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33F

Cambium
450 Platform
User Guide
System Release 15.2

Covers:
PMP 450 AP / PMP 450 SM / PTP 450 BH / PMP 450d
PMP 450i / PTP 450i
PMP 450b Mid-Gain / 450b High-Gain
PMP 450m
Accuracy
While reasonable efforts have been made to assure the accuracy of this document, Cambium Networks
assumes no liability resulting from any inaccuracies or omissions in this document, or from use of the
information obtained herein. Cambium reserves the right to make changes to any products described
herein to improve reliability, function, or design, and reserves the right to revise this document and to
make changes from time to time in content hereof with no obligation to notify any person of revisions
or changes. Cambium does not assume any liability arising out of the application or use of any
product, software, or circuit described herein; neither does it convey license under its patent rights or
the rights of others. It is possible that this publication may contain references to, or information about
Cambium products (machines and programs), programming, or services that are not announced in
your country. Such references or information must not be construed to mean that Cambium intends to
announce such Cambium products, programming, or services in your country.
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License Agreements
The software described in this document is the property of Cambium and its licensors. It is furnished
by express license agreement only and may be used only in accordance with the terms of such an
agreement.
High Risk Materials
Cambium and its supplier(s) specifically disclaim any express or implied warranty of fitness for any
high risk activities or uses of its products including, but not limited to, the operation of nuclear
facilities, aircraft navigation or aircraft communication systems, air traffic control, life support, or
weapons systems (“High Risk Use”). Any “High Risk Use” is unauthorized, is made at your own risk
and you shall be responsible for any and all losses, damage or claims arising out of any High Risk Use.

© 2018 Cambium Networks Limited. All Rights Reserved.

pmp-2254 (September 2018)


Contents
Cambium 450 Platform User Guide .................................................................................................... 1
Contents .................................................................................................................................................. i
List of Figures ..................................................................................................................................... xiv
List of Tables ........................................................................................................................................ xx
About This User Guide .......................................................................................................................... 1
Contacting Cambium Networks .................................................................................................... 1
Purpose ........................................................................................................................................... 2
Product notation conventions in document ................................................................................ 2
Cross references ............................................................................................................................. 3
Feedback ......................................................................................................................................... 3
Important regulatory information........................................................................................................ 4
Application software ...................................................................................................................... 4
USA specific information............................................................................................................... 4
Canada specific information ......................................................................................................... 5
Renseignements specifiques au Canada ..................................................................................... 6
EU Declaration of Conformity ....................................................................................................... 7
Specific expertise and training for professional installers ......................................................... 7
Ethernet networking skills ............................................................................................................. 7
Lightning protection ....................................................................................................................... 8
Training ........................................................................................................................................... 8
Problems and warranty ........................................................................................................................ 9
Reporting problems ....................................................................................................................... 9
Repair and service .......................................................................................................................... 9
Hardware warranty ........................................................................................................................ 9
Security advice .................................................................................................................................... 10
Warnings, cautions, and notes .......................................................................................................... 11
Warnings ....................................................................................................................................... 11
Cautions ........................................................................................................................................ 11
Notes ............................................................................................................................................. 11
Caring for the environment ................................................................................................................ 12
In EU countries ............................................................................................................................. 12
In non-EU countries ..................................................................................................................... 12
Chapter 1: Product description ....................................................................................................... 1-1
Overview of the 450 Platform Family ............................................................................................... 1-2
Purpose ........................................................................................................................................ 1-2
PMP 450m Series ........................................................................................................................ 1-2
PMP/PTP 450i Series ................................................................................................................... 1-4

Page i
Contents

PMP 450b Series .......................................................................................................................... 1-8


PMP/PTP 450 Series .................................................................................................................. 1-10
Supported interoperability for 450m/450i/450b/450 Series ................................................... 1-13
Typical deployment ................................................................................................................... 1-14
Product variants ........................................................................................................................ 1-16
Wireless operation ........................................................................................................................... 1-17
Time division duplexing ........................................................................................................... 1-17
Encryption .................................................................................................................................. 1-20
MIMO .......................................................................................................................................... 1-20
MU-MIMO .................................................................................................................................. 1-20
System management ....................................................................................................................... 1-22
Management agent ................................................................................................................... 1-22
Web server ................................................................................................................................. 1-22
Remote Authentication Dial-in User Service (RADIUS) ......................................................... 1-24
Network Time Protocol (NTP) .................................................................................................. 1-24
Wireless Manager (WM) ........................................................................................................... 1-25
cnMaestro™ ............................................................................................................................... 1-26
Radio recovery mode ................................................................................................................ 1-27
Chapter 2: System hardware .......................................................................................................... 2-1
System Components ......................................................................................................................... 2-2
Point-to-Multipoint (PMP) ........................................................................................................... 2-2
Backhaul (PTP) ............................................................................................................................. 2-5
450 Platform Family interfaces .................................................................................................. 2-7
ATEX/HAZLOC variants ............................................................................................................ 2-15
Diagnostic LEDs ......................................................................................................................... 2-16
Power supply options ............................................................................................................... 2-20
ODU mounting brackets & accessories ................................................................................... 2-29
Lightning protection .................................................................................................................. 2-29
ODU interfaces ................................................................................................................................. 2-30
PMP 450m Series AP ................................................................................................................. 2-30
PMP/PTP 450i ............................................................................................................................. 2-31
PMP 450b Mid-Gain SM............................................................................................................ 2-33
PMP 450b High Gain SM .......................................................................................................... 2-34
Cabling .............................................................................................................................................. 2-35
Ethernet standards and cable lengths ..................................................................................... 2-35
Outdoor copper Cat5e Ethernet cable ..................................................................................... 2-36
SFP module kits ......................................................................................................................... 2-37
Main Ethernet port .................................................................................................................... 2-39
Aux port ..................................................................................................................................... 2-39
Ethernet cable testing ............................................................................................................... 2-43
Lightning protection unit (LPU) and grounding kit ....................................................................... 2-44
Cable grounding kit ................................................................................................................... 2-45
Antennas and antenna cabling ....................................................................................................... 2-46

Page ii
Contents

Antenna requirements .............................................................................................................. 2-46


Supported external AP antennas ............................................................................................. 2-46
Supported external BH/SM antenna ........................................................................................ 2-46
RF cable and connectors........................................................................................................... 2-47
Antenna accessories ................................................................................................................. 2-47
GPS synchronization ........................................................................................................................ 2-48
GPS synchronization description ............................................................................................. 2-48
Universal GPS (UGPS) ............................................................................................................. 2-48
CMM5 ......................................................................................................................................... 2-49
CMM5 Controller Module ......................................................................................................... 2-51
CMM5 Injector Module ............................................................................................................. 2-52
CMM5 Injector Compatibility Matrix ....................................................................................... 2-52
CMM5 Specifications ................................................................................................................ 2-53
CMM4 (Rack Mount) ................................................................................................................ 2-55
CMM4 (Cabinet with switch) .................................................................................................. 2-58
CMM4 (Cabinet without switch) ............................................................................................ 2-58
CMM3/CMMmicro ..................................................................................................................... 2-59
Installing a GPS receiver ................................................................................................................. 2-61
GPS receiver location................................................................................................................ 2-61
Mounting the GPS receiver ...................................................................................................... 2-62
Cabling the GPS Antenna ......................................................................................................... 2-63
Installing and connecting the GPS LPU .................................................................................. 2-63
Ordering the components ............................................................................................................... 2-64
Chapter 3: System planning ........................................................................................................... 3-1
Typical deployment ........................................................................................................................... 3-2
ODU with PoE interface to PSU ................................................................................................. 3-2
Site planning....................................................................................................................................... 3-7
Site selection for PMP/PTP radios ............................................................................................. 3-7
Power supply site selection ........................................................................................................ 3-8
Maximum cable lengths ............................................................................................................. 3-8
Grounding and lightning protection .......................................................................................... 3-8
ODU and external antenna location ........................................................................................ 3-10
ODU ambient temperature limits ............................................................................................ 3-10
ODU wind loading ..................................................................................................................... 3-11
Hazardous locations .................................................................................................................. 3-15
Drop cable grounding points ................................................................................................... 3-15
Lightning Protection Unit (LPU) location ................................................................................ 3-16
Radio Frequency planning .............................................................................................................. 3-17
Regulatory limits ....................................................................................................................... 3-17
Conforming to the limits........................................................................................................... 3-17
Available spectrum ................................................................................................................... 3-17
Analyzing the RF Environment ................................................................................................ 3-18
Channel bandwidth ................................................................................................................... 3-18

Page iii
Contents

Anticipating Reflection of Radio Waves .................................................................................. 3-18


Obstructions in the Fresnel Zone ............................................................................................. 3-19
Planning for co-location............................................................................................................ 3-19
Multiple OFDM Access Point Clusters ..................................................................................... 3-20
Considerations on back-to-back frequency reuse .................................................................. 3-22
Link planning .................................................................................................................................... 3-27
Range and obstacles ................................................................................................................. 3-27
Path loss ..................................................................................................................................... 3-27
Calculating Link Loss ................................................................................................................ 3-28
Calculating Rx Signal Level ...................................................................................................... 3-28
Calculating Fade Margin ........................................................................................................... 3-29
Adaptive modulation ................................................................................................................ 3-29
Planning for connectorized units .................................................................................................... 3-30
When to install connectorized units ........................................................................................ 3-30
Choosing external antennas .................................................................................................... 3-30
Calculating RF cable length (5.8 GHz FCC only) ..................................................................... 3-30
Data network planning .................................................................................................................... 3-32
Understanding addresses......................................................................................................... 3-32
Dynamic or static addressing ................................................................................................... 3-32
DNS Client .................................................................................................................................. 3-33
Network Address Translation (NAT) ....................................................................................... 3-33
Developing an IP addressing scheme ..................................................................................... 3-34
Address Resolution Protocol .................................................................................................... 3-34
Allocating subnets ..................................................................................................................... 3-35
Selecting non-routable IP addresses ....................................................................................... 3-35
Translation bridging.................................................................................................................. 3-36
Engineering VLANs ................................................................................................................... 3-36
Network management planning ..................................................................................................... 3-40
Planning for SNMP operation .................................................................................................. 3-40
Enabling SNMP ......................................................................................................................... 3-40
Security planning ............................................................................................................................. 3-41
Isolating AP/BHM from the Internet ........................................................................................ 3-41
Encrypting radio transmissions ............................................................................................... 3-41
Planning for HTTPS operation ................................................................................................. 3-42
Planning for SNMPv3 operation .............................................................................................. 3-42
Managing module access by passwords ................................................................................ 3-43
Planning for RADIUS operation ............................................................................................... 3-44
Filtering protocols and ports .................................................................................................... 3-44
Encrypting downlink broadcasts ............................................................................................. 3-48
Isolating SMs in PMP ................................................................................................................ 3-48
Filtering management through Ethernet ................................................................................ 3-48
Allowing management from only specified IP addresses ..................................................... 3-49
Configuring management IP by DHCP .................................................................................... 3-49

Page iv
Contents

Controlling PPPoE PADI Downlink Forwarding ...................................................................... 3-50


Remote AP Deployment .................................................................................................................. 3-51
Remote AP (RAP) Performance ................................................................................................ 3-52
Example Use Case for RF Obstructions .................................................................................. 3-52
Example Use Case for Passing Sync ....................................................................................... 3-53
Physical Connections Involving the Remote AP .................................................................... 3-54
Passing Sync signal .................................................................................................................. 3-56
Wiring to Extend Network Sync ............................................................................................... 3-59
Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information ................................................................................ 4-1
Cambium Networks end user license agreement ........................................................................... 4-2
Definitions .................................................................................................................................... 4-2
Acceptance of this agreement ................................................................................................... 4-2
Grant of license ........................................................................................................................... 4-2
Conditions of use ........................................................................................................................ 4-3
Title and restrictions ................................................................................................................... 4-4
Confidentiality ............................................................................................................................. 4-4
Right to use Cambium’s name ................................................................................................... 4-5
Transfer ........................................................................................................................................ 4-5
Updates ........................................................................................................................................ 4-5
Maintenance ................................................................................................................................ 4-5
Disclaimer .................................................................................................................................... 4-6
Limitation of liability ................................................................................................................... 4-6
U.S. government ......................................................................................................................... 4-6
Term of license ............................................................................................................................ 4-7
Governing law ............................................................................................................................. 4-7
Assignment .................................................................................................................................. 4-7
Survival of provisions ................................................................................................................. 4-7
Entire agreement ......................................................................................................................... 4-7
Third party software .................................................................................................................... 4-7
Compliance with safety standards ................................................................................................. 4-22
Electrical safety compliance ..................................................................................................... 4-22
Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) compliance ................................................................. 4-22
Human exposure to radio frequency energy .......................................................................... 4-22
Hazardous location compliance ............................................................................................... 4-34
Compliance with radio regulations ................................................................................................ 4-36
Type approvals .......................................................................................................................... 4-37
Brazil specific information ........................................................................................................ 4-38
Australia Notification ................................................................................................................ 4-38
Regulatory Requirements for CEPT Member States (www.cept.org) .................................. 4-38
Chapter 5: Preparing for installation .............................................................................................. 5-1
Safety .................................................................................................................................................. 5-2
Hazardous locations .................................................................................................................... 5-2
Power lines .................................................................................................................................. 5-2

Page v
Contents

Working at heights ...................................................................................................................... 5-2


Power supply ............................................................................................................................... 5-2
Grounding and protective earth ................................................................................................ 5-3
Powering down before servicing ............................................................................................... 5-3
Primary disconnect device ......................................................................................................... 5-3
External cables ............................................................................................................................ 5-3
RF exposure near the antenna ................................................................................................... 5-3
Minimum separation distances ................................................................................................. 5-3
Grounding and lightning protection requirements .................................................................. 5-4
Grounding cable installation methods ...................................................................................... 5-4
Siting ODUs and antennas ......................................................................................................... 5-4
Thermal Safety ............................................................................................................................ 5-4
Preparing for installation ................................................................................................................... 5-6
ODU pre-configuration ............................................................................................................... 5-6
Preparing personnel .................................................................................................................... 5-6
Preparing inventory .................................................................................................................... 5-6
Preparing tools ............................................................................................................................ 5-7
Testing system components ............................................................................................................. 5-8
Unpacking Components ............................................................................................................. 5-8
Preparing the ODU ...................................................................................................................... 5-8
Configuring Link for Test ................................................................................................................. 5-17
Configuring the management PC ............................................................................................ 5-17
Logging into the web interface – AP/SM/BH........................................................................... 5-18
Using the Quick Start Configuration Wizard of the AP/BHM ................................................ 5-18
Chapter 6: Installation .................................................................................................................... 6-1
ODU variants and mounting bracket options .................................................................................. 6-2
Mount the ODU, LPU and surge suppressor ................................................................................... 6-3
Attach ground cables to the ODU .............................................................................................. 6-3
Mount the ODU on the mast ...................................................................................................... 6-6
Mount the top LPU .................................................................................................................... 6-12
Mount the Surge Suppressor ................................................................................................... 6-12
General protection installation ................................................................................................ 6-16
Installing the copper Cat5e Ethernet interface .............................................................................. 6-22
Install the main drop cable ....................................................................................................... 6-22
Install the bottom LPU to PSU drop cable .............................................................................. 6-24
Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU .................................................................. 6-26
PMP 450i Series ......................................................................................................................... 6-26
PMP 450 Series .......................................................................................................................... 6-35
PMP 450i Series AP 900 MHz ................................................................................................... 6-44
PMP 450 Series SM 900 MHz ................................................................................................... 6-51
Installing an integrated ODU........................................................................................................... 6-55
PMP 450m Series – AP .............................................................................................................. 6-55
PMP/PTP 450i Series – AP/SM/BH ............................................................................................ 6-58

Page vi
Contents

Connecting Cat5e Ethernet cable.................................................................................................... 6-59


Connecting an RJ45 and gland to a unit ................................................................................. 6-59
Disconnecting an RJ45 and gland from a unit ....................................................................... 6-61
Installing ODU .................................................................................................................................. 6-62
Installing a 450 Platform Family AP ......................................................................................... 6-62
Installing a 450 Platform Family SM ........................................................................................ 6-63
Installing a 450 Platform Family BHM ..................................................................................... 6-64
Installing a 450 Platform Family BHS ...................................................................................... 6-65
Configuring the Link .................................................................................................................. 6-66
Monitoring the Link ................................................................................................................... 6-66
Installing the AC Power Injector ..................................................................................................... 6-67
Installing CMM4 ............................................................................................................................... 6-68
Supplemental installation information .......................................................................................... 6-69
Stripping drop cable ................................................................................................................. 6-69
Creating a drop cable grounding point ................................................................................... 6-70
Attaching and weatherproofing an N type connector ........................................................... 6-73
Chapter 7: Configuration ................................................................................................................ 7-1
Preparing for configuration ............................................................................................................... 7-2
Safety precautions ...................................................................................................................... 7-2
Regulatory compliance ............................................................................................................... 7-2
Connecting to the unit ....................................................................................................................... 7-3
Configuring the management PC .............................................................................................. 7-3
Connecting to the PC and powering up .................................................................................... 7-4
Using the web interface ..................................................................................................................... 7-5
Logging into the web interface .................................................................................................. 7-5
Web GUI ....................................................................................................................................... 7-6
Using the menu options ............................................................................................................. 7-7
Quick link setup ................................................................................................................................ 7-12
Initiating Quick Start Wizard .................................................................................................... 7-12
Configuring time settings ......................................................................................................... 7-18
Powering the SM/BHS for test ................................................................................................. 7-19
Viewing the Session Status of the AP/BHM to determine test registration ......................... 7-20
Configuring IP and Ethernet interfaces .......................................................................................... 7-23
Configuring the IP interface ..................................................................................................... 7-24
Auxiliary port ............................................................................................................................. 7-27
NAT, DHCP Server, DHCP Client and DMZ ............................................................................. 7-28
DHCP – BHS ............................................................................................................................... 7-45
Reconnecting to the management PC ..................................................................................... 7-45
VLAN configuration for PMP ........................................................................................................ 7-45
VLAN configuration for PTP ........................................................................................................ 7-55
PPPoE page of SM ..................................................................................................................... 7-59
IP4 and IPv6 ............................................................................................................................... 7-62
Upgrading the software version and using CNUT ........................................................................ 7-67

Page vii
Contents

Checking the installed software version ................................................................................. 7-67


Upgrading to a new software version ..................................................................................... 7-67
General configuration ...................................................................................................................... 7-71
PMP 450m and PMP/PTP 450i Series ...................................................................................... 7-71
PMP/PTP 450 Series .................................................................................................................. 7-89
Configuring Unit Settings page ...................................................................................................... 7-94
Setting up time and date ................................................................................................................. 7-98
Time page of 450 Platform Family - AP/BHM ......................................................................... 7-98
Configuring synchronization ......................................................................................................... 7-100
Configuring security ...................................................................................................................... 7-102
Managing module access by password ................................................................................ 7-103
Isolating from the internet – APs/BHMs ................................................................................ 7-106
Encrypting radio transmissions ............................................................................................. 7-106
Requiring SM Authentication ................................................................................................. 7-107
Filtering protocols and ports .................................................................................................. 7-108
Encrypting downlink broadcasts ........................................................................................... 7-111
Isolating SMs ........................................................................................................................... 7-111
Filtering management through Ethernet .............................................................................. 7-112
Allowing management only from specified IP addresses ................................................... 7-112
Restricting radio Telnet access over the RF interface .......................................................... 7-112
Configuring SNMP Access ..................................................................................................... 7-115
Configuring Security ............................................................................................................... 7-117
Configuring radio parameters....................................................................................................... 7-134
PMP 450m Series – configuring radio ................................................................................... 7-135
PMP/PTP 450i Series – configuring radio .............................................................................. 7-140
PMP 450b Series - configuring radio ..................................................................................... 7-167
PMP/PTP 450 Series – configuring radio ............................................................................... 7-172
Custom Frequencies page ...................................................................................................... 7-189
DFS for 5 GHz Radios .............................................................................................................. 7-192
MIMO-A mode of operation .................................................................................................... 7-199
Improved PPS performance of 450 Platform Family ............................................................... 7-201
Setting up SNMP agent ................................................................................................................. 7-202
Configuring SM/BHS’s IP over-the-air access ...................................................................... 7-203
Configuring SNMP .................................................................................................................. 7-205
Configuring syslog ......................................................................................................................... 7-211
Syslog event logging .............................................................................................................. 7-212
Configuring system logging ................................................................................................... 7-212
Configuring remote access ........................................................................................................... 7-217
Accessing SM/BHS over-the-air by Web Proxy .................................................................... 7-217
Monitoring the Link ........................................................................................................................ 7-218
Link monitoring procedure ..................................................................................................... 7-218
Exporting Session Status page of AP/BHM .......................................................................... 7-220
Configuring quality of service ....................................................................................................... 7-221

Page viii
Contents

Maximum Information Rate (MIR) Parameters .................................................................... 7-221


Token Bucket Algorithm ......................................................................................................... 7-221
MIR Data Entry Checking ........................................................................................................ 7-222
Committed Information Rate (CIR) ........................................................................................ 7-222
Bandwidth from the SM Perspective ..................................................................................... 7-223
Interaction of Burst Allocation and Sustained Data Rate Settings ..................................... 7-223
SM Prioritization ...................................................................................................................... 7-223
Weighted Fair Queuing (WFQ) ............................................................................................... 7-225
High-priority Bandwidth ......................................................................................................... 7-227
Traffic Scheduling ................................................................................................................... 7-229
Setting the Configuration Source .......................................................................................... 7-230
Configuring Quality of Service (QoS) .................................................................................... 7-232
Installation Color Code .................................................................................................................. 7-243
Zero Touch Configuration Using DHCP Option 66...................................................................... 7-244
Configuration Steps ................................................................................................................ 7-244
Troubleshooting ...................................................................................................................... 7-249
Configuring Radio via config file .................................................................................................. 7-250
Import and Export of config file ............................................................................................. 7-250
Configuring cnMaestroTM Connectivity ........................................................................................ 7-252
Onboarding .............................................................................................................................. 7-252
Prerequisites for onboarding to cnMaestro™ ...................................................................... 7-253
Knowledge Based articles for onboarding............................................................................ 7-254
Order of Device Onboarding .................................................................................................. 7-254
Device Agent Logs .................................................................................................................. 7-255
Monitoring Tools for PMP Devices on cnMaestro™ ............................................................ 7-255
Zero Touch on boarding of the PMP SMs when the corresponding AP is on boarded ... 7-256
Configuring a RADIUS server ....................................................................................................... 7-258
Understanding RADIUS for PMP 450 Platform Family ....................................................... 7-258
Choosing Authentication Mode and Configuring for Authentication Servers - AP ..... 7-259
SM Authentication Mode – Require RADIUS or Follow AP ............................................ 7-264
Handling Certificates ............................................................................................................... 7-269
Configuring RADIUS servers for SM authentication ........................................................... 7-270
Assigning SM management IP addressing via RADIUS ...................................................... 7-272
Configuring RADIUS server for SM configuration ............................................................... 7-272
Configuring RADIUS server for SM configuration using Zero Touch feature ................... 7-276
Using RADIUS for centralized AP and SM user name and password management ........ 7-277
RADIUS Device Data Accounting ........................................................................................... 7-283
RADIUS Device Re-authentication ......................................................................................... 7-286
RADIUS Change of Authorization and Disconnect Message .............................................. 7-287
Microsoft RADIUS support ..................................................................................................... 7-288
Cisco ACS RADIUS Server Support ....................................................................................... 7-293
Configuring VSA ...................................................................................................................... 7-296
Configuring Ping Watchdog .......................................................................................................... 7-300

Page ix
Contents

Chapter 8: Tools.............................................................................................................................. 8-1


Using Spectrum Analyzer tool .......................................................................................................... 8-2
Mapping RF Neighbor Frequencies ........................................................................................... 8-2
Spectrum Analyzer tool .............................................................................................................. 8-3
Remote Spectrum Analyzer tool .............................................................................................. 8-13
Using the Alignment Tool ............................................................................................................... 8-16
Aiming page and Diagnostic LED – SM/BHS .......................................................................... 8-17
Alignment Tone ......................................................................................................................... 8-21
Using the Link Capacity Test tool ................................................................................................... 8-23
Performing Link Test ................................................................................................................. 8-23
Performing Extrapolated Link Test .......................................................................................... 8-29
Link Capacity Test page of AP .................................................................................................. 8-31
Link Capacity Test page of BHM/BHS/SM ............................................................................... 8-33
Using AP Evaluation tool ................................................................................................................. 8-34
AP Evaluation page ................................................................................................................... 8-34
Using BHM Evaluation tool ............................................................................................................. 8-38
BHM Evaluation page of BHS .................................................................................................. 8-38
Using the OFDM Frame Calculator tool ......................................................................................... 8-42
Using the Subscriber Configuration tool ....................................................................................... 8-47
Using the Link Status tool ............................................................................................................... 8-48
Link Status – AP/BHM ............................................................................................................... 8-49
Link Status – SM/BHS ............................................................................................................... 8-52
Using BER Results tool .................................................................................................................... 8-55
Using the Sessions tool ................................................................................................................... 8-56
Using the Ping Test tool .................................................................................................................. 8-57
Chapter 9: Operation ...................................................................................................................... 9-1
System information ........................................................................................................................... 9-2
Viewing General Status .............................................................................................................. 9-2
Viewing Session Status ............................................................................................................ 9-24
Viewing Remote Subscribers ................................................................................................... 9-33
Interpreting messages in the Event Log ................................................................................. 9-33
Viewing the Network Interface ................................................................................................. 9-36
Viewing the Layer 2 Neighbors ................................................................................................ 9-37
System statistics .............................................................................................................................. 9-38
Viewing the Scheduler statistics .............................................................................................. 9-38
Viewing list of Registration Failures statistics ........................................................................ 9-40
Interpreting Bridging Table statistics ...................................................................................... 9-42
Interpreting Translation Table statistics.................................................................................. 9-42
Interpreting Ethernet statistics ................................................................................................. 9-43
Interpreting RF Control Block statistics ................................................................................... 9-46
Interpreting Sounding statistics for AP ..................................................................................... 9-1
Interpreting VLAN statistics ....................................................................................................... 9-4
Interpreting Data Channels statistics ......................................................................................... 9-5

Page x
Contents

Interpreting MIR/Burst statistics ................................................................................................ 9-7


Interpreting Throughput statistics ........................................................................................... 9-10
Interpreting Overload statistics ................................................................................................ 9-13
Interpreting DHCP Relay statistics ........................................................................................... 9-15
Interpreting Filter statistics ....................................................................................................... 9-16
Viewing ARP statistics .............................................................................................................. 9-17
Viewing NAT statistics .............................................................................................................. 9-17
Viewing NAT DHCP Statistics .................................................................................................. 9-19
Interpreting Sync Status statistics ........................................................................................... 9-20
Interpreting PPPoE Statistics for Customer Activities ........................................................... 9-21
Interpreting Bridge Control Block statistics ............................................................................ 9-23
Interpreting Pass Through Statistics ....................................................................................... 9-26
Interpreting SNMPv3 Statistics ................................................................................................ 9-27
Interpreting syslog statistics .................................................................................................... 9-29
Interpreting Frame Utilization statistics .................................................................................. 9-30
Radio Recovery ................................................................................................................................ 9-42
Radio Recovery Console– PMP/PTP 450i/450b and PMP 450m ............................................ 9-42
Default Mode (or Default/Override Plug) - PMP/PTP 450 Series ........................................... 9-44
Chapter 10: Reference information ............................................................................................. 10-1
Equipment specifications ................................................................................................................ 10-2
Specifications for PMP 450m Series - AP................................................................................ 10-2
Specifications for PMP 450i Series - AP .................................................................................. 10-6
Specifications for PMP 450i Series - SM ............................................................................... 10-12
Specifications for PTP 450i Series - BH ................................................................................. 10-18
Specifications for PMP 450b Mid-Gain Series - SM ............................................................. 10-23
Specifications for PMP 450b High Gain Series - SM ............................................................ 10-28
Specifications for PMP 450 Series - AP ................................................................................. 10-32
Specifications for PMP 450 Series - SM ................................................................................ 10-37
Specifications for PTP 450 Series - BH .................................................................................. 10-42
PSU specifications................................................................................................................... 10-47
Data network specifications .......................................................................................................... 10-49
Ethernet interface .................................................................................................................... 10-49
Wireless specifications .................................................................................................................. 10-51
General wireless specifications ............................................................................................. 10-51
Link Range and Throughput ................................................................................................... 10-52
Country specific radio regulations ............................................................................................... 10-53
Type approvals ........................................................................................................................ 10-53
DFS for 2.4 and 5 GHz Radios ................................................................................................ 10-55
Equipment Disposal ....................................................................................................................... 10-57
Waste (Disposal) of Electronic and Electric Equipment ....................................................... 10-57
Country specific maximum transmit power ................................................................................ 10-58
Maximum transmit power 900 MHz band ............................................................................ 10-58
Maximum transmit power 2.4 GHz band .............................................................................. 10-59

Page xi
Contents

Maximum transmit power 3.5 GHz band .............................................................................. 10-60


Maximum transmit power 3.65 GHz band ............................................................................ 10-61
Maximum transmit power 4.9 GHz band .............................................................................. 10-61
Maximum transmit power 5.1 GHz band .............................................................................. 10-63
Maximum transmit power 5.2 GHz band .............................................................................. 10-66
Maximum transmit power 5.4 GHz band .............................................................................. 10-69
Maximum transmit power 5.8 GHz band .............................................................................. 10-75
Country specific frequency range ................................................................................................. 10-80
Frequency range 900 MHz band ............................................................................................ 10-80
Frequency range 2.4 GHz band .............................................................................................. 10-81
Frequency range 3.5 GHz band .............................................................................................. 10-81
Frequency range 3.65 GHz band ............................................................................................ 10-82
Frequency range 4.9 GHz band .............................................................................................. 10-83
Frequency range 5.1 GHz band .............................................................................................. 10-84
Frequency range 5.2 GHz band .............................................................................................. 10-87
Frequency range 5.4 GHz band .............................................................................................. 10-90
Frequency range 5.8 GHz band .............................................................................................. 10-96
FCC specific information ............................................................................................................. 10-102
FCC compliance testing ........................................................................................................ 10-102
FCC IDs ................................................................................................................................... 10-102
FCC approved antenna list ................................................................................................... 10-109
Innovation Science and Economic Development Canada (ISEDC) specific information ...... 10-113
900 MHz ISEDC notification .................................................................................................. 10-113
4.9 GHz ISEDC notification ................................................................................................... 10-113
Utilisation de la bande 4.9 GHz FCC et ISEDC .................................................................... 10-113
5.2 GHz and 5.4 GHz ISEDC notification .............................................................................. 10-113
Utilisation de la bande 5.2 and 5.4 GHz ISEDC ................................................................... 10-114
ISEDC notification 5.8 GHz ................................................................................................... 10-114
Utilisation de la bande 5.8 GHz ISEDC ................................................................................ 10-114
ISEDC certification numbers ................................................................................................ 10-115
Canada approved antenna list ............................................................................................. 10-116
Chapter 11: Troubleshooting ...................................................................................................... 11-1
General troubleshooting procedure ............................................................................................... 11-2
General planning for troubleshooting ..................................................................................... 11-2
General fault isolation process ................................................................................................ 11-3
Secondary Steps ....................................................................................................................... 11-4
Troubleshooting procedures ........................................................................................................... 11-5
Module has lost or does not establish connectivity .............................................................. 11-5
NAT/DHCP-configured SM has lost or does not establish connectivity .............................. 11-7
SM Does Not Register to an AP ............................................................................................... 11-9
Module has lost or does not gain sync ................................................................................. 11-10
Module does not establish Ethernet connectivity ................................................................ 11-11
CMM4 does not pass proper GPS sync to connected modules.......................................... 11-12

Page xii
Contents

Module Software Cannot be Upgraded ................................................................................ 11-13


Module Functions Properly, Except Web Interface Became Inaccessible ......................... 11-13
Power-up troubleshooting ............................................................................................................ 11-14
Registration and connectivity troubleshooting ........................................................................... 11-15
SM/BMS Registration.............................................................................................................. 11-15
Logs ................................................................................................................................................. 11-16
Persistent Logging .................................................................................................................. 11-16
Appendix A - 450m Reference information ........................................................................................... I
A.1 Specifications ................................................................................................................................... I
A.2 450m overload ................................................................................................................................. I
Glossary ................................................................................................................................................ III

Page xiii
List of Figures

List of Figures
Figure 1 PMP/PTP 450 Platform Family typical bridge deployment .................................................. 1-14
Figure 2 TDD frame division.................................................................................................................. 1-17
Figure 3 PMP 450m Series interfaces ..................................................................................................... 2-7
Figure 4 PMP/PTP 450i interfaces ........................................................................................................... 2-8
Figure 5 PMP 450b Mid-Gain Series - SM interfaces ............................................................................ 2-9
Figure 6 PMP 450b Series - SM interfaces (High Gain) ...................................................................... 2-10
Figure 7 PMP/PTP 450 Series - AP interfaces....................................................................................... 2-11
Figure 8 PMP/PTP 450 Series – SM/BH interfaces ............................................................................... 2-12
Figure 9 PMP/PTP 450 Series – SM/BH Connectorized interfaces ..................................................... 2-13
Figure 10 PMP 450d Series - SM Integrated Dish ............................................................................... 2-14
Figure 11 PMP 450 Series – SM 3 GHz Integrated ............................................................................... 2-14
Figure 12 PTP 450 Series – BHM/BHS .................................................................................................. 2-14
Figure 13 AP/BHM diagnostic LEDs, viewed from unit front ............................................................. 2-16
Figure 14 AP/BH diagnostic LEDs, viewed from unit front ................................................................. 2-18
Figure 15 AC Power Injector interfaces ................................................................................................ 2-22
Figure 16 AC+DC Enhanced Power Injector interfaces ....................................................................... 2-23
Figure 17 -48 V DC Power Injector interfaces ...................................................................................... 2-25
Figure 18 -20 to 32 VDC Power Injector interfaces .............................................................................. 2-26
Figure 19 Gigabit Enet Capable power supply .................................................................................... 2-28
Figure 20 PMP 450m Series - AP rear interfaces ................................................................................. 2-30
Figure 21 PMP/PTP 450i Series - ODU rear interfaces ........................................................................ 2-31
Figure 22 PMP/PTP 450i Series – Connectorized ODU antenna interfaces ....................................... 2-32
Figure 23 PMP 450b Mid-Gain SM - ODU rear interfaces .................................................................. 2-33
Figure 24 PMP 450b High Gain SM - ODU rear interfaces ................................................................. 2-34
Figure 25 Outdoor drop cable ............................................................................................................... 2-36
Figure 26 Optical SFP transceiver module .......................................................................................... 2-38
Figure 27 Long cable gland .................................................................................................................. 2-38
Figure 28 Alignment Tone Cable .......................................................................................................... 2-40
Figure 29 RJ12 Alignment Tone Cable ................................................................................................. 2-41
Figure 30 Cable gland (part number #N000065L033) ......................................................................... 2-42
Figure 31 Cable grounding kit ............................................................................................................... 2-45
Figure 32 UGPS ...................................................................................................................................... 2-48
Figure 33 Cluster Management: Scenario 1......................................................................................... 2-50
Figure 34 Cluster Management: Scenario 2......................................................................................... 2-51
Figure 35 Controller Module ................................................................................................................. 2-51
Figure 36 Injector Module...................................................................................................................... 2-52
Figure 37 CMM4 (Rack Mount).............................................................................................................. 2-55
Figure 38 CMM4 56 V power adapter (dongle).................................................................................... 2-56
Figure 39 CMM4 power adapter cabling diagram .............................................................................. 2-56

Page xiv
List of Figures

Figure 40 CMM4 (Cabinet with switch) ................................................................................................ 2-58


Figure 41 CMM3 ..................................................................................................................................... 2-60
Figure 42 Pole mounted CMM3 ............................................................................................................ 2-60
Figure 43 GPS antenna mounting ........................................................................................................ 2-62
Figure 44 Mast or tower installation ....................................................................................................... 3-2
Figure 45 Wall installation ....................................................................................................................... 3-3
Figure 46 Roof installation....................................................................................................................... 3-4
Figure 47 GPS receiver wall installation ................................................................................................ 3-5
Figure 48 GPS receiver tower or mast installation ............................................................................... 3-6
Figure 49 Rolling sphere method to determine the lightning protection zones ................................ 3-9
Figure 50 Example layout of 16 Access Point sectors (ABCD), 90-degree sectors........................... 3-20
Figure 51 Example layout of 6 Access Point sectors (ABC), 60-degree sectors ............................... 3-21
Figure 52 Reflection ............................................................................................................................... 3-23
Figure 53 Sector Antenna ...................................................................................................................... 3-24
Figure 54 cnMedusa Antenna ............................................................................................................... 3-25
Figure 55 PMP 450m Series AP antenna beam ................................................................................... 3-26
Figure 56 Determinants in Rx signal level ........................................................................................... 3-28
Figure 57 Cambium networks management domain ......................................................................... 3-33
Figure 58 Example of IP address in Class B subnet ............................................................................ 3-35
Figure 59 Categorical protocol filtering ................................................................................................ 3-46
Figure 60 Remote AP deployment ........................................................................................................ 3-51
Figure 61 Example for 900-MHz remote AP behind 5 GHz SM .......................................................... 3-53
Figure 62 Remote AP wired to SM that also serves a customer........................................................ 3-54
Figure 63 Remote AP wired to SM that serves as a relay .................................................................. 3-55
Figure 64 Additional link to extend network sync, Design 3 .............................................................. 3-56
Figure 65 Additional link to extend network sync, Design 4 .............................................................. 3-57
Figure 66 Additional link to extend network sync, Design 5 .............................................................. 3-58
Figure 67 Co-located AP or BH timing master Sync Setting configuration ...................................... 3-59
Figure 68 Pin 1 location ......................................................................................................................... 5-11
Figure 69 Straight-through Ethernet Cable .......................................................................................... 5-13
Figure 70 Crossover Ethernet Cable ..................................................................................................... 5-13
Figure 71 AP/BHM to UGPS cable ........................................................................................................ 5-15
Figure 72 Alignment tone cable pin configuration ............................................................................. 5-16
Figure 73 RJ-12 pinout for the default plug ......................................................................................... 5-16
Figure 74 PMP 450 900 MHz SM grounding .......................................................................................... 6-6
Figure 75 Gigabit Ethernet Surge Suppressor..................................................................................... 6-13
Figure 76 600SSH Surge Suppressor – inside .................................................................................... 6-14
Figure 77 Grounding cable minimum bend radius and angle ........................................................... 6-16
Figure 78 Grounding and lightning protection on wall ...................................................................... 6-19
Figure 79 Grounding and lightning protection on mast or tower ..................................................... 6-20
Figure 80 Grounding and lightning protection on building ............................................................... 6-21
Figure 81 RJ45 cable .............................................................................................................................. 6-23
Figure 82 AP antenna parts ................................................................................................................... 6-29

Page xv
List of Figures

Figure 83 Antenna top plate .................................................................................................................. 6-30


Figure 84 Attaching antenna plate to the AP ....................................................................................... 6-30
Figure 85 Attaching the plate ................................................................................................................ 6-31
Figure 86 Connect the port A and B to the PMP 450i AP .................................................................... 6-31
Figure 87 AP antenna upper bracket assembly ................................................................................... 6-32
Figure 88 AP antenna upper bracket attached to upper adjustment arms ....................................... 6-32
Figure 89 Rear strap connected to upper AP antenna bracket........................................................... 6-33
Figure 90 Assembled upper bracket connected to AP antenna ......................................................... 6-33
Figure 91 AP Antenna Lower Bracket Assembly ................................................................................. 6-33
Figure 92 Lower bracket attached to AP antenna................................................................................ 6-34
Figure 93 Completed AP and antenna assembly ................................................................................ 6-34
Figure 94 PMP 450 AP antenna parts ................................................................................................... 6-35
Figure 95 AP antenna upper bracket assembly .................................................................................. 6-36
Figure 96 AP antenna upper bracket attached to upper adjustment arms ...................................... 6-36
Figure 97 Rear strap connected to upper AP antenna bracket.......................................................... 6-37
Figure 98 Assembled upper bracket connected to AP antenna ........................................................ 6-37
Figure 99 AP Antenna Lower Bracket Assembly ................................................................................ 6-38
Figure 100 Lower bracket attached to AP antenna ............................................................................ 6-38
Figure 101 Attaching bracket to the rear of the AP ............................................................................ 6-39
Figure 102 Lower bracket attached to AP antenna ............................................................................ 6-39
Figure 103 Mounted PMP 450 AP and antenna assembly, viewed from back and back ................ 6-40
Figure 104 Attaching the AP antenna upper bracket to the pole ....................................................... 6-41
Figure 105 Attaching the AP antenna lower bracket to the pole ....................................................... 6-41
Figure 106 Variables for calculating angle of elevation (and depression) ........................................ 6-43
Figure 107 PMP 450i AP 900 MHz antenna unbox view .................................................................... 6-44
Figure 108 PMP 450i AP 900 MHz antenna inventory ........................................................................ 6-44
Figure 109 Attaching radio mounting PMP 450i AP 900 MHz antenna to the pole ......................... 6-49
Figure 110 900 MHz sector antenna alignment .................................................................................. 6-50
Figure 111 PMP 450i SM 900 MHz external directional antenna ....................................................... 6-51
Figure 112 Attach the antenna to the pole .......................................................................................... 6-51
Figure 113 Fixing the nuts .................................................................................................................... 6-52
Figure 114 Fixing the radio to the antenna .......................................................................................... 6-53
Figure 115 Connecting RF cable to the radio ....................................................................................... 6-53
Figure 116 Yagi antenna alignment - horizontally .............................................................................. 6-54
Figure 117 Yagi antenna alignment - upward tilt ............................................................................... 6-54
Figure 118 Yagi antenna alignment - downward tilt .......................................................................... 6-54
Figure 119 PMP 450m Series - AP unbox view................................................................................... 6-55
Figure 120 Fixing the mounting plate to the back of the ODU ........................................................... 6-58
Figure 121 Attaching the bracket body ................................................................................................ 6-58
Figure 122 Ethernet cable gland for PMP/PTP 450 Series ................................................................. 6-60
Figure 123 Ethernet cable gland for PMP/PTP 450i Series ................................................................ 6-60
Figure 124 Disarm Installation page (top and bottom of page shown) ............................................ 7-12
Figure 125 Regional Settings tab of AP/BHM ...................................................................................... 7-13

Page xvi
List of Figures

Figure 126 Radio Carrier Frequency tab of AP/BHM ........................................................................... 7-14


Figure 127 Synchronization tab of AP/BHM ......................................................................................... 7-15
Figure 128 LAN IP Address tab of the AP/BHM ................................................................................... 7-16
Figure 129 Review and Save Configuration tab of the AP/BHM ........................................................ 7-17
Figure 130 Time tab of the AP/BHM ..................................................................................................... 7-18
Figure 131 Time and date entry formats .............................................................................................. 7-19
Figure 132 Session Status tab of AP .................................................................................................... 7-21
Figure 133 NAT disabled implementation ........................................................................................... 7-29
Figure 134 NAT with DHCP client and DHCP server implementation ............................................... 7-30
Figure 135 NAT with DHCP client implementation ............................................................................. 7-30
Figure 136 NAT with DHCP server implementation ............................................................................ 7-31
Figure 137 NAT without DHCP implementation .................................................................................. 7-31
Figure 138 General page attributes - PMP 450 AP .............................................................................. 7-90
Figure 139 General page attributes - PMP 450 SM ............................................................................. 7-91
Figure 140 General page attributes - PTP 450 BHM ............................................................................ 7-92
Figure 141 General page attributes - PTP 450 BHS ............................................................................. 7-93
Figure 142 Sync Setting configuration ............................................................................................... 7-100
Figure 143 AP Evaluation Configuration parameter of Security tab for PMP ................................. 7-105
Figure 144 BHM Evaluation Configuration parameter of Security tab for PTP .............................. 7-105
Figure 145 RF Telnet Access Restrictions (orange) and Flow through (green) .............................. 7-112
Figure 146 RF Telnet Access Restriction (orange) and Potential Security Hole (green) ................ 7-113
Figure 147 PMP 450i AP Radio attributes - 3 GHz ............................................................................. 7-140
Figure 148 PMP 450i SM Radio attributes - 3 GHz ............................................................................ 7-148
Figure 149 Multicast VC statistics ....................................................................................................... 7-188
Figure 150 Multicast scheduler statistics ........................................................................................... 7-188
Figure 151 AP DFS Status ................................................................................................................... 7-192
Figure 152 Frame structure ................................................................................................................ 7-193
Figure 153 AP Session Status page .................................................................................................... 7-217
Figure 154 AP Remote Subscribers page ........................................................................................... 7-217
Figure 155 Session Status page .......................................................................................................... 7-218
Figure 156 Exporting Session Status page of PMP 450m AP .......................................................... 7-220
Figure 157 Uplink and downlink rate caps adjusted to apply aggregate cap ................................. 7-222
Figure 158 Uplink and downlink rate cap adjustment example ....................................................... 7-222
Figure 159 SM Prioritization on SM .................................................................................................... 7-223
Figure 160 SM Prioritization on AP ..................................................................................................... 7-224
Figure 161 Weighted Fair Queuing Configuration ............................................................................ 7-225
Figure 162 WFQ with SM Prioritization .............................................................................................. 7-226
Figure 163 Installation Color Code of AP ........................................................................................... 7-243
Figure 164 Configuration File upload and download page .............................................................. 7-250
Figure 165 Software Upgrade from cnMaestro™ ............................................................................. 7-253
Figure 166 DNS Test for cnMaestro™ connectivity .......................................................................... 7-254
Figure 167 Device Agent Logs ............................................................................................................ 7-255
Figure 168 Example cnMaestro™ screenshot ................................................................................... 7-256

Page xvii
List of Figures

Figure 169 SM Certificate Management ............................................................................................. 7-270


Figure 170 User Authentication and Access Tracking tab of the SM .............................................. 7-281
Figure 171 RADIUS accounting messages configuration ................................................................. 7-286
Figure 172 Device re-authentication configuration ........................................................................... 7-286
Figure 173 RADIUS CoA configuration for AP ................................................................................... 7-287
Figure 174 EAPPEAP settings .............................................................................................................. 7-288
Figure 175 Importing certificate in NPS ............................................................................................. 7-289
Figure 176 Selecting MD5 from NPS console.................................................................................... 7-290
Figure 177 User configuration ............................................................................................................ 7-291
Figure 178 RADIUS VSA configuration .............................................................................................. 7-292
Figure 179 Adding RADIUS client ....................................................................................................... 7-293
Figure 180 Creating users .................................................................................................................... 7-293
Figure 181 Creating RADIUS instance ................................................................................................ 7-294
Figure 182 RADIUS protocols.............................................................................................................. 7-294
Figure 183 Service selection ............................................................................................................... 7-295
Figure 184 Adding Trusted CA ............................................................................................................ 7-295
Figure 185 Installing Server Certificate .............................................................................................. 7-295
Figure 186 Monitoring logs ................................................................................................................. 7-296
Figure 187 VSA list ............................................................................................................................... 7-297
Figure 188 Spectrum analysis - Results ................................................................................................. 8-3
Figure 189 Spectrum Analyzer page result – PMP 450 SM ................................................................ 8-12
Figure 190 Alignment Tool tab of SM – Receive Power Level > -70 dBm ......................................... 8-16
Figure 191 Alignment Tool tab of SM – Receive Power Level between -70 to -80 dBm ................. 8-16
Figure 192 Alignment Tool tab of SM – Receive Power Level < -80 dBm ......................................... 8-16
Figure 193 PMP/PTP 450i Series link alignment tone ......................................................................... 8-21
Figure 194 Link Capacity Test – PMP 450m Series AP ........................................................................ 8-24
Figure 195 Link Test with Multiple LUIDs (1518-byte packet length) ................................................ 8-26
Figure 196 Link Capacity Test – PMP 450/450i Series AP ................................................................... 8-27
Figure 197 Link Test without Bridging (1518-byte packet length) ..................................................... 8-28
Figure 198 Extrapolated Link Test results ............................................................................................ 8-30
Figure 199 SM Configuration page of AP ............................................................................................ 8-47
Figure 200 BER Results tab of the SM .................................................................................................. 8-55
Figure 201 Sessions tab of the AP ........................................................................................................ 8-56
Figure 202 Ping Test tab of the AP ....................................................................................................... 8-57
Figure 203 Remote Subscribers page of AP ........................................................................................ 9-33
Figure 204 Event log data ...................................................................................................................... 9-34
Figure 205 Network Interface tab of the AP ......................................................................................... 9-36
Figure 206 Network Interface tab of the SM ........................................................................................ 9-36
Figure 207 Layer 2 Neighbors page ...................................................................................................... 9-37
Figure 208 Bridging Table page ............................................................................................................ 9-42
Figure 209 Translation Table page of SM ............................................................................................ 9-43
Figure 210 ARP page of the SM ............................................................................................................ 9-17
Figure 211 Recovery Options page ....................................................................................................... 9-43

Page xviii
List of Figures

Figure 212 SM Logs ............................................................................................................................. 11-16


Figure 213 SM Session log .................................................................................................................. 11-16
Figure 214 SM Authentication log ...................................................................................................... 11-16
Figure 215 SM Authorization log ........................................................................................................ 11-17

Page xix
List of Tables

List of Tables
Table 1 Main characteristics of the PMP 450m Series AP .................................................................... 1-3
Table 2 PMP 450m Series hardware configurations ............................................................................. 1-4
Table 3 Main characteristics of the PMP/PTP 450i Series ..................................................................... 1-5
Table 4 PMP/PTP 450i Series hardware configurations ........................................................................ 1-6
Table 5 Main characteristics of the PMP 450b Series ........................................................................... 1-8
Table 6 PMP 450b Series hardware configurations .............................................................................. 1-9
Table 7 Main characteristics of the PMP/PTP 450 Series .................................................................... 1-11
Table 8 PMP/PTP 450 Series hardware configurations ....................................................................... 1-12
Table 9 Supported Interoperability for PMP ....................................................................................... 1-13
Table 10 Supported Interoperability for PTP ...................................................................................... 1-13
Table 11 Modulation levels ................................................................................................................... 1-19
Table 12 PMP 450m Series variants ....................................................................................................... 2-2
Table 13 PMP 450i Series variants .......................................................................................................... 2-3
Table 14 PMP 450b Series variants ........................................................................................................ 2-3
Table 15 PMP 450 Series variants ........................................................................................................... 2-4
Table 16 PTP 450i Series variants ........................................................................................................... 2-5
Table 17 PTP 450 Series variants ............................................................................................................ 2-6
Table 18 PMP 450m Series AP interface descriptions and cabling ..................................................... 2-7
Table 19 PMP/PTP 450i Series - AP/SM/BH interface descriptions and cabling ................................. 2-9
Table 20 PMP 450b Series - SM (Mid-Gain) interface descriptions and cabling .............................. 2-10
Table 21 PMP 450b Series - SM (High Gain) interface descriptions and cabling ............................. 2-10
Table 22 PMP/PTP 450 Series - AP interface descriptions and cabling – 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz ......... 2-11
Table 23 AP/BHM LED descriptions ...................................................................................................... 2-17
Table 24 SM/BHS LED descriptions ...................................................................................................... 2-19
Table 25 PSU part numbers for PMP 450m AP ................................................................................... 2-20
Table 26 PSU part numbers for PMP/PTP 450i Series ........................................................................ 2-21
Table 27 AC Power Injector interface functions .................................................................................. 2-22
Table 28 AC+DC Enhanced Power Injector interface functions ......................................................... 2-24
Table 29 -48V DC Power Injector interfaces ......................................................................................... 2-25
Table 30 -Power Injector interfaces ...................................................................................................... 2-26
Table 31 PSU part numbers for PMP 450b SM ................................................................................... 2-26
Table 32 PSU part numbers for PMP/PTP 450 Series ......................................................................... 2-27
Table 33 –Gigabit Enet Capable power supply .................................................................................... 2-27
Table 34 Accessories part numbers ..................................................................................................... 2-29
Table 35 Lightning protection part numbers ....................................................................................... 2-29
Table 36 PMP 450m Series – AP rear interfaces .................................................................................. 2-30
Table 37 PMP/PTP 450i Series – ODU rear interfaces ......................................................................... 2-31
Table 38 PMP 450b Mid-Gain SM – ODU rear interfaces .................................................................. 2-33
Table 39 PMP 450b High Gain SM – ODU rear interfaces ................................................................. 2-34

Page xx
List of Tables

Table 40 PSU drop cable length restrictions ....................................................................................... 2-35


Table 41 Drop cable part numbers ....................................................................................................... 2-36
Table 42 SFP module kit part numbers ............................................................................................... 2-37
Table 43 Single Mode Optical SFP Interface per ODU (part number C000065L008) ...................... 2-37
Table 44 Multi-mode Optical SFP Interface per ODU (part number C000065L009) ........................ 2-37
Table 45 Main port PoE cable pinout ................................................................................................... 2-39
Table 46 Aux port PoE cable pinout ..................................................................................................... 2-39
Table 47 Aux port PoE cable pinout ..................................................................................................... 2-40
Table 48 RJ12 Aux port PoE cable pinout ............................................................................................ 2-41
Table 49 Alignment tone adapter third party product details ............................................................ 2-41
Table 50 RJ45 connector and spare gland part numbers ................................................................... 2-42
Table 51 LPU and grounding kit contents ............................................................................................ 2-44
Table 52 LPU and grounding kit part number ..................................................................................... 2-45
Table 53 Cable grounding kit part numbers ........................................................................................ 2-45
Table 54 List of AP external antennas .................................................................................................. 2-46
Table 55 PTP 450i Series BH or PMP 450/450i Series SM external antenna ..................................... 2-46
Table 56 RF cable and connector part numbers .................................................................................. 2-47
Table 57 CMM5 Cluster Management Scenario 1 ............................................................................... 2-49
Table 58 CMM5 Cluster Management Scenario 2 ............................................................................... 2-50
Table 59 Injector Compatibility Matrix ................................................................................................. 2-52
Table 60 CMM5 Specifications .............................................................................................................. 2-53
Table 61 CMM4 power adapter cable pinout....................................................................................... 2-57
Table 62 PMP 450m Series ODU part numbers................................................................................... 2-64
Table 63 PMP 450i Series ODU part numbers ..................................................................................... 2-64
Table 64 PMP 450i ATEX/HAZLOC ODU models/part numbers......................................................... 2-65
Table 65 PTP 450i Series ODU part numbers ...................................................................................... 2-66
Table 66 PTP 450i ATEX/HAZLOC ODU models/part numbers ......................................................... 2-67
Table 67 PMP 450b Series ODU part numbers .................................................................................... 2-67
Table 68 PMP 450 Series ODU part numbers ...................................................................................... 2-68
Table 69 PTP 450 Series ODU part numbers ....................................................................................... 2-70
Table 70 PMP/PTP 450/450i Series Accessories .................................................................................. 2-70
Table 71 PMP 450m Series wind loading (Newton) ............................................................................ 3-12
Table 72 PMP/PTP 450i Series wind loading (Newton) ...................................................................... 3-12
Table 73 PMP 450m Series wind loading (lb force) ............................................................................ 3-12
Table 74 PMP/PTP 450i Series wind loading (lb force) ....................................................................... 3-13
Table 75 PMP/PTP 450 Series wind loading (Newton) ....................................................................... 3-13
Table 76 PMP/PTP 450 Series wind loading (lb force) ........................................................................ 3-14
Table 77 PMP 450b Series wind loading (Newton) ............................................................................. 3-14
Table 78 PMP 450b Series wind loading (lb force) ............................................................................. 3-14
Table 79 EIRP limits from ATEX and HAZLOC standards .................................................................. 3-15
Table 80 Example 5.8 GHz 4-channel assignment by access site ...................................................... 3-20
Table 81 Example 5.8 GHz 3-channel assignment by access site ...................................................... 3-21
Table 82 RF cable lengths required to achieve 1.2 dB loss at 5.8 GHz .............................................. 3-31

Page xxi
List of Tables

Table 83 Special case VLAN IDs ........................................................................................................... 3-37


Table 84 VLAN filters in point-to-multipoint modules ........................................................................ 3-38
Table 85 Q-in-Q Ethernet frame ............................................................................................................ 3-39
Table 86 HTTPS security material ......................................................................................................... 3-42
Table 87 Ports filtered per protocol selections .................................................................................... 3-47
Table 88 Device default port numbers ................................................................................................. 3-47
Table 89 Safety compliance specifications .......................................................................................... 4-22
Table 90 EMC emissions compliance ................................................................................................... 4-22
Table 91 FCC minimum safe distances – PMP 450m 5.1 GHz, 5.2 GHz, 5.4 GHz and 5.8 GHz ........ 4-25
Table 92 FCC minimum safe distances – PMP/PTP 450b 4.9 GHz, 5.1 GHz, 5.2 GHz, 5.4 GHz and 5.8
GHz .................................................................................................................................................... 4-26
Table 93 ISEDC minimum safe distances – PMP/PTP 450b 4.9 GHz, 5.1 GHz, 5.2 GHz, 5.4 GHz and
5.8 GHz .............................................................................................................................................. 4-27
Table 94 FCC minimum safe distances – PMP/PTP 450i 900 MHz, 3.65 GHz, 4.9 GHz, 5.1 GHz, 5.2
GHz, 5.4 GHz and 5.8 GHz ............................................................................................................... 4-28
Table 95 ISEDC minimum safe distances – PMP/PTP 450i, 900 MHz, 3.5 GHz, 3.65 GHz, 4.9 GHz, 5.2
GHz, 5.4 GHz, and 5.8 GHz .............................................................................................................. 4-29
Table 96 FCC minimum safe distances – PMP/PTP 450 900 MHz, 2.4 GHz, 3.65 GHz and 5 GHz ... 4-31
Table 97 ISEDC minimum safe distances – PMP/PTP 450 900 MHz, 2.4 GHz, 3.5/3.65 GHz and 5 GHz
........................................................................................................................................................... 4-32
Table 98 Radio certifications ................................................................................................................. 4-37
Table 99 Tools for PMP and PTP 450 Platform ODU installation ......................................................... 5-9
Table 100 Main port pinout ................................................................................................................... 5-12
Table 101 Aux port pinout ..................................................................................................................... 5-12
Table 102 RJ-45 pinout for straight-through Ethernet cable .............................................................. 5-13
Table 103 RJ-45 pinout for crossover Ethernet cable ......................................................................... 5-14
Table 104 AP/BHM to UGPS cable pinout ............................................................................................ 5-15
Table 105 PMP/PTP 450i Series - ODU mounting bracket part numbers ............................................ 6-2
Table 106 RJ45 connector and cable color code ................................................................................. 6-23
Table 107 Menu options and web pages ............................................................................................... 7-7
Table 108 Session Status Attributes – AP ............................................................................................ 7-22
Table 109 IP interface attributes ........................................................................................................... 7-25
Table 110 SM/BHS private IP and LUID ................................................................................................ 7-26
Table 111 Aux port attributes ................................................................................................................ 7-27
Table 112 IP attributes - SM with NAT disabled .................................................................................. 7-33
Table 113 IP attributes - SM with NAT enabled................................................................................... 7-35
Table 114 NAT attributes - SM with NAT disabled ............................................................................. 7-36
Table 115 NAT attributes - SM with NAT enabled .............................................................................. 7-39
Table 116 SM DNS Options with NAT Enabled ................................................................................... 7-44
Table 117 NAT Port Mapping attributes - SM...................................................................................... 7-44
Table 118 VLAN Remarking Example ................................................................................................... 7-46
Table 119 AP/BHM VLAN tab attributes ............................................................................................... 7-48
Table 120 Q-in-Q Ethernet frame .......................................................................................................... 7-49
Table 121 SM VLAN attributes .............................................................................................................. 7-51

Page xxii
List of Tables

Table 122 SM VLAN Membership attributes ....................................................................................... 7-55


Table 123 BHM VLAN page attributes .................................................................................................. 7-55
Table 124 BHS VLAN page attributes ................................................................................................... 7-58
Table 125 SM PPPoE attributes ............................................................................................................. 7-60
Table 126 DiffServ attributes – AP/BHM ............................................................................................... 7-62
Table 127 Packet Filter Configuration attributes ................................................................................. 7-65
Table 128 General page attributes – PMP 450i AP .............................................................................. 7-71
Table 129 General page attributes –PMP 450m AP ............................................................................. 7-76
Table 130 General page attributes – PMP 450i SM ............................................................................. 7-78
Table 131 General page attributes – PTP 450i BHM ............................................................................ 7-81
Table 132 General page attributes – PTP 450i BHS ............................................................................. 7-83
Table 133 General page attributes – PMP 450b SM ............................................................................ 7-86
Table 134 Unit Settings attributes – 450 Platform Family AP/BHM ................................................... 7-95
Table 135 SM Unit Settings attributes ................................................................................................. 7-97
Table 136 450 Platform Family - AP/BHM Time attributes ................................................................ 7-98
Table 137 Add User page of account page - AP/ SM/BH .................................................................. 7-103
Table 138 Delete User page - 450 Platform Family - AP/ SM/BH ..................................................... 7-104
Table 139 Change User Setting page - 450 Platform Family AP/ SM/BH ........................................ 7-104
Table 140 User page –450 Platform Family AP/SM/BH ..................................................................... 7-105
Table 141 AP/BHM Protocol Filtering attributes ................................................................................ 7-108
Table 142 SM/BHS Protocol Filtering attributes ................................................................................ 7-110
Table 143 Port Configuration attributes – AP/SM/BHM/BMS ........................................................... 7-111
Table 144 Security attributes –450 Platform Family AP .................................................................... 7-117
Table 145 Security attributes –450 Platform Family BHM ................................................................ 7-123
Table 146 Security attributes –450 Platform Family SM ................................................................... 7-125
Table 147 Security attributes - 450 Platform Family BHS ................................................................. 7-131
Table 148 PMP 450m AP Radio attributes - 5 GHz ............................................................................ 7-135
Table 149 PMP 450i AP Radio attributes - 5 GHz ............................................................................... 7-142
Table 150 PMP 450i SM Radio attributes – 5 GHz ............................................................................. 7-150
Table 151 PMP 450i AP Radio attributes - 900 MHz .......................................................................... 7-157
Table 152 PTP 450i BHM Radio page attributes – 5 GHz .................................................................. 7-160
Table 153 PTP 450i BHS Radio attributes – 5 GHz ............................................................................. 7-163
Table 154 PMP 450b Mid-Gain/High Gain SM Radio attributes – 5 GHz ......................................... 7-167
Table 155 PMP 450 AP Radio attributes - 5 GHz ................................................................................ 7-172
Table 156 PMP 450 AP Radio attributes - 3.65 GHz ........................................................................... 7-174
Table 157 PMP 450 AP Radio attributes - 3.5 GHz ............................................................................. 7-175
Table 158 PMP 450 AP Radio attributes - 2.4 GHz ............................................................................. 7-176
Table 159 PMP 450 SM Radio attributes – 5 GHz .............................................................................. 7-177
Table 160 PMP 450 SM Radio attributes – 3.65 GHz ......................................................................... 7-179
Table 161 PMP 450 SM Radio attributes – 3.5 GHz ........................................................................... 7-180
Table 162 PMP 450 SM Radio attributes – 2.4 GHz ........................................................................... 7-181
Table 163 PMP 450 SM Radio attributes –900 MHz .......................................................................... 7-182
Table 164 PTP 450 BHM Radio attributes –5 GHz .............................................................................. 7-184

Page xxiii
List of Tables

Table 165 PTP 450 BHM Radio attributes –5 GHz .............................................................................. 7-185
Table 166 Example for mix of multicast and unicast traffic scenarios ............................................ 7-187
Table 167 450 Platform Family AP/SM/BH Custom Frequencies page – 5 GHz.............................. 7-189
Table 168 PMP/PTP 450 SM/BH Custom Frequencies page – 3.65 GHz .......................................... 7-190
Table 169 PMP/PTP 450 SM/BH Custom Frequencies page – 3.5 GHz ............................................ 7-191
Table 170 Throughput penalty per modulation................................................................................. 7-194
Table 171 Contention slot settings ..................................................................................................... 7-194
Table 172 450 Platform Family Modulation levels ............................................................................ 7-199
Table 173 Co-channel Interference per (CCI) MCS ............................................................................ 7-200
Table 174 Adjacent Channel Interference (ACI) per MCS ................................................................. 7-200
Table 175 LAN1 Network Interface Configuration tab of IP page attributes ................................... 7-203
Table 176 SNMP page attributes ........................................................................................................ 7-205
Table 177 Syslog parameters .............................................................................................................. 7-212
Table 178 Syslog Configuration attributes - AP ................................................................................ 7-213
Table 179 Syslog Configuration attributes - SM ............................................................................... 7-214
Table 180 Syslog Configuration attributes - BHS .............................................................................. 7-215
Table 181 Characteristics of traffic scheduling .................................................................................. 7-229
Table 182 Recommended combined settings for typical operations .............................................. 7-230
Table 183 Where feature values are obtained for an SM registered under an AP with Authentication
Mode set to something other than "DISABLED" ......................................................................... 7-231
Table 184 MIR, VLAN, HPC, and CIR Configuration Sources, Authentication Disabled ................ 7-231
Table 185 QoS page attributes - AP.................................................................................................... 7-232
Table 186 QoS page attributes - SM ................................................................................................... 7-237
Table 187 QoS page attributes - BHM ................................................................................................ 7-241
Table 188 QoS page attributes - BHS ................................................................................................. 7-242
Table 189 Configuring cnMaestro ...................................................................................................... 7-252
Table 190 Security tab attributes ........................................................................................................ 7-260
Table 191 SM Security tab attributes ................................................................................................. 7-264
Table 192 RADIUS Vendor Specific Attributes (VSAs) ..................................................................... 7-273
Table 193 AP User Authentication and Access Tracking attributes ................................................ 7-279
Table 194 SM User Authentication and Access Tracking attributes ............................................... 7-281
Table 195 Device data accounting RADIUS attributes ...................................................................... 7-283
Table 196 Ping Watchdog attributes .................................................................................................. 7-300
Table 197 Spectrum Analyzer page attributes - AP .............................................................................. 8-5
Table 198 Spectrum Analyzer page attributes - SM ............................................................................. 8-7
Table 199 Spectrum Analyzer page attributes - BHM ........................................................................... 8-9
Table 200 Spectrum Analyzer page attributes - BHS .......................................................................... 8-11
Table 201 Remote Spectrum Analyzer attributes - AP ........................................................................ 8-14
Table 202 Remote Spectrum Analyzer attributes - BHM .................................................................... 8-15
Table 203 Aiming page attributes – SM ............................................................................................... 8-18
Table 204 Aiming page attributes - BHS .............................................................................................. 8-20
Table 205 Alignment Tool Headsets and Alignment tone adapter third party product details ...... 8-22
Table 206 Link Capacity Test page attributes – 450m AP ................................................................... 8-31

Page xxiv
List of Tables

Table 207 Link Capacity Test page attributes – BHM/BHS ................................................................. 8-33
Table 208 AP Evaluation tab attributes - AP ........................................................................................ 8-34
Table 209 BHM Evaluation tab attributes - BHS .................................................................................. 8-38
Table 210 OFDM Frame Calculator page attributes ............................................................................ 8-43
Table 211 OFDM Calculated Frame Results attributes ....................................................................... 8-44
Table 212 Color code versus uplink/downlink rate column ............................................................... 8-48
Table 213 Link Status page attributes – AP/BHM ................................................................................ 8-49
Table 214 Link Status page attributes – SM/BHS ................................................................................ 8-52
Table 215 General Status page attributes – PMP 450m AP .................................................................. 9-3
Table 216 General Status page attributes – PMP 450 AP ..................................................................... 9-8
Table 217 General Status page attributes – PMP 450i AP .................................................................. 9-10
Table 218 General Status page attributes - SM ................................................................................... 9-13
Table 219 General Status page attributes - BHM ................................................................................ 9-18
Table 220 General Status page attributes - BHS ................................................................................. 9-21
Table 221 Device tab attributes ............................................................................................................. 9-24
Table 222 Session tab attributes ........................................................................................................... 9-26
Table 223 Power tab attributes ............................................................................................................. 9-27
Table 224 Configuration tab attributes ................................................................................................. 9-29
Table 225 Session Status > Configuration CIR configuration denotations ....................................... 9-31
Table 226 Link Quality tab attributes .................................................................................................... 9-32
Table 227 Event Log messages for abnormal events ......................................................................... 9-35
Table 228 Event Log messages for normal events ............................................................................. 9-35
Table 229 Scheduler tab attributes ....................................................................................................... 9-38
Table 230 SM Registration Failures page attributes - AP ................................................................... 9-40
Table 231 BHS Registration Failures page attributes - BHM .............................................................. 9-41
Table 232 Flags status............................................................................................................................ 9-41
Table 233 Ethernet tab attributes .......................................................................................................... 9-43
Table 234 Radio (Statistics) page attributes – RF Control Block ........................................................ 9-46
Table 235 Sounding Statistics - 450m AP page attributes ................................................................... 9-1
Table 236 VLAN page attributes ............................................................................................................. 9-4
Table 237 Data Channel page attributes ................................................................................................ 9-5
Table 238 MIR/Burst page attributes for AP........................................................................................... 9-7
Table 239 MIR/Burst page attributes for SM.......................................................................................... 9-8
Table 240 RF overload Configuration attributes – AP/BHM ............................................................... 9-10
Table 241 Overload page attributes – AP/SM/BHM/BHS .................................................................... 9-13
Table 242 DHCP Relay page attributes – AP/SM ................................................................................. 9-15
Table 243 Filter page attributes - SM ................................................................................................... 9-16
Table 244 NAT page attributes - SM .................................................................................................... 9-18
Table 245 NAT DHCP Statistics page attributes - SM ......................................................................... 9-19
Table 246 Sync Status page attributes - AP ......................................................................................... 9-20
Table 247 PPPoE Statistics page attributes - SM ................................................................................ 9-21
Table 248 Bridge Control Block page attributes – AP/SM/BHM/BHS................................................. 9-23
Table 249 Pass Through Statistics page attributes – AP .................................................................... 9-26

Page xxv
List of Tables

Table 250 SNMPv3 Statistics page attributes – AP ............................................................................. 9-27


Table 251 Syslog statistics page attributes – AP/SM/BH .................................................................... 9-29
Table 252 Frame utilization statistics for PMP 450m AP .................................................................... 9-30
Table 253 Frame utilization statistics for 450/450i/450m .................................................................... 9-38
Table 254 Recovery Options attributes ................................................................................................ 9-43
Table 255 PMP 450m Series - AP specifications.................................................................................. 10-2
Table 256 PMP 450i Series - AP specifications .................................................................................... 10-6
Table 257 PMP 450i Series - SM specifications ................................................................................. 10-12
Table 258 PTP 450i Series - BH specifications ................................................................................... 10-18
Table 259 PMP 450b Mid-Gain Series - SM specifications ............................................................... 10-23
Table 260 PMP 450b High Gain Series - SM specifications.............................................................. 10-28
Table 261 PMP 450 Series - AP specifications ................................................................................... 10-32
Table 262 PMP 450 Series - SM specifications .................................................................................. 10-37
Table 263 PTP 450 Series - BH specifications .................................................................................... 10-42
Table 264 PMP/PTP 450i AC power Injector specifications .............................................................. 10-47
Table 265 PMP/PTP 450 power supply specifications (part number: N000900L001A) .................. 10-48
Table 266 450m/450i Series Main and Aux Ethernet bridging specifications ................................ 10-49
Table 267 450 Series Ethernet bridging specifications ..................................................................... 10-49
Table 268 450 Platform Family - wireless specifications .................................................................. 10-51
Table 269 Radio certifications ............................................................................................................ 10-53
Table 270 Country & Bands DFS setting ............................................................................................ 10-55
Table 271 Default combined transmit power per country – 900 MHz band PMP 450i Series ....... 10-58
Table 272 Default combined transmit power per country – 2.4 GHz band PMP/PTP 450 Series .. 10-59
Table 273 Default combined transmit power per country – 3.5 GHz band PMP/PTP 450 Series .. 10-60
Table 274 Default combined transmit power per country – 3.65 GHz band PMP/PTP 450 ........... 10-61
Table 275 Default combined transmit power per country – 4.9 GHz band PMP/PTP 450i Series . 10-61
Table 276 Default combined transmit power per country – 4.9 GHz band PMP 450b Series ....... 10-62
Table 277 Default combined transmit power per Country – 5.1 GHz band PMP/PTP 450i Series 10-63
Table 278 Default combined transmit power per country – 5.1 GHz band PMP 450b Series ....... 10-64
Table 279 Default combined transmit power per Country – 5.1 GHz band PMP 450m Series ..... 10-65
Table 280 Default combined transmit power per country – 5.2 GHz band PMP/PTP 450i Series . 10-66
Table 281 Default combined transmit power per country – 5.2 GHz band PMP 450b Mid-Gain Series
......................................................................................................................................................... 10-67
Table 282 Default combined transmit power per country – 5.2 GHz band PMP 450b High Gain
Series .............................................................................................................................................. 10-67
Table 283 Default combined transmit power per Country – 5.2 GHz band PMP 450m Series ..... 10-68
Table 284 Default combined transmit power per country – 5.4 GHz band PMP 450m Series ...... 10-69
Table 285 Default combined transmit power per country – 5.4 GHz band PMP/PTP 450i Series . 10-70
Table 286 Default combined transmit power per country – 5.4 GHz band PMP 450b Mid-Gain Series
......................................................................................................................................................... 10-72
Table 287 Default combined transmit power per country – 5.4 GHz band PMP 450b High Gain
Series .............................................................................................................................................. 10-73
Table 288 Default combined transmit power per country – 5.4 GHz band PMP 450 Series ......... 10-74
Table 289 Default combined transmit power per Country – 5.8 GHz band PMP 450m Series ..... 10-75

Page xxvi
List of Tables

Table 290 Default combined transmit power per country – 5.8 GHz band PMP/PTP 450i Series . 10-76
Table 291 Default combined transmit power per country – 5.8 GHz band PMP 450b Mid-Gain Series
......................................................................................................................................................... 10-77
Table 292 Default combined transmit power per country – 5.8 GHz band PMP 450b High Gain
Series .............................................................................................................................................. 10-77
Table 293 Default combined transmit power per country – 5.8 GHz band PMP 450 Series ......... 10-78
Table 294 Frequency range per country – 900 MHz band ................................................................ 10-80
Table 295 Frequency range per country – 2.4 GHz band PMP/PTP 450 Series ............................... 10-81
Table 296 Frequency range per country – 3.5 GHz band PMP/PTP 450/450i Series....................... 10-81
Table 297 Frequency range per country – 3.65 GHz band PMP/PTP 450/450i Series .................... 10-82
Table 298 Frequency range per country – 4.9 GHz band PMP/PTP 450i Series .............................. 10-83
Table 299 Frequency range per country – 4.9 GHz band PMP 450b Series .................................... 10-83
Table 300 Frequency range per country – 5.1 GHz band PMP/PTP 450i Series .............................. 10-84
Table 301 Frequency range per country – 5.1 GHz band PMP 450b Mid-Gain Series ................... 10-85
Table 302 Frequency range per country – 5.1 GHz band PMP 450b High Gain Series .................. 10-85
Table 303 Frequency range per country – 5.1 GHz band PMP 450m Series ................................... 10-86
Table 304 Frequency range per country – 5.2 GHz band PMP/PTP 450i Series .............................. 10-87
Table 305 Frequency range per country – 5.2 GHz band PMP 450b Mid-Gain Series ................... 10-88
Table 306 Frequency range per country – 5.2 GHz band PMP 450b High Gain Series .................. 10-88
Table 307 Frequency range per country – 5.2 GHz band PMP 450m Series ................................... 10-89
Table 308 Frequency range per country – 5.4 GHz band PMP/PTP 450i Series .............................. 10-90
Table 309 Frequency range per country – 5.4 GHz band PMP 450b Mid-Gain Series ................... 10-91
Table 310 Frequency range per country – 5.4 GHz band PMP 450b High Gain Series .................. 10-91
Table 311 Frequency range per country – 5.4 GHz band PMP/PTP 450 Series........................... 10-92
Table 312 Frequency range per country – 5.4 GHz band PMP 450m Series ................................... 10-95
Table 313 Frequency range per country – 5.8 GHz band PMP/PTP 450i Series .............................. 10-96
Table 314 Frequency range per country – 5.8 GHz band PMP 450b Mid-GainSeries .................... 10-97
Table 315 Frequency range per country – 5.8 GHz band PMP 450b High Gain Series .................. 10-97
Table 316 Frequency range per country – 5.8 GHz band PMP/PTP 450 Series ............................... 10-97
Table 317 Frequency range per country – 5.8 GHz band PMP 450m Series ................................. 10-101
Table 318 US FCC IDs ........................................................................................................................ 10-102
Table 319 USA approved antenna list 4.9 GHz ................................................................................ 10-109
Table 320 USA approved antenna list 5.1 and 5.2 GHz .................................................................. 10-110
Table 321 USA approved antenna list 5.4 GHz ................................................................................ 10-111
Table 322 USA approved antenna list 5.8 GHz ................................................................................ 10-112
Table 323 ISEDC Certification Numbers ........................................................................................... 10-115
Table 324 Canada approved antenna list 4.9 and 5.8 GHz ............................................................. 10-117
Table 325 Canada approved antenna list 5.2 and 5.4 GHz ............................................................. 10-118

Page xxvii
About This User Guide
This guide describes the planning, installation, configuration and operation of the Cambium point-
to-point and point-to-multipoint wireless Ethernet bridges. It covers PMP/PTP 450, 450i, 450b, 450d
and PMP 450m platform Series. It is intended for use by the system designer, system installer and
system administrator.
For radio network design, refer to the following chapters:
• Chapter 1: Product description
• Chapter 2: System hardware
• Chapter 3: System planning
• Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information
• Chapter 5: Preparing for installation
• Chapter 6: Installation
For system configuration, tools and troubleshooting, refer to the following chapters:
• Chapter 7: Configuration
• Chapter 8: Tools
• Chapter 9: Operation
• Chapter 10: Reference information
• Chapter 11: Troubleshooting

Contacting Cambium Networks


Support website: https://support.cambiumnetworks.com

Main website: http://www.cambiumnetworks.com

Sales enquiries: solutions@cambiumnetworks.com

Support enquiries: https://support.cambiumnetworks.com


Repair enquiries: https://support.cambiumnetworks.com

Telephone number list: http://www.cambiumnetworks.com/contact

Address: Cambium Networks Limited,


Global Headquarters, 3800 Golf Road,
Suite 360, Rolling Meadows,
IL 60008 USA

Page 1
Purpose
Cambium Networks Point-to-Multi-Point (PMP)/Point-To-Point (PTP) 450 documents are intended
to instruct and assist personnel in the operation, installation and maintenance of the Cambium
PMP/PTP equipment and ancillary devices of 450 Platform Family. It is recommended that all
personnel engaged in such activities be properly trained.
Cambium disclaims all liability whatsoever, implied or express, for any risk of damage, loss or
reduction in system performance arising directly or indirectly out of the failure of the customer, or
anyone acting on the customer's behalf, to abide by the instructions, system parameters, or
recommendations made in this document.

Product notation conventions in document


This document covers Cambium 450 Series, 450i Series and 450m Series products. The following
notation conventions are followed while referring to product series and product family:

Product notation Description

• 450 Platform Family Refers to the complete 450 Series family, which includes 450
Series, 450i Series, 450b Series and 450m Series

• 450 Series Refers to 450 Series devices in the following configurations:


- PMP 450
- AP [2.4GHz/3.5 GHz/3.65 GHz /5 GHz]
- Connectorized
- SM [900 MHz/2.4GHz/3.5 GHz/3.65 GHz /5 GHz]
- Connectorized/ Integrated
- PTP 450 BHM/ BHS [900 MHz/3.5 GHz/3.65 GHz/5 GHz]
- Connectorized/ Integrated
- PMP 450d SM [5 GHz]
• 450i Series Refers to 450i Series devices in the following configurations:
- PMP 450i
- AP [900 MHz/3 GHz/5 GHz]
- Connectorized/ Integrated
- SM [3 GHz/5 GHz]
- Connectorized/ Integrated
- PTP 450i BHM/ BHS [3 GHz/5 GHz]
- Connectorized/ Integrated

• 450b Series Refers to 450b Series devices in the following configurations:


- PMP 450b Mid-Gain
- SM [5 GHz]
- Integrated
- PMP 450b High Gain
- SM [5 GHz] - Dish

Page 2
Product notation Description

• 450m Series Refers to 450m Series device configuration:


- PMP 450m AP 5 GHz
- Integrated

Cross references
References to external publications are shown in italics. Other cross references, emphasized in
blue text in electronic versions, are active links to the references.
This document is divided into numbered chapters that are divided into sections. Sections are not
numbered, but are individually named at the top of each page, and are listed in the table of
contents.

Feedback
We appreciate feedback from the users of our documents. This includes feedback on the structure,
content, accuracy, or completeness of our documents. To provide feedback, visit our support
website.https://support.cambiumnetworks.com.

Page 3
Important regulatory information

The 450 Platform Family products are certified as an unlicensed device in frequency bands where it
is not allowed to cause interference to licensed services (called primary users of the bands).

Application software
Download the latest 450 Platform Family software and install it in the Outdoor Units (ODUs) before
deploying the equipment. Instructions for installing software are provided in Upgrading the
software version and using CNUT on page 7-67.

USA specific information

Caution
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the
following two conditions:
• This device may not cause harmful interference, and
• This device must accept any interference received, including interference that may
cause undesired operation

The USA Federal Communications Commission (FCC) requires manufacturers to implement


special features to prevent interference to weather radar systems that operate in the band 5600
MHz to 5650 MHz. These features must be implemented in all products able to operate outdoors in
the band 5470 MHz to 5725 MHz.
Manufacturers must ensure that such radio products cannot be configured to operate outside of
FCC rules; specifically, it must not be possible to disable or modify the radar protection functions
that have been demonstrated to the FCC.
Cambium supplies variants of the 450, 450i, 450b, and 450m Series specifically for operation in the
USA to comply with FCC requirements (KDB 905462 D02 UNII DFS Compliance Procedures New
Rules v02). These variants are only allowed to operate with license keys that comply with FCC
rules.
To ensure compliance when using PMP 450 Series and PTP 450 Series, follow the
recommendation in Avoidance of weather radars (USA only).

Page 4
External antennas
When using a connectorized version of the product, the conducted transmit power may need to be
reduced to ensure the regulatory limit on transmitter EIRP is not exceeded. The installer must have
an understanding of how to compute the effective antenna gain from the actual antenna gain and
the feeder cable losses.
The range of permissible values for maximum antenna gain and feeder cable losses are included
in this user guide together with a sample calculation. The product GUI automatically applies the
correct conducted power limit to ensure that it is not possible for the installation to exceed the
EIRP limit, when the appropriate values for antenna gain and feeder cable losses are entered into
the GUI.

Avoidance of weather radars (USA only)


To comply with FCC rules (KDB 443999: Interim Plans to Approve UNII Devices Operating in the
5470 - 5725 MHz Band with Radar Detection and DFS Capabilities), units which are installed within
35 km (22 miles) of a Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) system (or have a line of sight
propagation path to such a system) must be configured to avoid any frequency within +30 MHz or
–30 MHz of the frequency of the TDWR device. This requirement applies even if the master is
outside the 35 km (22 miles) radius but communicates with outdoor clients which may be within
the 35 km (22 miles) radius of the TDWRs. If interference is not eliminated, a distance limitation
based on line-of-sight from TDWR will need to be used. Devices with bandwidths greater than 20
MHz may require greater frequency separation.
When planning a link in the USA, visit http://spectrumbridge.com/udia/home.aspx, enter the
location of the planned link and search for TDWR radars. If a TDWR system is located within 35 km
(22 miles) or has line of sight propagation to the PTP device, perform the following tasks:
• Register the installation on http://spectrumbridge.com/udia/home.aspx.
• Make a list of channel center frequencies that must be barred, that is, those falling within
+30 MHz or –30 MHz of the frequency of the TDWR radars.
The 450 Platform Family AP must be configured to not operate on the affected channels.

Canada specific information


Caution
This device complies with ISEDC ’s license-exempt RSSs. Operation is subject to the
following two conditions:
(1) This device may not cause interference; and
(2) This device must accept any interference, including interference that may cause
undesired operation of the device.

ISEDC requires manufacturers to implement special features to prevent interference to weather


radar systems that operate in the band 5600 MHz to 5650 MHz. These features must be
implemented in all products able to operate outdoors in the band 5470 MHz to 5725 MHz.

Page 5
Manufacturers must ensure that such radio products cannot be configured to operate outside of
ISEDC rules; specifically it must not be possible to disable or modify the radar protection functions
that have been demonstrated to ISEDC .
In order to comply with these ISEDC requirements, Cambium supplies variants of the 450 Platform
Family for operation in Canada. These variants are only allowed to operate with license keys that
comply with ISEDC rules. In particular, operation of radio channels overlapping the band
5600 MHz to 5650 MHz is not allowed and these channels are permanently barred.
In addition, other channels may also need to be barred when operating close to weather radar
installations.
Other variants of the 450 Platform Family are available for use in the rest of the world, but these
variants are not supplied to Canada except under strict controls, when they are needed for export
and deployment outside Canada.

Renseignements specifiques au Canada


Attention
Le présent appareil est conforme aux CNR d'Industrie Canada applicables aux
appareils radio exempts de licence. L'exploitation est autorisée aux deux conditions
suivantes :
(1) l'appareil ne doit pas produire de brouillage, et
(2) l'utilisateur de l'appareil doit accepter tout brouillage radioélectrique subi, même si
le brouillage est susceptible d'en compromettre le fonctionnement.

ISEDC a demandé aux fabricants de mettre en œuvre des mécanismes spécifiques pour éviter
d’interférer avec des systèmes radar fonctionnant dans la bande 5600 MHz à 5650 MHz. Ces
mécanismes doivent être mis en œuvre dans tous les produits capables de fonctionner à
l'extérieur dans la bande 5470 MHz à 5725 MHz.
Les fabricants doivent s'assurer que les produits de radiocommunications ne peuvent pas être
configurés pour fonctionner en dehors des règles ISEDC , en particulier, il ne doit pas être possible
de désactiver ou modifier les fonctions de protection des radars qui ont été démontrés à ISEDC .
Afin de se conformer à ces exigences de ISEDC , Cambium fournit des variantes du 450 Platform
Family exclusivement pour le Canada. Ces variantes ne permettent pas à l’équipement de
fonctionner en dehors des règles de ISEDC . En particulier, le fonctionnement des canaux de radio
qui chevauchent la bande 5600-5650 MHz est interdite et ces canaux sont définitivement exclus.

ISEDC Approved Antennas


The list of antennas used to obtain ISEDC approvals is provided in section Country specific radio
regulations, Innovation Science and Economic Development Canada (ISEDC) , Table 324.

Page 6
Antennas externes
Lorsque vous utilisez une version du produit sans antenne intégrée, il peut être nécessaire de
réduire la puissance d'émission pour garantir que la limite réglementaire de puissance isotrope
rayonnée équivalente (PIRE) n'est pas dépassée. L'installateur doit avoir une bonne
compréhension de la façon de calculer le gain de l'antenne réelle et les pertes dans les câbles de
connections.
La plage de valeurs admissibles pour un gain maximal de l'antenne et des pertes de câbles de
connections sont inclus dans ce guide d'utilisation avec un exemple de calcul. L'interface
utilisateur du produit applique automatiquement la limite de puissance menée correct afin de
s'assurer qu'il ne soit pas possible pour l'installation de dépasser la limite PIRE, lorsque les valeurs
appropriées pour le gain d'antenne et les pertes de câbles d'alimentation sont entrées dans
l’interface utilisateur.

Antennes approuvées par ISEDC


La liste des antennas approveés pour l’operation au Canada est founie dans le chapitre Country
specific radio regulations, Innovation Science and Economic Development Canada (ISEDC)
tableaux Table 324.

EU Declaration of Conformity
Hereby, Cambium Networks declares that the Cambium 450 Series, 450i Series and 450m Series
Wireless Ethernet Bridge complies with the essential requirements and other relevant provisions
of Directive 1999/5/EC. The declaration of conformity may be consulted at:
https://www.cambiumnetworks.com/support/compliance/

Specific expertise and training for professional installers


To ensure that the 450 Platform Family products – PMP/PTP 450 Series, PMP/PTP 450i Series, PMP
450m Series are installed and configured in compliance with the requirements of ISEDC and the
FCC, installers must have the radio engineering skills and training described in this section.
The Cambium Networks technical training program details can be accessed from below link:
https://www.cambiumnetworks.com/training/

Ethernet networking skills


The installer must have the ability to configure IP addressing on a PC and to set up and control
products using a web browser interface.

Page 7
Lightning protection
To protect outdoor radio installations from the impact of lightning strikes, the installer must be
familiar with the normal procedures for site selection, bonding and grounding. Installation
guidelines for the 450 Platform Family can be found in Chapter 2: System hardware and Chapter 3:
System planning.

Training
The installer needs to have basic competence in radio and IP network installation. The specific
requirements applicable to the 450 Platform should be gained by reading Chapter 5: Preparing for
installation, Chapter 6: Installation, Chapter 7: Configuration, Chapter 8: Tools and Chapter 9:
Operation; and by performing sample set ups at base workshop before live deployments.
The Cambium Networks technical training program details can be accessed from below link:
https://www.cambiumnetworks.com/training/

Page 8
Problems and warranty

Reporting problems
If any problems are encountered when installing or operating this equipment, follow this
procedure to investigate and report:

1 Search this document and the software release notes of supported releases.

2 Visit the support website.


3 Ask for assistance from the Cambium product supplier.

4 Gather information from affected units, such as any available diagnostic downloads.

5 Escalate the problem by emailing or telephoning support.

Repair and service


If unit failure is suspected, obtain details of the Return Material Authorization (RMA) process from
the support website (http://www.cambiumnetworks.com/support).

Hardware warranty
Cambium’s standard hardware warranty is for one (1) year from date of shipment from Cambium
Networks or a Cambium distributor. Cambium Networks warrants that hardware will conform to
the relevant published specifications and will be free from material defects in material and
workmanship under normal use and service. Cambium shall within this time, at its own option,
either repair or replace the defective product within thirty (30) days of receipt of the defective
product. Repaired or replaced product will be subject to the original warranty period but not less
than thirty (30) days.
To register PMP and PTP products or activate warranties, visit the support website. For warranty
assistance, contact the reseller or distributor. The removal of the tamper-evident seal will void the
warranty.

Caution
Using non-Cambium parts for repair could damage the equipment or void warranty.
Contact Cambium for service and repair instructions.
Portions of Cambium equipment may be damaged from exposure to electrostatic
discharge. Use precautions to prevent damage.

Page 9
Security advice

Cambium Networks systems and equipment provide security parameters that can be configured
by the operator based on their particular operating environment. Cambium recommends setting
and using these parameters following industry recognized security practices. Security aspects to
be considered are protecting the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of information and
assets. Assets include the ability to communicate, information about the nature of the
communications, and information about the parties involved.
In certain instances Cambium makes specific recommendations regarding security practices,
however the implementation of these recommendations and final responsibility for the security of
the system lies with the operator of the system.

Page 10
Warnings, cautions, and notes

The following describes how warnings and cautions are used in this document and in all
documents of the Cambium Networks document set.

Warnings
Warnings precede instructions that contain potentially hazardous situations. Warnings are used to
alert the reader to possible hazards that could cause loss of life or physical injury. A warning has
the following format:

Warning
Warning text and consequence for not following the instructions in the warning.

Cautions
Cautions precede instructions and are used when there is a possibility of damage to systems,
software, or individual items of equipment within a system. However, this damage presents no
danger to personnel. A caution has the following format:

Caution
Caution text and consequence for not following the instructions in the caution.

Notes
A note means that there is a possibility of an undesirable situation or provides additional
information to help the reader understand a topic or concept. A note has the following format:

Note
Note text.

Page 11
Caring for the environment

The following information describes national or regional requirements for the disposal of
Cambium Networks supplied equipment and for the approved disposal of surplus packaging.

In EU countries
The following information is provided to enable regulatory compliance with the European Union
(EU) directives identified and any amendments made to these directives when using Cambium
equipment in EU countries.

Disposal of Cambium equipment


European Union (EU) Directive 2002/96/EC Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE)
Do not dispose of Cambium equipment in landfill sites. For disposal instructions, refer to
https://www.cambiumnetworks.com/support/compliance/

Disposal of surplus packaging


Do not dispose of surplus packaging in landfill sites. In the EU, it is the individual recipient’s
responsibility to ensure that packaging materials are collected and recycled according to the
requirements of EU environmental law.

In non-EU countries
In non-EU countries, dispose of Cambium equipment and all surplus packaging in accordance with
national and regional regulations.

Page 12
Chapter 1: Product description
This chapter provides a high level description of 450 Platform Family products. It describes in
general terms the function of the product, the main product variants and the main hardware
components. The following topics are described in this chapter:
• Overview of the 450 Platform Family on page 1-2 introduces the key features, typical uses,
product variants and components of the 450 Platform Family.
• Wireless operation on page 1-17 describes how the 450 Platform Family wireless link is
operated, including modulation modes and spectrum management.
• System management on page 1-22 introduces the 450 Platform Family management system,
including the web interface, configuration, security, alerts and recovery.

Page 1-1
Chapter 1: Product description Overview of the 450 Platform Family

Overview of the 450 Platform Family

This section introduces the key features, typical uses, product variants and components of the 450
Platform Family.

Purpose
Cambium 450 Platform Family products are designed for Ethernet bridging over point-to-point and
point-to-multipoint microwave links in unlicensed and lightly-licensed frequency bands 900MHz,
2.4 GHz, 3.5/3.65 GHz and 4.9 to 5.925 GHz.
Users must ensure that the 450 Platform Family complies with local operating regulations.
The 450 Platform Family acts as a transparent bridge between two or more segments of the
operator’s network. In this sense, it can be treated as a virtual wired connection among points. The
450 Series platform forwards 802.3 Ethernet frames destined for the other part of the network and
filters frames it does not need to forward.

450 Platform Family


The 450 Series platform supports following:
• PMP 450m Series
• PMP/PTP 450i Series
• PMP 450b Series
• PMP/PTP 450 Series

PMP 450m Series


The PMP 450m Series AP is a revolutionary product which is based on Multi-User Multiple-Input
and Multiple-Output (MU-MIMO) technology. By combining a sophisticated beam forming antenna
array with multiple transceivers, Cambium Networks is using leading edge technology to provide a
substantial shift upward in capacity per sector.

Key features
The Cambium PMP 450m Series AP offers the following benefits:
• MU-MIMO Access Point is a technologically cutting-edge device providing more than 500
Mbps in 20 MHz Channel bandwidth using 2.5 ms frame size depending upon SMs position
within sector. Even higher data rates are possible in releases 15.1.3 and beyond by using 5 ms
frame sizes, or using 30 MHz or 40 MHz bandwidths.

Page 1-2
Chapter 1: Product description Overview of the 450 Platform Family

• PMP 450m AP is compatible with existing PMP 450/450i Series Subscriber Modules(SM),
providing an easy network upgrade path. This benefits to re-use existing SMs (i.e. capital
investment). With releases 15.1.3 and beyond, PMP 450m also provides basic sector mode
support for 430 SMs.
• 3x higher throughput packet rate compare 450 Series
• Integrated with 14x14 MU-MIMO antenna
• Gigabit copper/power port combined, 1000BaseT port with power out and SFP port, 2.5G
Copper SFP
• More than 20 bps/Hz spectral efficiency and over 40 bps/Hz when deployed in frequency re-use
configuration
Table 1 gives a summary of the main PMP 450m Series AP characteristics.

Table 1 Main characteristics of the PMP 450m Series AP

Characteristic Value

Topology PMP

Wireless link condition LOS, near LOS or non-LOS

Range PMP: Up to 40 mi (or 64 km)

Duplexing TDD (symmetric and asymmetric)

Connectivity 1000Base-T Ethernet Main port with PoE input

Operating frequencies 5.150 to 5.925 GHz

Tx Power 42 dBm EIRP

Channel bandwidth 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 MHz

High spectral efficiency More than 60 bps/Hz1

Timing synchronization CMM5 or UGPS

Data rate More than 500 Mbps with 20 MHz channel bandwidth and
2.5ms frame size. Additional data rate improvements are
available in release 15.1.3 or later by using 30 MHz and 40
MHz channel bandwidths, or 5 ms frame size.

Frequency bands
The PMP 450m Series AP operates from 5150 to 5925 MHz bands.

1 This is achieved in an ABAB frequency reuse AP deployment model.

Page 1-3
Chapter 1: Product description Overview of the 450 Platform Family

Hardware components
The ODU (Outdoor unit) is a self-contained transceiver unit that houses both radio and networking
electronics.

The PMP 450m Series is supplied in the following configurations:

Table 2 PMP 450m Series hardware configurations

ODU Frequency ODU type

PMP 450m AP 5150 to 5925 MHz Integrated 14 dBi, 90° MU-MIMO sector
antenna

PMP/PTP 450i Series


The PMP/PTP 450i Series is a high performance wireless bridge for Ethernet traffic. It is capable of
operating in line-of-sight (LOS), near-LOS and non-LOS propagation conditions. It supports 900
MHz, 3 GHz, and 4.9 to 5.925 GHz frequency band.

Key features
The PMP/PTP 450i Series has extensive quality of service (QoS) involving traffic classification,
traffic policy and shaping capability.
The Cambium PMP/PTP 450i Series offers the following benefits:
• Cambium’s high performing point-to-multipoint solution, with up to 310 Mbps (40 MHz
Channel Bandwidth and 5 ms Frame Period) usable throughput for PMP and PTP
• State-of-the-art MIMO (Multi In Multi Out) technology
• Upto 7.5 bps/Hz spectral efficiency
• Increased Packet Processing rate
• Efficient GPS synchronized, scheduled TDD operation for easy AP/BHM site deployment and
performance that is consistent regardless of SM/BHS loading
• A range of cost-effective subscriber device solutions to meet the business case of any network
application
• MIMO B Mode: This technique provides for the ability to double the throughput of a radio
transmission under proper RF conditions. Different data streams are transmitted
simultaneously on two different antennas
• MIMO-A mode: This mode of operation has same modulation levels as the MIMO-B mode,
namely: QPSK, 16-QAM, 64-QAM and 256-QAM. This mode increases system reliability in the
links.
• GPS synchronization via CMM4, CMM5, or UGPS
Table 3 gives a summary of the main PMP/PTP 450i Series characteristics.

Page 1-4
Chapter 1: Product description Overview of the 450 Platform Family

Table 3 Main characteristics of the PMP/PTP 450i Series

Characteristic Value

Topology PMP/PTP

Wireless link LOS, near LOS or non-LOS


condition

Range PTP: Up to 186 mi (or 299 km) depending on configuration for all bands
PMP: Up to 40 mi (or 64 km) for 5 GHz band
PMP: Up to 120 mi (or 193 km) for 900 MHz band

Duplexing TDD (symmetric and asymmetric)

Connectivity 1000Base-T Ethernet Main port with PoE input

Operating 902 to 928 MHz


frequencies 3.3 to 3.9 GHz
4.9 to 5.925 GHz

Tx Power Max 25 dBm (3 GHz)


Max 27 dBm (5 GHz)
Max 25 dBm (900 MHz)

Channel 5, 7, 10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 MHz


bandwidth
Note
All bands do not support all channel bandwidths. For more information,
refer to this link.

Spectral Up to 7.5 bps/Hz


efficiency

Timing CMM4, CMM5, or UGPS


synchronization

Data rate Up to 310 Mbps (40 MHz channel BW) for PMP/PTP

Frequency bands
The PMP/PTP 450i Series ODU can operate in the following bands:
• 900 MHz band: 902 to 928 MHz
• 3 GHz band: 3300 to 3900 MHz
• 5 GHz band: 4900 to 5925 MHz

Page 1-5
Chapter 1: Product description Overview of the 450 Platform Family

Note
900 MHz, 3 GHz, and 5 GHz bands with different frequencies require different hardware
components.

Hardware components
The ODU (Outdoor unit) is a self-contained transceiver unit that houses both radio and networking
electronics. The main hardware components of the PMP/PTP 450i Series are as follows:
• PMP 450i AP
• PMP 450i SM
• PTP 450i BH (BHM/BHS)

The PMP/PTP 450i Series is supplied in the following configurations:

Table 4 PMP/PTP 450i Series hardware configurations

ODU Frequency ODU type

PMP 450i AP 902 to 928 MHz Connectorized Use with an external antenna

3.3 to 3.9 GHz Integrated 17 dBi, 90° sector dual slant


antenna

Connectorized Use with an external antenna

4.9 to 5.925 GHz Integrated 16 dBi, 90° sector antenna


(support 4.9, 5.1, 5.2, 5.4 Connectorized Use with an external antenna
and 5.8 GHz)

PMP 450i SM 3.3 to 3.9 GHz Integrated 19 dBi, SM/BH with MARS antenna

Connectorized Use with an external antenna

4.9 to 5.925 GHz Integrated 23 dBi flat panel antenna


(support 4.9, 5.1, 5.2, 5.4 Connectorized Use with an external antenna
and 5.8 GHz)

PTP 450i BH 3.3 to 3.9 GHz Integrated 19 dBi, SM/BH with MARS antenna

Connectorized Use with an external antenna

4.9 to 5.925 GHz Integrated 23 dBi flat panel antenna


(support 4.9, 5.1, 5.2, 5.4 Connectorized Use with an external antenna
and 5.8 GHz)

Page 1-6
Chapter 1: Product description Overview of the 450 Platform Family

Note
The BH ODU can be configured as a BHM or a BHS in PTP mode.

Page 1-7
Chapter 1: Product description Overview of the 450 Platform Family

PMP 450b Series


The PMP 450b Series is a high performance wireless Subscriber Module. It supports 4.9 to 5.925
GHz frequency band.

Key features
The Cambium PMP 450b Series offers the following benefits:
• Ultra-wide band radios support the entire band from 4.9 to 5.925 GHz.
• Gigabit Ethernet Interface provides the maximum transfer rates to the device.
• 3.5 mm audio jack allows direct connection of headphones without any adapters.
• Updated FPGA enhances Packet Processing Power more than 4 times that of the 450 SM.
• Capable of up to 300 Mbps aggregate in a 40 MHz channel.
Table 5 gives a summary of the main PMP 450b Series characteristics.

Table 5 Main characteristics of the PMP 450b Series

Characteristic Value

Topology PMP

Wireless link condition LOS, near LOS or non-LOS

Range PMP: Up to 40 mi (or 64 km)

Duplexing TDD (symmetric and asymmetric)

Connectivity 100/1000Base-T Ethernet Main port with PoE input

Operating frequencies 4.9 to 5.925 GHz

Tx Power Max 27 dBm

Channel bandwidth 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 MHz

Spectral efficiency Up to 7.5 bps/Hz

Timing synchronization CMM4, CMM5, or UGPS

Data rate Up to 300 Mbps (40 MHz channel BW) for PMP

Frequency bands
The PMP 450b Series ODU can operate in the following band:
• 5 GHz band: 4900 to 5925 MHz

Page 1-8
Chapter 1: Product description Overview of the 450 Platform Family

Hardware components
The ODU (Outdoor unit) is a self-contained transceiver unit that houses both radio and networking
electronics. The main hardware components of the PMP 450b Series are as follows:
• PMP 450b SM

The PMP 450b Series is supplied in the following configurations:

Table 6 PMP 450b Series hardware configurations

ODU Frequency ODU type

PMP 450b 4.9 to 5.925 GHz Integrated 16 dBi integrated antenna


SM (support 4.9, 5.1, 5.2, 5.4 (Mid-Gain)
and 5.8 GHz)
Dish 23 dBi integrated antenna
(High Gain)

Page 1-9
Chapter 1: Product description Overview of the 450 Platform Family

PMP/PTP 450 Series


Cambium PMP/PTP 450 Series networks are designed for wireless point-to-multipoint and point-to-
point links in the unlicensed/licensed 900 MHz, 2.4 GHz, 3.5 GHz, 3.65 GHz, 5.4 GHz and 5.8 GHz
bands. Users must ensure that the PMP/PTP 450 Series complies with local operating regulations.
The PMP/PTP 450 Series enables network operators to grow their business by offering more
capacity for data, voice and video applications.

Key features
The Cambium PMP/PTP 450 Series offers the following benefits:
• Cambium’s point-to-multipoint and point-to-point solution, with up to 310 Mbps usable
throughput
• State-of-the-art MIMO (Multi In Multi Out) technology
• Efficient GPS synchronized, scheduled TDD operation for easy Access Point site deployment
and performance that is consistent regardless of subscriber loading
• A range of cost-effective subscriber device solutions to meet the business case of a network
application
• MIMO-B Mode: This technique provides for the ability to double the throughput of a radio
transmission under proper RF conditions. Different data streams are transmitted
simultaneously on two different antennas.
• MIMO-A Mode: This mode of operation using the same modulation levels as the MIMO-B
mode, namely: QPSK, 16-QAM, 64-QAM and 256-QAM but it provides an additional combining
gain.
Table 7 gives a summary of PMP/PTP 450 Series products main characteristics.

Page 1-10
Chapter 1: Product description Overview of the 450 Platform Family

Table 7 Main characteristics of the PMP/PTP 450 Series

Characteristic Value

Topology PMP/PTP

Wireless link condition LOS, near LOS or non-LOS

Range Up to 40 mi (or 64 km) for PMP


Up to 186 mi (or 299 km) for PTP

Duplexing TDD (symmetric and asymmetric)

Connectivity 100Base-T Ethernet Main port with PoE input

Operating frequencies 900 MHz, 2.4 GHz, 3.5 GHz, 3.65 GHz and 5 GHz

Tx Power max 22 dBm (2.4 GHz and 5 GHz)


max 25 dBm (3.5 GHz and 3.65 GHz)
max 25 dBm (900 MHz - PMP 450 SM and BH)

Channel bandwidth 5, 7, 10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 MHz

All bands do not support all channel bandwidths. For more


information, refer to this link.

High spectral efficiency Up to 7.5 bps/Hz

Timing synchronization CMM4 or UGPS

Data rate Up to 310 Mbps (40 MHz channel BW) for PMP/PTP

Frequency bands
The PMP/PTP 450 Series ODU can operate in the following bands:
• 900 MHz band: 902 to 928 MHz (SM and BH)
• 2.4 GHz band: 2400 to 2483 MHz
• 3.5 GHz band: 3300 to 3600 MHz
• 3.65 GHz band: 3500 to 3850 MHz
• 5 GHz band: 5470 to 5875 MHz

Page 1-11
Chapter 1: Product description Overview of the 450 Platform Family

Hardware components
The main hardware components of the PMP/PTP 450 are as follows:
• PMP 450 AP
• PMP 450 SM
• PTP 450 BH (BHM/BHS)

The PMP/PTP 450 is supplied in the following configurations:

Table 8 PMP/PTP 450 Series hardware configurations

ODU Frequency ODU type

PMP 450 AP 2.4 GHz Connectorized Use with an external antenna

Integrated 18 dBi Dual Slant

3.5/3.65 GHz Connectorized Use with an external antenna

Integrated 16 dBi Dual Slant

5 GHz Connectorized Use with an external antenna


(5.4 and 5.8 GHz)

PMP 450 SM 900 MHz Connectorized Use with an external antenna

2.4 GHz Connectorized Use with an external antenna

Integrated 7 dBi Dual Slant, integrated patch

3.5/3.65 GHz Connectorized Use with an external antenna

Integrated 8 dBi Dual Slant, integrated patch

Integrated 19 dBi Flat Plate, integrated


patch

5 GHz Connectorized Use with an external antenna


(5.4 and 5.8 GHz) Integrated 9 dBi H+V, integrated patch

Integrated 25 dBi H+V, Integrated dish

PTP 450 BH 902 to 928 MHz Connectorized Use with an external antenna

3.5/3.65 GHz Connectorized Use with an external antenna

Integrated 8 dBi Dual Slant

5 GHz Connectorized Use with an external antenna


(5.4 and 5.8 GHz) Integrated 9 dBi H+V

Page 1-12
Chapter 1: Product description Overview of the 450 Platform Family

Note
The BH ODU can be configured as a BHM or a BHS in PTP mode

Supported interoperability for 450m/450i/450b/450 Series


The supported interoperability among various 450m/450i/450 Series hardwares are listed below:

Table 9 Supported Interoperability for PMP

Band AP SM

5.1, 5.2 and 5.9 GHz PMP 450m AP PMP 450i SM, PMP 450b SM

4.9, 5.1, 5.2 and 5.9 GHz PMP 450i AP PMP 450i SM, PMP 450b SM

PMP 450m AP
PMP 450i SM, PMP 450 SM, PMP 450d
5.4 and 5.8 GHz PMP 450i AP
SM, and PMP 450b SM
PMP 450 AP

PMP 450 AP PMP 450 SM, PMP 450i SM


3.5 and 3.65 GHz
PMP 450i AP PMP 450i SM, PMP 450 SM

2.4 GHz PMP 450 AP PMP 450 SM

900 MHz PMP 450i AP PMP 450 SM

Table 10 Supported Interoperability for PTP

Band BH

900 MHz PTP 450 BHM and BHS

3.5 and 3.65 GHz PTP 450/450i BHM and BHS

4.9, 5.1, 5.2, 5.4 and 5.8 GHz PTP 450i BHM and BHS

5.4 and 5.8 GHz PTP 450/450i BHM and BHS

Page 1-13
Chapter 1: Product description Overview of the 450 Platform Family

Typical deployment
The 450 Platform Family is an “all outdoor” solution consisting of a wireless bridge across sites.
Each site installation consists of an Integrated or Connectorized outdoor unit (ODU) and a power
supply (PSU) (see Figure 1). The ODU provides the following interfaces:
• Ethernet port: This provides proprietary power over Ethernet and connection to the
management and/or data networks.

Figure 1 PMP/PTP 450 Platform Family typical bridge deployment

Building 1 Building 2

ODU ODU

Power over Ethernet


Lightning interface
protection units Lightning
protection units

PSU PSU

AC supply AC supply
Network Network
equipment equipment

Page 1-14
Chapter 1: Product description Overview of the 450 Platform Family

Point-to-Multipoint
The PMP configuration of 450 Platform Family consists of Access Point (AP) and Subscriber
Module (SM) ODU. The radio link operates on a single frequency channel in each direction using
Time Division Duplex (TDD). The AP operates in TDMA mode to service multiple SMs.
Applications for the PMP Series include:
• High throughput enterprise applications
• nLOS video surveillance in metro areas
• Urban area network extension
• Network extension into areas with foliage

Point-to-Point (Backhaul)
The PTP configuration of 450 Platform Family consists of two BH (Backhaul) ODUs. The customer
can decide, via software configuration, if this unit is a BHM (Backhaul Master) or a BHS (Backhaul
Slave). The radio link operates on a single frequency channel using Time Division Duplex (TDD).
The BHM operates in TDMA mode to service the BHS.
Applications for the PTP Series include:
• Enterprise Access
• nLOS video surveillance
• Leased line replacements and backup solutions
• Network extension

Page 1-15
Chapter 1: Product description Overview of the 450 Platform Family

Product variants
The 450 Platform Family is available in the following product variants:
• The ODU is supplied in the following regional variants:
o FCC, intended for deployment in the USA
o EU, intended for deployment in countries of the European Union or other countries
following ETSI regulations
o Rest of the World (RoW), intended for deployment in countries other than USA and EU
countries.
o IC, intended for deployment in Canada
• A ruggedized ODU Subscriber Module designed to meet IP-66 and IP-67 standards to
withstand harsh environments
• An integrated Dish ODU Subscriber Module in a new, rugged and high gain design for 5 GHz
band
• An indoor power supply module providing Power-over-Ethernet (PoE) supply to ODU
(AP/SM/BH)
• Antennas and antenna cabling: Connectorized ODUs require external antennas connected
using RF cable
• Ethernet cabling: All configurations require a copper Ethernet Cat5e connection from the ODU
(Ethernet port) to the PoE
• Lightning protection unit (LPU): LPUs are installed in the ports copper drop cables to provide
transient voltage surge suppression
• Surge Suppression: The Gigabit Surge Suppressor provides a path to ground (Protective Earth)
that protects connected radio equipment from near-miss lightning strikes.
• Ground cables: ODU, LPUs and outdoor copper Ethernet cables are bonded to the site
grounding system using ground cables.
For more information about these components, including interfaces, specifications and Cambium
part numbers, refer to Chapter 2: System hardware.

Page 1-16
Chapter 1: Product description Wireless operation

Wireless operation

This section describes how the 450 Platform Family wireless link is operated, including modulation
modes, power control and security.

Time division duplexing


The system uses Time Division Duplexing (TDD) – one channel alternately transmits and receives
rather than using one channel for transmitting and a second channel for receiving. The radio link
operates on a single frequency channel in each direction using TDD. The AP operates in TDMA
mode to service multiple SMs. To accomplish TDD, the AP/BHM must provide sync to its SM/BHS.
Furthermore, collocated APs/BHMs must be synced together – an unsynchronized AP/BHM that
transmits during the receive cycle of a collocated AP/BHM can prevent a second AP/BHM from
being able to decode the signals from its APs/BHSs. In addition, across a geographical area,
APs/BHMs that can “hear” each other benefit from using a common sync to further reduce self-
interference within the network.
Modules use TDD on a common frequency to divide frames for uplink (orange) and downlink
(green) usage, as shown in the figure below.
For more information on synchronization configuration options, see GPS synchronization on page
2-48.

Figure 2 TDD frame division

Time

Page 1-17
Chapter 1: Product description Wireless operation

TDD frame parameters


The TDD burst duration varies depending on the following:
• Channel Bandwidth
• Cyclic Prefix
• Frame Period
• Frame configuration - Downlink Data
• Link operation – Dynamic Rate Adaptation

OFDM and channel bandwidth


The PMP/PTP 450 Platform Family transmits using Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing
(OFDM). This wideband signal consists of many equally spaced sub-carriers. Although each sub
carrier is modulated at a low rate using conventional modulation schemes, the resultant data rate
from the sub-carriers is high. OFDM works exceptionally over a Non-Line-of-Sight (NLoS) channel.
The channel bandwidth of the OFDM signal is configurable to one of the following values: 5, 7, 10,
15, 20, 30, and 40 MHz. Higher bandwidths provide greater link capacity at the expense of using
more bandwidth. Systems configured for a narrower channel bandwidth provide better receiver
sensitivity and can also be an appropriate choice in deployments where the amount of free
spectrum is limited.

Note
The channel bandwidth must be configured to the same value at both ends of the link.
Not all channel bandwidths are available in all regulatory bands.

Cyclic Prefix
OFDM technology uses a cyclic prefix, where a portion of the end of a symbol (slot) is repeated at
the beginning of the symbol (slot) to allow multi-pathing to settle before receiving the desired
data. A 1/16 cyclic prefix means that for every 16 bits of throughput data transmitted, an additional
bit is used. For your convenience, the 450 Platform Family ODUs have been locked to a 1/16 CP.

Frame Period
The frame period or frame duration is the time between the beginning of a frame and the end of
the frame. The 450 Platform Family supports two frame periods: 2.5 ms and 5 ms.

The 5ms frame period configuration provides higher throughput as a result of reduced frame
overhead during transmission. In turn, the 2.5 ms frame period configuration affords reduced
latency in the system, half of that introduced by the 5 ms frame configuration.

Page 1-18
Chapter 1: Product description Wireless operation

Frame configuration - Downlink Data


The percentage of frame assigned to transport downlink data. The downlink data specifies the
percentage of the aggregate throughput for the downlink (frames transmitted from the AP/BHM to
the subscriber). The configurable range is 15% to 85%.

Note
For all 450 platform APs, the maximum configurable range is 34% to 66% for 40 MHz
with 5 ms frame.

Link operation – Dynamic Rate Adapt


The 450 Platform Family ODUs offer eight levels or speeds of operation – 2X MIMO-B and 1X
MIMO-A (QPSK), 4X MIMO-B and 2X MIMO-A (16-QAM), 6x MIMO-B and 3X MIMO-A (64-QAM)
and 8X MIMO-B and 4X MIMO-A (256-QAM). If received power varies due to distance between the
AP/BHM and the SM/BHS or due to obstructions, or if interference affects the RF environment, the
system automatically and dynamically adjusts the links to the best operation level.
The system chooses its modulation rate dynamically, based on an internal ARQ (Automatic Repeat
reQuest) error control method. With ARQ, every data slot of every frame sent over the air (except
downlink broadcast) is expected to be acknowledged by the receiver, and if acknowledgement is
not received, the data is resent. The sending unit monitors these re-sends and adjusts the
modulation rate accordingly. It is normal to have links that change levels of operation as the RF
environment changes. Furthermore, the uplink or downlink portions of TDD duty cycle operate
independently.
The various modulation levels used by 450 Platform Family are shown in Table 11.

Table 11 Modulation levels


Rate MIMO-B MIMO-A

QPSK 2X MIMO-B 1X MIMO-A

16-QAM 4X MIMO-B 2X MIMO-A

64-QAM 6X MIMO-B 3X MIMO-A

256-QAM 8X MIMO-B 4X MIMO-A

Note
MIMO-A achieves half the throughput of MIMO-B but adds a combining diversity (gain)
which enhances the link budget or availability.

Page 1-19
Chapter 1: Product description Wireless operation

Encryption
The 450 Platform Family supports optional encryption for data transmitted over the wireless link.
The 450 Platform Family supports the following form of encryption for security of the wireless link:
AES (Advanced Encryption Standard): An over-the-air link encryption option that uses the Rijndael
algorithm and 128-bit keys and 256-bit key size to establish a higher level of security than DES.
AES products are certified as compliant with the Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS
197) in the U.S.A.
The default setting on an AP is "Disabled".

MIMO
Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) techniques provide protection against fading and increase
the probability that the receiver decodes a usable signal. When the effects of MIMO are combined
with those of OFDM techniques and a high link budget, there is a high probability of a robust
connection over a non-line-of-sight path.
The sub-features that comprises the MIMO techniques utilized in the 450 Platform Family ODUs
are:
• MIMO-A: This technique enables 450 Platform Family radio to use a scheme that optimizes
coverage by transmitting the same data over both antennas. This redundancy improves the
signal to noise ratio at the receiver making it more robust.
• MIMO-B: This technique provides the ability to double the throughput of a radio transmission
under proper RF conditions. Different data streams are transmitted simultaneously on two
different antennas.

MU-MIMO
Multiple-input multiple-output, or MIMO, is a range of technologies used to multiply the capacity
of a wireless connection without requiring more spectrum.
Although traditional MIMO techniques are focused on increasing the bandwidth available between
two wireless nodes, multi-user MIMO (MU-MIMO) applies these technologies to increase overall
wireless network capacity by allowing an access point to communicate wirelessly with more than
one wireless node at once.
A MU-MIMO access point features an array of antennas. When the AP decides to communicate
with multiple nodes at the same time, it creates multiple simultaneous beams each directed to a
specific node.
This is contrast to a traditional wireless system, where two wireless nodes cannot communicate on
the same channel to the same access point at the same time, without causing significant self-
interference and degrading the overall wireless network performance.

Page 1-20
Chapter 1: Product description Wireless operation

A MU-MIMO access point estimates and measures what a transmission from each wireless node
‘sounds like’, by applying knowledge of the wireless path characteristics between the access point
and node. Known as channel estimation, this process is of vital importance; without it, the access
point cannot distinguish properly between wireless nodes, affecting performance.
Channel estimation is achieved by the access point sending a specific signal to a wireless node,
which the node then reflects back. By measuring how the signal was received back from the node,
the access point can estimate the wireless conditions between itself and the node, and know to
expect these same conditions to be applied to other communications from that node. This is
known as channel sounding.
Channel estimation and sounding must be regularly repeated to ensure wireless network
performance remains high; the speed at which a system is able to accurately estimate the channel
has a large impact on performance.
Once channel estimation is completed for a wireless node, the MU-MIMO access point can
electrically tune each antenna to provide the highest performance for that node. The access point
uses beamforming to create a radio beam to that node which is tuned for optimum performance
and avoids beams directed to other nodes, reducing interference and helping to improve overall
wireless network capacity.
A MU-MIMO access point can communicate to multiple wireless nodes simultaneously using this
process. As the majority of nodes are unable to make full use of the whole access point capacity at
once, communicating with several nodes simultaneously can greatly improve the overall capacity
achieved in the wireless network.
.

Page 1-21
Chapter 1: Product description System management

System management

This section introduces the 450 Platform Family management system, including the web interface,
installation, configuration, alerts and upgrades.

Management agent
The 450 Platform Family radios are managed through an embedded management agent.
Management workstations, network management systems or PCs can be connected to this agent
using the module’s Ethernet port or over-the air (SM/BHS)
The management agent supports the following interfaces:
• Hypertext transfer protocol (HTTP)
• Hypertext transfer protocol secure (HTTPS)
• RADIUS authentication
• Simple network management protocol (SNMP) – v2c and v3
• Network time protocol (NTP)
• System logging (Syslog)
• Wireless Manager (WM) software
• Canopy Network Updater Tool (CNUT) software
• cnMaestro™

Web server
The 450 Platform Family management agent contains a web server. The web server supports
access via the HTTP/HTTPS interface.
Web-based management offers a convenient way to manage the 450 Platform Family radios from
a locally connected computer or from a network management workstation connected through a
management network, without requiring any special management software. The web and SNMP
are the interfaces supported for installation of 450 Platform Family radios and for the majority of
configuration management tasks.

Page 1-22
Chapter 1: Product description System management

Web pages
The web-based management interfaces provide comprehensive web-based fault, configuration,
performance and security management functions organized into the following groups:
Access Point or Backhaul Master:
• Home
• Configuration
• Statistics
• Tools
• Logs
• Accounts
• Quick Start
• Copyright

Subscriber Module or Backhaul Slave


• Home
• Configuration
• Statistics
• Tools
• Logs
• Accounts
• PDA
• Copyright

Identity-based user accounts


• When identity-based user accounts are configured, a security officer can define from one to
four user accounts, each of which may have one of the four possible roles:
• ADMINISTRATOR, who has full read and write permissions. This is the level of the root and
admin users, as well as any other administrator accounts that one of them creates.
• INSTALLER, who has permissions identical to those of ADMINISTRATOR except that the
installer cannot add or delete users or change the password of any other user.
• TECHNICIAN, who has permissions to modify basic radio parameters and view informational
web pages
• GUEST, who has no write permissions and only a limited view of General Status tab
• Admin, Installer and Tech accounts can be configured as READ-ONLY. This will allow the
account to only see the items.
See Managing module access by passwords for detailed information on account permissions.

Page 1-23
Chapter 1: Product description System management

Remote Authentication Dial-in User Service (RADIUS)


The PMP configuration of 450 Platform Family includes support for RADIUS (Remote
Authentication Dial In User Service) protocol functionality including:
• SM Authentication: Allows only known SMs onto the network (blocking “rogue” SMs), and can
be configured to ensure SMs are connecting to a known network (preventing SMs from
connecting to “rogue” APs). RADIUS authentication is used for SMs, but not used for APs.
• SM Configuration: Configures authenticated SMs with MIR (Maximum Information Rate), High
Priority, and VLAN (Virtual LAN) parameters from the RADIUS server when a SM registers to
an AP.
• User Authentication allows users to configure a separate User authentication server along
with the SM authentication server. If firmware is upgraded while using this functionality and
no User authentication servers are configured, then AP continues to use the SM authentication
server for User authentication
• SM Accounting provides support for RADIUS accounting messages for usage-based billing.
This accounting includes indications for subscriber session establishment, subscriber session
disconnection, and bandwidth usage per session for each SM that connects to the AP.
• Centralized AP and SM user name and password management: Allows AP and SM usernames
and access levels (Administrator, Installer, Technician and Read-Only) to be centrally
administered in the RADIUS server instead of on each radio and tracks access events
(logon/logoff) for each username on the RADIUS server. This accounting does not track and
report specific configuration actions performed on radios or pull statistics such as bit counts
from the radios. Such functions require an Element Management System (EMS) such as
Cambium Wireless Manager. This accounting is not the ability to perform accounting functions
on the subscriber/end user/customer account.
• Framed-IP-Address: Operators may use a RADIUS server to assign management IP addressing
to SM modules. SNMP
The management agent supports fault and performance management by means of an SNMP
interface. The management agent is compatible with SNMP v2c and SNMP v3 using Management
Information Base (MIB) files which are available for download from the Cambium Networks
Support website:
https://support.cambiumnetworks.com/files/ptp450
https://support.cambiumnetworks.com/files/pmp450/

Network Time Protocol (NTP)


The clock supplies accurate date and time information to the system. It can be set to run with or
without a connection to a network time server (NTP). It can be configured to display local time by
setting the time zone and daylight saving in the Time web page.
If an NTP server connection is available, the clock can be set to synchronize with the server time at
regular intervals. The 450 Platform Family radios may receive NTP data from a CMM4 module or
an NTP server configured in the system’s management network.

Page 1-24
Chapter 1: Product description System management

The Time Zone option is configurable on the AP’s/BHM’s Time Configuration page, and may be
used to offset the received NTP time to match the operator’s local time zone. When set on the
AP/BHM, the offset is set for the entire sector (AP/BHSs is notified of the current Time Zone upon
initial registration). If a Time Zone change is applied, the AP/BHSs are notified of the change in a
best effort fashion, meaning some AP/BHSs may not pick up the change until the next re-
registration. Time Zone changes are noted in the Event Log.
An AP/BHM which is receiving NTP date and time information from an NTP server or from a GPS
synchronization source may be used as an NTP server. Any client which has IP connectivity to the
BHM may request NTP date and time information from the AP/BHM. No additional configuration
(other than the AP/BHM receiving valid NTP data) is required to use the AP/BHM as an NTP server.

Wireless Manager (WM)


Cambium Networks Wireless Manager 4.0 is recommended for managing 450 Platform Family
networks. You can achieve better uptime through better visibility of your network with the
Cambium Wireless Manager. This network management software tool offers breakthrough map-
based visualization capabilities using embedded Google maps, and combined with advanced
configuration, provisioning, alerting and reporting features you can control your entire outdoor
wireless network including Point-to-Multipoint and Point-to-Point solutions as well as other SNMP
enabled devices. With its powerful user interface you can not only be able to control your
network's access, distribution and backhaul layers, but can also have visibility to WLAN sites and
be able to quickly launch indoor network management systems. Some key features of Wireless
Manager are:
• Template-Based Configuration: With Wireless Manager's user-defined templates you can
accelerate the process for the configuration of the devices you add to your network resulting in
quicker and easier deployments. The template-based functionality provides an automated way
to configure large numbers of network devices with just a few mouse clicks, and can be
scheduled to occur at any time via Wireless Manager's Task Scheduler.
• Ultralight Thin Client: With the growing mobile workforce it is important to have access to the
status of your network at any time. With Wireless Manager you can view the status and
performance of your entire wireless network via a compact web interface accessible by your
smart phone.
• Map-Based Visualization: Wireless Manager overlays sophisticated real-time information about
your network elements onto building layouts and dynamic Google maps. Visuals can be scaled
to view an entire city or building or a specific area, floor or link.
• High Availability Architecture Support: Wireless Manager offers a high availability option,
providing a highly reliable and redundant network management solution that ensures you
always have management access to your network.
• High Scalability: The enhanced Wireless Manager offers you server scalability with support for
up to 10,000 nodes as well as support for distributed server architecture.
Cambium’s Wireless Manager 4.0 available for download at:
https://www.cambiumnetworks.com/products/software-tools/wireless-manager/

Page 1-25
Chapter 1: Product description System management

Canopy Network Updater Tool (CNUT)


CNUT (Canopy Network Updater Tool) is the stand-alone software update tool for 450 Platform
Family ODUs. The CNUT 4.11.2 should be used for 450 Platform Family ODUs.
The Canopy Network Updater Tool has the following features:
• Automatically discovers all network elements
• HTTP and HTTPS
• Executes UDP command that initiates and terminates the Auto-update mode within APs/BHMs.
This command is both secure and convenient:
o For security, the AP/BHM accepts this command from only the IP address that specified in
the Configuration page of ODU.
o For convenience, Network Updater automatically sets this Configuration parameter in the
AP/BHM to the IP address of the Network Updater server when the server performs any of
the update commands.
• Allows you to choose among updating:
o Entire network.
o Only elements that you select.
o Only network branches that you select.
• Provides a Script Engine that you can use with any script which:
o The user can define.
o Cambium supplies.
CNUT is available at:
https://www.cambiumnetworks.com/products/management/cambium-network-updater-tool/

cnMaestro™
cnMaestro™ is a cloud-based or on-premises platform specialized for secure, end-to-end network
lifecycle management: inventory management, device onboarding, daily operations, and
maintenance. The cnMaestro wireless network manager simplifies device management by offering
full network visibility. Network operators can have a real-time view of their complete end-to-end
network and perform a full suite of wireless network management functions to optimize system
availability, maximize throughput, and meet emerging needs of business and residential
customers. In addition, the cnMaestro wireless network manager collects and displays compliance
with service level agreements.
To learn about cnMaestro™, please visit http://www.cambiumnetworks.com/products/software-
tools/cnmaestro/
See Configuring cnMaestroTM Connectivity on 7-252 for details.

Page 1-26
Chapter 1: Product description System management

Radio recovery mode


The 450 Platform Family recovery mode provides a means to recover from serious configuration
errors including lost or forgotten passwords and unknown IP addresses.

The recovery procedure for 450m/450i/450b series and 450 series ODUs differ due to difference in
hardwares. This procedure for 450i/450m Series is known as Radio Recovery Console and for 450
Series is known as Default mode (or Default/Override Plug).

Radio Recovery Console – 450i, 450b and 450m Series


The Radio Recovery Console mode supports:
• Restoring factory default IP address 169.254.1.1 and password
• Boot with factory default Canopy system software settings
• Load previously installed SW images
See Radio Recovery Console– PMP/PTP 450i/450b and PMP 450m on page 9-42.

Default Mode (or Default Plug) – 450 Series


A default plug is available to provide access to a module whose password and/or IP address have
been forgotten.
This plug allows the 450 Series ODUs to be accessed using IP address 169.254.1.1 and no
password. During the override session, you can assign any new IP address and set either or both
user passwords (display-only and/or full access) as well as make other parameter changes.
See Default Mode (or Default/Override Plug) - PMP/PTP 450 on page 9-44.

Page 1-27
Chapter 2: System hardware
This chapter describes the hardware components of a 450 Platform link.
The following topics are described in this chapter:
• System Components on page 2-2 describes system components of PTP and PMP including its
accessories
• Cabling on page 2-35 describes about various cables.
• Lightning protection unit (LPU) and grounding kit on page 2-43 describes about lightning
protection and grounding kit
• Antennas and antenna cabling on page 2-46 describes supported antennas and its accessories
• GPS synchronization on page 2-48 describes UGPS and CMM4.
• Ordering the components on page 2-64 specifies Cambium part numbers for 450 Platform
Family components

Page 2-1
Chapter 2: System hardware System Components

System Components

Point-to-Multipoint (PMP)
The PMP radio is a transceiver device. It is a connectorized or radiated outdoor unit containing all
the radio, networking, and surge suppression electronics. It can be purchased as:
• Access Point Module (AP)
• Subscriber Module (SM)

PMP 450 Platform Family Integrated or Connectorized ODU


The PMP 450i Series and PMP 450 Series ODUs are supplied in Integrated or Connectorized
configurations. The PMP 450m Series AP is supplied in Integrated configuration only.
See Table 2 PMP 450m Series hardware configurations on page 1-4
See Table 4 PMP/PTP 450i Series hardware configurations on page 1-6
See Table 6 PMP 450b Series hardware configurations on page 1-9
See Table 8 PMP/PTP 450 Series hardware configurations on page 1-12

Product variants
Table 12 PMP 450m Series variants

Variant Region Antenna Frequency Channel Max


Range Bandwidth EIRP

FCC

RoW 90° integrated


5 GHz 5150 – 5925 5, 10, 15, 20,
sector array, 14x14 42 dBm
PMP 450m AP EU MHz 30, 40 MHz
MIMO system,
IC

Page 2-2
Chapter 2: System hardware System Components

Table 13 PMP 450i Series variants

Variant Region Antenna Frequency Channel Max Tx


Range Bandwidth Power

900 MHz PMP 5, 7, 10, 15, 20


FCC Connectorized 902 - 928 MHz 25 dBm
450i AP MHz

FCC, RoW, Connectorized


3 GHz PMP Canada, 3300 – 3900 5, 7, 10, 15, 20,
25 dBm
450i AP RoW DES, Integrated 16 dBi MHz 30, 40 MHz
Europe

FCC, RoW, Connectorized


5 GHz Canada, 4900 – 5925 5, 10, 15, 20,
Integrated 16 dBi 27 dBm
PMP 450i AP RoW DES, MHz 30, 40 MHz
Europe 90 degree

Table 14 PMP 450b Series variants

Variant Region Antenna Frequency Channel Max Tx


Range Bandwidth Power

FCC, RoW, Integrated 16 dBi


5 GHz Canada, 4900 – 5925 5, 10, 15, 20,
27 dBm
PMP 450b SM RoW DES, MHz 30, 40 MHz
Integrated 23 dBi
Europe

Note
The Transmit power is limited based on regional setting.

Page 2-3
Chapter 2: System hardware System Components

Table 15 PMP 450 Series variants

Variant Region Antenna Frequency Channel Max Tx


Range Bandwidth Power

900 MHz PMP 5, 7, 10, 15, 20


FCC Connectorized 902 - 928 MHz 25 dBm
450 SM MHz

2.4 GHz PMP Connectorized 2400 – 2483.5 5, 10, 15, 20


FCC ISM 22 dBm
450 AP Integrated 18 dBi MHz MHz

2.4 GHz PMP Connectorized 2400 – 2483.5 5, 10, 15, 20


FCC ISM 22 dBm
450 SM Integrated 7 dBi MHz MHz

3.5 GHz PMP Connectorized 3300 – 3600 5, 7, 10, 15, 20,


FCC ISM 25 dBm
450 AP Integrated 16 dBi MHz 30, 40 MHz

Connectorized
3.5 GHz PMP 3300 – 3600 5, 7, 10, 15, 20,
FCC ISM Integrated 8 dBi 25 dBm
450 SM MHz 30, 40 MHz
Integrated 19 dBi

3.65 GHz PMP Connectorized 3500 – 3850 5, 7, 10, 15, 20,


FCC ISM 25 dBm
450 AP Integrated 16 dBi MHz 30, 40 MHz

Connectorized
3.65 GHz PMP 3500 – 3850 5, 7, 10, 15, 20,
FCC ISM Integrated 8 dBi 25 dBm
450 SM MHz 30, 40 MHz
Integrated 19 dBi

Connectorized 5, 10, 15, 20,


30, 40 MHz (5,
5.4/5.8 GHz FCC, RoW, 5470 – 5875
15 and 30 MHz 22 dBm
PMP 450 AP RoW DES Integrated 17 dBi MHz
not available in
DFS regions)

Connectorized 5, 10, 15, 20,


30, 40 MHz (5,
5.4/5.8 GHz FCC, ROW, Integrated 9 dBi 5470 – 5875
15 and 30 MHz 22 dBm
PMP 450 SM RoW DES MHz
not available in
Integrated 25 dBi
DFS regions)

Note
The Transmit power is limited based on regional setting.

Page 2-4
Chapter 2: System hardware System Components

Backhaul (PTP)
The Backhaul radio is a transceiver device. It is a connectorized or integrated outdoor unit
containing all the radio, networking, and surge suppression electronics. It can be configured as:
• Backhaul Master (BHM)
• Backhaul Slave (BHS)

PTP 450 Platform Family Integrated or Connectorized ODU


See Table 4 PMP/PTP 450i Series hardware configurations on page 1-6
See Table 8 PMP/PTP 450 Series hardware configurations on page 1-12

Product variants
Table 16 PTP 450i Series variants

Variant Region Antenna Frequency Channel Max Tx Notes


Range Bandwid Power
th

FCC, Connectorized
RoW, 5, 7, 10, Transmit power
3 GHz Canada, 3300 - 3900 15, 20, limited based
25 dBm
PTP 450i Row Integrated 23 dBi MHz 30, 40 on regional
DES, MHz setting
Europe

FCC, Connectorized
RoW, Transmit power
5, 10, 15,
5 GHz Canada, 4900 – 5925 limited based
20, 30, 27 dBm
PTP 450i Row Integrated 23 dBi MHz on regional
40 MHz
DES, setting
Europe

Page 2-5
Chapter 2: System hardware System Components

Table 17 PTP 450 Series variants

Variant Region Antenna Frequency Channel Max Tx


Range Bandwidth Power

900 MHz PTP 902 – 928 5, 7, 10, 15,


FCC Connectorized 25 dBm
450 BH MHz 20 MHz

Connectorized
5, 7, 10, 15,
3.5 GHz PTP 3300 – 3600
ROW Integrated 16 dBi 20, 30, 40 25 dBm
450 BH MHz
MHz
Integrated 19 dBi

Connectorized
5, 7, 10, 15,
3.65 GHz PTP 3500 – 3850
ROW Integrated 16 dBi 20, 30, 40 25 dBm
450 BH MHz
MHz
Integrated 19 dBi

Connectorized
5.4/5.8 GHz FCC, RoW, 5470 – 5875 5, 10, 15, 20,
Integrated 9 dBi 22 dBm
PTP 450 BH RoW DES MHz 30, 40 MHz
Integrated 25 dBi

Note
The Transmit power is limited based on regional setting.

Page 2-6
Chapter 2: System hardware System Components

450 Platform Family interfaces


PMP 450m Series interfaces – AP
The 450m Series AP interfaces is illustrated below.
Figure 3 PMP 450m Series interfaces

Carabiner clip

Ground
Lugs

SFP AUX PSU/Ethernet

Table 18 PMP 450m Series AP interface descriptions and cabling

Interface Function Cabling

Power-over-Ethernet, Ethernet
communications (management and data), RJ45 Cable
PSU/Ethernet
CMM5 sync-over-power synchronization See Table 100 on page 5-12
input

Aux/Sync GPS synchronization input and output,


UGPS power output
RJ 45 Cable
Audio tones See Table 101 on page 5-12
Data

SFP Read Ethernet communications


(management and data)

Ground Lugs For grounding the unit 10 AWG copper wire

Page 2-7
Chapter 2: System hardware System Components

Note
For PMP 450m AP, the Sync-Over-Power is supported with CMM5 only.
For PMP 450m AP, the Sync-Over-Power will not work with CMM4 like PMP 450/450i
Series.

Note
SFP kits (Single Mode Optical SFP Interface per ODU (part number C000065L008A),
Multi-mode Optical SFP Interface per ODU (part number C000065L009A), and
2.5GBASE-T Copper SFP Interface per ODU (part number C000065L011A)) are required
for SFP port connectivity.

PMP/PTP 450i Series interfaces – AP/SM/BH


The AP/SM/BH interfaces are illustrated below.
Figure 4 PMP/PTP 450i interfaces

Carabiner clip

Ground
Lug

RF port A Aux ENET


RF port B Gland

Page 2-8
Chapter 2: System hardware System Components

Table 19 PMP/PTP 450i Series - AP/SM/BH interface descriptions and cabling

Interface Function Cabling

Power-over-Ethernet, Ethernet
communications (management and data), RJ45 Cable
PSU/Ethernet
CMM sync-over-power synchronization See Table 100 on page 5-12
input

Aux/Sync GPS synchronization input and output,


UGPS power output
RJ 45 Cable
Audio tones See Table 101 on page 5-12
Data

RF Port A Vertical RF connection to antenna 50 ohm RF cable, N-type

RF Port B Horizontal RF connection to antenna 50 ohm RF cable, N-type

Ground Lugs For grounding the unit 10 AWG copper wire

Note
If the Aux port will be used, a second Ethernet Gland will need to be ordered (Part
Number: N000065L033A).

PMP 450b Mid-Gain Series interfaces - SM


The PMP 450b Series - SM interfaces are illustrated below.

Figure 5 PMP 450b Mid-Gain Series - SM interfaces

PSU/Ethernet Port

Audio AUX Port

Page 2-9
Chapter 2: System hardware System Components

Table 20 PMP 450b Series - SM (Mid-Gain) interface descriptions and cabling

Interface Function Cabling

Power-over-Ethernet, Ethernet
PSU/Ethernet RJ45 Cable
communications (management and data)

Standard 3.5 mm TRRS


Audio AUX Port 3.5 mm audio jack for alignment tone
headphones

PMP 450b High Gain Series interfaces - SM


The PMP 450b Series - SM interfaces are illustrated below.

Figure 6 PMP 450b Series - SM interfaces (High Gain)

Table 21 PMP 450b Series - SM (High Gain) interface descriptions and cabling

Interface Function Cabling

Power-over-Ethernet, Ethernet
PSU/Ethernet RJ45 Cable
communications (management and data)

Standard 3.5 mm TRRS


Audio AUX Port 3.5 mm audio jack for alignment tone
headphones

Page 2-10
Chapter 2: System hardware System Components

PMP/PTP 450 Series interfaces - AP


The PMP 450 Series - AP interfaces are illustrated below.

Figure 7 PMP/PTP 450 Series - AP interfaces

RF Port A Sync/Default Ethernet RF port B

Table 22 PMP/PTP 450 Series - AP interface descriptions and cabling – 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz

Interface Function Cabling

Power-over-Ethernet, Ethernet
PSU/Ethernet communications (management and RJ45 Cable
data)

Sync/Default GPS synchronization signaling,


RJ11 cable, default
provides power to UGPS module.
plug.
Default plug port.

2.4 GHz -45 degree RF connection to AP


antenna 50 ohm RF cable,
RF Port A
N-type
5 GHz Vertical RF connection to AP antenna

2.4 GHz +45 degree RF connection to AP


antenna 50 ohm RF cable,
RF Port B
5 GHz Horizontal RF connection to AP N-type
antenna

Ground Lugs For grounding the unit 10 AWG copper


wire

Page 2-11
Chapter 2: System hardware System Components

PMP/PTP 450 Series interfaces – SM/BH


The PMP 450 Series SM/BH interfaces are illustrated below.

Figure 8 PMP/PTP 450 Series – SM/BH interfaces

Ethernet Sync/Default

Page 2-12
Chapter 2: System hardware System Components

Figure 9 PMP/PTP 450 Series – SM/BH Connectorized interfaces

External antenna
cable path A
(labeled “A”)

External antenna
cable path B
(labeled “B”)

Ground (connectorized models)

Note
As per Underwriters Laboratory (UL) guidelines, the Ground Lug on the radiated SM is
not required.

Page 2-13
Chapter 2: System hardware System Components

Figure 10 PMP 450d Series - SM Integrated Dish

Figure 11 PMP 450 Series – SM 3 GHz Integrated

Figure 12 PTP 450 Series – BHM/BHS

Page 2-14
Chapter 2: System hardware System Components

ATEX/HAZLOC variants
PTP/PMP 450i series products are available in ATEX/Hazloc variants for operation in locations
where explosive gas hazards exist, as defined by Hazloc (USA) and ATEX (Europe). ATEX/HAZLOC
variants are similar to the standard product except that:
• ODUs are supplied with the Full capacity license
• The frequency range is restricted to 4940 MHz to 5850 MHz
• The maximum EIRP generated by ODU is restricted to comply with the ATEX and HAZLOC
standards
In order to meet specific radio regulations in the USA, Canada and the EU, Cambium supplies
products approved for USA, Canada, EU and the rest of the world under different models and part
numbers. These models and part numbers are shown in Table 64 and Table 65.

Page 2-15
Chapter 2: System hardware System Components

Diagnostic LEDs
The diagnostic LEDs of 450 Platform Family ODUs are as shown below.

Note
The colors shown in the diagram may differ from the actual color displayed by the
AP/BHM, depending on its current status.

AP/BHM LEDs
The diagnostic LEDs report the information about the status of the AP/BHM.

Figure 13 AP/BHM diagnostic LEDs, viewed from unit front

ODU LED Display LED Labels

PMP 450m Series - AP

MAIN AUX
GPS/3 SES/2 SYN/1 PWR
LNK+ACT/5 LNK+ACT/4

PMP/PTP 450i Series - AP/BHM

MAIN LNK/5 ACT/4 GPS/3 SES/2 SYN/1 PWR

PMP/PTP 450 Series - AP/BHM

MAIN LNK/5 ACT/4 GPS/3 SES/2 SYN/1 PWR

Page 2-16
Chapter 2: System hardware System Components

Table 23 AP/BHM LED descriptions

LED Color when active Status Notes


information
provided

DC power Always lit after 10-20 seconds of power


PWR Red
on.

Presence of
SYN/1 Yellow -
sync

SES/2 Green Unused -

Lit when the AP/BHM is getting a sync


GPS/3 Red Pulse of sync pulse from a GPS source goes along
with SYN/1

Presence of
For 450 and 450i Series data activity Flashes during data transfer. Frequency
ACT/4
Yellow on the of flash is not a diagnostic indication.
Ethernet link

Flashes to indicate Ethernet activity on


AUX For 450m Series Aux port link Aux port. Indicates speed based on the
LNK + Red/ Green speed and following colors:
ACT/4 (bi-colored for 10/100) activity 10Base-T : Red
100Base-T : Green

Continuously lit when link is present.


For 450i Series Indicates speed based on the following
Red/ Green/Orange Activity on colors:

(bi-colored for Main port link 10Base-T : Red


10/100/1000) 100Base-T : Green
1000Base-T : Orange
MAIN
Continuously lit when link is present.
LNK/5 For 450 AP
10Base-T : Orange
Orange/Green/Yellow
100Base-T : Green
(10/100/1000)
Ethernet link 1000Base-T : Yellow

Continuously lit when link is present.


For 450 BHM
10Base-T : Green
Green
100Base-T : Green

For 450m Series


MAIN Main port link
Red/ Green/Orange Flashes to indicate data transfer speed
LNK + speed and
(bi-colored for and activity.
ACT/5 activity
10/100/1000)

Page 2-17
Chapter 2: System hardware System Components

SM/BHS LEDs
The SM/BHS LEDs provide different status of radio based on the operating modes. A SM/BHS in
“operating” mode registers and passes traffic normally. A SM/BHS in “aiming” mode does not
register or pass the traffic, but displays (via LED panel) the strength of received radio signals
(based on radio channel selected via Tools -> Alignment).

Figure 14 AP/BH diagnostic LEDs, viewed from unit front

ODU LED Display LED Labels

PMP/PTP 450i Series - SM/BHS

MAIN LNK/5 ACT/4 GPS/3 SES/2 SYN/1 PWR

PMP 450b Mid-Gain Series - SM

LNK/SPD/ STDBY/
GPS/3 SES/2 SYN/1
ACT/4 PWR

PMP 450b High Gain Series - SM

LNK/SPD/ STDBY/
GPS/3 SES/2 SYN/1
ACT/4 PWR

PMP/PTP 450 Series - SM/BHS

MAIN LNK/5 ACT/4 GPS/3 SES/2 SYN/1 PWR

Page 2-18
Chapter 2: System hardware System Components

Table 24 SM/BHS LED descriptions

Status information provided

LED Color when SM / BHS in SM / BHS in Notes


active “Operating” “Aiming” Mode
Mode
Always lit after 10-20
PWR Red
seconds of power on.

DC power DC power Flashes Yellow during boot-


STDBY/ up.
Yellow/Blue
PWR Flashes Blue when
operating.
These three LEDs Lit when SM/BHS is in sync
SYN/1 Yellow Presence of sync
act as a bar graph with an AP/BHM.
to indicate the
Lit when SM/BHS is in
SES/2 Green Session Indicator relative quality of
session.
alignment. As
power level
improves during
GPS/3 Red Unused alignment, more Unused
of these LEDs are
lit.
Presence of data Presence of data
Flashes during data transfer.
activity activity
ACT/4 Yellow Frequency of flash is not a
on the Ethernet on the Ethernet
diagnostic indication.
link link

Flashes during data transfer.


For 450b Series Frequency of flash is not a
LNK/SP Red/Green/Ora diagnostic indication.
Ethernet Link Ethernet Link
D/ACT/4 nge 10Base-T : Red
(10/100/1000) 100Base-T : Green
1000Base-T : Orange
For 450i Series Flashes during data transfer.
Red/ Green/ 10Base-T : Red
Orange Ethernet link Ethernet link
MAIN 100Base-T : Green
(bi-colored for
LNK/5 10/100/1000) 1000Base-T : Orange

For 450 Series Continuously lit when link is


Ethernet link Ethernet link
Green present.

Page 2-19
Chapter 2: System hardware System Components

Operating Mode
• Scanning: If the SM/BHS is not registered to AP/BHM, then these three LEDs cycle on and off
from left to right (SYN/1, SES/2 and GPS/3).
• Ethernet Link:
o For 450m AP, the MAIN LNK + ACT/5 LED is active when the Main port link is present and
the AUX LNK + ACT/4 LED is active when the Aux port link is present.
o For 450/450i AP/BHM, the MAIN LNK/5 LED is lit continuously when the link is present.
o For 450/450i SM/BHS, the MAIN LNK/5 LED is lit continuously when the link is present.
• Data Transfer:
o For 450m AP, the MAIN LNK + ACT/5 LED flashes to indicate data transfer speed and
activity on the Main port and the AUX LNK + ACT/4 LED flashes to indicate data transfer
speed and activity on the Aux port.
o For 450/450i AP/BHM, the ACT/4 LED flashes during data transfer.
o For 450/450i SM/BHS, the ACT/4 LED flashes during data transfer.
o For 450b SM, the LNK/SPD/ACT/4 LED flashes during data transfer.

Aiming Mode
The 3 LEDs (SYN/1, SES/2, and GPS/3) are turned into a 3-position bar graph. The more LEDs that
are lit, the better the received power the module is seeing. The colors of the LEDS have no
particular meaning other than to assist is distinguishing one position from the next.

Power supply options


The 450 Platform Family ODUs are powered over its Main Ethernet cable using Power Over
Ethernet (POE). The power injector is connected to the ODU and network terminating equipment
using Cat5e cable with RJ45 connectors.

Power supply – PMP 450m Series


The PMP 450m Series - AP supports powering from AC+DC Enhanced Power Injector (see AC+DC
Enhanced Power Injector on page 2-23)

PSU part numbers

Table 25 PSU part numbers for PMP 450m AP

Cambium description Cambium part number

AC+DC Enhanced Power Injector C000065L002C

Page 2-20
Chapter 2: System hardware System Components

Power supply – PMP/PTP 450i Series


The PMP/PTP 450i Series supports powering from the following powering sources:
• Power Supply, 60 W, 56 V with 1000BASE-T or GigE
• AC+DC Enhanced Power Injector
• Power over Ethernet midspan, 60 W, -48 VDC Input
• CMM4 with external 56 V power supply and CMM4 to 450i Series ODU cable (Dongle)
• IEEE802.3at power injector

Note
The 900 MHz SM is based off of the 450 Series , please see Power supply –
PMP/PTP 450 Series on page 2-27.

Warning
Always use an appropriately rated and approved AC supply cord-set in
accordance with the regulations of the country of use.
Warning
The PMP 450 Ruggedized High Gain Integrated Subscriber Module (Cambium
part numbers C035045C014A and C036045C014A), while encapsulated in a 450i-
type enclosure, contains 450 circuitry which must be powered via 30
VDC. Powering these SMs with a 56 VDC will damage the device.

Please refer to Cabling on Page 2-35 for details on maximum cable lengths between power injector
and PMP/PTP 450i.

PSU part numbers

Table 26 PSU part numbers for PMP/PTP 450i Series

Cambium description Cambium part number

Power supply, 60 W, 56 V with Gbps support N000065L001B

AC+DC Enhanced Power Injector C000065L002C

Line Cord, Fig 8 – US N000065L003A

Line Cord, Fig 8 – UK N000065L004A

Line Cord, Fig 8 – EU N000065L005A

Power over Ethernet midspan, 60 W, -48 VDC Input N000000L036A

Power supply, 30 W, 56 V – Gbps support N000000L034A

Page 2-21
Chapter 2: System hardware System Components

AC Power Injector N000065L001B

The AC Power Injector interfaces are shown in Figure 15 and described in Table 27.

Figure 15 AC Power Injector interfaces

Table 27 AC Power Injector interface functions

Interface Function

AC power in AC power input (main supply)

ODU RJ45 socket for connecting Cat5e cable to ODU

LAN RJ45 socket for connecting Cat5e cable to network

Power (green) LED Power supply detection

Page 2-22
Chapter 2: System hardware System Components

AC+DC Enhanced Power Injector C000065L002C

The AC+DC Enhanced Power Injector interfaces are shown in Figure 16 and described in Table 28.

Figure 16 AC+DC Enhanced Power Injector interfaces

AC Power Input

DC Out and DC In ports


LEDs

ODU Port LAN Port

Page 2-23
Chapter 2: System hardware System Components

Table 28 AC+DC Enhanced Power Injector interface functions

Interface Function

100-240V 47-63Hz 1.7A AC power input (main supply)

DC In Alternative DC power supply input

DC Out DC power output to a second PSU (for power supply redundancy) or


to a NIDU

ODU RJ45 socket for connecting Cat5e cable to ODU

LAN RJ45 socket for connecting Cat5e cable to network

Power - AC (green) LED Indicates power is applied at the AC power input

Power - DC (green) LED Indicates power is applied at the DC In port

Ethernet (yellow) LED Detects Ethernet traffic and it is used with PTP650 and PTP700
families only. It does not operate with the 450 platform products.

Note
The earlier power injector models only had a single power LED that combined
the AC+DC indications.

Page 2-24
Chapter 2: System hardware System Components

-48 VDC Power Injector N000000L036A

The DC Power Injector interfaces are shown in Figure 17 and described in Table 29.

Figure 17 -48 V DC Power Injector interfaces

Table 29 -48V DC Power Injector interfaces

Interface Function

DC input 36 to 60V, 2A

RJ 45 Sockets Two (Data In and Data & Power Out)

LEDs Two (AC and Port)

Page 2-25
Chapter 2: System hardware System Components

Power supply – PMP 450b Series


The PMP 450b Series support powering from the following powering sources:
• Gigabit Enet Capable Power Supply – 20 to 32 V DC, 15W
• CMM4 with external 29 V power supply

Figure 18 -20 to 32 VDC Power Injector interfaces

Table 30 -Power Injector interfaces

Interface Function

PSU/Ethernet 20 to 32 VDC, 2A

PSU part numbers

Table 31 PSU part numbers for PMP 450b SM

Cambium description Cambium part number

Gigabit Enet Capable Power Supply - 20 - 32VDC, 15W N000900L001C

Page 2-26
Chapter 2: System hardware System Components

Power supply – PMP/PTP 450 Series


The PMP/PTP 450 Series support powering from the following powering sources:
• Gigabit Enet Capable Power Supply – 30 VDC, 15W
• CMM4 with external 29 V power supply

Warning
The PMP 450 Ruggedized High Gain Integrated Subscriber Module (Cambium part
numbers C035045C014A and C036045C014A), while encapsulated in a 450i-type
enclosure, contains 450 circuitry which must be powered via 30VDC. Powering these
SMs with a 56 VDC will damage the device.

PSU part numbers

Table 32 PSU part numbers for PMP/PTP 450 Series

Cambium description Cambium part number

Gigabit Enet Capable Power Supply - 30VDC, 15W N000900L001C

Cable, UL Power Supply Cord Set, US N000900L007A

Cable, UL Power Supply Cord Set, EU N000900L008A

Cable, UL Power Supply Cord Set, UK N000900L009A

Cable, UL Power Supply Cord Set, Brazil N000900L010A

Gigabit Enet Capable Power Supply

The Gigabit Enet Capable power supply interfaces are described in Table 33. This power supply
requires procurement of an AC line cord that connects the outlet of the same (using IEC-60320
Type 5 connector). A list of available power supply cord options from Cambium Networks are
given in Table 32.

Table 33 –Gigabit Enet Capable power supply

Interface Function

AC Input 90-264 VAC, 0.5A rms @120VAC/ 0.25A rms @240VAC, 47 to 63 Hz

DC Output 30.0 Vdc +/-5%, 15W, 500 mA max

RJ 45 Sockets Two (Data In and Data & Power Out)

LEDs Green, :LED Intensity determined by Level 5 efficiency

Page 2-27
Chapter 2: System hardware System Components

Figure 19 Gigabit Enet Capable power supply

Page 2-28
Chapter 2: System hardware System Components

ODU mounting brackets & accessories


The list of supported brackets is provided in Table 34.
• The "Tilt bracket assembly" is the recommended bracket for the AP, SM or BH integrated units.
• The "Mounting Bracket (Connectorized)" can be used where a low profile and ease of assembly
of Connectorized AP, SM or BH is required.
• The "Mounting Bracket (Integrated)" provide a wider range of adjustment for AP, SM and BH
integrated devices.

Table 34 Accessories part numbers

Cambium description Cambium part number

Mounting brackets

Tilt Bracket Assembly N000045L002A

Mounting Bracket (Integrated) N000065L031A

Mounting Bracket (Connectorized) N000065L032A

Miscellaneous

Ethernet cable adapter for CMM4 (Dongle) N000045L001A

RJ-45 Gland Spare – PG16 style (QTY 10) N000065L033A

Blanking Plug Pack (Qty 10) N000065L036A

Lightning protection
The 450 Platform Family supports the lightning protection units listed in Table 35.
The LPU offers the highest level of protection and is the recommended device. Where low cost
deployment is essential, for example for SM in residential application, the Gigabit Surge
Suppressor may be used instead.

Table 35 Lightning protection part numbers

Cambium description Cambium part number

450 Series (Including 450b and 450d)

Surge Suppressor (30 VDC) 600SSH

450i and 450m Series

LPU and Grounding Kit (1 kit per ODU) C000065L007B

Gigabit Surge Suppressor (56 VDC) C000000L033A

Page 2-29
Chapter 2: System hardware ODU interfaces

ODU interfaces

PMP 450m Series AP


These interfaces are described in Table 37.

Figure 20 PMP 450m Series - AP rear interfaces

Ground Lug LED SFP Aux PSU (Main) Ground Lug

Table 36 PMP 450m Series – AP rear interfaces

Port name Connector Interface Description

PSU (Main) RJ45 PoE input Power over Ethernet (PoE).

10/100/1000 BaseT Ethernet Data

Aux RJ45 10/100 BaseT Ethernet Data

PoE output Standard IEEE802.3at PoE.

Sync input/output Connection and powering of UGPS


Sync input

SFP SFP 2.5 Gbps Copper and 1 Data and Management Services.
Gbps Fiber Ethernet Plug-in SFP module must be
purchased separately.

Page 2-30
Chapter 2: System hardware ODU interfaces

Ground Lugs 10 AWG copper wire For grounding the unit

PMP/PTP 450i
The Ethernet and Sync/AUX ports are on the rear of the integrated and connectorized ODUs
(Figure 21). These interfaces are described in Table 37.

Figure 21 PMP/PTP 450i Series - ODU rear interfaces

LED

Ground Lug Ground Lug

Aux
Main

RF port B RF port A

Table 37 PMP/PTP 450i Series – ODU rear interfaces

Port name Connector Interface Description

Main PSU RJ45 PoE input Power over Ethernet (PoE).

10/100/1000BASE-T Data
Ethernet

Sync/AUX RJ45 10/100/1000BASE-T Data (see Note below)


Ethernet

PoE output Standard IEEE802.3at PoE.

Sync input/output Connection and powering of UGPS


Sync input

Page 2-31
Chapter 2: System hardware ODU interfaces

The front of the connectorized ODU (Figure 22 PMP/PTP 450i Series – Connectorized ODU antenna
interfaces) provides N type female connectors for RF cable interfaces to antennas with ports A and
B for vertical and horizontal polarization respectively.

Figure 22 PMP/PTP 450i Series – Connectorized ODU antenna interfaces

Page 2-32
Chapter 2: System hardware ODU interfaces

PMP 450b Mid-Gain SM


The Ethernet and AUX ports are on the rear of the integrated and connectorized ODUs (Figure 23).
These interfaces are described in Table 38.

Figure 23 PMP 450b Mid-Gain SM - ODU rear interfaces

Table 38 PMP 450b Mid-Gain SM – ODU rear interfaces

Port name Connector Interface Description

PSU/Ethernet RJ45 PoE input Power over Ethernet (PoE).


Port
10/100/1000BASE-T Data
Ethernet

Audio AUX Standard Alignment tone input 3.5 mm audio jack for alignment
Port 3.5 mm tone
headphones

Page 2-33
Chapter 2: System hardware ODU interfaces

PMP 450b High Gain SM


The Ethernet and AUX ports are on the rear of the integrated and connectorized ODUs (Figure 23).
These interfaces are described in Table 38.

Figure 24 PMP 450b High Gain SM - ODU rear interfaces

Table 39 PMP 450b High Gain SM – ODU rear interfaces

Port name Connector Interface Description

PSU/Ethernet RJ45 PoE input Power over Ethernet (PoE).


Port
10/100/1000BASE-T Data
Ethernet

Audio AUX Standard Alignment tone input 3.5 mm audio jack for alignment
Port 3.5 mm tone
headphones

Page 2-34
Chapter 2: System hardware Cabling

Cabling

Ethernet standards and cable lengths


All configurations require a copper Ethernet connection from the ODU (Main PSU port) to the
Power supply.

Table 40 PSU drop cable length restrictions

System configuration Maximum cable length (m/ft)

Power supply PoE powered device From power supply From ODU to PoE
on AUX/SYNC port to ODU device on AUX/SYNC
port

Power supply (30W) None 100 m N/A

IEEE 802.3at Type 2 Not supported

AC Power Injector (60W) None 100 m N/A

IEEE 802.3at Type 2 100 m in total

AC+DC enhanced Power None 100 m N/A


Injector
IEEE 802.3at Type 2 100 m in total

-48 V DC power injector None 100 m N/A

IEEE 802.3at Type 2 100 m in total

CMM4 with 56 V supply None 100 m N/A

IEEE 802.3at Type 2 Not supported

IEEE802.3at compliant None 100 m N/A


supply
IEEE 802.3at Type 2 Not supported

Note
The Ethernet connectivity for CMM4 requires the part “Ethernet cable adapter for
CMM4 – N000045L001A”.

Page 2-35
Chapter 2: System hardware Cabling

Outdoor copper Cat5e Ethernet cable


Outdoor Cat5e cable is used for all connections that terminate outside the building. For example,
connections between the ODU, surge suppressors (if installed), UGPS receivers (if installed) and
the power supply injector. This is known as a “drop cable” (Figure 25).
The following practices are essential to the reliability and longevity of cabled connections:
• Use only shielded cables and connectors to resist interference and corrosion.
• For vertical runs, provide cable support and strain relief.
• Include a 2 ft (0.6 m) service loop on each end of the cable to allow for thermal expansion and
contraction and to facilitate terminating the cable again when needed.
• Include a drip loop to shed water so that most of the water does not reach the connector at the
device.
• Properly crimp all connectors.
• Use dielectric grease on all connectors to resist corrosion.
Order Superior Essex type BBDGe cable from Cambium Networks (Table 41). Other lengths of this
cable are available from Superior Essex.

Figure 25 Outdoor drop cable

Table 41 Drop cable part numbers

Cambium description Cambium part number

1000 ft Reel Outdoor Copper Clad CAT5E WB3175

328 ft (100 m) Reel Outdoor Copper Clad CAT5E WB3176

Page 2-36
Chapter 2: System hardware Cabling

SFP module kits


SFP module kits allow connection of a PMP 450 Series ODU to a network over an Optical Gigabit
Ethernet interface (1000BASE-LX or 1000BASE-SX) full-duplex mode.

Note
PMP 450m supports Fiber SFPs from system release 15.0.3.

Order SFP module kits from Cambium Networks (Table 42).

Table 42 SFP module kit part numbers

Cambium description Cambium part number

Single Mode Optical SFP Interface per ODU C000065L008A

Multi-mode Optical SFP Interface per ODU C000065L009A

2.5GBASE-T Copper SFP Interface per ODU C000065L011A

To compare the capabilities of the two optical SFP modules, refer to Table 43 and Table 44.

Table 43 Single Mode Optical SFP Interface per ODU (part number C000065L008)

Core/ Mode Bandwidth at Maximum Insertion loss


cladding 1310 nm length of optical (dB)
(microns) (MHz/km) interface

62.5/125 Multi 500 550 m (1800 ft) 1.67

50/125 Multi 400 550 m (1800 ft) 0.07

50/125 Multi 500 550 m (1800 ft) 1.19

10/125 Single N/A 5000 m (16400 ft) 0.16

Table 44 Multi-mode Optical SFP Interface per ODU (part number C000065L009)

Core/ Mode Bandwidth at Maximum Insertion loss


cladding 850 nm (MHz/km) length of optical (dB)
(microns) interface

62.5/125 Multi 160 220 m (720 ft) 2.38

62.5/125 Multi 200 275 m (900 ft) 2.6

50/125 Multi 400 500 m (1640 ft) 3.37

50/125 Multi 500 550 m (1800 ft) 3.56

The upgrade kits contain the following components:

Page 2-37
Chapter 2: System hardware Cabling

• Optical SFP transceiver module (Figure 26)


• Long EMC strain relief cable gland (Figure 27)
• The Ethernet SFP Module Installation Guide
• License key instructions and an entitlement key

Figure 26 Optical SFP transceiver module

Figure 27 Long cable gland

Page 2-38
Chapter 2: System hardware Cabling

Main Ethernet port


The PoE cable pinout diagram for Main port is given below.

Table 45 Main port PoE cable pinout

Ethernet PoE input


RJ45 pin Interface
description description

1 +TxRx0
+Ve or -Ve
2 –TxRx0

3 +TxRx1
+Ve or –Ve
6 1000 BaseT –TxRx1
Ethernet with
4 PoE In +TxRx2
+Ve or –Ve
5 –TxRx2

7 +TxRx3
+Ve or –Ve
8 –TxRx3

Note
The PoE input on the Main port accepts any polarity.

Aux port
Table 46 Aux port PoE cable pinout

PoE output
RJ45 pin Interface Signal description
description

1 +TxRx0
100 BaseT -Ve
2 Ethernet with –TxRx0

3 PoE Out (see +TxRx1


note below) +Ve
6 –TxRx1

GPS power out, Alignment


4
tone out, GPS data out

5 GPS and GPS data in N/A


alignment tone
7 GPS 0v

8 GPS Sync in

Page 2-39
Chapter 2: System hardware Cabling

Note
PMP 450m Series - AP Aux port supports only alignment and sync functionalities in
current 15.0/15.0.3 release.

Note
If the Aux port will be used, a second Ethernet gland will need to be ordered (Part
Number: N000065L033A).

Aux port to alignment tone headset wiring


A standard 32 ohms stereo headset can be connected to the AUX port to use the audio alignment
tool. The diagrams of the adapters for RJ45 and RJ12 are provided in Figure 28 and Figure 29
respectively. The recommended values for both resistors are 220 ohm, 0.25W. Different resistor
values can be used to optimize the level of the audio signal depending on the headset
characteristics and the level of ambient noise.

Figure 28 Alignment Tone Cable

Resistors
Left / tip
#8
Pin 7
220 Ω
Right / ring
Pin 4 220 Ω

Sleeve /Common

Table 47 Aux port PoE cable pinout

RJ45 pin Jack socket


Signal description Serial component
(AUX port) (to jack plug of headset)

220 ohms resistor Ring


4 Alignment tone out
220 ohm resistor Tip

7 GPS 0v None Sleeve

Page 2-40
Chapter 2: System hardware Cabling

Figure 29 RJ12 Alignment Tone Cable

#8 Pin 5 Left / tip

Right / ring
Pin 6

Table 48 RJ12 Aux port PoE cable pinout

RJ12 pin (AUX Jack socket


Signal description
port) (to jack plug of headset)

5 Alignment tone out Tip

6 Alignment tone out Ring

Alternatively, a readymade headset adapter can be ordered from Best-Tronics


(http://btpa.com/Cambium-Products/) with the following part number:

Table 49 Alignment tone adapter third party product details

Reference Product description

BT-1277 Headset alignment cable (RJ-45) for the PMP/PTP 450i Series products

BT-0674 Headset alignment cable (RJ-12) for the PMP/PTP 450 Series products.

Page 2-41
Chapter 2: System hardware Cabling

RJ45 connectors and spare glands


RJ45 connectors are required for plugging Cat5e cables into ODUs, LPUs, PSUs and other devices.
Order RJ45 connectors and crimp tool from Cambium Networks (Table 50).
The ODU is supplied with one environmental sealing gland for the drop cable. This gland is
suitable for cable diameters from 5 mm to 9 mm.

Figure 30 Cable gland (part number #N000065L033)

Table 50 RJ45 connector and spare gland part numbers

Cambium description Cambium part number

Tyco/AMP, Mod Plug RJ45, 100 pack WB3177

Tyco/AMP Crimp Tool WB3211

RJ-45 Spare Grounding Gland - PG16 size (Qty. 10) N000065L033

Page 2-42
Chapter 2: System hardware Cabling

Ethernet cable testing


This section describes a procedure for testing the RJ45 Ethernet cables used for Main and AUX
port connectivity on 450i and 450m radios.
To test a cable, perform the following instructions:
1. Check the resistances of the cable and radio installation using a digital multimeter (DMM).
2. Disconnect the drop cable from the power source (EPI or mains adapter) first; keep the
radio connected and test the resistances looking towards the radio. Test access can be
made via any of the following:
• Directly onto the pins of the RJ45 plug.
• Using a commercially available RJ45 breakout board.

Measure between Approximate resistance Example

Wire 1 and wire 2 1 ohm + 2 ohms per 10m of cable For a 20m cable:

Wire 3 and wire 6 Maximum difference between Approximate resistance


any two readings 0.3 ohms + 0.3
Wire 4 and wire 5 = 1 ohm + 2x 2 ohms
ohms per 10m of cable
Wire 7 and wire 8 A cable with a single LPU but no = 5 ohms
radio will read about 3,600 ohms. Maximum difference between
A cable with a single 1000SS but readings
no radio will read about 7,200 = 0.3 ohms + 2x 0.3 ohms
ohms.
= 0.9 ohms

Wire 1 and wire 3 > 20 Kohms

Wire 1 and wire 4

Wire 1 and wire 7

Wire 3 and wire 4

Wire 3 and wire 7

Wire 4 and wire 7

Note
These figures should be indicative only rather than hard limits. The measurement must
be done with a low-voltage DMM, not a high-voltage insulation tester.

Page 2-43
Chapter 2: System hardware Lightning protection unit (LPU) and grounding kit

Lightning protection unit (LPU) and grounding kit

450i and 450m Series LPUs provide transient voltage surge suppression for ODU installations.
Each cable requires two LPUs, one near the ODU and the other near the linked device, usually at
the building entry point (Table 51).

Table 51 LPU and grounding kit contents

Lightning protection units (LPUs) ODU to top LPU drop cable (600 mm)
LPU grounding point nuts and washers EMC strain relief cable glands

U-bolts, nuts and washers for mounting LPUs ODU to top LPU ground cable (M6-M6)

Bottom LPU ground cable (M6-M10) ODU to ground cable (M6-M10

Page 2-44
Chapter 2: System hardware Lightning protection unit (LPU) and grounding kit

One LPU and grounding kit (Table 51) is required for the PSU drop cable connection to the ODU. If
the ODU is to be connected to an auxiliary device, one additional LPU and grounding kit is
required for the Aux drop cable. Order the kits from Cambium Networks (Table 52).

Table 52 LPU and grounding kit part number

Cambium description Cambium part number

Aux ports LPU and Grounding Kit (One Kit Per End) C000065L007B

Cable grounding kit


Copper drop cable shields must be bonded to the grounding system in order to prevent lightning-
strike arcing (resulting in fire risk and damage to equipment).
One grounding kit (Figure 31) is required for each grounding point on the cable. Order cable
grounding kits from Cambium Networks (Table 53).

Caution
To provide adequate protection, all grounding cables must be a minimum size of 10
mm2 csa (8AWG), preferably 16 mm2 csa (6AWG), or 25 mm2 csa (4AWG).

Figure 31 Cable grounding kit

Table 53 Cable grounding kit part numbers

Cambium description Cambium part number

Cable Grounding Kits For 1/4" And 3/8" Cable 01010419001

Page 2-45
Chapter 2: System hardware Antennas and antenna cabling

Antennas and antenna cabling

Antenna requirements
Each connectorized ODU requires one external antenna (normally dual-polar).
For connectorized units operating in the USA or Canada 900 MHz, 4.9 GHz, 5.1 GHz, 5.2 GHz, 5.4
GHz or 5.8 GHz bands, choose external antennas which are recommended by Cambium Networks.
Do not install any other antennas.

Supported external AP antennas


The recommended AP external antennas are listed in Table 54.

Table 54 List of AP external antennas

Cambium description Cambium part number

900 MHz 13 dBi 65 degree Sector Antenna (Dual Slant) N009045D001A

5 GHz Horizontal and Vertical Polarization Antenna for 90 Degree 85009324001


Sector

5 GHz Horizontal and Vertical Polarization Antenna for 60 Degree 85009325001


Sector

Note
LINKPlanner, Cambium Networks, planning tool, contains an up-to-date, exhaustive
list of antennas that can be used with Cambium Products.

Supported external BH/SM antenna


The recommended PTP 450i Series BH or PMP 450/450i Series SM external antenna is
listed in Table 55.

Table 55 PTP 450i Series BH or PMP 450/450i Series SM external antenna

Cambium description Cambium part number

900 MHz 12 dBi gain directional antenna (Dual Slant) N009045D003A

Page 2-46
Chapter 2: System hardware Antennas and antenna cabling

RF cable and connectors


RF cable of generic type LMR-400 is required for connecting the ODU to the antenna. N type male
connectors are required for connecting the RF cables to the connectorized ODU. Two connectors
are required per ODU. Use weatherproof connectors, preferably ones that are supplied with
adhesive lined heat shrink sleeves that are fitted over the interface between the cable and
connector. Order CNT-400 RF cable and N type male connectors from Cambium Networks (Table
56).

Table 56 RF cable and connector part numbers

Cambium description Cambium part number

50 Ohm Braided Coaxial Cable - 75 meter 30010194001

50 Ohm Braided Coaxial Cable - 500 meter 30010195001

RF Connector, N, Male, Straight for CNT-400 Cable 09010091001

Antenna accessories
Connectorized ODUs require the following additional components:
• Cable grounding kits: Order one cable grounding kit for each grounding point on the antenna
cables. Refer to Lightning protection unit (LPU) and grounding kit on 2-44.
• Self-amalgamating and PVC tape: Order these items to weatherproof the RF connectors
• Lightning arrestors: When the connectorized ODU is mounted indoors, lightning arrestors (not
LPUs) are required for protecting the antenna RF cables at building entry. One arrestor is
required per antenna cable. One example of a compatible lightning arrestor is the Polyphaser
LSXL-ME or LSXL (not supplied by Cambium Networks).

Page 2-47
Chapter 2: System hardware GPS synchronization

GPS synchronization

GPS synchronization description


Cambium offers GPS synchronization to limit the network’s own self-interference. The Cluster
Management CMM provides Global Positioning System (GPS) synchronization to the Access Point
(AP) and all associated Subscriber Modules (SM). Network operators have a choice of UGPS and
CMM solutions to select the option that works best for the environment.

Universal GPS (UGPS)


The UGPS provides network synchronization for smaller networks where a CMM may not be cost
effective. The UGPS provides synchronization for one or two modules so that even remote areas at
the edge of the network can operate with synchronization for improved performance. The UGPS
works with all Cambium PMP radios. The UGPS has a small footprint and is easy to deploy.

Figure 32 UGPS

Note
PMP 450/450i/450m Series - APs can power up a UGPS via the Aux/Timing port.

Note
PMP 450i/450b/450m Series - If two units are to get sync from the UGPS, then an
external power supply is required.
If the GPS position information is required to be visible on the web GUI, then the
UGPS power must be enabled on the AP; and it is safe to use both AP power and
external power for a single UGPS unit.

Page 2-48
Chapter 2: System hardware GPS synchronization

CMM5
The CMM5 (Cluster Management Module) is the latest generation of solutions for the distribution
of TDD Sync signals and “Power-over-Ethernet (PoE)” in the field. The CMM5 is a modular design
with individual 4-port power injectors and an optional controller used for remote management.
Key features of the CMM5 include:
• Support for Gigabit Ethernet (1000BaseT)
• Modular and scalable from 4 ports to 32 ports
• Direct +/- 48VDC input (optional AC/DC power supplies are available from Cambium Networks)
• Uses Cambium Networks UGPS for a synchronization source
• Dual resilient power inputs
• Rack mountable
• Secure remote management when used with the optional CMM5 Controller Module
• Support for PMP 450m (cnMedusa™)
• Future support for integration into (cnMedusa™) for cloud or NOC-based management
It consists of four subsystems, described in the following sections:
• CMM5 Controller Module
• CMM5 Injector (29 volt and 56 volt versions)
• Power supply(s) (240/600 watt)
• UGPS

Cluster Management: Scenario 1


The following is a CMM5 Cluster Management scenario using four PMP 450i Access Points.

Table 57 CMM5 Cluster Management Scenario 1

Scenario Equipment Needed Features

Four PMP 450i Access Points 56 Volt Injector • Gigabit Ethernet


• Local Management
Interface
• +/- 48VDC Input
• Broad Device Support
• Rack Mountable

• 48 VDC Available UGPS -


• No management or
resilience required

Page 2-49
Chapter 2: System hardware GPS synchronization

Figure 33 Cluster Management: Scenario 1

Cluster Management: Scenario 2


The following is a CMM5 Cluster Management scenario using four PMP 450i Access Points and
four PMP 450 Access Points.

Table 58 CMM5 Cluster Management Scenario 2

Scenario Equipment Needed Features

Four PMP 450i Access Points • 56 Volt Injector • Gigabit Ethernet support
Four PMP 450 Access Points • 29 Volt Injector • Local Management
• 1 CMM5 Controller Interface

• One UGPS • +/- 48VDC Input


• Broad Device Support
• Rack Mountable

AC only environments Two UGPS AC-to-48 VDC Resilient power sources


Power Supplies

Management required - Secure, Remote


Resilience required Management (https)
Scalable to 32 devices

Page 2-50
Chapter 2: System hardware GPS synchronization

Figure 34 Cluster Management: Scenario 2

CMM5 Controller Module


The major features of the CMM5 Controller Module are:
• Auto-detect/control up to 8 Power Injectors
• Monitor SYNC/Power/GPS status
• Manage (up/down ports)
• Web (HTTPS) and SNMPv2/v3 management (SNMP on roadmap)
• 1U/ half-width rack-mount

Figure 35 Controller Module

Page 2-51
Chapter 2: System hardware GPS synchronization

CMM5 Injector Module


The CMM5 Injector Module has the following features:
• Stand-alone mode or used with controller for mgmt.
• +/- 48VDC input with green/amber LED’s for status
• Injects SYNC pulse from UGPS
• 2U / half-width rack-mount

Note
There are two different versions of the injector module (56V and 29V). You must
select the correct injector for the types of radios that you will be powering. In both
cases, the injectors use the same input power supplies or can be powered with +/-
48VDC. The output power is different and the type of SYNC signal used is different
between the two types of injectors. Systems can have 29V and 56V injectors deployed
alongside each other.

Figure 36 Injector Module

CMM5 Injector Compatibility Matrix


The following table provides the Injector compatibility matrix.

Table 59 Injector Compatibility Matrix

Product Power/Injector Module Sync

PMP 450m Yes/56V Yes

PMP/PTP 450i Yes/56V Yes

PMP 450b Yes/29V Yes

PMP 450/PTP 450 Yes/29V Yes

PMP 100/PTP 100 Yes/29V Yes

Page 2-52
Chapter 2: System hardware GPS synchronization

CMM5 Specifications
The following table provides specifications for the CMM5 Power & Sync Injector (56 Volts).

Table 60 CMM5 Specifications

CMM5 Power and Sync Injector 56 Volts

Model Number C000000L556A

Data Interface 4 each RJ45 Gigabit Powered output ports


“To Radios”
4 each RJ45 Gigabit Data input ports “To
Switch Array”
1 each GPS timing port (RJ-12)
1 each CMM5 USB Serial port for local
administration
1 each RJ12 Daisy Chain port “IN”
1 each RJ12 Daisy Chain port “OUT”

Surge Suppression Lightning Suppression for each “To Radios”


RJ45 Port

Power Input Voltage: + or - 48 VDC


Input Power Consumption: 400 watts
Output Voltage: + or - 55 VDC
Output Current: 0 - 1.8A per channel
Output Power: 0 - 90 Watts per channel

Cabinet Temperature -40° C to +55°C (-40° F to +131° F), 90%


humidity, condensing

Physical Max Distance from Managed Radios: 328


cable feet (100m)
Max Distance to GPS Antenna: 100 cable feet
(30.5m)

Dimensions 8.85” W x 15.75” D x 1.65” H (225mm x


400mm x 42mm)

Unit Weight 6.6 pounds (3kg)

Power Interface 2 Power input ports for 48 VDC Power (Power


Terminals supplies sold separately)

Page 2-53
Chapter 2: System hardware GPS synchronization

Note
DC Power Input requirement is +/- 48VDC and must not exceed 100V surges. If surges
above 100 VDC are expected, a suitable in-line DC surge suppressor with 48 VDC
nominal voltage is required.

Page 2-54
Chapter 2: System hardware GPS synchronization

CMM4 (Rack Mount)


The Cluster Management Module (CMM) is the heart of the Cambium system’s synchronization
capability, which allows network operators to reuse frequencies and add capacity while ensuring
consistency in the quality of service to customers.
For operators who prefer indoor CMM mounting, Cambium offers the Rack-Mounted Cluster
Management Module 4. The unit is designed to be mounted onto a standard 19-inch
telecommunications rack and to allow the Cambium CMM4 to be co-located with other
telecommunications equipment.

Figure 37 CMM4 (Rack Mount)

The CMM4 has two DC power inputs, one 29 V and one 56V. It can be used to power and
synchronize both 29 V legacy products such as the PMP 450 Series and 56V products such as the
PMP 450i Series simultaneously.
If the 29 V legacy products are connected to the CMM4, a 29 V power supply needs to be
connected.
If the 450i Series is connected to the CMM4, a 56 V power supply needs to be connected. The
CMM4 supports having two of the 56 V and two of the 29 V supplies for redundancy.

Warning
PMP 450i Series requires different wiring between the CMM4 and device. If a PMP450
Series ODU is replaced by a PMP 450i Series and the existing drop cable needs to be
re-used, the Ethernet cable adapter for CMM4 - N000045L001A" must be used between
the CMM4 and the existing drop cable.

Page 2-55
Chapter 2: System hardware GPS synchronization

Caution
Power requirements affect the recommended maximums for power cord length
feeding the CMM4. See the dedicated user guide that supports the CMM that you are
deploying.

Figure 38 CMM4 56 V power adapter (dongle)

CMM4 56 V power adapter cable pinout


Figure 39 CMM4 power adapter cabling diagram

J1 J2

1 1

5 5
7 7
8 8

Shield

RJ45 Plug RJ45 Jack

Page 2-56
Chapter 2: System hardware GPS synchronization

Table 61 CMM4 power adapter cable pinout

Plug J1 pin Jack J2 pin

1 1

2 2

3 3

4 4

5 7

6 6

7 5

8 8

Screen Screen

Note
Pins 5 and 7 are wired in a cross-over configuration.

Page 2-57
Chapter 2: System hardware GPS synchronization

CMM4 (Cabinet with switch)


Designed to deliver consistent and reliable wireless broadband service, the PMP/PTP system
gracefully scales to support large deployments. The cluster management module is the heart of
the system’s synchronization capability which allows network operators to re-use frequencies and
add capacity while ensuring consistency in the quality of service to customers. As a result,
subscribers can experience carrier-grade service even at the outer edge of the network.

Figure 40 CMM4 (Cabinet with switch)

CMM4 (Cabinet without switch)


This CMM includes all the functionality listed above but there is no switch. This provides the
network operator the flexibility to use the switch of their choice with the power and
synchronization capabilities of the CMM4.

Page 2-58
Chapter 2: System hardware GPS synchronization

CMM3/CMMmicro
The CMM3 or CMMmicro (Cluster Management Module micro) provides power, GPS timing, and
networking connections for an AP cluster. The CMM3 is configurable through a web interface.
The CMM3 contains an 8-port managed switch that supports Power over Ethernet (PoE – this is
Cambium PoE, not the standard PoE) on each port and connects any combination of APs, BHMs,
BHSs, or Ethernet feed. The Cambium fixed wireless broadband IP networks PoE differs from IEEE
Standard 803.3af PoE, and the two should not be intermixed. The CMM3 can auto-negotiate speed
to match inputs that are either 100Base-TX or 10Base-T, and either full duplex or half duplex,
where the connected device is set to auto-negotiate. Alternatively, these parameters are settable.
A CMM3 requires only one cable, terminating in an RJ-45 connector, for each connected module to
distribute
• Ethernet signaling.
• power to as many as 8 co-located modules—APs, BHMs, or BHSs. Through a browser interface
to the managed switch, ports can be powered or not.
• sync to APs and BHMs. The CMM3 receives 1-pulse per second timing information from Global
Positioning System (GPS) satellites through an antenna (included) and passes the timing pulse
embedded in the 24-V power to the connected modules.
GPS status information is available at the CMM3, however
• CMM3 provides time and date information to BHMs and APs if both the CMMmicro is
operating on CMMmicro Release 2.1 or later and the AP/BHM is operating on System Release
4.2 or later. See Configuring time settings on Page 7-18.
• CMM3 does not provide time and date information to BHMs and APs if either the CMM3 is
operating on a release earlier than CMMmicro Release 2.1 or the AP/BHM is operating on a
release earlier than System Release 4.2.
A CMM3/CMMicro is shown in Figure 41 and Figure 42.

Page 2-59
Chapter 2: System hardware GPS synchronization

Figure 41 CMM3 Figure 42 Pole mounted CMM3

Note
A CMM3 cannot be used to power up a 450i or 450m Series ODUs.

Page 2-60
Chapter 2: System hardware Installing a GPS receiver

Installing a GPS receiver

To install a GPS receiver as the timing reference source, use the following procedures:
• Mounting the GPS receiver on page 2-62
• Cabling the GPS Antenna on page 2-63
• Installing and connecting the GPS LPU on page 2-63

Caution
Prior to power-up of equipment, ensure that all cables are connected to the correct
interfaces of the CMM4 unit and the UGPS receiver module. Failure to do so may
result in damage to the equipment.

GPS receiver location


Mount the GPS receiver at a location that meets the following requirements:
• It must be possible to protect the installation as described in Grounding and lightning
protection on page 3-8.
• It must have an un-interrupted view of at least half of the southern (resp. northern) sky in the
northern (resp. southern) hemisphere. For a receiver mounted on a wall there must be no
other significant obstructions in the view of the sky.
• It must be mounted at least 1 m (3 ft), preferably 2 m (6 ft), away from other GPS receiving
equipment.
• It must not be sited in the field of radiation of co-located radio communications equipment and
should be positioned at a distance of at least 3 m (10 ft) away.
Mount the UGPS receiver on the wall of the equipment building if there is a suitable location on
the wall that can meet these requirements.

Caution
The GPS receiver is not approved for operation in locations where gas hazards exist,
as defined by HAZLOC (USA) and ATEX (Europe).

Mounting the GPS receiver module on the equipment building


If mounting the GPS receiver on the equipment building (Figure 47), select a position on the wall
that meets the following requirements:
• It must be below the roof height of the equipment building or below the height of any roof-
mounted equipment (such as air conditioning plant).
• It must be below the lightning air terminals.
• It must not project more than 600mm (24 inches) from the wall of the building.

Page 2-61
Chapter 2: System hardware Installing a GPS receiver

If these requirements cannot all be met, then the module must be mounted on a metal tower or
mast.

Mounting the GPS receiver module on a metal tower or mast


If mounting the GPS receiver module on a metal tower or mast (Figure 48), select a position that
meets the following requirements:
• It must not be mounted any higher than is necessary to receive an adequate signal from four
GPS satellites.
• It must be protected by a nearby lightning air terminal that projects farther out from the tower
than the GPS receiver module.

Mounting the GPS receiver


Mount the GPS receiver (following manufacturer’s instructions) upon either an external wall
(Figure 47) or a metal tower or mast (Figure 48).

Figure 43 GPS antenna mounting

Page 2-62
Chapter 2: System hardware Installing a GPS receiver

Procedure 1 Mounting the GPS receiver

1 Ensure that the mounting position


• has an unobstructed view of the sky to 20º above the horizon.
• is not the highest object at the site. (The GPS antenna does not need to be
particularly high on a site, which would give it more exposure to lightning. It just
needs to have an unobstructed view of the sky.)
• is not further than 100 feet (30.4 meters) of cable from the CMM.

2 Select a pole that has an outside diameter of 1.25 to 1.5 inches (3 to 4 cm) to which
the GPS antenna bracket can be mounted.

3 Place the U-bolts (provided) around the pole as shown in Figure 45.

4 Slide the GPS antenna bracket onto the U-bolts.

5 Slide the ring washers (provided) onto the U-bolts.

6 Slide the lock washers (provided) onto the U-bolts.

7 Use the nuts (provided) to securely fasten the bracket to the U-bolts.

Please refer to the PMP Synchronization Solutions User Guide located on the Cambium website
http://www.cambiumnetworks.com/resource/pmp-synchronization-solutions.

Cabling the GPS Antenna


Connect the GPS coax cable to the female N-connector on the GPS antenna. Please refer to the
PMP Synchronization Solutions User Guide located on the Cambium website
(http://www.cambiumnetworks.com/resource/pmp-synchronization-solutions ).

Installing and connecting the GPS LPU


Install and ground the GPS drop cable LPU at the building (or cabinet) entry point, as described in
Install the bottom LPU on page 6-24.

Page 2-63
Chapter 2: System hardware Ordering the components

Ordering the components

This section describes how to select components for 450m Series, 450i Series and 450 Series
Greenfield network or 450m/450i Series network migration. It specifies Cambium part numbers for
450 Platform Family components.

Order PMP 450m Series, PMP/PTP 450i Series and PMP/PTP 450 Series ODUs from Cambium
Networks.

PMP 450m
Table 62 PMP 450m Series ODU part numbers

Cambium description Cambium part number

PMP 450m AP (Access Point)

5 GHz PMP 450m Integrated Access Point, 90 Degree (ROW) C050045A101A

5 GHz PMP 450m Integrated Access Point, 90 Degree (FCC) C050045A102A

5 GHz PMP 450m Integrated Access Point, 90 Degree (EU) C050045A103A

5 GHz PMP 450m Integrated Access Point, 90 Degree (DES Only) C050045A104A

5 GHz PMP 450m Integrated Access Point, 90 Degree (IC) C050045A105A

PMP 450i
Table 63 PMP 450i Series ODU part numbers

Cambium description Cambium part number

PMP 450i AP (Access Point)

900 MHz PMP 450i Connectorized Access Point C009045A001A

3 GHz PMP 450i Connectorized Access Point C030045A001A

3 GHz PMP 450i Integrated Access Point, 90 Degree C030045A002A

3 GHz PMP 450i Connectorized Access Point, DES Only C030045A003A

3 GHz PMP 450i Integrated Access Point, 90 Degree, DES Only C030045A004A

5 GHz PMP 450i Connectorized Access Point (RoW) C050045A001A

5 GHz PMP 450i Connectorized Access Point (FCC) C050045A002A

5 GHz PMP 450i Connectorized Access Point (EU) C050045A003A

Page 2-64
Chapter 2: System hardware Ordering the components

Cambium description Cambium part number

5 GHz PMP 450i Connectorized Access Point (DES Only) C050045A004A

5 GHz PMP 450i Connectorized Access Point (IC) C050045A015A

5 GHz PMP 450i AP, Integrated 90°sector antenna (RoW) C050045A005A

5 GHz PMP 450i AP, Integrated 90°sector antenna (FCC) C050045A006A

5 GHz PMP 450i Integrated Access Point, 90 degree (EU) C050045A007A

5 GHz PMP 450i AP, Integrated 90°sector antenna (DES only) C050045A008A

5 GHz PMP 450i AP, Integrated 90°sector antenna (IC) C050045A016A

PMP 450i SM (Subscriber Module)

3 GHz PMP 450i Connectorized Subscriber Module C030045C001A

3 GHz PMP 450i SM, Integrated High Gain Antenna C030045C002A

5 GHz PMP 450i Connectorized Subscriber Module C050045C001A

5 GHz PMP 450i SM, Integrated High Gain Antenna C050045C002A

Note
The 450i SM does not have license keys.

Table 64 PMP 450i ATEX/HAZLOC ODU models/part numbers

ODU model / Description


part number

ODU model

5085CHH 450i Connectorized ATEX/HAZLOC

5085HH 450i Integrated 90 Deg Sector ATEX/HAZLOC

5095HH 450i Integrated High Gain Directional ATEX/HAZLOC

Part Number

C050045A009A 5 GHz PMP 450i Conn Access Point (ROW), ATEX/HAZLOC

C050045A010A 5 GHz PMP 450i Conn Access Point (FCC), ATEX/HAZLOC

C050045A011A 5 GHz PMP 450i Conn Access Point (EU), ATEX/HAZLOC

C050045A012A 5 GHz PMP 450i Integrated Access Point, 90 degree (ROW), ATEX/HAZLOC

C050045A013A 5 GHz PMP 450i Integrated Access Point, 90 degree (FCC), ATEX/HAZLOC

C050045A014A 5 GHz PMP 450i Integrated Access Point, 90 degree (EU), ATEX/HAZLOC

Page 2-65
Chapter 2: System hardware Ordering the components

C050045A017A 5 GHz PMP 450i Conn Access Point (IC), ATEX/HAZLOC

C050045A018A 5 GHz PMP 450i Integrated Access Point, 90 degree (IC), ATEX/HAZLOC

C050045A019A 5 GHz PMP 450i Conn Access Point (DES Only), ATEX/HAZLOC

5 GHz PMP 450i Integrated Access Point, 90 degree (DES Only),


C050045A020A
ATEX/HAZLOC

C050045C003A 5 GHz PMP 450i Conn Subscriber Module, ATEX/HAZLOC

C050045C004A 5 GHz PMP 450i Integrated High Gain Antenna, ATEX/HAZLOC

PTP 450i
Table 65 PTP 450i Series ODU part numbers

Cambium description Cambium part number

3 GHz PTP 450i END, Connectorized C030045B001A

3 GHz PTP 450i END, Integrated High Gain Antenna C030045B002A

3 GHz PTP 450i END, Connectorized (DES only) C030045B003A

3 GHz PTP 450i END, Integrated Access Point, 90 degree (DES only) C035045B004A

5 GHz PTP 450i END, Connectorized (RoW) C050045B001A

5 GHz PTP 450i END, Connectorized (FCC) C050045B003A

5 GHz PTP 450i END, Connectorized (EU) C050045B005A

5 GHz PTP 450i END, Connectorized (DES only) C050045B007A

5 GHz PTP 450i END, Connectorized (IC) C050045B015A

5 GHz PTP 450i END, Integrated High Gain Antenna (RoW) C050045B002A

5 GHz PTP 450i END, Integrated High Gain Antenna (FCC) C050045B004A

5 GHz PTP 450i END, Integrated High Gain Antenna (EU) C050045B006A

5 GHz PTP 450i END, Integrated High Gain Antenna (DES only) C050045B008A

5 GHz PTP 450i END, Integrated High Gain Antenna (IC) C050045B016A

Ethernet cable adapter for CMM4 N000045L001A

Page 2-66
Chapter 2: System hardware Ordering the components

Table 66 PTP 450i ATEX/HAZLOC ODU models/part numbers

ODU model / Description


part number

ODU model

5085CHH 450i Connectorized ATEX/HAZLOC

5085HH 450i Integrated 90 Deg Sector ATEX/HAZLOC

5095HH 450i Integrated High Gain Directional ATEX/HAZLOC

C050045B009A 5 GHz PTP 450i END, Connectorized (ROW), ATEX/HAZLOC

C050045B010A 5 GHz PTP 450i END, Integrated High Gain Antenna (ROW), ATEX/HAZLOC

C050045B011A 5 GHz PTP 450i END, Connectorized (FCC), ATEX/HAZLOC

C050045B012A 5 GHz PTP 450i END, Integrated High Gain Antenna (FCC), ATEX/HAZLOC

C050045B013A 5 GHz PTP 450i END, Connectorized (EU), ATEX/HAZLOC

C050045B014A 5 GHz PTP 450i END, Integrated High Gain Antenna (EU), ATEX/HAZLOC

C050045B017A 5 GHz PTP 450i END, Connectorized (IC), ATEX/HAZLOC

C050045B018A 5 GHz PTP 450i END, Integrated High Gain Antenna (IC), ATEX/HAZLOC

C050045B019A 5 GHz PTP 450i END, Connectorized (DES Only), ATEX/HAZLOC

5 GHz PTP 450i END, Integrated High Gain Antenna (DES Only),
C050045B020A
ATEX/HAZLOC

PMP 450b
Table 67 PMP 450b Series ODU part numbers

Cambium description Cambium part number

PMP 450b SM (Subscriber Module)

5 GHz 450b Mid-Gain WB SM C050045C011A

5 GHz 450b High Gain WB SM C050045C012A

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Chapter 2: System hardware Ordering the components

PMP 450
Table 68 PMP 450 Series ODU part numbers

Cambium description Cambium part number

PMP 450 AP (Access Point)

2.4 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Access Point C024045A001A

2.4 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Access Point (DES) C024045A003A

3.5 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Access Point C035045A001A

3.5 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Access Point (DES) C035045A003A

3.6 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Access Point C036045A001A

3.6 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Access Point (DES) C036045A003A

5 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Access Point C054045A001A

5 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Access Point (US only) C054045A002A

5 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Access Point (DES) C054045A003A

PMP 450 AP Lite

2.4 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Access Point - Lite C024045A011A

3.3-3.6 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Access Point - Lite C035045A011A

3.55-3.8 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Access Point - Lite C036045A011A

5 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Access Point - Lite C054045A011A

5 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Access Point (FCC) - Lite C054045A012A

PMP 450 SM (Subscriber Module)

900 MHz PMP 450 Connectorized Subscriber Module C009045C001A

2.4 GHz PMP 450 Subscriber Module, 4 Mbps C024045C001A

2.4 GHz PMP 450 Subscriber Module, 10 Mbps C024045C002A

2.4 GHz PMP 450 Subscriber Module, 20 Mbps C024045C003A

2.4 GHz PMP 450 Subscriber Module, Uncapped C024045C004A

2.4 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Subscriber Module, 4 Mbps C024045C005A

2.4 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Subscriber Module, 10 Mbps C024045C006A

2.4 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Subscriber Module, 20 Mbps C024045C007A

2.4 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Subscriber Module, Uncapped C024045C008A

3.5 GHz PMP 450 High Gain Directional Integrated Subscriber C035045C014A

3.5 GHz PMP 450 Subscriber Module, 4 Mbps C035045C001A

Page 2-68
Chapter 2: System hardware Ordering the components

Cambium description Cambium part number

3.5 GHz PMP 450 Subscriber Module, 10 Mbps C035045C002A

3.5 GHz PMP 450 Subscriber Module, 20 Mbps C035045C003A

3.5 GHz PMP 450 Subscriber Module, Uncapped C035045C004A

3.5 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Subscriber Module, 4 Mbps C035045C005A

3.5 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Subscriber Module, 10 Mbps C035045C006A

3.5 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Subscriber Module, 20 Mbps C035045C007A

3.5 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Subscriber Module, Uncapped C035045C008A

3.6 GHz PMP 450 High Gain Directional Integrated Subscriber C036045C014A

3.6 GHz PMP 450 Subscriber Module, 4 Mbps C036045C001A

3.6 GHz PMP 450 Subscriber Module, 10 Mbps C036045C002A

3.6 GHz PMP 450 Subscriber Module, 20 Mbps C036045C003A

3.6 GHz PMP 450 Subscriber Module, Uncapped C036045C004A

3.6 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Subscriber Module, 4 Mbps C036045C005A

3.6 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Subscriber Module, 10 Mbps C036045C006A

3.6 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Subscriber Module, 20 Mbps C036045C007A

3.6 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Subscriber Module, Uncapped C036045C008A

5 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Subscriber Module, 4 Mbps C054045C005A

5 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Subscriber Module, 10 Mbps C054045C006A

5 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Subscriber Module, 20 Mbps C054045C007A

5 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Subscriber Module, Uncapped C054045C008A

5 GHz PMP 450 Integrated Subscriber Module, 4 Mbps C054045C001B

5 GHz PMP 450 Integrated Subscriber Module, 10 Mbps C054045C002B

5 GHz PMP 450 Integrated Subscriber Module, 20 Mbps C054045C003B

5 GHz PMP 450 Integrated Subscriber Module, Uncapped C054045C004B

5 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Subscriber Module, 4 Mbps C054045C005B

5 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Subscriber Module, 10 Mbps C054045C006B

5 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Subscriber Module, 20 Mbps C054045C007B

5 GHz PMP 450 Connectorized Subscriber Module, Uncapped C054045C008B

5 GHz PMP 450d Subscriber Module, 20 Mbps – 4-pack C054045H013B

5 GHz PMP 450d Subscriber Module, Uncapped – 4-pack C054045H014B

Page 2-69
Chapter 2: System hardware Ordering the components

PTP 450
Table 69 PTP 450 Series ODU part numbers

Cambium description Cambium part number

PTP 450 900 MHz END – Connectorized C009045B001A

PTP 450 3.5 GHz END – Integrated C035045B001A

PTP 450 3.5 GHz END – Connectorized C035045B002A

PTP 450 3.5 GHz END – Integrated – DES Only C035045B003A

PTP 450 3.5 GHz END – Connectorized – DES Only C035045B004A

PTP 450 3.65 GHz END – Integrated C036045B001A

PTP 450 3.65 GHz END – Connectorized C036045B002A

PTP 450 3.65 GHz END – Integrated – DES Only C036045B003A

PTP 450 3.65 GHz END – Connectorized – DES Only C036045B004A

PTP 450 5 GHz END – Integrated (ROW) C054045B001A

PTP 450 5 GHz END – Connectorized (ROW) C054045B002A

PTP 450 5 GHz END – Integrated (ROW) – DES Only C054045B003A

PTP 450 5 GHz END – Connectorized (ROW) – DES Only C054045B004A

PTP 450 5 GHz END – Integrated (FCC) C054045B005A

PTP 450 5 GHz END – Connectorized (FCC) C054045B006A

PMP/PTP 450/450i Series Accessories


Table 70 PMP/PTP 450/450i Series Accessories

Cambium description Cambium part number

PMP 450 AP Antenna Options

900 MHz 65 degree Sector Antenna (Dual Slant) N009045D001A

900 MHz 12 dBi gain directional antenna (Dual Slant) N009045D003A

2.4 GHz Dual Slant Antenna for 60 Degree Sector C024045D601A

3.5 GHz and 3.6 GHz Dual Slant Antenna for 90 Degree Sector C030045D901A

5 GHz Antenna for 60 Degree Sector 85009325001

5 GHz Antenna for 90 Degree Sector 85009324001

N-type to N-type cable (16 inch length) 30009406002

Page 2-70
Chapter 2: System hardware Ordering the components

Cambium description Cambium part number

Power supplies

Power supply, 60 W, 56 V with Gbps support N000065L001B

AC+DC Enhanced Power Injector C000065L002C

Line Cord, Fig 8 – US N000065L003A

Line Cord, Fig 8 – UK N000065L004A

Line Cord, Fig 8 – EU N000065L005A

Power over Ethernet midspan, 60 W, -48 VDC Input N000000L036A

Power Supply, 30 W, 56 V – Gbps support N000000L034A

Gigabit Enet Capable Power Supply - 30VDC, 15W N000900L001A

Cable, UL Power Supply Cord Set, US N000900L007A

Cable, UL Power Supply Cord Set, EU N000900L008A

Cable, UL Power Supply Cord Set, UK N000900L009A

AP Optional Equipment

CMM MICRO (Outdoor Enclosure) (450 only) 1070CKHH

CMM5 Controller C000000L500A

CMM5 Power and Sync Injector 56V C000000L556A

UGPS 1096H

CMM5 Power Supply, AC, 56V 240W N000000L054B

CMM5 Power Supply AC, 48V, 640W N000000L101A

CMM5 Spare Controller Cable – 1m N000000L102A

CMM5 to UGPS Shielded Cable (20 meter) N000000L103A

CMM5 Spare DC Power Connector (10 pack) N000000L104A

CMM4 W/RUGGEDIZED Switch and GPS 1090CKHH

CMM4 NO Switch 1091HH

CMM4 Rack Mount Assembly 1092HH

Ethernet cable adapter for CMM4 N000045L001A

Universal GPS Module 1096H

RJ-45 Gland Spare – PG16 style (QTY 10) N000065L033A

Blanking Plug Pack (Qty 10) N000065L036A

SM Optional Equipment

Page 2-71
Chapter 2: System hardware Ordering the components

Cambium description Cambium part number

Power Supply, 30 W, 56 V – Gbps support N000000L034A

Gigabit Enet Capable Power Supply – 30 VDC, 15 W N000900L001A

Cable, UL Power Supply Cord Set, US N000900L007A

Cable, UL Power Supply Cord Set, EU N000900L008A

Cable, UL Power Supply Cord Set, UK N000900L009A

53CM Offset, Reflector Dish Kit, 4PK HK2022A

Alignment Tool Headset ACATHS-01A

Accessories

Surge Suppressor (30 VDC) 600SSH

Gigabit Surge Suppressor (56 VDC) C000000L033A

LPU and Grounding Kit (1 kit per ODU) C000065L007B

Single Mode Optical SFP Interface per ODU C000065L008A

Multimode Kit C000065L009A

50 Ohm Braided Coaxial Cable - 75 meter 30010194001

50 Ohm Braided Coaxial Cable - 500 meter 30010195001

RF Connector, N, Male, Straight for CNT-400 Cable 09010091001

Tyco/AMP, Mod Plug RJ45, 100 pack WB3177

Tyco/AMP Crimp Tool WB3211

RJ-45 Spare Grounding Gland - PG16 size (Qty. 10) N000065L033

Mounting brackets

Tilt Bracket Assembly N000045L002A

Mounting Bracket (Integrated) N000065L031A

Mounting Bracket (Connectorized) N000065L032A

Upgrade Keys

PMP 450 4 To 10 Mbps Upgrade Key C000045K002A

PMP 450 4 To 20 Mbps Upgrade Key C000045K003A

PMP 450 4 To Uncapped Upgrade Key C000045K004A

PMP 450 10 To 20 Mbps Upgrade Key C000045K005A

PMP 450 10 To Uncapped MBPS Upgrade Key C000045K006A

PMP 450 20 To Uncapped MBPS Upgrade Key C000045K007A

Page 2-72
Chapter 2: System hardware Ordering the components

Cambium description Cambium part number

PMP 450 Lite AP to Full AP Upgrade Key C000045K008A

Extended Warranty

PMP 450 Platform AP Extended Warranty, 1 Additional Year SG00TS4009A

PMP 450 Platform AP Extended Warranty, 2 Additional Years SG00TS4017A

PMP 450 Platform AP Extended Warranty, 4 Additional Years SG00TS4025A

PMP 450 Platform SM Extended Warranty, 1 Additional Year SG00TS4010A

PMP 450 Platform SM Extended Warranty, 2 Additional Years SG00TS4018A

PMP 450 Platform SM Extended Warranty, 4 Additional Years SG00TS4026A

Page 2-73
Chapter 3: System planning
This chapter provides information to help the user to plan a PMP/PTP 450 Platform link.
The following topics are described in this chapter:
• Typical deployment on page 3-2 contains diagrams illustrating typical PMP/PTP 450 Platform
site deployments.
• Site planning on page 3-7 describes factors to be considered when planning the proposed link
end sites, including grounding, lightning protection and equipment location.
• Radio Frequency planning on page 3-17 describes how to plan PMP/PTP 450 Platform links to
conform to the regulatory restrictions that apply in the country of operation.
• Link planning on page 3-27 describes factors to be taken into account when planning links,
such as range, path loss and throughput.
• Planning for connectorized units on page 3-30 describes factors to be taken into account when
planning to use connectorized ODUs with external antennas in PMP/PTP 450 Platform links.
• Data network planning on page 3-32 describes factors to be considered when planning
PMP/PTP 450 Platform data networks.
• Network management planning on page 3-40 describes how to plan for PMP/PTP 450 Platform
links to be managed remotely using SNMP.
• Security planning on page 3-41 describes how to plan for PMP/PTP 450 Platform links to
operate in secure mode.
• Remote AP Deployment on page 3-51 describes how to deploy Remote AP.

Page 3-1
Chapter 3: System planning Typical deployment

Typical deployment

This section contains diagrams illustrating typical PMP/PTP 450 Platform site deployments.

ODU with PoE interface to PSU


In the basic configuration, there is only one Ethernet interface, a copper cable for Power over
Ethernet (PoE) from the PSU to the ODU (PSU port), as shown in the following diagrams: mast or
tower installation (Figure 44), wall installation (Figure 45) and roof installation (Figure 46).

Figure 44 Mast or tower installation

Power over Ethernet CAT5e cable (gel-filled,


shielded with copper-plated steel)
Network CAT5e cable ODU

ODU ground cables

Site grounding system

First point of contact


between drop cable
and tower

Intermediate
Equipment building ground cable(s)
or cabinet as required

Bottom LPU

PSU

AC
supply Building Tower ground bar
Network
entry
equipment

Ground ring

Page 3-2
Chapter 3: System planning Typical deployment

Figure 45 Wall installation

Power over Ethernet CAT5e cable (gel-


filled, shielded with copper-plated steel)
Network Cat5e cable

ODU ground cables

Site grounding system

ODU

First point of contact


between drop cable
and wall

Bottom LPU

PSU

AC supply
Network Building entry
equipment

Ground ring

Page 3-3
Chapter 3: System planning Typical deployment

Figure 46 Roof installation

Power over Ethernet CAT5e cable


(gel-filled, shielded with copper-
plated steel)
Air terminals (finials)
Network CAT5e cable
ODU
ODU ground cables

Site grounding system

Tower grounding Building entry point


conductor

Drop cable inside building

Equipment room

Bottom LPU

PSU

AC
supply
Network
equipment

Equipment room entry point


AC
service
Building ground ring

Page 3-4
Chapter 3: System planning Typical deployment

Figure 47 GPS receiver wall installation

Power over Ethernet


CAT5e cable (gel-filled,
shielded with copper-
plated steel)
Drop cable to top
Network Cat5e cable LPU and ODU

ODU/ GPS Ground


cables
Site grounding system
GPS receiver

First point of contact


between drop cable
and wall

CMM 4

Network
equipment

Ground ring

Page 3-5
Chapter 3: System planning Typical deployment

Figure 48 GPS receiver tower or mast installation

Power over Ethernet CAT5e cable


(gel-filled, shielded with copper-
plated steel)
Network CAT5e cable

ODU/GPS ground cables

Site grounding system

GPS receiver

Equipment building First point of


or cabinet contact between
drop cable and
tower

Drop cable
to top LPU Intermediate
CMM 4 and ODU ground cable(s)
as required

Network
equipment

Tower ground bar

Ground ring

Page 3-6
Chapter 3: System planning Site planning

Site planning

This section describes factors to be considered when choosing sites for PMP or PTP radios, power
supplies, CMM4 (if applicable) and UGPS (if applicable).

Site selection for PMP/PTP radios


When selecting a site for the ODU, consider the following factors:
• Height and location to ensure that people are kept away from the antenna; see Calculated
distances and power compliance margins on page 4-25.
• Height and location to achieve the best radio path.
• Indoor location where the power supply LED indicators will be visible, so the drop cable length
will not exceed the maximum recommended length; see Power supply site selection on page
3-8.
• Ability to meet the requirements specified in Grounding and lightning protection on page 3-8.
• Aesthetics and planning permission issues.
• Cable lengths; see Ethernet standards and cable lengths on page 2-35.
• The effect of strong winds on the installation; see ODU wind loading on page 3-11.

Page 3-7
Chapter 3: System planning Site planning

Power supply site selection


When selecting a site for the ODU power supply, consider the following factors:
• Indoor location with no possibility of condensation, flooding or high humidity.
• Availability of a mains electricity supply.
• Located in an environment where it is not likely to exceed its operational temperature rating,
allowing for natural convection cooling.
• Accessibility for viewing status indicator LED and connecting Ethernet cables.
• Cable lengths; see Ethernet standards and cable lengths on page 2-35.

Maximum cable lengths


When installing PMP/PTP 450i Series ODU, the maximum permitted length of the shielded copper
Ethernet interface cable is 330 feet (100m) from AP/BHM/SM/BHS to their associated power
supplies or CMM4.
When installing PMP 450m Series ODU, the maximum permitted length of the shielded copper
Ethernet interface cable is 330 feet (100m) from ODU to the network interface equipment.

Grounding and lightning protection


Warning
Electro-magnetic discharge (lightning) damage is not covered under warranty. The
recommendations in this guide, when followed correctly, give the user the best
protection from the harmful effects of EMD. However, 100% protection is neither
implied nor possible.

Structures, equipment and people must be protected against power surges (typically caused by
lightning) by conducting the surge current to ground via a separate preferential solid path. The
actual degree of protection required depends on local conditions and applicable local regulations.
To adequately protect a PMP/PTP 450 Platform installation, both ground bonding and transient
voltage surge suppression are required.
Full details of lightning protection methods and requirements can be found in the international
standards IEC 61024-1 and IEC 61312-1, the U.S. National Electric Code ANSI/NFPA No. 70-1984 or
section 54 of the Canadian Electric Code.

Warning
International and national standards take precedence over the requirements in this
guide.

Page 3-8
Chapter 3: System planning Site planning

Lightning protection zones


Use the rolling sphere method (Figure 49) to determine where it is safe to mount equipment. An
imaginary sphere, typically 50 meters in radius, is rolled over the structure. Where the sphere rests
against the ground and a strike termination device (such as a finial or ground bar), all the space
under the sphere is considered to be in the zone of protection (Zone B). Similarly, where the
sphere rests on two finials, the space under the sphere is considered to be in the zone of
protection.

Figure 49 Rolling sphere method to determine the lightning protection zones

Zone A: In this zone a direct lightning strike is possible. Do not mount equipment in this zone.
Zone B: In this zone, direct EMD (lightning) effects are still possible, but mounting in this zone
significantly reduces the possibility of a direct strike. Mount equipment in this zone.

Warning
Never mount equipment in Zone A. Mounting in Zone A may put equipment,
structures and life at risk.

Page 3-9
Chapter 3: System planning Site planning

Site grounding system


Confirm that the site has a correctly installed grounding system on a common ground ring with
access points for grounding the 450 Platform Family ODU.
If the outdoor equipment is to be installed on the roof of a high building (Figure 46), confirm that
the following additional requirements are met:
• A grounding conductor is installed around the roof perimeter to form the main roof perimeter
lightning protection ring.
• Air terminals are installed along the length of the main roof perimeter lightning protection
ring, typically every 6.1m (20ft).
• The main roof perimeter lightning protection ring contains at least two down conductors
connected to the grounding electrode system. The down conductors should be physically
separated from one another, as far as practical.

ODU and external antenna location


Find a location for the ODU (and external antenna for connectorized units) that meets the following
requirements:
• The equipment is high enough to achieve the best radio path.
• People can be kept a safe distance away from the equipment when it is radiating. The safe
separation distances are defined in Calculated distances and power compliance margins on
page 4-25.
• The equipment is lower than the top of the supporting structure (tower, mast or building) or its
lightning air terminal.
• If the ODU is connectorized, select a mounting position that gives it maximum protection from
the elements, but still allows easy access for connecting and weatherproofing the cables. To
minimize cable losses, select a position where the antenna cable lengths can be minimized. If
diverse or two external antennas are being deployed, it is not necessary to mount the ODU at
the midpoint of the antennas.

ODU ambient temperature limits


Select a location where the ODU can operate within safe ambient temperature limits. The
following points need to be considered while selecting a location for the ODU:
• The ODU must be mounted in a Restricted Access Location (as defined in EN 60950-1) if the
operating ambient temperature may exceed 40°C, including solar radiation.
• If the ambient temperature never exceeds 40°C, the temperature of the external metal case
parts of the ODU will not exceed the touch temperature limit of 70°C.
• If the ambient temperature never exceeds 60°C, the temperature of the external metal case
parts of the ODU will not exceed the touch temperature limit of 90°C.

Page 3-10
Chapter 3: System planning Site planning

Note
A restricted access location is defined (in EN 60950-1) as one where access may only
be gained by use of a tool or lock and key, or other means of security, and access is
controlled by the authority responsible for the location. Access must only be gained
by persons who have been instructed about the reasons for the restrictions applied to
the location and about any precautions that must be taken. Examples of permissible
restricted access locations are a lockable equipment room or a lockable cabinet.

ODU wind loading


Ensure that the ODU and the structure on which it is mounted are capable of withstanding the
prevalent wind speeds at a proposed 450 Platform site. Wind speed statistics are available from
national meteorological offices.
The ODU and its mounting bracket are capable of withstanding wind speeds of:
• Up to 200 mph (322 kph) for PMP 450m Series – AP 5 GHz
• Up to 124 mph (Integrated) for PMP/PTP 450i – all models 3 GHz and 5 GHz
• Up to 200 mph (Connectorized) for PMP/PTP 450i – all models 3 GHz and 5 GHz
• Up to 200 mph (322 kph) for PMP/PTP 450 – all models
• Up to 200 mph (322 kph) for PMP 450 – Ruggedized
• Up to 200 mph (322 kph) for PMP 450i – all models 900 MHz
• Up to 118 mph (191 kph) for PMP 450b Mid-Gain
• Up to 90 mph (145 kph) for PMP 450b High Gain
• Up to 90 mph (145 kph) for PMP 450d
• Up to 100 mph (161 kph) for 900 MHz antennas

Wind blowing on the ODU will subject the mounting structure to significant lateral force. The
magnitude of the force depends on both wind strength and surface area of the ODU. Wind loading
is estimated using the following formulae:
• Force (in kilograms) = 0.1045aV2
where:
o “a” is the surface area in square meters, and
o “V” is the wind speed in meters per second.
• Force (in pounds) = 0.0042Av2
where:
o “A” is the surface area in square feet, and
o “v” is the wind speed in miles per hour.
Applying these formulae to the 450 platform at different wind speeds, the resulting wind loadings
are shown in below tables.

Page 3-11
Chapter 3: System planning Site planning

Table 71 PMP 450m Series wind loading (Newton)

Type of ODU Max surface area Wind speed (kilometer per hour)
(square meters)
160 170 180 190 200

Integrated 90º sector


0.331 671 757 849 946 1048
antenna

Table 72 PMP/PTP 450i Series wind loading (Newton)

Type of ODU Max surface area Wind speed (kilometer per hour)
(square meters)
160 170 180 190 200

Connectorized 0.035 94 106 119 132 146

Directional Yagi 0.025 67 76 85 94 105


antenna - 900 MHz

External 65º sector 0.253 677 764 857 954 1058


antenna – 900 MHz

Directional antenna – 0.1 142 160 180 200 222


3.x GHz

Integrated 90º sector 0.18 83 94 105 117 130


antenna -3.x GHz

Directional antenna – 0.093 249 281 315 351 389


5 GHz

Integrated 90º sector 0.126 337 381 427 475 527


antenna - 5 GHz

Table 73 PMP 450m Series wind loading (lb force)

Type of ODU Max surface area Wind speed (miles per hour)
(square feet)
100 105 110 115 120

Integrated 90º sector


3.565 150 165 181 198 216
antenna

Page 3-12
Chapter 3: System planning Site planning

Table 74 PMP/PTP 450i Series wind loading (lb force)

Type of ODU Max surface area Wind speed (miles per hour)
(square feet)
100 105 110 115 120

Connectorized 0.377 16 17 19 21 23

Directional antenna – 1.001 42 46 51 56 61


5 GHz

Integrated 90º sector 1.356 57 63 69 75 82


antenna - 5 GHz

Directional Yagi 0.27 11 13 14 15 16


antenna - 900 MHz

External 65º sector 2.72 114 126 138 151 165


antenna – 900 MHz

For a connectorized ODU, add the wind loading of the external antenna to that of the ODU. The
antenna manufacturer should be able to quote wind loading.

Table 75 PMP/PTP 450 Series wind loading (Newton)

Type of ODU Max surface area Wind speed (kilometer per hour)
(square meters)
160 170 180 190 200

External 60º sector 0.27 722 815 914 1019 1129


antenna – 2.4 GHz AP

External 60º sector 0.066 177 199 223 249 276


antenna – 5 GHz AP

External 90º sector 0.083 222 251 281 313 347


antenna – 5 GHz AP

SM 0.027 72 82 91 102 113

Integrated High Gain, 0.093 249 281 315 351 389


Ruggedized

Integrated Dish 0.14 375 423 474 528 585

Page 3-13
Chapter 3: System planning Site planning

Table 76 PMP/PTP 450 Series wind loading (lb force)

Type of ODU Max surface area Wind speed (miles per hour)
(square feet)
100 105 110 115 120

External 60º sector 2.9 122 134 147 161 175


antenna – 2.4 GHz
AP

External 60º sector 0.71 29.8 33 37 39 43


antenna – 5 GHz AP

External 90º sector 0.89 37 41 45 49 54


antenna – 5 GHz AP

SM 0.29 12 13 15 16 18

Integrated High 1 42 46 51 56 60
Gain, Ruggedized

Integrated Dish 1.49 63 69 76 83 90

Table 77 PMP 450b Series wind loading (Newton)

Type of ODU Max surface area Wind speed (miles per hour)
(square meters)
160 170 180 190 200

Integrated Mid- 0.03 80 90 101 113 125


Gain

Integrated High 0.13 347 392 440 490 543


Gain

Table 78 PMP 450b Series wind loading (lb force)

Type of ODU Max surface area Wind speed (miles per hour)
(square feet)
100 105 110 115 120

Integrated Mid- 0.33 13 15 16 18 19


Gain

Integrated High 1.41 59 65 71 78 85


Gain

Page 3-14
Chapter 3: System planning Site planning

Hazardous locations
Check that the ODUs will not be exposed to hazardous gases, as defined by HAZLOC (USA) and
ATEX (Europe) regulations. If there is a risk of such exposure, then order the PTP/PMP 450i
ATEX/Hazloc product variants, as these are intended for operation in locations with gas hazards.
The ATEX and HAZLOC standards limit the EIRP as shown in Table 79.

Table 79 EIRP limits from ATEX and HAZLOC standards

ATEX gas HAZLOC gas Typical gas type Maximum EIRP


group group (Watt)

IIA D Propane 6

IIB C Ethylene 3.5

IIC B Hydrogen 2

IIC A Acetylene 2

Further reading
For information about… Refer to…

Ordering Connectorized/ Integrated Table 64 and Table 65 on pages 2-65 and 2-66
ATEX/HAZLOC ODUs

ATEX/HAZLOC standards and type approval Hazardous location compliance on page 4-34

Deployment of ATEX/HAZLOC ODUs PMP/PTP 450i Hazardous Location Safety


Guidance (pmp-1712)

Drop cable grounding points


To estimate how many grounding kits are required for each drop cable, refer to the site installation
diagrams (Figure 44 , Figure 45, and Figure 46) and use the following criteria:
• The drop cable shield must be grounded near the ODU at the first point of contact between the
drop cable and the mast, tower or building.
• The drop cable shield must be grounded at the building entry point.
For mast or tower installations (Figure 44), use the following additional criteria:
• The drop cable shield must be grounded at the bottom of the tower, near the vertical to
horizontal transition point. This ground cable must be bonded to the tower or tower ground
bus bar (TGB), if installed.

Page 3-15
Chapter 3: System planning Site planning

• If the tower is greater than 61 m (200 ft) in height, the drop cable shield must be grounded at
the tower midpoint, and at additional points as necessary to reduce the distance between
ground cables to 61 m (200 ft) or less.
• In high lightning-prone geographical areas, the drop cable shield must be grounded at spacing
between 15 to 22 m (50 to 75 ft). This is especially important on towers taller than 45 m (150 ft).
For roof installations (Figure 46), use the following additional criteria:
• The drop cable shield must be bonded to the building grounding system at its top entry point
(usually on the roof).
• The drop cable shield must be bonded to the building grounding system at the entry point to
the equipment room.

Lightning Protection Unit (LPU) location


Find a location for the bottom LPU that meets the following requirements:
• The bottom LPU can be connected to the drop cable from the ODU.
• The bottom LPU is within 600 mm (24 in) of the point at which the drop cable enters the
building, enclosure or equipment room within a larger building.
• The bottom LPU can be bonded to the grounding system.

Page 3-16
Chapter 3: System planning Radio Frequency planning

Radio Frequency planning

This section describes how to plan 450 Platform Family links to conform to analysis of spectrum
and the regulatory restrictions that apply in the country of operation.

Regulatory limits
Many countries impose EIRP limits (Allowed EIRP) on products operating in the bands used by the
450 Platform Family.
Refer to Equipment Disposal (Chapter 10: Reference information) on page 10-57 to determine what
the maximum transmitted power and EIRP for PMP/PTP 450 Platform that can be used in each of
countries and frequency band.

Caution
It is the responsibility of the user to ensure that the PMP/PTP ODU is operated in
accordance with local regulatory limits.

Note
Contact the applicable radio regulator to find out if registration of the PMP/PTP 450
Platform link is required.

Conforming to the limits


Ensure the link is configured to conform to local regulatory requirements by configuring the PMP
450/450i Series AP or PTP 450/450i Series BHM for the correct country. In the following situations,
this does not prevent operation outside the regulations:
• When using connectorized ODUs with external antennas, the regulations may require the
maximum transmit power to be reduced.

Available spectrum
The available spectrum for operation depends on the regulatory band. When configured
appropriately, the unit will only allow operation on those channels which are permitted by the
regulations.

Page 3-17
Chapter 3: System planning Radio Frequency planning

Certain regulations have allocated certain channels as unavailable for use:


• FCC has allocated part of the 5.1 & 5.2 GHz
• ETSI has allocated part of the 5.4 GHz band to weather radar.
• UK and some other European countries have allocated part of the 5.8 GHz band to Road
Transport and Traffic Telematics (RTTT) systems.
The number and identity of channels barred in a given regulatory band is dependent on the
channel bandwidth and channel raster selected.

Analyzing the RF Environment


An essential element in RF network planning is the analysis of spectrum usage and the strength of
the signals that occupy the spectrum. Regardless of how these parameters are measured and log
or chart the results (through the Spectrum Analyzer feature or by using a spectrum analyzer),
ensure measurements are performed:
• At various times of day.
• On various days of the week.
• Periodically into the future.
As new RF neighbors move in or consumer devices proliferate in currently used spectrum, this
keeps the user aware of the dynamic possibilities for interference within the network.

Channel bandwidth
Select the required channel bandwidth for the link. The selection depends upon the regulatory
band selected.
The wider the channel bandwidth, the greater the capacity. As narrower channel bandwidths take
up less spectrum, selecting a narrow channel bandwidth may be a better choice when operating in
locations where the spectrum is very busy.
Both ends of the link must be configured to operate on the same channel bandwidth.

Anticipating Reflection of Radio Waves


In the signal path, any object that is larger than the wavelength of the signal can reflect the signal.
Such an object can even be the surface of the earth or of a river, bay or lake. The wavelength of the
signal is approximately
• 2 inches (or 5 cm) for 5.4 GHz and 5.8 GHz signals.
• 12 inches for 900 MHz signals
A reflected signal can arrive at the antenna of the receiver later than the non-reflected signal
arrives. These two or more signals cause the condition known as multipath. Multipath may
increase or decrease the signal level, resulting in overall attenuation that may be higher or lower
than that caused by the link distance. This is problematic at the margin of the link budget, where
the standard operating margin (fade margin) may be compromised.

Page 3-18
Chapter 3: System planning Radio Frequency planning

Obstructions in the Fresnel Zone


The Fresnel (pronounced fre∙NEL) Zone is a three-dimensional volume around the line of sight of
an antenna transmission. Objects that penetrate this area can cause the received strength of the
transmitted signal to fade. Out-of-phase reflections and absorption of the signal result in signal
cancellation.
The foliage of trees and plants in the Fresnel Zone can cause signal loss. Seasonal density,
moisture content of the foliage, and other factors such as wind may change the amount of loss.
Plan to perform frequent and regular link tests if you must transmit through foliage.

Planning for co-location


The first step to avoid interference in wireless systems is to set all AP/BHMs to receive timing from
a synchronization source (Cluster Management Module, or Universal Global Positioning System).
This ensures that the modules are in sync and start transmitting at the same time each frame.
The second step to avoid interference is to configure parameters on all AP/BHMs of the same
frequency band in proximity such that they have compatible transmit/receive ratios (all stop
transmitting each frame before any start receiving). This avoids the problem of one AP/BHM
attempting to receive the signal from a distant SM/BHS while a nearby AP/BHM transmits, which
could overpower that signal.

Note
Refer to Frame Alignment Legacy Mode parameter of Configuration > Radio >
Advance tab for legacy product settings (See Table 149 PMP 450i AP Radio attributes -
5 GHz on page 7-142).

The following parameters on the AP/BHM determine the transmit/receive ratio:


• Downlink Data percentage
• Frame Period
• Max Range
• (reserved) Contention slots
If OFDM (450 Platform Family, PMP/PTP 230) and FSK (PMP/PTP 1x0) APs/BHMs of the same
frequency band and channel bandwidth are in proximity, or if you want BHMs set to different
parameters then you must use the Frame Calculator to identify compatible settings for APs/BHMs.
The co-location is also supported for 900 MHz PMP 450i Series APs (OFDM) and PMP 100 Series
APs (FSK).
The Frame Calculator is available on the web management interface Tools > Frame Calculator. To
use the Frame Calculator, type into the calculator various configurable parameter values for each
proximal AP/BHM and then record the resulting AP/BHM Receive Start value. Next vary the
Downlink Data percentage in each calculation and iterate until a calculated AP/BHM Receive Start
for all co-located AP/BHMs where the transmit end does not come before the receive start.

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Chapter 3: System planning Radio Frequency planning

Cambium also provides co-location tool which helps in co-location planning:


https://support.cambiumnetworks.com/files/colocationtool
For more information on 450 Platform Family co-location, see
http://www.cambiumnetworks.com/solution-papers

Multiple OFDM Access Point Clusters


When deploying multiple AP clusters in a dense area, consider aligning the clusters as shown
below. However, this is only a recommendation. An installation may dictate a different pattern of
channel assignments.

Figure 50 Example layout of 16 Access Point sectors (ABCD), 90-degree sectors

An example for assignment of frequency channels is provided in the following table.

Table 80 Example 5.8 GHz 4-channel assignment by access site

Symbol Frequency

A 5.740 GHz

B 5.780 GHz

C 5.760 GHz

D 5.800 GHz

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Chapter 3: System planning Radio Frequency planning

Figure 51 Example layout of 6 Access Point sectors (ABC), 60-degree sectors

An example for assignment of frequency channels and sector IDs is provided in the following
table.

Table 81 Example 5.8 GHz 3-channel assignment by access site

Symbol Frequency

A 5.740 GHz

B 5.760 GHz

C 5.780 GHz

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Chapter 3: System planning Radio Frequency planning

Considerations on back-to-back frequency reuse


Cambium Networks recommends using back-to-back (ABAB) frequency reuse, as shown in Figure
50. This means that a base site of four sectors can be created using two frequencies, which works
very well and helps define networks in situations where high capacity is required in a limited
amount of spectrum.
The conditions necessary to implement this plan are:
• GPS synchronization: all the access points transmit at the same time
• Uplink and Downlink timings across APs do not overlap: they can be adjusted using the frame
calculators and co-location tools provided by Cambium
• Uplink power control to ensure that all signals are received on the uplink at the same level: this
is automatically enabled on all sectors
• There are no reflecting objects which are too large in the exclusion zones defined in this
section.
• The SMs do not normally have line-of-sight (LoS) to an interfering base station. The worst-case
range ratio in Figure 50 is 5:1 which in LoS only gives 14 dB protection. Greater than 30 dB is
required for 256QAM capability. Down tilt can be used to advantage when the elevation
beamwidth is low. Also, the range ratio applies to the longest distance SM, shorter distance
SMs have a better range ratio. This frequency reuse plan may not always give 256QAM for the
longest distance SMs. It is usually a good compromise between using more spectrum and
guaranteed modulation rate.

Reflecting objects
Figure 52 shows two diagrams of the same reflecting object. Uplink interference demonstrates the
situation when the two SMs are transmitting at the same time. SM2 should be received cleanly by
the AP for Sector 3. At the same time interference can arise from SM1 via the reflecting object and
cause a lower Signal-to-Interference ratio than required at AP3. This may either cause transmission
errors which are corrected by ARQ or cause the selected modulation rate to be lowered. Either
may cause a lower throughput from SM2 and therefore sector 3.
Downlink interference shows the situation when AP3 interferes with SM1. Again, the transmission
may be reduced by errors or a reduction in modulation rate.

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Chapter 3: System planning Radio Frequency planning

Figure 52 Reflection

Reflection likelihood guidance


As shown in the previous section, reflection can cause a decrease in throughput in an ABAB base
site. This section provides guidance on whether a reflection is likely to cause interference. The first
condition for whether a reflection can cause the data rate to reduce is that the reflecting object
must be in view of the AP and the SM to re-transmit the signal. If this is not the case, then the
object cannot cause interference.
Given that the potential reflecting object is seen by the AP and the SM, there are a range of object
sizes and a range of zones where we can predict that interference will occur which may reduce the
throughput when both sector 1 and sector 3 are carrying traffic.
Figure 53 and Figure 54 show regions enumerated A, B, C, and D. We also need to consider objects
of size 1, 2, 3 and 4 and define the areas where the objects may interfere.
• object size 1: a flat building face with a clear reflecting property from sector to AP
• object size 2: random metalwork such as a wireless tower
• object size 3: a 0.5 X 0.5m flat metallic face or tree
• object size 4: a 0.2 X 0.2m random metal structure or 0.5 X 0.5m foliage.
The conditions for no interference are:
• size 2 outside zone B
• size 3 outside zone C
• size 4 outside zone D
The size 1 object can interfere at large distances. It is necessary to look at the geometry by which
reflection could occur and cause interference. Typically, this will occur at a restricted range of
azimuths and ranges.

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Chapter 3: System planning Radio Frequency planning

Figure 53 Sector Antenna

Page 3-24
Chapter 3: System planning Radio Frequency planning

Figure 54 cnMedusa Antenna

Page 3-25
Chapter 3: System planning Radio Frequency planning

Figure 53 and Figure 54 each have three diagrams scaled in meters where Figure 53 is for the
sector antenna and Figure 54 is for cnMedusa. In each figure the distances and heights assume a
typical down tilt of 4°.
In each figure the top diagram represents the clearances required at zero azimuth. The middle
diagram represents the scaling required to the top diagram to allow for differences in azimuth of
the considered reflecting object. The bottom diagram is the scaled version of the top diagram
allowing for the dotted azimuth line in the middle diagram.
PMP 450m Series AP is based on Massive MU-MIMO technology. It is a 14x14 MIMO system which
allows simultaneous communication to up to seven SMs.

Figure 55 PMP 450m Series AP antenna beam

PMP 450m installation recommendations


• For best performance it is recommended to have a clearance zone around the mast. The
clearance zone depends on the surrounding environment and the antenna’s down tilt. If the
mast is surrounded by metal then larger clearance is required compared to an environment
where the antenna is surrounded by foliage
• SMs should be spread in azimuth of AP antenna
• 450m is susceptible to movement, for best MU-MIMO performance it is recommended that the
450m AP is mounted/installed on a mast that is extremely rigid (no movement and is 100%
vertical).
• LINKPlanner can be used to plan SMs across the AP antenna azimuth

Page 3-26
Chapter 3: System planning Link planning

Link planning

This section describes factors to be considered when planning links, such as range, obstacles path
loss and throughput. LINKPlanner is recommended.

Range and obstacles


Calculate the range of the link and identify any obstacles that may affect radio performance.
Perform a survey to identify all the obstructions (such as trees or buildings) in the path and to
assess the risk of interference. This information is necessary in order to achieve an accurate link
feasibility assessment.
The 450 Platform Family is designed to operate in Non-Line-of-Sight (NLoS) and Line-of-Sight
(LoS) environments. An NLOS environment is one in which there is no optical line-of-sight, that is,
there are obstructions between the antennas.
OFDM technology can often use multi-pathing to an advantage to overcome nLOS, especially in
cases where the Fresnel zone is only partially blocked by buildings, “urban canyons”, or foliage.
OFDM tends to help especially when obstacles are near the middle of the link, and less so when
the obstacles are very near the ODU.
However, attenuation through walls and trees is substantial for any use of the 5.4 GHz and 5.8 GHz
frequency bands. The lower frequency radio waves of 900 MHz radios provide greater penetration
through walls, trees and other obstacles, making it optimal for most non-line-of-sight applications.
Even with OFDM, these products are not expected to penetrate walls or extensive trees and
foliage.

Path loss
Path loss is the amount of attenuation the radio signal undergoes between the two ends of the
link. The path loss is the sum of the attenuation of the path if there were no obstacles in the way
(Free Space Path Loss), the attenuation caused by obstacles (Excess Path Loss) and a margin to
allow for possible fading of the radio signal (Fade Margin). The following calculation needs to be
performed to judge whether a link can be installed:
L free _ space  Lexcess  L fade  Lseasonal  Lcapability

Where: Is:
L free _ space Free Space Path Loss (dB)

Lexcess Excess Path Loss (dB)

L fa d e Fade Margin Required (dB)

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Chapter 3: System planning Link planning

Seasonal Fading (dB)


Lseasonal
Lcapability Equipment Capability (dB)

Calculating Link Loss


The link loss is the total attenuation of the wireless signal between two point-to-multipoint units.
The link loss calculation is presented below:

Link Loss (dB) = Transmit power of the remote wireless unit (dBm) − Tx Cable loss (dB)
− Received power at the local unit (dBm) – Rx cable loss (dB) +
Antenna gain at the remote unit (dBi) + Antenna gain at the local unit
(dBi)

Calculating Rx Signal Level


The determinants in Rx signal level are illustrated in Figure 56.

Figure 56 Determinants in Rx signal level

Rx signal level is calculated as follows:


Rx signal level dB = Tx power − Tx cable loss + Tx antenna gain
− free space path loss + Rx antenna gain − Rx cable loss

Note
This Rx signal level calculation presumes that a clear line of sight is established
between the transmitter and receiver and that no objects encroach in the Fresnel zone.

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Chapter 3: System planning Link planning

Calculating Fade Margin


Free space path loss is a major determinant in Rx (received) signal level. Rx signal level, in turn, is
a major factor in the system operating margin (fade margin), which is calculated as follows:

System operating margin (fade margin) dB = Rx signal level dB − Rx sensitivity dB

Thus, fade margin is the difference between strength of the received signal and the strength that
the receiver requires for maintaining a reliable link. A higher fade margin is characteristic of a
more reliable link.

Adaptive modulation
Adaptive modulation ensures that the highest throughput that can be achieved instantaneously
will be obtained, taking account of propagation and interference. When the link has been installed,
web pages provide information about the link loss currently measured by the equipment, both
instantaneously and averaged. The averaged value will require maximum seasonal fading to be
added, and then the radio reliability of the link can be computed.
For details of the system throughput, link loss and maximum distance for each frequency band in
all modulation modes, see Link on page 10-52.

Page 3-29
Chapter 3: System planning Planning for connectorized units

Planning for connectorized units

This section describes factors to be considered when planning to use connectorized ODUs with
external antennas in 450 Platform Family links.

When to install connectorized units


Most of radio links can be successfully deployed with the integrated ODU. However, the integrated
units may not be sufficient in some areas, for example:
• Where the path is heavily obscured by dense woodland on an NLOS link.
• Where long LOS links are required.
• Where there are known to be high levels of interference.
In these areas, connectorized ODUs and external antennas should be used.

Choosing external antennas


When selecting external antennas, consider the following factors:
• The required antenna gain.
• Ease of mounting and alignment.
• Use dual-polarization antenna (as the integrated antenna).

Note
Enter the antenna gain and cable loss into the Installation Wizard, if the country
selected has an EIRP limit, the corresponding maximum transmit power will be
calculated automatically by the unit.

Calculating RF cable length (5.8 GHz FCC only)


The 5.8 GHz band FCC approval for the product is based on tests with a cable loss between the
ODU and antenna of not less than 1.2 dB. If cable loss is below 1.2 dB with a 1.3 m (4 ft) diameter
external antenna, the connectorized 450 Platform Family may exceed the maximum radiated
spurious emissions allowed under FCC 5.8 GHz rules.
Cable loss depends mainly upon cable type and length. To meet or exceed the minimum loss of
1.2 dB, use cables of the type and length specified in Table 82 (source: Times Microwave). This
data excludes connector losses.

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Chapter 3: System planning Planning for connectorized units

Table 82 RF cable lengths required to achieve 1.2 dB loss at 5.8 GHz

RF cable type Minimum cable length

LMR100 0.6 m (1.9 ft)

LMR200 1.4 m (4.6 ft)

LMR300 2.2 m (7.3 ft)

LMR400 3.4 m (11.1 ft)

LMR600 5.0 m (16.5 ft)

Page 3-31
Chapter 3: System planning Data network planning

Data network planning

This section describes factors to be considered when planning 450 Platform Family data networks.

Understanding addresses
A basic understanding of Internet Protocol (IP) address and subnet mask concepts is required for
engineering your IP network.

IP address
The IP address is a 32-bit binary number that has four parts (octets). This set of four octets has two
segments, depending on the class of IP address. The first segment identifies the network. The
second identifies the hosts or devices on the network. The subnet mask marks a boundary
between these two sub-addresses.

Dynamic or static addressing


For any computer to communicate with a module, the computer must be configured to either
• use DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol). In this case, when not connected to the
network, the computer derives an IP address on the 169.254 network within two minutes.
• have an assigned static IP address (for example, 169.254.1.5) on the 169.254 network.

Note
If an IP address that is set in the module is not the 169.254.x.x network address, then
the network operator must assign the computer a static IP address in the same subnet.

When a DHCP server is not found


To operate on a network, a computer requires an IP address, a subnet mask, and possibly a
gateway address. Either a DHCP server automatically assigns this configuration information to a
computer on a network or an operator must input these items.
When a computer is brought on line and a DHCP server is not accessible (such as when the server
is down or the computer is not plugged into the network), Microsoft and Apple operating systems
default to an IP address of 169.254.x.x and a subnet mask of 255.255.0.0 (169.254/16, where /16
indicates that the first 16 bits of the address range are identical among all members of the subnet).

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Chapter 3: System planning Data network planning

DNS Client
The DNS Client is used to resolve names of management servers within the operator’s
management domain (see Figure 57). This feature allows hostname configuration for NTP servers,
Authorization Servers, DHCP relay servers, and SNMP trap servers. Operators may choose to
either enter in the FQDN (Fully Qualified Domain Name) for the host name or to manually enter the
IP addresses of the servers.

Figure 57 Cambium networks management domain

Network Address Translation (NAT)


NAT, DHCP Server, DHCP Client and DMZ in SM
The system provides NAT (network address translation) for SMs in the following combinations of
NAT and DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol):
• NAT Disabled
• NAT with DHCP Client (DHCP selected as the Connection Type of the WAN interface) and DHCP
Server
• NAT with DHCP Client (DHCP selected as the Connection Type of the WAN interface)
• NAT with DHCP Server
• NAT without DHCP

NAT
NAT isolates devices connected to the Ethernet/wired side of a SM from being seen directly from
the wireless side of the SM. With NAT enabled, the SM has an IP address for transport traffic
(separate from its address for management), terminates transport traffic, and allows you to assign
a range of IP addresses to devices that are connected to the Ethernet/wired side of the SM.

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Chapter 3: System planning Data network planning

In the Cambium system, NAT supports many protocols, including HTTP, ICMP (Internet Control
Message Protocols), and FTP (File Transfer Protocol). For virtual private network (VPN)
implementation, L2TP over IPSec (Level 2 Tunneling Protocol over IP Security) and PPTP (Point to
Point Tunneling Protocol) are supported.

DHCP
DHCP enables a device to be assigned a new IP address and TCP/IP parameters, including a default
gateway, whenever the device reboots. Thus DHCP reduces configuration time, conserves IP
addresses, and allows modules to be moved to a different network within the Cambium system.
In conjunction with the NAT features, each SM provides:
• A DHCP server that assigns IP addresses to computers connected to the SM by Ethernet
protocol.
• A DHCP client that receives an IP address for the SM from a network DHCP server.

DMZ
In conjunction with the NAT features, a DMZ (demilitarized zone) allows the assignment of one IP
address behind the SM for a device to logically exist outside the firewall and receive network
traffic. The first three octets of this IP address must be identical to the first three octets of the NAT
private IP address.

Developing an IP addressing scheme


Network elements are accessed through IP Version 4 (IPv4) addressing.
A proper IP addressing method is critical to the operation and security of a network.
Each module requires an IP address on the network. This IP address is for only management
purposes. For security, you must either:
• Assign a non-routable IP address.
• Assign a routable IP address only if a firewall is present to protect the module.

You assign an IP addresses to computers and network components by either static or dynamic IP
addressing. You will also assign the appropriate subnet mask and network gateway to each
module.

Address Resolution Protocol


As previously stated, the MAC address identifies a module in:
• Communications between modules.
• The data that modules store about each other.

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Chapter 3: System planning Data network planning

The IP address is essential for data delivery through a router interface. Address Resolution
Protocol (ARP) correlates MAC addresses to IP addresses.
For communications to outside the network segment, ARP reads the network gateway address of
the router and translates it into the MAC address of the router. Then the communication is sent to
MAC address (physical network interface card) of the router.
For each router between the sending module and the destination, this sequence applies. The ARP
correlation is stored until the ARP cache times out.

Allocating subnets
The subnet mask is a 32-bit binary number that filters the IP address. Where a subnet mask
contains a bit set to 1, the corresponding bit in the IP address is part of the network address.

Example IP address and subnet mask


In Figure 58, the first 16 bits of the 32-bit IP address identify the network:

Figure 58 Example of IP address in Class B subnet


Octet 1 Octet 2 Octet 3 Octet 4
IP address 169.254.1.1 10101001 11111110 00000001 00000001
Subnet mask 255.255.0.0 11111111 11111111 00000000 00000000

In this example, the network address is 169.254 and 216 (65,536) hosts are addressable.

Selecting non-routable IP addresses


The factory default assignments for network elements are:
• Unique MAC address
• IP address of 169.254.1.1
• Subnet mask of 255.255.0.0
• Network gateway address of 169.254.0.0
For each radio and CMM4, assign an IP address that is both consistent with the IP addressing plan
for your network and cannot be accessed from the Internet. IP addresses within the following
ranges are not routable from the Internet, regardless of whether a firewall is configured:
• 10.0.0.0 – 10.255.255.255
• 172.16.0.0 – 172.31.255.255
• 192.168.0.0 – 192.168.255.255

Also, the subnet mask and network gateway for each CMM4 can be assigned.

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Chapter 3: System planning Data network planning

Translation bridging
Optionally, the AP can be configured to change the source MAC address in every packet it receives
from its SMs to the MAC address of the SM/BHS that bridged the packet, before forwarding the
packet toward the public network. In this case:
• Not more than 128 IP devices at any time are valid to send data to the AP from behind the SM.
• SM populates the Translation Table tab of its Statistics web page, displaying the MAC address
and IP address of all the valid connected devices.
• Each entry in the Translation Table is associated with the number of minutes that have elapsed
since the last packet transfer between the connected device and the SM.
• If 128 are connected, and another attempt to connect:
o If no Translation Table entry is older than 255 minutes, the attempt is ignored.
o If an entry is older than 255 minutes, the oldest entry is removed and the attempt is
successful.
• The Send Untranslated ARP parameter in the General tab of the Configuration page can be:
o Disabled, so that the AP overwrites the MAC address in ARP packets before forwarding
them.
o Enabled, so that the AP forwards ARP packets regardless of whether it has overwritten the
MAC address.
This is the Translation Bridging feature, which you can enable in the General page of the
Configuration web page in the AP. When this feature is disabled, the setting of the
Send Untranslated ARP parameter has no effect, because all packets are forwarded untranslated
(with the source MAC address intact). See Address Resolution Protocol on Page 3-34.

Engineering VLANs
The radios support VLAN functionality as defined in the 802.1Q (Virtual LANs) specification, except
for the following aspects of that specification:
• Protocols:
o Generic Attribute Registration Protocol (GARP) GARV
o Spanning Tree Protocol (STP)
o Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP)
o GARP Multicast Registration Protocol (GMRP)
• Embedded source routing (ERIF) in the 802.1Q header
• Multicast pruning
• Flooding unknown unicast frames in the downlink

As an additional exception, the AP/BHM does not flood downward the unknown unicast frames to
the SM/BHS.
A VLAN configuration in Layer 2 establishes a logical group within the network. Each computer in
the VLAN, regardless of initial or eventual physical location, has access to the same data. For the
network operator, this provides flexibility in network segmentation, simpler management, and
enhanced security.

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Chapter 3: System planning Data network planning

Special case VLAN numbers


This system handles special case VLAN numbers according to IEEE specifications:

Table 83 Special case VLAN IDs

VLAN Number Purpose Usage Constraint

These packets have 802.1p priority, but are Must not be used as a
0
otherwise handled as untagged. management VLAN.

Although not noted as special case by IEEE


specifications, these packets identify traffic
Must not be used for
1 that was untagged upon ingress into the SM
system VLAN traffic.
and must remain untagged upon egress.
This policy is hard-coded in the AP.

4095 This VLAN is reserved for internal use. Must not be used at all.

SM membership in VLANs
With the supported VLAN functionality, the radios determine bridge forwarding on the basis of not
only the destination MAC address, but also the VLAN ID of the destination. This provides flexibility
in how SMs are used:
• Each SM can be a member in its own VLAN.
• Each SM can be in its own broadcast domain, such that only the radios that are members of
the VLAN can see broadcast and multicast traffic to and from the SM.
• The network operator can define a work group of SMs, regardless of the AP(s) to which they
register.

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Chapter 3: System planning Data network planning

PMP 450 Platform Family modules provide the VLAN frame filters that are described in Table 84.

Table 84 VLAN filters in point-to-multipoint modules

then a frame is discarded if…


Where VLAN is active,
entering the bridge/ because of this VLAN
if this parameter value
NAT switch through… filter in the software:
is selected …
Ethernet… TCP/IP…

any combination of
with a VID not in the
VLAN Ingress
membership table
parameter settings

any combination of with a VID not in


VLAN the Local Ingress
parameter settings membership table

Allow Frame Types:


with no 802.1Q tag Only Tagged
Tagged Frames Only

Allow Frame Types: with an 802.1Q tag,


Only Untagged
Untagged Frames Only regardless of VID

Local SM Management:
Disable in the SM, or with an 802.1Q tag
All Local SM and a VID in the Local SM Management
Management: membership table
Disable in the AP

leaving the bridge/


NAT switch through…

Ethernet… TCP/IP…

any combination of
with a VID not in the
VLAN Egress
membership table
parameter settings

any combination of with a VID not in


VLAN the Local Egress
parameter settings membership table

Priority on VLANs (802.1p)


The radios can prioritize traffic based on the eight priorities described in the IEEE 802.1p
specification. When the high-priority channel is enabled on a SM, regardless of whether VLAN is
enabled on the AP for the sector, packets received with a priority of 4 through 7 in the 802.1p field
are forwarded onto the high-priority channel.

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Chapter 3: System planning Data network planning

For example, when the high priority and low priority channels are enabled on an SM, medium and
ultra high priority channels are disabled.
Operators may configure priority precedence as 802.1p Then Diffserv (Default) or Diffserv Then
802.1p. Since these priority precedence configurations are independent between the AP and SM,
this setting must be configured on both the AP and SM to ensure that the precedence is adhered to
by both sides of the link.
VLAN settings can also cause the module to convert received non-VLAN packets into VLAN
packets. In this case, the 802.1p priority in packets leaving the module is set to the priority
established by the DiffServ configuration.
If VLAN is enabled, immediately monitor traffic to ensure that the results are as desired. For
example, high-priority traffic may block low-priority.

Q-in-Q DVLAN (Double-VLAN) Tagging (802.1ad)


PMP and PTP modules can be configured with 802.1ad Q-in-Q DVLAN (Double-VLAN) tagging
which is a way for an operator to put an 802.1Q VLAN inside of an 802.1ad VLAN. A nested VLAN,
which is the original 802.1Q tag and a new second 802.1ad tag, allows for bridging of VLAN traffic
across a network and segregates the broadcast domains of 802.1Q VLANs. Q-in-Q can be used
with PPPoE and/or NAT.
The 802.1ad standard defines the S-VLAN as the Service Provider VLAN and the C-VLAN as the
customer VLAN. The radio software does 2-layer Q-in-Q whereby the C-VLAN is the 802.1Q tag and
the S-VLAN is the second layer Q tag as shown in Table 85.

Table 85 Q-in-Q Ethernet frame

S-VLAN EthType C-VLAN EthType


Ethernet Header IP Data EthType 0x0800
0x88a8 0x8100

The 802.1ad S-VLAN is the outer VLAN that is configurable on the Configuration > VLAN web page
of the AP/BHM. The Q-in-Q EtherType parameter is configured with a default EtherType of 0x88a8
in addition to four alternate EtherTypes that can be configured to aid in interoperability with
existing networks that use a different EtherType than the default.
The C-VLAN is the inner VLAN tag, which is the same as 802.1Q. As a top-level concept, this
operates on the outermost tag at any given time, either “pushing” a tag on or “popping” a tag off.
This means packets will at most transition from an 802.1Q frame to an 801.ad frame (with a tag
“pushed” on) or an untagged 802.1 frame (with the tag “popped” off. Similarly, for an 802.1ad
frame, this can only transition from an 802.1ad frame to an 802.1Q frame (with the tag “popped”
off) since the radio software only supports 2 levels of tags.

Page 3-39
Chapter 3: System planning Network management planning

Network management planning

This section describes how to plan for 450 Platform Family links to be managed remotely using
SNMP.

Planning for SNMP operation


Cambium modules provide the following SNMP traps for automatic notifications to the NMS:
• coldStart, which signals that the SNMPv2c element is reinitializing itself and that its
configuration may have been altered.
• warmStart, which signals that the SNMPv2c element is reinitializing such that its configuration
is unaltered.
• authenticationFailure, which signals that the SNMPv2c element has received a protocol
message that is not properly authenticated (contingent on the snmpEnableAuthenTraps object
setting).
• linkDown, as defined in RFC 1573
• linkUp, as defined in RFC 1573
• egpNeighborLoss, as defined in RFC 1213
• whispGPSInSync, which signals a transition from not synchronized to synchronized.
• whispGPSOutSync, which signals a transition from synchronized to not synchronized.
• whispRegComplete, which signals registration completed.
• whispRegLost, which signals registration lost.
• whispRadarDetected, which signals that the one-minute scan has been completed, radar has
been detected and the radio will shut down.
• whispRadarEnd, which signals that the one-minute scan has been completed, radar has not
been detected and the radio will resume normal operation.

Note
The proprietary MIBs are provided in the 450 Platform Family software download files
in the support website (see Contacting Cambium Networks on page 1).

Enabling SNMP
Enable the SNMP interface for use by configuring the following attributes in the SNMP
Configuration page:
• SNMP State (default disabled)
• SNMP Version (default SNMPv2c)
• SNMP Port Number (default 161)

Page 3-40
Chapter 3: System planning Security planning

Security planning

This section describes how to plan for 450 Platform Family links to operate in secure mode.
• Managing module access by passwords
• Filtering protocols and ports
• Port Configuration

Isolating AP/BHM from the Internet


Ensure that the IP addresses of the AP/BHM in the network:
• are not routable over the Internet.
• do not share the subnet of the IP address of your user.
RFC 1918, Address Allocation for Private Subnets, reserves for private IP networks three blocks of
IP addresses that are not routable over the Internet:
• /8 subnets have one reserved network, 10.0.0.0 to 10.255.255.255.
• /16 subnets have 16 reserved networks, 172.16.0.0 to 172.31.255.255.
• /24 subnets have 256 reserved networks, 192.168.0.0 to 192.168.255.255.

Encrypting radio transmissions


Cambium fixed wireless broadband IP systems employ the following form of encryption for
security of the wireless link:
AES (Advanced Encryption Standard): An over-the-air link encryption option that uses the Rijndael
algorithm and 128-bit keys to establish a higher level of security than DES. AES products are
certified as compliant with the Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS 197) in the U.S.A.
The default encryption setting for 450 Platform Family ODU is "None".

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Planning for HTTPS operation


Before starting to configure HTTPS operation, ensure that the cryptographic material listed in
Table 86 is available.

Table 86 HTTPS security material

Item Description Quantity required

User Defined Security The banner provides warnings and notices Normally one per link.
Banner to be read by the user before logging in to This depends upon
the ODU. Use text that is appropriate to network policy.
the network security policy.

Port numbers for HTTP, Port numbers allocated by the network. As allocated by
HTTPS and Telnet network.

Planning for SNMPv3 operation


SNMP security mode
Decide how SNMPv3 security will be configured.
MIB-based security management uses standard SNMPv3 MIBs to configure the user-based
security model and the view-based access control model. This approach provides considerable
flexibility, allowing a network operator to tailor views and security levels appropriate for different
types of user. MIB-based security management may allow a network operator to take advantage of
built-in security management capabilities of existing network managers.
Web-based security management allows an operator to configure users, security levels, privacy
and authentication protocols, and passphrases using the 450 Platform Family web-based
management interface. The capabilities supported are somewhat less flexible than those
supported using the MIB-based security management, but will be sufficient in many applications.
Selection of web-based management for SNMPv3 security disables the MIB-based security
management. 450 Platform Family does not support concurrent use of MIB-based and web-based
management of SNMPv3 security.

Web-based management of SNMPv3 security


Initial configuration of SNMPv3 security is available only to HTTP or HTTPS user accounts with
security role of Security Officer.
Identify the format used for SNMP Engine ID. The following formats are available:
• MAC address (default)
• 5 and 32 hex characters (the hex character input is driven by RFC 3411 recommendations on
the Engine ID)

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Identify the user names and security roles of initial SNMPv3 users. Two security roles are
available:
• Read Only
• System Administrator
Identify the security level for each of the security roles. Three security levels are available:
(a) No authentication, no privacy
(b) Authentication, no privacy
(c) Authentication, privacy
If authentication is required, identify the protocol. The authentication protocol available is MD5.
If privacy will be used, identify the protocol. The privacy protocol available is cbc-des.

Managing module access by passwords


From the factory, each module has a preconfigured administrator-level account in the name root,
which initially requires no associated password. When you upgrade a module:
• An account is created in the name admin.
• Both admin and root inherit the password that was previously used to access the module, if:
o Full Access password, if one was set.
o Display-Only Access password, if one was set and no Full Access password was set.

Caution
If you use Wireless Manager, do not delete the root account from any module. If you
use a NMS that communicates with modules through SNMP, do not delete the root
account from any module unless you first can confirm that the NMS does not rely on
the root account for access to the modules.

Each module supports four or fewer user accounts, regardless of account levels. The available
levels are
• ADMINISTRATOR, who has full read and write permissions. This is the level of the root and
admin users, as well as any other administrator accounts that one of them creates.
• INSTALLER, who has permissions identical to those of ADMINISTRATOR except that the
installer cannot add or delete users or change the password of any other user.
• TECHNICIAN, who has permissions to modify basic radio parameters and view informational
web pages.
• GUEST, who has no write permissions and only a limited view of General Status tab.
• Admin, Installer and Tech accounts can be configured as READ-ONLY. This will allow the
account to only see the items.
The ability to view information of General Status tab can be controlled by the "Site Information
Viewable to Guest Users" under the SNMP tab.

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From the factory default state, configure passwords for both the root and admin account at the
ADMINISTRATOR permission level, using the Account > Change Users Password page. (If
configure only one of these, then the other will still require no password for access into it and thus
remain a security risk.) If you are intent on configuring only one of them, delete the admin account.
The root account is the only account that CNUT uses to update the module.
After a password has been set for any ADMINISTRATOR-level account, initial access to the module
GUI opens the view of GUEST level.

Planning for RADIUS operation


Configure RADIUS where remote authentication is required for users of the web-based interface.
Remote authentication has the following advantages:
• Control of passwords can be centralized.
• Management of user accounts can be more sophisticated. For example; users can be prompted
by a network manager to change passwords at regular intervals. As another example,
passwords can be checked for inclusion of dictionary words and phrases.
• Passwords can be updated without reconfiguring multiple network elements.
• User accounts can be disabled without reconfiguring multiple network elements.
Remote authentication has one significant disadvantage in a wireless link product such as 450
Platform Family. If the wireless link is down, a unit on the remote side of the broken link may be
prevented from contacting a RADIUS Server, with the result that users are unable to access the
web-based interface.
One useful strategy would be to combine RADIUS authentication for normal operation with a
single locally-authenticated user account for emergency use.
PMP 450 Platform Family SM provides a choice of the following authentication methods:
• Phase 1:
o EAP-MSCHAPv2
o EAP-TTLS
o EAP PEAP
• Phase 2:
o PAP
o CHAP
o MSCHAPv2
Ensure that the authentication method selected in 450 Platform Family is supported by the RADIUS
server.

Filtering protocols and ports


Configure filters for specified protocols and ports from leaving the AP/BHM and SM/BHS and
entering the network. This protects the network from both intended and inadvertent packet loading
or probing by network users. By keeping the specified protocols or ports off the network, this
feature also provides a level of protection to users from each other.

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Chapter 3: System planning Security planning

Protocol and port filtering is set per AP/SM/BH. Except for filtering of SNMP ports, filtering occurs
as packets leave the AP/SM/BH.
For example, if SM is configured to filter SNMP, then SNMP packets are blocked from entering the
SM and, thereby, from interacting with the SNMP portion of the protocol stack on the SM.

Port Filtering with NAT Enabled


Where NAT is enabled on the SM/BHS, the filtering can be enabled for only the user-defined ports.
The following are examples for situations where the configure port can be filtered where NAT is
enabled:
• To block a subscriber from using FTP, you can filter Ports 20 and 21 (the FTP ports) for both the
TCP and UDP protocols.
• To block a subscriber from access to SNMP, you can filter Ports 161 and 162 (the SNMP ports)
for both the TCP and UDP protocols.

Note
In only the SNMP case, filtering occurs before the packet interacts with the protocol
stack.

Protocol and Port Filtering with NAT Disabled


Where NAT is disabled on the SM/BHS, the filtering can be enabled for both protocols and the
three user-defined ports. Using the check boxes on the interface, it can be either:
• Allow all protocols except those that user wish to block.
• Block all protocols except those that user wish to allow.
Allow or block any of the following protocols:
• PPPoE (Point to Point Protocol over Ethernet)
• Any or all the following IPv4 (Internet Protocol version 4) protocols:
o SMB (Network Neighborhood)
o SNMP
o Bootp Client
o Bootp Server
o Up to 3 user-defined ports
o All other IPv4 traffic (see Figure 29)
• Any or all of the following IPv6 (Internet Protocol version 6) protocols:
o SMB (Network Neighborhood)
o SNMP
o Bootp Client
o Bootp Server
o Up to 3 user-defined ports

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Chapter 3: System planning Security planning

o All other IPv6 traffic (see Figure 29)


• Filter Direction – Upstream and Downstream
• ARP (Address Resolution Protocol)

Figure 59 Categorical protocol filtering

BootP BootP
Client Server

IPv4
SNMP Multica
st
All
Other
IPv4
User
Defined SMB
Port 1

User User
Defined Defined
Port 2 Port 3

PPPoE ARP
All
Others

The following are example situations in which the protocol filtering is configured where NAT is
disabled:
• If a subscriber is blocked from only PPPoE and SNMP, then the subscriber retains access to all
other protocols and all ports.
• If PPPoE, IPv4, and Uplink Broadcast are blocked, and check the All others selection, then only
Address Resolution Protocol is not filtered.
The ports filtered because of protocol selections in the Protocol Filtering tab of the SM/BHS are
listed in Table 87.

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Table 87 Ports filtered per protocol selections

Protocol Selected Port Filtered (Blocked)

Destination Ports UDP: 137, 138, 139, 445, 3702 and 1900
SMB
Destination Ports TCP: 137, 138, 139, 445, 2869, 5357 and 5358

SNMP Destination Ports TCP and UDP: 161 and 162

Bootp Client Source Port 68 UDP

Bootp Server Source Port 67 UDP

User Defined Port 1..3 User defined ports for filtering UDP and TCP

IPv4 Multicast Block IPv4 packet types except other filters defined

IPv6 Multicast Block IPv6 packet types except other filters defined

ARP Filter all Ethernet packet type 806

Upstream Applies packet filtering to traffic coming into the FEC interface

Applies packet filtering to traffic destined to exit the FEC


Downstream
interface

Port Configuration
450 Platform Family supports access to various communication protocols and only the ports
required for these protocols are available for access by external entities. Operators may change
the port numbers for these protocols via the radio GUI or SNMP.

Table 88 Device default port numbers

Port Usage Port Usage Device

21 FTP Listen Port AP, SM

80 HTTP Listen Port AP, SM

443 HTTPS Listen Port AP, SM

161 SNMP port Listen Port AP, SM

162 SNMP trap port Destination Port AP, SM

514 Syslog Server port Destination Port AP, SM

1812 Standard RADIUS port Destination Port AP

1813 Standard RADIUS accounting port Destination Port AP, SM

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Chapter 3: System planning Security planning

Encrypting downlink broadcasts


An AP can be enabled to encrypt downlink broadcast packets such as the following:
• ARP
• NetBIOS
• broadcast packets containing video data on UDP.
The encryption used is DES for a DES-configured module and AES for an AES-configured module.
Before the Encrypt Downlink Broadcast feature is enabled on the AP, air link security must be
enabled on the AP.

Isolating SMs in PMP


In an AP, SMs in the sector can be prevented from directly communicating with each other. In
CMM4, the connected APs can be prevented from directly communicating with each other, which
prevents SMs that are in different sectors of a cluster from communicating with each other.
In the AP, the SM Isolation parameter is available in the General tab of the Configuration web
page. Configure the SM Isolation feature by any of the following selections from drop-down menu:
• Disable SM Isolation (the default selection). This allows full communication between SMs.
• Enable Option 1 - Block SM destined packets from being forwarded. This prevents both
multicast/broadcast and unicast SM-to-SM communication.
• Enable Option 2 - Forward SM destined packets upstream. This not only prevents
multicast/broadcast and unicast SM-to-SM communication but also sends the packets, which
otherwise may have been handled SM to SM, through the Ethernet port of the AP.
In the CMM and the CMM4, SM isolation treatment is the result of how to manage the port-based
VLAN feature of the embedded switch, where all traffic can be switched from any AP to a specified
uplink port. However, this is not packet level switching. It is not based on VLAN IDs.

Filtering management through Ethernet


Configure the SM to disallow any device that is connected to its Ethernet port from accessing the
IP address of the SM. If the Ethernet Access Control parameter is set to Enabled, then:
• No attempt to access the SM management interface (by http, SNMP, ftp, or tftp) through
Ethernet is granted.
• Any attempt to access the SM management interface over the air (by IP address, presuming
that LAN1 Network Interface Configuration, Network Accessibility is set to Public, or by link
from the Session Status or Remote Subscribers tab in the AP) is unaffected.

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Allowing management from only specified IP addresses


The Security sub-menu of the Configuration web page in the AP/BHM and SM/BHS includes the IP
Access Control parameter. Specify one, two, or three IP addresses that must be allowed to access
the management interface (by HTTP, SNMP, FTP or TFTP).
If the selection is:
• IP Access Filtering Disabled, then management access is allowed from any IP address, even if
the Allowed Source IP 1 to 3 parameters are populated.
• IP Access Filtering Enabled, and specify at least one address in the Allowed Source IP 1 to 3
parameter, then management access is limited to the specified address(es).

Configuring management IP by DHCP


The Configuration > IP web page of every radio contains a LAN1 Network Interface Configuration,
DHCP State parameter that, if enabled, causes the IP configuration (IP address, subnet mask, and
gateway IP address) to be obtained through DHCP instead of the values of those individual
parameters. The setting of this DHCP state parameter is also viewable, but is not settable, in the
Network Interface tab of the Home page.
In the SM/BHS, this parameter is settable
• in the NAT tab of the Configuration web page, but only if NAT is enabled.
• in the IP tab of the Configuration web page, but only if the Network Accessibility parameter in
the IP tab is set to Public.

DHCP option 81
The DHCP server can be used to register and update the pointer (PTR) and host (A) DNS resource
records on behalf of its DHCP-enabled clients.
The DHCP option 81 permits the client to provide its fully qualified domain name (FQDN) as well as
instructions to the DHCP server on how it would like the server to process DNS dynamic updates
(if any) on its behalf. The hostname is populated as SiteName.DomainName depending upon
following conditions:
• If Sitename is default i.e. No Site Name, mac address will be used instead.
• The SiteName should only be a-z | A-Z | 0-9 and period(.) and dash (-).
• The domain name part should not start or end with dash (-).
• The underscore or space in domain name part will be converted to dash (-), anything else apart
from valid characters will be skipped.

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Controlling PPPoE PADI Downlink Forwarding


The AP supports the control of forwarding of PPPoE PADI (PPPoE Active Discovery Initiation)
packets. This forwarding is configured on the AP GUI Configuration > Radio page by parameter
PPPoE PADI Downlink Forwarding. When set to “Enabled”, the AP allows downstream and
upstream transmission of PPPoE PADI packets. When set to “Disabled”, the AP does NOT allow
PPPoE PADI packets to be sent out of the AP RF interface (downstream) but will allow PPPoE PADI
packets to enter the RF interface (upstream) and exit the Ethernet interface.

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Chapter 3: System planning Remote AP Deployment

Remote AP Deployment

In cases where the subscriber population is widely distributed, or conditions such as geography
restrict network deployment, you can add a Remote AP to:
• provide high-throughput service to near LoS business subscribers.
• reach around obstructions or penetrate foliage with non-LoS throughput.
• reach new, especially widely distributed, residential subscribers with broadband service.
• pass sync to an additional RF hop.
In the remote AP configuration, a remote AP is co-located with an SM. The remote AP distributes
the signal to SMs that are logically behind the co-located SM. A remote AP deployment is
illustrated in Figure 60.

Figure 60 Remote AP deployment

The co-located SM receives data in one channel, and the remote AP must redistribute the data in a
different channel. The two channels need to have a frequency gap equal to at least two times the
used channel bandwidth.
Base your selection of frequency band ranges on regulatory restrictions, environmental conditions,
and throughput requirements.

Note
Each relay hop (additional daisy-chained remote AP) adds approximately 5-7 msec
round trip latency.

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Chapter 3: System planning Remote AP Deployment

Remote AP (RAP) Performance


The performance of a remote AP is identical to the AP performance in cluster. Throughputs,
ranges, and antenna coverage are identical.
As with all equipment operating in the unlicensed spectrum, Cambium strongly recommends that
you perform site surveys before you add network elements. These will indicate that spectrum is
available in the area where you want to grow. Keep in mind that:
• non-LoS ranges heavily depend on environmental conditions.
• in most regions, not all frequencies are available.
• your deployments must be consistent with local regulatory restrictions.

Example Use Case for RF Obstructions


A remote AP can be used to provide last-mile access to a community where RF obstructions
prevent SMs from communicating with the higher-level AP in cluster. For example, you may be
able to use 900 MHz for the last mile between a remote AP and the outlying SMs where these
subscribers cannot form good links to a higher-level 5 GHz AP. In this case, the ability of the 900-
MHz wavelength to be effective around foliage at short range solves the foliage penetration
problem.
An example of this use case is shown in Figure 61.
In this example, the 5 GHz AP is a PMP 450i AP in the 5.8 GHz band operating on a 20 MHz channel
with a 2.5 ms frame; the SMs are 5 GHz PMP 450 integrated SMs. The SM connected to the remote
AP is a PMP 450i SM.
The remote AP is a PMP 450i AP in the 900 MHz band, also operating in a 20 MHz channel with a
2.5 ms frame; the SMs are 900 MHz PMP 450 connectorized SMs using the Cambium 23 dBi gain
antenna.

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Chapter 3: System planning Remote AP Deployment

Figure 61 Example for 900-MHz remote AP behind 5 GHz SM

The 5 GHz modules provide a sustained aggregate throughput of up to 126 Mbps to the sector.
One of the SMs in the sector is wired to a 900-MHz remote AP, which provides NLoS sustained
aggregate throughput2 of:
• 126 Mbps to 900-MHz SMs up to 4 miles away in the sector.
• 94 Mbps to 900-MHz SMs between 4 and 10 miles away in the sector.

Example Use Case for Passing Sync


All radios support the remote AP functionality. The BHS and the SM can reliably pass the sync
pulse, and the BHM and AP can reliably receive it.
However, not all devices are compatible with all other devices. The following table shows which
SMs can be connected to which APs.

Devices PMP 450 AP/BHM PMP 450i AP/BHM PMP 450m AP

PMP 450 SM/BHS X

PMP 450i SM/BHS X X

2 NLoS ranges depend on environmental conditions. Your results may vary from these.

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Chapter 3: System planning Remote AP Deployment

Examples of passing sync over cable are shown under Passing Sync in an Additional Hop on page
3-56.
For PMP 450, the sync is passed in a cable that connects Pins 1 and 6 of the RJ-11 timing ports of
the two modules.
For PMP 450i/450m the sync is passed in a cable that connects Pins7 and 8 of the RJ-45 timing
ports of the two modules.
When connecting modules in this way, make sure the AP and SM are properly configured, as
described in the Wiring to Extend Network Sync.

Physical Connections Involving the Remote AP


The SM to which a remote AP is connected to can be either an SM that serves a customer or an
SM that simply serves as a relay. If the SM serves a customer, wire the remote AP to the SM as
shown in Figure 62.

Figure 62 Remote AP wired to SM that also serves a customer

If the SM simply serves as a relay, you must use a straight-through RJ-45 female-to-female coupler
and wire the SM to the remote AP as shown in Figure 63.

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Chapter 3: System planning Remote AP Deployment

Figure 63 Remote AP wired to SM that serves as a relay

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Chapter 3: System planning Remote AP Deployment

Passing Sync signal


Passing Sync in a Single Hop
Network sync can be passed in a single hop in the following network designs:
• Design 1
o A CMM provides sync to a co-located AP.
o This AP sends the sync over the air to SMs.
• Design 2
o A CMM provides sync to a co-located BH timing master.
o This BH timing master sends the sync over the air to a BH timing slave.

Passing Sync in an Additional Hop


Network sync can be extended by one additional link in any of the following network designs:

Note
In each of these following designs, Link 2 is not on the same frequency band as Link 4.
(For example, Link 2 may be a 5.2 GHz link while Link 4 is a 5.7 or 2.4 GHz link.)

• Design 3
o A CMM provides sync to a co-located AP.
o This AP sends the sync over the air to an SM.
o This SM delivers the sync to a co-located AP.
o This AP passes the sync in the additional link over the air to SMs.
This design is illustrated in Figure 64.

Figure 64 Additional link to extend network sync, Design 3

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Chapter 3: System planning Remote AP Deployment

• Design 4
o A CMM provides sync to a co-located AP.
o This AP sends the sync over the air to an SM.
o This SM delivers the sync to a co-located BHM.
o This BHM passes the sync in the additional link over the air to a BHS.
This design is illustrated in Figure 65.

Figure 65 Additional link to extend network sync, Design 4

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Chapter 3: System planning Remote AP Deployment

• Design 5
o A CMM provides sync to a co-located BHM or the BHM generates timing.
o This BHM sends the sync over the air to a BHS.
o This BHS delivers the sync to a co-located AP.
This AP passes the sync in the additional link over the air to SMs.
This design is illustrated in Figure 66.

Figure 66 Additional link to extend network sync, Design 5

Wiring and configuration information for this sync extension is described under Wiring to Extend
Network Sync on page 3-59.

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Chapter 3: System planning Remote AP Deployment

Wiring to Extend Network Sync


The following procedure can be used to extend network sync by one additional hop, as described
under Passing Sync in an Additional Hop on page 3-56. When a co-located module receives sync
over the air, the co-located modules can be wired to pass the sync as follows:
1. Connect the GPS Utility ports of the co-located modules using a sync cable with RJ-11 (for
450) or RJ-45 (for 450i/450m) connectors.
2. Set the Sync Input parameter on the Configuration page of the co-located AP or BH timing
master to AutoSync.
3. Set the Device Type parameter on the Configuration page of the co-located AP or BH
timing master to Remote.
4. Set the Sync Output to Aux Port parameter on the Configuration page of the co-located AP
or BH timing master to Disabled.
5. Set the UGPS Power parameter on the Configuration page of the co-located AP or BH
timing master to Disabled.
6. Set the Frame Timing Pulse Gated parameter on the Configuration page of the co-located
SM or BH timing slave to Enable.

Note
This setting prevents interference if the SM or BH timing slave loses sync.

Figure 67 Co-located AP or BH timing master Sync Setting configuration

Page 3-59
Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information
This chapter provides end user license agreements and regulatory notifications.

Caution
Intentional or unintentional changes or modifications to the equipment must not be
made unless under the express consent of the party responsible for compliance. Any
such modifications could void the user’s authority to operate the equipment and will
void the manufacturer’s warranty.

Attention
Changements ou modifications Intentionnels ou non de l'équipement ne doivent pas
être entrepris sans l'autorisation de l’organisme responsable de la déclaration de
conformité. Ces modifications ou changements pourraient invalider le droit de
l'utilisateur à utiliser cet appareil et annuleraient la garantie du fabricant.

The following topics are described in this chapter:


• Cambium Networks end user license agreement on page 4-2 contains the Cambium and third-
party license agreements for the 450 Platform Family ODUs.
• Compliance with safety standards on page 4-22 lists the safety specifications against which the
450 Platform Family has been tested and certified. It also describes how to keep RF exposure
within safe limits.
• Compliance with radio regulations on page 4-36 describes how the 450 Platform Family
complies with the radio regulations that are in force in various countries, and contains
notifications made to regulatory bodies for the 450 Platform Family.

Page 4-1
Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information Cambium Networks end user license agreement

Cambium Networks end user license agreement

Definitions
In this Agreement, the word “Software” refers to the set of instructions for computers, in
executable form and in any media, (which may include diskette, CD-ROM, downloadable internet,
hardware, or firmware) licensed to you. The word “Documentation” refers to electronic or printed
manuals and accompanying instructional aids licensed to you. The word “Product” refers to
Cambium Networks’ fixed wireless broadband devices for which the Software and Documentation
is licensed for use.

Acceptance of this agreement


In connection with Cambium Networks’ delivery of certain proprietary software or products
containing embedded or pre-loaded proprietary software, or both, Cambium Networks is willing to
license this certain proprietary software and the accompanying documentation to you only on the
condition that you accept all the terms in this End User License Agreement (“Agreement”).
IF YOU DO NOT AGREE TO THE TERMS OF THIS AGREEMENT, DO NOT USE THE PRODUCT OR
INSTALL THE SOFTWARE. INSTEAD, YOU MAY, FOR A FULL REFUND, RETURN THIS PRODUCT
TO THE LOCATION WHERE YOU ACQUIRED IT OR PROVIDE WRITTEN VERIFICATION OF
DELETION OF ALL COPIES OF THE SOFTWARE. ANY USE OF THE SOFTWARE, INCLUDING BUT
NOT LIMITED TO USE ON THE PRODUCT, WILL CONSTITUTE YOUR ACCEPTANCE TO THE
TERMS OF THIS AGREEMENT.

Grant of license
Cambium Networks Limited (“Cambium”) grants you (“Licensee” or “you”) a personal,
nonexclusive, non-transferable license to use the Software and Documentation subject to the
Conditions of Use set forth in “Conditions of use” and the terms and conditions of this Agreement.
Any terms or conditions relating to the Software and Documentation appearing on the face or
reverse side of any purchase order, purchase order acknowledgment or other order document that
are different from, or in addition to, the terms of this Agreement will not be binding on the parties,
even if payment is accepted.

Page 4-2
Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information Cambium Networks end user license agreement

Conditions of use
Any use of the Software and Documentation outside of the conditions set forth in this Agreement
is strictly prohibited and will be deemed a breach of this Agreement.
1. Only you, your employees or agents may use the Software and Documentation. You will take all
necessary steps to insure that your employees and agents abide by the terms of this Agreement.
2. You will use the Software and Documentation (i) only for your internal business purposes; (ii)
only as described in the Software and Documentation; and (iii) in strict accordance with this
Agreement.
3. You may use the Software and Documentation, provided that the use is in conformance with the
terms set forth in this Agreement.
4. Portions of the Software and Documentation are protected by United States copyright laws,
international treaty provisions, and other applicable laws. Therefore, you must treat the Software
like any other copyrighted material (for example, a book or musical recording) except that you may
either: (i) make 1 copy of the transportable part of the Software (which typically is supplied on
diskette, CD-ROM, or downloadable internet), solely for back-up purposes; or (ii) copy the
transportable part of the Software to a PC hard disk, provided you keep the original solely for back-
up purposes. If the Documentation is in printed form, it may not be copied. If the Documentation
is in electronic form, you may print out 1 copy, which then may not be copied. With regard to the
copy made for backup or archival purposes, you agree to reproduce any Cambium Networks
copyright notice, and other proprietary legends appearing thereon. Such copyright notice(s) may
appear in any of several forms, including machine-readable form, and you agree to reproduce
such notice in each form in which it appears, to the extent it is physically possible to do so.
Unauthorized duplication of the Software or Documentation constitutes copyright infringement,
and in the United States is punishable in federal court by fine and imprisonment.
5. You will not transfer, directly or indirectly, any product, technical data or software to any
country for which the United States Government requires an export license or other governmental
approval without first obtaining such license or approval.

Page 4-3
Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information Cambium Networks end user license agreement

Title and restrictions


If you transfer possession of any copy of the Software and Documentation to another party outside
of the terms of this agreement, your license is automatically terminated. Title and copyrights to the
Software and Documentation and any copies made by you remain with Cambium Networks and its
licensors. You will not, and will not permit others to: (i) modify, translate, decompile, bootleg,
reverse engineer, disassemble, or extract the inner workings of the Software or Documentation,
(ii) copy the look-and-feel or functionality of the Software or Documentation; (iii) remove any
proprietary notices, marks, labels, or logos from the Software or Documentation; (iv) rent or
transfer all or some of the Software or Documentation to any other party without Cambium’s prior
written consent; or (v) utilize any computer software or hardware which is designed to defeat any
copy protection device, should the Software and Documentation be equipped with such a
protection device. If the Software and Documentation is provided on multiple types of media (such
as diskette, CD-ROM, downloadable internet), then you will only use the medium which best meets
your specific needs, and will not loan, rent, lease, or transfer the other media contained in the
package without Cambium’s written consent. Unauthorized copying of the Software or
Documentation, or failure to comply with any of the provisions of this Agreement, will result in
automatic termination of this license.

Confidentiality
You acknowledge that all Software and Documentation contain valuable proprietary information
and trade secrets and that unauthorized or improper use of the Software and Documentation will
result in irreparable harm to Cambium Networks for which monetary damages would be
inadequate and for which Cambium Networks will be entitled to immediate injunctive relief. If
applicable, you will limit access to the Software and Documentation to those of your employees
and agents who need to use the Software and Documentation for your internal business purposes,
and you will take appropriate action with those employees and agents to preserve the
confidentiality of the Software and Documentation, using the same degree of care to avoid
unauthorized or improper disclosure as you use for the protection of your own proprietary
software, but in no event less than reasonable care.
You have no obligation to preserve the confidentiality of any proprietary information that: (i) was
in the public domain at the time of disclosure; (ii) entered the public domain through no fault of
yours; (iii) was given to you free of any obligation to keep it confidential; (iv) is independently
developed by you; or (v) is disclosed as required by law provided that you notify Cambium
Networks prior to such disclosure and provide Cambium Networks with a reasonable opportunity
to respond.

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Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information Cambium Networks end user license agreement

Right to use Cambium’s name


Except as required in “Conditions of use”, you will not, during the term of this Agreement or
thereafter, use any trademark of Cambium Networks, or any word or symbol likely to be confused
with any Cambium Networks trademark, either alone or in any combination with another word or
words.

Transfer
The Software and Documentation may not be transferred to another party without the express
written consent of Cambium Networks, regardless of whether or not such transfer is accomplished
by physical or electronic means. Cambium’s consent may be withheld at its discretion and may be
conditioned upon transferee paying all applicable license fees and agreeing to be bound by this
Agreement.

Updates
During the first 12 months after purchase of a Product, or during the term of any executed
Maintenance and Support Agreement for the Product, you are entitled to receive Updates. An
“Update” means any code in any form which is a bug fix, patch, error correction, or minor
enhancement, but excludes any major feature added to the Software. Updates are available for
download at the support website.
Major features may be available from time to time for an additional license fee. If Cambium
Networks makes available to your major features and no other end user license agreement is
provided, then the terms of this Agreement will apply.

Maintenance
Except as provided above, Cambium Networks is not responsible for maintenance or field service
of the Software under this Agreement.

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Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information Cambium Networks end user license agreement

Disclaimer
CAMBIUM NETWORKS DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND, WHETHER EXPRESS,
IMPLIED, STATUTORY, OR IN ANY COMMUNICATION WITH YOU. CAMBIUM NETWORKS
SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIMS ANY WARRANTY INCLUDING THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILTY, NONINFRINGEMENT, OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. THE
SOFTWARE AND DOCUMENTATION ARE PROVIDED “AS IS.” CAMBIUM NETWORKS DOES NOT
WARRANT THAT THE SOFTWARE WILL MEET YOUR REQUIREMENTS, OR THAT THE OPERATION
OF THE SOFTWARE WILL BE UNINTERRUPTED OR ERROR FREE, OR THAT DEFECTS IN THE
SOFTWARE WILL BE CORRECTED. CAMBIUM NETWORKS MAKES NO WARRANTY WITH
RESPECT TO THE CORRECTNESS, ACCURACY, OR RELIABILITY OF THE SOFTWARE AND
DOCUMENTATION. Some jurisdictions do not allow the exclusion of implied warranties, so the
above exclusion may not apply to you.

Limitation of liability
IN NO EVENT SHALL CAMBIUM NETWORKS BE LIABLE TO YOU OR ANY OTHER PARTY FOR ANY
DIRECT, INDIRECT, GENERAL, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL, EXEMPLARY OR OTHER
DAMAGE ARISING OUT OF THE USE OR INABILITY TO USE THE PRODUCT (INCLUDING,
WITHOUT LIMITATION, DAMAGES FOR LOSS OF BUSINESS PROFITS, BUSINESS
INTERRUPTION, LOSS OF BUSINESS INFORMATION OR ANY OTHER PECUNIARY LOSS, OR
FROM ANY BREACH OF WARRANTY, EVEN IF CAMBIUM NETWORKS HAS BEEN ADVISED OF
THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES. (Some states do not allow the exclusion or limitation of
incidental or consequential damages, so the above exclusion or limitation may not apply to you.)
IN NO CASE SHALL CAMBIUM’S LIABILITY EXCEED THE AMOUNT YOU PAID FOR THE PRODUCT.

U.S. government
If you are acquiring the Product on behalf of any unit or agency of the U.S. Government, the
following applies. Use, duplication, or disclosure of the Software and Documentation is subject to
the restrictions set forth in subparagraphs (c) (1) and (2) of the Commercial Computer Software –
Restricted Rights clause at FAR 52.227-19 (JUNE 1987), if applicable, unless being provided to the
Department of Defense. If being provided to the Department of Defense, use, duplication, or
disclosure of the Products is subject to the restricted rights set forth in subparagraph (c) (1) (ii) of
the Rights in Technical Data and Computer Software clause at DFARS 252.227-7013 (OCT 1988), if
applicable. Software and Documentation may or may not include a Restricted Rights notice, or
other notice referring specifically to the terms and conditions of this Agreement. The terms and
conditions of this Agreement will each continue to apply, but only to the extent that such terms
and conditions are not inconsistent with the rights provided to you under the aforementioned
provisions of the FAR and DFARS, as applicable to the particular procuring agency and
procurement transaction.

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Term of license
Your right to use the Software will continue in perpetuity unless terminated as follows. Your right
to use the Software will terminate immediately without notice upon a breach of this Agreement by
you. Within 30 days after termination of this Agreement, you will certify to Cambium Networks in
writing that through your best efforts, and to the best of your knowledge, the original and all
copies, in whole or in part, in any form, of the Software and all related material and
Documentation, have been destroyed, except that, with prior written consent from Cambium
Networks, you may retain one copy for archival or backup purposes. You may not sublicense,
assign or transfer the license or the Product, except as expressly provided in this Agreement. Any
attempt to otherwise sublicense, assign or transfer any of the rights, duties or obligations
hereunder is null and void.

Governing law
This Agreement is governed by the laws of the United States of America to the extent that they
apply and otherwise by the laws of the State of Illinois.

Assignment
This agreement may not be assigned by you without Cambium’s prior written consent.

Survival of provisions
The parties agree that where the context of any provision indicates an intent that it survives the
term of this Agreement, then it will survive.

Entire agreement
This agreement contains the parties’ entire agreement regarding your use of the Software and
may be amended only in writing signed by both parties, except that Cambium Networks may
modify this Agreement as necessary to comply with applicable laws.

Third party software


The software may contain one or more items of Third-Party Software supplied by other third-party
suppliers. The terms of this Agreement govern your use of any Third-Party Software UNLESS A
SEPARATE THIRD-PARTY SOFTWARE LICENSE IS INCLUDED, IN WHICH CASE YOUR USE OF THE
THIRD-PARTY SOFTWARE WILL THEN BE GOVERNED BY THE SEPARATE THIRD-PARTY LICENSE.

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Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information Cambium Networks end user license agreement

Net SNMP
Various copyrights apply to this package, listed in various separate parts below. Please make sure
that you read all the parts.
---- Part 1: CMU/UCD copyright notice: (BSD like) -----
Copyright 1989, 1991, 1992 by Carnegie Mellon University
Derivative Work - 1996, 1998-2000
Copyright 1996, 1998-2000 The Regents of the University of California
All Rights Reserved
Permission to use, copy, modify and distribute this software and its documentation for any
purpose and without fee is hereby granted, provided that the above copyright notice appears in all
copies and that both that copyright notice and this permission notice appear in supporting
documentation, and that the name of CMU and The Regents of the University of California not be
used in advertising or publicity pertaining to distribution of the software without specific written
permission.
CMU AND THE REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA DISCLAIM ALL WARRANTIES
WITH REGARD TO THIS SOFTWARE, INCLUDING ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS. IN NO EVENT SHALL CMU OR THE REGENTS OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL
DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER RESULTING FROM THE LOSS OF USE, DATA OR
PROFITS, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS ACTION,
ARISING OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE USE OR PERFORMANCE OF THIS SOFTWARE.
---- Part 2: Networks Associates Technology, Inc copyright notice (BSD) -----
Copyright © 2001-2003, Networks Associates Technology, Inc
All rights reserved.
Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted
provided that the following conditions are met:
• Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notice, this list of conditions
and the following disclaimer.
• Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of
conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided
with the distribution.
• Neither the name of the Networks Associates Technology, Inc nor the names of its contributors
may be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software without specific prior
written permission.

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Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information Cambium Networks end user license agreement

THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS “AS IS”
AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE
DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE
FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL
DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR
SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER
CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR
TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF
THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.
---- Part 3: Cambridge Broadband Ltd. copyright notice (BSD) -----
Portions of this code are copyright © 2001-2003, Cambridge Broadband Ltd.
All rights reserved.
Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted
provided that the following conditions are met:
• Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notice, this list of conditions
and the following disclaimer.
• Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of
conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided
with the distribution.
• The name of Cambridge Broadband Ltd. may not be used to endorse or promote products
derived from this software without specific prior written permission.
THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDER “AS IS” AND ANY EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO
EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT HOLDER BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL,
SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO,
PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR
BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER
IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING
IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF
SUCH DAMAGE.
---- Part 4: Sun Microsystems, Inc. copyright notice (BSD) -----
Copyright © 2003 Sun Microsystems, Inc., 4150 Network Circle, Santa Clara,
California 95054, U.S.A. All rights reserved.
Use is subject to license terms below.
This distribution may include materials developed by third parties.
Sun, Sun Microsystems, the Sun logo and Solaris are trademarks or registered trademarks of Sun
Microsystems, Inc. in the U.S. and other countries.
Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted
provided that the following conditions are met:

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Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information Cambium Networks end user license agreement

• Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notice, this list of conditions
and the following disclaimer.
• Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of
conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided
with the distribution.
• Neither the name of the Sun Microsystems, Inc. nor the names of its contributors may be used
to endorse or promote products derived from this software without specific prior written
permission.
THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS “AS IS”
AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE
DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE
FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL
DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR
SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER
CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR
TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF
THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.
---- Part 5: Sparta, Inc copyright notice (BSD) -----
Copyright © 2003-2008, Sparta, Inc
All rights reserved.
Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted
provided that the following conditions are met:
• Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notice, this list of conditions
and the following disclaimer.
• Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of
conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided
with the distribution.
• Neither the name of Sparta, Inc nor the names of its contributors may be used to endorse or
promote products derived from this software without specific prior written permission.
THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS “AS IS”
AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE
DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE
FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL
DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR
SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER
CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR
TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF
THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.
---- Part 6: Cisco/BUPTNIC copyright notice (BSD) -----
Copyright © 2004, Cisco, Inc and Information Network
Center of Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications.

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All rights reserved.


Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted
provided that the following conditions are met:
• Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notice, this list of conditions
and the following disclaimer.
• Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of
conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided
with the distribution.
• Neither the name of Cisco, Inc, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, nor the
names of their contributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived from this
software without specific prior written permission.
THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS “AS IS”
AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED
WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE
DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE
FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL
DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR
SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER
CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR
TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF
THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.
---- Part 7: Fabasoft R&D Software GmbH & Co KG copyright notice (BSD) -----
Copyright © Fabasoft R&D Software GmbH & Co KG, 2003
oss@fabasoft.com
Author: Bernhard Penz
Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted
provided that the following conditions are met:
• Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notice, this list of conditions
and the following disclaimer.
• Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of
conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided
with the distribution.
• The name of Fabasoft R&D Software GmbH & Co KG or any of its subsidiaries, brand or
product names may not be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software
without specific prior written permission.

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THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDER “AS IS” AND ANY EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO
EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT HOLDER BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL,
SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO,
PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR
BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER
IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING
IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF
SUCH DAMAGE.

OpenSSL
Copyright (c) 1998-2008 The OpenSSL Project. All rights reserved.
Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted
provided that the following conditions are met:
1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and
the following disclaimer.
2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of conditions
and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the
distribution.
3. All advertising materials mentioning features or use of this software must display the following
acknowledgment:
“This product includes software developed by the OpenSSL Project for use in the OpenSSL
Toolkit. (http://www.openssl.org/)”
4. The names “OpenSSL Toolkit” and “OpenSSL Project” must not be used to endorse or promote
products derived from this software without prior written permission. For written permission,
please contact openssl-core@openssl.org.
5. Products derived from this software may not be called “OpenSSL” nor may “OpenSSL” appear
in their names without prior written permission of the OpenSSL Project.
6. Redistributions of any form whatsoever must retain the following acknowledgment:
“This product includes software developed by the OpenSSL Project for use in the OpenSSL Toolkit
(http://www.openssl.org/)”
THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE OpenSSL PROJECT “AS IS” AND ANY EXPRESSED OR
IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO
EVENT SHALL THE OpenSSL PROJECT OR ITS CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT,
INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING,
BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE,
DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY
OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE
OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED
OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.

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This product includes cryptographic software written by Eric Young (eay@cryptsoft.com). This
product includes software written by Tim Hudson (tjh@cryptsoft.com).
Original SSLeay License
Copyright © 1995-1998 Eric Young (eay@cryptsoft.com)
All rights reserved.
This package is an SSL implementation written by Eric Young (eay@cryptsoft.com). The
implementation was written so as to conform with Netscapes SSL.
This library is free for commercial and non-commercial use as long as the following conditions are
adhered to. The following conditions apply to all code found in this distribution, be it the RC4,
RSA, lhash, DES, etc., code; not just the SSL code. The SSL documentation included with this
distribution is covered by the same copyright terms except that the holder is Tim Hudson
(tjh@cryptsoft.com).
Copyright remains Eric Young's, and as such any Copyright notices in the code are not to be
removed.
If this package is used in a product, Eric Young should be given attribution as the author of the
parts of the library used. This can be in the form of a textual message at program startup or in
documentation (online or textual) provided with the package.
Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted
provided that the following conditions are met:
1. Redistributions of source code must retain the copyright notice, this list of conditions and the
following disclaimer.
2. Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of conditions
and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the
distribution.
3. All advertising materials mentioning features or use of this software must display the following
acknowledgement:
“This product includes cryptographic software written by Eric Young (eay@cryptsoft.com)”
The word ‘cryptographic’ can be left out if the routines from the library being used are not
cryptographic related.
4. If you include any Windows specific code (or a derivative thereof) from the apps directory
(application code) you must include an acknowledgement:
“This product includes software written by Tim Hudson (tjh@cryptsoft.com)”
THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY ERIC YOUNG “AS IS” AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED
WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO
EVENT SHALL THE AUTHOR OR CONTRIBUTORS BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT,
INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT
LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR
PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF
LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR
OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF
THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.

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The license and distribution terms for any publically available version or derivative of this code
cannot be changed. i.e. this code cannot simply be copied and put under another distribution
license [including the GNU Public License.]

Zlib
Copyright © 1995-2005 Jean-loup Gailly and Mark Adler
This software is provided ‘as-is’, without any express or implied warranty. In no event will the
authors be held liable for any damages arising from the use of this software.
Permission is granted to anyone to use this software for any purpose, including commercial
applications, and to alter it and redistribute it freely, subject to the following restrictions:
1. The origin of this software must not be misrepresented; you must not claim that you wrote the
original software. If you use this software in a product, an acknowledgment in the product
documentation would be appreciated but is not required.
2. Altered source versions must be plainly marked as such, and must not be misrepresented as
being the original software.
3. This notice may not be removed or altered from any source distribution.
Jean-loup Gailly jloup@gzip.org
Mark Adler madler@alumni.caltech.edu

Libpng
libpng versions 1.2.6, August 15, 2004, through 1.2.35, February 14, 2009, are Copyright © 2004,
2006-2008 Glenn Randers-Pehrson, and are distributed according to the same disclaimer and
license as libpng-1.2.5 with the following individual added to the list of Contributing Authors
Cosmin Truta
libpng versions 1.0.7, July 1, 2000, through 1.2.5 - October 3, 2002, are Copyright © 2000-2002
Glenn Randers-Pehrson, and are distributed according to the same disclaimer and license as
libpng-1.0.6 with the following individuals added to the list of Contributing Authors
Simon-Pierre Cadieux
Eric S. Raymond
Gilles Vollant
and with the following additions to the disclaimer:
There is no warranty against interference with your enjoyment of the library or against
infringement. There is no warranty that our efforts or the library will fulfil any of your particular
purposes or needs. This library is provided with all faults, and the entire risk of satisfactory quality,
performance, accuracy, and effort is with the user.
libpng versions 0.97, January 1998, through 1.0.6, March 20, 2000, are Copyright © 1998, 1999
Glenn Randers-Pehrson, and are distributed according to the same disclaimer and license as
libpng-0.96, with the following individuals added to the list of Contributing Authors:
Tom Lane
Glenn Randers-Pehrson

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Willem van Schaik


libpng versions 0.89, June 1996, through 0.96, May 1997, are Copyright © 1996, 1997 Andreas
Dilger
Distributed according to the same disclaimer and license as libpng-0.88, with the following
individuals added to the list of Contributing Authors:
John Bowler
Kevin Bracey
Sam Bushell
Magnus Holmgren
Greg Roelofs
Tom Tanner
libpng versions 0.5, May 1995, through 0.88, January 1996, are Copyright © 1995, 1996 Guy Eric
Schalnat, Group 42, Inc.
For the purposes of this copyright and license, “Contributing Authors” is defined as the following
set of individuals:
Andreas Dilger
Dave Martindale
Guy Eric Schalnat
Paul Schmidt
Tim Wegner
The PNG Reference Library is supplied “AS IS”. The Contributing Authors and Group 42, Inc.
disclaim all warranties, expressed or implied, including, without limitation, the warranties of
merchantability and of fitness for any purpose. The Contributing Authors and Group 42, Inc.
assume no liability for direct, indirect, incidental, special, exemplary, or consequential damages,
which may result from the use of the PNG Reference Library, even if advised of the possibility of
such damage.
Permission is hereby granted to use, copy, modify, and distribute this source code, or portions
hereof, for any purpose, without fee, subject to the following restrictions:
1. The origin of this source code must not be misrepresented.
2. Altered versions must be plainly marked as such and must not be misrepresented as being the
original source.
3. This Copyright notice may not be removed or altered from any source or altered source
distribution.
The Contributing Authors and Group 42, Inc. specifically permit, without fee, and encourage the
use of this source code as a component to supporting the PNG file format in commercial products.
If you use this source code in a product, acknowledgment is not required but would be
appreciated.
A “png_get_copyright” function is available, for convenient use in “about” boxes and the like:
printf("%s",png_get_copyright(NULL));
Also, the PNG logo (in PNG format, of course) is supplied in the files "pngbar.png" and "pngbar.jpg
(88x31) and "pngnow.png" (98x31).

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Libpng is OSI Certified Open Source Software. OSI Certified Open Source is a certification mark of
the Open Source Initiative.
Glenn Randers-Pehrson
glennrp at users.sourceforge.net
February 14, 2009

Bzip2
This program, "bzip2", the associated library "libbzip2", and all documentation, are copyright (C)
1996-2007 Julian R Seward. All rights reserved.
Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted
provided that the following conditions are met:
1. Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and
the following disclaimer.
2. The origin of this software must not be misrepresented; you must not claim that you wrote the
original software. If you use this software in a product, an acknowledgment in the product
documentation would be appreciated but is not required.
3. Altered source versions must be plainly marked as such, and must not be misrepresented as
being the original software.
4. The name of the author may not be used to endorse or promote products derived from this
software without specific prior written permission.
THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE AUTHOR “AS IS” AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED
WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF
MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO
EVENT SHALL THE AUTHOR BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL,
EXEMPLARY, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO,
PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR
BUSINESS INTERRUPTION) HOWEVER CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER
IN CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING
IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF
SUCH DAMAGE.
Julian Seward, jseward@bzip.org

USB library functions


Atmel Corporation
2325 Orchard Parkway
San Jose, Ca 95131
Copyright (c) 2004 Atmel

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Apache
Apache License
Version 2.0, January 2004
http://www.apache.org/licenses/

TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR USE, REPRODUCTION, AND DISTRIBUTION

1. Definitions.

"License" shall mean the terms and conditions for use, reproduction,
and distribution as defined by Sections 1 through 9 of this document.

"Licensor" shall mean the copyright owner or entity authorized by


the copyright owner that is granting the License.

"Legal Entity" shall mean the union of the acting entity and all
other entities that control, are controlled by, or are under common
control with that entity. For the purposes of this definition,
"control" means (i) the power, direct or indirect, to cause the
direction or management of such entity, whether by contract or
otherwise, or (ii) ownership of fifty percent (50%) or more of the
outstanding shares, or (iii) beneficial ownership of such entity.

"You" (or "Your") shall mean an individual or Legal Entity


exercising permissions granted by this License.

"Source" form shall mean the preferred form for making modifications,
including but not limited to software source code, documentation
source, and configuration files.

"Object" form shall mean any form resulting from mechanical


transformation or translation of a Source form, including but
not limited to compiled object code, generated documentation,
and conversions to other media types.

"Work" shall mean the work of authorship, whether in Source or


Object form, made available under the License, as indicated by a
copyright notice that is included in or attached to the work
(an example is provided in the Appendix below).

"Derivative Works" shall mean any work, whether in Source or Object


form, that is based on (or derived from) the Work and for which the
editorial revisions, annotations, elaborations, or other modifications
represent, as a whole, an original work of authorship. For the purposes
of this License, Derivative Works shall not include works that remain
separable from, or merely link (or bind by name) to the interfaces of,
the Work and Derivative Works thereof.

"Contribution" shall mean any work of authorship, including


the original version of the Work and any modifications or additions
to that Work or Derivative Works thereof, that is intentionally
submitted to Licensor for inclusion in the Work by the copyright owner
or by an individual or Legal Entity authorized to submit on behalf of
the copyright owner. For the purposes of this definition, "submitted"

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means any form of electronic, verbal, or written communication sent


to the Licensor or its representatives, including but not limited to
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Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information Cambium Networks end user license agreement

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Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information Cambium Networks end user license agreement

D3 JS library

Copyright (c) 2013, Michael Bostock


All rights reserved.

Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without


modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions are met:

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NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF THE USE OF THIS SOFTWARE,
EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.

Page 4-21
Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information Compliance with safety standards

Compliance with safety standards

This section lists the safety specifications against which the 450 Platform Family has been tested
and certified. It also describes how to keep RF exposure within safe limits.

Electrical safety compliance


The 450 Platform Family hardware has been tested for compliance to the electrical safety
specifications listed in Table 89.

Table 89 Safety compliance specifications

Region Specification

USA UL 60950

Canada CSA C22.2 No.60950

International CB certified & certificate to IEC 60950

Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) compliance


The EMC specification type approvals that have been granted for 450 Platform Family are listed
under Table 90.

Table 90 EMC emissions compliance

Region Specification

USA FCC Part 15 Class B

Canada RSS Gen and RSS 210

International EN 301 489-1 V1.9.2


EN 301 489-17 V2.1.1

Human exposure to radio frequency energy


Relevant standards (USA and EC) applicable when working with RF equipment are:
• ANSI IEEE C95.1-1991, IEEE Standard for Safety Levels with Respect to Human Exposure to
Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields, 3 kHz to 300 GHz.
• Council recommendation of 12 July 1999 on the limitation of exposure of the general public to
electromagnetic fields (0 Hz to 300 GHz) (1999/519/EC) and respective national regulations.

Page 4-22
Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information Compliance with safety standards

• Directive 2004/40/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 29 April 2004 on the
minimum health and safety requirements regarding the exposure of workers to the risks
arising from physical agents (electromagnetic fields) (18th individual Directive within the
meaning of Article 16(1) of Directive 89/391/EEC).
• US FCC limits for the general population. See the FCC web site at http://www.fcc.gov, and the
policies, guidelines, and requirements in Part 1 of Title 47 of the Code of Federal Regulations,
as well as the guidelines and suggestions for evaluating compliance in FCC OET Bulletin 65.
• Health Canada limits for the general population. See the Health Canada web site at
https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/environmental-workplace-
health/consultations/limits-human-exposure-radiofrequency-electromagnetic-energy-
frequency-range-3-300.html and Safety Code 6.
• EN 50383:2002 to 2010 Basic standard for the calculation and measurement of electromagnetic
field strength and SAR related to human exposure from radio base stations and fixed terminal
stations for wireless telecommunication systems (110 MHz - 40 GHz).
• BS EN 50385:2002 Product standard to demonstrate the compliances of radio base stations and
fixed terminal stations for wireless telecommunication systems with the basic restrictions or
the reference levels related to human exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic fields (110
MHz – 40 GHz) – general public.
• ICNIRP (International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection) guidelines for the
general public. See the ICNIRP web site at
https://www.icnirp.org/cms/upload/publications/ICNIRPemfgdl.pdf and Guidelines for Limiting
Exposure to Time-Varying Electric, Magnetic, and Electromagnetic Fields.

Power density exposure limit


Install the radios for the 450 Platform Family of wireless solutions so as to provide and maintain
the minimum separation distances from all persons.
The applicable FCC power density exposure limit for RF energy in the 4.9, 5.4 and 5.8 GHz
frequency bands is 10 W/m2 and in 900 MHz frequency band is 6 W/m2. For more information, see
Human exposure to radio frequency energy on page 4-22.
The applicable ISEDC power density exposure limit for RF energy in unlicensed bands is 0.02619 *
(f^(0.6834)), where f is the lowest frequency of the supported band. For licensed bands, the power
density exposure limit is 0.6455 * (f^(0.5)), where f is the lowest frequency of the supported band.

Page 4-23
Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information Compliance with safety standards

Calculation of power density


The following calculation is based on the ANSI IEEE C95.1-1991 method, as that provides a worst
case analysis. Details of the assessment to EN50383:2002 can be provided, if required.
Peak power density in the far field of a radio frequency point source is calculated as follows:

P .G
S
4 d 2
Where: Is:

S power density in W/m2

P maximum average transmit power


capability of the radio, in W

G total Tx gain as a factor, converted


from dB

d distance from point source, in m

Rearranging terms to solve for distance yields:

P.G
d
4 .S

Page 4-24
Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information Compliance with safety standards

Calculated distances and power compliance margins


The following tables show calculated minimum separation distances, recommended distances and
resulting margins for each frequency band and antenna combination for the USA and Canada.
These are conservative distances that include compliance margins. At these and greater separation
distances, the power density from the RF field is below generally accepted limits for the general
population.
450 Platform Family ODU adheres to all applicable EIRP limits for transmit power when operating
in MIMO mode. Separation distances and compliance margins include compensation for both
transmitters.

Explanation of terms used in the following tables:


P burst – maximum average transmit power during transmit burst (Watt)
P – maximum average transmit power of the radio (Watt)
G – total transmit gain as a factor, converted from dB
S – power density (Watt/m2)
d – minimum safe separation distance from point source (meters)

Table 91 FCC minimum safe distances – PMP 450m 5.1 GHz, 5.2 GHz, 5.4 GHz and 5.8 GHz

Band (GHz) Antenna PG (W) S (W/ m2) d (m)

5.1 90° sector 3.38 10 0.16

5.2 90° sector 0.85 10 0.08

5.4 90° sector 0.85 10 0.08

5.8 90° sector 3.38 10 0.16

Page 4-25
Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information Compliance with safety standards

Table 92 FCC minimum safe distances – PMP/PTP 450b 4.9 GHz, 5.1 GHz, 5.2 GHz, 5.4 GHz and 5.8
GHz

Band P G S d
Antenna
(GHz) (W) (dBi) (W/ m2) (m)

Dish 0.501 24 10 1.00

4.9 Patch Array 0.501 17 10 0.45

On-board 0.501 0 10 0.06

Dish 0.501 24 10 1.00

5.1 Patch Array 0.501 17 10 0.45

On-board 0.501 0 10 0.06

Dish 0.004 24 10 0.09

5.2 Patch Array 0.020 17 10 0.09

On-board 0.251 0 10 0.04

Dish 0.004 24 10 0.09

5.4 Patch Array 0.020 17 10 0.09

On-board 0.501 0 10 0.06

Dish 0.501 24 10 1.00

5.8 Patch Array 0.501 17 10 0.45

On-board 0.501 0 10 0.06

Page 4-26
Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information Compliance with safety standards

Table 93 ISEDC minimum safe distances – PMP/PTP 450b 4.9 GHz, 5.1 GHz, 5.2 GHz, 5.4 GHz and
5.8 GHz

Band P G S d S @ 20 cm
Antenna (W/ m2)
(GHz) (W) (dBi) (W/ m2) (m)

Dish 0.501 24 8.76 1.07 250.5

4.9 Patch Array 0.501 17 8.76 0.48 50.0

On-board 0.501 0 8.76 0.07 1.0

Dish 0.501 24 9.01 1.05 250.5

5.1 Patch Array 0.501 17 9.01 0.47 50.0

On-board 0.501 0 9.01 0.07 1.0

Dish 0.004 24 9.13 0.09 2.0

5.2 Patch Array 0.020 17 9.13 0.09 2.0

On-board 0.251 0 9.13 0.05 0.5

Dish 0.004 24 9.39 0.09 2.0

5.4 Patch Array 0.020 17 9.39 0.09 2.0

On-board 0.501 0 9.39 0.07 1.0

Dish 0.501 24 9.69 1.02 250.5

5.8 Patch Array 0.501 17 9.69 0.45 50.0

On-board 0.501 0 9.69 0.06 1.0

Page 4-27
Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information Compliance with safety standards

Table 94 FCC minimum safe distances – PMP/PTP 450i 900 MHz, 3.65 GHz, 4.9 GHz, 5.1 GHz, 5.2
GHz, 5.4 GHz and 5.8 GHz

P burst P G S d
Band Antenna
(W) (W) (dBi) (W/ m2) (m)

900 Sector antenna


- 0.19 22.75 (13 dBi) 6.0 0.27
MHz

90° sector antenna,


- 0.316 50.0 (17 dBi) 10.0 0.36
integrated
3.65
90° sector antenna,
GHz - 0.316 40.0 (16 dBi) 10.0 0.32
connectorized

Panel, integrated - 0.251 79.0 (19 dBi) 10.0 0.40

Omni-directional 0.2138 0.2512 20.0 (13 dBi) 10.0 0.17

90° sector antenna 0.2138 0.2512 50.0 (17 dBi) 10.0 0.26
4.9
2ft directional flat plate 0.2138 0.2512 631.0 (28 dBi) 10.0 0.93
GHz
4ft directional parabolic 0.851 0.1000 2344.0 (34.9 dBi) 10.0 1.14

6ft directional parabolic 0.1413 0.1659 5248.0 (37.2 dBi) 10.0 2.19

Omni-directional 0.170 0.200 20.0 (13.0 dBi) 10 0.15

5.1 90° sector 0.034 0.040 50.1 (17.0 dBi) 10 0.10


GHz 2ft directional flat plate 0.002 0.002 707.9 (28.5 dBi) 10 0.09

4ft directional parabolic 0.011 0.013 2818.4 (34.5 dBi) 10 0.44

Omni-directional 0.036 0.042 20.0 (13.0 dBi) 10 0.07

5.2 90° sector 0.014 0.017 50.1 (17.0 dBi) 10 0.07


GHz 2ft directional flat plate 0.001 0.001 707.9 (28.5 dBi) 10 0.07

4ft directional parabolic 0.000 0.000 2818.4 (34.5 dBi) 10 0.06

Omni-directional 0.036 0.042 20.0 (13.0 dBi) 10 0.07

5.4 90° sector 0.014 0.017 50.1 (17.0 dBi) 10 0.07


GHz 2ft directional flat plate 0.001 0.001 707.9 (28.5 dBi) 10 0.07

2ft directional parabolic 0.001 0.001 707.9 (28.5 dBi) 10 0.08

Omni-directional 0.24 0.28 20.0 (13 dBi) 10.0 0.18

90° sector 0.10 0.12 50.0 (17 dBi) 10.0 0.18


5.8
2ft directional flat plate 0.54 0.63 708.0 (28.5 dBi) 10.0 1.57
GHz
4ft directional parabolic 0.54 0.63 3388.0 (35.3 dBi) 10.0 3.43

6ft directional parabolic 0.54 0.63 6457.0 (38.1 dBi) 10.0 4.74

Page 4-28
Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information Compliance with safety standards

Table 95 ISEDC minimum safe distances – PMP/PTP 450i, 900 MHz, 3.5 GHz, 3.65 GHz, 4.9 GHz, 5.2
GHz, 5.4 GHz, and 5.8 GHz

P burst P G S d
Band Antenna
(W) (W) (dBi) (W/ m2) (m)

900
Sector - .02 20.0 (13 dBi) 2.74 0.11
MHz

90° sector antenna, -


0.794 50.0 (17 dBi) 37.10 0.29
integrated

3.5 GHz 90° sector antenna, - 0.794 37.10


40.0 (16 dBi) 0.23
connectorized

Panel, integrated - 0.794 79.0 (19 dBi) 37.10 0.37

90° sector antenna, - 0.794


50.0 (17 dBi) 7.13 0.67
3.65 integrated
GHz
90° sector antenna, - 0.794 7.13
(Lower 40.0 (16 dBi) 0.59
connectorized
Canada)
Panel, integrated - 0.794 79.0 (19 dBi) 7.13 0.84

90° sector antenna, - 7.13


0.316 50.0 (17 dBi) 0.42
3.65 integrated
GHz
90° sector antenna, - 7.13
(Upper 0.316 40.0 (16 dBi) 0.37
connectorized
Canada)
Panel, integrated - 0.251 79.0 (19 dBi) 7.13 0.47

Omni-directional 0.214 0.251 20.0 (13 dBi) 8.71 0.20

90° sector 0.214 0.251 50.1 (17 dBi) 8.71 0.31


4.9 GHz
2ft directional flat plate 0.214 0.251 631.0 (28 dBi) 8.71 1.11

6ft directional parabolic 0.141 0.166 5248.0 (37.2 dBi) 8.71 2.60

Omni-directional 0.009 0.011 20.0 (13.0 dBi) 9.13 0.04

90° sector 0.012 0.014 50.1 (17.0 dBi) 9.13 0.06


5.2 GHz
2ft directional flat plate 0.001 0.001 707.9 (28.5 dBi) 9.13 0.07

2ft directional parabolic 0.001 0.001 707.9 (28.5 dBi) 9.13 0.06

Page 4-29
Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information Compliance with safety standards

P burst P G S d
Band Antenna
(W) (W) (dBi) (W/ m2) (m)

Omni-directional 0.036 0.042 20.0 (13.0 dBi) 9.39 0.07

90° sector 0.014 0.017 50.1 (17.0 dBi) 9.39 0.07


5.4 GHz
2ft directional flat plate 0.001 0.001 707.9 (28.5 dBi) 9.39 0.07

2ft directional parabolic 0.001 0.001 707.9 (28.5 dBi) 9.39 0.06

Omni-directional 0.24 0.28 20.0 (13 dBi) 9.69 0.20

90° sector 0.10 0.12 50.1 (17 dBi) 9.69 0.20


5.8 GHz
2ft directional flat plate 0.54 0.63 707.9 (28.5 dBi) 9.69 1.67

4ft directional parabolic 0.54 0.63 3388.4 (35.3 dBi) 9.69 4.82

Page 4-30
Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information Compliance with safety standards

Table 96 FCC minimum safe distances – PMP/PTP 450 900 MHz, 2.4 GHz, 3.65 GHz and 5 GHz

P burst G S d
Band Antenna
(W) (dBi) (W/ m2) (m)

900 MHz Yagi 0.032 13 (11 dBi) 6 0.07

Sector Antenna 0.079 50 (17 dBi) 10 0.18

2.4 GHz Integrated 0.158 6 (8 dBi) 10 0.09

Reflector 0.040 100 (20 dBi) 10 0.18

Sector Antenna 0.316 32 (15 dBi) 10 0.28

3.65 Integrated 0.316 6 (8 dBi) 10 0.12


GHz Reflector 0.25 100 (20 dBi) 10 0.45

High Gain Ruggedized 0.25 79 (19 dBi) 10 0.40

Sector 0.025 40 (16 dBi) 10 0.09

Integrated 0.126 8 (9 dBi) 10 0.09

Reflector 0.003 316 (25 dBi) 10 0.09


5.4 GHz
CLIP 0.020 50 (17 dBi) 10 0.09

LENS 0.032 28 (14.5 dBi) 10 0.08

Integrated Dish (450d) 0.0032 316 (25 dBi) 10 0.09

Sector 0.079 40 (16 dBi) 10 0.16

Integrated 0.158 8 (9 dBi) 10 0.10

Reflector 0.158 316 (25 dBi) 10 0.63


5.8 GHz
CLIP 0.158 50 (17 dBi) 10 0.25

LENS 0.158 28 (14.5 dBi) 10 0.19

Integrated Dish (450d) 0.158 316 (25 dBi) 10 0.63

Page 4-31
Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information Compliance with safety standards

Table 97 ISEDC minimum safe distances – PMP/PTP 450 900 MHz, 2.4 GHz, 3.5/3.65 GHz and 5 GHz

P burst G S d
Band Antenna
(W) (dBi) (W/ m2) (m)

900 MHz Yagi 0.316 13 (11 dBi) 2.74 0.35

Sector Antenna 0.079 50 (17 dBi) 5.35 0.24


2.4 GHz
Integrated 0.158 6 (8 dBi) 5.35 0.12

Reflector 0.040 100 (20 dBi) 5.35 0.24

Sector 0.316 32 (15 dBi) 37.10 0.15

Integrated 0.316 6 (8 dBi) 37.10 0.06


3.5 GHz
Reflector 0.316 100 (20 dBi) 37.10 0.26

High Gain Ruggedized 0.316 79 (19 dBi) 37.10 0.23

Sector 0.316 32 (15 dBi) 38.20 0.15


3.65
GHz Integrated 0.316 6 (8 dBi) 38.20 0.06
(lower Reflector 0.316 100 (20 dBi) 38.20 0.26
Canada)
High Gain Ruggedized 0.316 79 (19 dBi) 38.20 0.23

Sector 0.316 32 (15 dBi) 38.20 0.14


3.65
GHz Integrated 0.316 6 (8 dBi) 38.20 0.06
(upper Reflector 0.20 100 (20 dBi) 38.20 0.20
Canada)
High Gain Ruggedized 0.003 79 (19 dBi) 38.20 0.23

Sector 0.025 40 (16 dBi) 9.39 0.09

Integrated 0.126 8 (9 dBi) 9.39 0.09

Reflector 0.003 316 (25 dBi) 9.39 0.09


5.4 GHz
CLIP 0.020 50 (17 dBi) 9.39 0.09

LENS 0.032 28 (14.5 dBi) 9.39 0.09

Integrated Dish (450d) 0.0032 316 (25 dBi) 9.39 0.09

Sector .079 40 (16 dBi) 9.69 0.16

Integrated 0.158 8 (9 dBi) 9.69 0.10

Reflector 0.158 316 (25 dBi) 9.69 0.064


5.8 GHz
CLIP 0.158 50 (17 dBi) 9.69 0.25

LENS 0.158 28 (14.5 dBi) 9.69 0.19

Integrated Dish (450d) 0.158 316 (25 dBi) 9.69 0.64

Page 4-32
Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information Compliance with safety standards

(*1) P: maximum average transmit power capability of the radio including cable loss (Watt)
Capacité de puissance d'émission moyenne maximale de la radio comprenant la perte dans
les câble de connexion (W)
(*2) G: total transmit gain as a factor, converted from dB
Gain total d'émission, converti à partir de la valeur en dB
(*3) S: power density (W/m2)
Densité de puissance (W/m2)
(*4) d: minimum distance from point source (meters)
Distance minimale de source ponctuelle (en mètres)

Page 4-33
Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information Compliance with safety standards

Note
Gain of antenna in dBi = 10 * log(G).
The regulations require that the power used for the calculations is the maximum
power in the transmit burst subject to allowance for source-based time-averaging.
At 5.4 GHz and EU 5.8 GHz, the products are generally limited to a fixed EIRP which
can be achieved with the Integrated Antenna. The calculations above assume that the
maximum EIRP allowed by the regulations is being transmitted.

Remarque
Gain de l'antenne en dBi = 10 * log(G).
Les règlements exigent que la puissance utilisée pour les calculs soit la puissance
maximale de la rafale de transmission soumis à une réduction pour prendre en
compte le rapport cyclique pour les signaux modulés dans le temps.
Pour une opération dans la CEE dans les bandes 5,4 GHz et 5,8 GHz, les produits sont
généralement limités à une PIRE qui peut être atteinte avec l'antenne intégrée. Les
calculs ci-dessus supposent que la PIRE maximale autorisée par la réglementation est
atteinte.

Note
If there are no EIRP limits in the country of deployment, use the distance calculations
for FCC 5.8 GHz for all frequency bands.
At FCC 5.8 GHz, for antennas between 0.6m (2ft) and 1.8m (6ft), alter the distance
proportionally to the antenna gain.

Remarque
Si aucune limite de PIRE existe pour le pays de déploiement, utilisez les calculs de
distance pour FCC 5,8 GHz pour toutes les bandes de fréquence.
Pour la band FCC 5,8 GHz et les antennes entre 0,6 m (2 pieds) et 1,8 m (6 pieds),
modifier la distance proportionnellement au gain de l'antenne.

Hazardous location compliance


The PMP/PTP 450i series ATEX/HAZLOC ODUs have been certified for operation in the following
hazardous locations:

ATEX
The products have been approved under an “Intrinsic Safety” assessment as defined in EN60079-
11:2007.
The approval is given by certificate number TRAC09ATEX31224X, issued by TRaC Global, with the
specific level of coverage shown below:
• II 3 G Ex ic IIC T4
• II - Equipment group (surface applications)
• 3 - Equipment category (infrequent exposure)

Page 4-34
Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information Compliance with safety standards

• G - Atmosphere (Gas)
• ic - Protection concept (intrinsic safety)
• IIC - Gas group (up to and including Hydrogen and Acetylene)
• T4 - Temperature class (135°C)

Page 4-35
Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information Compliance with radio regulations

Compliance with radio regulations

This section describes how the 450 Platform Family complies with the radio regulations that are in
force in various countries.

Caution
Where necessary, the end user is responsible for obtaining any National licenses
required to operate this product and these must be obtained before using the product
in any country. Contact the appropriate national administrations for details of the
conditions of use for the bands in question and any exceptions that might apply.

Caution
Changes or modifications not expressly approved by Cambium Networks could void
the user’s authority to operate the system.

Caution
For the connectorized version of the product and in order to reduce potential radio
interference to other users, the antenna type and its gain should be so chosen that the
Effective Isotropically Radiated Power (EIRP) is not more than that permitted for
successful communication.

Attention
Le cas échéant, l'utilisateur final est responsable de l'obtention des licences nationales
nécessaires pour faire fonctionner ce produit. Celles-ci doivent être obtenus avant
d'utiliser le produit dans un pays particulier. Contactez les administrations nationales
concernées pour les détails des conditions d'utilisation des bandes en question, et
toutes les exceptions qui pourraient s'appliquer

Attention
Les changements ou modifications non expressément approuvés par les réseaux de
Cambium pourraient annuler l'autorité de l'utilisateur à faire fonctionner le système.

Attention
Pour la version du produit avec une antenne externe, et afin de réduire le risque
d'interférence avec d'autres utilisateurs, le type d'antenne et son gain doivent être
choisis afin que la puissance isotrope rayonnée équivalente (PIRE) ne soit pas
supérieure au minimum nécessaire pour établir une liaison de la qualité requise.

Page 4-36
Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information Compliance with radio regulations

Type approvals
This system has achieved Type Approval in various countries around the world. This means that
the system has been tested against various local technical regulations and found to comply. The
frequency bands in which the system operates may be ‘unlicensed’ and, in these bands, the
system can be used provided it does not cause interference. The system is not guaranteed
protection against interference from other products and installations.
The radio specification type approvals that have been granted for 450 Platform Family frequency
variants are listed under Table 98.

Table 98 Radio certifications

Region/Country Band Specification

Brazil 4.9 GHz ANATEL, RESOLUÇÃO Nº 633, DE 14 DE MARÇO DE 2014

5.4 GHz ANATEL, RESOLUTION No. 506, FROM JULY 1, 2008

5.8 GHz ANATEL, RESOLUTION No. 506, FROM JULY 1, 2008

Mexico 900 MHz NOM-121-SCT1-2009

4.9 GHz Protocol Between the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and


MEXICO – Use of 4940 to 4990 MHz band.

5.4 GHz Acuerdo del 27 de noviembre de 2012

5.8 GHz NOM-121-SCT1-2009

USA 900 MHz FCC Part 15.247

2.4 GHz FCC Part 15 Class B

3.6 GHz FCC Part 15 Class B

4.9 GHz FCC 47 CFR Part 90

5.1 GHz FCC 47 CFR Part 15 E

5.2 GHz FCC 47 CFR Part 15 E

5.4 GHz FCC 47 CFR Part 15 E

5.8 GHz FCC 47 CFR Part 15 C

Canada 900 MHz RSS Gen and RSS 210

2.4 GHz RSS Gen and RSS 210

3.5 /3.6 GHz RSS Gen and RSS 192

4.9 GHz IC RSS-111, Issue 5

5.8 GHz IC RSS-247, Issue 1

Europe 3.5 GHz ETSI EN 302 326-2 V1.2.2

Page 4-37
Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information Compliance with radio regulations

4.9 GHz ETSI EN302 625; V1.1.1 Broadband Disaster Relief

5.4 GHz ETSI EN 301 893 V1.8.1

5.8 GHz ETSI EN 302 502 V2.1.1

Brazil specific information


Brazil notification
For compliant operation in the 5.4 GHz band, the Equivalent Isotropic Radiated Power from the
integrated antenna or connectorized antenna shall not exceed 30 dBm (0.5 W).
The operator is responsible for enabling the DFS feature on any Canopy 5.4 GHz radio by setting
the Country Code to “Brazil”, including after the module is reset to factory defaults.
Important Note: This equipment operates as a secondary application, so it has no rights against
harmful interference, even if generated by similar equipment, and cannot cause harmful
interference on systems operating as primary applications.

Brazil certification numbers


The Anatel certification number for Brazil for the PMP/PTP 450i Series is 2426-15-7745.

Australia Notification
900 MHz modules must be set to transmit and receive only on center channels of 920, 922, or 923
MHz to stay within the ACMA approved band of 915 MHz to 928 MHz for the class license and not
interfere with other approved users.
After considering antenna gain (in dBi), 900 MHz modules’ transmitter output power (in dBm) must
be set to stay within the legal regulatory limit of 30 dBm (1 W) EIRP for this 900 MHz frequency
band.

Regulatory Requirements for CEPT Member States


(www.cept.org)
When operated in accordance with the instructions for use, Cambium Wireless equipment
operating in the 5.1 GHz and 5.4 GHz bands is compliant with CEPT Resolution 229 (REV. WRC-12).
Operating the 450 Platform Family in the bands 5150 to 5350 MHz and 5470 to 5725 MHz is granted
providing it is not causing interference to the existing primary services allocated to those bands.
For compliant operation in the 5250 to 5350 MHz band, the transmit power from the integrated
antenna or a connectorized antenna shall be limited to a maximum mean EIRP of 200 mW and a
maximum mean EIRP density of 10 mW/MHz in any 1 MHz band.

Page 4-38
Chapter 4: Legal and regulatory information Compliance with radio regulations

For compliant operation in the 5470 to 5725 MHz band, the transmit power shall be restricted to a
maximum of 250 mW with a maximum mean EIRP of 1 W and a maximum mean EIRP density of
50 mW/MHz in any 1 MHz band.
For compliant operation in the bands 5 250-5 350 MHz and 5 470-5 725 MHz, the 450 Platform
Family employs transmitter power control.
For EU member states, RLAN equipment in the 5.4GHz bands is exempt from individual licensing
under Commission Recommendation 2003/203/EC. Contact the appropriate national
administrations for details on the conditions of use for the bands in question and any exceptions
that might apply. Also see www.ero.dk for further information.
Cambium Radio equipment operating in the 5470 to 5725 MHz band are categorized as “Class 1”

devices within the EU in accordance with ECC DEC(04)08 and are “CE” marked
to show compliance with the European Radio & Telecommunications Terminal Equipment
(R&TTE) directive 1999/5/EC. The relevant Declaration of Conformity can be found at
http://www.cambiumnetworks.com/ec_dofc/ .
A European Commission decision, implemented by Member States on 31 October 2005, makes the
frequency band 5470-5725 MHz available in all EU Member States for wireless access systems.
Under this decision, the designation of Canopy 5.4GHz products become “Class 1 devices” and
these do not require notification under article 6, section 4 of the R&TTE Directive. Consequently,

these 5.4GHz products are only marked with the symbol and may be used in
any member state.

Page 4-39
Chapter 5: Preparing for installation
This chapter describes how to stage and test the hardware for a 450 Platform network. This
chapter is arranged as follows:
• Safety on page 5-2: Describes the precautions to be observed and checks to be performed
before proceeding with the installation
• Preparing for installation on page 5-6: Describes the pre-configuration procedure before
proceeding with installation.
• Testing system components on page 5-8: Describes the procedures for unpacking and
performing and initial staging of the 450 Platform Family ODU.
• Configuring Link for Test on page 5-17: Describes the procedures for testing the equipment’s
radio links.

Page 5-1
Chapter 5: Preparing for installation Safety

Safety

Warning
To prevent loss of life or physical injury, observe the following safety guidelines. In no
event shall Cambium Networks be liable for any injury or damage caused during the
installation of the Cambium 450 Platform Family. Ensure that only qualified personnel
install a 450 Platform link.

Hazardous locations
Warning
When installing the PMP/PTP 450i ATEX/HAZLOC product variants in hazardous
locations, follow the instructions contained in the PMP/PTP 450i Series Hazardous
Location Guide (supplied in box with the products), in addition to the instructions in
this user guide.

Power lines
Exercise extreme care when working near power lines.

Working at heights
Exercise extreme care when working at heights.

Power supply
Always use one of the Cambium 450 Platform Family power supply units (PSU) to power the ODU.
Failure to use a Cambium supplied PoE could result in equipment damage and will invalidate the
safety certification and may cause a safety hazard.

Page 5-2
Chapter 5: Preparing for installation Safety

Grounding and protective earth


The Outdoor Unit (ODU) must be properly grounded to protect against lightning. It is the user’s
responsibility to install the equipment in accordance with national regulations. In the USA follow
the requirements of the National Electrical code NFPA 70-2005 and 780-2004 Installation of
Lightning Protection Systems. In Canada, follow Section 54 of the Canadian Electrical Code. These
codes describe correct installation procedures for grounding the outdoor unit, mast, lead-in wire
and discharge unit, size of grounding conductors and connection requirements for grounding
electrodes. Other regulations may apply in different countries and therefore it is recommended
that installation of the outdoor unit be contracted to a professional installer.

Powering down before servicing


Always power down and unplug the equipment before servicing.

Primary disconnect device


The ODU power supply is the primary disconnect device.

External cables
Safety may be compromised if outdoor rated cables are not used for connections that will be
exposed to the outdoor environment. For outdoor copper Cat5e Ethernet interfaces, always use
Cat5e cable that is gel-filled and shielded with copper-plated steel.

RF exposure near the antenna


Strong radio frequency (RF) fields will be present close to the antenna when the transmitter is on.
Always turn off the power to the ODU before undertaking maintenance activities in front of the
antenna.

Minimum separation distances


Ensure that personnel are not exposed to unsafe levels of RF energy. The units start to radiate RF
energy as soon as they are powered up. Never work in front of the antenna when the ODU is
powered. Install the ODUs so as to provide and maintain the minimum separation distances from
all persons. For minimum separation distances, see Calculated distances and power compliance
margins on page 4-25.

Page 5-3
Chapter 5: Preparing for installation Safety

Grounding and lightning protection requirements


Ensure that the installation meets the requirements defined in Grounding and lightning protection
on page 3-8.

Grounding cable installation methods


To provide effective protection against lightning induced surges, observe these requirements:
• Grounding conductor runs are as short, straight and smooth as possible, with bends and
curves kept to a minimum.

• Grounding cables must not be installed with drip loops.

• All bends must have a minimum radius of 200 mm (8 in) and a minimum angle of 90°. A
diagonal run is preferable to a bend, even though it does not follow the contour or run parallel
to the supporting structure.

• All bends, curves and connections must be routed towards the grounding electrode system,
ground rod, or ground bar.

• Grounding conductors must be securely fastened.

• Braided grounding conductors must not be used.

• Approved bonding techniques must be used for the connection of dissimilar metals.

Siting ODUs and antennas


ODUs, external antennas and GPS receivers are not designed to survive direct lightning strikes. For
this reason they must be installed in Zone B as defined in Lightning protection zones on page 3-9.
Mounting in Zone A may put equipment, structures and life at risk.

Thermal Safety
The ODU enclosure may be hot to the touch when in operation. The ODU must not be operated in
ambient temperatures exceeding 40°C unless mounted in a Restricted Access Location. For more
information, see ODU ambient temperature limits on page 3-10.

Warning
Do not install the ODU in a location where the ambient temperature could exceed 40°C
unless this is a Restricted Access Location as defined by EN 60950-1.

Page 5-4
Chapter 5: Preparing for installation Safety

Alerte
L’unité externe ne doit pas être installée dans un endroit où la température ambiante
est supérieure à 40C à moins que l’accès soit limité au personnel autorisé.

Page 5-5
Chapter 5: Preparing for installation Preparing for installation

Preparing for installation

ODU pre-configuration
It is common practice to pre-configure the units during staging before site installation by
performing the following tasks:
• Connecting to the unit
• Configuring IP and Ethernet interfaces
• Upgrading the software version and using CNUT
• General configuration
• Configuring security
• Configuring radio parameters
• Setting up SNMP agent
• Configuring syslog
• Configuring remote access
• Monitoring the Link
• Configuring quality of service
• Zero Touch Configuration Using DHCP Option 66
• Configuring Radio via config file
• Configuring a RADIUS server
If the units are to be pre-configured during staging, the safety precautions below MUST be
observed.

Preparing personnel
In no event shall Cambium Networks be liable for any injury or damage caused during the
installation of the Cambium 450 Platform Family ODU.
Ensure that only qualified personnel undertake the installation of a 450 Platform system.
Ensure that all safety precautions are observed.

Preparing inventory
Perform the following inventory checks:
• Check that the correct components are available, as described in Ordering the components on
page 2-64.
• Check the contents of all packages against their packing lists.

Page 5-6
Chapter 5: Preparing for installation Preparing for installation

Preparing tools
Check that following specific tools are available, in addition to general tools:
• RJ45 crimp tool (it must be the correct tool for the type of RJ45 being used).
• Personal Computer (PC) with 10 or 100 or 1000 BaseT Ethernet port
• Web browser
• Ethernet patch cables

Page 5-7
Chapter 5: Preparing for installation Testing system components

Testing system components


The best practice is to connect all components—AP/BHM, SMs/BHS, GPS antenna (if applicable)
and CMM (if applicable)—in a test setting and initially configure and verify them before deploying
them to an installation. In this way, any configuration issues are worked out before going on-site,
on a tower, in the weather, where the discovery of configuration issues or marginal hardware is
more problematic and work-flow affecting.

Unpacking Components
When a delivery arrives, inspect all packages immediately for damages.
Carefully unpack the equipment, verify that all the components have arrived as per order and are
in good condition. Save all packaging materials for equipment transportation to the installation
site.

Preparing the ODU


After the equipment is unpacked, the units may be configured for staging tests.
Use either of two methods to configure an AP/BHM:
• Use the Quick Start feature of the product (via GUI menu Quick Start)
• Manually set each parameter
After changing configuration parameters on a GUI web page:
• Before you leave a web page, click the Save button to save the change(s)
• After making change(s) on multiple web pages, click the Reboot button to reboot the module
and implement the change(s)

Configuring the Computing Device for Test


If the computer is configured for Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), disconnect the
computer from the network. If the computer is instead configured for static IP addressing
• Set the static address in the 169.254 network
• Set the subnet mask to 255.255.0.0.
For detailed instructions, see section Configuring the management PC on page 5-17.

Page 5-8
Chapter 5: Preparing for installation Testing system components

Factory default Configuration


From the factory, the APs/BHMs and SMs/BHSs are all configured to not transmit on any
frequency. This configuration ensures that equipment operators do not accidentally turn on an
unsynchronized module. Site synchronization of modules is required because
• modules:
o cannot transmit and receive signals at the same time.
o use TDD (Time Division Duplexing) to distribute signal access of the downlink and uplink
frames.
• when one module transmits while an unintended module nearby receives signal, the
transmitting module may interfere with or desense the receiving module. In this context,
interference is self-interference (within the same network).

ODU interfaces
See section 450 Platform Family interfaces on page 2-7

ODU diagnostic LEDs


See section AP/BHM LEDs on page 2-16.
See section SM/BHS LEDs on page 2-18.

Recommended Tools for Installation


The following tools may be needed for installation:

Table 99 Tools for PMP and PTP 450 Platform ODU installation

Equipment to Be Tools Required


Installed

AP or BHM • 3 mm Allen Wrench


Used for connecting the antenna mating bracket to the rear of the AP
housing
• Crescent Wrench Pair
Used for tightening cable glands
• Self-amalgamating and PVC Tape
Used for weatherproofing N-type connections

Page 5-9
Chapter 5: Preparing for installation Testing system components

Equipment to Be Tools Required


Installed

AP or BHM or BHS • 13 mm Spanner Wrench (or Ratchet Spanner Wrench) Pair


Antenna Used for connecting the antenna (sector or omni for AP, or directional for
BH)base to the pole/mast mounting bracket
• Self-amalgamating and PVC Tape
Used for weatherproofing N-type connections
• N-type Torque Wrench (not required but recommended)
Used for assuring proper tightening of N-type connectors terminating the
RF cables

SM • Wrench/driver (depending on operator’s choice of clamps)


Used for tightening clamps to the pole
• Alignment tone adapter / headset
Used for aligning the SM to the AP

Universal Global • Philips Screwdriver


Positioning System Used for attaching the UGPS unit to the pole/mast mounting bracket
• 13mm Spanner Wrench (or Ratchet Spanner Wrench)
Used for connecting the mounting bracket’s U-bolt to the antenna or mast

Cabling • Electrician’s Scissors or Wire Cutters


Used for cutting wire to length
• RJ-11/RJ-45 Crimping Tool
Used for stripping RJ-11/RJ-45 cables and for terminating cable ends
• Cable Testing Device
Used to ensure that cables are properly constructed

Standards for Wiring


Modules automatically sense whether the Ethernet cable in a connection is wired as straight-
through or crossover. Operators may use either straight-through or crossover cable to connect a
network interface card (NIC), hub, router, or switch to these modules. This guide follows the
EIA/TIA-568B colour code standard.

Page 5-10
Chapter 5: Preparing for installation Testing system components

Best Practices for Cabling


The following practices are essential to the reliability and longevity of cabled connections:
• Use only shielded cables to resist interference.
• For vertical runs, provide cable support and strain relief.
• Include a 2-ft (0.6-m) service loop on each end of the cable to allow for thermal expansion and
contraction and to facilitate terminating the cable again when needed.
• Include a drip loop to shed water so that most of the water does not reach the connector at the
device.
• Properly crimp all connectors.
• Use dielectric grease on all connectors to resist corrosion.
• Use only shielded connectors to resist interference and corrosion.

Wiring Connectors
The following diagrams correlate pins to wire colors and illustrate crossovers where applicable.
Pin 1, relative to the lock tab on the connector of a straight-through cable is located as shown
below.

Figure 68 Pin 1 location

Page 5-11
Chapter 5: Preparing for installation Testing system components

Main port pinout


Table 100 Main port pinout

RJ45 pin Description

1 +TxRx0

2 –TxRx0

3 +TxRx1

4 +TxRx2

5 –TxRx2

6 –TxRx1

7 +TxRx3

8 –TxRx3

Aux port pinout


Table 101 Aux port pinout

RJ45 pin Description

1 +TxRx0

2 –TxRx0

3 +TxRx1

4 GPS power out, Alignment tone out, GPS data out

5 GPS data in

6 –TxRx1

7 GPS 0v

8 GPS Sync in

Page 5-12
Chapter 5: Preparing for installation Testing system components

RJ-45 Pinout for Straight-through Ethernet Cable


Figure 69 Straight-through Ethernet Cable

RJ45 Connector (Bottom) Straight-Through Cable RJ45 Connector (Top)

8 8
7 7
6 6
5
4
`` 5
4
3 3
2 2
1 1

Table 102 RJ-45 pinout for straight-through Ethernet cable

Pin Signal Pair Color

1 TP1+ 2 White/orange stripe

2 TP1- 2 Orange solid

3 TP2+ 3 White/green stripe

4 TP3+ 1 Blue solid

5 TP3- 1 White/blue stripe

6 TP2- 3 Green solid

7 TP4+ 4 White/brown stripe

8 TP4- 4 Brown solid

RJ-45 Pinout for Crossover Ethernet Cable


Figure 70 Crossover Ethernet Cable
Hook Underneath Crossover Cable Hook On Top

8 8
7 7
6 6
5 5
Hook
4 4
3 3
2 2
1 1

UTP Category 5/6 Cable

Page 5-13
Chapter 5: Preparing for installation Testing system components

Table 103 RJ-45 pinout for crossover Ethernet cable

Connection 1 Connection 2
Pin
Signal Pair Color Signal Pair Color

1 TP1+ 2 White/orange stripe TP2+ 3 White/green stripe

2 TP1- 2 Orange solid TP2- 3 Green solid

3 TP2+ 3 White/green stripe TP1+ 2 White/orange stripe

4 TP3+ 1 White/blue stripe TP4+ 4 White/brown stripe

5 TP3- 1 Blue solid TP4- 4 Brown solid

6 TP2- 3 Green solid TP1- 2 Orange solid

7 TP4+ 4 White/brown stripe TP3+ 1 Blue solid

8 TP4- 4 Brown solid TP3- 1 White/blue stripe

Page 5-14
Chapter 5: Preparing for installation Testing system components

AP/BHM to UGPS cable


The AP/BHM to UGPS cable can be constructed from RJ12 to RJ 45 cable using the pin
configuration described in Table 104.

Note
This is only applicable for 450 AP/BHM.
The AP/BHM will only power up the UGPS if it configured to do so.

Figure 71 AP/BHM to UGPS cable


RJ45 Connector (Bottom) Straight-Through Cable RJ12 Connector (Top)
8 6
7 NC 5
6 4
5
4
`` NC
3
2
3 1
2
1

Table 104 AP/BHM to UGPS cable pinout

450i Series AP RJ 45 Pin UGPS RJ 12 Connector Connector


Pin
Connector

1 NC 1 8 on RJ 45

2 NC 2 NC

3 NC 3 5 on RJ 45

4 4 on RJ 12 4 4 on RJ 45

5 3 on RJ 12 5 NC

6 NC 6 7 on RJ 45

7 6 on RJ 12

8 1 on RJ 12

Page 5-15
Chapter 5: Preparing for installation Testing system components

Alignment tone cable (for PMP/PTP 450i)


The alignment tone cable is constructed using RJ45 plug and Stereo plug. The pin configuration is
shown in Figure 72

Figure 72 Alignment tone cable pin configuration

Resistors
Pin 7 Left
#8
220 Ω

Right
#1 220 Ω
Pin 4

Common

For more information, refer Aux port to alignment tone headset wiring.

Override plug cable (for PMP 450 only)


To construct an override plug, perform the following steps:
• Crimp an RJ-12 6 pins connector onto a 6-inch length of CAT 5 cable
• Pin out all 6 pins
• Short (solder together) pins 4 and 6 on the other end. Do not connect any other wires to
anything.

Figure 73 RJ-12 pinout for the default plug

RJ12 Connector (Bottom)


Override plug cable wiring
Not used
6
5 Not used Tie together
4
3 ``
2 Not used
1

Page 5-16
Chapter 5: Preparing for installation Configuring Link for Test

Configuring Link for Test


It is important to stage the AP/BHM and SM/BHS units first to verify proper registration before
deploying the modules to the site. To begin configuring the modules for test, see the sections
below:

Configuring the management PC


To configure the local management PC to communicate with the AP, SM, BHM or BHS, proceed as
follows:

Powering the AP/SM/BH for test configuration


Perform the following steps to power on the ODU.

Procedure 2 Powering the ODU

1 Plug one end of a CAT 5 Ethernet cable into the ODU.

2 Plug the Ethernet cable connector labeled To Radio into the jack in the pig tail that
hangs from the power supply.

3 Plug the other connector of the pig tail (this connector labeled To Computer) into
the Ethernet jack of the computing device.

4 Plug the power supply into an electrical outlet.

Warning
From this point until you remove power from the ODU, stay at least as
far from the AP as the minimum separation distance specified in
Minimum separation distances on page 5-3.

5 Power up the computing device

6 Start the browser in the computing device

The AP/BHM interface provides a series of web pages to configure and monitor the unit. Access
web-based interface through a computing device that is either directly connected or connected
through a network to the AP/BHM. If the computing device is not connected to a network when it is
being configured for test environment, and if the computer has used a proxy server address and
port to configure a module, then the operator may need to first disable the proxy setting in the
computer.

Page 5-17
Chapter 5: Preparing for installation Configuring Link for Test

Perform the following procedure to toggle the computer to not use the proxy setting.

Procedure 3 Bypassing browser proxy settings to access module web pages


1 Launch Microsoft Internet Explorer

2 Select Tools, Internet Options, Connections, LAN Settings. Alternate web browser
menu selections may differ.

3 Uncheck the Use a proxy server box.

In the address bar of your browser, enter the IP address of the AP/BHM. (For example, enter
http://169.254.1.1 to access the AP/BHM through its default IP address). The AP/BHM
responds by opening the General Status tab of its Home page.

Logging into the web interface – AP/SM/BH


Procedure 4 Logging into the web interface

1 Plug one end of a CAT 5 Ethernet cable into the AP/BHM

2 Plug the Ethernet cable connector labeled To Radio into the jack in the pig tail that
hangs from the power supply.

3 Plug the other connector of the pig tail (this connector labeled To Computer) into
the Ethernet jack of the computing device.

4 Plug the power supply into an electrical outlet.

Warning
From this point until you remove power from the ODU, stay at least as
far from the ODU as the minimum separation distance specified in
Minimum separation distances on page 5-3.

Using the Quick Start Configuration Wizard of the AP/BHM


See section Quick link setup on page 7-12.

Page 5-18
Chapter 6: Installation
This chapter describes how to install and test the hardware for a 450 Platform link. It contains the
following topics:
• ODU variants and mounting bracket options on page 6-2 provides details of six different
bracket options, including the type of ODU and range of pole diameters supported by each
option.
• Mount the ODU, LPU and surge suppressor on page 6-3 describes how to mount and ground
an integrated or connectorized ODU, how to mount and ground the top LPU.
• Installing the copper Cat5e Ethernet interface on page 6-22 describes how to install the copper
Cat5e power over Ethernet interface from the ODU to the PSU.
• Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU on page 6-26 describes how to install
external antennas for a connectorized ODU.
• Installing ODU on page 6-62 describes how to install PTP and PMP ODU radios.
• Installing the AC Power Injector on page 6-67 describes how to install a power supply unit for
the PMP/PTP 450 platform, either the AC Power Injector.
• Supplemental installation information on page 6-69 contains detailed installation procedures
that are not included in the above topics, such as how to strip cables, create grounding points
and weatherproof connectors.

Note
These instructions assume that LPUs are being installed from the 450 Platform Family
LPU and grounding kit (Cambium part number C000065L007). If the installation does
not require LPUs, adapt these instructions as appropriate.
If LPUs are being installed, only use the five black-capped EMC cable glands supplied
in the LPU and grounding kit. The silver-capped cable glands supplied in the ODU kits
must only be used in 450 Platform installations which do not require LPUs.

Page 6-1
Chapter 6: Installation ODU variants and mounting bracket options

ODU variants and mounting bracket options


Mounting bracket– PMP/PTP 450i Series
The PMP/PTP 450i Series supports below mentioned mounting bracket option:

Table 105 PMP/PTP 450i Series - ODU mounting bracket part numbers

Cambium description Cambium part number

Mounting bracket – low profile adjustable N000045L002A

The low-profile bracket provides elevation adjustment with the PMP/PTP 450i Series Integrated
ODUs of +10° to –5° or +5° to –10°. A larger adjustment range is available using the standard
integrated mounting bracket. The connectorized mounting bracket does not provide elevation
adjustment.

Mounting bracket– PMP 450 Series – SM 900 MHz


The PMP 450i Series – SM 900 MHz has special mounting bracket option. The PMP 450i Series AP -
900 MHz mounting procedure is the same as the other 450i Series radios. The 450 Series SM 900
MHz has a different mounting bracket which is supplied along with Yagi antenna.

Page 6-2
Chapter 6: Installation Mount the ODU, LPU and surge suppressor

Mount the ODU, LPU and surge suppressor


To install the ODU and top LPU, use the following procedures:
• Attach ground cables to the ODU on page 6-3
• Mount the ODU on the mast on page 6-6
• Mount the top LPU on page 6-12
• Mount the Surge Suppressor on page 6-12

Attach ground cables to the ODU

PMP 450m Series – AP


1 Fasten an AWG 10 (or 6mm2) copper ground
cable to each ODU grounding point using the
M6 (small) lugs.

2 Secure the M6 grounding bolts by applying 3


Nm torque.

3 Securely connect the copper wires to the


grounding system (Protective Earth) and the
LPU or Gigabit Ethernet Surge Suppressor
according to applicable regulations.

Page 6-3
Chapter 6: Installation Mount the ODU, LPU and surge suppressor

PMP/PTP 450i Series – AP/SM/BH, PMP 450 3GHz Ruggedized SM


1 Fasten an AWG 10 (or 6mm2) copper ground
cable to each ODU grounding point using the
M6 (small) lugs.

2 Tighten the Ground post screws.

3 Securely connect the copper wires to the grounding system (Protective Earth) and the LPU or
Gigabit Ethernet Surge Suppressor according to applicable regulations.

Page 6-4
Chapter 6: Installation Mount the ODU, LPU and surge suppressor

PMP 450 AP

1 Fasten an AWG 10 (or 6mm2) copper ground


cable to each ODU grounding point using the
M6 (small) lugs

2 Tighten the Ground post locking nut in the


copper wire

3 Securely connect the copper wire to the grounding system (Protective Earth) according to
applicable regulations.

PMP 450 SM
1 Fasten an AWG 10 (or 6mm2) copper ground
cable to each ODU grounding point using the
M6 (small) lugs

2 Tighten the Ground post locking nut in the


copper wire

Page 6-5
Chapter 6: Installation Mount the ODU, LPU and surge suppressor

3 Securely connect the copper wire to the grounding system (Protective Earth) according to
applicable regulations.
The grounding point on PMP 450 Series SM 900 MHz is different from 2.4, 3.5/3.65 and 5 GHz PMP
450 SMs as shown in Figure 74.

Figure 74 PMP 450 900 MHz SM grounding

Mount the ODU on the mast


PMP 450m Series – AP

1 See - PMP 450m Series – AP on page 6-55 for


Installation for an integrated ODU

2 Remove the rear bracket strap from upper and lower


brackets of ODU

3 Attach the upper and lower bracket of ODU to the


mount point by closing the rear strap around the pole

4 Secure the four-serrated flange M8 nuts by applying


10 Nm torque on upper and lower rear strap using a
13 mm spanner wrench. These must be tightened
evenly on the pole to avoid jumping/stripping threads
Secure the bolts on four sides by applying 8 Nm
torque as per the angle of the antenna.

Page 6-6
Chapter 6: Installation Mount the ODU, LPU and surge suppressor

PMP/PTP 450i Series – AP/SM/BH, PMP 450 3 GHz Ruggedized SM


Caution
Do not reverse the bracket clamp, as this arrangement may lead to failure of the
assembly. Do not over-tighten the bolts as this may lead to failure of the assembly.

1 Fix the mounting plate to the back of the ODU using


the four bolts, and spring and plain washers provided.
Tighten the bolts.

2 Attach the bracket body to the mounting plate using


the M8 bolt, spring and plain washers.

3 Hoist the ODU to the mounting position

4 Attach the bracket body to the pole using the bracket


clamp, M8 bolts, and spring and plain washers.

5 Adjust the elevation and azimuth to achieve visual


alignment.

PMP 450b Mid-Gain SM


1 Use a stainless steel hose clamp for the attachment.

2 Attach the mounting bracket to the structure with the


release tab facing downward. Tighten the hose clamp.

3 Slide the 450b SM onto the mounting bracket. Press


downwards until it clicks into place.

4 Loosen the adjuster wingnut on the bracket and set


the required SM tilt angle. Retighten the adjuster
wingnut by hand to secure the SM at the chosen
angle.

Page 6-7
Chapter 6: Installation Mount the ODU, LPU and surge suppressor

PMP 450b High Gain SM


1 Snap in the rear housing assembly.

2 Insert screws to hold the rear housing assembly to the


dish by applying 5 Nm Torque.

3 Snap in the center feed tube to the assembly.

4 Tighten the center feed tube lock screw.

Page 6-8
Chapter 6: Installation Mount the ODU, LPU and surge suppressor

5 Assemble the pole bracket to the Rear housing


bracket.

6 Remove the cable gland from bottom cover. Feed the


RJ45 cable though the gland, bottom cover and
connect to the radio.

7 Keep part loose and screw gland to the bottom cover.


Audio cable is not shown in the figure.

Page 6-9
Chapter 6: Installation Mount the ODU, LPU and surge suppressor

8 Tighten gland, bottom cover screws and connect to


the radio.

9 Loosen M8 nuts to remove outer clamp. Slip clamp


over pole and tighten M8 nuts by applying 8 Nm
torque. Do not over tighten to prevent aligning the
dish.

PMP 450 AP
1 Using an 8mm nut driver, attach the pole mount’s
AP housing bracket to the unit using the 4 M5 x
16mm bolts included with the AP.

Page 6-10
Chapter 6: Installation Mount the ODU, LPU and surge suppressor

2 Using the included (depending on pole diameter):


• M8 x 70mm hex cap bolts (2 quantity)
or
• M8 x 40mm hex cap bolts (2 quantity)
and
• M8 flat washers (2 quantity)
• M8 coil washers (2 quantity)
Attach the mounting bracket to the pole/mast.
The mounting bracket is designed to attach to
poles with diameters in the range of 2 in. (50mm)
to 3in. (75mm).

3 Complete the AP mounting assembly by attaching


the included:

• 8mm hex cap bolt (one quantity)


Through the AP’s attached mounting bracket and
pole mount. Now the AP may be adjusted to the
desired position and tightened with a 1/2-inch
spanner wrench to 11 lb/ft (14Nm).

PMP 450 SM (except PMP 450 SM - 900 MHz)


1 Use stainless steel hose clamps for the
attachment.

Stainless steel
hose clamps

2 Attach the mounting bracket to the structure.


Tighten the locking nut.

Reflector dish arm

PMP 450 SM 900 MHz (connectorized)


The PMP 450 900 MHz connectorized SM mounting procedure is different from other radios. It
does not get directly mounted on pole.

Page 6-11
Chapter 6: Installation Mount the ODU, LPU and surge suppressor

1 Align the 900 MHz SM to E bracket


of Yagi antenna

2 Slide the radio towards right to


lock on the antenna

Slide towards right to lock

Mount the top LPU


1 For separate LPU mounting, use the U-bolt
bracket from the LPU kit to mount the top LPU
on the pole below the ODU. Tighten to a torque
setting of 7.0 Nm (5.2 lb ft).

Please refer Gigabit LPU and Grounding Kit


Installation Guide for more details.

Mount the Surge Suppressor


PMP/PTP 450i/450b Series
Gigabit Ethernet Surge Suppressors are installed at both ends of the drop cable. One within 600
mm (24”) of and under the ODU. The other located within 600 mm (24”) of the building entry
point.
Quick procedure:
The quick procedure for the Surge Suppressor for PMP/PTP 450i/450b Series mounting is as
follows:

1 Ground using the terminal on the back of the


units. Use the supplied Tubular Lug and 6 mm2
(10 AWG) stranded cable, max length 600 mm
(24”).

Page 6-12
Chapter 6: Installation Mount the ODU, LPU and surge suppressor

I. Waterproof the cable lug with heat


shrink sleeving.
II. Secure the Cable assembly to the unit using
the supplied screw and washer.

2 Mount the Gigabit Ethernet Surge Suppressor on


the wall or pole

3 Connect the two CAT5e cables to the Gigabit


Ethernet Surge Suppressor

4 Slide the end cap over the bottom of the Gigabit


Ethernet Surge Suppressor, ensuring it clicks
firmly in place

Refer to the Gigabit Ethernet Surge Suppressor Installation Guide for more details.

Figure 75 Gigabit Ethernet Surge Suppressor

Page 6-13
Chapter 6: Installation Mount the ODU, LPU and surge suppressor

PMP/PTP 450 Series


The PMP/PTP 450 Series uses 600SSH Surge Suppressor. The inside of the surge suppressor is
shown in Figure 76.

Caution
The PMP 450 SM 900 MHz is based off of the 450 Series, be sure to use a 600SS to
protect this radio type.

Figure 76 600SSH Surge Suppressor – inside


Key to Callouts 600SSH
1 Holes—for mounting the Surge
Suppressor to a flat surface (such as an
outside wall). The distance between
centers is 4.25 inches (108 mm).
2 RJ-45 connectors—One side (neither side
is better than the other for this purpose)
connects to the product (AP, SM, AC
Adapter, or cluster management module).
The other connects to the drop cable.

Page 6-14
Chapter 6: Installation Mount the ODU, LPU and surge suppressor

3 Ground post and washer—use heavy


gauge (10 AWG or 6 mm2) copper wire for
connection. Refer to local electrical codes
for exact specifications.
4 Ground Cable Opening—route the 10
AWG (6 mm2) ground cable through this
opening.
5 CAT-5 Cable Knockouts—route the two
CAT-5 cables through these openings, or
alternatively through the Conduit
Knockouts.
6
Conduit Knockouts—on the back of the
case, near the bottom. Available for
installations where cable is routed
through building conduit.

Note
The 600SSH surge suppressor is shipped in the “isolated” position (pin 4 isolated by
68V from protective earth). If packet error issues occur over the Ethernet link (verify by
pinging the device through the 600SSH), configure the 600SSH to “grounded”
position (by moving the 600SSH switch from “isolated” to “ground”) to avoid ground
loops that may be present in the system.

The mounting procedure for the Surge Suppressor for PMP/PTP 450 Series is as follows:

1 Remove the cover of the 600SSH Surge Suppressor.

2 With the cable openings facing downward, mount the 600SSH to the outside of the
subscriber premises, as close to the point where the Ethernet cable penetrates the residence
or building as possible, and as close to the grounding system (Protective Earth) as possible.

3 Wrap an AWG 10 (or 6mm2) copper wire around the Ground post of the 600SSH.

4 Tighten the Ground post locking nut in the 600SSH onto the copper wire.

5 Securely connect the copper wire to the grounding system (Protective Earth) according to
applicable regulations.

6 Using diagonal cutters or long nose pliers, remove the knockouts that cover the cable
openings to the 600SSH.

7 Pack both surge suppressor Ethernet jacks with dielectric grease.

8 Wrap a splice loop in the loose end of the Ethernet cable from the SM.

9 Connect that cable to one of the Ethernet jacks.

Page 6-15
Chapter 6: Installation Mount the ODU, LPU and surge suppressor

10 Connect an Ethernet cable to the other Ethernet jack of the 600SSH and to the power adapter.

11 Replace the cover of the 600SSH.

General protection installation


To adequately protect a 450 Platform Family installation, both ground bonding and transient
voltage surge suppression are required.

Grounding cable requirements


When routing, fastening and connecting grounding cables, the following requirements must be
implemented:
• Grounding conductors must be run as short, straight, and smoothly as possible, with the
fewest possible number of bends and curves.
• Grounding cables must not be installed with drip loops.
• All bends must have a minimum radius of 203 mm (8 in) and a minimum angle of 90° (Figure
77). A diagonal run is preferable to a bend, even though it does not follow the contour or run
parallel to the supporting structure.
• All bends, curves and connections must be routed towards the grounding electrode system,
ground rod, or ground bar.
• Grounding conductors must be securely fastened.
• Braided grounding conductors must not be used.
• Approved bonding techniques must be used for the connection of dissimilar metals.

Figure 77 Grounding cable minimum bend radius and angle

Page 6-16
Chapter 6: Installation Mount the ODU, LPU and surge suppressor

Caution
Do not attach grounding cables to the ODU mounting bracket bolts, as this
arrangement will not provide full protection.

Page 6-17
Chapter 6: Installation Mount the ODU, LPU and surge suppressor

Basic requirements
The following basic protection requirements must be implemented:
• ODU must be in ‘Zone B’ (see Lightning protection zones on page 3-9).
• ODU must be grounded to the supporting structure.
• A surge suppression unit must be installed on the outside of the building.
• The distance between the ODU and Gigabit Surge Suppressor should be kept to a minimum.
• The drop cable must not be laid alongside a lightning air terminal.
• All grounding cables must be a minimum size of 10 mm2 csa (8AWG), preferably 16 mm2 csa
(6AWG), or 25 mm2 csa (4AWG).

Page 6-18
Chapter 6: Installation Mount the ODU, LPU and surge suppressor

Protection requirements for a wall installation


If the ODU is to be mounted on the wall of a building, then in addition to the general protection
requirements (above), the following requirements must be observed:
• The equipment must be lower than the top of the building or its lightning air terminal.
• The building must be correctly grounded.
Schematic examples of wall installations are shown in Figure 78.

Figure 78 Grounding and lightning protection on wall

Outdoor CAT5e cable

Cat5e cable

Building ground system


Equipment building
Ground cable
SM/BHS Ground to opposite-side
ODU grounding lug

Gigabit Surge Suppressor

Power
Gigabit Surge Suppressor Supply

Network
switch
External
ground bar

Ground ring

Page 6-19
Chapter 6: Installation Mount the ODU, LPU and surge suppressor

Protection requirements for a mast or tower installation


If the ODU is to be mounted on a metal tower or mast, then in addition to the general protection
requirements (above), the following requirements must be observed:
• The equipment must be lower than the top of the tower or its lightning air terminal.
• The metal tower or mast must be correctly grounded.
Schematic examples of mast or tower installations are shown in Figure 79.

Figure 79 Grounding and lightning protection on mast or tower

Outdoor CAT5e cable

Cat5e cable

Ground Cable

Tower/building ground system

AP/BHM

Ground to opposite side


ODU grounding lug Equipment building

Gigabit surge suppressor

Power
Gigabit surge suppressor supply

Network
External switch
ground bar

Ground ring

Page 6-20
Chapter 6: Installation Mount the ODU, LPU and surge suppressor

Protection requirements on a multi-floor building


If the ODU is to be mounted on a high-rise building, it is likely that cable entry is at roof level
(Figure 46) and the equipment room is several floors below. The following additional requirements
must be observed:
• The ODU must be below the lightning terminals and finials.
• A grounding conductor must be installed around the roof perimeter to form the main roof
perimeter lightning protection ring.
• Air terminals are typically installed along the length of the main roof perimeter lightning
protection ring typically every 6.1m (20ft).
• The main roof perimeter lightning protection ring must contain at least two down conductors
connected to the grounding electrode system. The down conductors should be physically
separated from one another, as far as practical.

Figure 80 Grounding and lightning protection on building

Page 6-21
Chapter 6: Installation Installing the copper Cat5e Ethernet interface

Installing the copper Cat5e Ethernet interface


To install the copper Cat5e Ethernet interface, use the following procedures:
• Install the main drop cable on page 6-22
• Install the bottom LPU to PSU drop cable on page 6-24
• Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU on page 6-26

Caution
To avoid damage to the installation, do not connect or disconnect the drop cable when
power is applied to the PSU or network terminating equipment.

Caution
Always use Cat5e cable that is gel-filled and shielded with copper-plated steel.
Alternative types of Cat5e cable are not supported by Cambium Networks. Cambium
Networks supply this cable (Cambium part numbers WB3175 and WB3176), RJ45
connectors (Cambium part number WB3177) and a crimp tool (Cambium part number
WB3211). The LPU and grounding kit contains a 600-mm length of this cable.

Install the main drop cable

Warning
The metal screen of the drop cable is very sharp and may cause personal injury.
• ALWAYS wear cut-resistant gloves (check the label to ensure they are cut resistant).
• ALWAYS wear protective eyewear.
• ALWAYS use a rotary blade tool to strip the cable (DO NOT use a bladed knife).

Warning
Failure to obey the following precautions may result in injury or death:
• Use the proper hoisting grip for the cable being installed. If the wrong hoisting grip is
used, slippage or insufficient gripping strength will result.
• Do not reuse hoisting grips. Used grips may have lost elasticity, stretched, or become
weakened. Reusing a grip can cause the cable to slip, break, or fall.
• The minimum requirement is one hoisting grip for each 60 m (200 ft) of cable.

Page 6-22
Chapter 6: Installation Installing the copper Cat5e Ethernet interface

Cut to length and fit hoisting grips


1 Cut the main drop cable to length from the top LPU to the bottom LPU.
2 Slide one or more hoisting grips onto the top end of the drop cable.

3 Secure the hoisting grip to the cable using a special tool, as recommended by the manufacturer.

Terminate with RJ45 connectors

Caution
Check that the crimp tool matches the RJ45 connector, otherwise the cable or
connector may be damaged.

1 Strip the cable outer sheath and fit the RJ45 connector load bar.

2 Fit the RJ45 connector housing as shown. To ensure there is effective strain relief, locate the
cable inner sheath under the connector housing tang.

Table 106 RJ45 connector and cable color code

Pin Color (Supplied Color Pins on plug face


cable) (Conventional)
1 Light Orange White/Orange
2 Orange Orange
3 Light Green White/Green
4 Blue Blue
5 Light Blue White/Blue
6 Green Green
7 Light Brown White/Brown
8 Brown Brown

Figure 81 RJ45 cable


RJ45 Connector (Bottom) Straight-Through Cable
8
7
6
5
4
``
3
2
1

Page 6-23
Chapter 6: Installation Installing the copper Cat5e Ethernet interface

Install the bottom LPU to PSU drop cable


Install the bottom LPU
Install the bottom LPU, ground it, and connect it to the main drop cable.

1 Select a mounting point for the bottom LPU within 600 mm (24 in) of the building entry point.
Mount the LPU vertically with cable glands facing downwards.

Power over Ethernet CAT5e


cable (gel-filled, shielded with Maximum 600 mm
copper-plated steel) Bottom LPU (24 inches)
Network CAT5e cable PSU drop
AC supply cable

Ground cables
PSU

Site grounding system


Building
entry
Network point
terminating
equipment
LPU to grounding system

Grounding system

2 Connect the main drop cable using the EMC cable gland to the bottom LPU.

3 Fasten one ground cable to the bottom LPU using the M6 (small) lug. Tighten both nuts to a
torque of 5 Nm (3.9 lb ft):

Locking nut
Washer
M6 lug
Washer
Nut
Toothed washer
Other end of ground cable has M10 lug
to ground

4 Select a building grounding point near the LPU bracket. Remove paint from the surface and
apply anti-oxidant compound. Fasten the LPU ground cable using the M10 (large) lug.

Page 6-24
Chapter 6: Installation Installing the copper Cat5e Ethernet interface

Install the LPU to PSU drop cable


Use this procedure to terminate the bottom LPU to PSU drop cable with RJ45 connectors at both
ends, and with a cable gland at the LPU end.

Warning
The metal screen of the drop cable is very sharp and may cause personal injury.
ALWAYS wear cut-resistant gloves (check the label to ensure they are cut resistant).
ALWAYS wear protective eyewear. ALWAYS use a rotary blade tool to strip the cable,
not a bladed knife.

Caution
Check that the crimp tool matches the RJ45 connector, otherwise the cable or
connector may be damaged.

1 Cut the drop cable to the length required from bottom LPU to PSU.

2 At the LPU end only:


• Fit one cable gland and one RJ45 connector by following the procedure Terminate with
RJ45 connectors on page 6-23.
• Connect this cable and gland to the bottom LPU.

3 At the PSU end only: Do not fit a cable gland. Strip the cable outer sheath and fit the RJ45
connector load bar. Fit the RJ45 connector housing. To ensure there is effective strain relief,
locate the cable inner sheath under the connector housing tang:

Page 6-25
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU


PMP 450i Series
Mounting and connecting an external antenna to connectorized ODU
To mount and connect an external antenna to the connectorized ODU, proceed as follows:
1 Mount the antenna(s) according to manufacturer’s instructions.

2 Connect the ODU A and B interfaces to the antenna(s) with RF cable of type LMR-400 (Cambium
part numbers 30010194001 and 30010195001) and N type connectors (Cambium part number
09010091001). Tighten the N type connectors to a torque setting of 1.7 Nm (1.3 lb ft).

3 If the ODU is mounted indoors, install lightning arrestors at the building entry point:

4 Form drip loops near the lower ends of the antenna cables. These ensure that water is not
channeled towards the connectors.

5 If the ODU is mounted outdoors, weatherproof the N type connectors (when antenna alignment
is complete) using PVC tape and self-amalgamating rubber tape.

Page 6-26
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

6 Weatherproof the antenna connectors in the same way (unless the antenna manufacturer
specifies a different method).
RF cable

CAT5e cable
Equipment building
or cabinet
RF cables to
antenna

Connectorized
ODU

A B
Lightning arrestors

AC supply

PSU

Network
equipment

Ground ring

Page 6-27
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

7 Ground the antenna cables to the supporting structure within 0.3 meters (1 foot) of the ODU and
antennas using the Cambium grounding kit (part number 01010419001):

Antenna

RF cable
PMP/PTP 450i ground
cable

Connectorized ODU

A B

8 Fix the antenna cables to the supporting structure using site approved methods. Ensure that no
undue strain is placed on the ODU or antenna connectors. Ensure that the cables do not flap in
the wind, as flapping cables are prone to damage and induce unwanted vibrations in the
supporting structure.

Note
A video on weatherproofing procedure can be found at:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a-twPfCVq4A

Page 6-28
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

Assembling the PMP 450i AP 5 GHz sector antenna and attaching to the
radio
To assemble a PMP 450i Series AP antenna, perform the following steps.

Note
Cambium recommends assembling the antenna, attach the AP and cabling, and to seal
the RF connections before installing the unit at the deployment site.

1 Inventory the parts to ensure that you have them all before you begin. The full set of parts
is shown below.

Figure 82 AP antenna parts

Page 6-29
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

2 Remove top plate from the antenna as shown in Figure 83.

Figure 83 Antenna top plate

3 Attach the antenna plate to the AP as shown in Figure 84.

Note
Please use the four “thin neck” M6 bolts and split washers provided with
the connectorized units rather that the ones provided in the antenna kit.

Figure 84 Attaching antenna plate to the AP

Page 6-30
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

4 Attach the plate mounted AP to the antenna and tighten the (4) serrated flange nuts using
a spanner wrench

Figure 85 Attaching the plate

5 Connect the port A of AP to vertical and port B of AP to horizontal polarization interfaces of


the antenna with RF cable. Tighten the N type connectors to a torque setting of 1.7 Nm (1.3
lb ft).

Figure 86 Connect the port A and B to the PMP 450i AP

Page 6-31
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

6 Assemble the upper bracket by attaching the (2) 7” hex bolts to the bracket using (2)
serrated flange nuts

Figure 87 AP antenna upper bracket assembly

7 Attach the upper bracket to the adjustment Figure 88 AP antenna upper bracket
arms using (2) hex bolts, (2) flat washers and attached to upper adjustment arms
(2) lock washers. Feed the bolt through the
lock washer then flat washer, then thread the
bolt into the upper bracket’s threaded
receptacle.

Page 6-32
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

8 Attach the rear strap to the upper bracket


Figure 89 Rear strap connected to upper
using (2) serrated flange nuts and (1)
AP antenna bracket
retaining bracket. Do not tighten the nuts
now.

9 Attach the entire upper bracket to the


Figure 90 Assembled upper bracket
antenna using (2) hex bolts, (2) flat washers connected to AP antenna
and (2) lock washers. Feed the bolt through
the lock washer then flat washer, then thread
the bolt into the upper bracket’s threaded
receptacle.

10 Begin assembling the lower bracket by


Figure 91 AP Antenna Lower Bracket
attaching the (2) 7” hex bolts to the bracket Assembly
using (2) serrated flange nuts

11 Attach the rear strap to the bracket using (2) serrated flange nuts and (1) retaining bracket.
Do not tighten the nuts now.

Attach the entire lower bracket to the antenna using (2) hex bolts, (2) flat washers and (2)
lock washers.

Page 6-33
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

Figure 92 Lower bracket attached to AP Figure 93 Completed AP and antenna


antenna assembly

Page 6-34
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

PMP 450 Series


Assembling the PMP 450 AP antenna
To assemble a PMP 450 Series AP antenna, perform the following steps.

Note
Cambium recommends assembling the antenna, attach the AP and cabling, and to seal
the RF connections before installing the unit at the deployment site.

1 Inventory the parts to ensure that you have them all before you begin. The full set of parts
is shown below.

Figure 94 PMP 450 AP antenna parts

Page 6-35
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

2 Begin assembling the upper bracket by attaching the (2) 7” hex bolts to the bracket using
(2) serrated flange nuts

Figure 95 AP antenna upper bracket assembly

3 Attach the upper bracket to the adjustment


Figure 96 AP antenna upper bracket
arms using (2) hex bolts, (2) flat washers attached to upper adjustment
and (2) lock washers. Feed the bolt through arms
the lock washer then flat washer, then
thread the bolt into the upper bracket’s
threaded receptacle.

Page 6-36
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

4 Attach the rear strap to the upper bracket using (2) serrated flange nuts and (1) retaining
bracket. Do not tighten the nuts now.

Figure 97 Rear strap connected to upper AP antenna bracket

5 Attach the entire upper bracket to the


Figure 98 Assembled upper bracket
antenna using (2) hex bolts, (2) flat washers connected to AP antenna
and (2) lock washers. Feed the bolt through
the lock washer then flat washer, then
thread the bolt into the upper bracket’s
threaded receptacle.

Page 6-37
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

6 Begin assembling the lower bracket by


Figure 99 AP Antenna Lower Bracket
attaching the (2) 7” hex bolts to the bracket
Assembly
using (2) serrated flange nuts

7 Attach the rear strap to the bracket using (2)


Figure 100 Lower bracket attached to AP
serrated flange nuts and (1) retaining antenna
bracket. Do not tighten the nuts now.

Attach the entire lower bracket to the


antenna using (2) hex bolts, (2) flat washers
and (2) lock washers.

Attaching the PMP 450 AP to the antenna


To attach a PMP 450 Series AP to the antenna, perform the following steps.

Page 6-38
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

Note
Use shielded cable for all infrastructure connections associated with APs, SMs, and
CMMs. The environment that these modules operate in often has significant unknown
or varying RF energy. Operator experience consistently indicates that the additional
cost of shielded cables is more than compensated by predictable operation and
reduced costs for troubleshooting and support.

1 Attach the included bracket to the rear of


Figure 101 Attaching bracket to the rear of
the AP using the (4) M5 x 7mm bolts the AP

2 Attach the AP to the antenna by sliding the bracket onto the bolts and tighten the (4)
serrated flange nuts using a 13-mm spanner wrench.

Figure 102 Lower bracket attached to AP antenna

Page 6-39
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

Note
If using a non-standard antenna, do not cover the equilibrium membrane vent located
on the back of the unit.

Equilibrium Membrane Vent

Figure 103 Mounted PMP 450 AP and antenna assembly, viewed from back and back

Page 6-40
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

Attaching the PMP 450 Series AP and antenna to the mount point
1 Attach the upper bracket of the antenna to the mount point by closing the rear strap around
the pole and tightening the (2) serrated flange nuts using a 13mm spanner wrench. These
must be tightened evenly on the pol to avoid jumping/stripping threads.

Figure 104 Attaching the AP antenna upper bracket to the pole

2 Attach the lower bracket of the antenna to the mount point by closing the rear strap around
the pole and tightening the (2) serrated flange nuts using a 13mm spanner wrench. These
must be tightened evenly on the pole to avoid jumping/stripping threads.

Figure 105 Attaching the AP antenna lower bracket to the pole

3 Use a local map, compass, and/or GPS device as needed to determine the direction that one
or more APs require to each cover the 90° sector.

Page 6-41
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

4 Choose the best mounting location for your particular application.

Note
Use the embedded spectrum analyzer or a commercial analyzer to evaluate
the frequencies present in various locations. OFDM APs need not be mounted
next to each other. They can be distributed throughout a given site. However,
the 90° offset must be maintained. If you want to collocate these APs with
PMP 100 Series APs of the 5.4-GHz frequency band range, plan to allow at
least 25 MHz of separation between their center channels.

5 Secure a ground strap to the ground lug on the back of the AP.

6 Secure the ground strap to the pole, tower, or other trusted ground.

7 The bracket of the standard antenna has provision for measured down tilt. The
recommended practice is to use one of the many radio analysis and mapping tools or on-
line tools to calculate down tilt based on antenna height above the service area.
The proper angle of tilt can be calculated as a factor of both the difference in elevation and
the distance that the link spans. Even in this case, a plumb line and a protractor can be
helpful to ensure the proper tilt. This tilt is typically minimal.
The number of degrees to offset (from vertical) the mounting hardware leg of the support
tube is equal to the angle of elevation from the lower module to the higher module (<B in
the example provided in Figure 69).

Page 6-42
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

Figure 106 Variables for calculating angle of elevation (and depression)

Where: Is:

b angle of elevation

B vertical difference in elevation

A horizontal distance between modules

To use metric units to find the angle of elevation, use the following formula:
B
tan b =
1000A
Where: Is:

B expressed in meters

A expressed in kilometers

To use English standard units to find the angle of elevation, use the following formula:
B
tan b =
5280A
Where: Is:

B expressed in feet

A expressed in miles

The angle of depression from the higher module is identical to the angle of elevation from
the lower module.

8 Connect the coax cables to the antenna and to the AP

9 Weatherproof the connector on the coax cables (see section Attaching and weatherproofing
an N type connector on page 6-73).

Page 6-43
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

PMP 450i Series AP 900 MHz


Mounting of PMP 450i AP 900 MHz
1 Inventory the parts to ensure that you have them all before you begin. The full set of parts
is shown in Figure 108.

Figure 107 PMP 450i AP 900 MHz antenna unbox view

Figure 108 PMP 450i AP 900 MHz antenna inventory

Upper bracket Adjustable arm

Lower bracket

Nuts and bolts

Radio assembly plate

Page 6-44
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

2 (1) Unfold the upper bracket assembly of the


antenna. 1

(2) Unfold the lower bracket assembly.


2

(3) Loose the radio assembly plate by


untightening M8 four bolds. 3

(4) Remove the radio assembly top plate by 4


sliding towards upper bracket assembly.

Page 6-45
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

3 (1) Place the radio assembly plate on the 1


radio and align holes with radio enclosure.

Note
Ensure that the radio plate
notch opening and RF port of
radio in same direction. It is
also important to make sure
you attach the radio assembly
plate in the proper orientation
as shown in figure.

(2) Insert M6 bolts through plate into radio 2


enclosure

(3) Fix the plate by tightening four bolts


3
with a torque setting on 2 ±0.5 Nm

Page 6-46
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

4 (1) Place the radio mounted plate on sector


antenna as shown in the figure. Ensure that 1
the orientation of RF port of antenna and
radio are in same direction

(2) Line up the radio assembly to four bolts


and slide towards lower bracket assembly 2
to lock.

(3) Tighten the radio assembly plate using 3


four M8 bolts to a torque setting of 2 ±0.5
Nm

Page 6-47
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

5 (1) Connect the port A of AP to vertical and Port A Port B


port B of AP to horizontal polarization 1
interfaces of the antenna with RF cable.
Ensure that the RF cables are pass-through
inside the lower bracket assembly

(2) Hand tighten the N type connectors and


the torque should not exceed more than 1
Nm 2

Mounting of PMP 450i AP 900 MHz antenna to the pole


The mounting procedure of PMP 450i AP 900 MHz and antenna to the pole is given below:

1 Remove the upper and lower rear bracket


strap from the sector antenna.

Page 6-48
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

2 Attach the upper and lower bracket of the antenna to the mount point by closing the rear
strap around the pole.

Note
Before mounting the radio on the pole, secure the upper and lower bracket
assemblies with a torque setting of 3 to 4 Nm as shown in Figure 1. Also,
ensure that inner strap of upper bracket is set to zero-degree marking.

Figure 109 Attaching radio mounting PMP 450i AP 900 MHz antenna to the pole

1 2
Inner strap

Rear strap

Rear strap

Page 6-49
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

3 Tighten the four-serrated flange M10 nuts


on the upper and lower rear straps using a
17 mm spanner wrench. These must be
tightened evenly on the pole to avoid
jumping/stripping threads

ODU ground cable

Building ground
system

Sector antenna alignment


The 900 MHz sector antenna horizontal and vertical alignment procedure is shown in Figure 110.
The antenna can be aligned from +5 to -10 degree by adjusting the inner strap of the upper bracket
assembly.

Figure 110 900 MHz sector antenna alignment

Horizontal alignment Vertical alignment Vertical alignment upward


downward tilt tilt
Inner strap

Upper
bracket
assembly

ODU ground cable

Building ground system

Page 6-50
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

PMP 450 Series SM 900 MHz


Attaching the SM 900 MHz directional antenna to the pole
1 Unbox the directional Yagi antenna.

Figure 111 PMP 450i SM 900 MHz external directional antenna

2 Attach the directional antenna to the pole and insert the two U clamps into the mounting
bracket of the antenna

Figure 112 Attach the antenna to the pole

Page 6-51
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

3 Tighten all nuts to approximately 6 to 7 Nm or less to avoid deforming the pole.

Figure 113 Fixing the nuts

Page 6-52
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

Radio mounting to the antenna


1 Align the radio to E bracket and slide towards right to lock on the antenna as shown in
figure.

Figure 114 Fixing the radio to the antenna

Slide towards right to lock

2 Connect the port A of SM to vertical and port B of SM to horizontal polarization interfaces


of the antenna with RF cable.

Figure 115 Connecting RF cable to the radio

ODU ground cable

Building ground system

Page 6-53
Chapter 6: Installation Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU

Directional Yagi antenna alignment


The directional Yagi antenna horizontal and vertical alignment procedure is shown below. The
Yagi antenna can be aligned for +15 to -15 degree.

Figure 116 Yagi antenna alignment - horizontally

Figure 117 Yagi antenna alignment - upward tilt

Figure 118 Yagi antenna alignment - downward tilt

Page 6-54
Chapter 6: Installation Installing an integrated ODU

Installing an integrated ODU


Caution
Do not reverse the bracket clamp, as this arrangement may lead to failure of the
assembly. Do not over-tighten the bolts as this may lead to failure of the assembly.

PMP 450m Series – AP


To mount and connect an integrated ODU, proceed as follows:
1 Inventory the parts to ensure that you have them all before you begin. The full set of parts
is shown in Figure 119.

Figure 119 PMP 450m Series - AP unbox view

(Additional
nuts)
Top bracket

(Additional
PMP 450m AP Bottom bracket nuts)

Note
The additional nuts provided for top and bottom brackets are used to hold the long
bolts in position during installation.

Page 6-55
Chapter 6: Installation Installing an integrated ODU

2 Attach the bottom bracket to the ODU using (2) hex


bolts and secure the M8 bolts by applying 5 Nm torque.

3 Attach the top bracket to the projecting studs on the


ODU and secure the top bracket using two M8 nuts by
applying 5 Nm torque.

4 Fix the front and rear strap assembly to the upper


bracket using two bolts. Do not tighten the nuts now.

Note: The PMP 450m antenna operates with 2 degrees


of electrical down-tilt.

5 Fix the front and rear strap assembly to the bottom


bracket using two bolts. Do not tighten the nuts now.

Page 6-56
Chapter 6: Installation Installing an integrated ODU

6 See PMP 450m Series – AP on page 6-3 for the


grounding procedure.

See PMP 450m Series – AP on page 6-6 for the


mounting procedure.

Page 6-57
Chapter 6: Installation Installing an integrated ODU

PMP/PTP 450i Series – AP/SM/BH


To mount and connect an integrated ODU, proceed as follows:

1 Fix the mounting plate to the back of the ODU using the four M6 bolts, and spring and plain
washers provided. Tighten the bolts to a torque setting of 5.0 Nm (3.7 lb ft).

Figure 120 Fixing the mounting plate to the back of the ODU

2 Attach the bracket body to the mounting plate using the M8 bolt, spring and plain washers.
3 Hoist the ODU to the mounting position.

4 Attach the bracket body to the pole using the bracket clamp, M8 bolts, and spring and plain
washers.

5 If the ODU is mounted outdoors, weatherproof the N type connectors (when antenna alignment
is complete) using PVC tape and self-amalgamating rubber tape.

Figure 121 Attaching the bracket body

Page 6-58
Chapter 6: Installation Connecting Cat5e Ethernet cable

Connecting Cat5e Ethernet cable

Connecting an RJ45 and gland to a unit


Perform this task to connect the Ethernet cable to an AP.
To connect the Ethernet cable with a gland to an AP unit, proceed as follows:

1 Insert the RJ45 cable through the gland components

2 Insert the RJ45 plug into the socket in the unit, making sure that the locking tab snaps
home.

3 Support the drop cable and gently hand screw the gland body into the unit until the
bushing seal is flush to the unit body.

Note
Do not fit the back shell prior to securing the gland body.

4 Once the gland is fully hand screwed into the unit, tighten it one full rotation only with a 1
1/8 inch spanner wrench.

5 When the gland body has been fitted, tighten the gland back shell.

Caution
Do not over-tighten the gland back shell, as the internal seal and structure or RJ45 port
may be damaged.

Page 6-59
Chapter 6: Installation Connecting Cat5e Ethernet cable

Figure 122 Ethernet cable gland for PMP/PTP 450 Series

Figure 123 Ethernet cable gland for PMP/PTP 450i Series

Page 6-60
Chapter 6: Installation Connecting Cat5e Ethernet cable

Disconnecting an RJ45 and gland from a unit


To disconnect the Ethernet cable and gland from a unit, proceed as follows:

1 Hold the Ethernet cable and remove the gland back shell.
2 Use a small flathead screwdriver (0.2”/5mm wide or greater) to gently release the black
plastic watertight bushing from the compression fins, being careful not to damage the
bushing.
3 Unscrew the gland body from the AP, making sure that the Ethernet cable is not rotating
while disengaging the gland body from the AP housing.

4 Use a small screwdriver to depress the RJ45 locking clip.


5 Unplug the RJ45 cable.

6 Remove the gland from the cable, if necessary.

Page 6-61
Chapter 6: Installation Installing ODU

Installing ODU

Installing a 450 Platform Family AP


To install a 450 Platform Family AP, perform the following steps.

Procedure 5 Installing an AP

1 Begin with the AP in the powered-down state.

2 Choose the best mounting location for your particular application. Modules need not
be mounted next to each other. They can be distributed throughout a given site.
However, the 60° offset must be maintained. Mounting can be done with supplied
clamps.
See Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU on page 6-26 for connecting
an external antenna to PMP 450i Series, PMP 450 Series, PMP 450i Series AP 900 MHz
and PMP 450 Series SM
See Installing an integrated ODU on page 6-55

3 Align the AP as follows:


a. Move the module to where the link will be unobstructed by the radio horizon and
no objects penetrate the Fresnel zone.
b. Use a local map, compass, and/or GPS device as needed to determine the
direction that one or more APs require to each cover the intended 60° sector.
c. Apply the appropriate degree of downward tilt.
d. Ensure that the nearest and furthest SMs that must register to this AP are within
the beam coverage area.

4 Adjust the azimuth to achieve visual alignment, lock the AP in the proper direction
and downward tilt.

5 Attach the cables to the AP (See Powering the AP/SM/BH for test configuration on
Page 5-17)
6 Waterproof the cables (See section Attaching and weatherproofing an N type
connector on page 6-73).

Page 6-62
Chapter 6: Installation Installing ODU

Installing a 450 Platform Family SM


Installing a 450 Platform Family SM consists of two procedures:
• Physically installing the SM on a residence or other location and performing a coarse
alignment using the alignment tool or alignment tone.
• Verifying the AP to SM link and finalizing alignment using review of power level, link tests, and
review of registration and session counts.

Procedure 6 Installing an SM

1 Choose the best mounting location for the SM based on section ODU and external
antenna location on page 3-10.
2 Use stainless steel hose clamps or equivalent fasteners to lock the SM into position.
See Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU on page 6-26 for
connecting external antenna
See Installing an integrated ODU on page 6-55

3 Remove the base cover of the SM.

4 Terminate the UV outside grade Category 5 Ethernet cable with an RJ-45 connector,
and connect the cable to the SM.

5 Wrap a drip loop in the cable.

6 For Connectorized Models, Install the external antenna according to the


manufacturer’s instructions.

7 For Connectorized Models, connect the SM’s N-type antenna connectors to the
external antenna, ensuring that the polarity matches between the SM cable labeling
and the antenna port labels.

Connectorized SM Antenna Cable Label Antenna Connection

A Vertical

B Horizontal

8 For Connectorized Models, weatherproof the N-type antenna connectors following


section Attaching and weatherproofing an N type connector on page 6-73.

9 Wrap an AWG 10 (or 6mm2) copper wire around the Ground post of the SM

10 Securely connect the copper wire to the grounding system (Protective Earth)
according to applicable regulations.

11 Install a surge suppressor as described in the section Mount the Surge Suppressor
on page 6-12.

12 Connect the power supply to a power source.

13 Connect the Ethernet output from the Data port of the power supply to the Ethernet
port of your laptop.

Page 6-63
Chapter 6: Installation Installing ODU

14 Connect the drop cable from ODU to the Data+power port of the power suppy.

15 Launch your web browser. In the URL address bar, enter 169.254.1.1. then press
Enter.

16 If the browser in laptop fails to access the interface of the SM, follow the procedure
Radio recovery mode on page 1-27
17 Log in as admin on the ODU. Configure a password for the admin account and log
off.

18 Log back into the SM as admin or root, using the password that you configured.
19 For coarse alignment of the SM, use the Alignment Tool located at Tools, Alignment
Tool.
Optionally, connect a headset to the AUX/SYNC port on the SM and listen to the
alignment tone, which indicates greater SM receive signal power by pitch. By
adjusting the SM’s position until the highest frequency pitch is obtained operators
and installers can be confident that the SM is properly positioned. For information
on device GUI tools available for alignment, see sections Using the Alignment Tool,
Using the Link Capacity Test tool, and Using AP Evaluation tool below.

20 When the highest power is achieved, lock the SM mounting bracket in place.

21 Log off of the SM web interface.

22 Disconnect the Ethernet cable from your laptop.

23 Replace the base cover of the SM.

24 Connect the Ethernet cable to the computer that the subscriber will be using.

Installing a 450 Platform Family BHM


To install a 450 Platform Family BHM, perform the following steps.

Procedure 7 Installing a BHM

1 Choose the best mounting location for your particular application.

2 Align the BHM as follows:


a. Move the module to where the link will be unobstructed by the radio horizon
and no objects penetrate the Fresnel zone.
b. Use a local map, compass, and/or GPS device as needed to determine the
direction to the BHS.
c. Apply the appropriate degree of downward or upward tilt.
d. Ensure that the BHS is within the beam coverage area.

Page 6-64
Chapter 6: Installation Installing ODU

3 Using stainless steel hose clamps or equivalent fasteners, lock the BHM into
position.
See Installing external antennas to a connectorized ODU on page 6-26 for
connecting external antenna

4 If this BHM will not be connected to a CMM, optionally connect a cable to a GPS
timing source and then to the SYNC port of the BHM.

5 Either connect the BHM’s Aux to the CMM or connect the DC power converter to the
BHM and then to an AC power source.
RESULT: When power is applied to a module or the unit is reset on the web-based
interface, the module requires approximately 25 seconds to boot. During this
interval, self-tests and other diagnostics are being performed.

6 Access Configuration > General page of the BHM for Synchronization configuration.

7 If a CMM4 is connected, set the Sync Input parameter to the AutoSync or Autosync
+ Free Run selection.

Installing a 450 Platform Family BHS


To install a PTP 450 platform Series BHS, perform the following steps.

Procedure 8 Installing a BHS


1 Choose the best mounting location for the BHS.

2 Terminate the UV outside grade Category 5 Ethernet cable with an RJ-45 connector,
and connect the cable to the BHS. (See Powering the AP/SM/BH for test
configuration on Page 5-17)

3 Use stainless steel hose clamps or equivalent fasteners to lock the BHS into
position.

4 Install a surge suppressor as described in the section Mount the Surge Suppressor
on page 6-12

5 For coarse alignment of the BHS, use the Audible Alignment Tone feature as
follows:
a. At the BHS, connect the RJ-45 connector of the Alignment Tool Headset to the
Aux port via an alignment tone adapter as shown in Figure 193 on page 8-21.
b. Listen to the alignment tone for pitch, which indicates greater signal power
(RSSI/dBm) by higher pitch.
Adjust the module slightly until you hear the highest pitch and highest volume

6 When you have achieved the best signal (highest pitch, loudest volume), lock the
BHS in place with the mounting hardware

Page 6-65
Chapter 6: Installation Installing ODU

Configuring the Link


See Configuring remote access on page 7-217.

Monitoring the Link


See Monitoring the Link on page 7-218.

Page 6-66
Chapter 6: Installation Installing the AC Power Injector

Installing the AC Power Injector

Caution
As the PSU is not waterproof, locate it away from sources of moisture, either in the
equipment building or in a ventilated moisture-proof enclosure. Do not locate the PSU
in a position where it may exceed its temperature rating.

Caution
Do not plug any device other than a PMP/PTP 450i Series ODU into the ODU port of
the PSU. Other devices may be damaged due to the non-standard techniques
employed to inject DC power into the Ethernet connection between the PSU and the
ODU.
Do not plug any device other than a Cambium 450 Platform PSU into the PSU port of
the ODU. Plugging any other device into the PSU port of the ODU may damage the
ODU and device.

Follow this procedure to install the AC Power Injector:

1 Form a drip loop on the PSU end of the LPU to PSU drop cable. The drip loop ensures that
any moisture that runs down the cable cannot enter the PSU.
2 (a) Place the AC Power Injector on a horizontal surface. Plug the LPU to PSU drop cable into
the PSU port labeled ODU. (b) When the system is ready for network connection, connect the
network Cat5e cable to the LAN port of the PSU:

(a) (b)

Page 6-67
Chapter 6: Installation Installing CMM4

Installing CMM4

Note
For instructions on CMM3 (CMMmicro) or CMM4 installation, including the outdoor
temperature range in which it is acceptable to install the unit, tools required,
mounting and cabling instructions, and connectivity verification, please see the
PMP Synchronization Solutions User Guide located on the Cambium website.

The Cluster Management Module 4 (CMM4) provides power, sync, and network connectivity for up
to eight APs, backhauls, and Ethernet terrestrial feeds in a variety of configurations.
The CMM4 provides:
• Sync over Power over Ethernet and integrated surge suppression on the controller board for
up to 8 APs or BHs. Both a custom 30 VDC power scheme and a custom 56 VDC power scheme
are available. Neither is the same as the later IEEE Standard 802.3af, and neither is compatible
with it.
• Managed switching using a hardened EtherWAN switch (1090CKHH models). The CMM4 ships
with a 14-port EtherWAN switch and is also available without a switch. The CMM4 originally
shipped with a 9-port EtherWAN switch.
• Surge suppression on the controller board for the incoming 30V DC and 56V DC power lines
and GPS coax cable.
• Auto-negotiation on the Ethernet ports. Ports will auto-negotiate to match inputs that are either
100Base-T or 10Base-T, and either full duplex or half duplex, when the connected device is set
to auto-negotiate. Alternatively, these parameters are settable.
• An always-on NTP (Network Time Protocol) server that can provide date and time to any radio
that can reach the CMM’s management IP address.
• CNUT can be used to upgrade the CMM-4 software.

450 Series and 450i Series can use the CMM4’s EtherWan switch for their network connectivity.

Note
The 56 V of a CMM4 needs to go through the adapter cable (part number
N000045L001A) as shown in Figure 38 on page 2-56.
A CMM4 56V power adapter cable can be prepared by swapping pins 5 and 7. See
CMM4 56 V power adapter cable pinout on page 2-56 for power adapter cable
pinout.

Page 6-68
Chapter 6: Installation Supplemental installation information

Supplemental installation information

This section contains detailed installation procedures that are not included in the above topics,
such as how to strip cables, create grounding points and weatherproof connectors.

Stripping drop cable


When preparing the drop cable for connection to the 450 Platform Family ODU or LPU, use the
following measurements:

When preparing the drop cable for connection to the 450 Platform PSU (without a cable gland), use
the following measurements:

Page 6-69
Chapter 6: Installation Supplemental installation information

Creating a drop cable grounding point


Use this procedure to connect the screen of the main drop cable to the metal of the supporting
structure using the cable grounding kit (Cambium part number 01010419001).
To identify suitable grounding points, refer to Hazardous locations on page 3-15.

1 Remove 60 mm (2.5 inches) of the drop cable outer sheath.

2 Cut 38mm (1.5 inches) of rubber tape (self-amalgamating) and fit to the ground cable lug.
Wrap the tape completely around the lug and cable.

3 Fold the ground wire strap around the drop cable screen and fit cable ties.

Page 6-70
Chapter 6: Installation Supplemental installation information

4 Tighten the cable ties with pliers. Cut the surplus from the cable ties.

5 Cut a 38mm (1.5 inches) section of self-amalgamating tape and wrap it completely around the
joint between the drop and ground cables.

6 Use the remainder of the self-amalgamating tape to wrap the complete assembly. Press the
tape edges together so that there are no gaps.

Page 6-71
Chapter 6: Installation Supplemental installation information

7 Wrap a layer of PVC tape from bottom to top, starting from 25 mm (1 inch) below and
finishing 25 mm (1 inch) above the edge of the self-amalgamating tape, overlapping at half
width.

8 Repeat with a further four layers of PVC tape, always overlapping at half width. Wrap the
layers in alternate directions (top to bottom, then bottom to top). The edges of each layer
should be 25mm (1 inch) above (A) and 25 mm (1 inch) below (B) the previous layer.

9 Prepare the metal grounding point of the supporting structure to provide a good electrical
contact with the grounding cable clamp. Remove paint, grease or dirt, if present. Apply anti-
oxidant compound liberally between the two metals.

10 Clamp the bottom lug of the grounding cable to the supporting structure using site approved
methods. Use a two-hole lug secured with fasteners in both holes. This provides better
protection than a single-hole lug.

Page 6-72
Chapter 6: Installation Supplemental installation information

Attaching and weatherproofing an N type connector


The following procedure should be used to weatherproof the N type connectors fitted to the
connectorized ODU (AP/SM/BH) and antenna. This procedure must be followed to ensure that
there is no moisture ingress at the radio ports. Failure to properly seal N-type antenna connectors
can result in poor link performance or complete loss of radio communication.

Note
Cambium recommends assembling the antenna, attach the ODU and cabling, and to
seal the RF connections before installing the unit at the deployment site.

Note
N type connectors should be tightened using a torque wrench, set to 15 lb in or 1.7
Nm. If a torque wrench is not available, N type connectors may be finger tightened.

Use this procedure to weatherproof the N type connectors fitted to the connectorized ODU and
external antenna (if recommended by the antenna manufacturer).

1 Ensure the connection is tight. A torque wrench should be used if available:

2 Wrap the connection with a layer of 19 mm (0.75 inch) PVC tape, starting 25 mm (1 inch)
below the connector body. Overlap the tape to half-width and extend the wrapping to the
body of the LPU. Avoid making creases or wrinkles:

Page 6-73
Chapter 6: Installation Supplemental installation information

3 Smooth the tape edges:

4 Cut a 125mm (5 inches) length of rubber tape (self-amalgamating):

5 Expand the width of the tape by stretching it so that it will wrap completely around the
connector and cable:

6 Press the tape edges together so that there are no gaps. The tape should extend 25 mm
(1 inch) beyond the PVC tape:

Page 6-74
Chapter 6: Installation Supplemental installation information

7 Wrap a layer of 50 mm (2 inch) PVC tape from bottom to top, starting from 25 mm (1 inch)
below the edge of the self-amalgamating tape, overlapping at half width.

8 Repeat with a further four layers of 19 mm (0.75 inch) PVC tape, always overlapping at half
width. Wrap the layers in alternate directions:
• Second layer: top to bottom.
• Third layer: bottom to top.
• Fourth layer: top to bottom.
• Fifth layer: bottom to top.
The bottom edge of each layer should be 25 mm (1 inch) below the previous layer.

9 Check the completed weatherproof connection:

Note
A video of this procedure can be found at:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a-twPfCVq4A

Page 6-75
Chapter 7: Configuration
This chapter describes how to use the web interface to configure the 450 Platform link. This
chapter contains the following topics:
• Preparing for configuration on page 7-2
• Connecting to the unit on page 7-3
• Using the web interface on page 7-5
• Quick link setup on page 7-12
• Configuring IP and Ethernet interfaces on page 7-23
• Upgrading the software version and using CNUT on page 7-67
• General configuration on page 7-71
• Configuring Unit Settings page on page 7-94
• Setting up time and date on page 7-98
• Configuring synchronization on page 7-100
• Configuring security on page 7-102
• Configuring radio parameters on page 7-134
• Setting up SNMP agent on page 7-202
• Configuring syslog on page 7-211
• Configuring remote access on page 7-217
• Monitoring the Link on page 7-218
• Configuring quality of service on page 7-221
• Installation Color Code on page 7-243
• Zero Touch Configuration Using DHCP Option 66 on page 7-244
• Configuring Radio via config file on page 7-250
• Configuring a RADIUS server on page 7-258

Page 7-1
Chapter 7: Configuration Preparing for configuration

Preparing for configuration

This section describes the checks to be performed before proceeding with unit configuration and
antenna alignment.

Safety precautions
All national and local safety standards must be followed while configuring the units and aligning
the antennas.

Warning
Ensure that personnel are not exposed to unsafe levels of RF energy. The units start to
radiate RF energy as soon as they are powered up. Respect the safety standards
defined in Compliance with safety standards on page 4-22, in particular the minimum
separation distances.
Observe the following guidelines:
• Never work in front of the antenna when the ODU is powered.
• Always power down the PSU before connecting or disconnecting the drop cable
from the PSU, ODU or LPU.

Regulatory compliance
All applicable radio regulations must be followed while configuring the units and aligning the
antennas. For more information, refer to Compliance with radio regulations on page 4-36.

Caution
If the system designer has provided a list of channels to be barred for TDWR radar
avoidance, the affected channels must be barred before the units are allowed to
radiate on site, otherwise the regulations will be infringed.

Attention
Si le concepteur du système a fourni une liste de canaux à interdire pour éviter les
radars TDWR, les cannaux concernées doivent être interdits avant que les unités sont
autorisées à émettre sur le site, sinon la réglementation peut être enfreinte.

Page 7-2
Chapter 7: Configuration Connecting to the unit

Connecting to the unit

This section describes how to connect the unit to a management PC and power it up.

Configuring the management PC


Use this procedure to configure the local management PC to communicate with the 450 Platform
ODU.

Procedure 9 Configuring the management PC


1 Select Properties for the Ethernet port. In Windows 7 this is found in Control Panel
> Network and Internet > Network Connections > Local Area Connection.

2 Select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP):

3 Click Properties.

Page 7-3
Chapter 7: Configuration Connecting to the unit

4 Enter an IP address that is valid for the 169.254.X.X network, avoiding 169.254.0.0
and 169.254.1.1. A good example is 169.254.1.3:

5 Enter a subnet mask of 255.255.0.0. Leave the default gateway blank.

Connecting to the PC and powering up


Use this procedure to connect a management PC and power up the 450 platform ODU.

Procedure 10 Connecting to the PC and powering up

1 Check that the ODU and PSU are correctly connected.

2 Connect the PC Ethernet port to the LAN port of the PSU using a standard (not
crossed) Ethernet cable.

3 Apply mains or battery power to the PSU. The green Power LED should illuminate
continuously.

4 After about several seconds, check that the orange Ethernet LED starts with 10 slow
flashes.
5 Check that the Ethernet LED then illuminates continuously.

Page 7-4
Chapter 7: Configuration Using the web interface

Using the web interface

This section describes how to log into the 450 Platform Family web interface and use its menus.

Logging into the web interface


Use this procedure to log into the web interface as a system administrator.

Procedure 11 Logging into the web interface

1 Start the web browser from the management PC.

2 Type the IP address of the unit into the address bar. The factory default IP address is
169.254.1.1. Press ENTER. The web interface menu and System Summary page are
displayed:

Page 7-5
Chapter 7: Configuration Using the web interface

3 On left hand side of home page, the login information is displayed:

4 Enter Username (factory default username is admin) and Password (factory default password
is admin) and click Login.

Web GUI

2
1 1

Field Name Description

Click an option in side navigation bar (area marked as “1”). Multiple


Main Menu
options in sub-navigation bars appear

Click top sub-navigation bar to choose one configuration page (area


Menu Options
marked as “2”)

Parameters To configure the parameters (e.g. area marked as “3”)

Press "Save Changes" to confirm and save the changes

To reboot the ODU

Page 7-6
Chapter 7: Configuration Using the web interface

Using the menu options


Use the menu navigation bar in the left panel to navigate to each web page. Some of the menu
options are only displayed for specific system configurations. Use Table 107 to locate information
about using each web page.

Table 107 Menu options and web pages

Main Menu options Applicable Description


menu module

General Status All Viewing General Status on page 9-2

Session Status AP, BHM Viewing Session Status on page 9-24

Event Log All Interpreting messages in the Event


Log on page 9-33

Network Interface AP, BHM Viewing the Network Interface on


page 9-36

Layer 2 Neighbors All Viewing the Layer 2 Neighbors on


page 9-37

General All General configuration on page 7-71

IP All Configuring IP and Ethernet interfaces


on page 7-23

Radio All Configuring radio parameters on page


7-135

SNMP All Setting up SNMP agent on page 7-202

cnMaestro All Configuring cnMaestroTM


Connectivity on page 7-252

Quality of Service (QoS) All Configuring quality of service on page


7-221

Security All Configuring security on page 7-102

Time AP, BHM Setting up time and date


Time page of 450 Platform Family -
AP/BHM on page 7-98

Page 7-7
Chapter 7: Configuration Using the web interface

Main Menu options Applicable Description


menu module

VLAN All VLAN configuration for PMP on page


7-45
VLAN configuration for PTP on page
7-55

DiffServ All IPv4 and IPv6 Prioritization on page 7-


62

Protocol Filtering All Filtering protocols and ports on page


7-63

Syslog All Configuring syslog on page 7-211

Ping Watchdog All Configuring Ping Watchdog on page


7-300

Unit Setting All Configuring Unit Settings page on


page 7-94

Scheduler All Viewing the Scheduler statistics on


page 9-38

Registration Failures AP, BHM Viewing list of Registration Failures


statistics on page 9-40

Bridge Control Block All Interpreting Bridge Control Block


statistics on page 9-23

Bridging Table All Interpreting Bridging Table statistics


on page 9-42

Ethernet All Interpreting Ethernet statistics on


page 9-43

Radio All Interpreting RF Control Block statistics


on page 9-46

VLAN All Interpreting VLAN statistics on page


9-4

Data Channels All Interpreting Data Channels statistics


on page 9-5

MIR/Burst AP, SM Interpreting MIR/Burst statistics on


page 9-6

Throughput AP, BHM Interpreting Throughput statistics on


page 9-10

Filter SM Interpreting Filter statistics on page 9-


16

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Chapter 7: Configuration Using the web interface

Main Menu options Applicable Description


menu module

ARP SM Viewing ARP statistics on page 9-17

Overload All Interpreting Overload statistics on


page 9-13

Syslog Statistics All Interpreting syslog statistics on page


9-29

Translation Table SM Interpreting Translation Table


statistics on page 9-42

DHCP Relay SM Interpreting DHCP Relay statistics on


page 9-15

NAT Stats SM Viewing NAT statistics on page 9-17

NAT DHCP SM Viewing NAT DHCP Statistics on page


9-19

Pass Through Statistics AP Interpreting Pass Through Statistics


on page 9-26

Sync Status AP Interpreting Sync Status statistics on


page 9-20

PPPoE SM Interpreting PPPoE Statistics for


Customer Activities on page 9-21

SNMPv3 Statistics All Interpreting SNMPv3 Statistics on


page 9-27

Frame Utilization Interpreting Frame Utilization


statistics on page 9-27

Link Capacity Test All Using the Link Capacity Test tool on
page 8-23

Spectrum Analyzer All Spectrum Analyzer tool on page 8-3

Remote Spectrum Analyzer All Remote Spectrum Analyzer tool on


page 8-13

AP/BHM Evaluation SM, BHS Using AP Evaluation tool on page 8-34


Using BHM Evaluation tool on page 8-
38

Subscriber Configuration AP Using the Subscriber Configuration


tool on page 8-47

OFDM Frame Calculator AP, BHM Using the OFDM Frame Calculator
tool on page 8-42

Page 7-9
Chapter 7: Configuration Using the web interface

Main Menu options Applicable Description


menu module

BER results SM Using BER Results tool on page 8-55

Alignment Tool SM, BHS Using the Alignment Tool on page 8-


16

Link Status AP Using the Link Status tool on page 8-


48

Sessions AP Using the Sessions tool on page 8-56

Ping Test All Using the Ping Test tool on page 8-57

Change User Setting Changing a User Setting on page 7-


104

Add user Adding a User for Access to a module


on page 7-103

Delete User Deleting a User from Access to a


module on page 7-104

User Users account on page 7-105

Quick Start AP, BHM Quick link setup on page 7-12

Region Settings AP, BHM Quick link setup on page 7-12

Radio Carrier Frequency AP, BHM Quick link setup on page 7-12

Synchronization AP, BHM Quick link setup on page 7-12

LAN IP Address AP, BHM Quick link setup on page 7-12

Review and Save Configuration AP, BHM Quick link setup on page 7-12

Quick Status SM

Spectrum Results (PDA) SM

Information SM

Page 7-10
Chapter 7: Configuration Using the web interface

Main Menu options Applicable Description


menu module

BHM Evaluation SM The PDA web-page includes 320 x 240


pixel formatted displays of
AIM SM information important to installation
and alignment for installers using
legacy PDA devices. All device web
pages are compatible with touch
devices such as smart phones and
tablets.

Copyright Notices All The Copyright web-page displays


pertinent device copyright
information.

All

Page 7-11
Chapter 7: Configuration Quick link setup

Quick link setup

This section describes how to use the Quick Start Wizard to complete the essential system
configuration tasks that must be performed on a PMP/PTP configuration.

Note
If the IP address of the AP or BHM is not known, See Radio recovery mode on page 1-
27.

Initiating Quick Start Wizard


Applicable products PMP:  AP PTP:  BHM

To start with Quick Start Wizard: after logging into the web management interface click the Quick
Start button on the left side of main menu bar. The AP/BHM responds by opening the Quick Start
page.

Figure 124 Disarm Installation page (top and bottom of page shown)

Quick Start is a wizard that helps you to perform a basic configuration that places an AP/BHM into
service. Only the following parameters must be configured:
• Region Code
• RF Carrier Frequency
• Synchronization
• LAN (Network) IP Address

Page 7-12
Chapter 7: Configuration Quick link setup

In each Quick Start page, you can


• specify the settings to satisfy the requirements of the network.
• review the configuration selected.
• save the configuration to non-volatile memory.

Procedure 12 Quick start wizard


1 At the bottom of the Quick Start tab, click the Go To Next Page button.

2 From the pull-down menu, select the region in which the AP will operate.
Figure 125 Regional Settings tab of AP/BHM

3 Click the Go To Next Page button.

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Chapter 7: Configuration Quick link setup

4 From the pull-down menu, select a frequency for the test.


Figure 126 Radio Carrier Frequency tab of AP/BHM

5 Click the Go To Next Page button.

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Chapter 7: Configuration Quick link setup

6 At the bottom of this tab, select Generate Sync Signal.


Figure 127 Synchronization tab of AP/BHM

7 Click the Go To Next Page button.

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Chapter 7: Configuration Quick link setup

8 At the bottom of the IP address configuration tab, either


• specify an IP Address, a Subnet Mask, and a Gateway IP Address for management of the
AP and leave the DHCP state set to Disabled.
• set the DHCP state to Enabled to have the IP address, subnet mask, and gateway IP
address automatically configured by a domain name server (DNS).
Figure 128 LAN IP Address tab of the AP/BHM

Note
Cambium encourages you to experiment with the interface. Unless you
save a configuration and reboot the AP after you save the configuration,
none of the changes are affected.

9 Click the Go To Next Page => button.

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Chapter 7: Configuration Quick link setup

10 Ensure that the initial parameters for the AP are set as you intended.
Figure 129 Review and Save Configuration tab of the AP/BHM

11 Click the Save Changes button.


12 Click the Reboot button.
RESULT: The AP responds with the message Reboot Has Been Initiated…

Page 7-17
Chapter 7: Configuration Quick link setup

13 Wait until the indicator LEDs are not red.

14 Trigger your browser to refresh the page until the AP redisplays the General Status tab.
15 Wait until the red indicator LEDs are not lit.

Configuring time settings


Applicable products PMP:  AP PTP:  BHM

To proceed with the test setup, click the Configuration link on the left side of the General Status
page. When the AP responds by opening the Configuration page to the General page, click the
Time tab.

Figure 130 Time tab of the AP/BHM

To have each log in the AP/BHM correlated to a meaningful time and date, either a reliable network
element must pass time and date to the AP/BHM or you must set the time and date whenever a
power cycle of the AP/BHM has occurred. A network element passes time and date in any of the
following scenarios:
• A connected CMM4 passes time and date (GPS time and date, if received).
• A separate NTP server is addressable from the AP/BHM.

If the AP/BHM should obtain time and date from a CMM4, or a separate NTP server, enter the IP
address of the CMM4 or NTP server on this tab. To force the AP/BHM to obtain time and date
before the first (or next) 15-minute interval query of the NTP server, click Get Time through NTP.

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Chapter 7: Configuration Quick link setup

If you enter a time and date, the format for entry is

Figure 131 Time and date entry formats

Time: hh / mm / ss

Date: MM / dd / yyyy

where
hh represents the two-digit hour in the range 00 to 24
mm represents the two-digit minute
ss represents the two-digit second
MM represents the two-digit month
dd represents the two-digit day
yyyy represents the four-digit year

Proceed with the time setup as follows.

Procedure 13 Entering AP/BHM time setup information

1 Enter the appropriate information in the format shown above.

2 Then click the Set Time and Date button.

Note
The time displayed at the top of this page is static unless your browser
is set to automatically refresh

Powering the SM/BHS for test


Procedure 14 Powering the SM/BHS for test

1 In one hand, securely hold the top (larger shell) of the SM/BHS. With the other hand,
depress the lever in the back of the base cover (smaller shell). Remove the base
cover.
2 Plug one end of a CAT 5 Ethernet cable into the SM PSU port

3 Plug the other end of the Ethernet cable into the jack in the pig tail that hangs from
the power supply

4 Roughly aim the SM/BHS toward the AP/BHM

5 Plug the power supply into an electrical outlet

Warning
From this point until you remove power from the AP/BHM, stay at
least as far from the AP/BHM as the minimum separation distance
specified in Calculated distances and power compliance margins.

6 Repeat the foregoing steps for each SM/BHS that you wish to include in the test.

Page 7-19
Chapter 7: Configuration Quick link setup

Viewing the Session Status of the AP/BHM to determine test


registration
Once the SMs/BHS under test are powered on, return to the computing device to determine if the
SM/BHS units have registered to the AP/BHM.

Note
In order for accurate power level readings to be displayed, traffic must be present on
the radio link.

The Session Status tab provides information about each SM/BHS that has registered to
the AP/BHM. This information is useful for managing and troubleshooting a system.
All information that you have entered in the Site Name field of the SM/BHS displays in the Session
Status tab of the linked AP/BHM.
The Session Status tab also includes the current active values on each SM( or BHS) (LUID) for MIR,
and VLAN, as well as the source of these values (representing the SM/BHS itself, Authentication
Server, or the AP/BHM and cap, if any—for example, APCAP as shown above).. As an SM/BHS
registers to the AP/BHM, the configuration source that this page displays for the associated LUID
may change. After registration, however, the displayed source is stable and can be trusted.
Idle subscribers may be included or removed from the session status display by enabling or
disabling, respectively, the Show Idle Sessions parameter. Enabling or disabling this parameter
only affects the GUI display of subscribers, not the registration status.
The SessionStatus.xml hyperlink allows user to export session status page from web management
interface of AP/BHM. The session status page will be exported in xml file.

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Chapter 7: Configuration Quick link setup

Procedure 15 Viewing the AP Session Status page

1 On the AP web management GUI, navigate to Home, Session Status:


Figure 132 Session Status tab of AP

Note
Session status page for BHM is same as AP.

2 Verify that for each SM (or BHS) MAC address (printed on the SM/BHS housing) the
AP/BHM has established a registered session by verifying the “State” status of each
entry.

The Session Status page of the AP/BHM is explained in Table 108.

Page 7-21
Chapter 7: Configuration Quick link setup

Table 108 Session Status Attributes – AP

Attribute Meaning

Show Idle Sessions Idle subscribers may be included or removed from the session status
display by enabling or disabling, respectively, the Show Idle Sessions
parameter. Enabling or disabling this parameter only affects the GUI
display of subscribers, not the registration status.

Last Session Counter This field displays date and time stamp of last session counter reset.
Reset

Last Time Idle SMs This field displays date and time stamp of last Idle SMs Removed. On
Removed click of “Remove Idle SMs” button, all the SMs which are in Idle state
are flushed out.

Data See Exporting Session Status page of AP/BHM on page 7-241

Device tab See Device tab on page 9-24

Session tab See Session tab on page 9-26

Power tab See Power tab on page 9-27

Configuration tab See


Configuration tab on page 9-29

Page 7-22
Chapter 7: Configuration Configuring IP and Ethernet interfaces

Configuring IP and Ethernet interfaces

This task consists of the following sections:


• Configuring the IP interface on page 7-24
• Auxiliary port on page 7-27
• NAT, DHCP Server, DHCP Client and DMZ on page 7-28
• IP interface with NAT disabled on page 7-33
• IP interface with NAT enabled on page
• NAT tab with NAT disabled on page 7-36
• NAT tab with NAT enabled on page 7-39
• NAT DNS Considerations on page 7-44
• DHCP – BHS on page 7-45
• VLAN configuration for PMP on page 7-45
• VLAN page of AP on page 7-48
• VLAN page of SM on page 7-51
• VLAN Membership tab of SM on page 7-55
• VLAN configuration for PTP on page 7-55
• NAT Port Mapping tab - SM on page 7-44

Page 7-23
Chapter 7: Configuration Configuring IP and Ethernet interfaces

Configuring the IP interface


The IP interface allows users to connect to the 450 Platform Family web interface, either from a
locally connected computer or from a management network.

Applicable products PMP:  AP  SM PTP:  BHM  BMS

To configure the IP interface, follow these instructions:

Procedure 16 Configuring the AP/BHM IP interface

1 Select menu option Configuration > IP. The LAN configuration page is displayed:

2 Update IP Address, Subnet Mask and Gateway IP Address to meet network


requirements (as specified by the network administrator).

3 Review the other IP interface attributes and update them, if necessary (see Table 109 IP
interface attributes).

4 Click Save. “Reboot Required” message is displayed:

5 Click Reboot.

The IP page of AP/SM/BHM/BHS is explained in Table 109.

Page 7-24
Chapter 7: Configuration Configuring IP and Ethernet interfaces

Table 109 IP interface attributes

Attribute Meaning

IP Address Internet Protocol (IP) address. This address is used by family of Internet
protocols to uniquely identify this unit on a network.

Subnet Mask Defines the address range of the connected IP network.

Gateway IP Address The IP address of a computer on the current network that acts as a
gateway. A gateway acts as an entrance and exit to packets from and to
other networks.

DHCP state If Enabled is selected, the DHCP server automatically assigns the IP
configuration (IP address, subnet mask, and gateway IP address) and the
values of those individual parameters (above) are not used. The setting
of this DHCP state parameter is also viewable (read only), in the Network
Interface tab of the Home page.

DNS IP Address Canopy devices allow for configuration of a preferred and alternate DNS
server IP address either automatically or manually. Devices must set
DNS server IP address manually when DHCP is disabled for the

Page 7-25
Chapter 7: Configuration Configuring IP and Ethernet interfaces

management interface of the device. DNS servers may be configured


automatically from the DHCP response when DHCP is enabled for the
management interface of the device. Optionally devices may be
configured to set the DNS server IP address manually when DHCP is
enabled for the management interface. The default DNS IP addresses are
0.0.0.0 when configured manually.

Preferred DNS The first address used for DNS resolution.


Server

Alternate DNS If the Preferred DNS server cannot be reached, the Alternate DNS Server
Server is used.

Domain Name The operator’s management domain name may be configured for DNS.
The domain name configuration can be used for configuration of the
servers in the operator’s network. The default domain name is
example.com, and is only used if configured as such.

Advanced LAN1 IP Hardcoded default alternate IP address (169.254.1.1) that is available


Configuration – only when connected to the Ethernet port. When enabled, user can
Default alternate configure a second IP address for the bridge which is other than the
LAN1 IP address hardcoded IP address (169.254.1.1).

AUX Ethernet Port – Enabled: Data is enabled for Auxiliary port


AUX Ethernet Port Disabled: Data is disabled for Auxiliary port

AUX Ethernet Port – Enabled: PoE out is enable for Auxiliary port
AUX Ethernet Port Disabled: PoE out is disabled for Auxiliary port
PoE

LAN2 Network It is recommended not to change this parameter from the default
Interface AP/BHM private IP address of 192.168.101.1. A /24 CIDR subnet is used to
Configuration (Radio communicate with each of the SMs/BHS that are registered. The AP/BHM
Private Interface) – IP uses a combination of the private IP and the LUID (logical unit ID) of the
Address SM/BHS.
It is only displayed for AP and BHM.

Table 110 SM/BHS private IP and LUID

SM/BHS LUID Private IP

First SM/BHS registered 2 192.168.101.2

Second SM/BHS registered 3 192.168.101.3

Page 7-26
Chapter 7: Configuration Configuring IP and Ethernet interfaces

Auxiliary port
An additional Ethernet port labeled “Aux” for Auxiliary port is implemented for downstream
traffic. This feature is supported only for PTP/PMP 450i ODUs.
To enable the Aux port, follow these instructions:

Procedure 17 Enabling Aux port interface

1 Select menu option Configuration > IP > Aux Network Interface tab.:

2 Click Enable button of Aux Ethernet Port parameter to enable Aux Ethernet port

3 Click Enable button of Aux Ethernet Port PoE parameter to enable Aux port PoE out.

4 Click Save. “Reboot Required” message is displayed.

5 Click Reboot.

Table 111 Aux port attributes

Attribute Meaning

Aux Ethernet Port Enabled: Data is enabled for Auxiliary port


Disabled: Data is disabled for Auxiliary port

Aux Ethernet Port Enabled: PoE out is enable for Auxiliary port
PoE Disabled: PoE out is disabled for Auxiliary port

By disabling this feature, the data at the Auxiliary port will be disabled.

Page 7-27
Chapter 7: Configuration Configuring IP and Ethernet interfaces

NAT, DHCP Server, DHCP Client and DMZ


Applicable products PMP:  SM

The system provides NAT (Network Address Translation) for SMs in the following combinations of
NAT and DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol):
• NAT Disabled
• NAT with DHCP Client (DHCP selected as the Connection Type of the WAN interface) and DHCP
Server
• NAT with DHCP Client(DHCP selected as the Connection Type of the WAN interface)
• NAT with DHCP Server
• NAT without DHCP

NAT
NAT isolates devices connected to the Ethernet or wired side of a SM from being seen directly
from the wireless side of the SM. With NAT enabled, the SM has an IP address for transport traffic
(separate from its address for management), terminates transport traffic and allows you to assign
a range of IP addresses to devices that are connected to the Ethernet or wired side of the SM.
In the Cambium system, NAT supports many protocols, including HTTP, ICMP (Internet Control
Message Protocols), and FTP (File Transfer Protocol). For virtual private network (VPN)
implementation, L2TP over IPSec (Level 2 Tunneling Protocol over IP Security) and PPTP (Point to
Point Tunneling Protocol) are supported.

Note
When NAT is enabled, a reduction in throughput is introduced in the system (due to
processing overhead).

DHCP
DHCP enables a device to be assigned a new IP address and TCP/IP parameters, including a default
gateway, whenever the device reboots. Thus, DHCP reduces configuration time, conserves IP
addresses, and allows modules to be moved to a different network within the Cambium system.
In conjunction with the NAT features, each SM provides the following:
• A DHCP server that assigns IP addresses to computers connected to the SM by Ethernet
protocol.
• A DHCP client that receives an IP address for the SM from a network DHCP server.

DMZ
In conjunction with the NAT features, a DMZ (Demilitarized Zone) allows the allotment of one IP
address behind the SM for a device to logically exist outside the firewall and receive network
traffic. The first three octets of this IP address must be identical to the first three octets of the NAT
private IP address.

Page 7-28
Chapter 7: Configuration Configuring IP and Ethernet interfaces

• A DHCP server that assigns IP addresses to computers connected to the SM by Ethernet


protocol.
• A DHCP client that receives an IP address for the SM from a network DHCP server.

NAT Disabled
The NAT Disabled implementation is illustrated in Figure 133.

Figure 133 NAT disabled implementation

NAT with DHCP Client and DHCP Server


The NAT with DHCP Client and DHCP server is illustrated in Figure 134.

Page 7-29
Chapter 7: Configuration Configuring IP and Ethernet interfaces

Figure 134 NAT with DHCP client and DHCP server implementation

NAT with DHCP Client


Figure 135 NAT with DHCP client implementation

Page 7-30
Chapter 7: Configuration Configuring IP and Ethernet interfaces

NAT with DHCP Server


Figure 136 NAT with DHCP server implementation

NAT without DHCP


Figure 137 NAT without DHCP implementation

Page 7-31
Chapter 7: Configuration Configuring IP and Ethernet interfaces

NAT and VPNs


VPN technology provides the benefits of a private network during communication over a public
network. One typical use of a VPN is to connect employees remotely (who are at home or in a
different city), with their corporate network through a public Internet. Any of several VPN
implementation schemes is possible. By design, NAT translates or changes addresses, and thus
interferes with a VPN that is not specifically supported by a given NAT implementation.
With NAT enabled, SM supports L2TP over IPSec (Level 2 Tunneling Protocol over IP Security)
VPNs and PPTP (Point to Point Tunneling Protocol) VPNs. With NAT disabled, SM supports all
types of VPNs.

Page 7-32
Chapter 7: Configuration Configuring IP and Ethernet interfaces

IP interface with NAT disabled - SM


The IP page of SM with NAT disabled is explained in Table 112.

Table 112 IP attributes - SM with NAT disabled

Attribute Meaning

IP Address Enter the non-routable IP address to associate with the Ethernet


connection on this SM. (The default IP address from the factory is
169.254.1.1.) If you forget this parameter, you must both:
• physically access the module.
• use recovery mode to access the module configuration parameters
at 169.254.1.1. See Radio recovery mode on page 1-27

Note
Note or print the IP settings from this page. Ensure that
you can readily associate these IP settings both with the
module and with the other data that you store about the
module.

Network Specify whether the IP address of the SM must be visible to only a


Accessibility device connected to the SM by Ethernet (Local) or be visible to the
AP/BHM as well (Public).

Subnet Mask Enter an appropriate subnet mask for the SM to communicate on the
network. The default subnet mask is 255.255.0.0.

Gateway IP Address Enter the appropriate gateway for the SM to communicate with the
network. The default gateway is 169.254.0.0.

DHCP state If you select Enabled, the DHCP server automatically assigns the IP
configuration (IP address, subnet mask, and gateway IP address) and the
values of those individual parameters (above) are not used. The setting
of this DHCP state parameter is also viewable, but not settable, in the
Network Interface tab of the Home page.

Page 7-33
Chapter 7: Configuration Configuring IP and Ethernet interfaces

In this tab, DHCP State is settable only if the Network Accessibility


parameter in the IP tab is set to Public. This parameter is also settable in
the NAT tab of the Configuration web page, but only when NAT is
enabled.
If the DHCP state parameter is set to Enabled in the Configuration > IP
sub-menu of the SM/BHS, do not check the BootpClient option for Packet
Filter Types in its Protocol Filtering tab, because doing so can block the
DHCP request. (Filters apply to all packets that leave the SM via its RF
interface, including those that the SM itself generates.) If you want to
keep DHCP enabled and avoid the blocking scenario, select the Bootp
Server option instead. This will result in responses being appropriately
filtered and discarded.

DHCP DNS IP Canopy devices allow for configuration of a preferred and alternate DNS
Address server IP address either automatically or manually. Devices must set
DNS server IP address manually when DHCP is disabled for the
management interface of the device. DNS servers may be configured
automatically from the DHCP response when DHCP is enabled for the
management interface of the device. Optionally devices may be
configured to set the DNS server IP address manually when DHCP is
enabled for the management interface. The default DNS IP addresses are
0.0.0.0 when configured manually.

Preferred DNS The first DNS server used for DNS resolution.
Server

Alternate DNS The second DNS server used for DNS resolution.
Server

Domain Name The operator’s management domain name may be configured for DNS.
The domain name configuration can be used for configuration of the
servers in the operator’s network. The default domain name is
example.com, and is only used if configured as such.

Page 7-34
Chapter 7: Configuration Configuring IP and Ethernet interfaces

IP interface with NAT enabled - SM


The IP page of SM with NAT enabled is explained in Table 113.

Table 113 IP attributes - SM with NAT enabled

Attribute Meaning

IP Address Assign an IP address for SM/BHS management through Ethernet access


to the SM/BHS. Set only the first three bytes. The last byte is
permanently set to 1. This address becomes the base for the range of
DHCP-assigned addresses.

Subnet Mask Assign a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 or a more restrictive subnet


mask. Set only the last byte of this subnet mask. Each of the first three
bytes is permanently set to 255.

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Chapter 7: Configuration Configuring IP and Ethernet interfaces

NAT tab with NAT disabled - SM


The NAT tab of SM with NAT disabled is explained in Table 114.

Table 114 NAT attributes - SM with NAT disabled

Page 7-36
Chapter 7: Configuration Configuring IP and Ethernet interfaces

Attribute Meaning

NAT Enable/Disable This parameter enables or disables the Network Address Translation
(NAT) feature for the SM. NAT isolates devices connected to the Ethernet
or wired side of a SM from being seen directly from the wireless side of
the SM. With NAT enabled, the SM has an IP address for transport traffic
separate from its address for management, terminates transport traffic,
and allows you to assign a range of IP addresses to devices that are
connected to the Ethernet or wired side of the SM.
When NAT is enabled, VLANs are not supported on the wired side of
that SM. You can enable NAT in SMs within a sector where VLAN is
enabled in the AP/BHM, but this may constrain network design.

IP Address This field displays the IP address for the SM. DHCP Server will not
automatically assign this address when NAT is disabled.

Subnet Mask This field displays the subnet mask for the SM. DHCP Server will not
automatically assign this address when NAT is disabled.

Gateway IP Address This field displays the gateway IP address for the SM. DHCP Server will
not automatically assign this address when NAT is disabled.

ARP Cache Timeout If a router upstream has an ARP cache of longer duration (as some use
30 minutes), enter a value of longer duration than the router ARP cache.
The default value of this field is 20 minutes.

TCP Session Where a large network exists behind the SM, you can set this parameter
Garbage Timeout to lower than the default value of 120 minutes. This action makes
additional resources available for greater traffic than the default value
accommodates.

UDP Session You may adjust this parameter in the range of 1 to 1440 minutes, based
Garbage Timeout on network performance. The default value of this parameter is 4
minutes.

Translation Table Total number of minutes that have elapsed since the last packet transfer
Size between the connected device and the SM/BHS.

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Note
When NAT is disabled, the following parameters are not required to be configurable:
WAN Inter face > Connection Type, IP Address, Subnet Mask, Gateway IP address
LAN Interface > IP Address
LAN DHCP Server > DHCP Server Enable/Disable, DHCP Server Lease Timeout,
Number of IP’s to Lease, DNS Server Proxy, DNS IP Address, Preferred DNS IP
address, Alternate DNS IP address
Remote Management Interface > Remote Management Interface, IP address, Subnet
Mask, DHCP DNS IP Address, Preferred DNS Server, Alternate DNS Server, Domain
Name
NAT Protocol Parameters > ARP Cache Timeout, TCP Session Garbage Timeout, UDP
Session Garbage Timeout, Translation Table Size

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NAT tab with NAT enabled - SM


The NAT tab of SM with NAT enabled is explained in Table 115.

Table 115 NAT attributes - SM with NAT enabled

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Attribute Meaning

NAT Enable/Disable This parameter enables or disabled the Network Address Translation
(NAT) feature for the SM. NAT isolates devices connected to the Ethernet
or wired side of a SM from being seen directly from the wireless side of
the SM. With NAT enabled, the SM has an IP address for transport traffic
separate from its address for management, terminates transport traffic,
and allows you to assign a range of IP addresses to devices that are
connected to the Ethernet or wired side of the SM.
When NAT is enabled, VLANs are not supported on the wired side of
that SM. You can enable NAT in SMs within a sector where VLAN is
enabled in the AP, but this may constrain network design.

WAN Interface The WAN interface is the RF-side address for transport traffic.

Connection Type This parameter may be set to


Static IP—when this is the selection, all three parameters (IP Address,
Subnet Mask, and Gateway IP Address) must be properly populated.
DHCP—when this is the selection, the information from the DHCP server
configures the interface.
PPPoE—when this is the selection, the information from the PPPoE
server configures the interface.

Subnet Mask If Static IP is set as the Connection Type of the WAN interface, then this
parameter configures the subnet mask of the SM for RF transport traffic.

Gateway IP Address If Static IP is set as the Connection Type of the WAN interface, then this
parameter configures the gateway IP address for the SM for RF transport
traffic.

Reply to Ping on By default, the radio interface does not respond to pings. If you use a
WAN Interface management system (such as WM) that will occasionally ping the SM,
set this parameter to Enabled.

LAN Interface The LAN interface is both the management access through the Ethernet
port and the Ethernet-side address for transport traffic. When NAT is
enabled, this interface is redundantly shown as the NAT Network
Interface Configuration on the IP tab of the Configuration web page in
the SM.

IP Address Assign an IP address for SM/BHS management through Ethernet access


to the SM. This address becomes the base for the range of DHCP-
assigned addresses.

Subnet Mask Assign a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 or a more restrictive subnet


mask. Set only the last byte of this subnet mask. Each of the first three
bytes is permanently set to 255.

DMZ Enable Either enable or disable DMZ for this SM/BHS.

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DMZ IP Address If you enable DMZ in the parameter above, set the last byte of the DMZ
host IP address to use for this SM when DMZ is enabled. Only one such
address is allowed. The first three bytes are identical to those of the NAT
private IP address. Ensure that the device that receives network traffic
behind this SM is assigned this address. The system provides a warning
if you enter an address within the range that DHCP can assign.

DHCP Server This is the server (in the SM) that provides an IP address to the device
connected to the Ethernet port of the SM.

DHCP Server Select either Enabled or Disabled.


Enable/Disable Enable to:
• Allow this SM to assign IP addresses, subnet masks, and gateway IP
addresses to attached devices.
• Assign a start address for DHCP.
• Designate how many IP addresses may be temporarily used (leased).
Disable to:
• Restrict SM/BHS from assigning addresses to attached devices.

DHCP Server Lease Based on network performance, enter the number of days between
Timeout when the DHCP server assigns an IP address and when that address
expires. The range of values for this parameter is 1 to 30 days. The
default value is 30 days.

DHCP Start IP If you enable DHCP Server below, set the last byte of the starting IP
address that the DHCP server assigns. The first three bytes are identical
to those of the NAT private IP address.

Number of IPs to Enter how many IP addresses the DHCP server is allowed to assign. The
Lease default value is 50 addresses.

DNS Server Proxy This parameter enables or disables advertisement of the SM/BHS as the
DNS server. On initial boot up of a SM with the NAT WAN interface
configured as DHCP or PPPoE, the SM module will not have DNS
information immediately. With DNS Server Proxy disabled, the clients
will renew their lease about every minute until the SM has the DNS
information to give out. At this point the SM will go to the full configured
lease time period which is 30 days by default. With DNS Server Proxy
enabled, the SM will give out full term leases with its NAT LAN IP as the
DNS server.

DNS IP Address Select either:


Obtain Automatically to allow the system to set the IP address of the
DNS server
or
Set Manually to enable yourself to set both a preferred and an alternate
DNS IP address.

Preferred DNS IP Enter the preferred DNS IP address to use when the DNS IP Address
Address parameter is set to Set Manually.

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Alternate DNS IP Enter the DNS IP address to use when the DNS IP Address parameter is
Address set to Set Manually and no response is received from the preferred DNS
IP address.

Remote To offer greater flexibility in IP address management, the NAT-enabled


Management SM’s configured WAN Interface IP address may now be used as the
Interface device Remote Management Interface (unless the SM’s PPPoE client is
set to Enabled)
Disable: When this interface is set to “Disable”, the SM is not directly
accessible by IP address. Management access is only possible through
either the LAN (Ethernet) interface or a link from an AP web page into
the WAN (RF-side) interface.
Enable (Standalone Config): When this interface is set to “Enable
(Standalone Config)”, to manage the SM/BHS the device must be
accessed by the IP addressing information provided in the Remote
Configuration Interface section.

Note
When configuring PPPoE over the link, use this configuration
option (PPPoE traffic is routed via the IP addressing specified
in section Remote Configuration Interface).

Enable (Use WAN Interface): When this interface is set to “Enable (Use
WAN Interface)”, the Remote Configuration Interface information is
greyed out, and the SM is managed via the IP addressing specified in
section WAN Interface).

Note
When using this configuration, the ports defined in section
Configuration, Port Configuration are consumed by the
device. For example, if FTP Port is configured as 21 by the
SM, an FTP server situated below the SM must use a port
other than 21. This also applies to DMZ devices; any ports
specified in section Configuration, Port Configuration will not
be translated through the NAT, they are consumed by the
device’s network stack for management.

Connection Type This parameter can be set to:


Static IP—when this is the selection, all three parameters (IP Address,
Subnet Mask, and Gateway IP Address) must be properly populated.
DHCP—when this is the selection, the information from the DHCP server
configures the interface.

IP Address If Static IP is set as the Connection Type of the WAN interface, then this
parameter configures the IP address of the SM for RF management
traffic.

Subnet Mask If Static IP is set as the Connection Type of the WAN interface, then this
parameter configures the subnet mask of the SM for RF management
traffic.

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Gateway IP Address If Static IP is set as the Connection Type of the WAN interface, then this
parameter configures the gateway IP address for the SM for RF
management traffic.
Note or print the IP settings from this page. Ensure that you can readily
associate these IP settings both with the module and with the other data
that you store about the module.

DHCP DNS IP Select either:


Address Obtain Automatically to allow the system to set the IP address of the
DNS server.
or
Set Manually to enable yourself to set both a preferred and an alternate
DNS IP address.

Preferred DNS Enter the preferred DNS IP address to use when the DNS IP Address
Server parameter is set to Set Manually.

Alternate DNS Enter the DNS IP address to use when the DNS IP Address parameter is
Server set to Set Manually and no response is received from the preferred DNS
IP address.

Domain Name Domain Name to use for management DNS configuration. This domain
name may be concatenated to DNS names used configured for the
remote configuration interface.

ARP Cache Timeout If a router upstream has an ARP cache of longer duration (as some use
30 minutes), enter a value of longer duration than the router ARP cache.
The default value of this field is 20 (minutes).

TCP Session Where a large network exists behind the SM, you can set this parameter
Garbage Timeout to lower than the default value of 120 (minutes). This action makes
additional resources available for greater traffic than the default value
accommodates.

UDP Session You may adjust this parameter in the range of 1 to 1440 minutes, based
Garbage Timeout on network performance. The default value of this parameter is 4
(minutes).

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NAT DNS Considerations - SM


SM DNS behavior is different depending on the accessibility of the SM. When NAT is enabled the
DNS configuration that is discussed in this document is tied to the RF Remote Configuration
Interface, which must be enabled to utilize DNS Client functionality. Note that the WAN DNS
settings when NAT is enabled are unchanged with the addition of the management DNS feature
discussed in this document.

Table 116 SM DNS Options with NAT Enabled

NAT Management Interface DHCP Status DNS Status


Configuration Accessibility

RF Remote N/A DNS Disabled


Management Interface
Disabled
NAT Enabled
RF Remote DHCP Disabled DNS Static Configuration
Management Interface
DHCP Enabled DNS from DHCP or DNS
Enabled
Static Configuration

NAT Port Mapping tab - SM


The NAT Port Mapping tab of the SM is explained in Table 117.

Table 117 NAT Port Mapping attributes - SM

Attribute Meaning

Port Map 1 to 10 Separate parameters allow you to distinguish NAT ports from each other
by assigning a unique combination of port number, protocol for traffic
through the port, and IP address for access to the port

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DHCP – BHS
Applicable products PTP:  BHM

DHCP enables a device to be assigned a new IP address and TCP/IP parameters, including a default
gateway, whenever the device reboots. Thus, DHCP reduces configuration time, conserves IP
addresses, and allows modules to be moved to a different network within the Cambium system.
In conjunction with the NAT features, each BHS provides:
• A DHCP server that assigns IP addresses to computers connected to the BHS by Ethernet
protocol.
• A DHCP client that receives an IP address for the BHS from a network DHCP server.

Reconnecting to the management PC


If the IP Address, Subnet Mask and Gateway IP Address of the unit have been updated to meet
network requirements, then reconfigure the local management PC to use an IP address that is valid
for the network. See Configuring the management PC on page 7-3.
Once the unit reboots, log in using the new IP address. See Logging into the web interface on page
7-5.

VLAN configuration for PMP


Applicable products PMP:  AP  SM

VLAN Remarking
VLAN Remarking feature allows the user to change the VLAN ID and priority of both upstream
and downstream packets at the Ethernet Interface. The remarking configuration is available for:

1. VLAN ID re-marking
2. 802.1p priority re-marking

Note
For Q-in-Q VLAN tagged frame, re-marking is performed on the outer tag.

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VLAN ID Remarking

SM supports the ability to re-mark the VLAN ID on both upstream and downstream VLAN frames
at the Ethernet interface. For instance, a configuration can be added to re-mark VLAN ID ‘x’ to
VLAN ID ‘y’ as shown in Table 118. AP does not support VLAN ID remarking.

Table 118 VLAN Remarking Example

VLAN frame direction Remarking

SM receives VLAN ID ‘x’ frame at the Ethernet interface, checks the


configuration and re-marks to VLAN ID ‘y’. So VLAN ID ‘y’ frame
Upstream comes out of AP’s Ethernet interface. When SM re-marks, a
dynamic entry in VLAN membership table for ‘y’ is added to allow
reception of VLAN ID ‘y’ downstream packet.

AP receives VLAN ID ‘y’ frame at the Ethernet interface and sends to


SM. SM accepts the frame as it has an entry in the membership
table and re-marks to VLAN ID ‘x’. This reverse re- marking is
Downstream necessary because the downstream devices do not know of re-
marking and are expecting VLAN ‘x’ frames. This remarking is done
just before sending the packet out on Ethernet interface.

802.1P Remarking

AP/BHM and SM/BHS allow re-marking of 802.1p priority bits for the frames received at the
Ethernet interface. Priority bits are not re-marked for the packets sent out of Ethernet interface
(reverse direction).

Configuration must be added at SM/BHS for upstream frames and at AP/BHM for downstream
frames.

VLAN Priority Bits configuration


VLAN Priority Bits Configuration feature allows the user to configure the three 802.1p bits upon
assigning VLAN to an ingress packet. The priority bits configuration is available for:
• Default Port VID
• Provider VID
• MAC Address mapped Port VID
• Management VID

Default Port VID


This VID is used for untagged frames and will correspond to the Q-Tag for 802.1Q frames (if
VLAN Port Type is Q), or the C-Tag for 802.1ad frames (if the VLAN Port Type is QinQ).
The priority bits used in the Q-tag/C-tag are configurable.

The configuration can be:

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• Promote IPv4/IPv6 priority – The priority in the IP header is copied to the Q-tag/C-tag.
• Define priority – Specify the priority in the range of 0 to 7. This value is used as priority in the
Q-tag/C-tag.

MAC Address Mapped VID


If a packet arrives at the SM/BHS that is sourced from a device whose MAC address is in the
table, then the corresponding VID is used for that frame’s Q-tag (Q port) or C-tag (QinQ port).
The priority bits used in the Q-tag/C-tag are configurable similar to default port VID.
Provider VID
The provider VID is used for the S-tag. The priority bits used in the S-tag are configurable
similar to default port VID. Provider VID has an extra priority configuration:
• Copy inner tag 802.1p priority – The priority in the C-tag is copied to the S-tag.

Management VID
This VID is used to communicate with AP/BHM and SM/BHS for management purposes. The
priority bits used in the Q-tag are configurable similar to default port VID.

Use AP’s Management VID for ICC connected SM


This feature allows the SM to use the AP’s management VLAN ID when the SM is registered to
the AP via ICC. This feature is useful for the customer who uses a different management VID for
the SM and AP and Zero Touch feature is enabled for configuration. This parameter may be
accessed via the Configuration > VLAN page on the AP’s web management interface.

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VLAN page of AP
The VLAN tab of the AP/BHM is explained in Table 119.

Table 119 AP/BHM VLAN tab attributes

Attribute Meaning

VLAN Specify whether VLAN functionality for the AP and all linked SMs must
(Enabled) or may not (Disabled) be allowed. The default value is
Disabled.

Always use Local Enable this option before you reboot this AP as a SM to use it to perform
VLAN Config spectrum analysis. Once the spectrum analysis completes, disable this
option before you reboot the module as an AP,

Allow Frame Types Select the type of arriving frames that the AP must tag, using the VID
that is stored in the Untagged Ingress VID parameter. The default value
is All Frames.

Dynamic Learning Specify whether the AP must (Enabled) or not (Disabled) add the VLAN
IDs (VIDs) of upstream frames to the VID table. (The AP passes frames
with VIDs that are stored in the table both upstream and downstream.).
The default value is Enabled.

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Attribute Meaning

VLAN Aging Timeout Specify how long the AP must keep dynamically learned VIDs. The range
of values is 5 to 1440 (minutes). The default value is 25 (minutes).

Note
VIDs that you enter for the Management VID and VLAN
Membership parameters do not time out.

Management VID Enter the VID that the operator wishes to use to communicate with the
module manager. The range of values is 1 to 4095. The default value is 1.

QinQ EtherType Modules can be configured with 802.1ad Q-in-Q DVLAN (Double-VLAN)
tagging which is a way for an operator to put an 802.1Q VLAN inside of
an 802.1ad VLAN. A nested VLAN, which is the original 802.1Q tag and a
new second 802.1ad tag, allows for bridging of VLAN traffic across a
network and segregates the broadcast domains of 802.1Q VLANs. Q-in-Q
can be used with PPPoE and/or NAT.
The 802.1ad standard defines the S-VLAN as the Service Provider VLAN
and the C-VLAN as the customer VLAN. The radio software does 2 layer
Q-in-Q whereby the C-VLAN is the 802.1Q tag and the S-VLAN is the
second layer Q tag as shown below:

Table 120 Q-in-Q Ethernet frame

Ethernet S-VLAN C-VLAN EthType IP Data EthType


Header EthType 0x88a8 0x8100 0x0800

The 802.1ad S-VLAN is the outer VLAN that is configurable on the


Configuration > VLAN web page of the AP. The Q-in-Q EtherType
parameter is configured with a default EtherType of 0x88a8 in addition
to four alternate EtherTypes that can be configured to aid in
interoperability with existing networks that use a different EtherType
than the default.
The C-VLAN is the inner VLAN tag, which is the same as 802.1Q. As a
top-level concept, this operates on the outermost tag at any given time,
either “pushing” a tag on or “popping” a tag off. This means packets
will at most transition from an 802.1Q frame to an 801.ad frame (with a
tag “pushed” on) or an untagged 802.1 frame (with the tag “popped”
off. Similarly, for an 802.1ad frame, this can only transition from an
802.1ad frame to an 802.1Q frame (with the tag “popped” off) since the
radio software only supports 2 levels of tags.

Use AP's This field allows the SM to use the AP’s management VLAN ID when the
Management VID for SM is registered to the AP via ICC.
ICC connected SM

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VLAN Not Active When VLAN is enabled in the AP, the Active Configuration block
provides the following details as read-only information in this tab. In the
Cambium fixed wireless broadband IP network, each device of any type
is automatically a permanent member of VID 1. This facilitates
deployment of devices that have VLAN enabled with those that do not.

VLAN Membership For each VLAN in which you want the AP to be a member, enter the
Table Configuration VLAN ID and then click the Add Member button. Similarly, for any VLAN
in which you want the AP to no longer be a member, enter the VLAN ID
and then click the Remove Member button.

VLAN Membership This field lists the VLANs that an AP is a member of. As the user adds a
table number between 1 and 4094, this number is populated here.

Enter the VID for which the operator wishes to remark the 802.1p priority
Source VLAN
for the downstream packets. The range of values is 1 to 4094. The
(Range: 1-4094)
default value is 1.

Remark Priority This is the priority you can assign to the VLAN Tagged packet. Priority of
(Range 0-7) 0 is the highest.

VLAN Remarking As the user enters a VLAN and a Remarking priority, this information is
table added in this table.

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VLAN page of SM
The VLAN tab of SM/BHS is explained in Table 121.

Table 121 SM VLAN attributes

Attribute Meaning

VLAN Port Type By default, this is Q, indicating that it is to operate in the existing
manner. The other option is Q-in-Q, which indicates that it must be
adding and removing the S-Tag, and adding a C-Tag if necessary for
untagged packets. The VLAN Port type corresponds to the Ethernet port
of the SM/BHS. Currently, the internal management interfaces will
always operate as Q ports.

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Accept QinQ Frames This option is valid for the Q-in-Q port so that the user may force
blocking of existing 802.1ad Q-in-Q frames. This way, only untagged or
single tagged packets will come in and out of the Ethernet interface. If a
Q-in-Q frame is about ingress or egress the Ethernet interface and this is
disabled, it is dropped and a filter entry will show up on the VLAN
Statistics page as DVLAN Egress or DVLAN Ingress.

Allow Frame Types Select the type of arriving frames that the SM must tag, using the VID
that is stored in the Untagged Ingress VID parameter. The default value
is All Frames.
Tagged Frames Only: The SM only tags incoming VLAN-tagged frames
Untagged Frames Only: The SM will only tag incoming untagged frames

Dynamic Learning Specify whether the SM must (Enable) or not (Disable) add the VIDs of
upstream frames (that enter the SM through the wired Ethernet
interface) to the VID table. The default value is Enable.

VLAN Aging Timeout Specify how long the SM/BHS must keep dynamically learned VIDs. The
range of values is 5 to 1440 (minutes). The default value is 25 (minutes).

Note
VIDs that you enter for the Untagged Ingress VID and
Management VID parameters do not time out.

Management VID Enter the VID that the SM/BHS must share with the AP/BHM. The range
of values is 1 to 4095. The default value is 1.

SM Management Specify whether to allow the SM/BHS (Enabled) or the AP/RADIUS


VID Pass-through (Disabled) to control the VLAN settings of this SM. The default value is
Enabled.
When VLAN is enabled in the AP to whom this SM is registered, the
Active Configuration block provides the following details as read-only
information in this tab. In the Cambium fixed wireless broadband IP
network, each device of any type is automatically a permanent member
of VID 1. This facilitates deployment of devices that have VLAN enabled
with those that do not.
If disabled, MVID traffic is not allowed to or from the SM wired interface.
Also, if Management VID is the same as a Port VID (Default or MAC-
based), then this setting is ignored and assumed to be Enabled.

Default Port VID This is the VID that is used for untagged frames and will correspond to
the Q-Tag for 802.1Q frames (if VLAN Port Type is Q), or the C-Tag for
802.1ad frames (if the VLAN Port Type is Q-in- Q).

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Port VID MAC These parameters allow operators to place specific devices onto
Address Mapping different VLANs (802.1Q tag or 802.1ad C-tag) based on the source
MAC address of the packet. If the MAC address entry is 00-00-00-00-00-
00 then that entry is not used. If a packet arrives at the SM that is
sourced from a device whose MAC address is in the table, then the
corresponding VID is used for that frame’s Q-tag (Q port) or C-tag (Q-
in-Q port). If there is no match, then the Default Port VID is used. This
table is also used in the downstream direction for removal of the tag
based on the destination MAC address so that an untagged (for Q port)
or Q-Tagged (for Q-in-Q port) frame is delivered to the end device. You
may use wildcards for the non-OUI (Organizationally Unique Identifier)
portion of the MAC address, which is the last 3 bytes. MAC addresses
contain 6 bytes, the first 3 of which are the OUI of the vendor that
manufactured the device and the last 3 are unique to that vendor OUI.
If you want to cover all devices from a known vendor’s OUI, you have
to specify 0xFF for the remaining 3 bytes. So, for example, if you
wanted all devices from a specific vendor with an OUI of 00-95-5b
(which is a Netgear OUI) to be on the same VID of 800, you have to
specify an entry with MAC address 00-95-5b-ff-ff-ff. Then, any device
underneath of the SM with MAC addresses starting with 00-95-5b is put
on VLAN 800.

Provider VID The provider VID is used for the S-tag. It is only used if the Port Type is
Q-in-Q and will always be used for the S-tag. If an existing 802.1Q
frame arrives, the Provider VID is what is used for adding and
removing of the outer S-tag. If an untagged frame arrives to a Q-in-Q
port, then the Provider VID is the S-tag and the Default Port VID (or Port
VID MAC Address Mapping, if valid) is used for the C-tag.

Active Configuration, This is the value of the parameter of the same name, configured above.
Default Port VID

Active Configuration, This is the listing of the MAC address VIDs configured in Port VID MAC
MAC Address VID Address Mapping.
Map

Active Configuration, This is the value of the parameter of the same name, configured above.
Management VID

Active Configuration, This is the value of the parameter of the same name, configured above.
SM Management
VID Pass-Through

Active Configuration, This is the value of the VLAN Aging Timeout parameter configured
Dynamic Aging above.
Timeout

Active Configuration, Yes is displayed if the value of the Dynamic Learning parameter above is
Allow Learning Enabled. No is displayed if the value of Dynamic Learning is Disabled.

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Active Configuration, This displays the selection that was made from the drop-down list at the
Allow Frame Type Allow Frame Types parameter above.

Active Configuration, This is set to Enabled if VLAN Port Type is set to QinQ, and is set to
QinQ Disabled if VLAN Port Type is set to Q.

Active Configuration, This is the value of the QinQ EtherType configured in the AP.
QinQ EthType

Active Configuration, This is the value of Accept QinQ Frames, configured above.
Allow QinQ Tagged
Frames

Active Configuration, This column lists the ID numbers of the VLANs in which this module is a
Current VID Member member, whether through assignment or through dynamic learning.
Set, VID Number

Active Configuration, For each VID number in the first column, the entry in this column
Current VID Member correlates the way in which the module became and continues to be a
Set, Type member:
Permanent—This indicates that the module was assigned the VID
number through direct configuration by the operator.
Dynamic—This indicates that the module adopted the VID number
through enabled dynamic learning, when a tagged packet from a SM
behind it in the network or from a customer equipment that is behind the
SM in this case, was read.

Active Configuration, For each VID number in the first column of the table, the entry in this
Current VID Member column reflects whether or when the VID number will time out:
Set, Age Permanent type - Number never times out and this is indicated by the
digit 0.
Dynamic type - Age reflects what is configured in the VLAN Aging
Timeout parameter in the Configuration => VLAN tab of the AP or
reflects a fewer number of minutes that represents the difference
between what was configured and what has elapsed since the VID was
learned. Each minute, the Age decreases by one until, at zero, the AP
deletes the learned VID, but can it again from packets sent by elements
that are beneath it in the network.

Note
Values in this Active Configuration block can differ from
attempted values in configurations:
The AP can override the value that the SM has configured for
SM Management VID Pass-Through.

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VLAN Membership tab of SM


The Configuration > VLAN > VLAN Membership tab is explained in Table 122.

Table 122 SM VLAN Membership attributes

Attribute Meaning

VLAN Membership For each VLAN in which you want the AP to be a member, enter the
Table Configuration VLAN ID and then click the Add Member button. Similarly, for any VLAN
in which you want the AP to no longer be a member, enter the VLAN ID
and then click the Remove Member button.

VLAN configuration for PTP


Applicable products PTP:  BHM  BMS

VLAN page of BHM


The VLAN tab of BHS is explained in Table 123.

Table 123 BHM VLAN page attributes

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Attribute Meaning

VLAN Specify whether VLAN functionality for the BHM and all linked BHS must
be (Enabled) or may not (Disabled) be allowed. The default value is
Disabled.

VLAN Port Type By default, this is Q, indicating that it is to operate in the existing
manner. The other option is Q-in-Q, which indicates that it must be
adding and removing the S-Tag, and adding a C-Tag if necessary for
untagged packets. The VLAN Port type corresponds to the Ethernet port
of the BHS. Currently, the internal management interfaces will always
operate as Q ports.

Accept QinQ Frames This option is valid for the Q-in-Q port so that the user may force
blocking of existing 802.1ad Q-in-Q frames. This way, only untagged or
single tagged packets will come in and out of the Ethernet interface. If a
Q-in-Q frame is about ingress or egress the Ethernet interface and this is
disabled, it is dropped and a filter entry will show up on the VLAN
Statistics page as DVLAN Egress or DVLAN Ingress.

Management VID Enter the VID that the BHS must share with the BHM. The range of
(Range 1-4094) values is 1 to 4095. The default value is 1.

Default Port VID This is the VID that is used for untagged frames and corresponds to the
(Range 1-4094) Q-Tag for 802.1Q frames (if VLAN Port Type is Q), or the C-Tag for
802.1ad frames (if the VLAN Port Type is Q-in- Q).

QinQ Ether Type Modules can be configured with 802.1ad Q-in-Q DVLAN (Double-VLAN)
tagging which is a way for an operator to put an 802.1Q VLAN inside of
an 802.1ad VLAN. A nested VLAN, which is the original 802.1Q tag and a
new second 802.1ad tag, allows for bridging of VLAN traffic across a
network and segregates the broadcast domains of 802.1Q VLANs. Q-in-Q
can be used with PPPoE and/or NAT.
The 802.1ad standard defines the S-VLAN as the Service Provider VLAN
and the C-VLAN as the customer VLAN. The radio software does 2-layer
Q-in-Q whereby the C-VLAN is the 802.1Q tag and the S-VLAN is the
second layer Q tag as shown below:

Ethernet S-VLAN EthType C-VLAN IP Data EthType


Header 0x88a8 EthType 0x8100 0x0800

The 802.1ad S-VLAN is the outer VLAN that is configurable on the


Configuration > VLAN web page of the BHM. The Q-in-Q EtherType
parameter is configured with a default EtherType of 0x88a8 in addition
to four alternate EtherTypes that can be configured to aid in
interoperability with existing networks that use a different EtherType
than the default.

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The C-VLAN is the inner VLAN tag, which is the same as 802.1Q. As a
top-level concept, this operates on the outermost tag at any given time,
either “pushing” a tag on or “popping” a tag off. This means packets
will at most transition from an 802.1Q frame to an 801.ad frame (with a
tag “pushed” on) or an untagged 802.1 frame (with the tag “popped”
off. Similarly, for an 802.1ad frame, this can only transition from an
802.1ad frame to an 802.1Q frame (with the tag “popped” off) since the
radio software only supports 2 levels of tags.

VLAN Not Active When VLAN is enabled in the BHM, the Active Configuration block
provides the following details as read-only information in this tab. In the
Cambium fixed wireless broadband IP network, each device of any type
is automatically a permanent member of VID 1. This facilitates
deployment of devices that have VLAN enabled with those that do not.

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VLAN page of BHS


The VLAN tab of BHS is explained in Table 124.

Table 124 BHS VLAN page attributes

Attribute Meaning

VLAN Specify whether VLAN functionality for the BHM and all linked BHS must
be (Enabled) or may not (Disabled) be allowed. The default value is
Disabled.

VLAN Port Type By default, this is Q, indicating that it is to operate in the existing
manner. The other option is Q-in-Q, which indicates that it must be
adding and removing the S-Tag, and adding a C-Tag if necessary for
untagged packets. The VLAN Port type corresponds to the Ethernet port
of the BHS. Currently, the internal management interfaces will always
operate as Q ports.

Accept QinQ Frames This option is valid for the Q-in-Q port so that the user may force
blocking of existing 802.1ad Q-in-Q frames. This way, only untagged or
single tagged packets will come in and out of the Ethernet interface. If a
Q-in-Q frame is about ingress or egress the Ethernet interface and this is
disabled, it is dropped and a filter entry will show up on the VLAN
Statistics page as DVLAN Egress or DVLAN Ingress.

Management VID Enter the VID that the BHS must share with the BHM. The range of
(Range 1-4094) values is 1 to 4095. The default value is 1.

Default Port VID This is the VID that is used for untagged frames and corresponds to the
(Range 1-4094) Q-Tag for 802.1Q frames (if VLAN Port Type is Q), or the C-Tag for
802.1ad frames (if the VLAN Port Type is Q-in- Q).

VLAN Not Active When VLAN is enabled in the BHM, the Active Configuration block
provides the following details as read-only information in this tab. In the
Cambium fixed wireless broadband IP network, each device of any type
is automatically a permanent member of VID 1. This facilitates
deployment of devices that have VLAN enabled with those that do not.

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PPPoE page of SM
Applicable products PMP:  SM

Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet (PPPoE) is a protocol that encapsulates PPP frames inside
Ethernet frames (at Ethernet speeds). Benefits to the network operator may include
• Access control
• Service monitoring
• Generation of statistics about activities of the customer
• Re-use of infrastructure and operational practices by operators who already use PPP for other
networks
PPPoE options are configurable for the SM only, and the AP indicates whether or not PPPoE is
enabled for a specific subscriber.
When PPPoE is enabled, once the RF session comes up between the SM and the AP, the SM will
immediately attempt to connect to the PPPoE Server. You can monitor the status of this by viewing
the PPPoE Session Log in the Logs section (Administrator only). Every time the RF session comes
up, the SM will check the status of the link and if it is down, the SM will attempt to redial the link if
necessary depending on the Timer Type. Also, on the Configuration page, the user may ‘Connect’
or ‘Disconnect’ the session manually. This can be used to override the session to force a manual
disconnect and/or reconnect if there is a problem with the session.
In order to enable PPPoE, NAT MUST be enabled on the SM and Translation Bridging MUST be
disabled on the AP. These items are strictly enforced for you when you are trying to enable PPPoE.
A message will indicate any prerequisites not being met. Also, the NAT Public IP DHCP client
cannot be enabled, because the NAT Public IP is received through the IPCP process of the PPPoE
discovery stages.
The pre-requisites are:
• NAT MUST be enabled on the SM
o NAT DHCP Client is disabled automatically. The NAT public IP is received from the PPPoE
Server.
o NAT Public Network Interface Configuration will not be used and must be left to defaults.
Also NAT Public IP DHCP is disabled if it is enabled.
• Translation Bridging MUST be DISABLED on the AP
o This will only be determined if the SM is in session since the SM won’t know the AP
configuration otherwise. If the SM is not in session, PPPoE can be enabled but if the SM
goes into session to a Translation Bridge-enabled AP, then PPPoE will not be enabled.
The PPPoE configuration parameters are explained in Table 125.

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Table 125 SM PPPoE attributes

Attribute Meaning

Access Concentrator An optional entry to set a specific access concentrator to connect to for
the PPPoE session. If this is blank, the SM will accept the first access
concentrator which matches the service name (if specified). This is
limited to 32 characters.

Service Name An optional entry to set a specific service name to connect to for the
PPPoE session. If this is left blank the SM will accept the first service
option that comes back from the access concentrator specified above, if
any. This is limited to 32 characters.

Authentication Type None means that no PPPoE authentication is implemented


CHAP/PAP means that CHAP authentication is attempted first, then PAP
authentication. The same password is used for both types.

User Name This is the CHAP/PAP user name that is used if CHAP/PAP authentication
is selected. If None is selected for authentication then this field is
unused. This is limited to 32 characters.

Password This is the CHAP/PAP password that is used if PAP authentication is


selected. If None is selected for authentication then this field is unused.
This is limited to 32 characters.

MTU Use MTU Received from PPPoE Server causes the SM to use the MRU of
the PPPoE server received in LCP as the MTU for the PPPoE link.

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Use User Defined MTU allows the operator to specify an MTU value to
use to override any MTU that may be determined in the LCP phase of
PPPoE session setup. If this is selected, the user is able to enter an MTU
value up to 1492. However, if the MTU determined in LCP negotiations is
less than this user-specified value, the SM will use the smaller value as
its MTU for the PPPoE link.

Timer Type Keep Alive is the default timer type. This timer will enable a keepalive
that will check the status of the link periodically. The user can set a
keepalive period. If no data is seen from the PPPoE server for that
period, the link is taken down and a reconnection attempt is started. For
marginal links, the keep alive timer can be useful so that the session will
stay alive over periodic dropouts. The keepalive timer must be set such
that the session can outlast any session drop. Some PPPoE servers will
have a session check timer of their own so that the timeouts of the
server and the SM are in sync, to ensure one side does not drop the
session prematurely.
Idle Timeout enables an idle timer that checks the usage of the link from
the customer side. If there is no data seen from the customer for the idle
timeout period, the PPPoE session is dropped. Once data starts flowing
from the customer again, the session is started up again. This timer is
useful for users who may not be using the connection frequently. If the
session is idle for long periods of time, this timer will allow the
resources used by the session to be returned to the server. Once the
connection is used again by the customer, the link is reestablished
automatically.

Timer Period The length in seconds of the PPPoE keepalive timer.

TCP MSS Clamping If this is enabled, then the SM will alter TCP SYN and SYN-ACK packets
by changing the Maximum Segment Size to be compatible with the
current MTU of the PPPoE link. This way, the user does not have to
worry about MTU on the client side for TCP packets. The MSS is set to
the current MTU – 40 (20 bytes for IP headers and 20 bytes for TCP
headers). This will cause the application on the client side to not send
any TCP packets larger than the MTU. If the network is exhibiting large
packet loss, try enabling this option. This may not be an option on the
PPPoE server itself. The SM will NOT reassemble IP fragments, so if the
MTUs are incorrect on the end stations, then MSS clamping will solve
the problem for TCP connections.

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IP4 and IPv6


Applicable products PMP:  AP  SM PTP:  BHM  BMS

IPv4 and IPv6 Prioritization


450 Platform Family provides operators the ability to prioritize IPv6 traffic in addition to IPv4
traffic. IPv6/IPv4 prioritization can be configured by selecting a CodePoint and the
corresponding priority from the GUI of the AP/BHM and the IPv6/IPv4 packet is set up
accordingly. There is no GUI option for selecting IPv6 or IPv4 priority. Once the priority is set, it
is set for IPv4 and IPv6 packets.

Configuring IPv4 and IPv6 Priority


IPv4 and IPv6 prioritization is set using the DiffServ tab on the AP/BHM and SM/BHS (located at
Configuration > DiffServ). A priority set to a specific CodePoint will apply to both IPv4 and IPv6
traffic.

Table 126 DiffServ attributes – AP/BHM

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Attribute Meaning

Codepoints 1 The PMP family of APs support four levels of QoS. The mapping of these
through 63 eight priority values to data channels is determined by the number of
data channels configured per SM as shown in the table below:

For example, for an AP that uses the default table shown above has
configured 3 QoS levels per SM, would see codepoints 0 through 15
mapped to the Low Priority data channels, codepoint 16 would be
mapped to the Medium Priority data channels, and so on.
Note that CodePoints 0, 8, 16, 24, 32, 48, and 56 are predefined to the
fixed values shown in the table above and are not user configurable.
Operator cannot change any of these three fixed priority values. Among
the configurable parameters, the priority values (and therefore the
handling of packets in the high or low priority channel) are set in the
AP/BHM for all downlinks within the sector and in the SM/BHS for each
uplink.

CodePoint Select This represents the CodePoint Selection to be modified via Priority
Select.

Priority Select The priority setting input for the CodePoint selected in CodePoint Select.

Priority Precedence Allows operator to decide if 802.1p or DiffServ priority bits must be used
first when making priority decisions.

PPPoE Control Operators may configure the AP/BHM to utilize the high priority channel
Message Priority for PPPoE control messages. Configuring the AP/BHM in this fashion can
benefit the continuity of PPPoE connections when there are issues with
PPPoE sessions being dropped in the network. This prioritization may be
configured in the DiffServ tab in the Configuration menu of the AP/BHM.

MPLS Traffic Class The Multi-Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) protocol is used to route
(TC) 0 through MPLS traffic based on the priority setting configured each MPLS Traffic Class.
Traffic Class (TC) 7 MPLS Traffic Class (TC) 0 through MPLS Traffic Class (TC) 7 can be
configured with 0 through 7 priority settings.

IPv4 and IPv6 Filtering


The operator can filter (block) specified IPv6 protocols including IPv4 and ports from leaving the
AP/BHM and SM/BHS and entering the network. This protects the network from both intended and
inadvertent packet loading or probing by network users. By keeping the specified protocols or
ports off the network, this feature also provides a level of protection to users from each other.

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Configuring IPv4 and IPv6 Filtering


IPv6 filters are set using the Protocol Filtering tab on the AP/BHM and SM/BHS (at Configuration >
Protocol Filtering). Once a filter is set for a packet type, those packets will not be sent over the RF
interface depending on “Filter Direction” setting.

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Table 127 Packet Filter Configuration attributes

Attribute Meaning

Packet Filter Types For any box selected, the Protocol and Port Filtering feature blocks the
associated protocol type.
To filter packets in any of the user-defined ports, you must do all of the
following:
• Check the box for User Defined Port n (See Below) in the Packet
Filter Types section of this tab.
• Provide a port number at Port #n. in the User Defined Port Filtering
Configuration section of this tab

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• Enable TCP and/or UDP by clicking the associated radio button

Filter Direction Operators may choose to filter upstream (uplink) RF packets or


downstream (downlink) RF packets.

User Defined Port You can specify ports for which to block subscriber access, regardless of
Filtering whether NAT is enabled.
Configuration

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Chapter 7: Configuration Upgrading the software version and using CNUT

Upgrading the software version and using CNUT

This section consists of the following procedures:


• Checking the installed software version on page 7-67
• Upgrading to a new software version on page 7-67

Caution
If the link is operational, ensure that the remote end of the link is upgraded first using
the wireless connection, and then the local end can be upgraded. Otherwise, the
remote end may not be accessible.
Use CNUT 4.11.2 or later version and always refer to the software release notes before
upgrading system software. The release notes are available at:
https://support.cambiumnetworks.com/files/pmp450
https://support.cambiumnetworks.com/files/ptp450

Checking the installed software version


To check the installed software version, follow these instructions:

Procedure 18 Checking the installed software version


1 Click on General tab under Home menu.

2 Note the installed Software Version (under Device Information):


PMP/PTP 450/450i/450m

3 Go to the support website (see Contacting Cambium Networks on page 1) and find Point-
to-Multipoint software updates. Check that the latest 450 Platform Family software
version is the same as the installed Software Version.

4 To upgrade software to the latest version, see Upgrading to a new software version on
page 7-67.

Upgrading to a new software version


All 450 platform modules are upgraded using the Canopy Network Updater Tool. The Canopy
Network Updater Tool (CNUT) manages and automates the software upgrade process for a
Canopy radio, or CMM4 (but not its 14-port switch) across the network. This eliminates the need
for an administrator to visit each radio in the network (or each AP/BHM while using the Auto
update feature) to upgrade the modules.

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Note
Please ensure that you have the most up-to-date version of CNUT by browsing to the
Customer Support Web Page located:
https://www.cambiumnetworks.com/products/software-tools/cambium-network-
updater-tool/

This section includes an example of updating a single unit before deployment. System-wide
upgrading procedures may be found in the CNUT Online Help manual, which can be found on the
Cambium support website (see Contacting Cambium Networks on page 1).

CNUT functions
The Canopy Network Updater tool has the following functions:
• Automatically discovers all network elements
• Executes a UDP command that initiates and terminates the Auto-update mode within
APs/BHMs. This command is both secure and convenient:
o For security, the AP/BHM accepts this command from only the IP address that you specify
in the Configuration page of the AP/BHM.
o For convenience, Network Updater automatically sets this Configuration parameter in the
APs/BHMs to the IP address of the Network Updater server when the server performs any
of the update commands.
• CNUT supports HTTP and HTTPS
• Allows you to choose the following among updating:
o Your entire network.
o Only elements that you select.
o Only network branches that you select.
• Provides a Script Engine that you can use with any script that:
o You define.
o Cambium supplies.
• Configurability of any of the following to be the file server for image files:
o The AP/BHM, for traditional file serving via UDP commands and monitoring via UDP
messaging
o CNUT HTTP/HTTPS Server, for upgrading via SNMP commands and monitoring via SNMP
messaging. This also supports an option to either set the image order specifically for this
file server or to allow the AP to determine the order.
o Local TFTP Server, for traditional file serving via UDP commands and monitoring via UDP
messaging. This supports setting the number of simultaneous image transfers per AP/BHM
• The capability to launch a test of connectivity and operational status of the local HTTP, HTTPS
and TFTP file servers
• An interface that supports efficient specification of the proper IP address for the local file
server(s) where Network Updater resides on a multi-homed computer
• An md5 checksum calculator utility for identifying corruption of downloaded image files before
Network Updater is set to apply them.

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Network element groups


With the Canopy Network Updater Tool, you can identify element groups composed of network
elements that you select. Identifying these element groups does the following:
• Organizes the display of elements (for example, by region or by AP/BHM cluster).
• Allows to:
o Perform an operation on all elements in the group simultaneously.
o Set group-level defaults for ftp password access and SNMP Community String (defaults
that can be overridden in an individual element when necessary).

Network layers
A typical network contains multiple layers of elements, with each layer farther from the Point of
Presence. For example, SMs (or BHS) are behind an AP/BHM and thus, in this context, at a lower
layer than the AP/BHM. Correctly portraying these layers in Network Updater is essential so that
Network Updater can perform radio and AP/BHM cluster upgrades in an appropriate order.

Script engine
Script Engine is the capability in Network Updater that executes any user-defined script against
any network element or element group. This capability is useful for network management,
especially for scripts that you repetitively execute across your network.
The Autodiscovery capability in Network Updater finds all of your network elements.
This comprehensive discovery:
• Ensures that, when you intend to execute a script against all elements, the script is indeed
executed against all elements.
• Maintains master lists of elements (element groups) against which you selectively execute
scripts.
The following scripts are included with CNUT:
• Gather Customer Support Information
• Set Access Point Authentication Mode
• Set Autoupdate Address on APs/BHMs
• Set SNMP Accessibility
• Reset Unit

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Software dependencies for CNUT


CNUT functionality requires
• one of the following operating systems
o Windows® 2000
o Windows Server 2003
o Windows 7 and Windows 8
o Windows XP or XP Professional
o Red Hat Enterprise Linux (32-bit) Version 4 or 5
• Java™ Runtime Version 2.0 or later (installed by the CNUT installation tool)

CNUT download
CNUT can be downloaded together with each system release that supports CNUT. Software for
these system releases is available from https://www.cambiumnetworks.com/products/software-
tools/cambium-network-updater-tool/, as either:
• A .zip file for use without the CNUT application.
• A .pkg file that the CNUT application can open.

Upgrading a module prior to deployment


To upgrade to a new software version, follow this:

Procedure 19 Upgrading a module prior to deployment

1 Go to the support website (see Contacting Cambium Networks on page 1) and find Point-
to-Multipoint software updates. Download and save the required software image.

2 Start CNUT

3 If you don’t start up with a blank new network file in CNUT, then open a new network file
with the New Network Archive operation (located at File > New Network).
4 Enter a new network element to the empty network tree using the Add Elements to
Network Root operation (located at Edit > Add Elements to Network Root).

5 In the Add Elements dialogue, select a type of Access Point or Subscriber Module and
enter the IP address of 169.254.1.1.

6 Make sure that the proper Installation Package is active with the Package Manager
dialogue (located at Update > Manage Packages).

7 To verify connectivity with the radio, perform a Refresh, Discover Entire Network
operation (located at View > Refresh/Discover Entire Network). You must see the details
columns for the new element filled in with ESN and software version information.
8 Initiate the upgrade of the radio using Update Entire Network Root operation (located at
Update > Update Entire Network Root). When this operation finishes, the radio is done
being upgraded.

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General configuration

The Configuration > General page of the AP/BMH or BHM/BHS contains many of the configurable
parameters that define how the ratios operate in sector or backhaul.

Applicable products PMP:  AP  SM PTP:  BHM  BMS

PMP 450m and PMP/PTP 450i Series


General page - PMP 450i AP
The General page of AP is explained in Table 128.

Table 128 General page attributes – PMP 450i AP

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Attribute Meaning

Ethernet Port Ethernet Port selection is applicable to the 450m platform only with two
Selection choices in the drop-down list:
• Main: A selection of main indicates that link connectivity and power
to the 450m is provided through the RF45 connection on the Main
port of the AP
• SFP: A selection of SFP indicates that link connectivity will be
provided through the SFP port on the 450m
Power continues to be provided via the RJ45 Main port

Link Speeds From the drop-down list of options, select the type of link speed for the
Ethernet connection. The Auto settings allow the two ends of the link to
automatically negotiate with each other the best possible speed, and
check whether the Ethernet traffic is full duplex or half duplex.
However, some Ethernet links work best when either:
• both ends are set to the same forced selection
• both ends are set to auto-negotiate and both have capability in least
one common speed and traffic type combination.

802.3at Type 2 PoE When the PoE Classification functionality is enabled and if Type 2 power
Status and is not present, the PAs do not power up and draw too much power.
By default, the PoE Classification feature is disabled and the PAs will
PoE Classification
power up regardless of the classification presented by the power source.
(PMP 450i Series
This is supported only on 450i series devices.
only)
PoE Classification configuration status also can be check under home >
General > Device Information tab:

Configuration See Setting the Configuration Source on page 7-230.


Source

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Sync Input See Configuring synchronization on page 7-100

Device Type Standard: The Autosync mechanism will source GPS synchronization
from the AP’s RJ-11 port, the AP’s power port, or from the device on-
board GPS module.
Remote: The Autosync mechanism will source GPS synchronization
from the AP’s RJ-11 port or from the device on-board GPS module.

Region From the drop-down list, select the region in which the radio is
operating.

Country From the drop-down list, select the country in which the radio is
operating.
Unlike selections in other parameters, your Country selection requires a
Save Changes and a Reboot cycle before it will force the context-
sensitive GUI to display related options (for example, Alternate
Frequency Carrier 1 and 2 in the Configuration > Radio tab).
PMP 450i Series ODUs shipped to the United States is locked to a Region
Code setting of “United States”. Units shipped to regions other than the
United States must be configured with the corresponding Region Code
to comply with local regulatory requirements.
Country Code settings affect the radios in the following ways:
• Maximum transmit power limiting (based on radio transmitter power
plus configured antenna gain)
• DFS operation is enabled based on the configured region code, if
applicable
For more information on how transmit power limiting and DFS is
implemented for each country, see the PMP 450 Planning Guide.

Webpage Auto Enter the frequency (in seconds) for the web browser to automatically
Update refresh the web-based interface. The default setting is 0. The 0 setting
causes the web-based interface to never be automatically refreshed.

Bridge Entry Specify the appropriate bridge timeout for correct network operation
Timeout with the existing network infrastructure. The Bridge Entry Timeout must
be a longer period than the ARP (Address Resolution Protocol) cache
timeout of the router that feeds the network.

Caution
An inappropriately low Bridge Entry Timeout setting may
lead to temporary loss of communication with some end
users.

Translation Bridging Optionally, you can configure the AP to change the source MAC address
in every packet it receives from its SMs to the MAC address of the SM
that bridged the packet, before forwarding the packet toward the public
network. If you do, then:

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Not more than 128 IP devices at any time are valid to send data to the AP
from behind the SM.
SM populates the Translation Table tab of its Statistics web page,
displaying the MAC address and IP address of all the valid connected
devices.
Each entry in the Translation Table is associated with the number of
minutes that have elapsed since the last packet transfer between the
connected device and the SM.
If 128 are connected and another attempts to connect:
If no Translation Table entry is older than 255 minutes, the attempt is
ignored.
If an entry is older than 255 minutes, the oldest entry is removed and the
attempt is successful.
The Send Untranslated ARP parameter in the General tab of the
Configuration page can be:
Disabled, so that the AP overwrites the MAC address in Address
Resolution Protocol (ARP) packets before forwarding them.
Enabled, so that the AP forwards ARP packets regardless of whether it
has overwritten the MAC address.
When this feature is disabled, the setting of the Send Untranslated ARP
parameter has no effect, because all packets are forwarded untranslated
(with the source MAC address intact).

Send Untranslated If the Translation Bridging parameter is set to Enabled, then the Send
ARP Untranslated ARP parameter can be:
Disabled - so that the AP will overwrite the MAC address in Address
Resolution Protocol (ARP) packets before forwarding them.
Enabled - so that the AP will forward ARP packets regardless of whether
it has overwritten the MAC address.
If the Translation Bridging parameter is set to Disabled, then the Send
Untranslated ARP parameter has no effect.

SM Isolation Prevent or allow SM-to-SM communication by selecting from the


following drop-down menu items:
Disable SM Isolation (the default selection). This allows full
communication between SMs.
Block SM Packets from being forwarded - This prevents both
multicast/broadcast and unicast SM-to-SM communication.
Block and Forward SM Packets to Backbone - This not only prevents
multicast/broadcast and unicast SM-to-SM communication but also
sends the packets, which otherwise are handled SM to SM, through the
Ethernet port of the AP.

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Forward Unknown Enabled: All unknown Unicast packets (no entry in the AP’s bridge table)
Unicast Packets received via the AP’s Ethernet LAN interface are forwarded to registered
SMs. If the target device is situated beneath a particular SM, when the
device responds the SM and AP will learn and add the device to their
bridge tables so that subsequent packets to that device is bridged to the
proper SM.
Disabled: All unknown Unicast packets (no entry in the AP’s bridge table)
received via the AP’s Ethernet LAN interface are discarded at the AP.

Update Application Enter the address of the server to access for software updates on this AP
Address and registered SMs.

Prioritize TCP ACK To reduce the likelihood of TCP acknowledgement packets being
dropped, set this parameter to Enabled. This can improve throughput
that the end user perceives during transient periods of congestion on the
link that is carrying acknowledgements. This parameter, when enabled,
can be particularly useful when running bi-direction FTP sessions over
the link. If a link is primarily used for video surveillance, it is
recommended to set this parameter to Disable.

Multicast Destination Using Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP), a module exchanges
Address multicast addresses with the device to which it is wired on the Ethernet
interface. Although some switches (CMM4, for example) do not pass
LLDP addresses upward in the network, a radio can pass it as the value
of the Multicast Destination Address parameter value in the connected
device that has it populated.

DHCP Relay Agent The AP may act as a DHCP relay for SMs and CPEs underneath it. The AP
will make use of the DHCP Option 82 (DHCP Relay Agent Information)
from RFC 3046 when performing relay functions. The AP offers two
types of DHCP relay functionality:
Full Relay Information - Configuring the DHCP Full Relay Operation will
take broadcast DHCP packets and send them to a Unicast server in
unicast mode. This way the DHCP requests and replies can be routed like
any other UDP packet.
Only Insert Option 82 - This option leaves the DHCP request on its
broadcast domain as opposed to DHCP Full Relay Operation which will
turn it into a unicast packet.
In order to accommodate setting up pools or classes for different VLANs,
the Option 82 field will include information to tell the server what VLAN
the client is on.

DHCP Server (Name The DHCP relay server may be either a DNS name or a static IP address
or IP Address) in dotted decimal notation. Additionally, the management DNS domain
name may be toggled such that the name of the DHCP relay server only
needs to be specified and the DNS domain name is automatically
appended to that name. The default DHCP relay server addresses are
255.255.255.255 with the appending of the DNS domain name disabled.

Page 7-75
Chapter 7: Configuration General configuration

Latitude Physical radio location data may be configured via the Latitude,
Longitude Longitude and Height fields.
Latitude and Longitude is measured in Decimal Degree while the Height
Height
is calculated in Meters.

General page - PMP 450m AP


The General page of AP is explained in Table 129.

Table 129 General page attributes –PMP 450m AP

Page 7-76
Chapter 7: Configuration General configuration

Attribute Meaning

Trial Mode This parameter allows to enable or disable Trial mode for radios with a
Limited key. Once the trial key is applied, the 30-day trial can be enabled
or disabled at any time.

For information about remaining attributes, refer Table 128.

Page 7-77
Chapter 7: Configuration General configuration

General page - PMP 450i SM


The General page of PMP 450i SM is explained in Table 130. The General page of PMP 450 SM
looks the same as PMP 450i SM.

Table 130 General page attributes – PMP 450i SM

Attribute Meaning

Link Speeds From the drop-down list of options, select the type of link speed for the
Ethernet connection. The default for this parameter is that all speeds are
selected. The recommended setting is a single speed selection for all
APs and SMs in the operator network.

802.3at Type 2 PoE When the PoE Classification functionality is enabled and if Type 2 power
Status and is not present, the Pas do not power up and draw too much power.
By default, the PoE Classification feature is disabled and the Pas will
PoE Classification
power up regardless of the classification presented by the power source.
This is supported only on 450i series ODUs.
PoE Classification configuration status also can be check under home >
General > Device Information tab:

Page 7-78
Chapter 7: Configuration General configuration

Ethernet Link Specify whether to enable or disable Ethernet/802.3 connectivity on the


Enable/Disable wired port of the SM. This parameter has no effect on the wireless link.
When you select Enable, this feature allows traffic on the Ethernet/802.3
port. This is the factory default state of the port. When you select
Disable, this feature prevents traffic on the port. Typical cases of when
you may want to select Disable include:
The subscriber is delinquent with payment(s).
You suspect that the subscriber is sending or flooding undesired
broadcast packets into the network, such as when
• a virus is present in the subscriber’s computing device.
• the subscriber’s home router is improperly configured.

Region This parameter allows you to set the region in which the radio will
operate.
The SM radio automatically inherits the Region type of the master. This
behavior ignores the value of the Region parameter in the SM, even
when the value is None. Nevertheless, since future system software
releases may read the value in order to configure some other region-
sensitive feature(s), this parameter must be always set to the value that
corresponds to the local region.

Country This parameter allows you to set the country in which the radio will
operate.
The SM radio automatically inherits the Country Code type of the
master. This behavior ignores the value of the Country parameter in the
SM, even when the value is None. Nevertheless, since future system
software releases may read the value in order to configure some other
region-sensitive feature(s), this parameter must be always set to the
value that corresponds to the local region.
PMP/PTP 450i Series ODU shipped to the United States is locked to a
Region Code setting of “United States”. Units shipped to regions other
than the United States must be configured with the corresponding
Region Code to comply with local regulatory requirements.

Webpage Auto See Table 128 General page attributes – PMP 450i AP on page 7-71
Update

Show Idle Sessions This parameter allows to enable or disable displaying idle sessions.

Bridge Entry Specify the appropriate bridge timeout for correct network operation
Timeout with the existing network infrastructure. Timeout occurs when the AP
encounters no activity with the SM (whose MAC address is the bridge
entry) within the interval that this parameter specifies. The Bridge Entry
Timeout must be a longer period than the ARP (Address Resolution
Protocol) cache timeout of the router that feeds the network.

Page 7-79
Chapter 7: Configuration General configuration

Caution
This parameter governs the timeout interval, even if a
router in the system has a longer timeout interval. The
default value of this field is 25 (minutes).
An inappropriately low Bridge Entry Timeout setting may
lead to temporary loss of communication with some end
users.

Bridge Table Size This parameter allows to restrict devices to connect to the SM. It is
configurable from 4 to 4096.

Note
Configure Bridge Table Restriction parameter to Drop packets
if MAC address is not in bridge table option to restrict the
number of devices configured from connecting to SM.

Bridge Table This parameter allows to either allow or restrict devices to connect to
Restriction SM using the following options:
• Drop packets if MAC address is not in bridge table: Select this option
to restrict communication from devices not listed in bridge table.
• Forward packets even if MAC address is not in bridge table: Select
this option to allow communication from any device.

Frame Timing Pulse If this SM extends the sync pulse to a BH master or an AP, select either
Gated Enable—If this SM loses sync from the AP, then do not propagate a sync
pulse to the BH timing master or another AP. This setting prevents
interference in the event that the SM loses sync.
Disable—If this SM loses sync from the AP, then propagate the sync
pulse to the BH timing master or another AP.

Multicast Destination Using Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP), a module exchanges
Address multicast addresses with the device to which it is wired on the Ethernet
interface. Although some switches (CMM4, for example) do not pass
LLDP addresses upward in the network, a radio can pass it as the value
of the Multicast Destination Address parameter value in the connected
device that has it populated.

Coordinates Physical radio location data may be configured via the Latitude,
Longitude and Height fields.

Page 7-80
Chapter 7: Configuration General configuration

General page - PTP 450i BHM


The General page of BHM is explained in Table 131. The General page of PTP 450 BHM looks the
same as PTP 450i BHM.

Table 131 General page attributes – PTP 450i BHM

Page 7-81
Chapter 7: Configuration General configuration

Attribute Meaning

Timing Mode Allows the user to choose the mode between Timing Master and
Timing Slave.

Link Speed See Table 128 General page attributes – PMP 450i AP on page 7-71

802.3at Type 2 PoE When the PoE Classification functionality is enabled and if Type 2
Status and power is not present, the PAs do not power up and draw too much
power.
PoE Classification
By default, the PoE Classification feature is disabled and the PAs will
power up regardless of the classification presented by the power
source.
This is supported only on 450i Series ODUs.
PoE Classification configuration status also can be check under home
> General > Device Information tab:

Sync Input See Configuring synchronization on page 7-100

Region

Country
See Table 128 General page attributes – PMP 450i AP on page 7-71
Webpage Auto Update

Bridge Entry Timeout

Bridging Functionality Select whether you want bridge table filtering active (Enable) or not
(Disable) on this BH.
Disable: allows user to use redundant BHs without causing network
addressing problems. Through a spanning tree protocol, this reduces
the convergence time from 25 minutes to few seconds. However, you
must disable bridge table filtering as only a deliberate part of your
overall network design since disabling it allows unwanted traffic
across the wireless interface.
Enable: Allows user to enable bridge functionality.

Note
Specify the appropriate bridge timeout for correct
network operation with the existing network
infrastructure. The Bridge Entry Timeout must be a
longer period than the ARP (Address Resolution
Protocol) cache timeout of the router that feeds the
network.

Prioritize TCP ACK

Multicast Destination See Table 128 General page attributes – PMP 450i AP on page 7-71
Address

Page 7-82
Chapter 7: Configuration General configuration

Latitude
Longitude
Height

General page - PTP 450i BHS


The General page of PTP 450i BHS is explained in Table 132. The General page of PTP 450 BHS
looks the same as PTP 450i BHS.

Table 132 General page attributes – PTP 450i BHS

Page 7-83
Chapter 7: Configuration General configuration

Attribute Meaning

Timing Mode Allows the user to choose the mode between Timing Master and Timing
Slave.

Link Speed From the drop-down list of options, select the type of link speed for the
Ethernet connection. The default for this parameter is that all speeds are
selected. The recommended setting is a single speed selection for all
BHMs and BHSs in the operator network.

802.3at Type 2 PoE When the PoE Classification functionality is enabled and if Type 2 power
Status and is not present, the PAs do not power up and draw too much power.
By default, the PoE Classification feature is disabled and the PAs will
PoE Classification
power up regardless of the classification presented by the power source.
This is supported only on 450i Series ODUs.
PoE Classification configuration status also can be check under home >
General > Device Information tab:

Region This parameter allows you to set the region in which the radio will
operate.
The BHS radio automatically inherits the Region type of the master. This
behavior ignores the value of the Region parameter in the BHS, even
when the value is None. Nevertheless, since future system software
releases may read the value in order to configure some other region-
sensitive feature(s), this parameter must be always set to the value that
corresponds to the local region.

Country This parameter allows you to set the country in which the radio will
operate.
The BHS radio automatically inherits the Country Code type of the
master. This behavior ignores the value of the Country parameter in the
BHS, even when the value is None. Nevertheless, since future system
software releases may read the value in order to configure some other
region-sensitive feature(s), this parameter must be always set to the
value that corresponds to the local region.
PMP/PTP 450i Series ODU shipped to the United States is locked to a
Region Code setting of “United States”. Units shipped to regions other
than the United States must be configured with the corresponding
Region Code to comply with local regulatory requirements.

Webpage Auto See Table 128 General page attributes – PMP 450i AP on page 7-71
Update

Bridge Entry Specify the appropriate bridge timeout for correct network operation
Timeout with the existing network infrastructure. Timeout occurs when the BHM
encounters no activity with the BHS (whose MAC address is the bridge
entry) within the interval that this parameter specifies. The Bridge Entry
Timeout must be a longer period than the ARP (Address Resolution
Protocol) cache timeout of the router that feeds the network.

Page 7-84
Chapter 7: Configuration General configuration

Caution
This parameter governs the timeout interval, even if a
router in the system has a longer timeout interval. The
default value of this field is 25 (minutes).
An inappropriately low Bridge Entry Timeout setting may
lead to temporary loss of communication with some end
users.

Bridging See Table 128 General page attributes – PMP 450i AP on page 7-71
Functionality

Frame Timing Pulse If this BHS extends the sync pulse to a BH master or an BHM, select
Gated either
Enable—If this BHS loses sync from the BHM, then do not propagate a
sync pulse to the BH timing master or other BHM. This setting prevents
interference in the event that the BHS loses sync.
Disable—If this BHS loses sync from the BHM, then propagate the sync
pulse to the BH timing master or other BHM.

Multicast Destination See Table 128 General page attributes – PMP 450i AP on page 7-71
Address

Latitude See Table 128 General page attributes – PMP 450i AP on page 7-71
Longitude
Height

Page 7-85
Chapter 7: Configuration General configuration

General page - PMP 450b SM


The General page of PMP 450b SM is explained in Table 133. The General page of PMP 450b SM
looks the same as PMP 450i SM.

Table 133 General page attributes – PMP 450b SM

Page 7-86
Chapter 7: Configuration General configuration

Attribute Meaning

Link Speed From the drop-down list of options, select the type of link speed for the
Ethernet connection. The default for this parameter is that all speeds are
selected. The recommended setting is a single speed selection for all
APs and SMs in the operator network.

Ethernet Link Specify whether to enable or disable Ethernet/802.3 connectivity on the


Enabled/Disbaled wired port of the SM. This parameter has no effect on the wireless link.
When you select Enable, this feature allows traffic on the Ethernet/802.3
port. This is the factory default state of the port. When you select
Disable, this feature prevents traffic on the port. Typical cases of when
you may want to select Disable include:
The subscriber is delinquent with payment(s).
You suspect that the subscriber is sending or flooding undesired
broadcast packets into the network, such as when
• a virus is present in the subscriber’s computing device.
• the subscriber’s home router is improperly configured.

Region This parameter allows you to set the region in which the radio will
operate.
The SM radio automatically inherits the Region type of the master. This
behavior ignores the value of the Region parameter in the SM, even
when the value is None. Nevertheless, since future system software
releases may read the value in order to configure some other region-
sensitive feature(s), this parameter must be always set to the value that
corresponds to the local region.

Country This parameter allows you to set the country in which the radio will
operate.
The SM radio automatically inherits the Country Code type of the
master. This behavior ignores the value of the Country parameter in the
SM, even when the value is None. Nevertheless, since future system
software releases may read the value in order to configure some other
region-sensitive feature(s), this parameter must be always set to the
value that corresponds to the local region.
PMP/PTP 450i Series ODU shipped to the United States is locked to a
Region Code setting of “United States”. Units shipped to regions other
than the United States must be configured with the corresponding
Region Code to comply with local regulatory requirements.

Webpage Auto Enter the frequency (in seconds) for the web browser to automatically
Update refresh the web-based interface. The default setting is 0. The 0 setting
causes the web-based interface to never be automatically refreshed.

Page 7-87
Chapter 7: Configuration General configuration

Bridge Entry Specify the appropriate bridge timeout for correct network operation
Timeout with the existing network infrastructure. Timeout occurs when the AP
encounters no activity with the SM (whose MAC address is the bridge
entry) within the interval that this parameter specifies. The Bridge Entry
Timeout must be a longer period than the ARP (Address Resolution
Protocol) cache timeout of the router that feeds the network.

Caution
This parameter governs the timeout interval, even if a
router in the system has a longer timeout interval. The
default value of this field is 25 (minutes).
An inappropriately low Bridge Entry Timeout setting may
lead to temporary loss of communication with some end
users.

Bridge Table Size This parameter allows to restrict devices to connect to the SM. It is
configurable from 4 to 4096.

Note
Configure Bridge Table Restriction parameter to Drop packets
if MAC address is not in bridge table option to restrict the
number of devices configured from connecting to SM.

Bridge Table This parameter allows to either allow or restrict devices to connect to
Restriction SM using the following options:
• Drop packets if MAC address is not in bridge table: Select this option
to restrict communication from devices not listed in bridge table.
Forward packets even if MAC address is not in bridge table: Select this
option to allow communication from any device.

Frame Timing Pulse If this SM extends the sync pulse to a BH master or an AP, select either
Gated Enable—If this SM loses sync from the AP, then do not propagate a sync
pulse to the BH timing master or another AP. This setting prevents
interference in the event that the SM loses sync.
Disable—If this SM loses sync from the AP, then propagate the sync
pulse to the BH timing master or another AP.

Multicast Destination Using Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP), a module exchanges
Address multicast addresses with the device to which it is wired on the Ethernet
interface. Although some switches (CMM4, for example) do not pass
LLDP addresses upward in the network, a radio can pass it as the value
of the Multicast Destination Address parameter value in the connected
device that has it populated.

Page 7-88
Chapter 7: Configuration General configuration

Latitude Physical radio location data may be configured via the Latitude,
Longitude Longitude and Height fields.
Latitude and Longitude is measured in Decimal Degree while the Height
Height
is calculated in Meters.

PMP/PTP 450 Series


Note
Refer Table 128 and Table 130 for PMP 450 AP/SM General page parameters details.

Page 7-89
Chapter 7: Configuration General configuration

General page - PMP 450 AP


Figure 138 General page attributes - PMP 450 AP

Page 7-90
Chapter 7: Configuration General configuration

General page - PMP 450 SM


Figure 139 General page attributes - PMP 450 SM

Page 7-91
Chapter 7: Configuration General configuration

General page – PTP 450 BHM


Figure 140 General page attributes - PTP 450 BHM

Page 7-92
Chapter 7: Configuration General configuration

General page – PTP 450 BHS


Figure 141 General page attributes - PTP 450 BHS

Page 7-93
Chapter 7: Configuration Configuring Unit Settings page

Configuring Unit Settings page

Applicable products PMP:  AP  SM PTP:  BHM  BMS

The Unit Settings page of the 450 Platform Family contains following options:
• Unit-Wide Changes
• Download Configuration File
• Upload and Apply Configuration File (for AP and BHM)
• LED Panel Settings (for SM and BHS)

Note
LED Panel setting is applicable for SM and BHS only.
Upload and Apply Configuration File attributes are not supported for SM and BHS.

The 450 Platform Family also supports import and export of configuration from the
AP/BHM/SM/BHS as a text file. The configuration file is in JSON format. The logged in user must
be an ADMINISTRATOR in order to export or import the configuration file.
The exported configuration file contains the complete configuration including all the default
values. To keep a backup of the current configuration, the file can be saved as-is and imported
later.
The configuration file supports encrypted password. The exported configuration file will contain
encrypted password. The import of configuration can have either encrypted or plain text password
in Configuration fie. A new tab Encrypt the Password is added under Encrypted Password tab to
generate encrypted password for a given password.
The Import and Export procedure of configuration file is described in Import and Export of config
file on page 7-250.
LED Panel Mode has options select Revised mode and Legacy mode. The Legacy mode configures
the radio to operate with standard LED behavior.

Page 7-94
Chapter 7: Configuration Configuring Unit Settings page

Unit Settings page of 450 Platform Family - AP/BHM


The Unit Setting page of AP/BHM is explained in Table 134.

Table 134 Unit Settings attributes – 450 Platform Family AP/BHM

Attribute Meaning

Set to Factory If Enabled is checked, then the default mode functions are enabled.
Defaults Upon When the module is rebooted with Default mode enabled, it can be
Default Mode accessed at the IP address 169.254.1.1 and no password, and all
Detection parameter values are reset to defaults. A subscriber, technician, or other
person who gains physical access to the module and uses an override
cannot see or learn the settings that were previously configured in it.
If Disabled is checked, then the default mode functions are disabled.
See Radio recovery mode on page 1-27

Caution
When Set to Factory Defaults Upon Default Mode is set to
Enable, the radio does not select all of the frequencies for
Radio Frequency Scan Selection List. It needs to be selected
manually.

Undo Unit-Wide When you click this button, any changes that you made in any tab but
Saved Changes did not commit by a reboot of the module are undone.

Page 7-95
Chapter 7: Configuration Configuring Unit Settings page

Set to Factory When you click this button, all configurable parameters on all tabs are
Defaults reset to the factory settings.

Note
This can be reverted by selecting "Undo Unit-Wide Saved
Changes", before rebooting the radio, though this is not
recommended.

Password This allows to provide encrypted password for a given password. On


click of ‘Encrypt the password’ button, the Encrypted Password field will
display encrypted value of entered plain text password in ‘Password’
field.

Configuration File This allows to download the configuration file of the radio. This
configuration file contains the complete configuration including all the
default values. The configuration file is highlighted as downloadable link
and the naming convention is “<mac address of AP>.cfg”.

Apply Configuration This allows to import and apply configuration to the AP.
File Chose File: Select the file to upload the configuration. The configuration
file is named as “<file name>.cfg”.
Upload: Import the configuration to the AP.
Apply Configuration File: Apply the imported configuration file to the AP.
The imported configuration file may either contain a full device
configuration or a partial device configuration. If a partial configuration
file is imported, only the items contained in the file will be updated, the
rest of the device configuration parameters will remain the same.
Operators may also include a special flag in the configure file to instruct
the device to first revert to factory defaults then to apply the imported
configuration.

Status of This section shows the results of the upload.


Configuration file

Page 7-96
Chapter 7: Configuration Configuring Unit Settings page

Unit Settings page of PMP/PTP 450i SM/BHS


The Unit Settings page of PMP/PTP 450i SM/BHS is explained in Table 135.

Table 135 SM Unit Settings attributes

Attribute Meaning

Set to Factory See Table 134 Unit Settings attributes – 450 Platform Family AP/BHM on
Defaults Upon page 7-95
Default Plug
Detection

LED Panel Settings Legacy Mode configures the radio to operate with standard LED
behavior.

Undo Unit-Wide
Saved Changes

Password

Set to Factory See Table 134 Unit Settings attributes – 450 Platform Family AP/BHM on
Defaults page 7-95

Configuration File

Status of
Configuration file

Page 7-97
Chapter 7: Configuration Setting up time and date

Setting up time and date

Time page of 450 Platform Family - AP/BHM


Applicable products PMP:  AP PTP:  BHM

The Time page of 450 Platform Family AP/BHM is explained in Table 136.

Table 136 450 Platform Family - AP/BHM Time attributes

Attribute Meaning

NTP Server (Name The management DNS domain name may be toggled such that the
or IP Address) name of the NTP server only needs to be specified and the DNS domain
name is automatically appended to that name.

NTP Server 1 (Name To have each log in the AP/BHM correlated to a meaningful time and
or IP Address) date, either a reliable network element must pass time and date to the
NTP Server 2 (Name AP/BHM or must set the time and date whenever a power cycle of the
or IP Address) AP/BHM has occurred. A network element passes time and date in any of
the following scenarios:
NTP Server 3 (Name
or IP Address) • A connected CMM4 passes time and date (GPS time and date, if
received).
• A connected CMM4 passes the time and date (GPS time and date, if
received), but only if both the CMMr is operating on CMMr Release
2.1 or later release. (These releases include NTP server functionality.)

Page 7-98
Chapter 7: Configuration Setting up time and date

• A separate NTP server (including APs/BHMs receiving NTP data) is


addressable from the AP/BHM.
If the AP/BHM needs to obtain time and date from a CMM4, or a separate
NTP server, enter the IP address or DNS name of the CMM4 or NTP
server on this tab. To force the AP/BHM to obtain time and date before
the first (or next) 15-minute interval query of the NTP server, click Get
Time via NTP.
The polling of the NTP servers is done in a sequential fashion, and the
polling status of each server is displayed in the NTP Update Log section
of the Time Configuration page. An entry of 0.0.0.0 in any of the NTP
Server fields indicates an unused server configuration.

NTP Server(s) in Use Lists the IP addresses of servers used for NTP retrieval.

Time Zone The Time Zone option may be used to offset the received NTP time to
match the operator’s local time zone. When set on the AP/BHM, the
offset is set for the entire sector SMs (or BHS) are notified of the current
Time Zone upon initial registration). If a Time Zone change is applied,
the SMs (or BHS) is notified of the change in a best effort fashion,
meaning some SMs//BHSs may not pick up the change until the next re-
registration. Time Zone changes are noted in the Event Log of the
AP/BHM and SM/BHS.

System Time The current time used by the system.

Last NTP Time The last time that the system time was set via NTP.
Update

Time This field may be used to manually set the system time of the radio.

Date This field may be used to manually set the system date of the radio.

NTP Update Log This field shows NTP clock update log. It includes NTP clock update Date
and Time stamp along with server name.

Page 7-99
Chapter 7: Configuration Configuring synchronization

Configuring synchronization

Applicable products PMP:  AP PTP:  BHM

This section describes synchronization options for PMP and PTP configuration.
This Sync Input parameter can be configured under Sync Setting tab of Configure > General page
(see General configuration on page 7-71).

PMP/PTP 450i Series has following synchronization options:


• AutoSync
• AutoSync + Free Run
• Generate Sync
• Free Run Before GPS Sync

Figure 142 Sync Setting configuration

AutoSync
For PTP, the BHM automatically receives sync from one of the following sources:
• GPS Sync over Timing Port (UGPS, co-located AP GPS sync output, or “Remote ” Device feed
from a registered SM’s GPS sync output)
• GPS Sync over Power Port (CMM4)
Upon AP/BM power on, the AP/BHM does not transmit until a valid synchronization pulse is
received from one of the sources above. If there is a loss of GPS synchronization pulse, within two
seconds the AP/BHM automatically attempts to source GPS signaling from another source.
In case of PMP, when there are synchronization sources on both the timing port and the power
port, the power port GPS source is chosen first.
If no valid GPS signal is received, the AP/BHM ceases transmission and SM/BHS registration is lost
until a valid GPS signal is received again on the AP or BHM.

Note
After an AP reboot, the sync acquisition takes a little longer than it had on 450i
(anywhere from 40 seconds to 120 seconds difference).

Page 7-100
Chapter 7: Configuration Configuring synchronization

AutoSync + Free Run


This mode operates similarly to mode “AutoSync”, but if a previously received synchronization
signal is lost and no GPS signaling alternative is achieved, the AP/BHM automatically changes to
synchronization mode “Generate Sync”. While SM registration ins maintained, in this mode there
is no synchronization of APs/BHMs that can “hear” each other; the AP/BHM will only generate a
sync signal for the local AP/BHM and its associated SMs/BHS. Once a valid GPS signal is obtained
again, the AP/BHM automatically switches to receiving synchronization via the GPS source and
SM/BHS registration is maintained.
When the Sync Input field is set to Autosync or Autosync + Free Run, other options become
available to be set e.g. UGPS Power and other fields. This is true on APs and BHMs.

Note
In mode AutoSync + Free Run, if a GPS signal is never achieved initially, the system
will not switch to “Free Run” mode, and SMs/BHS will not register to the AP/BHM. A
valid GPS signal must be present initially for the AP to switch into “Free Run” mode
(and to begin self-generating a synchronization pulse).
Also, when an AP/BHM is operating in “Free Run” mode, over a short time it will no
longer be synchronized with co-located or nearby APs/BHMs (within radio range).
Due to this lack of transmit and receive synchronization across APs/BHMs or across
systems, performance while in “Free Run” mode may be degraded until the
APs/BHMs operating in “Free Run” mode regain a external GPS synchronization
source. Careful attention is required to ensure that all systems are properly receiving
an external GPS synchronization pulse, and please consider “Free Run” mode as an
emergency option.

Generate Sync (factory default)


This option may be used when the AP/BHM is not receiving GPS synchronization pulses from
either a CMM4 or UGPS module, and there are no other APs/BHMs active within the link range.
Using this option will not synchronize transmission of APs/BHMs that can “hear” each other; it will
only generate a sync signal for the local AP/BHM and its associated SMs/BHS.

Note
When an AP/BHM has its "Regional Code" set to "None", The radio will not provide
valid Sync Pulse Information.
There is a RED warning that the radio will not transmit, but the user might expect to
see a valid sync if the radio is connected to a working CMM4 or UGPS.

Page 7-101
Chapter 7: Configuration Configuring security

Configuring security

Perform this task to configure the 450 Platform system in accordance with the network operator’s
security policy. Choose from the following procedures:
• Managing module access by password on page 7-103: to configure the unit access password
and access level
• Isolating from the internet on page 7-106: to ensure that APs are properly secured from
external networks
• Encrypting radio transmissions on page 7-106: to configure the unit to operate with AES
wireless link security
• Requiring SM Authentication on page 7-107: to set up the AP to require SMs to authenticate
via the AP, WM, or RADIUS server
• Filtering protocols and ports on page 7-108: to filter (block) specified protocols and ports from
leaving the system
• Encrypting downlink broadcasts on page 7-111: to encrypt downlink broadcast transmissions
• Isolating SMs on page 7-111: to prevent SMs in the same sector from directly communicating
with each other
• Filtering management through Ethernet on page 7-112: to prevent management access to the
SM via the radio’s Ethernet port
• Allowing management only from specified IP addresses on page 7-112: to only allow radio
management interface access from specified IP addresses
• Restricting radio Telnet access over the RF interface on page 7-112: to restrict Telnet access to
the AP
• Configuring SNMP Access on page 7-115
• Configuring Security on page 7-117

Page 7-102
Chapter 7: Configuration Configuring security

Managing module access by password


Applicable products PMP:  AP  SM PTP:  BHM  BMS

See Managing module access by passwords on page 3-43.

Adding a User for Access to a module


The Account > Add User page allows to create a new user for accessing 450 Platform Family -
AP/SM/BHM/BHS. The Add User page is explained in Table 137.

Table 137 Add User page of account page - AP/ SM/BH

Attribute Meaning

User Name User Account name.

Level Select appropriate level for new account. It can be INSTALLER,


ADMINISTRATOR or TECHNICIAN. See Managing module access by
passwords on page 3-43.

New Password Assign the password for new user account

Confirm Password This new password must be confirmed in the “Confirm Password” field.

User Mode User Mode is used to create an account which are mainly used for
viewing the configurations.
The local and remote Read-Only user account can be created by
“Admin”, “Installer” or “Tech” logins. To create a Read-Only user, the
“read-only” check box needs to be checked.

Note
The Read-Only user cannot perform any service impacting operations like creating
read-only accounts, editing and viewing read-only user accounts, changes in login
page, read-only user login, Telnet access, SNMP, RADIUS and upgrade/downgrade.

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Deleting a User from Access to a module


The Account > Delete User page provides a drop-down list of configured users from which to
select the user you want to delete. The Delete User page is explained in Table 138.

Table 138 Delete User page - 450 Platform Family - AP/ SM/BH

Attribute Meaning

User Select a user from drop-down list which has to be deleted and click
Delete button.
Accounts that cannot be deleted are
• the current user's own account.
• the last remaining account of ADMINISTRATOR level.

Changing a User Setting


The Account > Change User Setting page allows to update password, mode update and general
status permission for a user.
From the factory default state, configure passwords for both the root and admin account at the
ADMINISTRATOR permission level, using Update Password tab of Change Users Setting page.
The Change User Setting page is explained in Table 139.

Table 139 Change User Setting page - 450 Platform Family AP/ SM/BH

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Attribute Meaning

Update Password This tab provides a drop-down list of configured users from which a user
tab is selected to change password.

Update Mode tab This tab facilitates to convert a configured user to a Read-Only user.

General Status This tab enables and disables visibility of General Status Page for all
Permission tab Guest users.
To display of Radio data on SMs/BHS main Login page for Guest login, it
can be enabled or disabled in Security tab of Configuration page.

Figure 143 AP Evaluation Configuration parameter of Security tab for


PMP

Figure 144 BHM Evaluation Configuration parameter of Security tab for


PTP

Users account
The Account > Users page allows to view all configured users account for accessing the module.
The Users page is explained in Table 140.

Table 140 User page –450 Platform Family AP/SM/BH

Attribute Meaning

Username User access account name

Permission Permission of configured user – INSTALLER, ADMINISTRATOR or


TECHNICIAN

Mode This field indicate access mode of user – Read-Write or Read-Only.

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Overriding Forgotten IP Addresses or Passwords on AP and SM


See Radio recovery mode on page 1-27

Isolating from the internet – APs/BHMs


Applicable products PMP:  AP PTP:  BHM

See Isolating AP/BHM from the Internet on page 3-41.

Encrypting radio transmissions


Applicable products PMP:  AP  SM PTP:  BHM  BMS

See Encrypting radio transmissions on page 3-41.

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Requiring SM Authentication
Applicable products PMP:  AP  SM

Through the use of a shared AP key, or an external RADIUS (Remote Authentication Dial In User
Service) server, it enhances network security by requiring SMs to authenticate when they register.
For descriptions of each of the configurable security parameters on the AP, see Configuring
Security on page 7-117. For descriptions of each of the configurable security parameters on the
SM, see Security page - 450 Platform Family SM on page 7-125.

Operators may use the AP’s Authentication Mode field to select from among the following
authentication modes:
• Disabled—the AP requires no SMs to authenticate (factory default setting).
• Authentication Server —the AP requires any SM that attempts registration to be authenticated
in Wireless Manager before registration
• AP PreShared Key - The AP acts as the authentication server to its SMs and will make use of a
user-configurable pre-shared authentication key. The operator enters this key on both the AP
and all SMs desired to register to that AP. There is also an option of leaving the AP and SMs at
their default setting of using the “Default Key”. Due to the nature of the authentication
operation, if you want to set a specific authentication key, then you MUST configure the key on
all of the SMs and reboot them BEFORE enabling the key and option on the AP. Otherwise, if
you configure the AP first, none of the SMs is able to register.
• RADIUS AAA - When RADIUS AAA is selected, up to 3 Authentication Server (RADIUS Server)
IP addresses and Shared Secrets can be configured. The IP address(s) configured here must
match the IP address(s) of the RADIUS server(s). The shared secret(s) configured here must
match the shared secret(s) configured in the RADIUS server(s). Servers 2 and 3 are meant for
backup and reliability, not for splitting the database. If Server 1 doesn’t respond, Server 2 is
tried, and then server 3. If Server 1 rejects authentication, the SM is denied entry to the
network, and does not progress trying the other servers.
For more information on configuring the PMP 450 Platform network to utilize a RADIUS server,
see Configuring a RADIUS server on page 7-258.

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Filtering protocols and ports


Applicable products PMP:  AP  SM PTP:  BHM  BMS

The filtering protocols and ports allows to configure filters for specified protocols and ports from
leaving the AP/SM/BHM/BHS and entering the network. See Filtering protocols and ports on page
3-44.

Protocol filtering page of 450 Platform Family AP/BHM


The Protocol Filtering page of 450 Platform Family - AP/BHM is explained in Table 141.
Table 141 AP/BHM Protocol Filtering attributes

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Attribute Meaning

Packet Filter Types For any box selected, the Protocol and Port Filtering feature blocks the
associated protocol type.
To filter packets in any of the user-defined ports, must do all of the
following:
Check the box for User Defined Port n (See Below) in the Packet Filter
Types section of this tab.
In the User Defined Port Filtering Configuration section of this tab:
• provide a port number at Port #n.
• enable TCP and/or UDP by clicking the associated radio button

Filter Direction Operators may choose to filter upstream (uplink) RF packets or


downstream (downlink) RF packets.

User Defined Port You can specify ports for which to block subscriber access, regardless of
Filtering whether NAT is enabled.
Configuration

RF Telnet Access RF Telnet Access restricts Telnet access to the AP/BHM from a device
situated below a network SM/BHS (downstream from the AP/BHM). This
is a security enhancement to restrict RF-interface sourced AP access
specifically to the LAN1 IP address and LAN2 IP address (Radio Private
Address, typically 192.168.101.[LUID]). This restriction disallows
unauthorized users from running Telnet commands on the AP/BHM that
can change AP/BHM configuration or modifying network-critical
components such as routing and ARP tables.

PPPoE PADI Enabled: the AP/BHM allows downstream and upstream transmission of
Downlink PPPoE PADI packets. By default, PPPoE PADI Downlink Forwarding is set
Forwarding to “Enabled”.
Disabled: the AP/BHM disallows PPPoE PADI packets from entering the
Ethernet interface and exiting the RF interface (downstream to the
SM/BHS). PPPoE PADI packets are still allowed to enter the AP’s RF
interface and exit the AP’s /BHM’s Ethernet interface (upstream).

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Protocol filtering page of SM/BHS


The Protocol Filtering page of SM/BHS is explained in Table 142.
Table 142 SM/BHS Protocol Filtering attributes

Attribute Meaning

Packet Filter See Table 141 AP/BHM Protocol Filtering attributes on page 7-108
Configuration tab

User Defined Port See Table 141 AP/BHM Protocol Filtering attributes on page 7-108
Filtering
Configur