................................[2]

(ii) Calculate the resistance of component X if there is to be the correct potential difference
across the heater. The battery and the ammeter both have zero resistance.

resistance = ...........................................................[3]

(c) Some time after the heater is switched on, the ammeter reading is seen to have decreased.

Suggest why this happens.

...................................................................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................................................[1]

© UCLES 2011 0625/31/M/J/11


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(d) As an alternative to running the heater from a battery, it is decided to construct a circuit to
enable it to be operated from the a.c. mains supply.

Name the electrical component needed to

(i) reduce the potential difference from that of the mains supply down to a potential difference
suitable for the heater,

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

(ii) change the current from a.c. to a current which has only one direction.

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

[Total: 9]

© UCLES 2011 0625/31/M/J/11 [Turn over


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10

5 The manufacturer’s label on an electric heater is as shown in Fig. 5.1.

C.I.E. Electrical Company


Suitable for use on 110 V, 60 Hz supply
1 kW/ 2 kW
This appliance must be earthed when in use

Fig. 5.1

(a) State what electrical quantity is represented by

(i) 110 V, ............................................................................................................

(ii) 60 Hz, ............................................................................................................

(iii) 1 kW. ............................................................................................................ [1]

(b) (i) Which part of the electric heater must be earthed?

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

(ii) Explain what the hazard might be if the heater is not earthed.

...........................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[2]

(c) The heater has two 110 V heating elements, with two switches, so that either one or both
elements may be switched on.

In the space below, draw a circuit diagram showing how the heating elements and switches
are connected to the mains supply.
Use the symbol for each heating element.

[2]

[Total: 6]
© UCLES 2011 0625/31/M/J/11
PMT

11

6 (a) Six different nuclides have nucleon and proton numbers as follows:

nuclide nucleon number proton number

A 214 84

B 214 85

C 211 84

D 211 86

E 210 82

F 210 83

State which two nuclides are isotopes of the same element. .................. and ................. [1]

(b) Thorium-232 has a half-life of 1.4 × 1010 years.

At a particular instant, the activity of a sample of thorium-232 is 120 Bq.

(i) Calculate the time taken for the activity of this sample to fall to 15 Bq.

time taken ...........................................................[1]

(ii) Explain why, when the activity has become 15 Bq, much of the sample will no longer be
thorium-232.

...........................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

(iii) The sample of thorium-232 is used in an experiment in a laboratory.

Explain why its activity may be regarded as constant.

...........................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

[Total: 4]

© UCLES 2011 0625/31/M/J/11 [Turn over


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12

7 (a) The speed of light in air is known to be 3.0 × 108 m / s.

Outline how you would use a refraction experiment to deduce the speed of light in glass. You
may draw a diagram if it helps to clarify your answer.

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................................................[4]

(b) A tsunami is a giant water wave. It may be caused by an earthquake below the ocean.

Waves from a certain tsunami have a wavelength of 1.9 × 105 m and a speed of 240 m / s.

(i) Calculate the frequency of the tsunami waves.

frequency = ...........................................................[2]

© UCLES 2011 0625/31/M/J/11


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13

(ii) The shock wave from the earthquake travels at 2.5 × 103 m / s.

The centre of the earthquake is 6.0 × 105 m from the coast of a country.

Calculate how much warning of the arrival of the tsunami at the coast is given by the
earth tremor felt at the coast.

warning time = ...........................................................[4]

[Total: 10]

© UCLES 2011 0625/31/M/J/11 [Turn over


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14

8 (a) Fig. 8.1 shows a section of an optical fibre. It consists of a fibre of denser transparent material,
coated with a layer of a less dense transparent material.

less dense
material

ray
denser material

Fig. 8.1

One ray within the fibre has been started for you on Fig. 8.1.

(i) State and explain what happens to the ray already drawn, after it reaches the boundary
between the materials.

...........................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[2]

(ii) On Fig. 8.1, carefully continue the ray until it reaches the end of the section of optical
fibre. [1]

(b) Fibre-optic cables are sometimes used to carry out internal examinations on the human
stomach.

(i) Suggest one reason why the cable is made of thousands of very thin optical fibres.

...........................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

(ii) Describe briefly how the inside of the stomach is illuminated.

...........................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

© UCLES 2011 0625/31/M/J/11


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15

(iii) Describe briefly how the light from the stomach is transferred to the detecting equipment
outside the body.

...........................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

[Total: 6]

© UCLES 2011 0625/31/M/J/11 [Turn over


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16

9 A simple motor is made in a school laboratory. A coil of wire is mounted on an axle between the
poles of a horseshoe magnet, as illustrated in Fig. 9.1.

coil

B C

N S

A D

springy contacts (brushes)

+ –

battery

Fig. 9.1

(a) At the instant illustrated in Fig. 9.1, the coil ABCD is horizontal and the battery is connected
as shown.

(i) For this position, state the direction of the force on AB and the direction of the motion of
AB.

force on AB ........................................................................................................................

direction of motion of AB ...............................................................................................[1]

(ii) Explain why BC does not contribute to the turning force on the coil.

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

© UCLES 2011 0625/31/M/J/11


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17

(b) At the instant when the coil is vertical, the springy contacts do not, in fact, make contact with
the ends of the coil.

Describe and explain what happens to the coil.

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................................................[2]

(c) The motor in Fig. 9.1 does not rotate very quickly. The designer of a commercial motor is
required to produce a faster-rotating motor.

Suggest one change that could be made to increase the speed of the motor.

...................................................................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................................................[1]

[Total: 5]

© UCLES 2011 0625/31/M/J/11 [Turn over


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18

10 (a) A cathode-ray oscilloscope makes use of the process known as thermionic emission.

Describe what happens during this process.

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................................................[1]

(b) In the space below, draw a labelled diagram of a cathode-ray oscilloscope.

Include in your diagram the tube, the cathode, the accelerating anode, the focusing anode
and both X- and Y-plates. Do not attempt to show any external circuits.

[3]

(c) A cathode ray is a beam of electrons.

Suggest one way of controlling the number of electrons in the beam.

...................................................................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................................................[1]

© UCLES 2011 0625/31/M/J/11


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19

(d) One cathode-ray tube has 5000 V between the accelerating anode and the cathode.

The beam of electrons carries a total charge of 0.0095 C in 5.0 s.

Calculate

(i) the current caused by the beam,

current = ...........................................................[2]

(ii) the energy transferred by the beam in 20 s.

energy = ...........................................................[2]

[Total: 9]

Question 11 is on the next page.

© UCLES 2011 0625/31/M/J/11 [Turn over


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20

11 A mass of 0.36 kg of a certain substance is in the solid state in a well-insulated container. The
substance is heated at the rate of 1.2 × 104 J / minute.

2.0 minutes after starting the heating, the substance is all at the same temperature, and it starts to
melt.

11.0 minutes after starting the heating, the substance finishes melting and the temperature starts
to rise again.

(a) Calculate the specific latent heat of the substance.

specific latent heat = ...........................................................[3]

(b) (i) After 11 minutes of heating, when the temperature starts rising again, in which state is
the substance?

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

(ii) Describe what happens to the molecules as thermal energy is supplied to them in this
state.

...........................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[2]

[Total: 6]

Permission to reproduce items where third-party owned material protected by copyright is included has been sought and cleared where possible. Every
reasonable effort has been made by the publisher (UCLES) to trace copyright holders, but if any items requiring clearance have unwittingly been included, the
publisher will be pleased to make amends at the earliest possible opportunity.

University of Cambridge International Examinations is part of the Cambridge Assessment Group. Cambridge Assessment is the brand name of University of
Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES), which is itself a department of the University of Cambridge.

© UCLES 2011 0625/31/M/J/11


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UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS


International General Certificate of Secondary Education

MARK SCHEME for the May/June 2011 question paper


for the guidance of teachers

0625 PHYSICS
0625/32 Paper 3 (Extended Theory), maximum raw mark 80

This mark scheme is published as an aid to teachers and candidates, to indicate the requirements of
the examination. It shows the basis on which Examiners were instructed to award marks. It does not
indicate the details of the discussions that took place at an Examiners’ meeting before marking began,
which would have considered the acceptability of alternative answers.

Mark schemes must be read in conjunction with the question papers and the report on the
examination.

• Cambridge will not enter into discussions or correspondence in connection with these mark schemes.

Cambridge is publishing the mark schemes for the May/June 2011 question papers for most IGCSE,
GCE Advanced Level and Advanced Subsidiary Level syllabuses and some Ordinary Level
syllabuses.
PMT

Page 2 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2011 0625 32

Notes about Mark Scheme Symbols and Other Matters

B marks are independent marks, which do not depend on any other marks. For a B mark to be
scored, the point to which it refers must actually be seen in the candidate’s answer.

M marks are method marks upon which accuracy marks (A marks) later depend. For an M mark
to be scored, the point to which it refers must be seen in a candidate’s answer. If a
candidate fails to score a particular M mark, then none of the dependent A marks can be
scored.

C marks are compensatory method marks which can be scored even if the points to which they
refer are not written down by the candidate, provided subsequent working gives
evidence that they must have known it e.g. if an equation carries a C mark and the
candidate does not write down the actual equation but does correct working which
shows he knew the equation, then the C mark is scored.

A marks are accuracy or answer marks which either depend on an M mark, or which are one of
the ways which allow a C mark to be scored.

c.a.o. means “correct answer only”.

e.c.f. means “error carried forward”. This indicates that if a candidate has made an earlier
mistake and has carried his incorrect value forward to subsequent stages of working, he
may be given marks indicated by e.c.f. provided his subsequent working is correct,
bearing in mind his earlier mistake. This prevents a candidate being penalised more
than once for a particular mistake, but only applies to marks annotated “e.c.f.”

e.e.o.o. means “each error or omission”.

brackets ( ) around words or units in the mark scheme are intended to indicate wording used to
clarify the mark scheme, but the marks do not depend on seeing the words or units in
brackets e.g. 10 (J) means that the mark is scored for 10, regardless of the unit given.

underlining indicates that this must be seen in the answer offered, or something very similar.
OR/or indicates alternative answers, any one of which is satisfactory for scoring the marks.
Significant Answers are acceptable to any number of significant figures ≥ 2, except if specified
figures otherwise, or if only 1 sig. fig. is appropriate.
Units Deduct one mark for each incorrect or missing unit from an answer that would
otherwise gain all the marks available for that answer: maximum 1 per question.
No deduction is incurred if the unit is missing from the final answer but is shown correctly
in the working.

Fractions These are only acceptable where specified.


Extras Ignore extras in answers if they are irrelevant; if they contradict an otherwise correct
response or are forbidden by mark scheme, use right + wrong = 0
Ignore Indicates that something which is not correct is disregarded and does not cause a right
plus wrong penalty.
Not/NOT Indicates that an incorrect answer is not to be disregarded, but cancels another
otherwise correct alternative offered by the candidate i.e. right plus wrong penalty
applies.

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2011


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Page 3 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2011 0625 32

1 (a) scalar, vector, scalar, vector, scalar B3

(b) (i) (average speed) = distance / time OR 18/1.2 C1


= 15 m / s A1

(ii) (time =) (total) distance / speed OR 21/15 C1


= 1.4 s A1

(iii) air resistance / friction / force opposing motion B1

(iv) velocity changes because direction changes B1 [9]

2 (a) kinetic energy (of the package / belt / motor)


heat / thermal / internal energy / work done against friction
sound energy B2

(b) mgh OR 36 × 10 × 2.4 C1


= 864 J OR N m A1

(c) P = E/t in any form: words, symbols or numbers


OR E/t OR 864 / 4.4 C1
= 196 W OR J / s A1

(d) P = E/t in any form, words or symbols


OR mass is increased AND power is constant B1

increase in potential energy of mass is greater


OR work done / energy used (to raise mass) is greater B1

speed reduced / time taken is longer B1 [9]

3 (a) force AND


perpendicular distance (of force) from the point. B1

(b) (i) downward arrow at centre of bar B1

(ii) 0.5(0) m / 50 cm B1

(iii) 40 × 1.2 OR 48 seen anywhere C1


(+) 30 × 0.5 0R 15 seen anywhere C1
= 63 N m A1

(iv) F × 0.2 = 63 C1
F = 63/0.2 = 315 N A1

(v) make bar / B longer


OR move pivot / stone to the left
OR increase distance between force and pivot (by moving pivot to left)
OR increase mass of the bar / B B1 [9]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2011


PMT

Page 4 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2011 0625 32

4 (a) 330 J of heat / energy required to change 1 g of ice to water at constant


temperature / at melting point / at 0 degrees C B1

(b) (i) (B to C ice is) changing to water / melting / changing to liquid / changing
state B1

(D to E water is) changing to steam / vaporising / boiling / changing to gas B1

(ii) Sp. latent of vaporisation of water is greater than sp. latent of fusion of ice B1

(iii) s.h.c. of ice is less than s.h.c. of water B1

more heat required to raise temperature of water


OR rate of temperature rise of water is slower
OR temperature rise of water takes longer B1 [6]

5 (a) (i) (Molecules) move randomly / in random directions


(Molecules) have high speeds
(Molecules) collide with each other / with walls B1

(ii) (Force is caused by) collision (and rebound) of molecules (with the walls)
o.w.t.t.e C1

(iii) p = F/A OR (force =) pA OR 300 × 0.12 C1


OR 300 000 × 0.12
OR any other recognisable pressure × area
= 36 kN / 36 000 N A1

(b) (i) p1V1 = p2V2 / 300 × 0.1 (× 0.12) = p2 × 0.05 (× 0.12)


OR if V is halved, p is doubled OR vice versa C1

p2 = 600 kPa A1

(ii) (molecules) collide with walls more often o.w.t.t.e.


OR more collisions with walls per second or per unit time o.w.t.t.e B1 [7]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2011


PMT

Page 5 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2011 0625 32

6 (a) (i) shake end of rope (e.g. from side to side / up and down) B1

(ii) distance from crest to crest / trough to trough / any 2 adjacent points in
phase, labelled λ B1

distance from central horizontal line to peak or trough, labelled A B1

(iii) increase rate of shaking end of rope (to increase frequency) / shake faster /
move more quickly B1

(b) in shallow water wavelength is smaller OR waves / lines are closer together B1
frequency is constant B1
(slower because) speed = frequency × wavelength B1
OR
lines / waves closer together in shallow water / waves in shallow water lag behind B1
smaller distance travelled in same time by waves in shallow water o.w.t.t.e. B1
(slower because) speed = distance / time B1 [7]

7 (a) distance from (principal) focus/focal point to (the centre of) the lens B1

(b) (i) image can be formed on a screen


OR is formed by rays of light meeting
OR is formed on the opposite side of the lens from the object B1

(ii) 1. straight line ray from point A to point B


AND lens at intersection of ray and axis. B1
2. ray from A parallel to axis, bent at lens to pass through B. F at
intersection of ray and axis.
OR Ray from point A through nearer focus, labelled F, to lens, bent at
lens, then parallel to axis, to point B B1
3. any third ray from A to B, bent at lens B1

(iii) (distance from image to lens is) reduced B1


(image is) smaller B1 [7]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2011


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Page 6 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2011 0625 32

8 (a) energy supplied / work done (per unit charge) to B1


drive charge round a (complete) circuit B1
OR
p.d. / voltage across battery / power source B1

(b) (i) P = IV OR (I =) P/V OR (I =) 60/240 C1


= 0.25 A OR ¼ A A1

(ii) I = V/R OR other version OR (R = )V/I C1


OR (R = )240/0.25
OR P=V2/R or other version e.g. (R=) V2/P
OR (R=) 2402/60
R= 960 Ω A1

(c) current in series circuit = 240 / 972 =0.247 A B1

current suits both bulbs, (so both light up so Y is correct) B1


OR
p.d. across bulb A = 240 × (960/972) = 237 V
p.d. across bulb B = 240 × 12/972 = 2.96 V B1
p.d. suits both bulbs, (so both light up so Y correct) B1 [8]

9 (a) (i) arrow pointing vertically downwards B1

(ii) magnetic fields due to current and magnet interact with each other
OR current produces magnetic field.
OR wire contains moving charges which experience a force in a magnetic
field B1

(iii) direction of force unchanged B1

(b) arrow at P pointing down the page B1


curved path B1 [5]

10 (a) correct symbol for OR gate

B1

(b) output is low / zero / off if both inputs are low / zero / off B1

output is high / one / on if one input is high / one / on


BUT this mark is not scored if candidate puts output low when both inputs high B1

(c) switches in doors are on if doors are open or vice versa B1


(switches in) doors provide inputs (to gate) B1
output (of gate) is connected to buzzer / warning light / alarm B1 [6]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2011


PMT

Page 7 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2011 0625 32

11 (a) (i) proton B1

(ii) proton and neutron B1

(b) number of protons = 47 B1


number of neutrons = 60 B1

(c) (i) 8 hrs +/– 0.25 hrs B1

(ii) first point plotted is half the count-rate of a point on the curve, and 8 hours
after that point (ecf from (c)(i) ) B1

second point plotted same as above or with respect to first point plotted B1

possible points include:


16 hrs, 80 counts/s
24 hrs, 40 counts/s
13.5 hrs, 100 counts/s
21.5 hrs, 50 counts/s
16.5 hrs, 75 counts/s [7]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2011


PMT

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS


International General Certificate of Secondary Education
* 7 5 3 0 4 6 5 1 9 9 *

PHYSICS 0625/32
Paper 3 Extended May/June 2011
1 hour 15 minutes
Candidates answer on the Question Paper.
No Additional Materials are required.

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

Write your Centre number, candidate number and name on all the work you hand in.
Write in dark blue or black pen.
You may use a soft pencil for any diagrams, graphs or rough working.
Do not use staples, paper clips, highlighters, glue or correction fluid.
DO NOT WRITE IN ANY BARCODES.

Answer all questions.


You may lose marks if you do not show your working or if you do not use appropriate units.
Take the weight of 1 kg to be 10 N (i.e. acceleration of free fall = 10 m / s2).

At the end of the examination, fasten all your work securely together.
The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end of each question or part question.

This document consists of 16 printed pages.

DC (LEO/DJ) 28932/5
© UCLES 2010 [Turn over
PMT

1 (a) Complete the table below to identify the physical quantities as scalars or vectors.

physical quantity scalar or vector

speed

velocity

distance

force

kinetic energy
[3]

(b) Fig. 1.1 shows the path of a football as it is kicked along the ground between three players.
The distances between the players are shown on Fig. 1.1.

A
18 m

21 m

Fig. 1.1

The ball takes 1.2 s to travel from player A to player B.

(i) Calculate the average speed of the ball between A and B.

average speed = ...........................................................[2]

(ii) Player B kicks the ball to player C.


It travels with the same average speed.
Calculate the time taken for the ball to travel from B to C.

time = ...........................................................[2]

© UCLES 2011 0625/32/M/J/11


PMT

(iii) Suggest why the speed of the ball might change during its motion from A to B.

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

(iv) Discuss whether the average velocities, from A to B and from B to C, are the same.

...........................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

[Total: 9]

© UCLES 2011 0625/32/M/J/11 [Turn over


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2 Fig. 2.1 shows a conveyor belt transporting a package to a raised platform. The belt is driven by a
motor.

conveyor belt
package

motor

Fig. 2.1

(a) State three types of energy, other than gravitational potential energy, into which the electrical
energy supplied to the motor is converted.

1. ...............................................................................................................................................

2. ...............................................................................................................................................

3. ...........................................................................................................................................[2]

(b) The mass of the package is 36 kg. Calculate the increase in the gravitational potential energy
(p.e.) of the package when it is raised through a vertical height of 2.4 m.

increase in p.e. = ...........................................................[2]

(c) The package is raised through the vertical height of 2.4 m in 4.4 s. Calculate the power needed
to raise the package.

power = .......................................................... [2]

(d) Assume that the power available to raise packages is constant. A package of mass greater
than 36 kg is raised through the same height. Suggest and explain the effect of this increase
in mass on the operation of the belt.

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................................................[3]

[Total: 9]

© UCLES 2011 0625/32/M/J/11


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3 (a) Complete the following statement:

The moment of a force about a point is ....................................................................................

multiplied by ..........................................................................................................................[1]

(b) Fig. 3.1 shows a uniform iron bar B of weight 30 N and length 1.40 m. The bar is being used to
lift one edge of a concrete slab S. A stone, placed 0.20 m from one end of B, acts as a pivot.
A force of 40 N pushing down at the other end of B is just enough to lift the slab and hold it as
shown.

1.40 m

0.20 m force 40 N
concrete slab iron bar B
S
stone

Fig. 3.1

(i) On Fig. 3.1, draw an arrow to show the weight of bar B acting from its centre of mass. [1]

(ii) State the distance d of the centre of mass of bar B from the pivot.

d = ...........................................................[1]

(iii) Calculate the total clockwise moment, about the pivot, of the forces acting on bar B.

total clockwise moment = ...........................................................[3]

(iv) Calculate the downward force which the slab S exerts on the end of bar B.

force = ...........................................................[2]

(v) Suggest a change to the arrangement in Fig. 3.1 that would reduce the force required to
lift the slab.

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

[Total: 9]

© UCLES 2011 0625/32/M/J/11 [Turn over


PMT

4 Use the information in the table when answering this question.

specific heat capacity of ice 2.0 J / (g °C)

specific heat capacity of water 4.2 J / (g °C)

specific latent heat of fusion of ice 330 J / g

specific latent heat of vaporisation of water 2260 J / g

(a) Explain what is meant by the statement: ‘the specific latent heat of fusion of ice is 330 J / g’.

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................................................[1]

(b) A block of ice is taken from a freezer at –25 °C, placed in a metal container, and heated by a
source of constant power.

The graph in Fig. 4.1 shows how the temperature of the contents of the container changes
with time. At point E on the graph the container is empty.

D E
100
temperature / °C
75

50

25
B C
0
time
A
–25

Fig. 4.1

(i) State what is taking place in the regions of the graph from B to C, and from D to E.

B to C ................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

D to E ................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[2]

(ii) Use the information in the table to explain why the line DE is longer than the line BC.

...........................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]
© UCLES 2011 0625/32/M/J/11
PMT

(iii) Use the information in the table to explain why the graph is steeper from A to B than from
C to D.

...........................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[2]

[Total: 6]

© UCLES 2011 0625/32/M/J/11 [Turn over


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5 Fig. 5.1 shows a gas contained in a cylinder enclosed by a piston.

piston pressure gauge

gas cylinder

100 cm

Fig. 5.1

At first, the length of cylinder containing the gas is 100 cm. The pressure of the gas, shown by the
pressure gauge, is 300 kPa. The area of cross-section of the cylinder is 0.12 m2.

(a) (i) Describe the motion of the molecules of the gas.

...........................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

(ii) Explain how the molecules exert a force on the walls of the cylinder.

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

(iii) Calculate the force exerted by the gas on the piston.

force = ...........................................................[2]

(b) The piston is moved so that the new length of cylinder occupied by the gas is 50 cm. The
temperature of the gas is unchanged.

(i) Calculate the new pressure of the gas.

pressure = ...........................................................[2]

© UCLES 2011 0625/32/M/J/11


PMT

(ii) Explain, in terms of the behaviour of the molecules, why the pressure has changed.

...........................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

[Total: 7]

© UCLES 2011 0625/32/M/J/11 [Turn over


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10

6 (a) (i) A long rope, fixed at one end, is being used by a student to demonstrate transverse
waves.
State what the student does to the rope to produce the transverse wave.

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

(ii) Fig. 6.1 shows a section of the rope when the transverse wave is present.

Fig. 6.1

On Fig. 6.1, show

1. a distance, labelled λ, corresponding to the wavelength of the wave,

2. a distance, labelled A, corresponding to the amplitude of the wave. [2]

(iii) Suggest what the student could do to reduce the wavelength of the wave.

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

© UCLES 2011 0625/32/M/J/11


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11

(b) The diagram in Fig. 6.2 represents waves on the surface of water in a ripple tank. The waves
are travelling from deep water across a boundary into shallow water.

deep water shallow


water

Fig. 6.2

Explain how the diagram shows that water waves travel more slowly in shallow water than in
deep water.

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

.............................................................................................................................................. [3]

[Total: 7]

© UCLES 2011 0625/32/M/J/11 [Turn over


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12

7 (a) What is meant by the focal length of a converging lens?

...................................................................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................................................[1]

(b) An object is placed in front of a converging lens. A real image is formed, as shown in Fig. 7.1.
The converging lens is not shown.

object

image
B

Fig. 7.1

(i) Explain what is meant by a real image.

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

(ii) Rays of light from point A on the object form point B on the image.

On Fig. 6.1, draw

1. a ray to find the position of the converging lens, showing the lens as a vertical straight
line in this position,

2. a ray to find the position of a principal focus of the lens, marking this position F,

3. a third possible ray from A to B. [3]

(iii) The distance between the object and the lens is increased. State any changes which
take place in

1. the distance of the image from the lens,

...........................................................................................................................................

2. the size of the image.

.......................................................................................................................................[2]

[Total: 7]

© UCLES 2011 0625/32/M/J/11


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13

8 (a) What is meant by the electromotive force (e.m.f.) of an electric power supply?

...................................................................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................................................[2]

(b) When connected to a 240 V supply, a desk lamp has a power rating of 60 W.

Calculate

(i) the current in the lamp,

current = ...........................................................[2]

(ii) the resistance of the lamp’s filament.

resistance = ...........................................................[2]

(c) A torch lamp is normally connected to a 3.0 V battery and carries a current of 0.25 A. The
resistance of its filament is 12 Ω.

The desk lamp in (b) and the torch lamp are connected in series.

Students X and Y plan to connect the lamp combination to a 240 V supply.

Student X says that the filament of the torch lamp will melt and the circuit will no longer work.
Student Y says that both lamps will light up and stay on.

Show, with a suitable calculation, whether student X or student Y is correct.

...................................................................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................................................[2]

[Total: 8]
© UCLES 2011 0625/32/M/J/11 [Turn over
PMT

14

9 (a) Fig. 9.1 shows a wire, held between the poles of a magnet, carrying a current in the direction
of the arrow.

current

Fig. 9.1

(i) On Fig. 9.1, draw an arrow, labelled F, to show the direction of the force acting on the
wire. [1]

(ii) Explain why the force F acts on the wire.

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

(iii) The directions of the current and the magnetic field are both reversed. State the effect on
the force F.

...................................................................................................................................... [1]

(b) Fig. 9.2 shows a negatively charged particle travelling, in a vacuum, into a region where a
magnetic field acts. The magnetic field, shown by the crosses, is acting into the paper.

– P

Fig. 9.2

(i) Draw an arrow, labelled F, to show the direction of the force on the particle at point P
where it enters the field.

(ii) Describe the path of the particle as it continues to move through the magnetic field.

.......................................................................................................................................[2]

[Total: 5]

© UCLES 2011 0625/32/M/J/11


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15

10 (a) In the space below, draw the symbol for an OR gate.

[1]

(b) Describe the action of an OR gate in terms of its inputs and outputs.

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................................................[2]

(c) A car manufacturer wishes to install an alarm system in a 2-door car to inform the driver if
either door is not properly closed. An OR gate is to be used in the construction of this system.
Describe suitable input and output arrangements for the gate.

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................................................[3]

[Total: 6]

Question 11 is on the next page.

© UCLES 2011 0625/32/M/J/11 [Turn over


PMT

16

11 (a) An atom consists of a nucleus made up of protons and neutrons, surrounded by orbiting
electrons.

(i) Which of these particles has a positive charge? .............................[1]

(ii) Which two of these particles have almost equal mass?

............................. and ............................. [1]


107
(b) A silver nucleus is denoted by 47 Ag. State the number of protons and the number of neutrons
in this nucleus.

number of protons = ................. number of neutrons = ................. [2]

(c) The graph in Fig. 11.1 shows part of the decay curve of a radioactive nuclide. The count rate
is plotted against time.

300
count rate
counts / s

200

100

0
0 5 10 15 20 25 30
time / hours

Fig. 11.1

(i) Use the graph to find the half-life of this nuclide.

half-life = ...............................................[1]

(ii) Plot two more points on Fig. 11.1 at times greater than 10 hours. Use a dot in a circle to
indicate each point. [2]

[Total: 7]

Permission to reproduce items where third-party owned material protected by copyright is included has been sought and cleared where possible. Every
reasonable effort has been made by the publisher (UCLES) to trace copyright holders, but if any items requiring clearance have unwittingly been included, the
publisher will be pleased to make amends at the earliest possible opportunity.

University of Cambridge International Examinations is part of the Cambridge Assessment Group. Cambridge Assessment is the brand name of University of
Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES), which is itself a department of the University of Cambridge.

© UCLES 2011 0625/32/M/J/11


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UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS


International General Certificate of Secondary Education

MARK SCHEME for the May/June 2011 question paper


for the guidance of teachers

0625 PHYSICS
0625/33 Paper 3 (Extended Theory), maximum raw mark 80

This mark scheme is published as an aid to teachers and candidates, to indicate the requirements of
the examination. It shows the basis on which Examiners were instructed to award marks. It does not
indicate the details of the discussions that took place at an Examiners’ meeting before marking began,
which would have considered the acceptability of alternative answers.

Mark schemes must be read in conjunction with the question papers and the report on the
examination.

• Cambridge will not enter into discussions or correspondence in connection with these mark schemes.

Cambridge is publishing the mark schemes for the May/June 2011 question papers for most IGCSE,
GCE Advanced Level and Advanced Subsidiary Level syllabuses and some Ordinary Level
syllabuses.
PMT

Page 2 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2011 0625 33

Notes about Mark Scheme Symbols and Other Matters

B marks are independent marks, which do not depend on any other marks. For a B mark to be
scored, the point to which it refers must actually be seen in the candidate’s answer.

M marks are method marks upon which accuracy marks (A marks) later depend. For an M mark
to be scored, the point to which it refers must be seen in a candidate’s answer. If a
candidate fails to score a particular M mark, then none of the dependent A marks can be
scored.

C marks are compensatory method marks which can be scored even if the points to which they
refer are not written down by the candidate, provided subsequent working gives
evidence that they must have known it e.g. if an equation carries a C mark and the
candidate does not write down the actual equation but does correct working which
shows he knew the equation, then the C mark is scored.

A marks are accuracy or answer marks which either depend on an M mark, or which are one of
the ways which allow a C mark to be scored.

c.a.o. means “correct answer only”.

e.c.f. means “error carried forward”. This indicates that if a candidate has made an earlier
mistake and has carried his incorrect value forward to subsequent stages of working, he
may be given marks indicated by e.c.f. provided his subsequent working is correct,
bearing in mind his earlier mistake. This prevents a candidate being penalised more
than once for a particular mistake, but only applies to marks annotated “e.c.f.”

e.e.o.o. means “each error or omission”.

brackets ( ) around words or units in the mark scheme are intended to indicate wording used to
clarify the mark scheme, but the marks do not depend on seeing the words or units in
brackets e.g. 10 (J) means that the mark is scored for 10, regardless of the unit given.

underlining indicates that this must be seen in the answer offered, or something very similar.
OR/or indicates alternative answers, any one of which is satisfactory for scoring the marks.
Significant Answers are acceptable to any number of significant figures ≥ 2, except if specified
figures otherwise, or if only 1 sig. fig. is appropriate.
Units Deduct one mark for each incorrect or missing unit from an answer that would
otherwise gain all the marks available for that answer: maximum 1 per question.
No deduction is incurred if the unit is missing from the final answer but is shown correctly
in the working.

Fractions These are only acceptable where specified.


Extras Ignore extras in answers if they are irrelevant; if they contradict an otherwise correct
response or are forbidden by mark scheme, use right + wrong = 0
Ignore Indicates that something which is not correct is disregarded and does not cause a right
plus wrong penalty.
Not/NOT Indicates that an incorrect answer is not to be disregarded, but cancels another
otherwise correct alternative offered by the candidate i.e. right plus wrong penalty
applies.

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2011


PMT

Page 3 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2011 0625 33

1 (a) scalar, vector, scalar, vector, scalar B3

(b) (i) (average speed) = distance / time OR 18/1.2 C1


= 15 m / s A1

(ii) (time =) (total) distance / speed OR 21/15 C1


= 1.4 s A1

(iii) air resistance / friction / force opposing motion B1

(iv) velocity changes because direction changes B1 [9]

2 (a) kinetic energy (of the package / belt / motor)


heat / thermal / internal energy / work done against friction
sound energy B2

(b) mgh OR 36 × 10 × 2.4 C1


= 864 J OR N m A1

(c) P = E/t in any form: words, symbols or numbers


OR E/t OR 864 / 4.4 C1
= 196 W OR J / s A1

(d) P = E/t in any form, words or symbols


OR mass is increased AND power is constant B1

increase in potential energy of mass is greater


OR work done / energy used (to raise mass) is greater B1

speed reduced / time taken is longer B1 [9]

3 (a) force AND


perpendicular distance (of force) from the point. B1

(b) (i) downward arrow at centre of bar B1

(ii) 0.5(0) m / 50 cm B1

(iii) 40 × 1.2 OR 48 seen anywhere C1


(+) 30 × 0.5 0R 15 seen anywhere C1
= 63 N m A1

(iv) F × 0.2 = 63 C1
F = 63/0.2 = 315 N A1

(v) make bar / B longer


OR move pivot / stone to the left
OR increase distance between force and pivot (by moving pivot to left)
OR increase mass of the bar / B B1 [9]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2011


PMT

Page 4 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2011 0625 33

4 (a) 330 J of heat / energy required to change 1 g of ice to water at constant


temperature / at melting point / at 0 degrees C B1

(b) (i) (B to C ice is) changing to water / melting / changing to liquid / changing
state B1

(D to E water is) changing to steam / vaporising / boiling / changing to gas B1

(ii) Sp. latent of vaporisation of water is greater than sp. latent of fusion of ice B1

(iii) s.h.c. of ice is less than s.h.c. of water B1

more heat required to raise temperature of water


OR rate of temperature rise of water is slower
OR temperature rise of water takes longer B1 [6]

5 (a) (i) (Molecules) move randomly / in random directions


(Molecules) have high speeds
(Molecules) collide with each other / with walls B1

(ii) (Force is caused by) collision (and rebound) of molecules (with the walls)
o.w.t.t.e C1

(iii) p = F/A OR (force =) pA OR 300 × 0.12 C1


OR 300 000 × 0.12
OR any other recognisable pressure × area
= 36 kN / 36 000 N A1

(b) (i) p1V1 = p2V2 / 300 × 0.1 (× 0.12) = p2 × 0.05 (× 0.12)


OR if V is halved, p is doubled OR vice versa C1

p2 = 600 kPa A1

(ii) (molecules) collide with walls more often o.w.t.t.e.


OR more collisions with walls per second or per unit time o.w.t.t.e B1 [7]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2011


PMT

Page 5 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2011 0625 33

6 (a) (i) shake end of rope (e.g. from side to side / up and down) B1

(ii) distance from crest to crest / trough to trough / any 2 adjacent points in
phase, labelled λ B1

distance from central horizontal line to peak or trough, labelled A B1

(iii) increase rate of shaking end of rope (to increase frequency) / shake faster /
move more quickly B1

(b) in shallow water wavelength is smaller OR waves / lines are closer together B1
frequency is constant B1
(slower because) speed = frequency × wavelength B1
OR
lines / waves closer together in shallow water / waves in shallow water lag behind B1
smaller distance travelled in same time by waves in shallow water o.w.t.t.e. B1
(slower because) speed = distance / time B1 [7]

7 (a) distance from (principal) focus/focal point to (the centre of) the lens B1

(b) (i) image can be formed on a screen


OR is formed by rays of light meeting
OR is formed on the opposite side of the lens from the object B1

(ii) 1. straight line ray from point A to point B


AND lens at intersection of ray and axis. B1
2. ray from A parallel to axis, bent at lens to pass through B. F at
intersection of ray and axis.
OR Ray from point A through nearer focus, labelled F, to lens, bent at
lens, then parallel to axis, to point B B1
3. any third ray from A to B, bent at lens B1

(iii) (distance from image to lens is) reduced B1


(image is) smaller B1 [7]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2011


PMT

Page 6 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2011 0625 33

8 (a) energy supplied / work done (per unit charge) to B1


drive charge round a (complete) circuit B1
OR
p.d. / voltage across battery / power source B1

(b) (i) P = IV OR (I =) P/V OR (I =) 60/240 C1


= 0.25 A OR ¼ A A1

(ii) I = V/R OR other version OR (R = )V/I C1


OR (R = )240/0.25
OR P=V2/R or other version e.g. (R=) V2/P
OR (R=) 2402/60
R= 960 Ω A1

(c) current in series circuit = 240 / 972 =0.247 A B1

current suits both bulbs, (so both light up so Y is correct) B1


OR
p.d. across bulb A = 240 × (960/972) = 237 V
p.d. across bulb B = 240 × 12/972 = 2.96 V B1
p.d. suits both bulbs, (so both light up so Y correct) B1 [8]

9 (a) (i) arrow pointing vertically downwards B1

(ii) magnetic fields due to current and magnet interact with each other
OR current produces magnetic field.
OR wire contains moving charges which experience a force in a magnetic
field B1

(iii) direction of force unchanged B1

(b) arrow at P pointing down the page B1


curved path B1 [5]

10 (a) correct symbol for OR gate

B1

(b) output is low / zero / off if both inputs are low / zero / off B1

output is high / one / on if one input is high / one / on


BUT this mark is not scored if candidate puts output low when both inputs high B1

(c) switches in doors are on if doors are open or vice versa B1


(switches in) doors provide inputs (to gate) B1
output (of gate) is connected to buzzer / warning light / alarm B1 [6]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2011


PMT

Page 7 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2011 0625 33

11 (a) (i) proton B1

(ii) proton and neutron B1

(b) number of protons = 47 B1


number of neutrons = 60 B1

(c) (i) 8 hrs +/– 0.25 hrs B1

(ii) first point plotted is half the count-rate of a point on the curve, and 8 hours
after that point (ecf from (c)(i) ) B1

second point plotted same as above or with respect to first point plotted B1

possible points include:


16 hrs, 80 counts/s
24 hrs, 40 counts/s
13.5 hrs, 100 counts/s
21.5 hrs, 50 counts/s
16.5 hrs, 75 counts/s [7]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2011


PMT

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS


International General Certificate of Secondary Education
* 1 8 0 3 4 2 4 2 5 4 *

PHYSICS 0625/33
Paper 3 Extended May/June 2011
1 hour 15 minutes
Candidates answer on the Question Paper.
No Additional Materials are required.

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

Write your Centre number, candidate number and name on all the work you hand in.
Write in dark blue or black pen.
You may use a soft pencil for any diagrams, graphs or rough working.
Do not use staples, paper clips, highlighters, glue or correction fluid.
DO NOT WRITE IN ANY BARCODES.

Answer all questions.


You may lose marks if you do not show your working or if you do not use appropriate units.
Take the weight of 1 kg to be 10 N (i.e. acceleration of free fall = 10 m / s2).

At the end of the examination, fasten all your work securely together.
The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end of each question or part question.

This document consists of 16 printed pages.

DC (NH/DJ) 43389
© UCLES 2011 [Turn over
PMT

1 (a) Complete the table below to identify the physical quantities as scalars or vectors.

physical quantity scalar or vector

speed

velocity

distance

force

kinetic energy
[3]

(b) Fig. 1.1 shows the path of a football as it is kicked along the ground between three players.
The distances between the players are shown on Fig. 1.1.

A
18 m

21 m

Fig. 1.1

The ball takes 1.2 s to travel from player A to player B.

(i) Calculate the average speed of the ball between A and B.

average speed = ...........................................................[2]

(ii) Player B kicks the ball to player C.


It travels with the same average speed.
Calculate the time taken for the ball to travel from B to C.

time = ...........................................................[2]

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(iii) Suggest why the speed of the ball might change during its motion from A to B.

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

(iv) Discuss whether the average velocities, from A to B and from B to C, are the same.

...........................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

[Total: 9]

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2 Fig. 2.1 shows a conveyor belt transporting a package to a raised platform. The belt is driven by a
motor.

conveyor belt
package

motor

Fig. 2.1

(a) State three types of energy, other than gravitational potential energy, into which the electrical
energy supplied to the motor is converted.

1. ...............................................................................................................................................

2. ...............................................................................................................................................

3. ...........................................................................................................................................[2]

(b) The mass of the package is 36 kg. Calculate the increase in the gravitational potential energy
(p.e.) of the package when it is raised through a vertical height of 2.4 m.

increase in p.e. = ...........................................................[2]

(c) The package is raised through the vertical height of 2.4 m in 4.4 s. Calculate the power needed
to raise the package.

power = .......................................................... [2]

(d) Assume that the power available to raise packages is constant. A package of mass greater
than 36 kg is raised through the same height. Suggest and explain the effect of this increase
in mass on the operation of the belt.

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................................................[3]

[Total: 9]

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3 (a) Complete the following statement:

The moment of a force about a point is ....................................................................................

multiplied by ..........................................................................................................................[1]

(b) Fig. 3.1 shows a uniform iron bar B of weight 30 N and length 1.40 m. The bar is being used to
lift one edge of a concrete slab S. A stone, placed 0.20 m from one end of B, acts as a pivot.
A force of 40 N pushing down at the other end of B is just enough to lift the slab and hold it as
shown.

1.40 m

0.20 m force 40 N
concrete slab iron bar B
S
stone

Fig. 3.1

(i) On Fig. 3.1, draw an arrow to show the weight of bar B acting from its centre of mass. [1]

(ii) State the distance d of the centre of mass of bar B from the pivot.

d = ...........................................................[1]

(iii) Calculate the total clockwise moment, about the pivot, of the forces acting on bar B.

total clockwise moment = ...........................................................[3]

(iv) Calculate the downward force which the slab S exerts on the end of bar B.

force = ...........................................................[2]

(v) Suggest a change to the arrangement in Fig. 3.1 that would reduce the force required to
lift the slab.

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

[Total: 9]

© UCLES 2011 0625/33/M/J/11 [Turn over


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4 Use the information in the table when answering this question.

specific heat capacity of ice 2.0 J / (g °C)

specific heat capacity of water 4.2 J / (g °C)

specific latent heat of fusion of ice 330 J / g

specific latent heat of vaporisation of water 2260 J / g

(a) Explain what is meant by the statement: ‘the specific latent heat of fusion of ice is 330 J / g’.

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................................................[1]

(b) A block of ice is taken from a freezer at –25 °C, placed in a metal container, and heated by a
source of constant power.

The graph in Fig. 4.1 shows how the temperature of the contents of the container changes
with time. At point E on the graph the container is empty.

D E
100
temperature / °C
75

50

25
B C
0
time
A
–25

Fig. 4.1

(i) State what is taking place in the regions of the graph from B to C, and from D to E.

B to C ................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

D to E ................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[2]

(ii) Use the information in the table to explain why the line DE is longer than the line BC.

...........................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]
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(iii) Use the information in the table to explain why the graph is steeper from A to B than from
C to D.

...........................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[2]

[Total: 6]

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5 Fig. 5.1 shows a gas contained in a cylinder enclosed by a piston.

piston pressure gauge

gas cylinder

100 cm

Fig. 5.1

At first, the length of cylinder containing the gas is 100 cm. The pressure of the gas, shown by the
pressure gauge, is 300 kPa. The area of cross-section of the cylinder is 0.12 m2.

(a) (i) Describe the motion of the molecules of the gas.

...........................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

(ii) Explain how the molecules exert a force on the walls of the cylinder.

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

(iii) Calculate the force exerted by the gas on the piston.

force = ...........................................................[2]

(b) The piston is moved so that the new length of cylinder occupied by the gas is 50 cm. The
temperature of the gas is unchanged.

(i) Calculate the new pressure of the gas.

pressure = ...........................................................[2]

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(ii) Explain, in terms of the behaviour of the molecules, why the pressure has changed.

...........................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

[Total: 7]

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10

6 (a) (i) A long rope, fixed at one end, is being used by a student to demonstrate transverse
waves.
State what the student does to the rope to produce the transverse wave.

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

(ii) Fig. 6.1 shows a section of the rope when the transverse wave is present.

Fig. 6.1

On Fig. 6.1, show

1. a distance, labelled λ, corresponding to the wavelength of the wave,

2. a distance, labelled A, corresponding to the amplitude of the wave. [2]

(iii) Suggest what the student could do to reduce the wavelength of the wave.

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

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11

(b) The diagram in Fig. 6.2 represents waves on the surface of water in a ripple tank. The waves
are travelling from deep water across a boundary into shallow water.

deep water shallow


water

Fig. 6.2

Explain how the diagram shows that water waves travel more slowly in shallow water than in
deep water.

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

.............................................................................................................................................. [3]

[Total: 7]

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12

7 (a) What is meant by the focal length of a converging lens?

...................................................................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................................................[1]

(b) An object is placed in front of a converging lens. A real image is formed, as shown in Fig. 7.1.
The converging lens is not shown.

object

image
B

Fig. 7.1

(i) Explain what is meant by a real image.

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

(ii) Rays of light from point A on the object form point B on the image.

On Fig. 6.1, draw

1. a ray to find the position of the converging lens, showing the lens as a vertical straight
line in this position,

2. a ray to find the position of a principal focus of the lens, marking this position F,

3. a third possible ray from A to B. [3]

(iii) The distance between the object and the lens is increased. State any changes which
take place in

1. the distance of the image from the lens,

...........................................................................................................................................

2. the size of the image.

.......................................................................................................................................[2]

[Total: 7]

© UCLES 2011 0625/33/M/J/11


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13

8 (a) What is meant by the electromotive force (e.m.f.) of an electric power supply?

...................................................................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................................................[2]

(b) When connected to a 240 V supply, a desk lamp has a power rating of 60 W.

Calculate

(i) the current in the lamp,

current = ...........................................................[2]

(ii) the resistance of the lamp’s filament.

resistance = ...........................................................[2]

(c) A torch lamp is normally connected to a 3.0 V battery and carries a current of 0.25 A. The
resistance of its filament is 12 Ω.

The desk lamp in (b) and the torch lamp are connected in series.

Students X and Y plan to connect the lamp combination to a 240 V supply.

Student X says that the filament of the torch lamp will melt and the circuit will no longer work.
Student Y says that both lamps will light up and stay on.

Show, with a suitable calculation, whether student X or student Y is correct.

...................................................................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................................................[2]

[Total: 8]
© UCLES 2011 0625/33/M/J/11 [Turn over
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14

9 (a) Fig. 9.1 shows a wire, held between the poles of a magnet, carrying a current in the direction
of the arrow.

current

Fig. 9.1

(i) On Fig. 9.1, draw an arrow, labelled F, to show the direction of the force acting on the
wire. [1]

(ii) Explain why the force F acts on the wire.

...........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................[1]

(iii) The directions of the current and the magnetic field are both reversed. State the effect on
the force F.

...................................................................................................................................... [1]

(b) Fig. 9.2 shows a negatively charged particle travelling, in a vacuum, into a region where a
magnetic field acts. The magnetic field, shown by the crosses, is acting into the paper.

– P

Fig. 9.2

(i) Draw an arrow, labelled F, to show the direction of the force on the particle at point P
where it enters the field.

(ii) Describe the path of the particle as it continues to move through the magnetic field.

.......................................................................................................................................[2]

[Total: 5]

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15

10 (a) In the space below, draw the symbol for an OR gate.

[1]

(b) Describe the action of an OR gate in terms of its inputs and outputs.

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................................................[2]

(c) A car manufacturer wishes to install an alarm system in a 2-door car to inform the driver if
either door is not properly closed. An OR gate is to be used in the construction of this system.
Describe suitable input and output arrangements for the gate.

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................................................[3]

[Total: 6]

Question 11 is on the next page.

© UCLES 2011 0625/33/M/J/11 [Turn over


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16

11 (a) An atom consists of a nucleus made up of protons and neutrons, surrounded by orbiting
electrons.

(i) Which of these particles has a positive charge? .............................[1]

(ii) Which two of these particles have almost equal mass?

............................. and ............................. [1]


107
(b) A silver nucleus is denoted by 47 Ag. State the number of protons and the number of neutrons
in this nucleus.

number of protons = ................. number of neutrons = ................. [2]

(c) The graph in Fig. 11.1 shows part of the decay curve of a radioactive nuclide. The count rate
is plotted against time.

300
count rate
counts / s

200

100

0
0 5 10 15 20 25 30
time / hours

Fig. 11.1

(i) Use the graph to find the half-life of this nuclide.

half-life = ...............................................[1]

(ii) Plot two more points on Fig. 11.1 at times greater than 10 hours. Use a dot in a circle to
indicate each point. [2]

[Total: 7]

Permission to reproduce items where third-party owned material protected by copyright is included has been sought and cleared where possible. Every
reasonable effort has been made by the publisher (UCLES) to trace copyright holders, but if any items requiring clearance have unwittingly been included, the
publisher will be pleased to make amends at the earliest possible opportunity.

University of Cambridge International Examinations is part of the Cambridge Assessment Group. Cambridge Assessment is the brand name of University of
Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES), which is itself a department of the University of Cambridge.

© UCLES 2011 0625/33/M/J/11


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UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS


International General Certificate of Secondary Education

MARK SCHEME for the May/June 2012 question paper


for the guidance of teachers

0625 PHYSICS
0625/31 Paper 3 (Extended Theory), maximum raw mark 80

This mark scheme is published as an aid to teachers and candidates, to indicate the requirements of
the examination. It shows the basis on which Examiners were instructed to award marks. It does not
indicate the details of the discussions that took place at an Examiners’ meeting before marking began,
which would have considered the acceptability of alternative answers.

Mark schemes must be read in conjunction with the question papers and the report on the
examination.

• Cambridge will not enter into discussions or correspondence in connection with these mark schemes.

Cambridge is publishing the mark schemes for the May/June 2012 question papers for most IGCSE,
GCE Advanced Level and Advanced Subsidiary Level syllabuses and some Ordinary Level
syllabuses.
PMT

Page 2 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2012 0625 31

NOTES ABOUT MARK SCHEME

M marks are method marks upon which further marks depend. For an M mark to be scored, the
point to which it refers must be seen in a candidate's answer. If a candidate fails to score
a particular M mark, then none of the dependent marks can be scored.

B marks are independent marks, which do not depend on other marks. For a B mark to be scored,
the point to which it refers must be seen specifically in the candidate’s answers.

A marks In general A marks are awarded for final answers to numerical questions.
If a final numerical answer, eligible for A marks, is correct, with the correct unit and an
acceptable number of significant figures, all the marks for that question are normally
awarded.
It is very occasionally possible to arrive at a correct answer by an entirely wrong
approach. In these rare circumstances, do not award the A marks, but award C marks on
their merits. However, correct numerical answers with no working shown gain all the
marks available.

C marks are compensatory marks in general applicable to numerical questions. These can be
scored even if the point to which they refer are not written down by the candidate,
provided subsequent working gives evidence that they must have known it. For
example, if an equation carries a C mark and the candidate does not write down the
actual equation but does correct substitution or working which shows he knew the
equation, then the C mark is scored. A C mark is not awarded if a candidate makes two
points which contradict each other. Points which are wrong but irrelevant are ignored.

brackets ( ) around words or units in the mark scheme are intended to indicate wording used to
clarify the mark scheme, but the marks do not depend on seeing the words or units in
brackets, e.g. 10 (J) means that the mark is scored for 10, regardless of the unit given.

underlining indicates that this must be seen in the answer offered, or something very similar.

OR / or indicates alternative answers, any one of which is satisfactory for scoring the marks.

e.e.o.o. means "each error or omission".

o.w.t.t.e. means “or words to that effect”.

Spelling Be generous about spelling and use of English. If an answer can be understood to mean
what we want, give credit. However, beware of and do not allow ambiguities, accidental
or deliberate: e.g. spelling which suggests confusion between reflection / refraction /
diffraction / thermistor / transistor / transformer.

Not/NOT Indicates that an incorrect answer is not to be disregarded, but cancels another
otherwise correct alternative offered by the candidate i.e. right plus wrong penalty
applies.

Ignore Indicates that something which is not correct or irrelevant is to be disregarded and does
not cause a right plus wrong penalty.

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2012


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Page 3 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2012 0625 31

ecf meaning "error carried forward" is mainly applicable to numerical questions, but may in
particular circumstances be applied in non-numerical questions.
This indicates that if a candidate has made an earlier mistake and has carried an
incorrect value forward to subsequent stages of working, marks indicated by ecf may be
awarded, provided the subsequent working is correct, bearing in mind the earlier
mistake. This prevents a candidate being penalised more than once for a particular
mistake, but only applies to marks annotated ecf.

Significant Figures
Answers are normally acceptable to any number of significant figures ≥ 2. Accept
answers that round to give the correct answer to 2 s.f. Any exceptions to this general rule
will be specified in the mark scheme.

Units Deduct one mark for each incorrect or missing unit from a final answer that would
otherwise gain all the marks available for that answer: maximum 1 per question. No
deduction is incurred if the unit is missing from the final answer but is shown correctly in
the working.

Arithmetic errors
Deduct one mark if the only error in arriving at a final answer is clearly an arithmetic one.

Transcription errors
Deduct one mark if the only error in arriving at a final answer is because given or
previously calculated data has clearly been misread but used correctly.

Fractions e.g. ½, ¼ etc are only acceptable where specified.

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2012


PMT

Page 4 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2012 0625 31

1 (a) Period: 1.81 s OR 1.8 s as mean value


OR 1.8 s as most common reading / the mode B1

(b) Time a minimum of 2 (successive) oscillations B1


Divide result by the number of oscillations B1
OR
Count no. of oscillations in at least 20 s (B1)
Divide the time by the number of oscillations
OR Divide no. of oscillations by time and find reciprocal (B1)
2 of:
Repeat (several times) and find mean
Time with reference to fixed / fiducial point or top or bottom of oscillation
Check / set zero of stop-watch B2
Show knowledge of what is meant by one oscillation

[Total: 5]

2 (a) (i) Increasing speed / acceleration B1

(ii) Constant / steady / uniform speed or motion B1

(iii) Decreasing speed / deceleration / braking / slowing / stopping / negative


acceleration B1

(b) (i) (Total) distance / (total) time OR d / t OR 400 / 60 C1


6.67 m/s at least 2 s.f. A1

(ii) Mention of maximum gradient OR clear that whole or part of B to C is used C1


Use of correct data from graph to +/– ½ square C1
Answer rounds to 9.2 to 9.4 m/s, at least 2 s.f. A1

[Total: 8]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2012


PMT

Page 5 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2012 0625 31

3 (a) Example: e.g. battery: (chemical to) electrical


engine: (chemical to) kinetic / mechanical
fire: (chemical to) thermal / heat
(human) body: (chemical to) heat / kinetic B1

(b) (i) (P =) IV OR in words OR 0.27 × 17 C1


= 4.59 W at least 2 s.f. A1

(ii) (K.E. =) efficiency × input OR 0.35 × 4.59 C1


= 1.61 J or Nm at least 2 s.f. A1

(iii) 1. d = m/V OR (m =) V × d OR in words OR 0.00014 × 1000 C1


= 0.14 kg A1

2. P.E. gained = K.E. lost OR mgh = ½ mv2


OR 0.14 × 10 × h = 1.61 OR 1.6 C1
h = 1.15 m OR 1.14 m at least 2 s.f. A1

OR
½ mv2 = 1.61 OR
v2 = 2 × 1.61 / 0.14 = 23 OR v2 = 2 × 1.6 / 0.14 = 22.86 (C1)
(h =) v2/2g = 23/20 = 1.15 m OR (h =) 22.86/20 = 1.14 m (A1)

[Total: 9]

4 (a) (p =) F/A OR in words OR 90/4.8 OR 90 / 0.00048 C1


= 18.75 N/cm2 OR 1.875 × 105 Pa OR 187500 Pa
OR 187.5 kPa OR 0.1875 MPa at least 2 s.f. A1

(b) Area of Y bigger (than area of X so force greater) B1

(c) Volume of oil moved at Y = volume of oil moved at X B1


Area of Y × distance moved by Y = Area of X × distance moved by X (so distance
move by Y smaller) B1
OR
Work done by piston X = work done on piston Y (B1)
Work = force × distance and F2 is greater than F1 so distance moved by Y smaller
(than distance moved by X) (B1)

(d) Air bubbles compress when pressure applied M1


More movement of piston X required for same movement of piston Y
OR Y moves less (for same movement of X)
OR Driver must push the brake pedal further / do more work
OR Pressure reduced / force on Y reduced
OR System is less efficient A1

[Total: 7]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2012


PMT

Page 6 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2012 0625 31

5 (a) (i) e.g. freezing, solidification, condensation


OR example e.g. water to ice, steam to water, gas to solid B1

(ii) No change B1

(b) Heat/energy required to change temperature of the body B1


by 1 °C / 1 K / 1 unit / 1 deg B1
OR
mass (of body) × specific heat capacity (B2)

(c) (i) Q = mcθ OR in words OR 250 × 4.2 × 20 C1


= 21000 J A1

(ii) 21000 J OR same as (c)(i) B1

(iii) Q = mL OR m = Q/L OR either in words


OR 21000 = m × 330 OR m = 21000/330 C1
= 63.6 g at least 2 s.f. A1

[Total: 9]

6 (a) (i) Glass / flask receives heat / rises in temperature B1


Glass / flask expands B1

(ii) Heat flows through glass to water OR Water receives heat / thermal energy
from / conducted by glass OR Water temperature rises OR Water molecules
move faster / gain K.E. B1
Water expands / Water molecules move further apart B1

(iii) Glass / solid expands less OR water / liquid expands more B1

(b) Use a bigger flask OR a narrower tube


OR Use a solid and a liquid that expand more B1

[Total: 6]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2012


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Page 7 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2012 0625 31

7 (a) (Molecule) moves up and down / rises and falls


OR oscillates perpendicular to direction of wave
OR describes a circle B1

(b) (i) At least 3 circular arcs, angular spread greater than 90° (symmetrically above
and below slit B1
Centre of arcs at centre of slit and with same spacing (by eye) as incident
waves B1

(ii) Diffraction B1

(c) v = f × λ OR 12 = f × 1.4 OR f = v / λ OR f = 12 / 1.4 C1


f = 8.57 Hz / per s / waves or vibrations per s A1
at least 2 s.f.

[Total: 6]

8 (a) (i) Electron(s) B1

(ii) At least 2 + signs on left-hand side of S


Same number of – signs on right-hand side of S B1

(iii) Connect S to earth (with rod in place) M1


Remove connection of S to earth M1
Remove R / rod A1

(b) (i) Q = It OR I = Q / t OR in words OR I = 30/120 C1


= 0.25 A or C/s A1

(ii) E = IVt OR in words OR 0.25 × 1.5 × 106 × 120 C1


OR
E = QV OR in words OR 30 × 1.5 × 106 (C1)
E = 45000000 J / 4.5 × 107 J / 45 MJ / 12.5 kWh A1

[Total: 9]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2012


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Page 8 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2012 0625 31

9 (a) (i) I1 = I2 + I3 B1

(ii) I1 = I4 OR same B1

(b) (i) (V = IR = 0.80 × 3.0 =) 2.4 V A1

(ii) I = V/R in any algebraic form OR 2.4 / 2 OR (b)(i) / 2


OR any voltage divided by 2 C1
(I3 = V/R = 2.4 / 2 =) 1.2 A A1
OR
I3/I2 = 3/2 (C1)
I3 = 3/2 × 0.8 A = 1.2 A (A1)

(iii) (I2 + I3 OR Current through R = 0.8 + 1.2) = 2.0 (A)


OR 6 V / 2 A used C1
Parallel combination formula: 1/r = 1/r1 + 1/r2
OR (r =) r1r2/(r1 + r2) C1
Use of formula: combined resistance = 1.2 (Ω) C1
(R + 1.2 = 6/2 = 3.0 Ω R =) 1.8 Ω A1
OR
Current through R = 0.8 + 1.2 = 2.0 (A) (C1)
P.D. across R = 6.0 – 2.4 (C1)
= 3.6 (V) (C1)
R = 3.6 / 2.0 = 1.8 Ω (A1)

[Total: 9]

10 (a) (i) Parallel lines perpendicular to pole faces with arrows N to S B1

(ii) Arrow pointing to the right B1

(b) (i) Geiger (counter) / Geiger (tube) (+ scaler / ratemeter) / photographic plate /
scintillation counter / cloud chamber / luminescent or phosphorescent plate B1

(ii) Out of the plane of the paper B1

(iii) (Path is) a curve / circular / arc B1

(iv) (Air molecules are) ionised / lose electrons B1

[Total: 6]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2012


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Page 9 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2012 0625 31

11 (a) Transistor B1

(b) Resistor / variable resistor / rheostat identified B1


Light-dependent resistor / LDR identified B1
Resistor or alternative in gap A; LDR in gap B B1

(c) Thermistor / thermal resistor / heat or temperature dependent resistor identified B1


Thermistor (or alternative name) in gap A and resistor in gap B B1

[Total: 6]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2012


PMT

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS


International General Certificate of Secondary Education
* 9 3 4 4 1 2 2 4 5 9 *

PHYSICS 0625/31
Paper 3 Extended May/June 2012
1 hour 15 minutes
Candidates answer on the Question Paper.
No Additional Materials are required.

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

Write your Centre number, candidate number and name on all the work you hand in.
Write in dark blue or black pen.
You may use a pencil for any diagrams or graphs.
Do not use staples, paper clips, highlighters, glue or correction fluid.
DO NOT WRITE IN ANY BARCODES.

Answer all questions. For Examiner’s Use


You may lose marks if you do not show your working or if you do not use
appropriate units. 1
Take the weight of 1 kg to be 10 N (i.e. acceleration of free fall = 10 m / s2).
2
At the end of the examination, fasten all your work securely together.
The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end of each question or part 3
question.
4

10

11

Total

This document consists of 12 printed pages.

DC (NF/JG) 43223/5
© UCLES 2012 [Turn over
PMT

1 The period of the vertical oscillations of a mass hanging from a spring is known to be For
constant. Examiner’s
Use

(a) A student times single oscillations with a stopwatch. In 10 separate measurements, the
stopwatch readings were:

1.8 s, 1.9 s, 1.7 s, 1.9 s, 1.8 s, 1.8 s, 1.9 s, 1.7 s, 1.8 s, 1.8 s.

What is the best value obtainable from these readings for the time of one oscillation?
Explain how you arrive at your answer.

best value = .....................................................................................................................

explanation ......................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [1]

(b) Describe how, using the same stopwatch, the student can find the period of oscillation
more accurately.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [4]

[Total: 5]

© UCLES 2012 0625/31/M/J/12


PMT

2 A girl rides her bicycle along a straight level road. Fig. 2.1 shows a graph of her distance For
moved against time. Examiner’s
Use

400 D

300

distance / m

200

100
B

A
0
0 10 20 30 40 50 60
time / s

Fig. 2.1

(a) Describe her motion

(i) from A to B, ..............................................................................................................

(ii) from B to C, ..............................................................................................................

(iii) from C to D. ..............................................................................................................


[3]

(b) Calculate

(i) her average speed from A to D,

average speed = ................................................. [2]

(ii) her maximum speed.

maximum speed = ................................................. [3]

[Total: 8]
© UCLES 2012 0625/31/M/J/12 [Turn over
PMT

3 (a) State an example of the conversion of chemical energy to another form of energy. For
Examiner’s
example ........................................................................................................................... Use

energy conversion ....................................................................................................... [1]

(b) The electrical output of a solar panel powers a pump. The pump operates a water
fountain. The output of the solar panel is 17 V and the current supplied to the pump is
0.27 A.

(i) Calculate the electrical power generated by the solar panel.

power = ................................................. [2]

(ii) The pump converts electrical energy to kinetic energy of water with an efficiency
of 35%.

Calculate the kinetic energy of the water delivered by the pump in 1 second.

kinetic energy = ................................................. [2]

(iii) The pump propels 0.00014 m3 of water per second. This water rises vertically as a
jet. The density of water is 1000 kg / m3.

Calculate

1. the mass of water propelled by the pump in 1 second,

mass = ................................................. [2]

2. the maximum height of the jet of water.

maximum height = ................................................. [2]

[Total: 9]
© UCLES 2012 0625/31/M/J/12
PMT

4 Fig. 4.1 represents part of the hydraulic braking system of a car. For
Examiner’s
Use
piston X piston Y

F1
F2

Fig. 4.1

The force F1 of the driver’s foot on the brake pedal moves piston X. The space between
pistons X and Y is filled with oil which cannot be compressed. The force F2 exerted by the oil
moves piston Y. This force is applied to the brake mechanism in the wheels of the car.

The area of cross-section of piston X is 4.8 cm2.

(a) The force F1 is 90 N. Calculate the pressure exerted on the oil by piston X.

pressure = ................................................. [2]

(b) The pressure on piston Y is the same as the pressure applied by piston X. Explain why
the force F2 is greater than the force F1.

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [1]

(c) Piston Y moves a smaller distance than piston X. Explain why.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [2]

(d) Suggest why the braking system does not work properly if the oil contains bubbles of air.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [2]

[Total: 7]

© UCLES 2012 0625/31/M/J/12 [Turn over


PMT

5 (a) Suggest For


Examiner’s
(i) an example of a change of state resulting from the removal of thermal energy from Use

a quantity of material,

.............................................................................................................................. [1]

(ii) the effect of this change of state on the temperature of the material.

............................................................................................................................. [1]

(b) Define the thermal capacity of a body.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [2]

(c) A polystyrene cup holds 250 g of water at 20 °C. In order to cool the water to make a
cold drink, small pieces of ice at 0 °C are added until the water reaches 0 °C and no
unmelted ice is present.

[specific heat capacity of water = 4.2 J / (g °C), specific latent heat of fusion of
ice = 330 J / g]

Assume no thermal energy is lost or gained by the cup.

(i) Calculate the thermal energy lost by the water in cooling to 0 °C.

thermal energy lost = ................................................. [2]

(ii) State the thermal energy gained by the ice in melting.

thermal energy gained = ................................................. [1]

(iii) Calculate the mass of ice added.

mass of ice = ................................................. [2]

[Total: 9]

© UCLES 2012 0625/31/M/J/12


PMT

6 Fig. 6.1 shows a glass flask full of water at 10 °C and sealed with a bung. A long glass tube For
passes through the bung into the water. The water level in the tube is at X. Examiner’s
Use

bung X

glass flask

water

Fig. 6.1

When the flask is placed in hot water, the water level initially falls a little below X, and then
rises some way above X.

(a) Suggest why

(i) the water level initially falls,

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................. [2]

(ii) the water level then rises,

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................. [2]

(iii) the rise is greater than the fall.

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................. [1]

(b) Suggest a change to the apparatus that would make the fall and rise of the water level
greater.

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [1]

[Total: 6]

© UCLES 2012 0625/31/M/J/12 [Turn over


PMT

7 (a) A wave passes along the surface of the water in a ripple tank. Describe the motion of a For
molecule on the surface as the wave passes. Examiner’s
Use

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [1]

(b) Fig. 7.1 shows a view from above of water waves approaching a narrow gap in a barrier.
The water on both sides of the barrier has the same depth.

barrier with
narrow gap

direction of
water waves

Fig. 7.1

(i) On Fig. 7.1, sketch the pattern of waves in the region to the right of the barrier. [2]
(ii) State the process by which waves arrive at point P to the right of the barrier.

.............................................................................................................................. [1]

(c) The waves approaching the barrier in Fig. 7.1 have a wavelength of 1.4 cm and travel at
a speed of 12 cm / s.

Calculate the frequency of the waves.

frequency = ................................................. [2]

[Total: 6]

© UCLES 2012 0625/31/M/J/12


PMT

8 (a) In Fig. 8.1, S is a metal sphere standing on an insulating base. R is a negatively charged For
rod placed close to S. Examiner’s
Use



R –
S


– insulating
base

Fig. 8.1

(i) Name the particles in S that move when R is brought close to S.

............................................................................................................................. [1]

(ii) On Fig. 8.1, add + signs and – signs to suggest the result of this movement. [1]

(iii) Describe the actions which now need to take place so that S becomes positively
charged with the charge distributed evenly over its surface. A positively charged
object is not available.

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................. [3]

(b) During a thunderstorm, the potential difference between thunderclouds and the ground
builds up to 1.5 × 106 V. In each stroke of lightning, 30 C of charge passes between the
thunderclouds and the ground. Lightning strokes to the ground occur, on average, at 2
minute intervals.

Calculate

(i) the average current between the thunderclouds and the ground,

average current = ................................................. [2]

(ii) the energy transferred in each stroke of lightning.

energy = ................................................. [2]


[Total: 9]
© UCLES 2012 0625/31/M/J/12 [Turn over
PMT

10

9 This question refers to quantities and data shown on the circuit diagram of Fig. 9.1. For
Examiner’s
6.0 V Use

I4

I1 3.0 1
A R
I2
X Y

I3

2.0 1

Fig. 9.1

(a) State the relationship between

(i) the currents I1, I2 and I3 , ..................................................................................... [1]

(ii) the currents I1 and I4 . ......................................................................................... [1]

(b) The ammeter reads 0.80 A. Assume it has zero resistance.

Calculate

(i) the potential difference between X and Y,

p.d. = ................................................. [1]

(ii) the current I3,

current = ................................................. [2]

(iii) the resistance of R.

resistance = ................................................. [4]


[Total: 9]
© UCLES 2012 0625/31/M/J/12
PMT

11

10 (a) Fig. 10.1 shows a wire PQ placed between the poles of a magnet. There is a current in For
wire PQ. Examiner’s
Use

P Q
S

Fig. 10.1

(i) On Fig. 10.1, sketch lines with arrows to show the direction of the magnetic field
between the poles of the magnet. [1]
(ii) The force on PQ is into the paper.

Draw an arrow on PQ to show the direction of the current. [1]

(b) The wire PQ in Fig. 10.1 is replaced by a narrow beam of β-particles travelling from left
to right.

(i) Suggest a suitable detector for the β-particles.

............................................................................................................................. [1]

(ii) State the direction of the force on the β-particles.

............................................................................................................................. [1]

(iii) Describe the path of the β-particles in the space between the poles of the magnet.

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................. [1]

(iv) State what happens to the air molecules along the path of the β-particles.

............................................................................................................................. [1]

[Total: 6]

Question 11 is on the next page.

© UCLES 2012 0625/31/M/J/12 [Turn over


PMT

12

11 Fig. 11.1 shows part of a circuit designed to switch on a security lamp when it gets dark. For
Examiner’s
Use

relay coil S L
A

+

X

Fig. 11.1

When there is a current in the relay coil, switch S closes and the lamp L comes on.

(a) Write down the name of the component X. .................................................. [1]

(b) The circuit has gaps at A and at B.

State the components that need to be connected into these gaps for the circuit to
perform its required function.

gap A ...............................................................................................................................

gap B ...............................................................................................................................
[3]

(c) The circuit in Fig. 11.1 is modified. The function of lamp L is now to give a warning when
the temperature becomes too high.

State any necessary changes of components in the circuit.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [2]

[Total: 6]

Permission to reproduce items where third-party owned material protected by copyright is included has been sought and cleared where possible. Every
reasonable effort has been made by the publisher (UCLES) to trace copyright holders, but if any items requiring clearance have unwittingly been included, the
publisher will be pleased to make amends at the earliest possible opportunity.

University of Cambridge International Examinations is part of the Cambridge Assessment Group. Cambridge Assessment is the brand name of University of
Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES), which is itself a department of the University of Cambridge.

© UCLES 2012 0625/31/M/J/12


PMT

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS


International General Certificate of Secondary Education

MARK SCHEME for the May/June 2012 question paper


for the guidance of teachers

0625 PHYSICS
0625/32 Paper 3 (Extended Theory), maximum raw mark 80

This mark scheme is published as an aid to teachers and candidates, to indicate the requirements of
the examination. It shows the basis on which Examiners were instructed to award marks. It does not
indicate the details of the discussions that took place at an Examiners’ meeting before marking began,
which would have considered the acceptability of alternative answers.

Mark schemes must be read in conjunction with the question papers and the report on the
examination.

• Cambridge will not enter into discussions or correspondence in connection with these mark schemes.

Cambridge is publishing the mark schemes for the May/June 2012 question papers for most IGCSE,
GCE Advanced Level and Advanced Subsidiary Level syllabuses and some Ordinary Level
syllabuses.
PMT

Page 2 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2012 0625 32

NOTES ABOUT MARK SCHEME SYMBOLS & OTHER MATTERS

M marks are method marks upon which further marks depend. For an M mark to be scored, the
point to which it refers must be seen in a candidate's answer. If a candidate fails to score
a particular M mark, then none of the dependent marks can be scored.

B marks are independent marks, which do not depend on other marks. For a B mark to be scored,
the point to which it refers must be seen specifically in the candidate’s answers.

A marks In general A marks are awarded for final answers to numerical questions.
If a final numerical answer, eligible for A marks, is correct, with the correct unit and an
acceptable number of significant figures, all the marks for that question are normally
awarded.
It is very occasionally possible to arrive at a correct answer by an entirely wrong
approach. In these rare circumstances, do not award the A marks, but award C marks on
their merits. However, correct numerical answers with no working shown gain all the
marks available.

C marks are compensatory marks in general applicable to numerical questions. These can be
scored even if the point to which they refer are not written down by the candidate,
provided subsequent working gives evidence that they must have known it. For
example, if an equation carries a C mark and the candidate does not write down the
actual equation but does correct substitution or working which shows he knew the
equation, then the C mark is scored. A C mark is not awarded if a candidate makes two
points which contradict each other. Points which are wrong but irrelevant are ignored.

brackets ( ) around words or units in the mark scheme are intended to indicate wording used to
clarify the mark scheme, but the marks do not depend on seeing the words or units in
brackets, e.g. 10 (J) means that the mark is scored for 10, regardless of the unit given.

underlining indicates that this must be seen in the answer offered, or something very similar.

OR / or indicates alternative answers, any one of which is satisfactory for scoring the marks.

e.e.o.o. means "each error or omission".

o.w.t.t.e. means “or words to that effect”.

Spelling Be generous about spelling and use of English. If an answer can be understood to mean
what we want, give credit. However, beware of and do not allow ambiguities, accidental
or deliberate: e.g. spelling which suggests confusion between reflection / refraction /
diffraction / thermistor / transistor / transformer.

Not/NOT Indicates that an incorrect answer is not to be disregarded, but cancels another
otherwise correct alternative offered by the candidate i.e. right plus wrong penalty
applies.

Ignore Indicates that something which is not correct or irrelevant is to be disregarded and does
not cause a right plus wrong penalty.

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2012


PMT

Page 3 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2012 0625 32

ecf meaning "error carried forward" is mainly applicable to numerical questions, but may in
particular circumstances be applied in non-numerical questions.
This indicates that if a candidate has made an earlier mistake and has carried an
incorrect value forward to subsequent stages of working, marks indicated by ecf may be
awarded, provided the subsequent working is correct, bearing in mind the earlier
mistake. This prevents a candidate being penalised more than once for a particular
mistake, but only applies to marks annotated ecf.

Significant Figures
Answers are normally acceptable to any number of significant figures ≥ 2. Accept
answers that round to give the correct answer to 2 s.f. Any exceptions to this general rule
will be specified in the mark scheme.

Units Deduct one mark for each incorrect or missing unit from a final answer that would
otherwise gain all the marks available for that answer: maximum 1 per question.

Arithmetic errors
Deduct one mark if the only error in arriving at a final answer is clearly an arithmetic one.

Transcription errors
Deduct one mark if the only error in arriving at a final answer is because given or
previously calculated data has clearly been misread but used correctly.

Fractions e.g. ½, ¼, 1/10 etc are only acceptable where specified.

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2012


PMT

Page 4 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2012 0625 32

1 (a) (i) constant/steady/uniform speed/velocity OR speed/velocity = 2.5 (m/s) B1


speed/velocity = 2.5 m/s accept fraction, average speed/velocity = 2.5 m/s B1 [2]

(ii) shape curving upward but not to vertical, at least to 3.5 s unless reaches
25 m B1 [1]

(b) horizontal (straight) line OR careful sketch


accept parallel to time/x-axis B1 [1]

(c) tolerance on both axes ± ½ small square throughout both parts

(i) horizontal straight line at 2.5 m/s from 0 to 2 s, ecf from (a)(i) B1

(ii) straight line rising to the right as far as the edge of the graph area M1
∆v = 4 m/s or gradient clearly 2 m/s2 A1 [3]

(d) horizontal (straight) line M1


at 0 m/s A1 [2]
accept for both marks: line in/along time/x-axis OR line with y/v = 0 OR careful
sketch

[Total: 9]

2 (a) mass = (1.5 × 10 × 12)/(30 × 10) OR = (1.5 × 12)/30


OR any correct moment equation with force or mass but not mixture C1
= 0.6(0) kg A1 [2]

(b) 21 N ecf from (a) B1 [1]

(c) (i) stays in position B1

(ii) any two from:


• clockwise moment = anticlockwise moment B1
• centre of mass at pivot B1
• no (resultant) moment/turning force acting on sculpture
• balanced/in equilibrium
• relative distances from pivot unchanged [3]

[Total: 6]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2012


PMT

Page 5 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2012 0625 32

3 (a) (mass flow rate =) 1030 (kg/s) C1


use of mgh C1
loss of GPE = 1030 × 10 × 3 = 30 900 J or Nm ecf from 1st line A1 [3]

(b) output power = (26 × 400 =) 10 400 (W) C1


efficiency = output (power)/input (power) with/without 100
OR= output/input with/without 100 OR any numbers
that clearly show relationship the correct way up is intended C1
efficiency = (100 × 10 400/30 900 = ) 33.7% at least 2 s.f. A1 [3]
allow ecf from (a) and 1st line of (b)

(c) (i) from basin/to sea/from right/to left B1

(ii) turbine design allows rotation in both directions


OR meaningful comment on change of pitch
OR generator works when rotating in either direction B1 [2]

[Total: 8]

4 (a) (i) 50° B1

(ii) total internal (reflection) B1 [2]

(b) use of sin i/sin r = n OR 1/n in any form


OR 1/sin c = n OR 1/n C1
i = 40(°) and r = 90(°) OR vice versa ecf if measured from interface not normal C1
n = (1/sin i = 1/0.643 = ) 1.556 ecf from previous line A1 [3]

(c) reflected ray drawn in same position as original reflected ray B1


0° < angle of refracted ray from surface < 13° B1 [2]

(d) prism drawn in correct orientation to give t.i.r. B1


correct reflection of rays B1 [2]

[Total: 9]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2012


PMT

Page 6 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2012 0625 32

5 (a) (i) CD B1

(ii) any 3 points from


• wavefront changes direction/refracted OR wavefront bends B1
• in Q distances travelled (by waves) shorter/wavelength less B1
• wave spreads in region Q from B B1
• all points on wavefront AB move to (corresponding) points on CD
• in same time that/while end A of wavefront AB move to C and end B
moves to D [4]

(b) regions P and Q same depth/regions P and Q (now) one medium B1


same wavelength/wavefronts travel same speed/distance in each region
OR no refraction/change of direction OR no bending of waves B1 [2]

[Total: 6]

6 (a) T-shirt in wind/on L dries quicker OR T-shirt out of wind/on R dries slower M1
wind removes more evaporated molecules accept quicker
NOT wind gives water molecules more KE A1 [2]

(b) T-shirt folded double/on R dries slower OR T-shirt unfolded/on L dries quicker M1
correct reference to smaller/larger surface area for molecules to evaporate
OR water trapped (in fold) OR more humid in fold A1 [2]

(c) water evaporates from her hair B1


heat required for evaporation OR heat flows (from body/hair) to warm up cold
water
OR faster molecules escape leaving water cooler/lowering KE
ignore: there is a cooling effect B1 [2]

[Total: 6]

7 (a) (i) more negatives in left than right B1


roughly same no. of positives as negatives B1 [2]

(ii) clearly more negatives than positives, anywhere on sphere B1 [1]

(b) (i) straight lines, radial towards point, arrows inwards B1

(ii) direction of field OR direction of force on (point) positive (charge) B1 [2]

[Total: 5]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2012


PMT

Page 7 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2012 0625 32

8 (a) (i) (milliammeter) deflects/shows reading/current OR reading changes OR there


is a current B1
change of flux/field (lines) cut OR emf/current induced/produced B1 [2]

(ii) greater deflection/current B1


rate of change of flux (linkage) is greater o.w.t.t.e
e.g. more magnetic field lines cutting coil (per second) OR field cut faster B1 [2]

(b) (i) upwards/opposite to magnet’s direction of travel ignore towards magnet B1

(ii) current (in coil) causes a magnetic field B1


force caused by overlapping (magnetic) fields B1 [3]

[Total: 7]

9 (a) (i) total R = 320 (Ω) or V per lamp = 6 (V) C1


I = (240/320 or 6/8 =) 0.75 A ecf from previous line A1 [2]

(ii) use of P = VI OR I2R OR V2/R C1


4.5 W ecf from (a)(i) A1 [2]

(b) resistance of each lamp = 8 × 1.05 = 8.4 (Ω) B1


total R = 240/0.9 = 266.7 (Ω) OR V per lamp = 8.4 x 0.9 = 7.56 (V) B1
no. of lamps (= 266.7/8.4) = 31.7 OR (= 240/7.56) = 31.7 B1
max. no. of failed lamps = 8 B1
accept reverse logic [4]

[Total: 8]

10 for (b) and (d) accept HIGH/LOW or ON/OFF

(a) NOR B1 [1]

(b) outputs 1, 0, 0, 0
lose 1 mark e.e.o.o. B2 [2]

(c) (i) OR and NOT gates either order B1

(ii) both symbols correct B1


OR then NOT, connected B1 [3]

(d) logic level at Y, 0 B1


logic level at Z, opposite to candidate’s answer to Y B1 [2]

[Total: 8]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2012


PMT

Page 8 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2012 0625 32

11 (a) any mention background B1


background/radiation varies randomly o.w.t.t.e. OR rate of decay very small OR
sample nearly all decayed B1 [2]

(b) correctly deducts correct background (13 – 15 /s) B1


takes 2 detector readings, one twice the other B1
correct working, with/without background subtraction, i.e. use of graph B1
half life = 1.2 – 1.8 days OR follows from working B1 [4]

(c) α (very) short range in air OR will not reach researcher


NOT will not penetrate skin B1
γ long range/very penetrating/heavy shielding needed OR will reach researcher B1 [2]

[Total: 8]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2012


PMT

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS


International General Certificate of Secondary Education
* 1 8 7 6 1 2 6 6 5 3 *

PHYSICS 0625/32
Paper 3 Extended May/June 2012
1 hour 15 minutes
Candidates answer on the Question Paper.
No Additional Materials are required.

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

Write your Centre number, candidate number and name on all the work you hand in.
Write in dark blue or black pen.
You may use a pencil for any diagrams or graphs.
Do not use staples, paper clips, highlighters, glue or correction fluid.
DO NOT WRITE IN ANY BARCODES.
For Examiner’s Use
Answer all questions.
You may lose marks if you do not show your working or if you do not use 1
appropriate units.
Take the weight of 1 kg to be 10 N (i.e. acceleration of free fall = 10 m / s2). 2
At the end of the examination, fasten all your work securely together. 3
The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end of each question or
part question. 4

10

11

Total

This document consists of 19 printed pages and 1 blank page.

DC (NF/SW) 43228/5
© UCLES 2012 [Turn over
PMT

1 Fig. 1.1 is a distance / time graph showing the motion of an object. For
Examiner’s
Use
25

20
distance / m
15

10

0
0 1 2 3 4
time / s

Fig. 1.1

(a) (i) Describe the motion shown for the first 2 s, calculating any relevant quantity.

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................
[2]

(ii) After 2 s the object accelerates.

On Fig. 1.1, sketch a possible shape of the graph for the next 2 s.
[1]

(b) Describe how a distance / time graph shows an object that is stationary.

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [1]

© UCLES 2012 0625/32/M/J/12


PMT

(c) Fig. 1.2 shows the axes for a speed / time graph. For
Examiner’s
Use
10

8
speed
m/s 6

0
0 1 2 3 4
time / s

Fig. 1.2

On Fig. 1.2, draw

(i) the graph of the motion for the first 2 s as shown in Fig. 1.1,
(ii) an extension of the graph for the next 2 s, showing the object accelerating at 2 m / s2.
[3]

(d) Describe how a speed / time graph shows an object that is stationary.

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [2]

[Total: 9]

© UCLES 2012 0625/32/M/J/12 [Turn over


PMT

2 Fig. 2.1 shows a mobile bird sculpture that has been created by an artist. For
Examiner’s
Use
tail

bird sculpture

pivot

M hole in sculpture E
for pivot

12 cm 30 cm

Fig. 2.1

M is the centre of mass of the bird sculpture, including its tail (but not including the
counter-weight that will be added later). The mass of the bird and tail is 1.5 kg.

The bird sculpture is placed on a pivot.

The artist adds the counter-weight at the end E of the tail so that the bird remains stationary
in the position shown.

(a) Calculate the mass of the counter-weight.

mass = ................................................. [2]

(b) The centre of mass of the sculpture with counter-weight is at the pivot.

Calculate the upward force acting at the pivot.

force = ................................................. [1]

© UCLES 2012 0625/32/M/J/12


PMT

(c) The sculpture is rotated clockwise to the position shown in Fig. 2.2. It is held still, then For
carefully released. Examiner’s
Use

pivot

counter-weight

Fig. 2.2

(i) State whether the sculpture will stay in that position, rotate further clockwise or
rotate back anticlockwise.

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

(ii) Explain your answer to (i).

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................
[3]

[Total: 6]

© UCLES 2012 0625/32/M/J/12 [Turn over


PMT

3 Fig. 3.1 shows a water turbine that is generating electricity in a small tidal energy scheme. For
Examiner’s
Use
barrage

sea-water level at high tide

3.0 m

water level in tidal basin

turbine connected to
electricity generator

Fig. 3.1

At high tide, 1.0 m3 of sea-water of density 1030 kg / m3 flows through the turbine every
second.

(a) Calculate the loss of gravitational potential energy when 1.0 m3 of sea-water falls
through a vertical distance of 3.0 m.

loss of gravitational potential energy = ................................................. [3]

(b) Assume that your answer to (a) is the energy lost per second by the sea-water passing
through the turbine at high tide. The generator delivers a current of 26 A at 400 V.

Calculate the efficiency of the scheme.

efficiency = ..............................................% [3]

© UCLES 2012 0625/32/M/J/12


PMT

(c) At low tide, the sea-water level is lower than the water level in the tidal basin. For
Examiner’s
(i) State the direction of the flow of water through the turbine at low tide. Use

..................................................................................................................................

(ii) Suggest an essential feature of the turbine and generator for electricity to be
generated at low tide.

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................
[2]

[Total: 8]

© UCLES 2012 0625/32/M/J/12 [Turn over


PMT

4 Figs. 4.1 and 4.2 show a semi-circular glass block as rays of blue light are directed into the For
block at different angles. The rays are directed towards the centre C of the semi-circle so that Examiner’s
no refraction occurs as the rays enter the block. Use

(a) At the angle shown in Fig. 4.1, no refracted ray emerges from the block at C.

C
40°

incident reflected
ray ray
glass
air

Fig. 4.1

(i) Determine the angle of reflection at C.

angle of reflection = ......................................................


(ii) State the type of reflection occurring at C.

..................................................................................................................................
[2]

(b)

C
50° ray emerges in air
close to glass
surface

incident reflected
ray glass ray
air

Fig. 4.2

Calculate the refractive index of the glass.

refractive index = ................................................. [3]

© UCLES 2012 0625/32/M/J/12


PMT

(c) The experiment in (b) is now repeated with red light. For
Examiner’s
On Fig. 4.3, draw and label the paths of the reflected and refracted rays of red light. The Use

dashed lines show the paths taken by the blue light in (b).

C
50°

paths taken by rays


of blue light in (b)
red
light

Fig. 4.3 [2]

(d) Fig. 4.4 shows a 45° – 45° – 90° prism used in an optical instrument. Part of the path of
a ray of light passing through the instrument is also shown. Light leaves the instrument
along path B.

prism

path B

Fig. 4.4

In the dashed box, draw another 45° – 45° – 90° prism and complete the path of the
light through this box. [2]

[Total: 9]

© UCLES 2012 0625/32/M/J/12 [Turn over


PMT

10

5 Fig. 5.1 shows a view from above of waves on the surface of water in a water tank. For
Examiner’s
Use

region Q B C
region P

Fig. 5.1

The wavefront AB is travelling in region P towards region Q, where the water is shallower
and the waves travel more slowly.

(a) Some time later, the wavefront has moved into region Q.

CD, CE and CF are suggested positions of the new wavefront.

(i) State which is the correct position of the new wavefront.

..................................................................................................................................

(ii) Explain your answer to (i).

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................
[4]

© UCLES 2012 0625/32/M/J/12


PMT

11

(b) Fig. 5.2 shows the waves after a change is made to the way the tank is set up, and the For
experiment is repeated. Examiner’s
Use

region Q B C
region P

Fig. 5.2

The wave from position AB in region P now moves to position CG in region Q.

State the change that has been made and explain your reasoning.

change .............................................................................................................................

explanation ......................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [2]

[Total: 6]

© UCLES 2012 0625/32/M/J/12 [Turn over


PMT

12

6 (a) Two students hang out identical T-shirts to dry at the same time in the same For
neighbourhood. The only difference between the drying conditions is that one T-shirt is Examiner’s
sheltered from any wind and the other is in a strong breeze, as shown in Fig. 6.1. Use

fence
clothes line

strong breeze no breeze

Fig. 6.1

State and explain, in terms of water molecules, the difference between the drying times
of the T-shirts.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [2]

© UCLES 2012 0625/32/M/J/12


PMT

13

(b) Fig. 6.2 shows another occasion when a student hangs out two identical T-shirts to dry For
next to each other on a line. One T-shirt is folded double as shown in Fig. 6.2. Examiner’s
Use

clothes line

Fig. 6.2

State and explain, in terms of water molecules, the difference between the drying times
of the T-shirts.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [2]

(c) A runner in a hot country feels cooler if she pours water over her hair to keep it wet,
even when the water is at the same temperature as the air around her.

Explain, in terms of a change of state of water, why she feels cooler.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [2]

[Total: 6]

© UCLES 2012 0625/32/M/J/12 [Turn over


PMT

14

7 (a) Fig. 7.1 shows a conducting sphere A, initially uncharged, mounted on an insulating For
base. The positively-charged, non-conducting sphere B is brought close to sphere A Examiner’s
without touching the sphere. Use

non-conducting
sphere B conducting sphere
A
+++
+ +
++ +

insulating
base

Fig. 7.1

(i) On Fig. 7.1, draw the resulting distribution of any positive and negative charges on
sphere A. [2]
(ii) The sphere A is now earthed as shown in Fig. 7.2.

non-conducting
sphere B conducting sphere
A
+++
+ +
++ +

connection
to earth

insulating
base

Fig. 7.2

On Fig. 7.2, draw the distribution of any positive and negative charges on sphere A after
it is earthed. [1]

© UCLES 2012 0625/32/M/J/12


PMT

15

(b) (i) On Fig. 7.3, draw lines of force with direction arrows to represent the electric field For
pattern in the plane of the paper around a negative point charge at point X. Examiner’s
Use

Fig. 7.3

(ii) State what is represented by the directions of the arrows on the lines.

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................
[2]

[Total: 5]

© UCLES 2012 0625/32/M/J/12 [Turn over


PMT

16

8 A student holds a magnet above a solenoid, which is connected to a centre-zero milli-ammeter For
as shown Fig. 8.1. Examiner’s
Use

magnet

mA solenoid

Fig. 8.1

(a) The student drops the magnet so that it falls through the solenoid.

State and explain what would be observed on the milliammeter

(i) as the magnet enters the solenoid,

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................. [2]

(ii) as the magnet speeds up inside the solenoid.

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................. [2]

(b) As the magnet passes into the coil in part (a), the coil exerts a force on the magnet even
though there is no contact between them.

(i) State the direction of this force.

..................................................................................................................................

(ii) Explain how this force is caused.

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................
[3]
[Total: 7]
© UCLES 2012 0625/32/M/J/12
PMT

17

9 40 lamps, each of resistance 8.0 Ω, are connected in series to a 240 V supply in order to For
decorate a tree. Examiner’s
Use

(a) Calculate

(i) the current in each lamp,

current = ................................................. [2]

(ii) the power dissipated in each lamp.

power = ................................................. [2]

(b) The lamps are designed to “fail-short”. If a filament fails, the lamp shorts so that it has
no resistance. The other lamps continue to light and the current increases.

The lamps are connected through a fuse that blows when the current rises above
0.9 A. At this current, the resistance of each lamp is 5% greater than its normal working
resistance.

Calculate the maximum number of lamps that can fail before the fuse blows.

number of lamps = ................................................. [4]

[Total: 8]

© UCLES 2012 0625/32/M/J/12 [Turn over


PMT

18

10 A student is designing a digital electronics circuit and needs to use the logic gate X shown For
in Fig. 10.1. Examiner’s
Use

input A
output
input B
X

Fig. 10.1

(a) Name the logic gate X. .................................. [1]

(b) Write down the values of the output when the inputs are

(i) input A low (logic 0), input B low (logic 0), output ..................................

(ii) input A low (logic 0), input B high (logic 1), output ..................................

(iii) input A high (logic 1), input B low (logic 0), output ..................................

(iv) input A high (logic 1), input B high (logic 1). output ..................................
[2]

(c) When the student starts to build the circuit, he finds that the store room has run out
of this type of logic gate. There is a supply of AND, OR and NOT gates. The student’s
teacher explains that a combination of two of these gates may be used instead of logic
gate X.

(i) State the two gates he should use to replace logic gate X.

.................................. and ..................................

(ii) Draw clearly in the space below these two logic gates, correctly connected, using
standard symbols.

[3]

(d) Fig. 10.2 shows a block diagram, not using standard symbols, of a combination of gates.

U NOT Y Z
AND NOT
W

Fig. 10.2

State the logic levels of points Y and Z when the logic levels of points U and W are both 1.

logic level at point Y ......................................................

logic level at point Z ......................................................


[2]
[Total: 8]
© UCLES 2012 0625/32/M/J/12
PMT

19

11 In a research laboratory, a radioactive sample is placed close to a radiation detector. The For
graph in Fig. 11.1 shows the decay of the sample. Examiner’s
Use
60

50

detector reading 40
counts / min
30

20

10

0
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
time / days

Fig. 11.1

(a) After 6 days the count rate hardly decreases and, in fact, increases a little at times.
Explain these observations.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [2]

(b) Use the graph to determine the half-life of the sample. Explain your working carefully.

half-life = ................................................. [4]

(c) Another radioactive sample is a strong emitter of α-particles and γ-rays. A junior
researcher suggests that a sufficient safety precaution, when working with this sample,
would be to hold the sample with long forceps. Explain why this suggestion, although
helpful, may be insufficient.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [2]
[Total: 8]
© UCLES 2012 0625/32/M/J/12
PMT

20

BLANK PAGE

Permission to reproduce items where third-party owned material protected by copyright is included has been sought and cleared where possible. Every
reasonable effort has been made by the publisher (UCLES) to trace copyright holders, but if any items requiring clearance have unwittingly been included, the
publisher will be pleased to make amends at the earliest possible opportunity.

University of Cambridge International Examinations is part of the Cambridge Assessment Group. Cambridge Assessment is the brand name of University of
Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES), which is itself a department of the University of Cambridge.

© UCLES 2012 0625/32/M/J/12


PMT

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS


International General Certificate of Secondary Education

MARK SCHEME for the May/June 2012 question paper


for the guidance of teachers

0625 PHYSICS
0625/33 Paper 3 (Extended Theory), maximum raw mark 80

This mark scheme is published as an aid to teachers and candidates, to indicate the requirements of
the examination. It shows the basis on which Examiners were instructed to award marks. It does not
indicate the details of the discussions that took place at an Examiners’ meeting before marking began,
which would have considered the acceptability of alternative answers.

Mark schemes must be read in conjunction with the question papers and the report on the
examination.

• Cambridge will not enter into discussions or correspondence in connection with these mark schemes.

Cambridge is publishing the mark schemes for the May/June 2012 question papers for most IGCSE,
GCE Advanced Level and Advanced Subsidiary Level syllabuses and some Ordinary Level
syllabuses.
PMT

Page 2 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2012 0625 33

NOTES ABOUT MARK SCHEME SYMBOLS & OTHER MATTERS

M marks are method marks upon which further marks depend. For an M mark to be scored, the
point to which it refers must be seen in a candidate's answer. If a candidate fails to score
a particular M mark, then none of the dependent marks can be scored.

B marks are independent marks, which do not depend on other marks. For a B mark to be scored,
the point to which it refers must be seen specifically in the candidate’s answers.

A marks In general A marks are awarded for final answers to numerical questions.
If a final numerical answer, eligible for A marks, is correct, with the correct unit and an
acceptable number of significant figures, all the marks for that question are normally
awarded.
It is very occasionally possible to arrive at a correct answer by an entirely wrong
approach. In these rare circumstances, do not award the A marks, but award C marks on
their merits. However, correct numerical answers with no working shown gain all the
marks available.

C marks are compensatory marks in general applicable to numerical questions. These can be
scored even if the point to which they refer are not written down by the candidate,
provided subsequent working gives evidence that they must have known it. For
example, if an equation carries a C mark and the candidate does not write down the
actual equation but does correct substitution or working which shows he knew the
equation, then the C mark is scored. A C mark is not awarded if a candidate makes two
points which contradict each other. Points which are wrong but irrelevant are ignored.

brackets ( ) around words or units in the mark scheme are intended to indicate wording used to
clarify the mark scheme, but the marks do not depend on seeing the words or units in
brackets, e.g. 10 (J) means that the mark is scored for 10, regardless of the unit given.

underlining indicates that this must be seen in the answer offered, or something very similar.

OR / or indicates alternative answers, any one of which is satisfactory for scoring the marks.

e.e.o.o. means "each error or omission".

o.w.t.t.e. means “or words to that effect”.

Spelling Be generous about spelling and use of English. If an answer can be understood to mean
what we want, give credit. However, beware of and do not allow ambiguities, accidental
or deliberate: e.g. spelling which suggests confusion between reflection / refraction /
diffraction / thermistor / transistor / transformer.

Not/NOT Indicates that an incorrect answer is not to be disregarded, but cancels another
otherwise correct alternative offered by the candidate i.e. right plus wrong penalty
applies.

Ignore Indicates that something which is not correct or irrelevant is to be disregarded and does
not cause a right plus wrong penalty.

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2012


PMT

Page 3 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2012 0625 33

ecf meaning "error carried forward" is mainly applicable to numerical questions, but may in
particular circumstances be applied in non-numerical questions.
This indicates that if a candidate has made an earlier mistake and has carried an
incorrect value forward to subsequent stages of working, marks indicated by ecf may be
awarded, provided the subsequent working is correct, bearing in mind the earlier
mistake. This prevents a candidate being penalised more than once for a particular
mistake, but only applies to marks annotated ecf.

Significant Figures
Answers are normally acceptable to any number of significant figures ≥ 2. Accept
answers that round to give the correct answer to 2 s.f. Any exceptions to this general rule
will be specified in the mark scheme.

Units Deduct one mark for each incorrect or missing unit from a final answer that would
otherwise gain all the marks available for that answer: maximum 1 per question.

Arithmetic errors
Deduct one mark if the only error in arriving at a final answer is clearly an arithmetic one.

Transcription errors
Deduct one mark if the only error in arriving at a final answer is because given or
previously calculated data has clearly been misread but used correctly.

Fractions e.g. ½, ¼, 1/10 etc are only acceptable where specified.

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2012


PMT

Page 4 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2012 0625 33

1 (a) (i) constant/steady/uniform speed/velocity OR speed/velocity = 2.5 (m/s) B1


speed/velocity = 2.5 m/s accept fraction, average speed/velocity = 2.5 m/s B1 [2]

(ii) shape curving upward but not to vertical, at least to 3.5 s unless reaches
25 m B1 [1]

(b) horizontal (straight) line OR careful sketch


accept parallel to time/x-axis B1 [1]

(c) tolerance on both axes ± ½ small square throughout both parts

(i) horizontal straight line at 2.5 m/s from 0 to 2 s, ecf from (a)(i) B1

(ii) straight line rising to the right as far as the edge of the graph area M1
∆v = 4 m/s or gradient clearly 2 m/s2 A1 [3]

(d) horizontal (straight) line M1


at 0 m/s A1 [2]
accept for both marks: line in/along time/x-axis OR line with y/v = 0 OR careful
sketch

[Total: 9]

2 (a) mass = (1.5 × 10 × 12)/(30 × 10) OR = (1.5 × 12)/30


OR any correct moment equation with force or mass but not mixture C1
= 0.6(0) kg A1 [2]

(b) 21 N ecf from (a) B1 [1]

(c) (i) stays in position B1

(ii) any two from:


• clockwise moment = anticlockwise moment B1
• centre of mass at pivot B1
• no (resultant) moment/turning force acting on sculpture
• balanced/in equilibrium
• relative distances from pivot unchanged [3]

[Total: 6]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2012


PMT

Page 5 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2012 0625 33

3 (a) (mass flow rate =) 1030 (kg/s) C1


use of mgh C1
loss of GPE = 1030 × 10 × 3 = 30 900 J or Nm ecf from 1st line A1 [3]

(b) output power = (26 × 400 =) 10 400 (W) C1


efficiency = output (power)/input (power) with/without 100
OR= output/input with/without 100 OR any numbers
that clearly show relationship the correct way up is intended C1
efficiency = (100 × 10 400/30 900 = ) 33.7% at least 2 s.f. A1 [3]
allow ecf from (a) and 1st line of (b)

(c) (i) from basin/to sea/from right/to left B1

(ii) turbine design allows rotation in both directions


OR meaningful comment on change of pitch
OR generator works when rotating in either direction B1 [2]

[Total: 8]

4 (a) (i) 50° B1

(ii) total internal (reflection) B1 [2]

(b) use of sin i/sin r = n OR 1/n in any form


OR 1/sin c = n OR 1/n C1
i = 40(°) and r = 90(°) OR vice versa ecf if measured from interface not normal C1
n = (1/sin i = 1/0.643 = ) 1.556 ecf from previous line A1 [3]

(c) reflected ray drawn in same position as original reflected ray B1


0° < angle of refracted ray from surface < 13° B1 [2]

(d) prism drawn in correct orientation to give t.i.r. B1


correct reflection of rays B1 [2]

[Total: 9]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2012


PMT

Page 6 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2012 0625 33

5 (a) (i) CD B1

(ii) any 3 points from


• wavefront changes direction/refracted OR wavefront bends B1
• in Q distances travelled (by waves) shorter/wavelength less B1
• wave spreads in region Q from B B1
• all points on wavefront AB move to (corresponding) points on CD
• in same time that/while end A of wavefront AB move to C and end B
moves to D [4]

(b) regions P and Q same depth/regions P and Q (now) one medium B1


same wavelength/wavefronts travel same speed/distance in each region
OR no refraction/change of direction OR no bending of waves B1 [2]

[Total: 6]

6 (a) T-shirt in wind/on L dries quicker OR T-shirt out of wind/on R dries slower M1
wind removes more evaporated molecules accept quicker
NOT wind gives water molecules more KE A1 [2]

(b) T-shirt folded double/on R dries slower OR T-shirt unfolded/on L dries quicker M1
correct reference to smaller/larger surface area for molecules to evaporate
OR water trapped (in fold) OR more humid in fold A1 [2]

(c) water evaporates from her hair B1


heat required for evaporation OR heat flows (from body/hair) to warm up cold
water
OR faster molecules escape leaving water cooler/lowering KE
ignore: there is a cooling effect B1 [2]

[Total: 6]

7 (a) (i) more negatives in left than right B1


roughly same no. of positives as negatives B1 [2]

(ii) clearly more negatives than positives, anywhere on sphere B1 [1]

(b) (i) straight lines, radial towards point, arrows inwards B1

(ii) direction of field OR direction of force on (point) positive (charge) B1 [2]

[Total: 5]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2012


PMT

Page 7 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2012 0625 33

8 (a) (i) (milliammeter) deflects/shows reading/current OR reading changes OR there


is a current B1
change of flux/field (lines) cut OR emf/current induced/produced B1 [2]

(ii) greater deflection/current B1


rate of change of flux (linkage) is greater o.w.t.t.e
e.g. more magnetic field lines cutting coil (per second) OR field cut faster B1 [2]

(b) (i) upwards/opposite to magnet’s direction of travel ignore towards magnet B1

(ii) current (in coil) causes a magnetic field B1


force caused by overlapping (magnetic) fields B1 [3]

[Total: 7]

9 (a) (i) total R = 320 (Ω) or V per lamp = 6 (V) C1


I = (240/320 or 6/8 =) 0.75 A ecf from previous line A1 [2]

(ii) use of P = VI OR I2R OR V2/R C1


4.5 W ecf from (a)(i) A1 [2]

(b) resistance of each lamp = 8 × 1.05 = 8.4 (Ω) B1


total R = 240/0.9 = 266.7 (Ω) OR V per lamp = 8.4 x 0.9 = 7.56 (V) B1
no. of lamps (= 266.7/8.4) = 31.7 OR (= 240/7.56) = 31.7 B1
max. no. of failed lamps = 8 B1
accept reverse logic [4]

[Total: 8]

10 for (b) and (d) accept HIGH/LOW or ON/OFF

(a) NOR B1 [1]

(b) outputs 1, 0, 0, 0
lose 1 mark e.e.o.o. B2 [2]

(c) (i) OR and NOT gates either order B1

(ii) both symbols correct B1


OR then NOT, connected B1 [3]

(d) logic level at Y, 0 B1


logic level at Z, opposite to candidate’s answer to Y B1 [2]

[Total: 8]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2012


PMT

Page 8 Mark Scheme: Teachers’ version Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2012 0625 33

11 (a) any mention background B1


background/radiation varies randomly o.w.t.t.e. OR rate of decay very small OR
sample nearly all decayed B1 [2]

(b) correctly deducts correct background (13 – 15 /s) B1


takes 2 detector readings, one twice the other B1
correct working, with/without background subtraction, i.e. use of graph B1
half life = 1.2 – 1.8 days OR follows from working B1 [4]

(c) α (very) short range in air OR will not reach researcher


NOT will not penetrate skin B1
γ long range/very penetrating/heavy shielding needed OR will reach researcher B1 [2]

[Total: 8]

© University of Cambridge International Examinations 2012


PMT

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS


International General Certificate of Secondary Education
* 0 4 3 7 9 3 2 4 5 6 *

PHYSICS 0625/33
Paper 3 Extended May/June 2012
1 hour 15 minutes
Candidates answer on the Question Paper.
No Additional Materials are required.

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

Write your Centre number, candidate number and name on all the work you hand in.
Write in dark blue or black pen.
You may use a pencil for any diagrams or graphs.
Do not use staples, paper clips, highlighters, glue or correction fluid.
DO NOT WRITE IN ANY BARCODES.
For Examiner’s Use
Answer all questions.
You may lose marks if you do not show your working or if you do not use 1
appropriate units.
Take the weight of 1 kg to be 10 N (i.e. acceleration of free fall = 10 m / s2). 2
At the end of the examination, fasten all your work securely together. 3
The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end of each question or
part question. 4

10

11

Total

This document consists of 19 printed pages and 1 blank page.

DC (NF/SW) 58313
© UCLES 2012 [Turn over
PMT

1 Fig. 1.1 is a distance / time graph showing the motion of an object. For
Examiner’s
Use
25

20
distance / m
15

10

0
0 1 2 3 4
time / s

Fig. 1.1

(a) (i) Describe the motion shown for the first 2 s, calculating any relevant quantity.

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................
[2]

(ii) After 2 s the object accelerates.

On Fig. 1.1, sketch a possible shape of the graph for the next 2 s.
[1]

(b) Describe how a distance / time graph shows an object that is stationary.

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [1]

© UCLES 2012 0625/33/M/J/12


PMT

(c) Fig. 1.2 shows the axes for a speed / time graph. For
Examiner’s
Use
10

8
speed
m/s 6

0
0 1 2 3 4
time / s

Fig. 1.2

On Fig. 1.2, draw

(i) the graph of the motion for the first 2 s as shown in Fig. 1.1,
(ii) an extension of the graph for the next 2 s, showing the object accelerating at 2 m / s2.
[3]

(d) Describe how a speed / time graph shows an object that is stationary.

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [2]

[Total: 9]

© UCLES 2012 0625/33/M/J/12 [Turn over


PMT

2 Fig. 2.1 shows a mobile bird sculpture that has been created by an artist. For
Examiner’s
Use
tail

bird sculpture

pivot

M hole in sculpture E
for pivot

12 cm 30 cm

Fig. 2.1

M is the centre of mass of the bird sculpture, including its tail (but not including the
counter-weight that will be added later). The mass of the bird and tail is 1.5 kg.

The bird sculpture is placed on a pivot.

The artist adds the counter-weight at the end E of the tail so that the bird remains stationary
in the position shown.

(a) Calculate the mass of the counter-weight.

mass = ................................................. [2]

(b) The centre of mass of the sculpture with counter-weight is at the pivot.

Calculate the upward force acting at the pivot.

force = ................................................. [1]

© UCLES 2012 0625/33/M/J/12


PMT

(c) The sculpture is rotated clockwise to the position shown in Fig. 2.2. It is held still, then For
carefully released. Examiner’s
Use

pivot

counter-weight

Fig. 2.2

(i) State whether the sculpture will stay in that position, rotate further clockwise or
rotate back anticlockwise.

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

(ii) Explain your answer to (i).

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................
[3]

[Total: 6]

© UCLES 2012 0625/33/M/J/12 [Turn over


PMT

3 Fig. 3.1 shows a water turbine that is generating electricity in a small tidal energy scheme. For
Examiner’s
Use
barrage

sea-water level at high tide

3.0 m

water level in tidal basin

turbine connected to
electricity generator

Fig. 3.1

At high tide, 1.0 m3 of sea-water of density 1030 kg / m3 flows through the turbine every
second.

(a) Calculate the loss of gravitational potential energy when 1.0 m3 of sea-water falls
through a vertical distance of 3.0 m.

loss of gravitational potential energy = ................................................. [3]

(b) Assume that your answer to (a) is the energy lost per second by the sea-water passing
through the turbine at high tide. The generator delivers a current of 26 A at 400 V.

Calculate the efficiency of the scheme.

efficiency = ..............................................% [3]

© UCLES 2012 0625/33/M/J/12


PMT

(c) At low tide, the sea-water level is lower than the water level in the tidal basin. For
Examiner’s
(i) State the direction of the flow of water through the turbine at low tide. Use

..................................................................................................................................

(ii) Suggest an essential feature of the turbine and generator for electricity to be
generated at low tide.

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................
[2]

[Total: 8]

© UCLES 2012 0625/33/M/J/12 [Turn over


PMT

4 Figs. 4.1 and 4.2 show a semi-circular glass block as rays of blue light are directed into the For
block at different angles. The rays are directed towards the centre C of the semi-circle so that Examiner’s
no refraction occurs as the rays enter the block. Use

(a) At the angle shown in Fig. 4.1, no refracted ray emerges from the block at C.

C
40°

incident reflected
ray ray
glass
air

Fig. 4.1

(i) Determine the angle of reflection at C.

angle of reflection = ......................................................


(ii) State the type of reflection occurring at C.

..................................................................................................................................
[2]

(b)

C
50° ray emerges in air
close to glass
surface

incident reflected
ray glass ray
air

Fig. 4.2

Calculate the refractive index of the glass.

refractive index = ................................................. [3]

© UCLES 2012 0625/33/M/J/12


PMT

(c) The experiment in (b) is now repeated with red light. For
Examiner’s
On Fig. 4.3, draw and label the paths of the reflected and refracted rays of red light. The Use

dashed lines show the paths taken by the blue light in (b).

C
50°

paths taken by rays


of blue light in (b)
red
light

Fig. 4.3 [2]

(d) Fig. 4.4 shows a 45° – 45° – 90° prism used in an optical instrument. Part of the path of
a ray of light passing through the instrument is also shown. Light leaves the instrument
along path B.

prism

path B

Fig. 4.4

In the dashed box, draw another 45° – 45° – 90° prism and complete the path of the
light through this box. [2]

[Total: 9]

© UCLES 2012 0625/33/M/J/12 [Turn over


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10

5 Fig. 5.1 shows a view from above of waves on the surface of water in a water tank. For
Examiner’s
Use

region Q B C
region P

Fig. 5.1

The wavefront AB is travelling in region P towards region Q, where the water is shallower
and the waves travel more slowly.

(a) Some time later, the wavefront has moved into region Q.

CD, CE and CF are suggested positions of the new wavefront.

(i) State which is the correct position of the new wavefront.

..................................................................................................................................

(ii) Explain your answer to (i).

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................
[4]

© UCLES 2012 0625/33/M/J/12


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11

(b) Fig. 5.2 shows the waves after a change is made to the way the tank is set up, and the For
experiment is repeated. Examiner’s
Use

region Q B C
region P

Fig. 5.2

The wave from position AB in region P now moves to position CG in region Q.

State the change that has been made and explain your reasoning.

change .............................................................................................................................

explanation ......................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [2]

[Total: 6]

© UCLES 2012 0625/33/M/J/12 [Turn over


PMT

12

6 (a) Two students hang out identical T-shirts to dry at the same time in the same For
neighbourhood. The only difference between the drying conditions is that one T-shirt is Examiner’s
sheltered from any wind and the other is in a strong breeze, as shown in Fig. 6.1. Use

fence
clothes line

strong breeze no breeze

Fig. 6.1

State and explain, in terms of water molecules, the difference between the drying times
of the T-shirts.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [2]

© UCLES 2012 0625/33/M/J/12


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13

(b) Fig. 6.2 shows another occasion when a student hangs out two identical T-shirts to dry For
next to each other on a line. One T-shirt is folded double as shown in Fig. 6.2. Examiner’s
Use

clothes line

Fig. 6.2

State and explain, in terms of water molecules, the difference between the drying times
of the T-shirts.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [2]

(c) A runner in a hot country feels cooler if she pours water over her hair to keep it wet,
even when the water is at the same temperature as the air around her.

Explain, in terms of a change of state of water, why she feels cooler.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [2]

[Total: 6]

© UCLES 2012 0625/33/M/J/12 [Turn over


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14

7 (a) Fig. 7.1 shows a conducting sphere A, initially uncharged, mounted on an insulating For
base. The positively-charged, non-conducting sphere B is brought close to sphere A Examiner’s
without touching the sphere. Use

non-conducting
sphere B conducting sphere
A
+++
+ +
++ +

insulating
base

Fig. 7.1

(i) On Fig. 7.1, draw the resulting distribution of any positive and negative charges on
sphere A. [2]
(ii) The sphere A is now earthed as shown in Fig. 7.2.

non-conducting
sphere B conducting sphere
A
+++
+ +
++ +

connection
to earth

insulating
base

Fig. 7.2

On Fig. 7.2, draw the distribution of any positive and negative charges on sphere A after
it is earthed. [1]

© UCLES 2012 0625/33/M/J/12


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15

(b) (i) On Fig. 7.3, draw lines of force with direction arrows to represent the electric field For
pattern in the plane of the paper around a negative point charge at point X. Examiner’s
Use

Fig. 7.3

(ii) State what is represented by the directions of the arrows on the lines.

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................
[2]

[Total: 5]

© UCLES 2012 0625/33/M/J/12 [Turn over


PMT

16

8 A student holds a magnet above a solenoid, which is connected to a centre-zero milli-ammeter For
as shown Fig. 8.1. Examiner’s
Use

magnet

mA solenoid

Fig. 8.1

(a) The student drops the magnet so that it falls through the solenoid.

State and explain what would be observed on the milliammeter

(i) as the magnet enters the solenoid,

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................. [2]

(ii) as the magnet speeds up inside the solenoid.

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................. [2]

(b) As the magnet passes into the coil in part (a), the coil exerts a force on the magnet even
though there is no contact between them.

(i) State the direction of this force.

..................................................................................................................................

(ii) Explain how this force is caused.

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................
[3]
[Total: 7]
© UCLES 2012 0625/33/M/J/12
PMT

17

9 40 lamps, each of resistance 8.0 Ω, are connected in series to a 240 V supply in order to For
decorate a tree. Examiner’s
Use

(a) Calculate

(i) the current in each lamp,

current = ................................................. [2]

(ii) the power dissipated in each lamp.

power = ................................................. [2]

(b) The lamps are designed to “fail-short”. If a filament fails, the lamp shorts so that it has
no resistance. The other lamps continue to light and the current increases.

The lamps are connected through a fuse that blows when the current rises above
0.9 A. At this current, the resistance of each lamp is 5% greater than its normal working
resistance.

Calculate the maximum number of lamps that can fail before the fuse blows.

number of lamps = ................................................. [4]

[Total: 8]

© UCLES 2012 0625/33/M/J/12 [Turn over


PMT

18

10 A student is designing a digital electronics circuit and needs to use the logic gate X shown For
in Fig. 10.1. Examiner’s
Use

input A
output
input B
X

Fig. 10.1

(a) Name the logic gate X. .................................. [1]

(b) Write down the values of the output when the inputs are

(i) input A low (logic 0), input B low (logic 0), output ..................................

(ii) input A low (logic 0), input B high (logic 1), output ..................................

(iii) input A high (logic 1), input B low (logic 0), output ..................................

(iv) input A high (logic 1), input B high (logic 1). output ..................................
[2]

(c) When the student starts to build the circuit, he finds that the store room has run out
of this type of logic gate. There is a supply of AND, OR and NOT gates. The student’s
teacher explains that a combination of two of these gates may be used instead of logic
gate X.

(i) State the two gates he should use to replace logic gate X.

.................................. and ..................................

(ii) Draw clearly in the space below these two logic gates, correctly connected, using
standard symbols.

[3]

(d) Fig. 10.2 shows a block diagram, not using standard symbols, of a combination of gates.

U NOT Y Z
AND NOT
W

Fig. 10.2

State the logic levels of points Y and Z when the logic levels of points U and W are both 1.

logic level at point Y ......................................................

logic level at point Z ......................................................


[2]
[Total: 8]
© UCLES 2012 0625/33/M/J/12
PMT

19

11 In a research laboratory, a radioactive sample is placed close to a radiation detector. The For
graph in Fig. 11.1 shows the decay of the sample. Examiner’s
Use
60

50

detector reading 40
counts / min
30

20

10

0
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
time / days

Fig. 11.1

(a) After 6 days the count rate hardly decreases and, in fact, increases a little at times.
Explain these observations.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [2]

(b) Use the graph to determine the half-life of the sample. Explain your working carefully.

half-life = ................................................. [4]

(c) Another radioactive sample is a strong emitter of α-particles and γ-rays. A junior
researcher suggests that a sufficient safety precaution, when working with this sample,
would be to hold the sample with long forceps. Explain why this suggestion, although
helpful, may be insufficient.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [2]
[Total: 8]
© UCLES 2012 0625/33/M/J/12
PMT

20

BLANK PAGE

Permission to reproduce items where third-party owned material protected by copyright is included has been sought and cleared where possible. Every
reasonable effort has been made by the publisher (UCLES) to trace copyright holders, but if any items requiring clearance have unwittingly been included, the
publisher will be pleased to make amends at the earliest possible opportunity.

University of Cambridge International Examinations is part of the Cambridge Assessment Group. Cambridge Assessment is the brand name of University of
Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES), which is itself a department of the University of Cambridge.

© UCLES 2012 0625/33/M/J/12


PMT

CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS


International General Certificate of Secondary Education

MARK SCHEME for the May/June 2013 series

0625 PHYSICS
0625/31 Paper 3 (Extended Theory), maximum raw mark 80

This mark scheme is published as an aid to teachers and candidates, to indicate the requirements of
the examination. It shows the basis on which Examiners were instructed to award marks. It does not
indicate the details of the discussions that took place at an Examiners’ meeting before marking began,
which would have considered the acceptability of alternative answers.

Mark schemes should be read in conjunction with the question paper and the Principal Examiner
Report for Teachers.

Cambridge will not enter into discussions about these mark schemes.

Cambridge is publishing the mark schemes for the May/June 2013 series for most IGCSE, GCE
Advanced Level and Advanced Subsidiary Level components and some Ordinary Level components.
PMT

Page 2 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2013 0625 31

NOTES ABOUT MARK SCHEME SYMBOLS & OTHER MATTERS

M marks are method marks upon which further marks depend. For an M mark to be scored, the
point to which it refers must be seen in a candidate's answer. If a candidate fails to score
a particular M mark, then none of the dependent marks can be scored.

B marks are independent marks, which do not depend on other marks. For a B mark to be scored,
the point to which it refers must be seen specifically in the candidate’s answers.

A marks In general A marks are awarded for final answers to numerical questions.
If a final numerical answer, eligible for A marks, is correct, with the correct unit and an
acceptable number of significant figures, all the marks for that question are normally
awarded.
It is very occasionally possible to arrive at a correct answer by an entirely wrong
approach. In these rare circumstances, do not award the A marks, but award C marks on
their merits. However, correct numerical answers with no working shown gain all the
marks available.

C marks are compensatory marks in general applicable to numerical questions. These can be
scored even if the point to which they refer are not written down by the candidate,
provided subsequent working gives evidence that they must have known it. For
example, if an equation carries a C mark and the candidate does not write down the
actual equation but does correct substitution or working which shows he knew the
equation, then the C mark is scored. A C mark is not awarded if a candidate makes two
points which contradict each other. Points which are wrong but irrelevant are ignored.

brackets ( ) around words or units in the mark scheme are intended to indicate wording used to
clarify the mark scheme, but the marks do not depend on seeing the words or units in
brackets, e.g. 10 (J) means that the mark is scored for 10, regardless of the unit given.

underlining indicates that this must be seen in the answer offered, or something very similar.

OR / or indicates alternative answers, any one of which is satisfactory for scoring the marks.

e.e.o.o. means ‘each error or omission’.

o.w.t.t.e. means ‘or words to that effect’.

Spelling Be generous about spelling and use of English. If an answer can be understood to mean
what we want, give credit. However, beware of and do not allow ambiguities, accidental
or deliberate: e.g. spelling which suggests confusion between reflection / refraction /
diffraction / thermistor / transistor / transformer.

Not/NOT Indicates that an incorrect answer is not to be disregarded, but cancels another
otherwise correct alternative offered by the candidate i.e. right plus wrong penalty
applies.

Ignore Indicates that something which is not correct or irrelevant is to be disregarded and does
not cause a right plus wrong penalty.

© Cambridge International Examinations 2013


PMT

Page 3 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2013 0625 31

e.c.f. meaning ‘error carried forward’ is mainly applicable to numerical questions, but may in
particular circumstances be applied in non-numerical questions.
This indicates that if a candidate has made an earlier mistake and has carried an
incorrect value forward to subsequent stages of working, marks indicated by ecf may be
awarded, provided the subsequent working is correct, bearing in mind the earlier
mistake. This prevents a candidate being penalised more than once for a particular
mistake, but only applies to marks annotated e.c.f.

Significant Figures
Answers are normally acceptable to any number of significant figures ù 2. Accept
answers that round to give the correct answer to 2 s.f. Any exceptions to this general rule
will be specified in the mark scheme.

Units Deduct one mark for each incorrect or missing unit from a final answer that would
otherwise gain all the marks available for that answer: maximum 1 per question.

Arithmetic errors
Deduct one mark if the only error in arriving at a final answer is clearly an arithmetic one.

Transcription errors
Deduct one mark if the only error in arriving at a final answer is because given or
previously calculated data has clearly been misread but used correctly.

Fractions e.g. ½, ¼, 1/10 etc. are only acceptable where specified.

© Cambridge International Examinations 2013


PMT

Page 4 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2013 0625 31

1 (a) (density =) mass/volume OR mass per unit volume


OR m/V with symbols explained B1

(b) (i) (vol =) mass/density OR 60.7/2.70 C1


= 22.48 cm3 to 2 or more sig. figs A1

(ii) V = A × (average) thickness OR thickness = V/A


OR 22.48 / (50 × 30) C1
0.01499 cm to 2 or more sig. figs. e.c.f. (b)(i) A1

(c) (i) micrometer/screw gauge / (vernier/digital) callipers B1

(ii) check zero of device used / cut sheet into several pieces / detail of how to use
device / fold sheet B1

measure thickness of sheet in different places


OR measure thickness of several pieces together B1
calculate/obtain average thickness OR divide answer by number of measurements/
pieces/places B1

[Total 9]

2 (a) underline or circle force B1


underline or circle velocity B1

(b) (i) 4.07 – 4.1 (s) B1

(ii) (v – u)/t OR ∆v/t OR in words OR use of 40 ÷ (ans. to (b)(i))


OR other correct values from graph C1
answer between 9.7 and 10 m/s2 or m/s/s A1

(iii) area under graph OR ½ (u + v)t OR ½ × 40 × (ans. to (b)(i)) C1


OR s = ut + ½at2 OR v2 = u2 + 2as OR numbers substituted
82 m A1

(c) graph continues in straight line to 6 s B1

[Total 8]

© Cambridge International Examinations 2013


PMT

Page 5 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2013 0625 31

3 (a) (i) 1. (loss of P.E. =) mgh OR 92 × 10 × 1500 C1


1.38 × 106 J A1
correct use of mgh with h = 500 or 2000 gains 1 mark only

(ii) 2. (K.E. =) ½ mv2 OR ½ × 92 × 522 C1


1.244 × 105 J at least 2 sig. figs A1

(a) (ii) difference is due to:


(work done in overcoming) air resistance/drag
OR energy converted to/lost as heat (by air resistance/drag) B1

(b) (i) increases B1

(ii) 920 N B1

[Total 7]

4 (a) (i) mention of vacuum OR glass is a poor conductor


OR vacuum/gap between walls has no molecules/atoms/particles B1

(ii) surface/silver (of walls) is good reflector/poor absorber (of radiation) B1


surface/silver (of walls) is poor emitter (of radiation) B1

(b) add a stopper/lid/bung/cover/top to reduce/prevent (loss of heat by) convection/ M1


conduction/radiation/evaporation OR to prevent steam/hot vapour leaving B1

made of insulator OR example of insulator to reduce/prevent (loss of heat by)


convection/radiation/evaporation OR to prevent steam/hot air leaving B1

[Total 6]

5 (a) (i) and (ii) marked together to maximum of 3 marks


(i) molecules escape/leave the liquid/form gas or vapour B1

(ii) evaporation OR heat/(thermal) energy needed for evaporation leaves sweat cooler B1
fast(er) molecules/high(er) energy molecules escape
OR slow(er) molecules left behind B1
heat flows from body to warm the sweat (so body cools) B1

(b) (i) (Q =) mc∆θ OR mcT OR 60 × 4000 × 0.50 C1


1.2 × 105 J / 120 kJ A1

(ii) Q = mL in any form OR (m =) Q/L OR either with numbers C1


(m = 1.2 × 105 / 2.4 × 106 =) 0.05 kg e.c.f from (b)(i) A1

[Total 7]

© Cambridge International Examinations 2013


PMT

Page 6 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2013 0625 31

6 (a) (i) (pressure =) force/area OR force per unit area OR (P =) F/A with symbols
explained B1

(ii) molecules collide with/hit walls/surface (of box) B1


molecule(s) exert force on wall B1
pressure is total force / force of all molecules divided by (total) area of wall B1

(b) (i) (P =) hρg OR in words OR 0.25 × 13 600 × 10 C1


34 000 Pa OR N/m2 A1
allow 1 mark for h = 250 used and 3.4 × 107 Pa obtained

(ii) (P = 1.02 × 105 – 34 000)


68 000 Pa or N/m2 B1
e.c.f. from (b)(i) only if (b)(i) is less than 1.02 × 105

[Total 7]

7 (a) two of:


ray through centre of lens undeviated
ray parallel to axis refracted to right hand focus B2
rays through left hand focus refracted parallel to axis

rays extrapolated to a point B1

accuracy marks: image 6 cm from lens B1


image 6 cm high B1

(b) image is virtual/not real AND


cannot be seen on screen OR no rays come from (position of) image B1

[Total 6]

© Cambridge International Examinations 2013


PMT

Page 7 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2013 0625 31

8 (a) 15–25 Hz to 15 000–25 000 Hz / 15–25 kHz B1

(b) (i) (region) where air layers/molecules/particles are pushed together/moved together/
closer (than normal)
OR (region) where (air) pressure raised/air (more) compressed/more dense B1

(ii) (region) where air layers/molecules are pushed apart/far(ther) apart (than normal)
OR (region) where (air) pressure reduced/air expanded B1

(c) (i) (sound is) loud(er) OR volume (of sound is) increased B1

(ii) sound has a higher frequency/pitch OR higher note (heard) B1

(d) 3.5 – 1.9 OR 1.6 (s) seen OR v = 2d /1.9 C1


250 × 2 OR 500 (m) seen OR v = (2d + 500)/3.5 C1
(speed = 500 / 1.6 =) 312.5 m / s at least 2 sig. figs A1

[Total 8]

9 (a) (i) all lamps off

(ii) 12 Ω lamps (only) on B1

(iii) 4 Ω lamps (only) on

(b) (i) 12 V B1

(ii) I = V/R in any form OR V/R OR 12/12 C1


1.0 A OR 1 A A1
e.c.f. from (b)(i)

(c) current in 4 Ω lamp = 3 (A) (current in 12 Ω lamp is in (b)(ii)) C1


(P =) IV OR I 2R C1
(P =) 36 W for 4 Ω lamp; P = 12 W for 12 Ω lamp A1
e.c.f. from (b)(ii)
OR
(P =) V2/R (C1)
(P =) 122/4 = 36 W for 4 Ω lamp OR 122/12 = 12 W for 12 Ω lamp (C1)
(P =) 122/4 = 36 W for 4 Ω lamp AND 122/12 = 12 W for 12 Ω lamp (A1)
OR
(P =) V2/R (B1)
Same V for all lamps (M1)
4 Ω lamp has higher power / 12 Ω has lower power (A1)

[Total 7]

© Cambridge International Examinations 2013


PMT

Page 8 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2013 0625 31

10 (a) at least 3 concentric circles centred on wire B1


arrows clockwise on each circle / at least one circle B1
spacing of circles increasing as radius increases B1

(b) (i) arrow pointing down on side AB, up on side CD B1

(ii) forces on AB and CD are opposite OR up and down and separated / not in same
line (so cause rotation)
OR have moments in same sense / direction
OR cause couple / torque B1

(iii) to reverse current in loop or keep current in AB or CD in the same direction


OR keep current on side near a pole in the same direction when (plane of) coil is
vertical
OR every half turn
OR when AB and CD swap sides B1
so that:
rotation continues (in same direction)
OR so that rotation doesn’t reverse its direction
OR to maintain sense/direction of moments/couple
OR coil turns more than half a revolution B1

[Total 7]

11 (a) (i) 2 protons B1


2 neutrons B1

(ii) a (fast moving) electron B1

(b) electron/electrons removed from/gained by the molecule B1

(c) (i) force because particle is charged


OR the force on the particles is perpendicular to their paths
OR direction of force changes as direction of motion changes B1

(ii) α-particle curve up the page in at least half of width of field B1

β-particle curve opposite to α-particle curve OR down page if α line has no B1


curvature anywhere
smaller radius of β path clear B1

[Total 8]

© Cambridge International Examinations 2013


PMT

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS


International General Certificate of Secondary Education
* 6 4 2 2 8 5 0 7 8 5 *

PHYSICS 0625/31
Paper 3 Extended May/June 2013
1 hour 15 minutes
Candidates answer on the Question Paper.
No Additional Materials are required.

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

Write your Centre number, candidate number and name on all the work you hand in.
Write in dark blue or black pen.
You may use a pencil for any diagrams or graphs.
Do not use staples, paper clips, highlighters, glue or correction fluid.
DO NOT WRITE IN ANY BARCODES.

Answer all questions. For Examiner’s Use


Electronic calculators may be used.
You may lose marks if you do not show your working or if you do not use 1
appropriate units.
Take the weight of 1 kg to be 10 N (i.e. acceleration of free fall = 10 m / s2). 2

At the end of the examination, fasten all your work securely together. 3
The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end of each question or part
question. 4

10

11

Total

This document consists of 20 printed pages.

DC (SJF/CGW) 58285/4
© UCLES 2013 [Turn over
PMT

1 (a) Define density. For


Examiner’s
.......................................................................................................................................... Use

...................................................................................................................................... [1]

(b) The density of aluminium is 2.70 g / cm3. The thickness of a rectangular sheet of
aluminium foil varies, but is much less than 1 mm.

A student wishes to find the average thickness. She obtains the following measurements.

mass of sheet = 60.7 g


length of sheet = 50.0 cm
width of sheet = 30.0 cm

Calculate the student’s values for

(i) the volume of the sheet,

volume = .................................................. [2]

(ii) the average thickness of the sheet.

thickness = .................................................. [2]

(c) Another student, provided with a means of cutting the sheet, decides to find its average
thickness using a single measuring instrument. Assume the surfaces of the sheet are
perfectly smooth.

(i) Name a measuring instrument she could use.

.............................................................................................................................. [1]

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PMT

(ii) Describe the procedure she should follow to obtain an accurate value of the For
average thickness of the sheet. Examiner’s
Use
Details of how to read the instrument are not required.

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

.............................................................................................................................. [3]

[Total: 9]

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PMT

2 (a) Underline the vectors in the following list of quantities. For


Examiner’s
density energy force mass velocity volume [2] Use

(b) A small metal ball is projected into the air with a velocity of 40 m / s vertically upwards.

The graph in Fig. 2.1 shows how the velocity changes with time until the ball reaches its
maximum height.

40
velocity
m/s

20

0
0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 6.0
time / s

–20

–40

Fig. 2.1

Use the graph to find,

(i) the time at which the ball reaches its maximum height,

time = .................................................. [1]

(ii) the deceleration of the ball,

deceleration = .................................................. [2]

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PMT

(iii) the maximum height reached by the ball. For


Examiner’s
Use

maximum height = .................................................. [2]

(c) On Fig. 2.1, add a line to the graph to show how the velocity of the ball changes after it
reaches its maximum height. Your line should extend to time 6.0 s. [1]
[Total: 8]

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3 Fig. 3.1 shows the descent of a sky-diver from a stationary balloon. For
Examiner’s
Use

2000 m

sky-diver

parachute

500 m

Fig. 3.1 (not to scale)


The sky-diver steps from the balloon at a height of 2000 m and accelerates downwards.
His speed is 52 m / s at a height of 500 m.
He then opens his parachute. From 400 m to ground level, he falls at constant speed.
(a) The total mass of the sky-diver and his equipment is 92 kg.
(i) Calculate, for the sky-diver,
1. the loss of gravitational potential energy in the fall from 2000 m to 500 m,

loss of gravitational potential energy = .................................................. [2]


2. the kinetic energy at the height of 500 m.

kinetic energy = .................................................. [2]


© UCLES 2013 0625/31/M/J/13
PMT

(ii) The kinetic energy at 500 m is not equal to the loss of gravitational potential energy. For
Explain why there is a difference in the values. Examiner’s
Use

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

.............................................................................................................................. [1]

(b) State

(i) what happens to the air resistance acting on the sky-diver during the fall from
2000 m to 500 m,

.............................................................................................................................. [1]

(ii) the value of the air resistance during the fall from 400 m to ground.

air resistance = .................................................. [1]

[Total: 7]

© UCLES 2013 0625/31/M/J/13 [Turn over


PMT

4 Fig. 4.1 shows a cross-section of a double-walled glass vacuum flask, containing a hot liquid. For
The surfaces of the two glass walls of the flask have shiny silvered coatings. Examiner’s
Use

silvered
surfaces

vacuum

hot liquid

Fig. 4.1

(a) Explain

(i) why the rate of loss of thermal energy through the walls of the flask by conduction
is very low,

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

(ii) why the rate of loss of thermal energy through the walls of the flask by radiation is
very low.

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................
[3]

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(b) Suggest, with reasons, what must be added to the flask shown in Fig. 4.1 in order to For
keep the liquid hot. Examiner’s
Use

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................... [3]
[Total: 6]

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10

5 (a) On a hot day, sweat forms on the surface of a person’s body and the sweat evaporates. For
Examiner’s
Explain, in terms of the behaviour of molecules, Use

(i) the process of evaporation,

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

(ii) how this process helps the body to cool down.

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................
[3]

(b) The temperature of a person of mass 60 kg falls from 37.2 °C to 36.7 °C.

(i) Calculate the thermal energy lost from the body. The average specific heat capacity
of the body is 4000 J / (kg °C).

thermal energy lost = .................................................. [2]

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11

(ii) The cooling of the body was entirely due to the evaporation of sweat. For
Examiner’s
Calculate the mass of sweat which evaporated. The specific latent heat of Use
vaporisation of sweat is 2.4 × 106 J / kg.

mass = .................................................. [2]


[Total: 7]

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12

6 (a) (i) Define pressure. For


Examiner’s
.............................................................................................................................. [1] Use

(ii) A closed box contains a gas.


Explain, in terms of molecules, how the gas exerts a pressure on the walls of the
box.

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

.............................................................................................................................. [3]

(b) Fig. 6.1 shows a flask connected to a pump and also to a manometer containing
mercury.

to pump

manometer

250 mm

flask

Fig. 6.1

The right-hand tube of the manometer is open to the atmosphere.

The pump has been operated so that the mercury levels differ, as shown, by 250 mm.
The density of mercury is 13 600 kg / m3.

(i) Calculate the pressure, in Pa, due to the 250 mm column of mercury.

pressure = .................................................. [2]

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13

(ii) The pressure of the atmosphere is 1.02 × 105 Pa. For


Examiner’s
Calculate the pressure of the air in the flask. Use

pressure = .................................................. [1]

[Total: 7]

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14

7 Fig. 7.1 shows the principal axis PQ of a converging lens and the centre line XY of the lens. For
Examiner’s
Use

P Q

Fig. 7.1

An object 2.0 cm high is placed 2.0 cm to the left of the lens. The converging lens has a
focal length of 3.0 cm.

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15

(a) On Fig. 7.1, draw a full-scale diagram to find the distance of the image from the lens, For
and the height of the image. Examiner’s
Use

distance of image from the lens = ......................................................

height of image = ......................................................


[5]

(b) State and explain whether the image in (a) is real or virtual.

..........................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................... [1]

[Total: 6]

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16

8 (a) State the range of frequencies of sound which can be heard by a healthy human ear. For
Examiner’s
...................................................................................................................................... [1] Use

(b) Compressions and rarefactions occur along the path of sound waves.

State, in terms of the behaviour of molecules, what is meant by

(i) a compression,

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

(ii) a rarefaction.

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................
[2]

(c) State the effect on what is heard by a listener when there is

(i) an increase in the amplitude of a sound,

.............................................................................................................................. [1]

(ii) a decrease in the wavelength of a sound.

.............................................................................................................................. [1]

(d) A student carries out an experiment to find the speed of sound in air.

He stands facing a high cliff and shouts. He hears the echo 1.9 s later.

He then walks 250 m further away from the cliff and shouts again, hearing the echo 3.5 s
later.

Calculate the speed of sound given by this experiment.

speed = .................................................. [3]

[Total: 8]
© UCLES 2013 0625/31/M/J/13
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17

9 Fig. 9.1 shows the circuit that operates the two headlights and the two sidelights of a car. For
Examiner’s
A Use
1

2
3

12 V 4.0 1 4.01 121 121

Fig. 9.1

Two of the lamps have resistances of 4.0 Ω when lit. The other two lamps have resistances of
12 Ω when lit. Switch A can be connected to positions 1, 2 or 3.

(a) State what happens when switch A is connected to

(i) position 1, .................................................................................................................

(ii) position 2, .................................................................................................................

(iii) position 3. .................................................................................................................


[1]

(b) (i) State the potential difference across each lamp when lit.

potential difference = .................................................. [1]

(ii) Calculate the current in each 12 Ω lamp when lit.

current = .................................................. [2]

(c) Show, with reasons for your answer, which type of lamp, 4.0 Ω or 12 Ω, has the higher
power.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................... [3]

[Total: 7]

© UCLES 2013 0625/31/M/J/13 [Turn over


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18

10 (a) Fig. 10.1 shows the cross-section of a wire carrying a current into the plane of the paper. For
Examiner’s
Use

Fig. 10.1

On Fig. 10.1, sketch the magnetic field due to the current in the wire. The detail of your
sketch should suggest the variation in the strength of the field. Show the direction of the
field with arrows. [3]

(b) Fig. 10.2 shows part of a model of a d.c. motor.

S B
axis

A C
N
X
Y D

Fig. 10.2

A loop of wire ABCD is placed between the poles of a magnet. The loop is free to rotate
about the axis shown. There is a current in the loop in the direction indicated by the
arrows.

(i) On Fig. 10.2, draw arrows to show the directions of the forces acting on side AB
and on side CD of the loop. [1]

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19

(ii) With the loop in the position shown in Fig. 10.2, explain why the forces on AB and For
CD cause the loop to rotate about the axis. Examiner’s
Use

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

.............................................................................................................................. [1]

(iii) The ends X and Y of the loop are connected to a battery using brushes and a split-
ring commutator.
State why a split-ring commutator is used.

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

.............................................................................................................................. [2]

[Total: 7]

Turn over for Question 11

© UCLES 2013 0625/31/M/J/13 [Turn over


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20

11 (a) Complete the following statements. For


Examiner’s
(i) An α-particle consists of ......................................................................................... . Use

(ii) A β-particle consists of ........................................................................................... .


[3]

(b) As α-particles and β-particles pass through a gas, molecules of the gas become ionised.

Explain what is meant by the ionisation of a gas molecule.

..........................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................... [1]

(c) Fig. 11.1 shows a beam of α-particles and a beam of β-particles in a vacuum. The
beams are about to enter a region in which a very strong magnetic field is acting. The
direction of the magnetic field is into the page.

_-particles

`-particles

uniform
magnetic field

Fig. 11.1

(i) Suggest why the paths of the particles in the magnetic field are curved.

.............................................................................................................................. [1]

(ii) Sketch the paths of both types of particle in the magnetic field. [3]

[Total: 8]

Permission to reproduce items where third-party owned material protected by copyright is included has been sought and cleared where possible.
Every reasonable effort has been made by the publisher (UCLES) to trace copyright holders, but if any items requiring clearance have unwittingly been
included, the publisher will be pleased to make amends at the earliest possible opportunity.

University of Cambridge International Examinations is part of the Cambridge Assessment Group. Cambridge Assessment is the brand name of
University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES), which is itself a department of the University of Cambridge.

© UCLES 2013 0625/31/M/J/13


PMT

CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS


International General Certificate of Secondary Education

MARK SCHEME for the May/June 2013 series

0625 PHYSICS
0625/32 Paper 3 (Extended Theory), maximum raw mark 80

This mark scheme is published as an aid to teachers and candidates, to indicate the requirements of
the examination. It shows the basis on which Examiners were instructed to award marks. It does not
indicate the details of the discussions that took place at an Examiners’ meeting before marking began,
which would have considered the acceptability of alternative answers.

Mark schemes should be read in conjunction with the question paper and the Principal Examiner
Report for Teachers.

Cambridge will not enter into discussions about these mark schemes.

Cambridge is publishing the mark schemes for the May/June 2013 series for most IGCSE, GCE
Advanced Level and Advanced Subsidiary Level components and some Ordinary Level components.
PMT

Page 2 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2013 0625 32

NOTES ABOUT MARK SCHEME SYMBOLS & OTHER MATTERS

M marks are method marks upon which further marks depend. For an M mark to be scored, the
point to which it refers must be seen in a candidate’s answer. If a candidate fails to score
a particular M mark, then none of the dependent marks can be scored.

B marks are independent marks, which do not depend on other marks. For a B mark to be scored,
the point to which it refers must be seen specifically in the candidate’s answers.

A marks In general A marks are awarded for final answers to numerical questions.
If a final numerical answer, eligible for A marks, is correct, with the correct unit and an
acceptable number of significant figures, all the marks for that question are normally
awarded.
It is very occasionally possible to arrive at a correct answer by an entirely wrong
approach. In these rare circumstances, do not award the A marks, but award C marks on
their merits. However, correct numerical answers with no working shown gain all the
marks available.

C marks are compensatory marks in general applicable to numerical questions. These can be
scored even if the point to which they refer are not written down by the candidate,
provided subsequent working gives evidence that they must have known it. For
example, if an equation carries a C mark and the candidate does not write down the
actual equation but does correct substitution or working which shows he knew the
equation, then the C mark is scored. A C mark is not awarded if a candidate makes two
points which contradict each other. Points which are wrong but irrelevant are ignored.

brackets ( ) around words or units in the mark scheme are intended to indicate wording used to
clarify the mark scheme, but the marks do not depend on seeing the words or units in
brackets, e.g. 10 (J) means that the mark is scored for 10, regardless of the unit given.

underlining indicates that this must be seen in the answer offered, or something very similar.

OR / or indicates alternative answers, any one of which is satisfactory for scoring the marks.

e.e.o.o. means ‘each error or omission’.

o.w.t.t.e. means ‘or words to that effect’.

Spelling Be generous about spelling and use of English. If an answer can be understood to mean
what we want, give credit. However, beware of and do not allow ambiguities, accidental
or deliberate: e.g. spelling which suggests confusion between reflection / refraction /
diffraction / thermistor / transistor / transformer.

Not/NOT Indicates that an incorrect answer is not to be disregarded, but cancels another
otherwise correct alternative offered by the candidate, i.e. right plus wrong penalty
applies.

Ignore Indicates that something which is not correct or irrelevant is to be disregarded and does
not cause a right plus wrong penalty.

© Cambridge International Examinations 2013


PMT

Page 3 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2013 0625 32

e.c.f. meaning ‘error carried forward’ is mainly applicable to numerical questions, but may in
particular circumstances be applied in non-numerical questions.
This indicates that if a candidate has made an earlier mistake and has carried an
incorrect value forward to subsequent stages of working, marks indicated by e.c.f. may
be awarded, provided the subsequent working is correct, bearing in mind the earlier
mistake. This prevents a candidate being penalised more than once for a particular
mistake, but only applies to marks annotated e.c.f.

Significant Figures
Answers are normally acceptable to any number of significant figures ù 2. Accept
answers that round to give the correct answer to 2 s.f. Any exceptions to this general rule
will be specified in the mark scheme.

Units Deduct one mark for each incorrect or missing unit from a final answer that would
otherwise gain all the marks available for that answer: maximum 1 per question.

Arithmetic errors
Deduct one mark if the only error in arriving at a final answer is clearly an arithmetic one.

Transcription errors
Deduct one mark if the only error in arriving at a final answer is because given or
previously calculated data has clearly been misread but used correctly.

Fractions e.g. ½, ¼, 1/10 etc. are only acceptable where specified.

© Cambridge International Examinations 2013


PMT

Page 4 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2013 0625 32

1 (a) V = W × L × D in any form words, symbols or numbers C1


use of M = ρV in any form OR ρV words, symbols or numbers C1
(M = 51 × 20 × 11 × 1030 = 11 556 600 =) 1.2 × 107 kg A1 [3]

(b) p = ρg(∆)h in any form words, symbols or numbers C1


(∆h = 60 000 / (1030 × 10) =) 5.8(25) m A1 [2]

(c) use of F = pA in any form or pA words, symbols or numbers C1


(F = 60 000 × 32.8 × 8.3 = 60 000 × 272.2 =) 1.6(33) × 107 N A1 [2]
e.c.f. from (b)

[Total: 7]

2 (a) (i) Hooke’s Law B1 [1]

(ii) straight line (graph) / constant gradient B1


through origin/(0,0) B1 [2]
ignore through zero
ignore extension proportional to load

(b) curved extension to graph with increasing gradient, condone decreasing


NOT if any part of curve is vertical/horizontal or has negative gradient B1 [1]

[Total: 4]

© Cambridge International Examinations 2013


PMT

Page 5 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2013 0625 32

3 (a) any two from:


at surface / not within liquid (if other way round must be explicit) B1
at any temperature / not at boiling point (if other way round must be explicit) B1 [2]
(evaporation) causes cooling
boiling requires a heat source
bubbles rising

(b) (i) viable heat source clearly described e.g. electrical/immersion heater B1
appropriate readings e.g. V, I, t or P & t or joulemeter readings B1 [2]
OR
combustion heater but only with some mention of amount of fuel used B1
correct measurement of amount of fuel used B1

(ii) viable mass measuring device clearly described B1


e.g. (top pan) balance/scales
appropriate readings B1 [2]
e.g. mass of water before and after / change of mass of water
OR
measuring cylinder B1
volume of water before and after / change of volume of water B1

[Total: 6]

4 (a) suitable scales (more than half each scale used, no products of 3 s, 7 s etc.) B1
2 straight line sections, continuous 0 to 120 s, 1st section positive gradient,
2nd section negative gradient B1
section 1 straight line, from(0, 0) to (30, 900) B1
section 2 straight line from end of section 1 to (120, 0) B1 [4]

(b) (i) use of a = ∆v / t or ∆v / t in any form words, symbols or numbers C1


(a = 900 / 30 =) 30 m / s2 A1 [2]
e.c.f. from graph

(ii) use of s = area under graph (accept valid equation(s)) C1


(distance = 0.5 × 900 × 120 =) 54 000 m A1 [2]
e.c.f. from continuous graph, if curves working must be clear
no e.c.f. from graph if it’s a single rectangle

[Total: 8]

© Cambridge International Examinations 2013


PMT

Page 6 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2013 0625 32

5 (a) (i) diffraction B1 [1]

(ii) 1 or 2 parallel waves (and part-circular ends) in outer harbour


NOT part-circular ends going down B1
3 part-circular waves, > 45° each side by eye, in inner harbour
allow flat below gap
centred in gap, allow error up to 1λ vertically B1
wavelength constant throughout, must have 3 extra wavefronts, judged
along line of direction of wave travel in Fig. 5.1 B1 [3]

(b) (i) refraction B1 [1]

(ii) at least 4 parallel, straight waves joined onto original waves B1


at least 3 straight waves, sloping down to the right OR with constant reduced λ B1 [2]

[Total: 7]

6 (a) correct reflection of left ray


AND 22° ≤ angle between right ray and surface ≤ 32°, by protractor B1
rays projected back to form image in correct position B1 [2]

(b) both rays refract down M1


rays projected back to form image somewhere in water to the left of where left ray
strikes surface A1 [2]

(c) sin c = 1 / 1.33 OR sin c /sin r = 1 / 1.33 C1


OR sin–1 (1 / 1.33) OR sin–1 0.75
(c = 48.8° =) 49° A1 [2]

(d) appropriate use, accept diagram


accept ‘endoscope’, ‘in medicine’ is not sufficient M1
clear diagram of the above use or t.i.r. diagram for optical fibre A1
one from:
light goes down fibre/into body
illuminates internal organ
light/image returns from body/organ o.w.t.t.e. A1 [3]

[Total: 9]

© Cambridge International Examinations 2013


PMT

Page 7 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2013 0625 32

7 (a) (Pi =) 260 (× 2) × length × breadth (= 260 × 0.1), words, symbols or numbers C1
note: gets this mark if omits factor of 2
(Pi = 2 × 260 × 0.25 × 0.2 =) 26 W A1 [2]

(b) (Po = 0.95 × 20 =) 19 (W) B1


efficiency = output (energy) / input (energy)
accept power for energy
E = candidate’s Po/candidate’s Pi evaluated (= 0.73 or 73%), accept fraction (19/26) C1
0.73% or bald 73 gets unit penalty A1 [3]

(c) A OR B in series with C connected across 20 V M1


parallel combination of A and B only A1 [2]

(d) 1 / R = 1 / R1 + 1 / R2 OR R = R1R2 / (R1 + R2) in any form OR R1R2 / (R1 + R2) C1


words, symbols or numbers
12 Ω A1 [2]

[Total: 9]

8 (a) at least 3 complete circles/ellipses, roughly centred on X M1


spacing greater as radius increases A1
at least 1 arrow to show clockwise field, no contradiction B1 [3]

(b) use of compass/suspended small magnet B1


observe needle/magnet on one field line B1
observe needle/magnet on another field line B1
mark on card OR needle/magnet shows direction of field B1 [4]

OR
(sprinkle) iron filings o.w.t.t.e. M1
tap card A1
direction/alignment of iron filings show field B1
use compass/suspended small magnet to show field direction B1

(c) wire X/Y is in a magnetic field / any reference to magnetic fields


accept description involving poles that clearly implies fields B1
current carrying conductor in field / fields interact/cut/combine/overlap B1 [2]

(d) top box only ticked B1 [1]

[Total: 10]

© Cambridge International Examinations 2013


PMT

Page 8 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2013 0625 32

9 (a) first box only ticked in each line 2 × B1 [2]

(b) (i) output/V/I/power increases M1


greater (rate of change of) field/flux
OR sensible reference to V1 / V2 = N1 / N2 OR V1 proportional to V2 A1 [2]

(ii) output/V/I/power zero M1


accept nothing happens NOT no change
field/flux does not change
ignore transformers only work with a.c./don’t work with d.c. A1 [2]
special case for answer about what happens at moment of switching on/off:
correct statement of some output etc. for short time M1
change of field/flux A1

[Total: 6]

10 (a)
hydrogen-1 deuterium tritium

no.of protons 1 1 1

no. of 0 1 2
neutrons

no. of 1 1 1
electrons

proton line correct B1


neutron line correct, do not accept blank for 0 B1
electron line correct B1 [3]

(b) ignore any reference to background radiation throughout this part

(i) beta / fast moving electrons B1 [1]

(ii) any two from:


beta stopped by 5 mm/thick Al / beta not stopped by 0.5 mm/thin Al B1
alpha stopped by 0.5mm/thin Al
accept stopped by paper B1 [2]
gamma not stopped by 5 mm or more/thick Al
ignore any reference to range in air

(c) (i) fusion / thermonuclear (reaction) B1 [1]

(ii) (energy) released B1 [1]

(d) fission B1 [1]

[Total: 9]

© Cambridge International Examinations 2013


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Page 9 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2013 0625 32

11 (a) (i) electrons B1 [1]


ignore β

(ii) to heat cathode or produce thermionic emission o.w.t.t.e.


i.e. any mention of heating/providing energy and production/emission
of electrons B1 [1]
NOT heater/filament emits electrons

(iii) air would stop/weaken (electron) beam OR electrons have no collisions B1 [1]

(b) X-plates B1
zero (p.d.)/off NOT zero current
Y-plates B1 [2]
alternating (p.d.) OR description
condone a.c.

[Total: 5]

© Cambridge International Examinations 2013


PMT

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS


International General Certificate of Secondary Education
* 5 6 3 8 7 4 8 9 6 2 *

PHYSICS 0625/32
Paper 3 Extended May/June 2013
1 hour 15 minutes
Candidates answer on the Question Paper.
No Additional Materials are required.

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

Write your Centre number, candidate number and name on all the work you hand in.
Write in dark blue or black pen.
You may use a pencil for any diagrams or graphs.
Do not use staples, paper clips, highlighters, glue or correction fluid.
DO NOT WRITE IN ANY BARCODES.
For Examiner’s Use
Answer all questions.
Electronic calculators may be used. 1
You may lose marks if you do not show your working or if you do not use
appropriate units. 2
Take the weight of 1 kg to be 10 N (i.e. acceleration of free fall = 10 m / s2).
3
At the end of the examination, fasten all your work securely together.
The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end of each question or 4
part question.
5

10

11

Total

This document consists of 20 printed pages.

DC (SJF/SW) 58287/5
© UCLES 2013 [Turn over
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1 Fig. 1.1 shows a side view of a large tank in a marine visitor attraction. For
Examiner’s
Use

sea-water

viewing
panel
M

tank

Fig. 1.1 (not to scale)

The tank is 51 m long and 20 m wide. The sea-water in the tank is 11 m deep and has a
density of 1030 kg / m3.

(a) Calculate the mass of water in the tank.

mass = ................................................. [3]

(b) The pressure at point M, halfway down the large viewing panel, is 60 kPa more than
atmospheric pressure.

Calculate the depth of M below the surface of the water.

depth = ................................................. [2]

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(c) The viewing panel is 32.8 m wide and 8.3 m high. For
Examiner’s
Calculate the outward force of the water on the panel. Assume that the pressure at M is Use

the average pressure on the whole panel.

force = ................................................. [2]

[Total: 7]

© UCLES 2013 0625/32/M/J/13 [Turn over


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2 Fig. 2.1 shows the extension-load graph for a spring. For


Examiner’s
Use

P
extension

0
0
load

Fig. 2.1

Point P is the limit of proportionality.

(a) (i) Name the law obeyed by the spring from the origin to P.

.............................................................................................................................. [1]

(ii) Describe two features of the graph which show that the law is obeyed.

1. ...............................................................................................................................

2. ...............................................................................................................................
[2]

(b) On Fig. 2.1, sketch a possible continuation of the graph when the spring is loaded
beyond the limit of proportionality. [1]

[Total: 4]

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3 Water molecules evaporate from a puddle and escape to the atmosphere. Water molecules For
also escape to the atmosphere from water boiling in a kettle. Examiner’s
Use

(a) State two ways in which evaporation differs from boiling.

1. ......................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

2. ......................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................
[2]

(b) This part of the question is about an experiment to determine the specific latent heat of
vaporisation of water.

(i) Suggest apparatus that will provide thermal energy (heat) and state the readings
needed to determine the amount of thermal energy provided.

apparatus .................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

readings ...................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................
[2]

(ii) Suggest apparatus required for determining the mass of liquid vaporised and state
the readings needed to determine that mass.

apparatus .................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

readings ...................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................
[2]

[Total: 6]

© UCLES 2013 0625/32/M/J/13 [Turn over


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4 A rocket, initially at rest on the ground, accelerates vertically. For


Examiner’s
It accelerates uniformly until it reaches a speed of 900 m / s after 30 s. Use

After this period of uniform acceleration, the rocket engine cuts out. During the next 90 s, the
upward speed of the rocket decreases uniformly to zero.

(a) On Fig. 4.1, plot a speed-time graph for the rocket for the first 120 s of its flight.

speed
m/s

time / s

Fig. 4.1 [4]

(b) Using the graph,

(i) calculate the acceleration during the first 30 s,

acceleration = .................................................. [2]

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(ii) determine the height reached by the rocket after 120 s. For
Examiner’s
Use

height reached = .................................................. [2]


[Total: 8]

© UCLES 2013 0625/32/M/J/13 [Turn over


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5 (a) Fig. 5.1 shows an aerial view of wavefronts passing from the open sea into an outer For
harbour. Examiner’s
Use

open sea

outer harbour direction of


wall wave travel

outer harbour

inner harbour
wall
inner harbour

Fig. 5.1

(i) The wavefronts in the outer harbour are curving at their ends.
Name the process that is occurring at the entrance to the harbour.

.............................................................................................................................. [1]

(ii) On Fig. 5.1, carefully complete the wave pattern as the wavefronts progress through
the outer harbour and into the inner harbour. Show the rest of the wave pattern in
the outer harbour and three wavefronts in the inner harbour. [3]

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(b) Fig. 5.2 shows an aerial view of wavefronts in deep water approaching a region of For
shallow water where they travel more slowly. Examiner’s
Use

deep water shallow water

direction of
wave travel

interface

Fig. 5.2

(i) Name the process that occurs as the wavefronts pass from deep to shallow water.

.............................................................................................................................. [1]

(ii) Complete Fig. 5.2 to show possible positions of the five wavefronts in the shallow
water. [2]

[Total: 7]

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10

6 (a) Fig. 6.1 shows two rays from a point object P incident on a water surface. For
Examiner’s
An observer sees the image of P produced by reflection at the surface of the water. Use

water
air
surface
water

Fig. 6.1

On Fig. 6.1, draw the reflected rays and complete the diagram to locate the position of
the image. Label the position of the image I. [2]

(b) Fig. 6.2 shows two rays from a point object Q incident on another water surface.

An observer sees the image of Q produced by refraction at the surface of the water.

water
air surface
water

Fig. 6.2

On Fig. 6.2, draw possible refracted rays and complete the diagram to locate a possible
position of the image. Label the position of the image J.
You do not need to calculate any angles. [2]

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11

(c) The refractive index of water is 1.33. For


Examiner’s
Calculate the critical angle. Use

critical angle = .................................................. [2]

(d) Describe, with a diagram, a medical use of optical fibres.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................... [3]

[Total: 9]

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12

7 The solar charger shown in Fig. 7.1 is used to charge portable electronic devices in a part of For
the world without any other electricity supply. Examiner’s
Use

solar panels

Fig. 7.1

The dimensions of each of the solar panels are 0.25 m × 0.20 m. The solar power incident on
1.0 m2 of flat ground in this part of the world is 260 W.

(a) Calculate the total solar power incident on the two panels of the charger.

solar power = ................................................. [2]

(b) The output of the charger is 0.95 A at 20 V.

Calculate the efficiency of the charger.

efficiency = .................................................. [3]

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13

(c) Three devices A, B and C are connected together and then connected to the 20 V For
charger. The potential difference (p.d.) across A is measured as 14 V, across B it is 14 V Examiner’s
and across C it is 6 V. Use

Complete Fig. 7.2 to show the arrangement of the devices connected to the charger.
Draw devices B and C as similar boxes to the box shown for device A.

output from charger


20 V

device A

Fig. 7.2 [2]

(d) Two other devices, D and E, have resistances of 20 Ω and 30 Ω.

Calculate the total resistance of D and E when they are connected in parallel.

total resistance = .................................................. [2]

[Total: 9]

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14

8 Fig. 8.1 shows a vertical current-carrying wire passing through a card at point X. For
Examiner’s
Use

X Y Z

card

current direction

Fig. 8.1

(a) On Fig. 8.1, sketch on the card the pattern of the magnetic field produced by the current
in the wire. The detail of your sketch should suggest the variation in the strength of the
field. Show the direction of the field with arrows. [3]

(b) Using your knowledge of investigating the magnetic field around a bar magnet, suggest
an experiment or experiments to confirm that you have drawn the correct pattern and
direction in (a).

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................
[4]

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15

(c) A second current-carrying wire is inserted vertically through the card at Y. For
Examiner’s
Suggest why there is now a force on the wire at X. Use

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................... [2]

(d) The wire at Y is moved to Z. It still carries the same current.

Tick the appropriate box to indicate whether the force on the wire at X is now smaller,
greater or the same.

smaller

greater

same [1]

[Total: 10]

© UCLES 2013 0625/32/M/J/13 [Turn over


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16

9 There is an alternating current in the primary coil of the transformer shown in Fig. 9.1. For
Examiner’s
soft-iron core Use

primary secondary
coil coil

Fig. 9.1

(a) Tick one box in each line of the table that best describes the magnetic field in the core
and the magnetic field in the secondary coil.

magnetic field
continually continually continually zero
increasing and increasing decreasing
decreasing
soft-iron core
secondary coil
[2]

(b) State and explain the effect on the output from the secondary coil of

(i) increasing the voltage across the primary coil,

output .......................................................................................................................

explanation ...............................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................
[2]

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17

(ii) replacing the alternating current in the primary coil with direct current from a battery. For
Examiner’s
output ....................................................................................................................... Use

explanation ...............................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................
[2]

[Total: 6]

© UCLES 2013 0625/32/M/J/13 [Turn over


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18

10 There are two stable, naturally occurring isotopes of hydrogen. For


Examiner’s
Common hydrogen (hydrogen-1) has a proton number of 1 and a nucleon number of 1. Use

Hydrogen-2 (deuterium) has a nucleon number of 2.

There is also a radioactive isotope of hydrogen called tritium (hydrogen-3), with a nucleon
number of 3.

(a) Complete the table for neutral atoms of these isotopes.

hydrogen-1 hydrogen-2 hydrogen-3


(deuterium) (tritium)

number of protons

number of neutrons

number of electrons
[3]

(b) Two samples of tritium are stored in aluminium containers of different thickness.

Sample 1 is in a container of thickness 0.5 mm and radiation can be detected coming


through the container.

Sample 2 is in a container of thickness 5 mm and no radiation comes through.

(i) State the type of radiation coming through the container of Sample 1.

.............................................................................................................................. [1]

(ii) Explain your answer to (b)(i).

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

.............................................................................................................................. [2]

(c) Under conditions of extremely high temperature and pressure, as in the interior of the
Sun, hydrogen nuclei can join together.

(i) Name this process.

.............................................................................................................................. [1]

(ii) State whether energy is released, absorbed or neither released nor absorbed
during this reaction.

.............................................................................................................................. [1]

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19

(d) When a nucleus of a certain isotope of uranium is bombarded by a suitable neutron, it For
splits into two smaller nuclei and energy is released. Examiner’s
Use

Name this process.

...................................................................................................................................... [1]

[Total: 9]

Turn over for Question 11

© UCLES 2013 0625/32/M/J/13 [Turn over


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20

11 Fig. 11.1 shows the main components of a cathode-ray oscilloscope. For


Examiner’s
Use
IOXRUHVFHQW
VFUHHQ

KHDWHU
EHDP

FDWKRGH DQRGH <SODWHV ;SODWHV


V\VWHP YDFXXP
JULG

Fig. 11.1

(a) (i) Name the particles that are in the beam.

.............................................................................................................................. [1]

(ii) Explain the purpose of the heater.

.............................................................................................................................. [1]

(iii) Explain why there is a vacuum in the tube.

..................................................................................................................................

.............................................................................................................................. [1]

(b) When no potential difference (p.d.) is applied across either the X-plates or the Y-plates,
a spot is seen in the centre of the fluorescent screen.

Describe the p.d.s applied to the X-plates and to the Y-plates when the spot moves up
and down in the centre of the screen.

X-plates ............................................................................................................................

Y-plates ............................................................................................................................
[2]

[Total: 5]

Permission to reproduce items where third-party owned material protected by copyright is included has been sought and cleared where possible.
Every reasonable effort has been made by the publisher (UCLES) to trace copyright holders, but if any items requiring clearance have unwittingly been
included, the publisher will be pleased to make amends at the earliest possible opportunity.

University of Cambridge International Examinations is part of the Cambridge Assessment Group. Cambridge Assessment is the brand name of University
of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES), which is itself a department of the University of Cambridge.

© UCLES 2013 0625/32/M/J/13


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CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS


International General Certificate of Secondary Education

MARK SCHEME for the May/June 2013 series

0625 PHYSICS
0625/33 Paper 3 (Extended Theory), maximum raw mark 80

This mark scheme is published as an aid to teachers and candidates, to indicate the requirements of
the examination. It shows the basis on which Examiners were instructed to award marks. It does not
indicate the details of the discussions that took place at an Examiners’ meeting before marking began,
which would have considered the acceptability of alternative answers.

Mark schemes should be read in conjunction with the question paper and the Principal Examiner
Report for Teachers.

Cambridge will not enter into discussions about these mark schemes.

Cambridge is publishing the mark schemes for the May/June 2013 series for most IGCSE, GCE
Advanced Level and Advanced Subsidiary Level components and some Ordinary Level components.
PMT

Page 2 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2013 0625 33

NOTES ABOUT MARK SCHEME SYMBOLS & OTHER MATTERS

M marks are method marks upon which further marks depend. For an M mark to be scored, the
point to which it refers must be seen in a candidate's answer. If a candidate fails to score
a particular M mark, then none of the dependent marks can be scored.

B marks are independent marks, which do not depend on other marks. For a B mark to be scored,
the point to which it refers must be seen specifically in the candidate’s answers.

A marks In general A marks are awarded for final answers to numerical questions.
If a final numerical answer, eligible for A marks, is correct, with the correct unit and an
acceptable number of significant figures, all the marks for that question are normally
awarded.
It is very occasionally possible to arrive at a correct answer by an entirely wrong
approach. In these rare circumstances, do not award the A marks, but award C marks on
their merits. However, correct numerical answers with no working shown gain all the
marks available.

C marks are compensatory marks in general applicable to numerical questions. These can be
scored even if the point to which they refer are not written down by the candidate,
provided subsequent working gives evidence that they must have known it. For
example, if an equation carries a C mark and the candidate does not write down the
actual equation but does correct substitution or working which shows he knew the
equation, then the C mark is scored. A C mark is not awarded if a candidate makes two
points which contradict each other. Points which are wrong but irrelevant are ignored.

brackets ( ) around words or units in the mark scheme are intended to indicate wording used to
clarify the mark scheme, but the marks do not depend on seeing the words or units in
brackets, e.g. 10 (J) means that the mark is scored for 10, regardless of the unit given.

underlining indicates that this must be seen in the answer offered, or something very similar.

OR / or indicates alternative answers, any one of which is satisfactory for scoring the marks.

e.e.o.o. means ‘each error or omission’.

o.w.t.t.e. means ‘or words to that effect’.

Spelling Be generous about spelling and use of English. If an answer can be understood to mean
what we want, give credit. However, beware of and do not allow ambiguities, accidental
or deliberate: e.g. spelling which suggests confusion between reflection / refraction /
diffraction / thermistor / transistor / transformer.

Not/NOT Indicates that an incorrect answer is not to be disregarded, but cancels another
otherwise correct alternative offered by the candidate, i.e. right plus wrong penalty
applies.

Ignore Indicates that something which is not correct or irrelevant is to be disregarded and does
not cause a right plus wrong penalty.

© Cambridge International Examinations 2013


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Page 3 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2013 0625 33

e.c.f. meaning ‘error carried forward’ is mainly applicable to numerical questions, but may in
particular circumstances be applied in non-numerical questions.
This indicates that if a candidate has made an earlier mistake and has carried an
incorrect value forward to subsequent stages of working, marks indicated by ecf may be
awarded, provided the subsequent working is correct, bearing in mind the earlier
mistake. This prevents a candidate being penalised more than once for a particular
mistake, but only applies to marks annotated e.c.f.

Significant Figures
Answers are normally acceptable to any number of significant figures ù 2. Accept
answers that round to give the correct answer to 2 s.f. Any exceptions to this general rule
will be specified in the mark scheme.

Units Deduct one mark for each incorrect or missing unit from a final answer that would
otherwise gain all the marks available for that answer: maximum 1 per question.

Arithmetic errors
Deduct one mark if the only error in arriving at a final answer is clearly an arithmetic one.

Transcription errors
Deduct one mark if the only error in arriving at a final answer is because given or
previously calculated data has clearly been misread but used correctly.

Fractions e.g. ½, ¼, 1/10 etc. are only acceptable where specified.

© Cambridge International Examinations 2013


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Page 4 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2013 0625 33

1 (a) (i) constant/uniform gradient/slope OR straight line B1

(ii) (a = ∆) v ÷ t OR 36 ÷ 48 C1
0.75 m / s2 (NOT 0.76) A1

(b) (i) horizontal line from (48, 36) to (120, 36) B1

(ii) area under graph (mentioned or implied) B1


864 OR 2592 C1
3500/3460/3456 m A1 [7]

2 (a) (i) (m = ) ρV OR 1000 × 1.8 × 106 C1


1.8 × 109 kg A1

(ii) (g.p.e. = )mgh OR 1.8 × 109 × 10 × 350 (e.c.f. from (a)(i)) C1


6.3 × 1012 J (e.c.f. from (a)(i)) A1

(iii) (P = )E/t OR 6.3 × 1012/7 OR 6.3 × 1012/(7 × 60) OR 6.3 × 1012/(7 × 3600) C1
(ecf from (a)(i)(ii))
2.5 × 108 W (e.c.f. from (a)(i)(ii)) A1

(b) (i) continuously regenerated / not used up / everlasting supply


IGNORE used again / recycled / can be renewed B1

(ii) any two of: biomass/geothermal/solar/ tidal/wave/wind energy/wood


(NOT nuclear/light) B2 [9]

3 (a) velocity has direction/is a vector AND speed doesn’t/isn’t/is a scalar B1

(b) (i) horizontal arrow to right AND touching parachutist (when extended) B1
arrow/line horizontal AND arrow / line vertical AND making two sides of triangle
OR rectangle B1

(ii) correct diagonal (i.e. top left to bottom right) B1


10.4 –10.5 m / s B1
51–55° to horizontal OR 35 –39° to vertical (NOT more than 2 sig.figs.) B1

(iii) ½mv2 OR 0.5 × 85 × 10.52 (e.c.f. from (b)(ii)) C1


0.5 × 85 × 10.52 (e.c.f. from (b)(ii)) C1
4.7/4.69/4.685625 × 103 J (e.c.f. from (b)(ii)) A1 [9]

© Cambridge International Examinations 2013


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Page 5 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2013 0625 33

4 (a) 85 000 N (accept 83 300 N) B1

(b) (i) (P = )F/A OR 85 000/3.4 OR 85 000/3.4 × 2 OR 85 000/6.8 (e.c.f. from (a)(i)) C1


1.2/1.25/1.3 × 104 Pa (e.c.f. from (a)(i)) A1

(ii) larger area M1


smaller pressure A1

(c) (i) (measure of) turning effect OR F × x B1

(ii) no resultant/net force B1


no resultant/net turning effect/moment B1 [8]

5 (a) any two of:


boiling throughout liquid (evaporation at surface),
boiling at one temperature (evaporation at any / all temperature / below boiling point),
boiling not affected by draught/area (evaporation is),
boiling produces bubbles (evaporation does not). B2

(b) (thermal energy) does work against intermolecular forces / breaks bonds B1
molecules separated/moved apart OR becomes PE B1

(c) apparatus: e.g. kettle AND balance / scales OR steam condensing in water with
measuring cylinder / scales AND thermometer B1
two masses determined OR volume/mass condensed B1
determine energy input: e.g. VIt or Pt or mc∆T B1
(le = )Q/m B1 [8]

6 (a) (i) any two of:


(gas) molecules further apart
greater PE
move singly / in straight lines
OR vice versa for. liquid molecules
(allow faster) B2

(ii) gases compressible OR liquids incompressible B1


forces between gas molecules weaker OR vice versa for liquid molecules B1

(b) (i) pV = constant OR p1V1 = p2V2 OR 2.6 × 106 × 0.035 OR 91 000 C1


2.6 × 106 × 0.035/1.0 × 105 OR 91 000/1.0 ×105 C1
0.91 m3 A1

(ii) slower / less KE B1 [8]

© Cambridge International Examinations 2013


PMT

Page 6 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2013 0625 33

7 (a) (i) (only) one frequency (accept wavelength) B1

(ii) 4.7 × 1014 Hz OR the same as before OR unchanged B1

(b) (i) (n = )c/v OR 3.0 × 108 / 2.0 × 108 M1


1.5 A1

(ii) (λ = )c/f OR 2.0 × 108/4.7 × 1014 C1


4.3/4.26/4.255319 × 10–7 m A1 [6]

8 (a) in copper/metals/conductors, electrons (free to move) B1


in nylon/insulators electrons fixed/not free (to move) B1

(b) (negatively charged nylon) rod near to sphere B1


earth/touch (with hand) the sphere B1
remove earth/hand (and remove rod) B1

(c) at least four equally spaced, radial lines from surface M1


at least one outward arrow AND none wrong A1 [7]

9 (a) (i) same number of / 92 protons (in nucleus) (IGNORE electrons) B1

(ii) different number of neutrons B1

(b) most α-particles travel straight (through the foil) M1


nucleus small / atom mostly empty space A1
small number deflected (through large angles) M1
most of mass in nucleus ACCEPT nucleus positive/charged A1 [6]

10 (a) in order downwards: 1 1 1 0 c.a.o. B1

(b) (i) 1 AND 0 (e.c.f. from (b)(i)) B1

(ii) NOT (gate) (allow NOR (gate)) B1

(c) R = 1 AND S = 0 (e.c.f. from (b)(i)) B1


T=1 B1 [5]

© Cambridge International Examinations 2013


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Page 7 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2013 0625 33

11 (a) (i) (I = )P/V OR 18 000/120 OR 18/120 C1


150 A A1

(ii) (E = )Pt OR 18 000 × 30 × 60 OR 18 000 × 1800 OR 18 000 × 30 OR 5.4 × 105 C1


3.2 × 107 J OR 9.0 kW h A1

(b) any three of:


(high voltage means) low(er) current
for given supply power
(low(er) current means) less heat/thermal energy (generated in cables) OR P = I2R
for given resistance (of cables)
cables heated by current B3 [7]

© Cambridge International Examinations 2013


PMT

UNIVERSITY OF CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS


International General Certificate of Secondary Education
* 9 1 8 0 4 7 9 0 0 9 *

PHYSICS 0625/33
Paper 3 Extended May/June 2013
1 hour 15 minutes
Candidates answer on the Question Paper.
No Additional Materials are required.

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

Write your Centre number, candidate number and name on all the work you hand in.
Write in dark blue or black pen.
You may use a pencil for any diagrams or graphs.
Do not use staples, paper clips, highlighters, glue or correction fluid.
DO NOT WRITE IN ANY BARCODES.
For Examiner’s Use
Answer all questions.
Electronic calculators may be used. 1
You may lose marks if you do not show your working or if you do not use
appropriate units. 2
Take the weight of 1 kg to be 10 N (i.e. acceleration of free fall = 10 m / s2).
3
At the end of the examination, fasten all your work securely together.
The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end of each question or 4
part question.
5

10

11

Total

This document consists of 16 printed pages.

DC (NF/CGW) 58581/5
© UCLES 2013 [Turn over
PMT

1 A train is at rest in a railway station. At time t = 0, the train starts to move forwards with an For
increasing speed until it reaches its maximum speed at time t = 48 s. Examiner’s
Use
Fig. 1.1 is the speed-time graph for the first 48 s of the journey.

40

30
speed
m/s

20

10

0
0 20 40 60 80 100 120
time / s

Fig. 1.1

(a) (i) State how the graph shows that, during the first 48 s of the journey, the acceleration
of the train is constant.

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................. [1]

(ii) Calculate the acceleration of the train during the first 48 s of the journey.

acceleration = .................................................. [2]

(b) After time t = 48 s, the train continues at its maximum speed for another 72 s.

(i) On Fig. 1.1, sketch the speed-time graph for the next 72 s of the journey. [1]
(ii) Determine the total distance travelled by the train in the 120 s after it starts moving.

distance = .................................................. [3]


[Total: 7]
© UCLES 2013 0625/33/M/J/13
PMT

2 Water is stored in a reservoir at an average vertical height of 350 m above the turbines of a For
hydroelectric power station. Examiner’s
Use

During a 7.0 hour period, 1.8 × 106 m3 of water flows down from the reservoir to the turbines.

(a) The density of water is 1000 kg / m3.

For this 7.0 hour period, calculate

(i) the mass of water that flows from the reservoir to the turbines,

mass = .................................................. [2]

(ii) the gravitational potential energy transformed as the water flows to the turbines,

energy = .................................................. [2]

(iii) the maximum possible average output power.

power = .................................................. [2]

(b) A hydroelectric power station generates electricity from a renewable energy source.

(i) Explain what is meant, in this context, by renewable.

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................. [1]

(ii) State two other renewable energy sources.

1. ..............................................................................................................................

2. ..............................................................................................................................
[2]

[Total: 9]

© UCLES 2013 0625/33/M/J/13 [Turn over


PMT

3 On a windy day, a parachutist of mass 85 kg jumps from an aeroplane. For


Examiner’s
Fig. 3.1 shows the parachutist falling through the air at a constant vertical velocity of 8.4 m / s Use

downwards.

8.4 m / s

Fig. 3.1

(a) Distinguish between speed and velocity.

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [1]

© UCLES 2013 0625/33/M/J/13


PMT

(b) As the parachutist falls, the wind is moving him towards the right of the diagram, at a For
horizontal velocity of 6.3 m / s. Examiner’s
Use

(i) On Fig. 3.1, draw an arrow to show the horizontal velocity of the parachutist. [1]
(ii) On the grid below, draw a vector diagram to determine graphically the size and
direction of the resultant velocity of the parachutist.

size = .......................................................

direction = .......................................................
[4]

(iii) Calculate the kinetic energy of the parachutist.

kinetic energy = .................................................. [3]

[Total: 9]

© UCLES 2013 0625/33/M/J/13 [Turn over


PMT

4 A large crane has a mass of 8500 kg. Fig. 4.1 shows the crane on a muddy building-site. For
Examiner’s
Use

lifting-arm

hook
axle
caterpillar tracks

Fig. 4.1

(a) Calculate the weight of the crane.

weight = .................................................. [1]

(b) The crane rests on two caterpillar tracks each of which has a contact area with the
ground of 3.4 m2.

(i) Calculate the pressure that the crane exerts on the ground.

pressure = .................................................. [2]

(ii) As the crane driver walks towards the crane, he starts to sink into the mud. He lays
a wide plank of wood on the mud and he walks along the plank.

Explain why he does not sink into the mud when he walks along the plank.

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................. [2]

© UCLES 2013 0625/33/M/J/13


PMT

(c) When the crane lifts a heavy load with its hook, the load exerts a moment on the For
lifting-arm about the axle. Examiner’s
Use

(i) Explain what is meant by moment of a force.

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................. [1]

(ii) Despite the moment exerted on the lifting-arm, the crane remains in equilibrium.

State the two conditions required for any object to be in equilibrium.

1. ..............................................................................................................................

2. ..............................................................................................................................
[2]

[Total: 8]

© UCLES 2013 0625/33/M/J/13 [Turn over


PMT

5 Fig. 5.1 shows a saucepan of boiling water on an electric hotplate. For


Examiner’s
Use

Fig. 5.1

As time passes, thermal energy (heat) is constantly supplied to the water but its temperature
remains at 100 °C.

(a) State two ways in which boiling differs from evaporation.

1. .....................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

2. .....................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................
[2]

(b) Explain, in terms of the water molecules, what happens to the thermal energy supplied
to the water as it boils.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [2]

© UCLES 2013 0625/33/M/J/13


PMT

(c) Describe an experiment to measure the specific latent heat of steam. You may include a For
diagram. Examiner’s
Use

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [4]

[Total: 8]

© UCLES 2013 0625/33/M/J/13 [Turn over


PMT

10

6 (a) (i) State two ways in which the molecular structure of a gas differs from the molecular For
structure of a liquid. Examiner’s
Use
1. ..............................................................................................................................

2. ..............................................................................................................................
[2]

(ii) Compressibility is the ease with which a substance can be compressed.

State and explain, in terms of the forces between the molecules, how the
compressibility of a gas differs from that of a liquid.

..................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................. [2]

(b) Fig. 6.1 shows a weather balloon being inflated by helium from a cylinder.

HELIUM

Fig. 6.1

(i) The helium that inflates the balloon had a volume of 0.035 m3 at a pressure of
2.6 × 106 Pa, inside the cylinder.

The pressure of the helium in the balloon is 1.0 × 105 Pa and its temperature is the
same as it was when in the cylinder.

Calculate the volume occupied by the helium in the balloon.

volume = .................................................. [3]

(ii) As the balloon rises up through the atmosphere, the temperature of the helium
decreases.

State the effect of this temperature change on the helium molecules.

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................. [1]
[Total: 8]
© UCLES 2013 0625/33/M/J/13
PMT

11

7 The frequency of the monochromatic light produced by a laser is 4.7 × 1014 Hz. For
Examiner’s
A ray of light from the laser passes from a vacuum, where the speed of light is 3.0 × 108 m / s, Use

into a fibre-optic cable.

(a) State

(i) what is meant by monochromatic,

..................................................................................................................................

............................................................................................................................. [1]

(ii) the frequency of light from the laser in the fibre-optic cable.

............................................................................................................................. [1]

(b) The speed of light in the fibre-optic cable is 2.0 × 108 m / s.

Calculate

(i) the refractive index of the material from which fibre-optic cable is made,

refractive index = .................................................. [2]

(ii) the wavelength of light from the laser in the fibre-optic cable.

wavelength = .................................................. [2]

[Total: 6]

© UCLES 2013 0625/33/M/J/13 [Turn over


PMT

12

8 Fig. 8.1 shows a small, uncharged copper sphere suspended from a nylon thread, and a For
plastic rod being rubbed with a woollen cloth. Examiner’s
Use

nylon
thread plastic rod

woollen
cloth
copper
sphere

Fig. 8.1

The rod becomes negatively charged as it is rubbed.

(a) Explain, in terms of electrons, why copper is a conductor but nylon is an insulator.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [2]

(b) Describe how the negatively charged rod may be used to induce a positive charge on
the copper sphere.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [3]

(c) The copper sphere is given a positive charge, as shown in Fig. 8.2.

Fig. 8.2

On Fig. 8.2, draw arrows to indicate the direction and pattern of the electric field that
surrounds the positively charged sphere. [2]

[Total: 7]
© UCLES 2013 0625/33/M/J/13
PMT

13

9 In a laboratory experiment, the isotope uranium-238 is used as a source of α-particles. For


Examiner’s
(a) State Use

(i) one feature of uranium-238 nuclei that is the same for the nuclei of other uranium
isotopes,

............................................................................................................................. [1]

(ii) one feature of uranium-238 nuclei that is different for the nuclei of other uranium
isotopes.

............................................................................................................................. [1]

(b) Fig. 9.1 shows the α-particles from the uranium source being directed at a very thin gold
foil, in a vacuum.

thin gold foil


moveable
_-particle
detector

uranium source
vacuum
_-particles

Fig. 9.1

To investigate the scattering of α-particles, a detector is moved to different positions


around the very thin gold foil and measurements are recorded.

Describe the results from this scattering experiment and explain what they show about
the structure of atoms.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [4]

[Total: 6]

© UCLES 2013 0625/33/M/J/13 [Turn over


PMT

14

10 Fig. 10.1 is the symbol for a NAND gate with inputs A and B. For
Examiner’s
Use
input A
output
input B

Fig. 10.1

(a) Input A and input B can be set to 1 (high) or to 0 (low).

Complete the table below to give the outputs for this NAND gate.

input input
output
A B

0 0

0 1

1 0

1 1

[1]

(b) The two inputs of the NAND gate are joined together and connected to an input C, as
shown in Fig. 10.2.

input C output

Fig. 10.2

(i) Determine the output of this NAND gate when

1. input C is set to 0,

output = .......................................................

2. input C is set to 1.

output = .......................................................
[1]

(ii) State the name of the logic gate that behaves in the same way as the NAND gate in
Fig. 10.2.

............................................................................................................................. [1]
© UCLES 2013 0625/33/M/J/13
PMT

15

(c) A circuit combines three NAND gates. For


Examiner’s
The inputs to the circuit are P and Q, as shown in Fig. 10.3. Use

P
R
T
S
Q

Fig. 10.3

Points R, S and T in the circuit are also labelled.

Input P is set to 0 and input Q is set to 1.

Determine the logic states (0 or 1) of points R, S and T.

point R = ..............................

point S = ..............................

point T = ..............................
[2]

[Total: 5]

Turn over for Question 11

© UCLES 2013 0625/33/M/J/13 [Turn over


PMT

16

11 A remote ski lodge receives 18 kW of electric power from a 120 V supply. For
Examiner’s
(a) Calculate Use

(i) the current that the ski lodge draws from the supply,

current = .................................................. [2]

(ii) the electrical energy supplied to the ski lodge in 30 minutes.

energy = .................................................. [2]

(b) The power supply to the ski lodge is from a nearby transformer that is connected to
long-distance transmission cables. The voltage of the transmission cables is very much
larger than 120 V.

Explain why energy losses in the transmission cables are lower when the voltage is
high.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..................................................................................................................................... [3]

[Total: 7]

Permission to reproduce items where third-party owned material protected by copyright is included has been sought and cleared where possible. Every
reasonable effort has been made by the publisher (UCLES) to trace copyright holders, but if any items requiring clearance have unwittingly been included, the
publisher will be pleased to make amends at the earliest possible opportunity.

University of Cambridge International Examinations is part of the Cambridge Assessment Group. Cambridge Assessment is the brand name of University of
Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate (UCLES), which is itself a department of the University of Cambridge.

© UCLES 2013 0625/33/M/J/13


PMT

CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS


International General Certificate of Secondary Education

MARK SCHEME for the May/June 2014 series

0625 PHYSICS
0625/31 Paper 3 (Extended Theory), maximum raw mark 80

This mark scheme is published as an aid to teachers and candidates, to indicate the requirements of
the examination. It shows the basis on which Examiners were instructed to award marks. It does not
indicate the details of the discussions that took place at an Examiners’ meeting before marking began,
which would have considered the acceptability of alternative answers.

Mark schemes should be read in conjunction with the question paper and the Principal Examiner
Report for Teachers.

Cambridge will not enter into discussions about these mark schemes.

Cambridge is publishing the mark schemes for the May/June 2014 series for most IGCSE, GCE
Advanced Level and Advanced Subsidiary Level components and some Ordinary Level components.
PMT

Page 2 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2014 0625 31

NOTES ABOUT MARK SCHEME SYMBOLS & OTHER MATTERS

B marks are independent marks, which do not depend on other marks. For a B mark to be
scored, the point to which it refers must be seen specifically in the candidate’s answer.

M marks are method marks upon which accuracy marks (A marks) later depend. For an M mark to
be scored, the point to which it refers must be seen in a candidate's answer. If a
candidate fails to score a particular M mark, then none of the dependent A marks can be
scored.

C marks are compensatory marks in general applicable to numerical questions. These can be
scored even if the point to which they refer are not written down by the candidate,
provided subsequent working gives evidence that they must have known it. For
example, if an equation carries a C mark and the candidate does not write down the
actual equation but does correct substitution or working which shows he knew the
equation, then the C mark is scored. A C mark is not awarded if a candidate makes two
points which contradict each other. Points which are wrong but irrelevant are ignored.

A marks A marks are accuracy or answer marks which either depend on an M mark, or which are
one of the ways which allow a C mark to be scored. A marks are commonly awarded for
final answers to numerical questions. If a final numerical answer, eligible for A marks, is
correct, with the correct unit and an acceptable number of significant figures, all the
marks for that question are normally awarded. It is very occasionally possible to arrive at
a correct answer by an entirely wrong approach. In these rare circumstances, do not
award the A marks, but award C marks on their merits. An A mark following an M mark is
a dependent mark.

Brackets ( ) around words or units in the mark scheme are intended to indicate wording used to
clarify the mark scheme, but the marks do not depend on seeing the words or units in
brackets, e.g. 10 (J) means that the mark is scored for 10, regardless of the unit given.

Underlining indicates that this must be seen in the answer offered, or something very similar.

OR / or indicates alternative answers, any one of which is satisfactory for scoring the marks.

e.e.o.o. means "each error or omission".

o.w.t.t.e. means “or words to that effect”.

Spelling Be generous about spelling and use of English. If an answer can be understood to mean
what we want, give credit. However, do not allow ambiguities, e.g. spelling which
suggests confusion between reflection / refraction / diffraction or thermistor / transistor/
transformer.

Not / NOT indicates that an incorrect answer is not to be disregarded, but cancels another
otherwise correct alternative offered by the candidate i.e. right plus wrong penalty
applies.

Ignore indicates that something which is not correct or irrelevant is to be disregarded and does
not cause a right plus wrong penalty.

ecf meaning "error carried forward" is mainly applicable to numerical questions, but may in
particular circumstances be applied in non-numerical questions. This indicates that if a

© Cambridge International Examinations 2014


PMT

Page 3 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2014 0625 31

candidate has made an earlier mistake and has carried an incorrect value forward to
subsequent stages of working, marks indicated by ecf may be awarded, provided the
subsequent working is correct, bearing in mind the earlier mistake. This prevents a
candidate being penalised more than once for a particular mistake, but only applies to
marks annotated ecf.

Significant figures
Answers are normally acceptable to any number of significant figures ≥ 2. Any
exceptions to this general rule will be specified in the mark scheme.

Units Deduct one mark for each incorrect or missing unit from an answer that would otherwise
gain all the marks available for that answer: maximum 1 per question. No deduction is
incurred if the unit is missing from the final answer but is shown correctly in the working.

Fractions Allow these only where specified in the mark scheme.

© Cambridge International Examinations 2014


PMT

Page 4 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2014 0625 31

1 (a) (i) (liquid) has a uniform expansion / expands at a constant rate / expands
evenly / expands linearly B1

(ii) any two from:


larger bulb / wider / longer bulb
more liquid
narrower capillary / tube
use liquid with greater expansion B2

(iii) thermometer must be longer B1

(b) any 2 from:


resistance / conductance of a metal / wire / conductor / thermistor
voltage / current of a thermocouple
volume / pressure / expansion / contraction of a gas
colour of a metal
amount of radiation OR frequency OR wavelength of radiation from a metal / furnace
colour / arrangement of liquid crystals
expansion of a solid / any dimension of a solid
bending of a bimetallic strip B2

[Total: 6]

2 (a) (density =) mass / volume B1

(b) water used in measuring / graduated cylinder B1

volume of water known or read / recorded / taken B1

place the coins in the water and read / record / take new level of water in cylinder B1

subtract readings B1

OR ALTERNATIVE METHOD:
pour water into displacement can to level of spout (B1)

place the coins / several coins in the water (B1)

collect overflow (B1)

measure volume of overflow water using measuring graduated cylinder (B1)

measure mass / weigh the coins used with balance / spring balance B1

© Cambridge International Examinations 2014


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Page 5 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2014 0625 31

(c) one from:


read measuring cylinder levels at bottom of meniscus
repeat volume measurement and find average
place eye level with surface in measuring cylinder (to avoid parallax error)
place coins one at a time to avoid air bubbles between coins
avoid splashing when adding coins to water
make sure coins are dry / clean
use narrow / small measuring cylinder
place containers on horizontal surface
check zero of balance / spring balance / scales
displacement can method: make sure dripping finishes before and after adding coins B1

[Total: 7]

3 (a) Fd OR weight × d OR mgh OR 30 000 × 10 × 140 OR 4.2 × 107 seen anywhere C1

(P = ) E / t OR W / t OR mgh / t symbols or words C1

4.2 × 107 / 60 C1

7.0 ×105 W / 700 kW / 0.7 MW A1

(b) efficiency = output / input OR (Pin =) 100 × Pout / efficiency C1

(Pin =) 100 × 7 × 105 / 70 C1

1.0 × 106 W OR 1 000 000 W OR 1.0 MW A1

(c) (horizontal) wind has no effect on P.E gained / vertical force on water
OR same upward / vertical force acts on water
OR force from wind is horizontal B1

[Total: 8]

4 (a) 2 lines at 90 ° to each other of same length labelled 30 N or 6 cm B1

both lines 6.0 ± 0.2 cm. B1

arrows on the two lines drawn, either head to tail B1


OR a complete square shown with diagonal and arrows on adjacent sides

resultant in range 40–45 N B1

(b) (vertically) upwards B1

© Cambridge International Examinations 2014


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Page 6 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2014 0625 31

(c) same as value in (a), only if answer to (a) is a force


OR 40–45 N B1

[Total: 6]

5 (a) (i) (W = mg =1440 × 10 =) 14 400 N B1

(ii) (P =) F / A OR 14 400 / (1.5 × 1.2) C1

8000 Pa OR N / m2 A1

(b) (i) (P =) hρg OR 1.4 × 1000 × 10 C1

14 000 Pa OR N / m2 A1

(b) (ii) pressure on base of P smaller / Q greater M1

(with same volume removed) smaller decrease in depth in Q


OR height in Q is greater A1

[Total: 7]

6 (a) (molecules) move in random directions / randomly / with constant random motion / zig-
zag motion / in all directions B1

(molecules) have random speeds OR a range of speeds OR move (very) fast / at


(very) high speed B1

any 1 from:
(molecules) collide with each other
(molecules) move in straight lines between collisions
(molecules) change direction in collisions
(molecules) collide with walls (of cylinder) B1

(b) (i) pressure increases M1

more frequent collisions between molecules and walls


OR molecules collide with walls more often / at greater rate A1

(ii) pV = constant
OR p1V1 = p2V2 in any form
OR 1.0 × 105 × 500 = p2 × 240 C1

2.1 × 105 Pa to 2 or more sig. figs A1

[Total: 7]

© Cambridge International Examinations 2014


PMT

Page 7 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2014 0625 31

7 (a) (a liquid evaporates) at any temperature / below the boiling point / over a range of
temperatures / below 100 oC / at different temperatures / not at a fixed temperature B1

(during evaporation) vapour forms at / escapes from the surface of the liquid B1

(without a supply of thermal energy,) evaporation continues / occurs / doesn’t stop


OR causes liquid to cool / is slower / reduces B1

(b) (i) (Q =) mL C1
OR 0.075 × 2.25 × 106

1.7 × 105 J A1

(ii) (E =) VIt OR 240 × 0.65 × (20 × 60) C1


OR P = IV and P = E / t OR energy / time

1.9 × 105 J A1

(iii) energy is transferred to the surroundings


OR in heating the surroundings / air / atmosphere / hot-plate B1

[Total: 8]

8 (a) speed of sound in gas: 300 m / s B1

speed of sound in solid: 3000 m / s B1

(b) particles / molecules / atoms oscillate / vibrate


OR pressure variation / compressions / rarefactions / displacements move B1

in the direction of travel (of the wave / sound) B1

(c) (i) two complete wavelengths / cycles with shorter wavelength B1

wave drawn has greater amplitude B1

(ii) higher frequency / pitch B1

louder / higher volume B1

[Total: 8]

9 (a) (i) (I =) V / R OR 6 / (12 + 4) OR 6 / 16 C1

0.38 A / 0.37 A A1

© Cambridge International Examinations 2014


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Page 8 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2014 0625 31

(ii) 1 / R = 1 / R1 + 1 / R2
OR (R =) R1 R2 / (R1 + R2)
OR above with numbers substituted C1

R = 3 (Ω) C1

(I = 6 / 3 =) 2(.0) A A1

OR ALTERNATIVE METHOD:
6 / 12 (C1)

+ 6/4 (C1)

2(.0) A (A1)

(b) (i) R ∝ l (in words or symbols)


OR directly proportional OR e.g. R doubles when l doubles B1

(ii) R ∝1 / A (or with words)


OR inversely proportional OR e.g. R doubles when A halves B1

(c) 4 / 12 OR 4:12 OR 1 / 3 OR 1:3 OR 0.33 B1

[Total: 8]

10 (a) slip-rings (and brushes) B1

(b) (i) sinusoidal curve, any value at t = 0 B1

(ii) appropriate T value indicated on graph B1

(iii) smaller T / time of one cycle OR higher frequency B1

higher maximum current / greater amplitude / higher peaks / higher peak-to-peak B1

(c) diode / rectifier B1

[Total: 6]

11 (a) γ: none / zero / 0 / neutral AND


2 cm (or more) of lead / thick lead / 50 cm (or more) of concrete B1

β: particle / electron AND


any named metal / glass / concrete OR 1 m of air B1

α: particle / helium nucleus / 2 protons + 2 neutrons / 42 He / 42 α AND


positive OR + OR +2 B1

© Cambridge International Examinations 2014


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Page 9 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2014 0625 31

(b) (i) 38

(ii) 90

(iii) 52

(iv) 38 B3

(c) 36 hours = 3 half-lives


OR halving in steps from 4800 to 600 seen C1

half-life = 12 hours OR 3 half-lives OR 2 / 3 of 36 C1

(further time to reduce to 150 Bq =) 24 (hours) A1

[Total: 9]

© Cambridge International Examinations 2014


PMT

Cambridge International Examinations


Cambridge International General Certificate of Secondary Education
* 4 9 2 3 6 8 5 2 9 2 *

PHYSICS 0625/31
Paper 3 Extended May/June 2014
1 hour 15 minutes
Candidates answer on the Question Paper.
No Additional Materials are required.

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

Write your Centre number, candidate number and name on all the work you hand in.
Write in dark blue or black pen.
You may use an HB pencil for any diagrams or graphs.
Do not use staples, paper clips, glue or correction fluid.
DO NOT WRITE IN ANY BARCODES.

Answer all questions.


Electronic calculators may be used.
You may lose marks if you do not show your working or if you do not use appropriate units.
Take the weight of 1 kg to be 10 N (i.e. acceleration of free fall = 10 m / s2).

At the end of the examination, fasten all your work securely together.
The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end of each question or part question.

The syllabus is approved for use in England, Wales and Northern Ireland as a Cambridge International Level 1/Level 2 Certificate.

This document consists of 12 printed pages.

DC (NF/SW) 81293/4
© UCLES 2014 [Turn over
PMT

1 (a) Fig. 1.1 shows a liquid-in-glass thermometer.

–10 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 °C

Fig. 1.1

(i) In the process of making the thermometer, the scale divisions were spaced equally.

What assumption was made about the liquid?

...........................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................... [1]

(ii) Suggest two changes to the thermometer that would require the spacing of the scale
divisions to be larger.

1. .......................................................................................................................................

2. .......................................................................................................................................
[2]

(iii) As a result of the changes in (ii), what other change is needed to enable the thermometer
to be used for the same temperature range?

...................................................................................................................................... [1]

(b) The expansion of a liquid is an example of a physical property that may be used to measure
temperature.

State two other physical properties that may also be used to measure temperature.

1. the ................................................................. of .................................................................

2. the ................................................................. of .................................................................


[2]

[Total: 6]

© UCLES 2014 0625/31/M/J/14


PMT

2 A student has a large number of coins of different diameters, all made of the same metal. She
wishes to find the density of the metal by a method involving placing the coins in water.

(a) State the formula needed to calculate the density.

.............................................................................................................................................. [1]

(b) Describe how the measurements of the required quantities are carried out.

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

.............................................................................................................................................. [5]

(c) State one precaution taken when carrying out the measurements in (b) to ensure that the
result is as accurate as possible.

...................................................................................................................................................

.............................................................................................................................................. [1]

[Total: 7]

© UCLES 2014 0625/31/M/J/14 [Turn over


PMT

3 (a) On a day with no wind, a fountain in Switzerland propels 30 000 kg of water per minute to a
height of 140 m.

Calculate the power used in raising the water.

power = ............................................... [4]

(b) The efficiency of the pump which operates the fountain is 70%.

Calculate the power supplied to the pump.

power = ............................................... [3]

(c) On another day, a horizontal wind is blowing. The water does not rise vertically.

Explain why the water still rises to a height of 140 m.

...................................................................................................................................................

.............................................................................................................................................. [1]

[Total: 8]

© UCLES 2014 0625/31/M/J/14


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4 Fig. 4.1 shows a heavy ball B of weight W suspended from a fixed beam by two ropes P and Q.

beam

P Q
30 N 30 N

45° 45°
B

Fig. 4.1

P and Q are both at an angle of 45° to the horizontal. The tensions in P and Q are each 30 N.

(a) In the space below, draw a scale diagram to find the resultant of the tensions in P and Q. Use
a scale of 1.0 cm to represent 5.0 N. Label the forces and show their directions with arrows.

resultant = ............................................... [4]

(b) State the direction of the resultant. ...................................................................................... [1]

(c) State the magnitude of W. magnitude of W = ............................................... [1]

[Total: 6]
© UCLES 2014 0625/31/M/J/14 [Turn over
PMT

5 (a) A water tank has a rectangular base of dimensions 1.5 m by 1.2 m and contains 1440 kg of
water.

Calculate

(i) the weight of the water,

weight = ............................................... [1]

(ii) the pressure exerted by the water on the base of the tank.

pressure = ............................................... [2]

(b) Fig. 5.1 shows two water tanks P and Q of different shape. Both tanks are circular when
viewed from above. The tanks each contain the same volume of water. The depth of water in
both tanks is 1.4 m.

1.4 m

P Q

Fig. 5.1

(i) The density of water is 1000 kg / m3. The pressures exerted by the water on the base of
the two tanks are equal.

Calculate this pressure.

pressure = ............................................... [2]

(ii) Equal small volumes of water are removed from each tank.

State which tank, P or Q, now has the greater water pressure on its base. Explain your
answer.

...........................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................... [2]

[Total: 7]
© UCLES 2014 0625/31/M/J/14
PMT

6 Fig. 6.1 shows a quantity of gas in a cylinder fitted with a piston P.

gas

Fig. 6.1

(a) Describe the motion of the molecules of the gas.

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

.............................................................................................................................................. [3]

(b) The piston is now slowly pushed down to decrease the volume of the gas. The temperature of
the gas does not change.

(i) State and explain, in terms of molecules, what happens to the pressure of the gas.

...........................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................... [2]

(ii) Before pushing the piston down, the pressure of the gas was 1.0 × 105 Pa. Pushing the
piston down reduces the volume of the gas from 500 cm3 to 240 cm3.

Calculate the final pressure of the gas.

pressure = ................................................ [2]

[Total: 7]

© UCLES 2014 0625/31/M/J/14 [Turn over


PMT

7 (a) The following are three statements about boiling.


• A liquid boils at a fixed temperature.
• During boiling, vapour can form at any point within the liquid.
• Without a supply of thermal energy, boiling stops.

Complete the following equivalent statements about evaporation.

• A liquid evaporates at ........................................................................................................

......................................................................................................................................... .

• During evaporation .............................................................................................................

......................................................................................................................................... .

• Without a supply of thermal energy, evaporation ............................................................ .


[3]

(b) A pan containing water boiling at 100 °C is standing on an electrically heated hot-plate. In
20 minutes, 0.075 kg of water is lost as steam. The specific latent heat of vaporisation of
water is 2.25 × 106 J / kg.

(i) Calculate the energy used in converting 0.075 kg of boiling water to steam.

energy = ............................................... [2]

(ii) The hot-plate operates at 240 V, 0.65 A.

Calculate the energy supplied to the hot-plate in 20 minutes.

energy = ............................................... [2]

(iii) Suggest why the answers to (b)(i) and (b)(ii) are not the same.

...........................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................... [1]

[Total: 8]

© UCLES 2014 0625/31/M/J/14


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8 (a) Draw a straight line from each quantity on the left-hand side to a speed on the right-hand side
which is typical for that quantity.

30 m / s

300 m / s
speed of sound in gas

3000 m / s

speed of sound in solid


30 000 m / s

300 000 m / s
[2]

(b) Explain why sound waves are described as longitudinal.

...................................................................................................................................................

.............................................................................................................................................. [2]

(c) Fig. 8.1 shows how the displacement of air molecules, at an instant of time, varies with
distance along the path of a sound wave.

displacement

0
0 distance along path
of sound wave

Fig. 8.1

(i) On Fig. 8.1, sketch two cycles of a sound wave that has a shorter wavelength and a
greater amplitude. [2]

(ii) State two changes in the sound heard from this wave compared with the original wave.

1. .......................................................................................................................................

2. .......................................................................................................................................
[2]

[Total: 8]

© UCLES 2014 0625/31/M/J/14 [Turn over


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10

9 In the circuit shown in Fig. 9.1, resistors can be connected between terminals P and Q. The e.m.f.
of the battery is 6.0 V.

6.0 V

P Q

Fig. 9.1

(a) Calculate the current shown by the ammeter when a 12.0 Ω resistor and a 4.0 Ω resistor are

(i) connected in series between P and Q,

current = ............................................... [2]

(ii) connected in parallel between P and Q.

current = ............................................... [3]

(b) State the relationship between

(i) the resistance R and the length l of a wire of constant cross-sectional area,

...........................................................................................................................................

(ii) the resistance R and the cross-sectional area A of a wire of constant length.

...........................................................................................................................................
[2]

(c) The 12.0 Ω and 4.0 Ω resistors in (a) are wires of the same length and are made of the same
alloy.

cross-sectional area of 12.0 Ω resistor


Calculate the ratio:
cross-sectional area of 4.0 Ω resistor

ratio = ............................................... [1]

[Total: 8]
© UCLES 2014 0625/31/M/J/14
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11

10 Fig. 10.1 shows a coil of wire rotating steadily in the magnetic field between the poles of a
permanent magnet. The current generated in the coil is to pass through resistor R.

rotation of
coil coil

N S

A B

C D

Fig. 10.1

(a) The apparatus in Fig. 10.1 is part of an a.c. generator. What is connected between the ends A
and B of the coil and the connections C and D?

.............................................................................................................................................. [1]

(b) (i) On Fig. 10.2, sketch a graph to show the variation with time of the current through R. [1]

current

0
time

Fig. 10.2

(ii) On Fig. 10.2, show the time T corresponding to one complete rotation of the coil. [1]
(iii) State two ways in which the graph would be different if the coil spins at a faster rate.

1. .......................................................................................................................................

2. .................................................................................................................................. [2]

(c) Suggest what could be connected between C and R so that the current in R is always in the
same direction.

.............................................................................................................................................. [1]
[Total: 6]
© UCLES 2014 0625/31/M/J/14 [Turn over
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12

11 (a) Complete the table below for the three types of radiation.

radiation nature charge stopped by

electromagnetic
γ
radiation

β negative

α thick paper

[3]

(b) An isotope of strontium is represented in nuclide notation as 90Sr.


38

For a neutral atom of this isotope, state

(i) the proton number, ...............

(ii) the nucleon number, ...............

(iii) the number of neutrons, ...............

(iv) the number of electrons. ...............


[3]

(c) A sample of a radioactive material is placed near a radiation detector. A count-rate of


4800 counts / s is detected from the sample. After 36 hours the count-rate has fallen to
600 counts / s.

Calculate how many more hours must pass for the count-rate to become 150 counts / s.

number of hours = ............................................... [3]

[Total: 9]

Permission to reproduce items where third-party owned material protected by copyright is included has been sought and cleared where possible. Every
reasonable effort has been made by the publisher (UCLES) to trace copyright holders, but if any items requiring clearance have unwittingly been included, the
publisher will be pleased to make amends at the earliest possible opportunity.

Cambridge International Examinations is part of he Cambridge Assessment Group. Cambridge Assessment is the brand name of University of Cambridge Local
Examinations Syndicate (UCLES), which is itself a department of he University of Cambridge.

© UCLES 2014 0625/31/M/J/14


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CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS


International General Certificate of Secondary Education

MARK SCHEME for the May/June 2014 series

0625 PHYSICS
0625/32 Paper 3 (Extended Theory), maximum raw mark 80

This mark scheme is published as an aid to teachers and candidates, to indicate the requirements of
the examination. It shows the basis on which Examiners were instructed to award marks. It does not
indicate the details of the discussions that took place at an Examiners’ meeting before marking began,
which would have considered the acceptability of alternative answers.

Mark schemes should be read in conjunction with the question paper and the Principal Examiner
Report for Teachers.

Cambridge will not enter into discussions about these mark schemes.

Cambridge is publishing the mark schemes for the May/June 2014 series for most IGCSE, GCE
Advanced Level and Advanced Subsidiary Level components and some Ordinary Level components.
PMT

Page 2 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2014 0625 32

NOTES ABOUT MARK SCHEME SYMBOLS & OTHER MATTERS

B marks are independent marks, which do not depend on other marks. For a B mark to be
scored, the point to which it refers must be seen specifically in the candidate’s answer.

M marks are method marks upon which accuracy marks (A marks) later depend. For an M mark to
be scored, the point to which it refers must be seen in a candidate's answer. If a
candidate fails to score a particular M mark, then none of the dependent A marks can be
scored.

C marks are compensatory marks in general applicable to numerical questions. These can be
scored even if the point to which they refer are not written down by the candidate,
provided subsequent working gives evidence that they must have known it. For
example, if an equation carries a C mark and the candidate does not write down the
actual equation but does correct substitution or working which shows he knew the
equation, then the C mark is scored. A C mark is not awarded if a candidate makes two
points which contradict each other. Points which are wrong but irrelevant are ignored.

A marks A marks are accuracy or answer marks which either depend on an M mark, or which are
one of the ways which allow a C mark to be scored. A marks are commonly awarded for
final answers to numerical questions. If a final numerical answer, eligible for A marks, is
correct, with the correct unit and an acceptable number of significant figures, all the
marks for that question are normally awarded. It is very occasionally possible to arrive at
a correct answer by an entirely wrong approach. In these rare circumstances, do not
award the A marks, but award C marks on their merits. An A mark following an M mark is
a dependent mark.

Brackets ( ) around words or units in the mark scheme are intended to indicate wording used to
clarify the mark scheme, but the marks do not depend on seeing the words or units in
brackets, e.g. 10 (J) means that the mark is scored for 10, regardless of the unit given.

Underlining indicates that this must be seen in the answer offered, or something very similar.

OR / or indicates alternative answers, any one of which is satisfactory for scoring the marks.

e.e.o.o. means "each error or omission".

o.w.t.t.e. means “or words to that effect”.

Spelling Be generous about spelling and use of English. If an answer can be understood to mean
what we want, give credit. However, do not allow ambiguities, e.g. spelling which
suggests confusion between reflection / refraction / diffraction or thermistor / transistor/
transformer.

Not / NOT indicates that an incorrect answer is not to be disregarded, but cancels another
otherwise correct alternative offered by the candidate, i.e. right plus wrong penalty
applies.

Ignore indicates that something which is not correct or irrelevant is to be disregarded and does
not cause a right plus wrong penalty.

ecf meaning "error carried forward" is mainly applicable to numerical questions, but may in
particular circumstances be applied in non-numerical questions. This indicates that if a
candidate has made an earlier mistake and has carried an incorrect value forward to

© Cambridge International Examinations 2014


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Page 3 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2014 0625 32

subsequent stages of working, marks indicated by ecf may be awarded, provided the
subsequent working is correct, bearing in mind the earlier mistake. This prevents a
candidate being penalised more than once for a particular mistake, but only applies to
marks annotated ecf.

Significant figures
Answers are normally acceptable to any number of significant figures ≥ 2. Any
exceptions to this general rule will be specified in the mark scheme.

Units Deduct one mark for each incorrect or missing unit from an answer that would otherwise
gain all the marks available for that answer: maximum 1 per question. No deduction is
incurred if the unit is missing from the final answer but is shown correctly in the working.

Fractions Allow these only where specified in the mark scheme.

© Cambridge International Examinations 2014


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Page 4 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2014 0625 32

1 (a) (i) decreases / average speed 2 m / s B1

(ii) constant / speed 0.8 m / s B1

(b) (i) negative B1

(ii) zero B1

(c) uses v = d / t in any form or d / t C1

(av. vel = 50 / 40 =) 1.3 m / s or 1.25 m / s A1

[Total: 6]

2 (a) metre rule, tape measure, (surveyor’s) laser measurer, trundle wheel
tape is too vague, accept rule(r) B1

(b) M = ρV in any form or ρV in words, symbols or numbers C1

(mass = 1.2 × 76.4 =) 92 kg A1

(c) mass (of air) in room decreases B1

(because) air expands / vol of air increases / density of air decreases /


appropriate use of pV = nRT OR pressure argument e.g. pressure would have
increased (with constant volume) if mass constant B1

any ONE from: B1


some air leaves room
molecules collide harder or more (often)
molecules move faster / have more energy
molecules move further apart NOT molecules expand

[Total: 6]

3 (a) (i) ½mv2 in words, symbols or numbers C1

(v = √(2 × ½ × 16.2) =) 4.0 m / s accept 4 A1

(ii) mgh or KE / mg or v = √(2gh) or v2 = u2 + 2as words, symbols or numbers C1

correct substitution e.g. h = 16.2 / 2 × 10 C1

0.81 m allow e.c.f. from 3(a)(i) A1

(iii) heating of water o.w.t.t.e. B2


compensation mark: award B1 for one of heat, internal energy, sound, KE of water
ignore intermediate states throughout 3(a)(iii) e.g. KE / PE of splashed water

© Cambridge International Examinations 2014


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Page 5 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2014 0625 32

(b) same height M1

m affects both KE and GPE (in same way) / v2 = u2 + 2as applies in both cases
ignore “height doesn’t depend on mass” A1
special case : M1 for logical argument about not all KE becoming GPE
A1 for consequent statement about height gained

[Total: 9]

4 (a) (thermal) energy / heat to heat unit mass / 1 kg / 1 g B1

by unit temperature / 1 °C / 1 K B1

(b) (i) SHC= Q / (m∆T) in any form or Q / (m∆T) words, symbols or numbers C1

(SHC = 8700 / 800 × 12=) 0.91 J / (g °C) or 910 J / (kg °C) A1

(ii) th. cap. = Q / ∆T in any form or Q / ∆T or m × SHC words, symbols or numbers C1

(th. cap. = 8700 / 12 or 0.906 × 800 or 906 × 0.8 =) 730 J / °C or 725 J / °C A1

(c) lag (cylinder) / wait after heating until temperature stable / at max. value M1

prevents / reduces heat losses or heat (energy) takes time to flow throughout block A1
throughout 4(c), reward correct alternative physics which answers the question
e.g. use greater power to reduce expt time and hence energy lost
ignore: repeats or use thermometer with low thermal capacity

[Total: 8]

5 (a) (i) reduces (rate of evaporation) NOT zero (rate of evaporation) M1

no / fewer evaporated molecules removed by wind


OR greater humidity / vapour pressure
NOT fewer molecules in liquid / puddle blown away A1

(ii) increases (rate of evaporation) M1

molecules move faster / have more energy OR more molecules have energy
to escape A1

(b) greater (rate of evaporation) OR rate is less in small puddle


ignore rate of disappearance of puddle B1

surface areas correctly compared B1

© Cambridge International Examinations 2014


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Page 6 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2014 0625 32

(c) description of viable experiment NOT absorption expt M1

statement of measurements to be made A1

good detail e.g. thermometers in comparable positions OR pyrometer same


position relative to different surfaces A1

[Total: 9]

6 (a) reflected ray in correct quadrant B1

34° Y angle from surface Y 42° B1


ignore refracted ray for both marks

(b) angle of incidence: any mark in v box only B1

angle of refraction: any mark in y box only B1

(c) sin i / sin r = n or sin i / sin r = 1 / n in any form C1

sin r = 1.33 sin 30 or (sin 30) / 1.33 or 0.665 or 0.376 C1

(r = )42° A1

(d) refracted down compared to incident ray ignore emerging ray M1

between dashed line and 25° above it ignore emerging ray A1

[Total: 9]

7 (a) 3rd box only indicated, reverses direction B1

(b) (i) straight line up / down page B1

arrow pointing down page B1

(ii) to the right or left e.c.f. (b)(i) B1

to the right e.c.f. (b)(i) B1

(c) F=ma in any form or F / m symbols, words or numbers


OR final answer 6 × 10 4 m / s2 C1

(a = 0.21 / 0.35 =) 0.6 m / s2 A1

[Total: 7]

© Cambridge International Examinations 2014


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Page 7 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2014 0625 32

8 (a) 4.5 V ignore sign B1

(b) 1 / Rp = 1 / R1 + 1 / R2
OR (Rp =) R1R2 / (R1 + R2) words, symbols or numbers C1

R = (1 / (1 / 1 + 1 / 5)) = 0.83 Ω A1

(c) V= IR in any form OR V / R words, symbols or numbers C1

use of total e.m.f. as V AND series resistance as R


OR 4 / 5 of total emf seen OR 1 / 6 of total current seen C1

(I = 4.5 / 5 =) 0.90 A accept 0.9 e.c.f. from (a) A1

(d) 1.5 V ignore sign B1

[Total: 7]

9 (a) more negatives in top half than bottom half M1

roughly same no of positives as negatives A1

(b) clearly more negatives than positives, anywhere in / on block B1

(c) wire removed first M1

charges kept in block OR so no charge can flow to or from block


NOT any mention of positive charges moving
accept reverse argument A1

(d) (charging by) induction NOT e.m. induction OR earthing B1

[Total: 6]

10 (a) row 1 0 0 accept low / off B1

row 2 0 1 accept low / off and high / on B1

row 3 1 1 accept high / on B1

© Cambridge International Examinations 2014


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Page 8 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2014 0625 32

(b) 2 wires to flat (input) side, 1 wire from curved (output) side
do not accept pointed curved side or small circle B1

(c) NOT gate connected to output of AND gate


accept labelled boxes for gates
do not allow any extra gates or inputs M1

NOT gate correct way round


A1

[Total: 6]

11 (a) γ not deflected NOT extra(s) in γ column B1

α towards –ve or +ve AND β opposite NOT extra(s) in α or β column B1

α towards –ve AND β towards +ve NOT extra(s) in α or β column B1

(b) atoms / molecules (condone particles) lose / gain electrons OR become charged
NOT α or β particles lose / gain electrons OR become charged B1

(c) maximum three points (to include at least one explanation) from:
maximum two points from:
• α is charged / is a helium ion (is scored if 3rd explanation bullet point scored)
• γ is not charged
• α has mass
• γ does not have mass
• α has large size
• γ has negligible / no size
• γ is electromagnetic (wave) / photon
• α travels more slowly (than γ, but NOT more slowly than speed of light
unless next bullet point is also scored )
• γ travels at the speed of light / faster (than α)
any explanation (maximum three) e.g.:
• α makes frequent collisions (with air molecules) so range short
• γ has few (successful) collisions (with electrons) so not very ionising / range
long
• α more ionising because it has greater charge
• γ has no charge so less ionising
• α loses some energy with each collision so range short
• γ loses energy in single rare collision so takes longer distance before losing
all energy
• γ faster so travels further before energy is lost
• different methods of ionisation make α more ionising
B3

[Total: 7]

© Cambridge International Examinations 2014


PMT

Cambridge International Examinations


Cambridge International General Certificate of Secondary Education
* 4 4 0 0 7 9 6 6 0 8 *

PHYSICS 0625/32
Paper 3 Extended May/June 2014
1 hour 15 minutes
Candidates answer on the Question Paper.
No Additional Materials are required.

READ THESE INSTRUCTIONS FIRST

Write your Centre number, candidate number and name on all the work you hand in.
Write in dark blue or black pen.
You may use an HB pencil for any diagrams or graphs.
Do not use staples, paper clips, glue or correction fluid.
DO NOT WRITE IN ANY BARCODES.

Answer all questions.


Electronic calculators may be used.
You may lose marks if you do not show your working or if you do not use appropriate units.
Take the weight of 1 kg to be 10 N (i.e. acceleration of free fall = 10 m / s2).

At the end of the examination, fasten all your work securely together.
The number of marks is given in brackets [ ] at the end of each question or part question.

The syllabus is approved for use in England, Wales and Northern Ireland as a Cambridge International Level 1/Level 2 Certificate.

This document consists of 17 printed pages and 3 blank pages.

DC (NF/SW) 81295/4
© UCLES 2014 [Turn over
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1 Fig. 1.1 shows a distance-time graph for a moving object.

C
50

distance / m

B
30

A
0
0 15 40
time / s

Fig. 1.1

(a) Describe the speed of the object between points

(i) A and B,

...........................................................................................................................................

(ii) B and C.

...........................................................................................................................................
[2]

(b) State whether the acceleration of the object is zero, negative or positive, as shown on the
graph between points

(i) A and B,

...........................................................................................................................................

(ii) B and C.

...........................................................................................................................................
[2]

(c) Calculate the average speed of the object during the 40 seconds.

speed = ........................................................ [2]

[Total: 6]
© UCLES 2014 0625/32/M/J/14
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2 A surveyor measures the dimensions of a room of constant height. Fig. 2.1 is a top view of the
room and shows the measurements taken.

6.01 m

4.25 m

6.75 m

3.26 m

Fig. 2.1

(a) State an instrument that would be suitable to take these measurements.

.............................................................................................................................................. [1]

(b) The volume of air in the room is 76.4 m3. The density of the air is 1.2 kg / m3.

Calculate the mass of air in the room.

mass = ........................................................ [2]

(c) A window in the room is open. The next day, the temperature of the room has increased, but
the pressure of the air has stayed the same.

State and explain what has happened to the mass of air in the room.

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

.............................................................................................................................................. [3]

[Total: 6]

© UCLES 2014 0625/32/M/J/14 [Turn over


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3 When a salmon swims up a river to breed, it often has to jump up waterfalls. Fig. 3.1 shows a
salmon jumping above the surface of the water. On this occasion the salmon falls back down into
the river.

salmon

waterfall

river

Fig. 3.1

The salmon has a mass of 2.0 kg.

(a) The salmon leaves the water vertically with a kinetic energy of 16.2 J.

(i) Calculate the speed of the salmon as it leaves the water.

speed = ........................................................ [2]

(ii) Calculate the maximum height gained by the salmon. Ignore air resistance.

gain in height = ........................................................ [3]

(iii) After the salmon has re-entered the river, it has lost nearly all its original kinetic energy.

State what has happened to the lost energy.

...........................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................... [2]

© UCLES 2014 0625/32/M/J/14


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(b) Another salmon, of much greater mass, leaves the water vertically with the same speed.

State and explain how the height of this salmon’s jump compares to the height reached by the
first salmon.

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

.............................................................................................................................................. [2]

[Total: 9]

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BLANK PAGE

© UCLES 2014 0625/32/M/J/14


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4 (a) Define the specific heat capacity of a substance.

...................................................................................................................................................

.............................................................................................................................................. [2]

(b) Fig. 4.1 shows a cylinder of aluminium heated by an electric heater.

electric heater
C.I.E. Power Pack

thermometer
V
+ –

aluminium cylinder

Fig. 4.1

The mass of the cylinder is 800 g. The heater delivers 8700 J of thermal energy to the cylinder
and the temperature of the cylinder increases by 12 °C.

(i) Calculate a value for the specific heat capacity of aluminium.

specific heat capacity = ........................................................ [2]

(ii) Calculate the thermal capacity (heat capacity) of the aluminium cylinder.

thermal capacity = ........................................................ [2]

(c) State and explain a method of improving the accuracy of the experiment.

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

.............................................................................................................................................. [2]

[Total: 8]
© UCLES 2014 0625/32/M/J/14 [Turn over
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5 (a) Puddles of water form on a path after rainfall on a windy day.

In terms of molecules, state and explain how the rate of evaporation of the puddles is
affected by

(i) a reduction of wind speed,

...........................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................... [2]

(ii) an increase of water temperature.

...........................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................... [2]

(b) Fig. 5.1 shows two puddles.

large puddle

small puddle

Fig. 5.1

State and explain how the rate of evaporation from the large puddle compares to that from the
small puddle under the same conditions.

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

.............................................................................................................................................. [2]

© UCLES 2014 0625/32/M/J/14


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(c) Describe an experiment to demonstrate the difference between good and bad emitters of
infra-red radiation. You may include a diagram to help your description. State what readings
should be taken.

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................................................[3]

[Total: 9]

© UCLES 2014 0625/32/M/J/14 [Turn over


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10

6 (a) Fig. 6.1 shows a ray of light incident on the surface of a glass block.

Fig. 6.1

On Fig. 6.1, accurately draw the reflected ray. [2]

(b) Fig. 6.2 shows a ray of light incident on a glass prism.

v w x
u z y

Fig. 6.2

Put one tick only in each line of the table to indicate which of the angles labelled in Fig. 6.2
are the angle of incidence and the angle of refraction.

u v w x y z

angle of incidence

angle of refraction
[2]

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11

(c) The refractive index of water is 1.33. A ray of light passes from water into air. The angle of
incidence at the water-air interface is 30 °.

Calculate the angle of refraction.

angle of refraction = ........................................................ [3]

(d) Fig. 6.3 shows rays of violet and red light incident on a prism. The dashed line shows the path
taken by the ray of violet light in the prism.

path of
rays of violet
and red light

Fig. 6.3

On Fig. 6.3, draw and label the path that the ray of red light takes in the prism. A calculation is
not required. [2]

[Total: 9]

© UCLES 2014 0625/32/M/J/14 [Turn over


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12

7 (a) A solenoid connected to a battery produces a magnetic field. The wires are then connected to
the battery terminals the other way round.

Tick one box in the table to indicate the effect on the magnetic field.

decreases but not to zero

decreases to zero

reverses direction

increases

stays the same


[1]

(b) Fig. 7.1 shows a top view of two bar magnets and a vertical rigid conducting rod carrying a
current. The direction of the current in the rod is coming out of the paper.

vertical rod perpendicular


to paper

Fig. 7.1

(i) On Fig. 7.1, draw a single line with an arrow to show the direction of the magnetic field
due to the bar magnets at the position of the rod. [2]
(ii) State the direction of the force exerted on the vertical rod.

...................................................................................................................................... [2]

© UCLES 2014 0625/32/M/J/14


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13

(c) The rod has a mass of 350 g and the resultant force acting on the rod is 0.21 N. The rod is free
to move.

Calculate the initial acceleration of the rod.

acceleration = ........................................................ [2]

[Total: 7]

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14

8 Fig. 8.1 shows three cells each with e.m.f. 1.5 V connected in series.

1.5 V 1.5 V 1.5 V

4.0 1 1.0 1

1.0 1

Fig. 8.1

(a) Calculate the combined e.m.f. of the cells.

e.m.f. = ........................................................ [1]

(b) Calculate the combined resistance of the three resistors shown in Fig. 8.1.

resistance = ........................................................ [2]

(c) Calculate the current in the 4.0 Ω resistor in Fig. 8.1.

current = ........................................................ [3]

© UCLES 2014 0625/32/M/J/14


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15

(d) Calculate the combined e.m.f. of the cells if one cell is reversed.

e.m.f. = ........................................................ [1]

[Total: 7]

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16

9 Fig. 9.1 shows a positively charged plastic rod, a metal block resting on an insulator, and a wire
connected to earth.

positively charged
plastic rod

metal block

wire connected
insulator
to earth

Fig. 9.1

(a) On Fig. 9.1, draw the charge distribution in the metal block. [2]

(b) The earth wire is held against the metal block, as shown in Fig. 9.2.

positively charged
plastic rod

metal block

wire connected
insulator
to earth

Fig. 9.2

On Fig. 9.2, draw the new charge distribution. [1]

(c) The charged rod and the earth wire are removed and the metal block is left charged.

State the order in which the rod and the wire were removed. Explain your answer.

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

.............................................................................................................................................. [2]

(d) Name this charging process.

.............................................................................................................................................. [1]

[Total: 6]

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17

10 (a) Fig. 10.1 shows a digital logic circuit, not using the recognised symbols.

AND gate
input A D
input B
OR gate

output E
input C

Fig. 10.1

Complete the table below to indicate the logic levels of points D and E in the circuit, when
points A, B and C are at the logic levels indicated.
0 represents low or off. 1 represents high or on.

A B C D E

0 0 0

0 0 1

1 1 1
[3]

(b) Draw the recognised symbol for an AND gate.

[1]

(c) A NAND gate can be replaced by an AND gate and a NOT gate.

Draw a diagram to show how the AND gate and the NOT gate should be connected. Label
clearly the logic gates and any input or output.

[2]

[Total: 6]

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11 Fig. 11.1 shows a beam of radiation that contains α-particles, β-particles and γ-rays. The beam
enters a very strong electric field between charged plates in a vacuum.

plate at positive voltage

beam of radiation

plate at negative voltage

Fig. 11.1

(a) Indicate the deflection, if any, of the α-particles, β-particles and γ-rays, by placing one tick in
each column of the table.

possible deflection α-particles β-particles γ-rays

no deflection

towards positive plate

towards negative plate

out of the paper

into the paper


[3]

(b) The radiation is said to be ionising. Explain what this means.

...................................................................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................................................[1]

(c) α-particles are more strongly ionising and have a shorter range in air than γ-rays.

Use your knowledge of the nature of these radiations to explain these differences.

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

...................................................................................................................................................

.............................................................................................................................................. [3]

[Total: 7]

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BLANK PAGE

© UCLES 2014 0625/32/M/J/14


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20

BLANK PAGE

Permission to reproduce items where third-party owned material protected by copyright is included has been sought and cleared where possible. Every
reasonable effort has been made by the publisher (UCLES) to trace copyright holders, but if any items requiring clearance have unwittingly been included, the
publisher will be pleased to make amends at the earliest possible opportunity.

Cambridge International Examinations is part of he Cambridge Assessment Group. Cambridge Assessment is the brand name of University of Cambridge Local
Examinations Syndicate (UCLES), which is itself a department of he University of Cambridge.

© UCLES 2014 0625/32/M/J/14


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CAMBRIDGE INTERNATIONAL EXAMINATIONS


International General Certificate of Secondary Education

MARK SCHEME for the May/June 2014 series

0625 PHYSICS
0625/33 Paper 3 (Extended Theory), maximum raw mark 80

This mark scheme is published as an aid to teachers and candidates, to indicate the requirements of
the examination. It shows the basis on which Examiners were instructed to award marks. It does not
indicate the details of the discussions that took place at an Examiners’ meeting before marking began,
which would have considered the acceptability of alternative answers.

Mark schemes should be read in conjunction with the question paper and the Principal Examiner
Report for Teachers.

Cambridge will not enter into discussions about these mark schemes.

Cambridge is publishing the mark schemes for the May/June 2014 series for most IGCSE, GCE
Advanced Level and Advanced Subsidiary Level components and some Ordinary Level components.
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Page 2 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2014 0625 33

NOTES ABOUT MARK SCHEME SYMBOLS & OTHER MATTERS

B marks are independent marks, which do not depend on other marks. For a B mark to be
scored, the point to which it refers must be seen specifically in the candidate’s answer.

M marks are method marks upon which accuracy marks (A marks) later depend. For an M mark to
be scored, the point to which it refers must be seen in a candidate's answer. If a
candidate fails to score a particular M mark, then none of the dependent A marks can be
scored.

C marks are compensatory marks in general applicable to numerical questions. These can be
scored even if the point to which they refer are not written down by the candidate,
provided subsequent working gives evidence that they must have known it. For
example, if an equation carries a C mark and the candidate does not write down the
actual equation but does correct substitution or working which shows he knew the
equation, then the C mark is scored. A C mark is not awarded if a candidate makes two
points which contradict each other. Points which are wrong but irrelevant are ignored.

A marks A marks are accuracy or answer marks which either depend on an M mark, or which are
one of the ways which allow a C mark to be scored. A marks are commonly awarded for
final answers to numerical questions. If a final numerical answer, eligible for A marks, is
correct, with the correct unit and an acceptable number of significant figures, all the
marks for that question are normally awarded. It is very occasionally possible to arrive at
a correct answer by an entirely wrong approach. In these rare circumstances, do not
award the A marks, but award C marks on their merits. An A mark following an M mark is
a dependent mark.

Brackets ( ) around words or units in the mark scheme are intended to indicate wording used to
clarify the mark scheme, but the marks do not depend on seeing the words or units in
brackets, e.g. 10 (J) means that the mark is scored for 10, regardless of the unit given.

Underlining indicates that this must be seen in the answer offered, or something very similar.

OR / or indicates alternative answers, any one of which is satisfactory for scoring the marks.

e.e.o.o. means "each error or omission".

o.w.t.t.e. means “or words to that effect”.

Spelling Be generous about spelling and use of English. If an answer can be understood to mean
what we want, give credit. However, do not allow ambiguities, e.g. spelling which
suggests confusion between reflection / refraction / diffraction or thermistor / transistor/
transformer.

Not / NOT indicates that an incorrect answer is not to be disregarded, but cancels another
otherwise correct alternative offered by the candidate, i.e. right plus wrong penalty
applies.

Ignore indicates that something which is not correct or irrelevant is to be disregarded and does
not cause a right plus wrong penalty.

ecf meaning "error carried forward" is mainly applicable to numerical questions, but may in
particular circumstances, but rarely, be applied in non-numerical questions. This
indicates that if a candidate has made an earlier mistake and has carried an incorrect

© Cambridge International Examinations 2014


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Page 3 Mark Scheme Syllabus Paper


IGCSE – May/June 2014 0625 33

value forward to subsequent stages of working, marks indicated by ecf may be awarded,
provided the subsequent working is correct, bearing in mind the earlier mistake. This
prevents a candidate being penalised more than once for a particular mistake, but only
applies to marks annotated ecf.

Significant figures
Answers are normally acceptable to any number of significant figures ≥ 2. Any
exceptions to this general rule will be specified in the mark scheme.

Units Deduct one mark for each incorrect or missing unit from an answer that would otherwise
gain all the marks available for that answer: maximum 1 per question. No deduction is
incurred if the unit is missing from the final answer but is shown correctly in the working.

Fractions Allow these only where specified in the mark scheme.

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IGCSE – May/June 2014 0625 33

1 (a) (i) A marked between t = 0 and t = 6.0 s B1

(ii) B marked between t 6.0 s and t = 7.0 s B1

(iii) C marked on clearly curved section before t = 14 s B1

(b) (i) (a =)∆v / t OR 30 / 1 OR 15 / 0.5 etc. OR triangle on graph / tangent C1

(ignore – sign) 25 m / s2 < a < 35 m / s2 A1

(ii) (F =)ma OR 750 × 30 e.c.f. from (b)(i) C1

2.2 / 2.25 / 2.3 × 104 N e.c.f. from (b)(i) A1

(c) acceleration / rate of change of speed is zero OR speed is constant OR air


resistance / backwards force equal and opposite to driving / forwards force B1

[Total: 8]

2 (a) (if no diagram, max. mark is 3)


measuring / graduated cylinder B1

water AND initial reading OR known volume


alternative method: water AND filled eureka can owtte B1

immerse stone AND final reading


alternative method: immerse stone AND catch overflow B1

final reading – initial reading


alternative method: reading on measuring cylinder B1

(b) (i) mass, NOT with other quantity B1

(ii) (ρR)m / V in symbols or words B1

(c) attach weight to wood


OR different liquid
OR push down with stick M1

accuracy mark must match method


subtract volume of weight from total volume
OR new liquid less dense than wood
OR no part of stick in water / thin stick A1

[Total: 8]

3 (a) (immediately below / above the / at) 50 cm mark OR at pivot B1

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IGCSE – May/June 2014 0625 33

(b) (i) anticlockwise moment = clockwise moment OR 45 × 0.40 = 25 × W C1

0.72 N A1

(ii) 0.072 kg OR 72 g e.c.f from (b)(i) B1

(c) (i) no net moment OR two moments cancel C1

moment due to weight of rule cancels moment due to weight of apple A1

(ii) weight of the rule / it is bigger B1

[Total: 7]

4 (a) (i) molecules in random arrangement B1

molecules similar distance apart B1

(ii) molecules in random arrangement AND further apart B1

(b) (i) gas ringed / indicated B1

(ii) more room for molecules OR molecules fit into gaps OR there are gaps
between molecules B1

no repulsive forces between molecules OR (repulsive) forces between


molecules smaller OR pressure on walls smaller OR only small
force / pressure required B1

[Total: 6]

5 (a) (m =) Pt / l OR 460 × 180 / 2.3 × 106 OR 82 800 / 2.3 × 106 C1

0.036 kg OR 36 g A1

(b) (i) any two from:


(surface) area
draught
temperature (of water / room)
humidity of air B2

(ii) any two from:


evaporation at any temperature / below boiling point
evaporation (only) at the surface
evaporation influenced by surface area / draught / temperature / humidity (not
if given in (b)(i)) B2

[Total: 6]

© Cambridge International Examinations 2014


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IGCSE – May/June 2014 0625 33

6 (a) (i) A OR left hand thermometer B1

(ii) E AND longest length and smallest range / more length per degree / liquid
moves more per degree / increases the most per degree B1

(b) any two from:


narrow bore / tube
large amount of liquid / mercury / ethanol / alcohol / bulb
liquid with large expansivity OR ethanol instead of mercury B2

(c) 80 ( UC) OR 80 / 120 OR 18 / 120 C1

12 cm A1

[Total: 6]

7 (a) vibrations OR compressions AND rarefactions M1

vibrations parallel to direction of travel (of wave energy)


OR compressions move in direction of travel (of wave energy) A1

(b) (i) (ä=)v / f OR 6100 / 7500 OR 6100 / 7.5 C1

0.81(33333) m OR 813(33333) mm A1

(ii) 1. decreases B1

2. same answer as 1. B1

[Total: 6]

8 (a) (i) two rays from lamp to mirror AND one good (i ≈ r) reflected ray B1

two good reflected rays AND rays traced back above mirror B1

labelled / clear image located at intersection AND in correct position B1

(ii) any two from:


virtual
(longitudinally) inverted
same size (as lamp) OR same distance (from mirror) B2

(b) light reflected back / down OR not wasted OR room brighter OR more light etc. B1

[Total: 6]

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IGCSE – May/June 2014 0625 33

9 (a) at least three vertical lines between the plates B1

equally spaced OR some curvature at the ends B1

at least one correct (upwards) arrow AND none wrong B1

(b) (i) (I=) Q / t OR 0.000 000 042 / 0.000 000 035 OR 4.2 × 10 8 / 3.5 × 10 8
C1

1.2 × 10n for any n C1

1.2 A A1

(ii) contains electrons C1

electrons are free to move A1

[Total: 8]

10 (a) (P=)VI OR 230 × 3.5 C1

805 / 810 W A1

(b) (IY=)7.0 (A)


alternative method: (RX=)V / I OR 230 / 3.5 OR 66 / 65.7(1429) C1

(ITot=)10.5 (A)
alternative method: ( (RY=) 230 / 7.0 OR 66 / 2 OR 65.7(1429) / 2 OR
33 / 32.9 / 32.85714) C1

(R=)V / I OR 230 / 10.5


alternative method: (R=)R1R2 / (R1 + R2) OR 2159 / 98.57
OR 1 / R= 1 / R1 + 1 / R2 OR 1 / R= 1 / 65.7N1 / 32.9 C1

22 / 21.9(0476) Ω A1

[Total: 6]

11 (a) (i) (V2=)V1N2 / N2 OR 230 × 2000 / 40 000 C1

11 / 11.5 /12 V A1

(ii) any three from:


alternating / changing magnetic field (in core)
(magnetic field) transferred (allow conducted) to coil Q
changing flux linkage / in Q
e.m.f. / voltage induced in Q B3

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IGCSE – May/June 2014 0625 33

(b) (i) diode B1

(ii) it conducts in (only) on