Você está na página 1de 10

High Intermediate to Advanced Business English

It’s All In How You Say It (Emails and Internal Communication)


Lesson 1 of 2

GOALS OF THE LESSON: To introduce common collocations used in business emails. To


provide practice using different email forms for different purposes.

SKILLS used &/or reinforced: Writing, sequencing, fluency

YOU WILL NEED: Copies of handouts & key, copies of homework assignment

WARM-UP: (5 minutes) Ask students about common reasons to write email. (Provide
information, request information, clarify something, scheduling, etc.) Elicit common problems
they have experienced. Ask if there’s a difference in the way they talk to someone in the office
and they way they write to that same person in an email – and if so, what? Advise students
that today we will practice different strategies for effective emails.

MAIN ACTIVITY 1: (20-25 minutes) Ask students how much they know about writing
professional and effective emails. What are some of their best practices? Note anything
volunteered on the board.

Distribute Handout #1 (Best Practices Quiz) – Explain that it’s a list of sentences about writing
emails. Working in pairs, invite the students to discuss each one and decide if the sentence is
good advice (G), or bad advice (B), or optional (O). (The pair with the most right wins!)

After completion, distribute the key, and Handout #2 (Best Practices). Allow time for review
and to answer any questions.

MAIN ACTIVITY 2: (20-25 minutes) Write a sample sentence on the board – “ABC
Equipment which was founded in 1925 in the USA is a profitable company which produces
equipment for sports that is very high quality and is sold in Europe.” Invite students to find
ways to simplify this sentence.

(Suggested answer: Founded in 1925, ABC Equipment is a successful American high-end


sporting goods company that exports to Europe. )

High-Int to Adv Biz Eng / It’s All In How You Say It (Emails) / April 2016 / D. Prichard Page 1 of 10
Distribute Handout #3. Divide students into pairs. Invite students to work together to simplify
the 10 sentences without losing information and with correct grammar. When finished, invite
pairs to compare their sentences. Review and explain any grammar errors.
WRAP-UP: Distribute homework assignment. Explain expectations. Advise students that the
completed homework will be used in the next class.

HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT:
Review the elements of professional emails. Then write emails for the scenarios below.
1. You work for a large mail order house. One of your regular customers has just emailed
you that she is very upset because the packaging for the $500 worth of goods that she
ordered was ripped and crushed, ruining a few items. She wants compensation and is
threatening to no longer do business with you. You have to write her back and deal with
the problem
2. A good customer has still not paid their $10,000 bill that is now 60 days overdue. You
are obviously very concerned. Your many phone calls have not been returned. You need
to write this client to explain exactly what is due and workout a payment plan. You have
to tell her that, although you would prefer to not have to go this route, if you don’t hear
from him/her in a certain amount of days, you will have to refer the account to a
collection agency.
3. You work for a large mail order house. One of your regular customers has just emailed
you that she is very upset because the packaging for the $500 worth of goods that she
ordered was ripped and crushed, ruining a few items. She wants compensation and is
threatening to no longer do business with you. You have to write her back and deal with
the problem.
4. A potential big, important client is coming in from California to meet with you and your
President to learn more about the services offered at your advertising agency. You have
to write him with your address, hotel information, directions to your office and
entertainment arrangements for the evening he will be here.
5. You had asked for the information about one thing and you receive answer to another.
Explain that this is not what you need, ask for the other answer. Explain that you have a
deadline to meet and that you need this information in a hurry.
6. You and your client finally have a verbal agreement on a contract. You need to send him
the hard copy to review. Write an email, send the contract, explain the deadline, and
make the appointment to meet in person to sign it.

High-Int to Adv Biz Eng / It’s All In How You Say It (Emails) / April 2016 / D. Prichard Page 2 of 10
HANDOUT #1 – BEST PRACTICES QUIZ -
How much do you know? Work with your partner. Beside each sentence, write
“G” for “Good Advice” or “B” for “Bad Advice”

1. _____ You can be sure you don’t skip anyone if you send one email to the entire group.
That way, you know your request will be answered quickly and more people will be
interested.
2. _____ You should always change the subject line on every email you forward to
someone else.
3. _____ It’s ok to leave the subject line empty if you are emailing a close coworker.
4. _____ You can get faster action on your emails if you always send it as “urgent” and put
“high priority” or “important” in your message.
5. _____ It’s good to always include something friendly in your emails – a joke or emoticon
– so that the recipients will always open your emails first.
6. _____ If your message is really short, it’s ok to put the entire message in the subject line.
That way, the recipient doesn’t even have to open the email.
7. _____ Subject lines need a verb whenever possible, so that the recipient has a better
idea of what is going on.
8. _____ People love to see and hear their names, so always include a greeting in the
email.
9. _____ If you have a lot of information, your recipients will understand and be patient
with very long emails. 2 or 3 pages is ok, when the subject is really important.
10. _____ Don’t put anything in an email that you wouldn’t put in a written letter on
company letterhead. Email is less formal, but it is still official company communication.
11. _____ Be aware of what your readers do and don’t know so you can include the right
amount of detail and other information.
12. _____ Paragraphs are better than bullet points because it’s more like reading a book.
13._____ Use abbreviations to save space in your email.
14. _____ Be direct and put your main idea first, then give all the supporting detail.
15. _____ Writing in capital letters is a good way to get your readers’ attention.
16. _____ Requesting a “read receipt” will impress your reader and tell them you take
their email seriously.
17. _____ Simple is better. Sentences more than 20 words are difficult for the reader.
18. _____ Generally, use active voice when talking about your own actions (Ex: I
recommend…..) , and passive voice when talking about the company’s actions. (Ex: It is
recommended that….)
19. _____ Different countries use different ways to write dates, so use the date you are
used to, and the reader will know you are using your country’s way.
20. _____ One page emails aren’t recommended because they take too long to write.

High-Int to Adv Biz Eng / It’s All In How You Say It (Emails) / April 2016 / D. Prichard Page 3 of 10
KEY TO HANDOUT #1 (Best Practices Quiz)

1. B 2. G 3. B 4. B 5. B 6. B 7. G 8. G. 9. B 10. G 11. G 12. B

13. B 14. G 15. B 16. B 17. G 18. G 19. B 20. B

*****************************************************

KEY TO HANDOUT #1 (Best Practices Quiz)

1. B 2. G 3. B 4. B 5. B 6. B 7. G 8. G. 9. B 10. G 11. G 12. B

13. B 14. G 15. B 16. B 17. G 18. G 19. B 20. B

*****************************************************

KEY TO HANDOUT #1 (Best Practices Quiz)

1. B 2. G 3. B 4. B 5. B 6. B 7. G 8. G. 9. B 10. G 11. G 12. B

13. B 14. G 15. B 16. B 17. G 18. G 19. B 20. B

*****************************************************

KEY TO HANDOUT #1 (Best Practices Quiz)

1. B 2. G 3. B 4. B 5. B 6. B 7. G 8. G. 9. B 10. G 11. G 12. B

13. B 14. G 15. B 16. B 17. G 18. G 19. B 20. B

*****************************************************

KEY TO HANDOUT #1 (Best Practices Quiz)

1. B 2. G 3. B 4. B 5. B 6. B 7. G 8. G. 9. B 10. G 11. G 12. B

13. B 14. G 15. B 16. B 17. G 18. G 19. B 20. B

High-Int to Adv Biz Eng / It’s All In How You Say It (Emails) / April 2016 / D. Prichard Page 4 of 10
HANDOUT #2 – BEST PRACTICES - Emails should have an address,
subject line, opening, body, and closing, just like written letter.
A) Address – Try to avoid putting more than one person on an email. The
recipients may assume the other people are helping you.
B) Subject Line
1. Try to use a verb. For example: Instead of using “Meeting June 3”,
say “June 3 Meeting – location changed”
2. Don’t use things like “urgent” or “important” or “high priority”
unless it is. Otherwise, the readers won’t take you seriously.
3. Change the subject line when you forward emails.
C) Greeting -
1. Use their name (Dear Mr. XXX, Dear Mrs. XXX).
2. If you don’t know their name, use “Dear Sir” or “Dear Madam”.
3. If you know their name, but not their gender, use their whole name.
(Dear Chris Jones)
D) Opening - State your main ideas first. Then explain the background
details. Use short sentences with few dependent clauses and 20 words
or less.
E) Body –
1. Generally, use active voice when talking about your own actions, and
passive voice when talking about the company’s actions.
2. Limit the body of the email to one page. It will take longer to make
clearer sentences, but your readers will pay more attention.
3. Use bullet points to organize multiple pieces of information.
4. Use “I” when talking about yourself, use “we” for the company.
5. Avoid typing in capital letters. It appears as if you are shouting.
6. State dates clearly, because different countries use different formats.
7. Use business language for business matters, even if you are writing a
colleague who is also a friend.
8. Avoid abbreviations. Not everybody knows the same ones.
F) Closing
1. Don’t send jokes or use emoticons. It is unprofessional.
2. Closings are used to refer to a future event, to repeat an apology, or
to offer help.
High-Int to Adv Biz Eng / It’s All In How You Say It (Emails) / April 2016 / D. Prichard Page 5 of 10
Informal emails/ letters might include: Formal emails/ letters might include:
- contractions - the use of the passive voice rather than “I”
- short sentences when representing the company (It is
- notes/ incomplete sentences recommended rather than I recommend)
- informal subject line - standard phrases (Do not hesitate to contact
- informal punctuation (exclamation us…)
marks, dashes) - more formal punctuation (colons, semi-
- internet abbreviations/ smilies/ colons)
emoticons - more formal grammar (could, would)
- informal vocabulary (stuff) - longer and more complex sentences
- informal grammar (can) - use of more formal linking words (in addition,
- no or informal salutations and closings however)
- formal salutation and closing
Thanks Can you Thank you Could/ Would you
I just wanted to let you know I’m sorry I would like to confirm I would like to apologize
To get To contact To receive To get in touch
Stuff Ok Goods Satisfactory
A lot To need Very much To require
To send To be sorry To dispatch To regret
But Still However Nevertheless
Because since
10 Good Opening Lines: 10 Good Closing Lines:
* With reference to your letter of 8 June, I.. * If you require any further information, feel
* I am writing to enquire about ... free to contact me.
* After having seen your advertisement * I look forward to your reply.
in ... , I would like ... * I look forward to hearing from you.
* After having received your address * I look forward to seeing you.
from ... , I ... * Please advise as necessary.
* I received your address from ... and * We look forward to a successful working
would like ... relationship in the future.
* We/I recently wrote to you about ... * Should you need any further information,
* Thank you for your letter of 8 May. please do not hesitate to contact me.
* Thank you for your letter regarding ... * Once again, I apologize for any inconvenience.
* Thank you for your letter/e-mail about ... * We hope that we may continue to rely on your
* In reply to your letter of 8 May, ... valued custom.
* I would appreciate your immediate attention
to this matter.
High-Int to Adv Biz Eng / It’s All In How You Say It (Emails) / April 2016 / D. Prichard Page 6 of 10
Handout #3 – Simplifying sentences
Work with your partner. Simplify the following into a simpler form without losing
meaning and with proper grammar.

1. The computers which were manufactured in Taiwan and shipped to Singapore were
sold to 50 schools that taught nursing.

2. The meetings which will be held on September 12 and 13 will be attended by


members of the accounting department for the purpose of presenting new policies
and procedures for the company’s finances.

3. The staff members of the IT department who attended the seminar last week
learned new procedures which will reduce costs in the IT department.

4. The shipment of iPhones which were produced in 2015 was purchased by a company
that sells all of its products online around the world.

5. Your request for information was received by the department that handles customer
concerns. That department has a policy of answering all letters within 2 days.

6. An industry seminar which was attended by more than 1000 professionals included
10 presentations by experts and an awards ceremony to recognize several
outstanding people who made great contributions in their fields.

7. The CEO who recently joined the company asked the members of the Board of
Directors who have been with the company for many years to attend a meeting so
that they could give him their individual opinions on the performance of the company.

8. I ordered a shipment of desk chairs which will match the chairs that are in our office
now. The order was placed on April 23 and it will be delivered on June 30.

9. The problem which the accounting department had with the payroll for next month
can’t be fixed until the Chief Financial Officer returns from his vacation to America.

10. The architectural firm thinks that the building which is located in Haidian District
will be finished in 6 months or less, and that the tenants will be able to move into
their offices at that point.

High-Int to Adv Biz Eng / It’s All In How You Say It (Emails) / April 2016 / D. Prichard Page 7 of 10
SUGGESTED SIMPLIFICATIONS:

1. The Taiwan-manufactured computers were shipped to Singapore and sold to 50 nursing


schools.

2. The September 12 and 13 meetings will be attended by accounting department


employees so they can present the company’s new financial policies and procedures.

3. The IT staff members at last week’s seminar learned new cost-saving procedures for
their department.

4. The shipment of 2015 iPhones was purchase by a global online seller.

5. Your request was received by Customer Service, and they will respond within 48 hours.

6. Over 1000 professionals attended the seminar that included 10 presentations by experts
and awards to top industry contributors.

7. The new CEO asked the long-standing Board of Directors to attend a meeting to share
their individual opinions on company performance.

8. On April 23, I ordered a shipment of desk chairs to match our existing ones, and they will
be delivered on June 30.

9. The accounting department’s problem with next month’s payroll cannot be resolved
until the CFO returns from his vacation.

10. The architectural firm believes that the Haidian district building will be ready for
occupancy within 6 months.

High-Int to Adv Biz Eng / It’s All In How You Say It (Emails) / April 2016 / D. Prichard Page 8 of 10
High Intermediate to Advanced Business English
It’s All In How You Say It (Emails and Internal Communication)
Lesson 2 of 2

GOALS OF THE LESSON: To introduce common collocations used in business emails. To


provide practice using different email forms for different purposes.

SKILLS used &/or reinforced: Writing, sequencing, fluency

YOU WILL NEED: Completed homework assignment

WARM-UP: (5 minutes) As

HOMEWORK REVIEW: Homework for this class will be utilized in the main activity. No separate
homework review is required.

MAIN ACTIVITY #1: (10-15 minutes) Ask students for some common phrases in email. (For
example: “I look forward to your reply”) Distribute Handout #1 – Invite students to work in
pairs to match the intent on the left with the email phrase on the right.

Worksheet Key:

KEY: P, U, F, A, Y, T, B, C, X, D, G, Q, E, H, K, S, V, W, I, Z, J, L, M, N, O, R

MAIN ACTIVITY #2: (Remainder of class time) Invite students to exchange emails written
for their homework assignment. Explain that the receiving student should write the reply to
the email they have. When the email reply is written, they should return it to the original
source for a follow-up email. Encourage students to help each other with grammar and phrase
correction.

WRAP-UP: Ask for any new techniques and/or useful phrases they’ve learned.

High-Int to Adv Biz Eng / It’s All In How You Say It (Emails) / April 2016 / D. Prichard Page 9 of 10
HANDOUT #1 – Match the intent on the left with the email phrase on the right.
____A situation is unpleasant for you and I feel bad about it. A. Thank you so much for your patience.
_____ I really need for you to make this happen as quickly B. I apologize for the delay in replying……
as possible.
_____ Wow! You really answered me fast! Good job! C. I regret to inform you that….
_____ I made you wait a long time for this and I’m really D. In response to your letter of May 8…..
glad you aren’t angry
_____ There’s a lot of information I need to give you, but it E. I’m writing you at the suggestion of our
is in another document with this email. mutual associate, Robert Johnson.
______ I think I answered everything you want to know. F. Thank you so much for your prompt
reply/response. (I appreciate your…)
_____ I waited a long time to answer you, and I feel bad G. I am writing to confirm our meeting on
about it June 18th.
_____ I don’t want to tell you this, but I must, and you H. If you could let me know a good time for
aren’t going to like it. you, I’ll schedule accordingly.
____ You have something I need and I need it quickly I. Please let me know if you need any further
clarification.
____ You sent me a letter and now I am writing you because J. According to our records, here is a
you wrote me breakdown of _______
____ I made an appointment with you and I want to make K. As promised, the information you
sure you know it. require/requested is attached.
_____ You were supposed to pay and you didn’t. L. It was a pleasure to meet with you today.
Just to summarize, we agree that…..
_____ You don’t know me, but I’m a friend of __________. M. I am happy/pleased to inform you that..
_____ I need to meet with you but I don’t know when you N. I would be grateful if you’d please reply to
are available. confirm receipt.
____ I told you I would do something, and I did it. Here it is. O. Thank you for your interest in our _______
_____ I thought I could go to your office on a certain day, P. I apologize for any inconvenience
but I can’t, and I feel bad about it.
_____ You need to change the way you think about Q. I am writing concerning the car payment
something based on certain information that was due May 1
_____ You helped me so much and I’m really glad. R. In reference to my email of June 20, could
you please…..
____ I’ve given you a lot of information, and I’m worried S. I regret that I will not be able to attend the
that you won’t understand it all. meeting tomorrow.
____ This is all of what I want to tell you, and I’m really glad T. I trust this addresses all of your concerns.
you read all of it.
____ I looked for the information, and this is what I found U. Please forward me ______ as soon as
out about something…. possible.
_____ I saw you today, and I need to make sure you know V. I strongly urge you to reconsider on the
what I believe after we talked. grounds that...
_____ I have some really good news. W. Thank you so much for your assistance.
_____ I’m worried that you won’t get this, and I really need X Time is critical, so I would appreciate it if
to know that you are aware of this problem. you would please expedite this.
____ You want information about our _______? Great! Y. As promised, I am attaching to this email
the information you requested.
____ I wrote to you and you didn’t answer me. Z. Thank you again for your time.

High-Int to Adv Biz Eng / It’s All In How You Say It (Emails) / April 2016 / D. Prichard Page 10 of 10

Interesses relacionados