Você está na página 1de 2

 

MILITARY TECHNOLOGICAL COLLEGE  

MTCC3006 Introduction to Civil Engineering 

Week 11: Introduction to Fluids in Motion  

Vocabulary 

Real fluid: In a real fluid, viscosity, turbulence, and friction exist and these need to be considered in 
understanding its behavior.  

Ideal fluid: In an ideal fluid, some or all of the above parameters are assumed to be negligible and are 
not considered in understanding its behavior. The fluid is also assumed to be incompressible. 

Laminar flow: Occurs when a fluid flows in parallel layers, with no disruption between the layers. 

Turbulent flow: Flow in which the fluid undergoes irregular fluctuations or mixing. 

Steady flow: Flow of a fluid in which the flow rate (Q) does not change with time or position.  

Unsteady flow: Flow of a fluid in which the flow rate (Q) CHANGES with time and position. 

Uniform flow: The cross sectional area of flow and mean velocity is the same from one section to the 
next along the length of the pipe, and flow rate (Q) is constant. 

Non‐uniform flow: The cross sectional area of flow and mean velocity changes from one section to the 
next along the length of the pipe, and flow rate (Q) is constant. 

Nozzle: A cylindrical or round spout at the end of a pipe to control the jet of a fluid. 

Flow rate (Q): Defined as the volume of fluid (V) which passes per unit time (t), calculated by Q = V/t 
(Units: m3/s).  

Reynold’s number (Re): A dimensionless number used in fluid mechanics to indicate whether fluid flow 
through a pipe is laminar or turbulent. It can be calculated by Re = ρvD/µ = vD/ν. 
 

Pressure head: The energy of a fluid, measured in meters, due to the pressure exerted on the pipe, 
calculated by P/γ. 

Velocity head: The velocity of a fluid expressed in terms of the head, or the pressure required to 
produce that velocity, calculated by V2/2g. 

Elevation head: The energy of a fluid due to its height above a reference datum level, i.e. the effect of 
gravitational force. 

Major loss: The losses that occur over the entire pipe, as the friction of the fluid over the pipe walls 
removes energy from the system 

Minor loss: Additional losses due to the flow entries and exits, fittings and valves are usually referred to 
as minor losses. 

Open‐channel flow: Flow of a fluid in a conduit with a free surface which is subjected to atmospheric 
pressure (e.g. a channel).