Você está na página 1de 49

SECTION 4: 

STEADY‐STATE ERROR
MAE 4421 – Control of Aerospace 
& Mechanical Systems
2 Introduction

K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Introduction 
3

 Consider a simple unity‐feedback system

 The error is the difference between the reference and the output

 The input to the controller, 
 Consider a case where:
 Reference input is a step
 Plant has no poles at the origin – finite DC gain
 Controller is a simple gain block
 In steady state, the forward path reduces to a constant gain:

K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Introduction 
4

 In steady state, we’d like: 
 Output to be equal to the input: 
 Zero steady‐state error:  0
 Is that the case here?

1
1

 No, if  0, then  0
 Non‐zero steady‐state error to a step input for finite 
steady‐state forward‐path gain
 Finite DC gain implies no poles at the origin in  or 
K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Introduction 
5

 Now, allow a single pole at the origin
 An integrator in the forward path
 Now the error is

 For a step input
1 1

 Applying the final value theorem gives the steady‐state error
lim lim 0
→ →

 Zero steady‐state error to a step input when there is an integrator 
in the forward path
K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Introduction 
6

 Next, consider a ramp input to the same system
⋅1 and  

 Now the error is
1 1

 The steady‐state error is
1
lim lim
→ →

 Non‐zero, but finite, steady‐state error to a ramp input 
when there is an integrator in the forward path 
K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Introduction 
7

 Two key observations from the preceding example 
involving unity‐feedback systems:
 Steady‐state error is related to the number of 
integrators in the open‐loop transfer function
 Steady‐state error is related to the type of input

 We’ll now explore both of these observations more 
thoroughly
 First, we’ll introduce the concept of system type

K. Webb MAE 4421
8 System Type and Steady‐State Error

K. Webb MAE 4421
System Type
9

 System Type
The degree of the input polynomial for which the steady‐
state error is a finite, non‐zero constant
 Type 0: finite, non‐zero error to a step input
 Type 1: finite, non‐zero error to a ramp input
 Type 2: finite, non‐zero error to a parabolic input

 For the remainder of this sub‐section, and the one 
that follows, we’ll consider only the special case of 
unity‐feedback systems
K. Webb MAE 4421
System Type – Unity‐Feedback Systems
10

 For unity‐feedback systems, system type is determined by 
the number of integrators in the forward path
 Type 0: no integrators in the open‐loop TF, e.g.:
4
6 4 8
 Type 1: one integrator in the open‐loop TF, e.g.:
15
3 12
 Type 2: two integrators in the open‐loop TF, e.g.:
5
3 7
K. Webb MAE 4421
Types of Inputs
11

 When characterizing a control system’s error performance we focus 
on three main inputs:
 Step 
 Ramp
 Parabola
 We will derive expressions for the steady‐state error due to each

 Step:
 1 ⟷

 For a positioning system, this 
represents a constant position

K. Webb MAE 4421
Types of Inputs
12

 Ramp:
 ⋅1 ⟷

 For a positioning system, this 
represents a constant 
velocity

 Parabola:
 ⋅1 ⟷

 For a positioning system, this 
represents a constant 
acceleration
K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Unity‐Feedback
13

 For unity‐feedback systems steady‐state error can be expressed in 
terms of the open‐loop transfer function, 

 Steady‐state error is found by applying the final value theorem

lim lim
→ → 1

 We’ll now consider this expression for each of the three inputs of 
interest
K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Step Input
14

 For a step input
1
1 ⟷

 Steady‐state error to a step input is
1
lim lim
→ → 1
1
lim
→ 1


K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Step Input
15

1
1 lim

 In order to have  0, as we’d like, we must have
lim ∞

 That is, the DC gain of the open‐loop system must be infinite
 If  has the following form


then 

lim ∞
→ ⋯
and we’ll have non‐zero steady‐state error

K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Step Input
16

 However, consider  of the following form

where 
 That is,  includes  integrators
 It is a type  system
lim ∞ and    0

 A type 1 or greater system will exhibit zero steady‐
state error to a step input
K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Ramp Input
17

 For a ramp input
1
⋅1 ⟷

 Steady‐state error to a ramp input is
1
lim lim
→ → 1
1
lim

1
lim

K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Ramp Input
18

1
lim

 In order to have  0, the following must be true
lim ∞

 If there are no integrators in the forward path, then

lim lim 0
→ → ⋯
and

 A type 0 system has infinite steady‐state error to a ramp 
input
K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Ramp Input
19

 If there is a single integrator in the forward path, i.e. 
a type 1 system 


then 

lim
→ ⋯
and 


 A type 1 system has non‐zero, but finite, steady‐
state error to a ramp input
K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Ramp Input
20

 If there are two or more integrators in the forward 
path, i.e. a type 2 or greater system 

,     2

then 

lim lim ∞
→ → ⋯
and 
0

 A type 2 or greater system has zero steady‐state 
error to a ramp input
K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Parabolic Input
21

 For a Parabolic input
1
⋅1 ⟷
2
 Steady‐state error to a parabolic input is
1
lim lim
→ → 1
1
lim

1
lim

K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Parabolic Input
22

1
lim

 In order to have  0, the following must be true
lim ∞

 If there are no integrators in the forward path, then

lim lim 0
→ → ⋯
and

 A type 0 system has infinite steady‐state error to a 
parabolic input
K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Parabolic Input
23

 If there is a single integrator in the forward path, i.e. 
a type 1 system 


then 

lim 0
→ ⋯
and 

 A type 1 system has infinite steady‐state error to a 
parabolic input

K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Parabolic Input
24

 If there are two integrators in the forward path, i.e. a 
type 2 system 


then 
⋯ ⋯
lim lim
→ → ⋯ ⋯
and 

 A type 2 system has non‐zero, but finite, steady‐state 
error to a parabolic input
K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Parabolic Input
25

 If there are three or more integrators in the forward 
path, i.e. a type 3 or greater system 

,     3

then 

lim lim ∞
→ → ⋯
and 
0

 A type 3 or greater system has zero steady‐state 
error to a parabolic input
K. Webb MAE 4421
26 Static Error Constants

K. Webb MAE 4421
Static Error Constants – Unity‐Feedback
27

 We’ve seen that the steady‐state error to each of the inputs 
considered is
 Step:

 Ramp:

 Parabola:

 The limit term in each expression is the static error constant
associated with that particular input:
 Position constant: lim

 Velocity constant: lim

 Acceleration constant: lim

K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error vs. System Type
28

 Steady‐state error vs. input and system type
System  Input
Type Step Ramp Parabola
0 1
∞ ∞
1
1 1
0 ∞

2 1
0 0

3 0 0 0

 Note that the given steady‐state error is for inputs of 
unit magnitude
 Actual error is scaled by the magnitude of the reference 
input
K. Webb MAE 4421
29 Non‐Unity‐Feedback Systems

K. Webb MAE 4421
Non‐Unity‐Feedback Systems
30

 So far, we’ve focused on the special case of unity‐
feedback systems

 System type determined by # of integrators in the forward 
path – i.e., # of open‐loop poles at the origin
 Steady‐state error determined using static error constants

 Static error constants determined from the open‐loop
transfer function

K. Webb MAE 4421
Non‐Unity‐Feedback Systems
31

 More general approach to determining steady‐state 
error is to use the closed‐loop transfer function
 Applicable to non‐unity‐feedback systems, e.g.:

 The error is

K. Webb MAE 4421
Non‐Unity‐Feedback Systems
32

 Apply the final value theorem to determine the 
steady‐state error:

→ →

 Here, system type is determined by using the more 
general definition:
System type is the degree of the input polynomial for 
which the steady‐state error is a finite, non‐zero constant

K. Webb MAE 4421
Non‐Unity‐Feedback Systems
33

 Alternatively, find steady‐state error by converting to a 
unity‐feedback configuration, e.g.:

 Add and subtract unity‐feedback paths:

K. Webb MAE 4421
Non‐Unity‐Feedback Systems
34

 Combine the two upper parallel feedback paths:

 Collapsing the inner feedback form leaves a unity‐
feedback system
 Can now apply unity‐
feedback error analysis 
techniques
K. Webb MAE 4421
35 Steady‐State Error – Examples 

K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Example 1
36

 What is the steady‐state error to a constant reference input, 
3 ⋅ 1 , for the following feedback positioning system?

 A type 0 system
 Non‐zero error to a constant reference
 Position constant:
lim 10

 Steady‐state error:
1 1
3
1 1 10

0.27
K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Example 1
37

0.27

K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Example 1
38

 What is the same system’s steady‐state error to a unit 
ramp input,  ⋅1 ?
 A type 0 system, so error to a ramp reference will be infinite
 Verify using closed‐loop transfer function
10
1 11
 Steady‐state error is
1 10
lim 1 lim 1
→ → 11
1 1
lim ∞
→ 11

K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Example 1
39

K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Example 2
40

 Design the controller,  , for error of 0.05 to a unit ramp 
input

 Plant is type 0
 Forward path must be type 1 for finite error to a ramp input
 must be type 1, so one very simple option is:

 Forward‐path transfer function is
2
1 5

K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Example 2
41

 The velocity constant is
2 2
lim lim
→ → 1 5 5
 Steady‐state error is
1 5
2
 For error of 0.05:
5
0.05
2
50
K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Example 2
42

0.05

K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Example 3
43

 Next, consider a non‐unity‐feedback system:

 Determine controller gain,  , to provide a 2% steady‐state 
error to a constant reference input
 First, convert to a unity‐
feedback system
 Combine forward‐path blocks
 Simultaneously add and subtract 
unity‐feedback paths

K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Example 3
44

 Combine the top two parallel feedback paths

 Simplifying the inner feedback form leaves a unity‐feedback 
system 

K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Example 3
45

 Steady‐state error for this type 0 system is
1
1
where
20 ⋅
lim 2⋅
→ 10
 For 2% steady‐state error
1
0.02
1 2⋅
 The controller gain is
24.5

K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Example 3
46

 Note that the 
controller gain has 
been set to satisfy 
a steady‐state 
error requirement 
only
 Closed loop poles 
are very lightly‐ 0.02
damped
 Dynamic response 
is likely 
unacceptable

K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Example 4
47

 Now, consider a unity‐feedback system with a disturbance 
input

where
and  

 Determine the controller gain,  , such that error due to a 
constant disturbance is 1% of 
 For this value of  , what is the steady‐state error to a 
constant reference input?
K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Example 4
48

 The total error is given by

1
1
1 1

 Substituting in controller and plant transfer functions 
gives
5 1
5 5
K. Webb MAE 4421
Steady‐State Error – Example 4
49

 Error due to a constant disturbance can be found by applying the 
final value theorem
1
, lim
→ 5
1 1 1
, lim
→ 5 5

 We can calculate the required gain for 1% error
1
, 0.01 ⟶ 95
5
 At this gain value, the error due to a constant reference is
1 5 5
, lim ⟶ 5%
→ 5 100

K. Webb MAE 4421