Você está na página 1de 38

doi:10.5477/cis/reis.156.

97

The New Frontier of Digital Inequality.


The Participatory Divide
La nueva frontera de la desigualdad digital: la brecha participativa

José M. Robles Morales, Mirko Antino, Stefano De Marco and Josep A. Lobera

Key words Abstract


Digital Divide This article focuses on the relationship between digital participation
• Social Inequality and the digital participation divide. The first concept refers to the use
• Internet of the Internet to produce cultural goods that are subsequently shared
• Social Networking on a global scale; the latter, refers to the inequalities generated by the
• Political Participation uneven distribution of these creative uses of the Internet in a given
population. Empirically, our work focuses on the role of digital skills
and sociopolitical attitudes toward the Internet in explaining the digital
participation divide, as they are considered precursors of digital
participation. Results suggest that the same mechanisms that
previously sustained digital divide are now fostering digital
participation divide; however, we argue that the negative social
consequences of this divide exceed those of its predecessor.

Palabras clave Resumen


Brecha digital En este trabajo estudiamos la relación entre participación digital y
• Desigualdad social brecha participativa. Mientras que la participación digital hace
• Internet referencia al uso de Internet por parte de los ciudadanos para producir
• Redes sociales bienes culturales que son posteriormente compartidos a escala global–,
• Participación política la brecha participativa se define como el conjunto de desigualdades
que genera una distribución irregular de estos usos creativos de
Internet. Se examina la brecha participativa desde un enfoque
cuantitativo, prestando especial atención al análisis de la brecha
participativa política. Concluimos que las desigualdades clásicas que
caracterizaban a la brecha digital se trasladan a este nuevo entorno
tecnológico. Sin embargo las consecuencias socialmente negativas de
la brecha participativa exceden a las de su antecesora.

Citation
Robles Morales, José Manuel; Antino, Mirko; De Marco, Stefano y Lobera, Josep A. (2016). «The
New Frontier of Digital Inequality. The Participatory Divide». Revista Española de Investigaciones
Sociológicas, 156: 97-116.
(http://dx.doi.org/10.5477/cis/reis.156.97)

José Manuel Robles Morales: Universidad Complutense de Madrid | jmrobles@ccee.ucm.es


Mirko Antino: Instituto Universitário de Lisboa (UICTE-IUL) and Universidad Complutense de Madrid | mirko.antino@iscte.pt
Stefano De Marco: Universidad Complutense de Madrid | s.demarco@cps.ucm.es
Josep A. Lobera: Universidad Autónoma de Madrid | josep.lobera@uam.es

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, October - December 2016, pp. 97-116
98 The New Frontier of Digital Inequality. The Participatory Divide

Introduction1 To do this, our analysis focuses on a con-


cept recently incorporated into the literature
Over the last decade, experts who study the on the digital divide: the participation divide.
Internet have pointed to the emergence of a Through this concept we analyse the factors
new digital phenomenon playing an impor- that determine the possibilities that citizens
tant role in an emerging process of social have to create digital content (Blank, 2013;
change. This phenomenon has been given Correa, 2010; Hargittai and Walejko, 2008;
various names, digital production (Schradie, Schradie, 2011). In other words, the partici-
2011), peer production (Benkler, 2006), digi- pation divide analyses the inequalities that
tal participation (Hoffman, Lutz and Meckel, lead to an irregular distribution in digital par-
2014), etc., and refers to the possibility indi- ticipation in a given population.
viduals have, thanks to digital technologies, We analyse the participation divide both
to produce cultural content that can later be in general and in one of its specific manifes-
shared worldwide2. One of the common ele- tations: the creation and/or distribution of
ments most emphasised of these uses of the political content, which we refer to as the po-
Internet is that they disturb, if not challenge, litical participation divide. Thus, the political
the vertical structures of production of the participation divide is understood to be a
industrial societies that preceded the net- specific form of the participation divide. We
work society (Benkler, 2006) and empower therefore look at the factors associated with
the citizens that use them (Hoffman, Lutz and use of the Internet to share personalised di-
Meckel, 2014). gital content, as well as the factors that
From a critical standpoint, it is important enable us to understand why certain persons
to examine the extent to which experts’ inter- specifically share political content and others
pretations of these new uses of the Internet do not.
are an idealized projection of the reality they Our hypotheses are the following: i) In
are attempting to describe or a realistic inter- Spain there is an unequal distribution of digi-
pretation based on the information available tal participation, understood as the use of the
(Kreiss, Finn and Turner, 2011). Clearly, this Internet to create and/or transmit digital re-
question is beyond the scope of this study, sources in general and political resources in
however, our intention is to take a step particular; ii) this unequal distribution is asso-
toward understanding up to what point these ciated with a set of variables that are identi-
expectations are well-founded, because, if fiable through empirical methods; of particu-
true, they would represent an important and lar importance are certain sociodemographic
fundamental social innovation. Thus, we exa- variables, digital skills and the beliefs that
mine, using existing empirical information in citizens have about the political possibilities
Spain, the limitations and potential of the ty- of the Internet, and iii) the participation divide
pes of behaviours defined as digital partici- has very significant effects on the fair and
pation . balanced development of the network socie-
ty in Spain.
This article is organised in the following
1 This article has been made possible thanks to Projects way. First, we present our theoretical fra-
Plan Nacional de I+D+I CSO2009-13424 and CSO2012- mework, focusing on the concepts of digital
35688, part of Spain’s National R & D&I Plan.
participation and the participation divide.
2 In this paper we use the term “digital participation” to
more clearly show the relationship between the practices
Next, we carry out an empirical analysis of
described here and the concept of the “participation the factors that generate, first, the participa-
divide”. tion divide and, secondly, the political parti-

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, October - December 2016, pp. 97-116
José M. Robles Morales, Mirko Antino, Stefano De Marco and Josep A. Lobera 99

cipation divide in Spain. In the final section ment and processing of information and
and bringing together our theoretical fra- knowledge. Thus, Benkler (2006) maintains
mework and our empirical findings, we pro- that the technological tools included in
pose a series of conclusions based on the what is referred to as Web 2.0, especially
rise and potential of digital production in the social networks, allow the “citizen-ama-
Spain. teur” to carry out professional activities that
were in the past reserved for organisations.
These activities range from the production
From the information age of goods and services to the creation of
to the network age: digital cultural and political content. The transition
participation from the organisational to the individual is
linked to technological factors such as the
The idea of digital participation can be fra-
democratisation of access to personal
med within a broader socioeconomic pro-
computers, the spread of the use of the In-
cess whose beginnings are described in the
ternet across layers of the population that
pioneering work of Castells, The Information increasingly have intermediate and high le-
Age: Economy, Society and Culture (1997)3 vels of education and, as has been said, the
In this book, Castells explains how in wes- appearance of new types of tools that break
tern societies at the end of the twentieth cen- with the traditional direction between pro-
tury the emergence of a new type of social ducer and consumer: social networks and
organisation took place: informationalism, in the Web 2.0 (Benkler, 2006). In any case,
which the generation, processing and trans- this process of individualisation has been a
mission of information become the funda- central axis of many studies that, from the
mental sources of production and power. very beginning of the discipline of sociolo-
One of the main causes of this transforma- gy, have tried to describe the cultural chan-
tion was the emergence of information and ges affecting western societies (Zabludovs-
communications technologies. In the social ky, 2013).
structure described by Castells (1997), orga-
The key issue for Benkler in The Wealth of
nization, whether political, social or econo-
Networks (2006) is that the economy that is
mic, continues playing a key role. Thus, Cas-
emerging as a result of the changes pointed
tells (1997) emphasises how the network
to above is based on a collaborative, non-
enterprise, new social movements and states
proprietary system (not based on the idea of
themselves are transformed into central
the market). From his point of view, the re-
agents in the new society to the extent that,
duction of the costs of production and of or-
thanks to digital technologies, they are able
ganisation that is generated by the digital
to generate, process and transmit informa-
tools of the Web 2.0 allows individuals to
tion and knowledge.
produce goods without expecting physical
The most important aspect of recent compensation or rights of authorship. In
contributions to this debate is the important addition, the ease of coordination and inte-
role of the individualisation of the manage- raction offered by these digital services
strengthens a collaborative system worldwi-
de. This economic transformation from the
3  This summary of the classical studies of the network point of view of Benkler and others repre-
society and knowledge society is not a comprehensive
analysis of these studies or of the development of this sents the foundation for a significant process
field. Our goal here is solely, based on key references, of social change.
to introduce certain central concepts. For this reason
that we do not discuss, but only summarize, the details This social change affects different
of these works. spheres, such as the cultural system and its

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, October - December 2016, pp. 97-116
100 The New Frontier of Digital Inequality. The Participatory Divide

system of values (Jenkins, 2006), the infor- This effect of the Internet on politics is not
mation system (Sampedro, 2014) and the limited to political participation but also rea-
political system, which is one of the objec- ches into conventional politics. Thus, Ward
tives of this study. The social production of and Gibson (2009) have introduced the term,
political content is one of the most impor- disintermediation, to describe the process by
tant areas among those mentioned here, as which the internet reduces the weight of tra-
it generates results that have attained great ditional political organisations that had
diffusion both socially and academically amassed great power and the emergence of
(Surowiecki, 2004; Rheingold, 2003; Ben- citizen groups organised through the Internet
nett and Sergerberg, 2012). Concretely, (Wring and Horrocks, 2001).
Castells (2015) places the use of digital
As a consequence of all of the above,
tools at the centre of political change, ma-
Shirky (2008a) and Benkler and Nissenbaum
king possible a new “mass self-communi-
(2006) have introduced an anthropological
cation” and new global protest movements,
dimension associated with this process of
such as though that emerged in Tunisia,
social change. The latter authors argue, for
Iceland, Egypt, Spain, the United States,
example, that “the emergence of peer pro-
Turkey and Brazil. Thus, political participa-
duction offers an opportunity for more peo-
tion is rapidly evolving globally thanks to
ple to engage in practices that permit them
new digital technologies that permit “a fun-
to exhibit and experience virtuous behavior”
damental mechanism of power-making in
(Benkler and Nissenbaum, 2006, 394). The
the network society: switching power”
first of these civic virtues that this form of
(Castells, 2015:29).
production has generated is independence
Bennett and Segerberg (2012) carried and autonomy; that is, the possibility of ma-
out a series of studies looking at the political king decisions about our own lives and ha-
uses of the Internet and its effect on political
ving independence with respect to any form
protest actions. One of these effects is the
of authority. Along the same lines, these fos-
transformation from a logic of collective ac-
ter the development of the economy descri-
tion (Olson, 1978) to a logic of connective
bed in The Wealth of Networks (Benkler,
action in which citizens participate in an in-
2006), which favours other civic virtues such
dividualised yet coordinated way through
as creativity, social participation, altruism
social networks. According to the authors,
and cooperation.
this form of participation does not require a
shared group identity or organisation that In short, whether in instrumental terms
can respond to opportunities for action. In (social, economic and political participation)
other words, the Internet reduces the impor- or ethical terms (strengthening virtues), digi-
tance traditionally attributed to organisa- tal participation and peer production are ge-
tions and identity in explaining processes of nerating a positive scenario by increasing the
citizen political participation (Laraña, 1999). repertoire of action available to citizens, their
The other key element in their analysis is the ways to express demands, participation in
emergence of a new logic of connective ac- the economic sphere and stimuli connecting
tion, based on sharing personalised content individuals to virtuous practices. In our opi-
through digital networks (Bennett and Se- nion this is a highly desirable scenario.
gerberg, 2012). From this point of view, the However, at the same time, we believe it is
Internet becomes an arena for political so- essential to analyse how social, economic
cialisation in which citizens produce content and political inequalities are manifested in
and/or diffuse it to express their support or this scenario, and their negative effects on
opposition to certain causes. the potential of this process.

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, October - December 2016, pp. 97-116
José M. Robles Morales, Mirko Antino, Stefano De Marco and Josep A. Lobera 101

From the digital divide to the degree certain uses of Internet generate
participation divide competitive advantages for their users (Dijk,
2005). These types of uses of the Internet
From its beginnings, the study of the rapid in- have been termed  beneficial and advan-
troduction of the Internet into society has been ced  uses of the Internet (BAUI). From this
accompanied by both academic and social perspective, digital inequality is the result of
concerns over the potentially negative effects the difference between citizens that make
of this process. Thus, the term digital divide use of these types of Internet services and
was coined in the 1990s to refer to “the gap tools and those citizens who do not have the
between those who do and those who do not resources to do so (DiMaggio and Hargittai,
have access to new forms of information tech- 2001). The central idea is to analyze the fac-
nology” (Dijk, 2006: 221). This original ap- tors that explain why a particular person is in
proach to the digital divide was mainly focused a position to transform the possibilities offe-
on the differences in levels of access to new red by the Internet into opportunities to im-
information and communications technologies prove his or her life (DiMaggio and Hargittai,
among different populations. 2001; Dijk, 2013). Here, evidence was found
This traditional perspective was criticised of the importance of a set of variables related
by some authors who, like Jan van Dijk to capacities to manage the Internet: digital
(2006), noted that the idea of a digital divide skills (DiMaggio et al., 2004; Deursen and
proposed a division that was too simplistic, Dijk, 2009). The different concepts of digital
between two population groups (individuals divide and digital inequality are in our opinion
with and without access), and that “access strongly determined by the context of the net-
to Internet” did not mean “use of Internet”. work and knowledge society (Castells, 1997).
As a result, from this moment onwards, ex- In that context, the Internet user is understood
perts turned their attention to factors explai- to be a person who uses the Internet to ac-
ning why certain individuals make use of cess information or resources that, in the case
these types of technologies. This new un- of the BAUIs, can be useful and beneficial.
derstanding of the digital divide revealed that This understanding of the Internet user is far
differences in the use of the Internet are de- from that adopted in The Wealth of Networks
termined by social factors (Hoffman et al., (Benkler, 2006). As we have seen in Benkler’s
2001; Bimber, 2000; Bonfadelli, 2002). work, the internet user is an individual that not
Until then, academic interest had focused only consumes but also produces and shares
on the factors that motivate some individuals the result of his or her labour through the In-
and not others to enter into this new world ternet.
the Internet was opening up. This approach, The concept of a participation divide in-
typical of the first stages in the study of tech- volves an adaptation of the principles and
nological change (Norris, 2001), changed ideas that articulate the study of the digital
when empirical studies began to show a de- divide to the context of peer production.
cline in the digital divide in virtually all dimen- The participation divide refers to social in-
sions pointed out in early studies (Torres, equalities in the production of digital con-
Robles y De Marco, 2013). In a context of tent4 (Blank, 2013; Correa, 2010; Hargittai &
very high rates of Internet penetration and a
clear decline in the digital divide, experts be-
gan to consider the importance of the Inter- 4  Itis in this sense that the concept of participation di-
net “for what”. vide is different from other similar concepts, such as the
digital divide 2.0 or citizens 2.0. While these refer to the
One of the most interesting studies along possibilities to access content that could potentially
these lines was aimed at analysing to what strengthen personal or collective development, the par-

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, October - December 2016, pp. 97-116
102 The New Frontier of Digital Inequality. The Participatory Divide

Walejko, 2008; Schradie, 2011).This idea is Experts have stressed different causes
not new in the literature, as in 2003 Jan van in explaining the participation divide. For
Dijk noted that some of the principle adver- example, Hargittai and Walejko (2008)
se effects of the digital divide would be that showed that gender is fundamental in pre-
citizens who use the Internet would be more dicting the content of Internet users’ crea-
socially integrated and participate more in tions; while Schradie (2011) showed that
community, economic and political activities age is a fundamental barrier for citizen par-
than citizens that do not use this technolo- ticipation on the Internet: the younger indi-
gy. After Benkler’s analysis in 2006, this idea viduals are, the more likely they are to crea-
became fundamental. The participation di- te digital content. Correa (2010) tried to
vide emphasises inequality, not in the con- explain the participation divide based on
sumption of information and knowledge, but variables such as the subjective utility of
in the different possibilities citizens have to these types of practices. Other studies have
express themselves and participate in any revealed the importance material resources
social sphere in a proactive way; that is, and communications infrastructure have in
through the creation of content and its dis- facilitating these uses of the Internet,
tribution. Jan van Dijk (2013:33) identified a showing that access to the Internet from di-
causal chain generating the digital divide fferent devices increases the likelihood that
and the participation divide: 1) categorical an Internet user will create digital content
inequalities present in society lead to an (Hassani, 2006).
unequal distribution of resources; 2) this Our work is focused on the study of the
unequal distribution of resources – combi- factors that allow us to predict the partici-
ned with the characteristics of different te- pation divide, in general, and specifically,
chnologies – leads to an unequal access to
that affect the creation and distribution of
digital technologies; 3) the unequal access
political content. To do this, we have exami-
to digital technologies leads to unequal par-
ned a broad number of variables that the
ticipation in society; 4) unequal participation
literature discussed above points to as im-
in society reinforces the categorical inequa-
portant. Thus, our objective is to understand
lities and unequal distribution of resources.
which of these variables are, in the case of
We find different areas where the partici- Spain, the most helpful in understanding
pation divide is evident. According to Hoff- this phenomenon. However, we aim to go a
man, Lutz and Meckel (2014), studies on the step further and discuss, based on our em-
participation divide have focused on specific pirical findings, the consequences of the
areas: political participation, the economy existence of a participation divide affecting
and business, cultural participation, educa- the opportunities of Spanish citizens.
tion and health. According to Rice and Fuller
(2013), one of the areas most studied is, sig-
nificantly, the area we are analysing here:
how the participation divide affects the poli- An Approach to the
tical sphere. However, and given the recent Participation Divide in Spain
appearance of the concept, we do not yet
have a body of definitive and conclusive fin- According to the Survey on Equipment and
dings (Hargittai & Walejko, 2008). Use of Information and Communication Te-
chnologies (ICT) in Households (2014) ca-
rried out by Spain’s National Statistics Ins-
ticipation divide specificallty refers to capacities and titute, 46% of Spanish citizens “post”
possibilities to produce content. content on the Internet they produced

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, October - December 2016, pp. 97-116
José M. Robles Morales, Mirko Antino, Stefano De Marco and Josep A. Lobera 103

Graph 1.  Sharing own content on the Internet by sociodemographic variables

Net monthly income of household they belong to: more than 2,500
Net monthly income of household they belong to: from 1,601 to 2,500
Net monthly income of household they belong to: from 901 to 1,600
Net monthly income of household they belong to: less than 900
Education level: doctorate
Education level: bachelor's degree, masters and equivalent
Education level: 2 year degree and equivalent
Education level: advanced vocational training
Education level: second stage of secondary education
Education level: obligatory secondary education
Education level: primary school
Education level: no formal education and incomplete primary school
Age: from 65 to 74 years of age
Age: from 55 to 64
Age: from 45 to 54
Age: from 35 to 44
Age: from 25 to 34
Age: from 16 to 24
Women
Men

Source: Based on Survey on Equipment and Use of Communication and Information Technologies in Households (INE, 2014).

themselves. As shown in graph 1, the varia- Data


bles that seem to affect the participation
divide are those commonly used to explain To achieve our objectives, we have used data
the digital divide and digital inequality. The- from the survey on Equipment and Use of In-
formation and Communication Technologies
se are age and education level. However,
(ICT) in Households (2014). The survey sam-
both gender and economic resources also
ple is representative of the Spanish popula-
seem to have an effect – although not as
tion, both sexes, from 16 to 74 years of age,
strong – on this type of digital behaviour.
who reside in households in Spain. One per-
Unfortunately, this survey does not con- son, previously selected by computerized ran-
tain data on the type of content shared. This dom sampling, was interviewed in each hou-
would have allowed us to refine the above sehold surveyed. The sample design is based
general description. However, in order to on taking as reference all Spanish territory and
advance our understanding of the general applying a three-stage sampling method5.
sources of the participation divide, we have For the present analysis, we have chosen
carried out a path analysis in which we have to include only Internet users; that is, sub-
used as our independent variables, com-
mon sociodemographic variables used in
the study of the digital divide and digital 5 For more information on the survey: http://www.ine.es/
dyngs /INEbase/es/operacion.htm c=Estadistica_C&cid=
skills, the central factor in analysing digital 1254736176741&menu=metodologia&i
inequality. dp=1254735976608

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, October - December 2016, pp. 97-116
104 The New Frontier of Digital Inequality. The Participatory Divide

TABLE 1.  List of indicators that compose the "digital skills" scale

Copy or move files or folders


Use copy or cut and paste
Use simple arithmetic formulas (spread sheet)
Compress files
Computer tasks Connect to or install devices
carried out in the last
three months Write a programme
Transfer files between devices and the computer
Modify the configuration of applications (ex: Internet browser)
Create digital presentations
Install or change operating systems

Email
Sending chat messages, social network messaging, etc.
Internet services
used in the last three Reading or downloading news, newspapers, online journals
months
Looking for information on goods and services
Electronic banking
Ecommerce
Source: Survey on Equipment and Use of Communication and Information Technologies in Households (INE, 2014).

jects who had used the Internet within the once a month). Thus, a scale is obtained with
three months prior to the interview. This re- values ranging between 0 and 2 (maximum
sulted in a total sample of 8,452 individuals. creative use and maximum connection), and
This decision was made in order to overcome that includes five other variables between the
the simple dichotomy between user and non- two extremes.
user, and in this way study the effect of cer- The first group of independent variables
tain variables on creative uses of the Internet. gathers sociodemographic information on
the subjects interviewed. Concretely, becau-
Variables se of the significant role they have played in
For the dependent variable, we have cons- previous empirical studies on the digital divi-
tructed a scale based on the ratio of the sum de, we have included in this group age
of positive responses to the variables that (numerical variable), employment status (or-
collect information on the creative uses of dinal variable) and education level (ordinal
the Internet (maximum 2) and the frequency variable). These three variables have been
of Internet use. The variables referring to taken directly from the National Statistics
creative uses of the Internet are: posting Institute survey and the categories that make
one’s own content to be shared and creating up the last two are:
and/or maintaining one’s own web-pages or Employment status: economically active
blogs. The variable measuring frequency of (self-employed and employee), unemployed,
use is an ordinal variable and ranges from 1 students, homemaker (which also includes
(connects daily) to 4 (connects less than persons carrying out “volunteer work”) and

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, October - December 2016, pp. 97-116
José M. Robles Morales, Mirko Antino, Stefano De Marco and Josep A. Lobera 105

pensioners (retirees and permanently disa- al. 2010). Consequently, the results indicate
bled). that this model does fit the data matrix and,
Education level: no education, primary therefore, is considered valid.
education, first level of secondary education, In addition, the regression coefficients,
second level of secondary education, upper presented in Table 2, show that all the rela-
level vocational training and higher educa- tionships proposed in the model are signifi-
tion. cant: the effect of the 3 sociodemographic
In addition to these sociodemographic va- variables is mediated by digital skills. In the
riables, we have also included digital skills as case of age, this mediation is partial, since
an independent variable in this study because this variable also has a direct effect on the
of its importance and centrality in the study of creative uses of the Internet. In both cases,
digital inequalities. To measure this variable age has a negative relationship.
we have constructed a scale based on 16 di- In short, thanks to our analysis, we know
chotomous ítems6. Of these, ten refer to com- that “posting one’s own content on the Inter-
puter tasks carried out by the interviewee in net to be shared” is an activity closely linked
the previous three months, these are included to the sociodemographic factors introduced
because certain digital skills are propaedeutic in our model. This reaffirms the findings from
or preparatory for Internet use (Dijk, 2006). other studies outside of Spain (Correa, 2010;
The other six indicators are linked to the Inter- Schradie, 2011). However, we also observed
net services used by the interviewee in the that the digital skills variable mediates bet-
previous three months. In table 1, we have ween these factors and creative uses of the
included the list of indicators that compose Internet, in this way becoming the chain of
the “digital skills” scale. transmission of traditional inequalities (status
and education level) into the digital world. To
Results summarise, thanks to our study, we know
With the selected variables, we have imple- that the participation divide, understood in
mented a model of path analysis that inclu- general terms, is closely linked to the factors
des the mediation of digital skills between that allow us to predict the digital divide.
the sociodemographic variables and creative However, as we will examine in the conclu-
uses of the Internet. This structure is based sions, the social results of different types of
on various empirical studies which have digital inequality differ noticeably.
shown that digital skills function as a trans-
mission chain between sociodemographic
factors (age, education level, economic re- The political participation divide
sources, etc.) and inequalities in Internet use in spain: an analysis of the
(Authors, 2013). Thus, the test model takes political use of social networks
the following form (figure 1):
Our analysis of the political participation di-
The adjustment indices obtained by the vide in Spain is focused on one concrete be-
implementation of the analysis meet the cri- haviour: sharing political material (texts, pho-
teria for the acceptance of the model (Ruiz et tos or videos) on social networks. Thanks to
a survey carried out through a project7 fun-

6 The scale was built based on a factorial analysis. Gi-


ven the dichotomous nature of the variables used, we
7 The technical data from this survey will be provided in
decided to use an analysis based on polychoric matrices.
The rotation chosen is oblimin. Main results. Determinant the following section in the description of the empirical
= 0.005; Bartlett index (P = 0.000010); KMO Test = 0.916 work carried out specifically for this article.

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, October - December 2016, pp. 97-116
106 The New Frontier of Digital Inequality. The Participatory Divide

figure 1.  Model of participatory divide in Spain

Status

Education Skills Sharing content

Age

Source: by authors.

ded by Spain’s Ministry of Science and Inno- of 1,526 subjects were interviewed, and the
vation, we know that 20.1% of Internet users sample was stratified by habitat and autono-
in Spain have at some time posted political mous region, and distributed proportionally
images on social networks such as Face- in relation to the each region’s total popula-
book or Twitter. A slightly higher percentage, tion. Age and gender quotas were applied to
24.3%, have shared statements, texts or the final unit (the person interviewed). Based
quotes (whether their own or others) through on the criteria of simple random sampling for
social networks. Regarding sharing videos a confidence level of 95.5% (which is usually
with political content, this is less common in adopted) and in the worst case scenario of
Spain. Approximately 15% of Spanish Inter- maximum indetermination (p = q = 50), the
net users have done this at one time or margin of error of the data referring to the
another. As can be seen in graph 2, these total sample is ± 2.6.
types of practices are more common among
young people, among men more than wo- Variables and measures employed
men and among individuals fewer economic
resources. Dependent variable: political participation di-
vide (creation and distribution of political
Once we have described the general cha-
content on social networks).
racteristics of the penetration of the beha-
viour we want to analyze, we will move on to To construct the user profile we used the
a more detailed analysis of the factors that subscale of digital political participation in
allow us to predict the political participation social networks (an instrument developed by
divide in Spain. As in the study of the general authors, under review) and made up of 3
participation divide, we use as independent items (Cronbach’s Alpha index = .82). These
variables those factors examined in the lite- items are: sharing texts of political content
rature and recounted in the theoretical sec- on digital social networks, sharing photos of
tion of this article. political content on digital social networks
and sharing videos of political content on di-
gital social networks. We chose those sub-
Data
jects who did not share political content on
To carry out this objective, we have used social networks. This variable finally only in-
data from a representative survey of the Spa- cludes two values, having or not having this
nish population, part of a Ministry of Science profile. In the sample studied, of the 1,526
and Innovation research project. The inter- subjects, those who did not use Internet
views were conducted through CATI. A total were excluded (for not having the possibility

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, October - December 2016, pp. 97-116
José M. Robles Morales, Mirko Antino, Stefano De Marco and Josep A. Lobera 107

TABLE 2.  Adjustment indices

Value
Statistic Abbreviation Criterion
obtained

Comparative fit

  Comparative Fit Idex CFI >0.9 0.99


  Tucker-Lewis Index TLI >0.9 0.968
  Normed fit Index NFI >0.9 0.99

Normalised Fit

  Parsimony Normed Fit Index PNFI Close to 1 0.297

Others

  Goodness of Fit Index GFI >0.9 0.997


  Adjusted Goodness of Fit Index AGFI >0.9 0.985
  Root Mean Square Residual RMR Close to 0 0.049
  Root Mean Square Error of Approximation RMSEA <0.08 0.288
Source: Based on Survey on Equipment and Use of Communication and Information Technologies in Households (INE, 2014).

of putting in practice acts of digital political Education level: As with the preceding varia-
participation) and of those remaining, 71.2% ble, we used the scale developed and re-
of the subjects had this profile. commended by the INE.

Second block of variables: sociodemogra- Second block of variables:


phic variables. technological variables.

Status: We used the scale developed and re- Digital skills: To measure this variable, we de-
commended by Spain’s National Statistics veloped our own scale, consisting of 14 items,
Institute (INE). whose reliability, estimated by Cronbach’s

TABLE 3.  Regression coefficients

      B S.E. Beta P

Digital skills <--- Education 0.192 0.006 0.341 ***

Digital skills <--- Age -0.026 0.001 -0.346 ***

Digital skills <--- Status 0.028 0.002 0.147 ***

Creative uses <--- Digital skills 0.238 0.006 0.376 ***

Creative uses <--- Age -0.01 0 -0.216 ***

Source: Based on Survey on Equipment and Use of Communication and Information Technologies in Households (INE, 2014).

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, October - December 2016, pp. 97-116
108 The New Frontier of Digital Inequality. The Participatory Divide

Graph 2. Sharing of videos, photos or text with political content on social networks by sociodemographic
variables

Status: low

Status: middle-low

Status: middle

Status: middle-high

Status: high

Sex: woman

Sex: man

Age: from 60 to 74

Age: from 45 to 59

Age: from 30 to 44

Age from 16 to 29

Videos with political content Photos with political content Text with political content

Source: Based on survey carried out as part of the R&D project CSO2009-13424.

Alpha, was equal to = .79. This scale is incor- survey on “Equipment and Use of Informa-
porated, as are all the variables used in this tion and Communication Technology in hou-
section, in the survey of the Ministry of Scien- seholds”. This variable measures the type
ce and Innovation. The 14 items are arranged and variety of connections to Internet a user
hierarchically by difficulty of use. Thus, digital has. Thus, it asks if the respondent has a
skills are measured through a scale where the connection to Internet via cable, Wifi, etc.
simplest action would be “opening the brow- According to the literature, the quality and
ser” and the most complex, “programming in stability of the Internet connection is an im-
HTML”. portant factor for a more extensive and inten-
sive use of the Internet (Howard et al. 2002).
Independence of use: This variable is cons-
tructed similarly to that used by the INE to Third block of variables: Attitudinal variables
measure the ability of citizens to use the In- Post materialistic values: To measure this va-
ternet in different places and at any time. It riable, we used the scale developed by the
asks directly if the respondent has used the World Values Survey (www.worldvaluessur-
Internet in various places such as at home, vey.org) consisting of 6 items, whose reliabi-
at work, in a cyber cafe, etc. According to the lity, estimated by Cronbach’s Alpha, was
literature, this possibility allows greater com- equal to = .88).
plexity in the use of the Internet and applica-
tions (Hassani, 2006). Social capital: To measure this variable, we
used the scale developed by Norris (2001),
Infrastructure: This variable has also been consisting of 26 items, whose reliability esti-
constructed taking as a reference the INE mated by Cronbach’s Alpha was .82.

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, October - December 2016, pp. 97-116
José M. Robles Morales, Mirko Antino, Stefano De Marco and Josep A. Lobera 109

Perceived utility: To measure this variable, we Analysis of the data


used the scale developed by Malhotra and
To test our hypotheses, we have applied a
Galletta (1999), consisting of 6 items, whose
hierarchical logistic regression model. This
reliability estimated by Cronbach’s Alpha
technique allows us to predict a dichoto-
was .85. Thanks to this scale we can measu-
mous dependent variable.
re if respondents feel that the Internet is a
tool that allows them to solve the problems
and meet the needs they have. Results

Perceived ease of use: To measure this varia- The logistic regression model had an accep-
ble, we used the scale developed by Malho- table, if not optimal, fit (something expected,
tra and Galletta (1999), consisting of 4 items, considering the complexity of the model and
whose reliability estimated by Cronbach’s the peculiarity of the profile studied); it
alpha was .74. In this scale, respondents are allowed classification of 69% of subjects into
asked whether or not they consider the Inter- the third block, with an adjustment of 0.164
net to be an accessible tool in terms of ease (estimated with Nagelkerke’s R2).
of use.
TABLE 4. Summary of logistic regression model
(third block)
Sociopolitical perceptions of the Internet: This
variable is constructed based on our own Cox and
Maximum Nagelkerke R
scale from 1 to 7 in which respondents were Step Snell R
likelihood log -2 square
square
asked to what extent they agreed or disa-
greed with a set of statements about the poli- 1 448,843a 0.112 0.164
tical possibilities of the Internet. For this study, Source: Based on survey carried out as part of the R&D
project CSO2009-13424.
two items were selected: concretely, the Inter-
net strengthens social ties and the Internet
TABLE 5. Classification indices of the logistic
can improve the capacity to influence power.
regression model (third block)
Predicted
This last variable is, as we shall see, of Do not use
particular importance for our analysis of the Observed social networks Corrected
percentage
political participation divide. Overall, we 0.00 1.00
found that empirical studies on the relation- No use of 0.00 13 101 11.4
ship between attitudes and political uses of social
1.00 16 305 95.0
the Internet use variables measuring general networks
political attitudes, such as trust in institutions Overall percentage 73.1
or interest in politics (Borge and Cardinal, a. Cut off value is .500
2011). However, we believe that, given the Source: Based on survey carried out as part of the R&D
characteristics of the digital medium, it is a project CSO2009-13424.

prerequisite that citizens perceive the Inter-


net as a tool that enables them to act politi- As shown in table 6, of the predictors in-
cally. From our point of view, without this cluded in the model, only two proved to be
attitudinal prerequisite, it is not possible to significant. Specifically, the odds ratio asso-
embark on a path that leads a given citizen ciated with the predictor, “digital skills”, in-
to engage in digital political practices. In this forms us that greater independence in Internet
article we analyze the extent to which socio- use by participants in the study is associated
political attitudes toward the Internet are a with a decrease in the advantage of having the
factor facilitating its political use. profile studied (odds ratio = 0.882, p <.05).

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, October - December 2016, pp. 97-116
110 The New Frontier of Digital Inequality. The Participatory Divide

Similarly, the odds ratio associated with the in our study, the participation divide is a ge-
predictor, “sociopolitical perception of the In- nerational phenomenon; the older a person
ternet”, informs us that a more sociopolitical is, the more likely he/she is to not engage in
perception of the Internet by participants in these practices and, therefore, their partici-
the study is associated with a decrease in the pation in the creation and enrichment of the
advantage of having the profile studied (odds Internet will be lesser. This, as described
ratio = .898, p <.05). In short, our model helps above, occurs directly and unlike the other
explain the proposed profile. sociodemographic factors examined, is not
mediated by digital skills.
What makes digital participation distinc-
Conclusions tive is that it describes a new technological
Our empirical study has made it possible to scenario in which citizens are no longer pas-
sive actors but are transformed into pro-ac-
test the hypotheses made at the beginning of
tive agents; that is, persons who collaborate
this article. Now we know that digital partici-
in building their digital environment. Accor-
pation is unevenly distributed in the Spanish
ding to the literature, this participation em-
population. The percentage of young per-
powers citizens to the extent that it gives
sons and persons with higher education le-
them independence from the powers that
vels who use the Internet is significantly hig-
have traditionally been the creators of cultu-
her than the percentage of those with the
ral content (Benkler, 2006). However, this
opposite characteristics. This implies that
new step in the development of the network
there is a participation divide problem affec-
society faces the same problems that initially
ting the current development of the network
affected the penetration of Internet use (digi-
society in Spain.
tal divide) and then the equal distribution of
The path analysis carried out reveals that, uses of the (BAUI).
in addition, the participation divide is statis-
As we have seen in our review of the lite-
tically related to sociodemographic factors
rature, the digital divide seems to be a phe-
such as status, education level and age.
nomenon destined to disappear. However,
However, while the first two factors have an
the same is not occurring, at least at present,
impact on digital participation through their
with digital inequality. The differences bet-
relationship to digital skills, age has a direct
ween individuals who use and do not use the
impact on this behaviour.
Internet services and tools that generate
As various studies have shown, “digital competitive advantages do not seem to be
skills” are key to understanding inequalities decreasing significantly in Spain (Authors,
in the network society, as they are a chain of 2013). Will it be the same with the participa-
transmission between traditional forms of in- tion divide? This is a question that must be
equality, the uneven distribution of economic studied in the future. However, we would
(status) and educational resources, and the venture to speculate that just as with the ad-
possibilities citizens have to participate in the vantageous uses of the Internet, digital par-
new social context. Thus, the conjunction ticipation depends on a series of educational
between middle/low education level and a and digital requirements that only certain
low level of ability to manage the Internet, as social groups meet. Thus, empowerment
well as middle/low status and the lack of di- through digital participation will affect to a
gital skills, transform into the central basis of greater degree those groups that are in a bet-
the participation divide. ter position socially, producing in this way an
Another important factor in this type of imbalance that will affect key areas such as
digital inequality is the role of age. As shown politics and the economy.

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, October - December 2016, pp. 97-116
José M. Robles Morales, Mirko Antino, Stefano De Marco and Josep A. Lobera 111

TABLE 6.  Logistic regression model (third block))

Standard
B Wald gl Sig. Exp(B)
error
Status 0.042 0.118 0.126 1 0.723 1.043
Age 0.029 0.019 2.529 1 0.112 1.030
Sex -3.102 2.698 1.322 1 0.250 0.045
Education -0.088 0.133 0.435 1 0.510 0.916
Digital skills -0.126 0.062 4.100 1 0.043 0.882
Independence of use -0.025 0.147 0.028 1 0.867 0.976
Infrastructure -0.116 0.148 0.617 1 0.432 0.891
Post- materialist values 0.005 0.022 0.061 1 0.806 1.005
Social capital -0.005 0.012 0.147 1 0.701 0.995
Perceived utility 0.004 0.033 0.014 1 0.907 1.004
Perceived ease of use -0.008 0.052 0.022 1 0.882 0.992
Sociopolitical attitudes toward Internet -0.108 0.046 5.457 1 0.019 0.898
Constant 6.500 3.586 3.286 1 0.070 664.985
Source: Based on survey carried out as part of the R&D project CSO2009-13424.

The second object of our research, the age variable is contained in the variable, “so-
political participation divide, can be explai- ciopolitical attitudes toward the Internet”.
ned through similar patterns to those descri- Thus, we could talk about an attitudinal divi-
bed for its general counterpart. Thanks to our de, with younger generations perceiving the
study, we know that the material resources Internet as a political tool.
available to citizens, as well as their overall However, the key issue in this analysis is
values and attitudes, post-materialist values that it points to how perceptions about the
and social capital, are not found to be impor- sociopolitical possibilities of the Internet are
tant antecedents of the behavior observed. the distinctive feature of this dimension of the
The effects of these variables in steps 1 and participation divide. Individuals who think of
2 of our analysis are represented in the third the Internet as a medium that allows them to
step by two specific variables: digital skills influence power and/or as a tool to become
and sociopolitical attitudes toward the Inter- more integrated in the community engage to
net. a greater extent with political content in the
Digital skills are, again, a key variable for digital environment. Thus, we highlight here
the politically creative use of the Internet. the attitudinal dimension of this form of in-
However, in this case, sociodemographic va- equality. It is important to stress that general
riables, including age, are not found to be sociopolitical attitudes, post-materialist va-
significant. We can speculate that, in a logis- lues ​​and social capital are not significant va-
tic regression model as implemented here, riables in the model when we introduce so-
the effect of these variables is contained in ciopolitical attitudes toward the Internet.
the digital skills variable. This, if correct, Therefore, the issue is not only that the ob-
would again show the “chain of transmis- served behavior has a very significant attitu-
sion” effect of classical inequalities that the- dinal dimension, but that this attitude refers
se skills represent. It is also possible that the primarily to the sociopolitical interpretation

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, October - December 2016, pp. 97-116
112 The New Frontier of Digital Inequality. The Participatory Divide

that the subjects make of digital tools. In te in an increasingly more specialised and
short, the higher the level of credibility given influential sphere. In addition, those that are
to the Internet in political and social terms, able to participate will create content based
the greater the likelihood that a person parti- on their own interests and expectations
cipates using digital political content. without addressing the demands or needs of
To conclude, we would like to point out those who remain excluded. These partici-
some issues of a more general character pants will have the opportunity to experience
that, from our point of view, can give us a the virtues that Benkler and Nissenbaum
more precise idea of the risks associated (2006) refer to. This will be an Internet cons-
with these types of inequalities. The study of tructed and experienced for and by the privi-
the concept of digital participation has been, leged. Digital participation does not, as a
in great measure, accompanied by a favou- result, seem to lead to greater horizontality
rable, if not optimistic, disposition toward the among the overall population, as the literatu-
social, political and economic effects of this re suggests, but instead, to a new form of
process (Benkler, 2006). Along with the idea elitism.
that digital participation empowers indivi-
duals (Shirky, 2008b), we find studies that
find a positive effect from digital participation Bibliography
on such socially and politically positive vir- Benkler, Yochai (2006). The Wealth of Notworks: How
tues as independence, creativity, etc. Social Production Transfors Markets and Free-
(Benkler and Nissenbaum, 2006). dom. New Haven, Connecticut: Yale University
As our findings show here, the level of Press.
penetration of the political use of digital so- Benkler, Yochai and Nissenbaum, Helen (2006).
cial networks is relatively important. There- “Commons Based Peer Production and Virtue”.
fore, we consider it important to observe the The Journal of Political Philosophy, 14(4): 394-
419.
growth in Spain of some of the indicators
that measure this form of participation. Bennett, W. Lance and Segerberg, Alexandra (2012).
However, and at the same time, we also find The Logic of Connective Action: Digital Media
and the Personalization of Contentious Politics.
that this behaviour is closely related to va-
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
riables that, such as education level and
digital skills, divide the population into those Bimber, Bruce (2000). “Measuring the Gender Gap
on the Internet”. Social Science Quarterly, 81:
with the resources to take advantage of the
868-876.
benefits of digital participation and those
without. Blank, Grant (2013). “Who Creates Content? Strati-
fication and Content Creation on the Internet”.
While the variables that help us to predict Information, Communication and Society, 16(4):
digital participation are very similar to those 590-612.
used to explain the digital divide, the poten- Bonfadelli, Heinz (2002). “The Internet and Know­
tially negative effects of the latter are much ledge Gaps. A Theoretical and Empirical Investi-
greater. In the case of the digital divide, the gation”. European Journal of Communication,
issue was the opportunity to access the In- 17(1): 65-84.
ternet. However, while the content indivi- Borge, Rosa and Cardenal, Ana S. (2011). “Surfing
duals could access once they became an the Net: A Pathway to Participation for the Po-
Internet user was not seen as a problem, gi- litically Uninterested?”. Policy and Internet, 3 (1):
ven that initially it was relatively homoge- 1-29.
neous, in the case of the participatory divide, Castells, Manuel (1997). La Era de la Información.
these variables determine who can participa- Vol. I: La Sociedad Red. Madrid: Alianza Editorial.

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, October - December 2016, pp. 97-116
José M. Robles Morales, Mirko Antino, Stefano De Marco and Josep A. Lobera 113

Castells, Manuel (2015). Redes de indignación y es- Howard, Philip E.; Rainie, Lee and Jones, Steve
peranza. Madrid: Alianza Editorial. (2002). “Days and Nights on the Internet”. In:
Wellman, B. and Haythornthwaite, C. (eds.). The
Correa, Teresa (2010). “The Participation Divide among
Internet in Everyday Life. Oxford: Blackwell Pu-
“online experts”: Experience, Skills and Psycho-
logical Factors as Predictors of College Students’ blishing.
Web Content Creation”. Journal of Computer- Jenkins, Henry (2006). Convergence Culture: Where
Mediated Communication, 16(1): 71-92. Old and New Media Collide. New York: New York
Deursen, Alexander van and Dijk, Jan van (2009). University Press.
“Improving Digital Skills for the Use of Online Kreiss, Daniel; Finn, Megan and Turner, Fred (2011).
Public Information and Services”. Government “The Limits of Peer Production: Some Reminders
Information Quarterly, 26(2): 333-340. from Max Weber for the Network Society”. New
Dijk, Jan van (2005). The Deepening Divide. Inequal- Media and Society, 13(2): 243-259.
ity in the Information Society. Thousand Oaks, Laraña, Enrique (1999). La construcción de los mo-
California: Sage Publications. vimientos sociales. Madrid: Alianza Editorial.
Dijk, Jan van (2006). “Digital Divide Research, Achieve- Malhotra, Yogesh and Galletta, Dennis F. (1999). “Ex-
ments and Shortcomings”. Poetics, 34(4): 221-235. tending the Technology Acceptance Model to
Dijk, Jan van (2013). “A Theory of the Digital Divide. Account for Social Influence: Theoretical Bases
The Digital Divide”. In: Ragnedda, M. and and Empirical Validation”. Proceedings of the
Muschert, G. W. (eds.). The Digital Divide: The 32nd Hawaii International Conference on System
Internet and Social Inequality in International Per- Sciences, IEEE.
spective. New York: Routledge. Norris, Pippa (2001). Digital Divide? Civic Engage-
DiMaggio, Paul and Hargittai, Eszter (2001). “From the ment, Information Poverty and the Internet World-
Digital Divide to Digital Inequality. Studying Inter- wide. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
net Use as Penetration Increase”. Working Paper Olson, Mancur (1978). The Logic of Collective Action.
15. Centre for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies. Public Goods and the Theory of Groups. Cam-
DiMaggio, Paul et al. (2004). “From Unequal Access bridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press.
to Differentiated Use: A Literature Review and Rheingold, Howard (2003). Smart Mobs: The Next
Agenda for Research on Digital Inequality”. In: Social Revolution. Cambridge, Massachusetts:
Neckerman, K. M. (ed.). Social Inequality. New Perseus.
York: Russell Sage Foundation.
Rice, Ronald E. and Fuller, Ryan (2013). “Theoretical
Hargittai, Eszter and Walejko, Gina (2008). “The Par- Perspectives in the Study of Communication and
ticipation Divide: Content Creation and Sharing the Internet, 2000-2009”. In: Dutton, W. (ed.).
in the Digital Age”. Information, Communication Oxford Handbook of Internet Studies. Oxford:
and Society, 11(2): 239-256. Oxford University Press.
Hassani, Sara N. (2006). “Locating Digital Divides at Ruiz, M. A.; Pardo A. and San Martín, R. (2010). “Mo-
Home, Work, and Everywhere Else”. Poetics, delos de emociones estructurales”. Papeles del
34(4): 250-272. Psicólogo, 31(1): 34-45.
Hoffmann, Christian P.; Lutz, Christoph and Meckel, Sampedro, Víctor (2014). El cuarto poder en red. Por
Miriam (2014). “Content Creation on the Internet un periodismo (de código libre) libre. Madrid:
a Social Cognitive Perspective on the Participa- Icaria.
tion Divide”. ICA Annual Conference 2014, CAT
Shirky, Clay (2008a). Here Comes Everybody. New
Panel “Digital Divides“, Seattle, May, 26.
York: Penguin Press.
Hoffman, Donna L.; Novak, Thomas P. and Scholos-
Shirky, Clay (2008b). Excedente cognitivo. Creativi-
ser, Ann E. (2001). “The Evolution of Digital Di-
dad y generosidad en la era conectada. Barce-
vide: Examining Relationship of Race to Internet
lona: Ediciones Deusto.
Access and Usage over Time”. In: Compaine, B.
M. (ed.). The Digital Divide. Facing a Crisis or Schradie, Jen (2011). “The Digital Production Gap:
Creating a Myth? Cambridge, Massachusetts: The Digital Divide and Web 2.0 Collide”. Poetics,
The MIT Press. 39(2): 145-168.

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, October - December 2016, pp. 97-116
114 The New Frontier of Digital Inequality. The Participatory Divide

Surowiecki, James (2004). The Wisdom of Crowds. Mobilization, Participation, and Change”. In:
New York: Anchor Books. Chadwick, A. and Howard, P. N. (eds.). The Rout-
Torres-Albero, Cristóbal; Robles, José Manuel and ledge Handbook of Internet Politics. New York:
De Marco, Stefano (2013). “Inequalities in the Routledge.
Information Society: From the Digital Divide to
Wring, Dominic and Horrocks, Ivan (2001). “The
Digital Inequality”. In: López Peláez A. (ed.). The
Robotics Divide. A New Frontier in the 21st Cen- Transformation of Political Parties”. In: Axford, B.
tury? London, Springer, pp. 173-194. and Huggins, R. (eds.). New Media and Politics.
London: Sage.
Walsh, Ekaterina O. (2000). The Truth about the Dig-
ital Divide. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Forrester. Zabludovsky, Gina (2013). “El concepto de individua-
Ward, Stephen and Gibson, Rachel (2009). “Euro- lización en la sociología clásica y contemporá-
pean Political Organizations and the Internet: nea”. Política y Cultura, 39: 229-248.

RECEPTION: August 27, 2015


REVIEW: November 23, 2015
ACCEPTANCE: January 26, 2016

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, October - December 2016, pp. 97-116
doi:10.5477/cis/reis.156.97

La nueva frontera de la desigualdad digital: la


brecha participativa
The New Frontier of Digital Inequality. The Participatory Divide

José M. Robles Morales, Mirko Antino, Stefano De Marco y Josep A. Lobera

Palabras clave Resumen


Brecha digital En este trabajo estudiamos la relación entre participación digital y
• Desigualdad social brecha participativa. Mientras que la participación digital hace
• Internet referencia al uso de Internet por parte de los ciudadanos para producir
• Participación política bienes culturales que son posteriormente compartidos a escala global–,
• Redes sociales la brecha participativa se define como el conjunto de desigualdades
que genera una distribución irregular de estos usos creativos de
Internet. Se examina la brecha participativa desde un enfoque
cuantitativo, prestando especial atención al análisis de la brecha
participativa política. Concluimos que las desigualdades clásicas que
caracterizaban a la brecha digital se trasladan a este nuevo entorno
tecnológico. Sin embargo las consecuencias socialmente negativas de
la brecha participativa exceden a las de su antecesora.

Key words Abstract


Digital Divide This article focuses on the relationship between digital participation and
• Social Inequality the digital participation divide. The first concept refers to the use of the
• Internet Internet to produce cultural goods that are subsequently shared on a
• Political Participation global scale; the latter, refers to the inequalities generated by the uneven
• Social Networking distribution of these creative uses of the Internet in a given population.
Empirically, our work focuses on the role of digital skills and sociopolitical
attitudes toward the Internet in explaining the digital participation divide,
as they are considered precursors of digital participation. Results suggest
that the same mechanisms that previously sustained digital divide are now
fostering digital participation divide; however, we argue that the negative
social consequences of this divide exceed those of its predecessor.

Cómo citar
Robles Morales, José Manuel; Antino, Mirko; De Marco, Stefano y Lobera, Josep A. (2016). «La
nueva frontera de la desigualdad digital: la brecha participativa». Revista Española de
Investigaciones Sociológicas, 156: 97-116.
(http://dx.doi.org/10.5477/cis/reis.156.97)

La versión en inglés de este artículo puede consultarse en http://reis.cis.es


José Manuel Robles Morales: Universidad Complutense de Madrid | jmrobles@ccee.ucm.es
Mirko Antino: Instituto Universitário de Lisboa (UICTE-IUL) y Universidad Complutense de Madrid | mirko.antino@iscte.pt
Stefano De Marco: Universidad Complutense de Madrid | s.demarco@cps.ucm.es
Josep A. Lobera: Universidad Autónoma de Madrid | josep.lobera@uam.es

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, Octubre - Diciembre 2016, pp. 97-116
98 La nueva frontera de la desigualdad digital: la brecha participativa

Introducción1 social. Así, nos preguntamos, tomando


como referencia la información empírica
A lo largo de la última década, los expertos existente, qué limitaciones y potencialidades
en el estudio de Internet han señalado la tiene en España este tipo de comportamien-
emergencia de un nuevo fenómeno digital tos definidos como participación digital.
que estaría jugando un importante papel en
Para ello, nuestro trabajo girará en torno
un incipiente proceso de cambio social. Este
a un concepto recientemente incorporado a
fenómeno ha sido denominado de diversas
la literatura de la brecha digital: participation
formas, producción digital (Schradie, 2011),
divide (brecha participativa). A través de este
producción por pares (Benkler, 2006), parti-
concepto se analizan los factores que deter-
cipación digital (Hoffman, Lutz y Meckel,
minan las posibilidades que tienen los ciuda-
2014), etc., y se refiere a las posibilidades
danos para crear contenidos digitales (Blank,
con las que cuentan las personas, gracias a
2013; Correa, 2010; Hargittai y Walejko,
las tecnologías digitales, para producir con-
2008; Schradie, 2011). En otras palabras, la
tenidos culturales que son, posteriormente,
brecha participativa analiza el conjunto de
compartidos a escala global2. Uno de los
desigualdades que genera una distribución
elementos comunes más destacados de es-
irregular de la participación digital en una po-
tos usos de Internet es que pugnan, cuando
blación dada.
no desafían, las estructuras verticales de
producción propias de las sociedades indus- Analizaremos la brecha participativa, en
triales que precedieron a la sociedad red general, y en una de sus manifestaciones es-
(Benkler, 2006) y empoderan a los ciudada- pecíficas; la creación y/o distribución de
nos que las realizan (Hoffman, Lutz y Meckel, contenidos de carácter político, a la que de-
2014). nominamos brecha participativa política. Por
lo tanto, la brecha participativa política sería
Desde una perspectiva crítica, es impor-
entendida como un caso específico de la
tante plantearse hasta qué punto las inter-
brecha participativa. Así, nos preguntamos
pretaciones realizadas por los expertos so-
por los factores que nos permiten predecir
bre estos nuevos usos de Internet son una
que una determinada persona use Internet
proyección idealizada y dulcificada de la
para compartir contenidos previamente
realidad que se trata de describir o una inter-
creados por ella y también por las variables
pretación realista y ajustada la información
que nos permiten comprender por qué deter-
disponible (Kreiss, Finn y Turner, 2011). No
minadas personas comparten contenidos
cabe duda que esta cuestión excede con
políticos y otras no.
creces el formato de un trabajo como el pre-
sente, sin embargo, pretendemos dar un Nuestras hipótesis en este trabajo son
paso en esta dirección para comprender las siguientes: i) en España existe una dis-
hasta qué punto están fundadas estas ex- tribución irregular de participación digital,
pectativas que, de ser ciertas, representarían entendida como el uso de Internet para ge-
una importante y fundamental innovación nerar y/o transmitir recursos digitales, en
general, y políticos, en particular, ii) esta
distribución desigual obedece a un conjun-
1  Esteartículo se ha podido realizar gracias a los Pro-
to de variables identificables a través de
yectos del Plan Nacional de I+D+I CSO2009-13424 y métodos empíricos entre las que destacan
CSO2012-35688. determinadas variables sociodemográficas,
2  En este trabajo utilizaremos el término «participación las habilidades digitales y las creencias que
digital» para hacer más fácil la relación, que realizaremos
a continuación, entre las prácticas descritas aquí y el tienen los ciudadanos sobre las posibilida-
concepto de «brecha participativa». des políticas de Internet y iii) la brecha par-

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, Octubre - Diciembre 2016, pp. 97-116
José M. Robles Morales, Mirko Antino, Stefano De Marco y Josep A. Lobera 99

ticipativa tiene efectos muy relevantes so- En la estructura social descrita por Cas-
bre el desarrollo justo y equilibrado de la tells (1997), la organización, ya sea política,
sociedad red en España. social o económica, continúa jugando un pa-
Este trabajo está estructurado de la si- pel central. Así, Castells (1997) destaca
guiente manera. En primer lugar, presentare- cómo la empresa red, los nuevos movimien-
mos nuestro marco teórico. Este marco teó- tos sociales o los propios Estados se trans-
rico tiene a su vez dos partes: el concepto de forman en agentes centrales en la nueva so-
participación digital y el concepto de brecha ciedad en la medida en que eran capaces de,
participativa. A continuación, propondremos gracias a las tecnologías digitales, generar,
un análisis empírico de los factores que ge- procesar y transmitir información y, también,
neran, primero, la brecha participativa y, se- conocimiento.
gundo, la brecha participativa política en La marca más importante de las recientes
España. En el último apartado, y poniendo en aportaciones a este debate es el papel pro-
relación nuestro marco teórico y los resulta- tagonista concedido a la individualización de
dos empíricos de nuestro análisis, propon- la gestión y procesamiento de la información
dremos un conjunto de conclusiones que y el conocimiento. Así, Benkler (2006) man-
evalúan el surgimiento y las potencialidades tiene que las herramientas tecnológicas re-
de la producción digital en España. cogidas bajo la categoría web 2.0, especial-
mente las redes sociales, permiten al
«ciudadano-amateur» realizar las actividades
De la era de la información profesionales que, anteriormente, estaban
a la era de las redes. reservadas a las organizaciones. Estas acti-
La participación digital vidades irían desde la producción de bienes
y servicios a la creación de contenidos cul-
La idea de participación digital se enmarca en turales y políticos. La transición de lo organi-
un proceso socioeconómico más amplio cuyo zativo a lo individual estaría, nuevamente,
inicio se describe en la obra pionera de M. vinculada a factores tecnológicos como la
Castells La era de la información: economía, democratización del acceso a los ordenado-
sociedad y cultura (1997)3. En esta obra, Cas- res personales, la extensión del uso de Inter-
tells explica cómo, en las sociedades occi- net entre capas de la población que cuentan,
dentales de finales del siglo XX, se produce la cada vez más, con niveles medios y altos de
emergencia de un tipo novedoso de organiza- formación y, como se ha dicho, la aparición
ción social, el informacionalismo, en el que la de un nuevo tipo de herramientas que rom-
generación, el procesamiento y la transmisión pen con la tradicional direccionalidad entre
de la información se convierten en las fuentes productor y consumidor: las redes sociales y
fundamentales de producción y poder. Una la web 2.0 (Benkler, 2006). De cualquier ma-
de las principales causas de esta transforma- nera, dicho proceso de individualización ha
ción es la irrupción de las Tecnologías de la sido un eje central de variados estudios que,
Información y la Comunicación. desde los propios inicios de la disciplina so-
ciológica, han tratado de describir los cam-
bios culturales que afectaban a las socieda-
3 Esta aproximación a los estudios clásicos sobre la des occidentales (Zabludovsky, 2013).
sociedad red y la sociedad del conocimiento no preten-
de ser un análisis exhaustivo de estas obras o del de- La cuestión clave descrita por Benkler en
sarrollo de este ámbito de estudio. Nuestro objetivo aquí La riqueza de las redes (2006) es que la eco-
es, únicamente, partir de referencias claves para intro- nomía que está surgiendo como consecuen-
ducir los conceptos centrales de este trabajo. Es, por
este motivo, que no discutimos, únicamente resumimos, cia de los cambios apuntados anteriormente
los pormenores de estas obras. se basa en un sistema no propietario (no ba-

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, Octubre - Diciembre 2016, pp. 97-116
100 La nueva frontera de la desigualdad digital: la brecha participativa

sado en la idea de mercado) y colaborativo. des sociales. Desde el punto de vista de los
Desde su punto de vista, la reducción de autores, esta forma de participación no re-
costes de producción y de organización que queriría de una identidad colectiva compar-
generan las herramientas digitales basadas tida o de organizaciones que puedan res-
en la web 2.0 permite a los ciudadanos pro- ponder a las oportunidades de acción. En
ducir bienes sin esperar una contrapresta- otras palabras, Internet estaría reduciendo la
ción material o derechos de autoría. Igual- importancia que tradicionalmente se atribuía
mente, la facilidad de coordinación y de a la organización y la identidad dentro de las
interacción que ofrecen estos servicios digi- explicaciones de los procesos de participa-
tales potencia un sistema colaborativo a es- ción política ciudadana (Laraña, 1999). El
cala planetaria. Esta transformación econó- otro elemento clave de la explicación de es-
mica estaría, desde el punto de vista de tos autores es la emergencia de una nueva
estos autores, en la base de un importante lógica de acción conectiva, basada en com-
proceso de cambio social. partir contenidos personalizados por medio
Este cambio social afecta a distintos ám- de redes digitales (Bennett y Segerberg,
bitos como, por ejemplo, el sistema cultural 2012). Desde este punto de vista, Internet se
y de valores (Jenkins, 2006), el informativo transformaría en ámbito de socialización po-
(Sampedro, 2014) o, y este es uno de nues- lítica en el que los ciudadanos producirían
tros objetos de investigación, el político. La contenidos y/o los difundirían para expresar
producción social de contenidos políticos es su apoyo a determinadas causas o para po-
uno de los ámbitos más prolíficos de entre ner en cuestión otras.
los señalados aquí, ya que ofrece conclusio- Esta interpretación del efecto de Internet
nes que han alcanzado un gran predicamen- sobre la política no se circunscribe únicamente
to tanto a nivel social como académico (Su- al ámbito de la participación política, sino que
rowiecki, 2004; Rheingold, 2003; Bennett y se ha extendido al ámbito de la política con-
Segerberg, 2012). En concreto, Castells vencional. Así, Ward y Gibson (2009) han de-
(2015) sitúa en el centro de los cambios po- nominado desintermediación al proceso según
líticos al uso de las herramientas digitales y el cual Internet permite relativizar el peso de las
que hacen posible una nueva «autocomuni- organizaciones políticas que tradicionalmente
cación de masas» y nuevos movimientos atesoraban mayor poder y la emergencia de
globales de protesta, como los desarrollados grupos ciudadanos organizados a través de
en Túnez, Islandia, Egipto, España, Estados Internet (Wring y Horrocks, 2001).
Unidos, Turquía y Brasil. La participación po- Como consecuencia de todo lo anterior,
lítica, así, está evolucionando rápidamente a expertos como Shirky (2008a) o Benkler y
nivel global, gracias a las tecnologías digita- Nissenbaum (2006) han introducido una di-
les que permiten un «mecanismo básico de mensión antropológica asociada a este pro-
construcción de poder en la sociedad red: el ceso de cambio social. Desde el punto de
poder de interconexión» (Castells, 2015: 29). vista de los segundos, por ejemplo, «la apa-
Bennett y Segerberg (2012) han realizado rición de la producción compartida de con-
un conjunto de trabajos relacionados con la tenidos ofrece a un conjunto más amplio de
idea de usos políticos de Internet y su efecto gente la oportunidad de involucrarse en
sobre las acciones políticas de protesta. Uno prácticas que les permita mostrar y experi-
de estos efectos es la transformación de la mentar comportamientos virtuosos» (Benkler
lógica de la acción colectiva (Olson, 1978) a y Nissenbaum, 2006: 394). Esta forma de
una lógica de la acción conectiva en la que producción favorecería el desarrollo de las
los ciudadanos participan de forma indivi- virtudes de la independencia y la autonomía.
dualizada y coordinados a través de las re- Es decir, la posibilidad de decidir sobre nues-

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, Octubre - Diciembre 2016, pp. 97-116
José M. Robles Morales, Mirko Antino, Stefano De Marco y Josep A. Lobera 101

tras propias vidas y ser independientes res- Jan van Dijk (2006), señalaban que la idea de
pecto a cualquier tipo de autoridad. En la brecha digital plantea una división demasia-
misma línea, alientan el desarrollo de la eco- do simplista entre dos grupos poblacionales
nomía descrita en La riqueza de las redes (personas con y sin acceso) y que «acceso a
(Benkler, 2006), ya que favorece otras virtu- Internet» no implica «uso de Internet». A par-
des cívicas como la creatividad y, por lo tan- tir de este momento, los expertos giraron su
to, la participación social, el altruismo y la atención hacia los factores que explican por
cooperación. qué una determinada persona hace uso de
En definitiva, ya sea en términos instru- este tipo de tecnologías. Esta nueva pers-
mentales (participación social, económica y pectiva de la brecha digital puso en eviden-
política) o éticos (potenciación de virtudes), cia que las diferencias en el uso de Internet
la participación digital o producción por pa- están determinadas por variables sociales
res estaría generando un escenario positivo (Hoffman et al., 2001; Bimber, 2000; Bonfa-
al aumentar, entre otras, el repertorio de ac- delli, 2002).
ción de los ciudadanos, sus formas de ex- Hasta este momento, el interés académi-
presión de demandas, la participación en la co se había centrado en los factores que mo-
esfera económica y los estímulos para vincu- tivan a unas personas y no a otras a aden-
larse a prácticas virtuosas. Se trata, desde trarse en el nuevo escenario que estaba
nuestro punto de vista, de un escenario alta- abriendo Internet. Este planteamiento, típico
mente deseable. Sin embargo, al mismo de las primeras fases del estudio del cambio
tiempo, consideramos fundamental analizar tecnológico (Norris, 2001), se modificó cuan-
cómo se expresan las desigualdades socia- do las investigaciones empíricas comenza-
les, económicas y políticas en este escena- ron a evidenciar un retroceso de la brecha
rio, así como el efecto negativo de aquellas digital en prácticamente todas las dimensio-
sobre las potencialidades de este proceso. nes apuntadas por los primeros estudios (To-
rres, Robles y De Marco, 2013). En un con-
texto con tasas muy elevadas de penetración
De la brecha digital a la brecha de Internet y con un proceso claro de retro-
participativa ceso de la brecha digital, los expertos co-
menzaron a considerar la importancia del
Desde sus inicios, el estudio de la rápida in- «para qué».
troducción de Internet en la sociedad ha es- Uno de los esfuerzos más interesantes en
tado acompañado por la preocupación, tanto esta dirección se ha dirigido a analizar en qué
académica como social, por los efectos po- medida determinados usos de Internet gene-
tencialmente negativos de este proceso. De ran ventajas competitivas para sus usuarios
esta forma, en la década de los noventa del (Dijk, 2005). Este tipo de usos de Internet han
siglo XX, se acuñó el término «brecha digital» sido denominados usos beneficiosos y avan-
(digital divide) para referirse a «la distancia en- zados de Internet (UBAI). Desde este punto de
tre aquellas personas que tienen y no tienen vista, la desigualdad digital sería el resultado
acceso a Internet» (Dijk, 2006: 221). Este en- de la diferencia entre los ciudadanos que ha-
foque original de la brecha digital se encon- cen uso de este tipo de servicios y herramien-
traba fundamentalmente centrado en las dife- tas de Internet y aquellos ciudadanos que no
rencias en el nivel de acceso a las nuevas cuentan con recursos para hacer uso de ellos
tecnologías de la información y la comunica- (DiMaggio y Hargittai, 2001). La idea central
ción entre distintas poblaciones. sería analizar los factores que explican que
Esta perspectiva clásica pronto encontró una determinada persona se encuentre en
oposición entre algunos autores que, como disposición de transformar las facilidades que

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, Octubre - Diciembre 2016, pp. 97-116
102 La nueva frontera de la desigualdad digital: la brecha participativa

ofrece Internet en oportunidades para mejorar Benkler (2006), esta idea adquiere el matiz de
sus vidas (DiMaggio y Hargittai, 2001; Dijk, fundamental. La brecha participativa enfatiza
2013). En este punto se evidenció la impor- la desigualdad, no en el consumo de infor-
tancia de un conjunto de variables relaciona- mación y conocimiento, sino en las posibili-
das con las capacidades para manejar Inter- dades de unos ciudadanos y otros para ex-
net: las habilidades digitales (DiMaggio et al., presarse y participar en cualquier ámbito de
2004; Deursen y Dijk, 2009). Las distintas forma proactiva, es decir, mediante la crea-
concepciones de brecha digital y desigualdad ción de contenidos y su distribución. Jan van
digital están, desde nuestro punto de vista, Dijk (2013: 33) identifica una cadena causal
fuertemente marcadas por el contexto de la en la que estarían involucradas la brecha di-
sociedad red y el conocimiento (Castells, gital así como la desigualdad participativa: 1)
1997). En dicho contexto el usuario de Inter- las desigualdades categóricas presentes en
net es entendido como una persona que usa la sociedad conducen a una distribución
Internet para acceder a información o recur- desigual de los recursos; 2) esta distribución
sos que, en el caso de los UBAI, pueden re- desigual de los recursos —junto con las ca-
sultarle útiles y beneficiosos. Esta perspectiva racterísticas propias de cada tecnología—
del internauta está lejos de la adoptada en La conduce a un acceso desigual a las tecnolo-
riqueza de las redes (Benkler, 2006). Como gías digitales; 3) el acceso desigual a las
hemos visto, siguiendo la obra mencionada, tecnologías digitales conduce a una partici-
el internauta es un individuo que no solo con- pación desigual en la sociedad; 4) la par-
sume, sino que también produce y comparte ticipación desigual en la sociedad refuerza
el resultado de su labor a través de Internet. las desigualdades categóricas y la distribu-
El concepto de participation divide (bre- ción desigual de los recursos.
cha participativa) supone una adaptación de Encontramos distintos ámbitos en los
los principios e ideas que vertebran el estu- que se evidencia la brecha participativa. Se-
dio de la brecha digital al contexto de la pro- gún Hoffman, Lutz y Meckel (2014), los estu-
ducción por pares. Con brecha participativa dios sobre la brecha participativa se han
nos referimos a las desigualdades sociales centrado en distintos dominios: participación
en la producción de contenidos digitales4 política, economía y negocio, participación
(Blank, 2013; Correa, 2010; Hargittai y Walej­ cultural, educación y salud. Según Rice y Fu-
ko, 2008; Schradie, 2011). Esta idea no es ller (2013), una de las áreas más estudiadas
nueva en la literatura, ya en 2003 Jan van es, significativamente, la que nos ocupa aquí;
Dijk apuntaba que uno de los principales cómo afecta la brecha participativa al ámbito
efectos perniciosos de la brecha digital sería de la política. Sin embargo, y dada la reciente
que los ciudadanos que usan Internet esta- aparición del concepto, aún no contamos con
rían socialmente más integrados y participa- un cuerpo de resultados definitivos y conclu-
rían más en actividades comunitarias, eco- yentes (Hargittai y Walejko, 2008).
nómicas y políticas que los ciudadanos que Los expertos han puesto el acento sobre
no utilizan esta tecnología. Tras la obra de distintas causas para explicar la brecha par-
ticipativa. De esta forma, por ejemplo, Har-
gittai y Walejko (2008) han mostrado cómo la
4  Es,en este sentido, en el que el concepto de brecha variable género se transforma en un factor
participativa se diferencia de otros conceptos similares
como brecha digital 2.0 o citizens 2.0. Mientras estos fundamental para predecir el contenido de
se refieren a las posibilidades de acceso a contenidos las creaciones de los internautas. Por su par-
que, potencialmente, pueden fortalecer el desarrollo te, Schradie (2011) ha evidenciado cómo la
personal y/o comunitario de los ciudadanos, la brecha
participativa se refiere a las capacidades y posibilidades edad es una barrera fundamental para la par-
para producir contenidos. ticipación de los ciudadanos en Internet. Así,

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, Octubre - Diciembre 2016, pp. 97-116
José M. Robles Morales, Mirko Antino, Stefano De Marco y Josep A. Lobera 103

Gráfico 1.  Compartir contenidos propios a través de Internet según variables sociodemográficas

Fuente: Elaboración propia a partir de la encuesta «Equipamiento y uso de tecnologías de la información y comunicación
en los hogares» (INE, 2014).

cuanto más jóvenes, más probabilidad exis- variables que la literatura anteriormente des-
te de que los ciudadanos se comporten crita apunta como más relevantes. Así, nues-
como creadores de contenidos digitales. tro objetivo es conocer cuál o cuáles de ellas
Correa (2010), por su parte, ha tratado de son, en el caso de España, las que más nos
explicar la brecha participativa a partir de va- ayudan a comprender este fenómeno. Sin
riables como la utilidad subjetiva de este tipo embargo, pretendemos ir un paso más allá y
de prácticas. Por último, encontramos estu- discutir, a partir de los resultados empíricos,
dios que muestran el papel que los recursos las consecuencias de la existencia de una
materiales y las infraestructuras de comuni- brecha participativa que afecte a las oportu-
cación juegan como facilitadores de este nidades de los ciudadanos españoles.
tipo de usos de Internet. De esta forma, el
acceso a Internet desde diferentes dispositi-
vos aumenta la probabilidad de que un inter- Una aproximación a la situación
nauta cree contenidos digitales (Hassani,
de la brecha participativa en
2006).
España
Nuestro trabajo se centra en el estudio de
las variables que nos permiten predecir la Según la encuesta «Equipamiento y Uso de
brecha participativa, en general, y aquella Tecnologías de la Información y Comunicación
que afecta a la creación y distribución de en los hogares 2014», realizada por el Instituto
contenidos de carácter político. Para ello, Nacional de Estadística, el 46% de los ciuda-
tomamos una amplia representación de las danos españoles «cuelga» contenidos produ-

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, Octubre - Diciembre 2016, pp. 97-116
104 La nueva frontera de la desigualdad digital: la brecha participativa

cidos por ellos mismos en Internet para ser tres meses anteriores a la entrevista. De este
compartidos. Tal y como muestra el gráfico 1, modo se ha alcanzado una muestra total de
las variables que parecen afectar a la brecha 8.452 personas. Esta decisión se debe a la
participativa son las comúnmente utilizadas voluntad de superar la simple dicotomía en-
para la explicación de la brecha digital y la des- tre usuario y no usuario, y así estudiar el
igualdad digital. Estas son la edad y el nivel de efecto de determinadas variables sobre los
estudios. Sin embargo, tanto el género como usos creativos de Internet.
los recursos económicos disponibles parecen
tener un efecto no tan fuerte sobre este tipo de Variables
comportamientos digitales.
Desgraciadamente, no contamos en esta Para la variable dependiente se ha construido
encuesta con datos sobre el tipo de conteni- una escala a partir del cociente entre la suma
dos compartidos. Esto nos hubiera permitido de respuestas positivas a las variables que
matizar la descripción general anterior. Sin recogen información sobre los usos creativos
embargo, con el objetivo de avanzar en la de Internet (máximo 2) y la frecuencia de uso
comprensión de las fuentes generales de la de Internet. Las variables referidas a los usos
brecha participativa, hemos realizado un creativos de Internet son: colgar contenidos
path analysis en el que se utilizan, como in- propios para ser compartidos y crear y/o
dependientes, las variables sociodemográfi- mantener webs o blogs propios. La variable
cas clásicas en estudio de la brecha digital, relativa a la frecuencia de uso es ordinal y sus
y las habilidades digitales, eje central en el valores están entre 1 (conexión diaria) y 4 (co-
análisis de la desigualdad digital. nexión menos de una vez al mes). Así, se ob-
tiene una escala cuyos valores varían entre 0
Datos y 2 (máximo uso creativo y máxima conexión),
y que comprende otros cinco valores interme-
Para alcanzar los objetivos de este apartado dios entre los dos extremos.
se han utilizado los datos de la «Encuesta El primer grupo de variables indepen-
sobre Equipamiento y Uso de Tecnologías de dientes recoge información sociodemográfi-
la Información y Comunicación en los hoga- ca sobre los sujetos encuestados. En con-
res» (2014). La muestra es representativa de
creto, dentro de este grupo se utilizaron, por
la población española, de ambos sexos, de
su importante papel en los estudios empíri-
edad comprendida entre 16 y 74 años y que
cos sobre la brecha digital, la edad (variable
reside en viviendas del territorio nacional. Ha
numérica), la situación laboral (variable ordi-
sido entrevistada una sola persona por vi-
nal) y el nivel de estudios (variable ordinal).
vienda, previamente seleccionada a través
Estas tres variables han sido tomadas direc-
de método aleatorio informatizado. El diseño
tamente de la encuesta del INE y las catego-
muestral se ha realizado tomando como re-
rías que componen las dos últimas son:
ferencia todo el territorio español y aplicando
un muestreo trietápico5. — Situación laboral: ocupados activos
Para el presente análisis se ha optado por (cuenta propia y cuenta ajena), ocupados
escoger solo a los internautas, es decir, los parados, estudiantes, labores del hogar
sujetos que habían accedido a Internet en los (incluye también «realizando tareas de
voluntariado social») y pensionistas (jubi-
lados e incapacitados permanentes).
5  Para más información sobre la encuesta: http://www. — Nivel de estudios: sin estudios, educa-
ine.es/dyngs/INEbase/es/operacion.htm?c=Estadistica_
C&cid=1254736176741&menu=metodologia&i ción primaria, primer nivel de educación
dp=1254735976608 secundaria, segundo nivel de educación

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, Octubre - Diciembre 2016, pp. 97-116
José M. Robles Morales, Mirko Antino, Stefano De Marco y Josep A. Lobera 105

Tabla 1.  Listado de indicadores que componen la escala «habilidades digitales»

Copiar o mover ficheros o carpetas


Usar copiar o cortar y pegar
Usar fórmulas aritméticas simples (hoja cálculo)
Comprimir ficheros
Tareas informáticas Conectar o instalar dispositivos
realizadas en los
últimos 3 meses Escribir un programa
Transferir ficheros entre otros disp. y el ordenador
Modificar parámetros de configuración de aplicaciones (ej. navegadores de Internet)
Creación presentaciones electrónicas
Instalar o sustituir sistemas operativos

Correo electrónico
Envío de mensajes a chats, redes sociales, etc.
Servicio usado de
Leer o descargar noticias, periódicos, revistas on-line.
Internet en los últimos
3 meses Buscar información sobre bienes y servicios
Banca electrónica
Comercio electrónico
Fuente: Encuesta «Equipamiento y uso de tecnologías de la información y comunicación en los hogares» (INE, 2014).

secundaria, formación profesional de indicadores están vinculados a los servicios


grado superior y educación superior. de Internet utilizados por el entrevistado en
los últimos tres meses. En la tabla 1 se inclu-
Junto a las variables sociodemográficas ye el listado de indicadores que componen
señaladas, en este estudio hemos incluido la escala «habilidades digitales».
como variable independiente, por su impor-
tancia y centralidad en el estudio de las des- Resultados
igualdades digitales, las habilidades digita-
les. Para medir esta variable se ha construido Con las variables seleccionadas, se ha im-
una escala a partir de 16 ítems dicotómicos6. plementado un modelo de path analysis que
De estos, 10 se refieren a tareas informáticas incluye la mediación de las habilidades digi-
realizadas por el entrevistado en los últimos tales entre las variables sociodemográficas y
tres meses. Esto, debido a que determina- los usos creativos de Internet. Esta estructu-
das habilidades digitales son propedéuticas ra está basada en distintos estudios empíri-
al uso de Internet (Dijk, 2006). Los otros seis cos en los que se muestra que las habilida-
des digitales funcionan como cadena de
transmisión entre las variables tradicionales
6  La escala se ha construido a partir de un análisis fac- (edad, nivel de estudios, recursos económi-
torial. Vista la naturaleza dicotómica de las variables cos, etc.) y las desigualdades en el uso de
empleadas, se ha decidido implementar un análisis ba- Internet (Torres, Robles y De Marco, 2013).
sado en matrices policóricas. La rotación escogida es
oblimin. Resultados principales. Determinante = 0.005; Así pues, el modelo toma la forma que pode-
índice de Bartlett (P = 0.000010); test de KMO = 0.916. mos observar en la figura 1.

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, Octubre - Diciembre 2016, pp. 97-116
106 La nueva frontera de la desigualdad digital: la brecha participativa

figura 1.  Modelo brecha participativa en España

Estudios

Fuente: Elaboración propia.

Los índices de ajuste obtenidos con la dicha mediación es parcial, ya que esta varia-
implementación del análisis cumplen con los ble también tiene un efecto directo sobre los
criterios exigidos para la aceptación del mo- usos creativos de Internet. La edad mantiene,
delo (Ruiz et al., 2010). Consecuentemente, en ambos casos, relaciones negativas.
los resultados indican que este modelo sí se En definitiva, gracias a nuestro análisis, sa-
ajusta a la matriz de datos y, por lo tanto, se bemos que «colgar contenidos propios en In-
considera válido. ternet para ser compartidos» es una actividad
Además, los coeficientes de regresión, estrechamente relacionada con variables so-
presentados en la tabla 2, manifiestan que ciodemográficas introducidas en nuestro mo-
todas las relaciones planteadas en el modelo delo. Esto reafirma los resultados obtenidos
son significativas: el efecto de las tres varia- por otros estudios fuera de España (Correa,
bles sociodemográficas está mediado por las 2010; Schradie, 2011). Sin embargo, observa-
habilidades digitales. En el caso de la edad, mos también cómo la variable «habilidades

Tabla 2.  Índices de ajuste

Valor
Estadístico Abreviatura Criterio
obtenido
Ajuste comparativo      
  Índice de bondad de ajuste comparativo CFI >0,9 0,99
  Índice de Tucker-Lewis TLI >0,9 0,968
  Índice de ajuste normalizado NFI >0,9 0,99
Ajuste normalizado      
  NFI corregido por parsimonia PNFI Próximo a 1 0,297
Otros      
  Índice de bondad de ajuste GFI >0,9 0,997
  Índice de bondad de ajuste corregido AGFI >0,9 0,985
  Raíz del residuo cuadrático medio RMR Próximo a 0 0,049
  Raíz de residuo cuadrático promedio de aproximación RMSEA <0,08 0,288
Fuente: Elaboración propia a partir de la encuesta «Equipamiento y uso de tecnologías de la información y comunicación
en los hogares» (INE, 2014).

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, Octubre - Diciembre 2016, pp. 97-116
José M. Robles Morales, Mirko Antino, Stefano De Marco y Josep A. Lobera 107

Tabla 3.  Coeficientes de regresión

      B S.E. Beta P

Habilidades digitales <--- Estudios 0,192 0,006 0,341 ***

Habilidades digitales <--- Edad -0,026 0,001 -0,346 ***

Habilidades digitales <--- Estatus 0,028 0,002 0,147 ***

Usos creativos <--- Habilidades digitales 0,238 0,006 0,376 ***

Usos creativos <--- Edad -0,01 0 -0,216 ***

Fuente: Elaboración propia a partir de la encuesta «Equipamiento y uso de tecnologías de la información y comunicación
en los hogares» (INE, 2014).

digitales» media entre aquellas y los usos crea- España, sabemos que un 20,1% de los inter-
tivos de Internet transformándose, de esta for- nautas españoles había colgado, alguna vez,
ma, en la cadena de transmisión de las «des- imágenes de temática política a través de
igualdades tradicionales» (estatus y nivel de redes sociales como Facebook, Twitter, etc.
estudios) al mundo digital. En resumen, gracias Un porcentaje algo mayor, un 24,3%, había
a nuestro estudio sabemos que la brecha par- compartido frases, textos o citas (en este
ticipativa, entendida en términos generales, caso suyas o de otros) a través de redes so-
está estrechamente vinculada a las variables ciales. Por último, compartir vídeos con con-
que permitían predecir la brecha digital. Sin tenido político es menos común en España.
embargo, tal y como trataremos extensamente Aproximadamente el 15% de los internautas
en las conclusiones, los resultados sociales de españoles ha realizado alguna vez este tipo
una y otra forma de desigualdad digital difieren de actividad. Tal y como se aprecia en el grá-
sensiblemente. fico 2, este tipo de prácticas son más comu-
nes entre personas jóvenes, más entre hom-
bres que entre mujeres y entre personas con
La brecha participativa política menos recursos económicos.
en España: un análisis del uso Una vez descritos algunos datos genera-
político de las redes sociales les sobre la penetración del comportamiento
que queremos analizar, procederemos a un
Nuestro análisis sobre la brecha participativa
análisis más elaborado sobre los factores
política en España se centra en un tipo de
que nos permiten predecir la brecha partici-
comportamiento concreto: compartir mate-
pativa política en España. Al igual que en el
rial de contenido político (textos, fotos o ví-
estudio de la brecha participativa general,
deos) a través de redes sociales. Gracias a la
tomaremos como variables independientes
encuesta realizada en el marco del proyecto
aquellas descritas en la literatura y resumi-
CSO2009-134247 financiado por el Ministe-
das en el apartado teórico de este artículo.
rio de Innovación y Ciencia del Gobierno de

Datos
7  Losdatos técnicos de esta encuesta se proporciona- Para cumplir con este objetivo, utilizamos los
rán de forma adecuada y completa en el siguiente apar-
tado al describir el trabajo empírico realizado específi- datos de una encuesta representativa de la
camente para este artículo. población española, realizada en el marco

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, Octubre - Diciembre 2016, pp. 97-116
108 La nueva frontera de la desigualdad digital: la brecha participativa

Gráfico 2. Compartir vídeos, fotos o textos de contenido político a través de las redes sociales según
variables sociodemográficas

Fuente: Elaboración propia a partir de la encuesta realizada en el marco del proyecto de I+D CSO2009-13424.

del proyecto de I+D CSO2009-13424. Las eran: compartir textos de contenido político a
entrevistas han sido realizadas en modalidad través de redes sociales digitales, compartir
CATI. En total se han entrevistado 1.526 su- fotos de contenido político a través de redes
jetos y la muestra estaba estratificada por la sociales digitales y compartir vídeos de con-
intersección hábitat/comunidad autónoma y tenido político a través de redes sociales digi-
distribuidas de manera proporcional al total tales. Elegimos aquellos sujetos que no com-
de la región. Se aplicaron cuotas de sexo y partían contenidos políticos a través de redes
edad a la unidad última (persona entrevista- sociales. Dicha variable finalmente únicamen-
da). Partiendo de los criterios del muestreo te incluye dos valores, tener o no tener dicho
aleatorio simple, para un nivel de confianza perfil. En la muestra estudiada, sobre 1.526
del 95,5% (que es el habitualmente adopta- sujetos, aquellos que no utilizan Internet fue-
do) y en la hipótesis más desfavorable de ron excluidos (por no tener posibilidad de rea-
máxima indeterminación (p=q=50), el mar- lizar prácticas de participación política digital)
gen de error de los datos referidos al total de y, de los remanentes, el 71,2% de los sujetos
la muestra es de ± 2,6. se encuentran en este perfil.

Variables y medidas empleadas


Variables del segundo bloque:
variables sociodemográficas
Variable dependiente: brecha participativa po- Estatus. Se utilizó la escala elaborada y reco-
lítica (creación y distribución de contenidos mendada por el Instituto Nacional de Esta-
políticos a través de redes sociales). Para dística (INE).
construir el perfil de usuario utilizamos la sub-
escala de participación política digital referida Nivel de estudios. Al igual que en la variable
a las redes sociales de 3 ítems y construido anterior, se utilizó la escala elaborada y reco-
por los autores de este artículo. Estos ítems mendada por el INE.

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, Octubre - Diciembre 2016, pp. 97-116
José M. Robles Morales, Mirko Antino, Stefano De Marco y Josep A. Lobera 109

Variables del segundo bloque: Capital social. Para medir esta variable, utili-
variables tecnológicas zamos la escala elaborada por Norris (2001),
Habilidades digitales. Para medir esta varia- formada por 26 ítems, cuya fiabilidad, esti-
ble, utilizamos una escala de elaboración mada por Alpha de Cronbach, fue 0,82.
propia, formada por 14 ítems, cuya fiabilidad, Utilidad percibida. Para medir esta variable,
estimada por Alpha de Cronbach, fue igual a utilizamos la escala elaborada por Malhotra y
= 0,79). Esta escala está incorporada, como Galletta (1999), formada por 6 ítems, cuya fia-
todas las variables usadas en este apartado, bilidad, estimada por Alpha de Cronbach, fue
a la encuesta del proyecto de I+D CSO2009- 0,85. Gracias a esta escala se mide si los en-
13424. Los 14 ítems están ordenados jerár- cuestados consideran que Internet es una
quicamente por dificultad de uso. De esta herramienta que les permite resolver los pro-
forma, las habilidades digitales se miden a blemas y necesidades a los que se enfrentan.
través de una escala donde la acción más
Facilidad de uso percibida. Para medir esta
sencilla sería «abrir el navedador» y la más
variable, utilizamos la escala elaborada por
compleja «programar en HTML».
Malhotra y Galletta (1999), formada por 4
Independencia de uso. Esta variable está ítems, cuya fiabilidad, estimada por Alpha de
construida de forma similar a la utilizada por el Cronbach, fue 0,74. En esta escala se pre-
INE para medir la posibilidad que tienen los gunta a los encuestados si consideran que
ciudadanos para utilizar Internet en distintos Internet es o no una herramienta accesible
lugares y en cualquier momento. En ella se pre- en términos de facilidad de uso.
gunta directamente si ha usado Internet en
Percepción sociopolítica de Internet. Esta va-
distintos lugares, como la casa, el trabajo, un
riable está construida a partir de una escala
cibercafé, estc. Según la literatura, esta posibi-
propia definida de 1 a 7 en la que se pregunta
lidad permite una profundización mayor en el
a los encuestados en qué medida están o no
uso y en los usos de Internet (Hassani, 2006).
de acuerdo con un conjunto de afirmaciones
Infraestructura. Esta variable también ha sido sobre las posibilidades políticas de Internet.
construida tomando como referencia la en- Para este trabajo se seleccionaron dos ítems:
cuesta del INE «Equipamiento y uso de tec- en concreto, Internet refuerza los vínculos so-
nologías de la información y comunicación ciales e Internet puede mejorar la capacidad
en los hogares». Esta variable mide el tipo y para influir sobre el poder.
la variedad de conexiones a Internet que tie- Esta última variable es, como veremos, de
ne un ciudadano. Así, se pregunta si cuenta especial importancia para nuestro análisis de
con conexión a Internet por cable, wifi, etc. la brecha participativa política. En términos
Según la literatura, la calidad y la estabilidad generales, encontramos que los estudios em-
de la conexión a Internet es un factor rele- píricos sobre las relaciones entre actitudes y
vante para hacer un uso más extensivo e usos políticos de Internet usan variables vin-
intensivo de Internet (Howard et al., 2002). culadas a actitudes políticas generales como
la confianza en las instituciones o el interés
Variables del tercer bloque: por la política (Borge y Cardenal, 2011). Sin
variables actitudinales
embargo, consideramos que, dadas las ca-
Valores postmaterialistas. Para medir esta racterísticas propias del medio digital, es un
variable, utilizamos la escala elaborada por prerrequisito que los ciudadanos perciban
la encuesta mundial de valores (www.world- Internet como una herramienta que les permi-
valuessurvey.org) formada por 6 ítems, cuya te actuar políticamente. Desde nuestro punto
fiabilidad, estimada por Alpha de Cronbach, de vista, sin este prerrequisito actitudinal no
fue igual a = 0,88). es posible emprender el camino que lleve a un

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, Octubre - Diciembre 2016, pp. 97-116
110 La nueva frontera de la desigualdad digital: la brecha participativa

determinado ciudadano a realizar prácticas Tal como se muestra en la tabla 6, de los


políticas digitales. En este artículo hemos predictores que incluimos en el modelo, úni-
apostado por iniciar este camino y analizar en camente dos de ellos resultaron ser significa-
qué medida las actitudes sociopolíticas hacia tivos. Específicamente, la razón de ventaja
Internet se transforman en un elemento facili- asociada al predictor «habilidades digitales»
tador del uso político de Internet. nos informa de que una mayor independencia
del uso de Internet por parte de los participan-
tes en el estudio lleva asociada un decremen-
Análisis de los datos to en la ventaja de tener el perfil estudiado
Para comprobar nuestras hipótesis, aplica- (razón de ventaja = 0,882, p < 0,05). De forma
mos un modelo de regresión logística jerár- similar, la razón de ventaja asociada al predic-
quica. Esta técnica de análisis permite pre- tor «percepción sociopolítica de Internet» nos
informa de que una mayor percepción socio-
decir una variable dependiente dicotómica.
política de Internet por parte de los participan-
tes en el estudio lleva asociada un decremen-
Resultados to en la ventaja de tener el perfil estudiado
(razón de ventaja = 0,898, p < 0,05). En defi-
El modelo de regresión logística tuvo un ajus-
nitiva, nuestro modelo nos ayuda a explicar el
te aceptable, aunque no óptimo (algo espera-
perfil propuesto.
do, considerando la complejidad del modelo
y la peculiaridad del perfil estudiado), permi-
tiendo clasificar en el tercer bloque un 69% de
Conclusiones
los sujetos, con un ajuste de 0,164 (estimado
con el R cuadrado de Nagelkerke). Nuestro estudio empírico nos ha permitido
comprobar las hipótesis planteadas al inicio
Tabla 4. Resumen del modelo de regresión
de nuestro trabajo. Ahora sabemos que la
logística (tercer bloque) participación digital está irregularmente dis-
tribuida entre la población española. El por-
Logaritmo R cuadrado R cuadrado
centaje de personas más jóvenes y con ma-
Escalón de la de Cox y de
verosimilitud -2 Snell Nagelkerke yor nivel de formación que participan en
1 448,843a 0,112 0,164 Internet es significativamente mayor que el
porcentaje de personas con las característi-
a El valor de corte es 0,500.
cas opuestas. Esto implica que existe un
Fuente: Elaboración propia a partir de la encuesta realizada
en el marco del proyecto de I+D CSO2009-13424. problema de brecha participativa que afecta
al desarrollo actual de la sociedad red en Es-
paña.
Tabla 5. Índices de clasificación del modelo de
regresión logística (tercer bloque) El path analysis elaborado nos informa,
Observado Pronosticado además, de que la brecha participativa está
No uso de las
estadísticamente relacionada con las varia-
redes sociales Corrección de bles sociodemográficas como el estatus, el
porcentaje
0,00 1,00 nivel de estudios y la edad de la población.
No uso de 0,00 13 101 11,4
Sin embargo, mientras las dos primeras va-
las redes riables anteriormente señaladas inciden so-
1,00 16 305 95,0
sociales bre la participación digital de forma mediada
Porcentaje global 73,1 a través de las habilidades digitales, la edad
Fuente: Elaboración propia a partir de la encuesta realizada incide directamente sobre dicho comporta-
en el marco del proyecto de I+D CSO2009-13424. miento.

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, Octubre - Diciembre 2016, pp. 97-116
José M. Robles Morales, Mirko Antino, Stefano De Marco y Josep A. Lobera 111

Tabla 6.  Modelo de regresión logística (tercer bloque)

Error
B Wald gl Sig. Exp(B)
estándar
Estatus 0,042 0,118 0,126 1 0,723 1,043
Edad 0,029 0,019 2,529 1 0,112 1,030
Sexo -3,102 2,698 1,322 1 0,250 0,045
Estudios -0,088 0,133 0,435 1 0,510 0,916
Habilidades digitales -0,126 0,062 4,100 1 0,043 0,882
Independencia de uso -0,025 0,147 0,028 1 0,867 0,976
Infraestructura -0,116 0,148 0,617 1 0,432 0,891
Valores Post Materialistas 0,005 0,022 0,061 1 0,806 1,005
Capital Social -0,005 0,012 0,147 1 0,701 0,995
Utilidad Percibida 0,004 0,033 0,014 1 0,907 1,004
Facilidad de uso percibida -0,008 0,052 0,022 1 0,882 0,992
Actitudes sociopolíticas hacia Internet -0,108 0,046 5,457 1 0,019 0,898
Constante 6,500 3,586 3,286 1 0,070 664,985
Fuente: Elaboración propia a partir de la encuesta realizada en el marco del proyecto de I+D CSO2009-13424.

Tal y como han mostrado distintos estu- duce de forma directa y, a diferencia del res-
dios, la variable «habilidades digitales» es un to de variables sociodemográficas, no se
elemento clave para entender las desigual- encuentra mediada por las habilidades digi-
dades en la sociedad red ya que se posicio- tales.
na como la cadena de transmisión entre las La marca distinta de la participación digi-
formas tradicionales de desigualdad, la irre-
tal es que nos describe un nuevo escenario
gular distribución de recursos económicos
tecnológico en el que los ciudadanos dejan
(estatus) y formativos (educación), y las po-
de ser agentes pasivos y se transforman en
sibilidades con las que cuentan los ciudada-
agentes proactivos. Es decir, personas que
nos para participar en el nuevo contexto so-
colaboran en la construcción de su entorno
cial. Así, la conjunción de las variables nivel
digital. Según la literatura, esta participación
de estudio medio/bajo y bajo nivel de empleo
da poder a los ciudadanos en la medida en
se transforman, junto al estatus medio/bajo
y escasas habilidades digitales, en los ejes que les ofrece independencia respecto a los
axiales de la brecha participativa. poderes que, tradicionalmente, se han reser-
vado la creación de contenidos culturales
Otra nota relevante de este tipo de des-
(Benkler, 2006). Sin embargo, este nuevo
igualdad digital es el papel que juega la
paso dado en el desarrollo de la sociedad
edad. Según muestra nuestro estudio, la bre-
red se encuentra con los mismos problemas
cha participativa es un fenómeno generacio-
que afectaron a, primero, la penetración del
nal; cuanto mayor es la edad de los indivi-
duos más probable es que no realicen este uso de Internet (brecha digital) y, segundo, a
tipo de prácticas y, por lo tanto, su participa- la igual distribución de los usos beneficiosos
ción en la creación y enriquecimiento de In- y avanzados de Internet (UBAI).
ternet será menor. Esta circunstancia, tal y Tal y como hemos visto a través de nues-
como se ha descrito anteriormente, se pro- tra descripción de la literatura, la brecha di-

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, Octubre - Diciembre 2016, pp. 97-116
112 La nueva frontera de la desigualdad digital: la brecha participativa

gital parece ser un fenómeno destinado a la variable habilidades digitales. Esto, de ser
desaparecer. Sin embargo, no sucede, al correcto, mostraría nuevamente el efecto
menos en el momento presente, lo mismo «cadena de transmisión» de las desigualda-
con la desigualdad digital. Las diferencias des clásicas que representan este tipo de
entre las personas que usan y no usan servi- habilidades. Igualmente, es posible que la
cios y herramientas de Internet que generan variable edad esté recogida en la variable
ventajas competitivas no parecen estar redu- «actitudes sociopolíticas hacia Internet». De
ciéndose en España de forma significativa esta forma, podríamos hablar de una brecha
(Torres-Albero, Robles y De Marco, 2013). actitudinal según la cual las nuevas genera-
¿Sucederá lo mismo con la brecha participa- ciones percibirían Internet como una herra-
tiva? Esta es una cuestión que deberá ser mienta para hacer política.
estudiada en el futuro. Sin embargo, nos No obstante, la cuestión clave de este
aventuramos a especular con la idea de que, análisis es que nos señala cómo la percep-
al igual que los usos ventajosos de Internet, ción sobre las posibilidades sociopolíticas
la participación digital depende de un con- de Internet es la marca distintiva de esta
junto de exigencias formativas y digitales dimensión de la brecha participativa. Los
que solo reúnen determinados grupos socia- ciudadanos que consideran Internet como
les. De ser así, el empoderamiento que ge- un medio que les permite influir sobre el po-
nera la participación digital afectaría en ma- der y/o como una herramienta para estar
yor medida a los grupos socialmente mejor más integrados en la comunidad son ciuda-
posicionados produciendo, de esta forma, danos que participan, en mayor medida,
un desequilibrio que afectaría a ámbitos cla- con contenidos políticos en el entorno digi-
ve como la política, la economía, etc. tal. Por lo tanto, aquí destacamos la dimen-
Nuestro segundo objeto de investigación, sión actitudinal de esta forma de desigual-
la brecha participativa política, puede ser ex- dad. Es importante destacar que las
plicada apelando a patrones similares a los actitudes sociopolíticas generales, los valo-
descritos para su homóloga general. Gracias res postmaterialistas y el capital social, de-
a nuestro estudio sabemos que los recursos jan de comportarse como variables signifi-
materiales de los que disponen los ciudada- cativas en el modelo cuando introducimos
nos, así como los valores y actitudes gene- las actitudes sociopolíticas hacia Internet.
rales que poseen, valores postmaterialistas y Por lo tanto, la cuestión no es únicamente
capital social, no se posicionan como ante- que el comportamiento observado presenta
cedentes significativos del comportamiento una dimensión actitudinal muy relevante,
observado. Los efectos de estas variables en sino que dicha actitud se refiere fundamen-
los pasos 1 y 2 de nuestro análisis quedan talmente a la interpretación sociopolítica
recogidos en el tercer paso por dos variables que los sujetos realizan de la herramienta
concretas: las habilidades digitales y las ac- digital. En definitiva, cuanto mayor es el ni-
titudes sociopolíticas hacia Internet. vel de credibilidad otorgado a Internet en
Las habilidades digitales aparecen, nue- términos políticos y sociales, mayor es la
vamente, como una variable clave para ha- probabilidad de que una persona participe
cer un uso políticamente creativo de Internet. digitalmente con contenidos políticos.
Sin embargo, en este caso, las variables so- Para concluir, nos gustaría señalar algu-
ciodemográficas, incluyendo la edad, no se nas cuestiones de carácter más general que,
muestran significativas. Podemos especular desde nuestro punto de vista, pueden dar-
con la idea de que, en un modelo de regre- nos una idea más precisa sobre los riesgos
sión logística como el implementado aquí, el asociados a este tipo de desigualdades. El
efecto de dichas variables esté recogido por estudio del concepto de participación digital

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, Octubre - Diciembre 2016, pp. 97-116
José M. Robles Morales, Mirko Antino, Stefano De Marco y Josep A. Lobera 113

ha venido acompañado, en gran medida, de rán estos quienes tengan la oportunidad de


una disposición favorable, cuando no opti- experimentar las virtudes de las que hablan
mista, respecto a los efectos sociales, políti- Benkler y Nissenbaum (2006). Se trata de un
cos y económicos de este proceso (Benkler, Internet construido y experimentado por y
2006). Junto a la idea de que la participación para los privilegiados. La participación digi-
digital potencia el empoderamiento de los tal no parecería, así, conllevar una horizon-
ciudadanos (Shirky, 2008b), encontramos talidad mayor entre el conjunto de la pobla-
estudios que apuestan por un efecto positivo ción, tal y como sugiere la literatura
de la participación digital sobre las virtudes mencionada, sino una nueva forma de elitis-
social y políticamente positivas como la in- mo.
dependencia, la creatividad, etc. (Benkler y
Nissenbaum, 2006).
Tal y como constatan los datos aportados Bibliografía
aquí, el nivel de penetración del uso político Benkler, Yochai (2006). The Wealth of Notworks: How
de redes sociales digitales es relativamente Social Production Transfors Markets and Free-
importante. Por lo tanto, consideramos rele- dom. New Haven, Connecticut: Yale University
vante constatar el crecimiento en nuestro Press.
país de algunos de los indicadores que mi- Benkler, Yochai y Nissenbaum, Helen (2006). «Com-
den esta forma de participación. Sin embar- mons Based Peer Production and Virtue». The
go, y al mismo tiempo, observamos que di- Journal of Political Philosophy, 14(4): 394-419.
cho comportamiento está estrechamente Bennett, W. Lance y Segerberg, Alexandra (2012).
relacionado con variables que, como el nivel The Logic of Connective Action: Digital Media
de estudios o las habilidades digitales, seg- and the Personalization of Contentious Politics.
mentan a la población con recursos para ac- Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
ceder a todas las ventajas de la participación Bimber, Bruce (2000). «Measuring the Gender Gap
digital. on the Internet». Social Science Quarterly, 81:
868-876.
Pese a que las variables que nos ayudan
a predecir la participación digital sean muy Blank, Grant (2013). «Who Creates Content? Strati-
fication and Content Creation on the Internet».
parecidas a las usadas para explicar la bre-
Information, Communication and Society, 16(4):
cha digital, sus efectos potencialmente ne- 590-612.
gativos son mucho mayores. En el caso de
Bonfadelli, Heinz (2002). «The Internet and Know­
la brecha digital, la cuestión giraba en torno
ledge Gaps. A Theoretical and Empirical Investi-
a las oportunidades para acceder a Internet. gation». European Journal of Communication,
Sin embargo, los contenidos a los que se 17(1): 65-84.
podía acceder, una vez que un sujeto se
Borge, Rosa y Cardenal, Ana S. (2011). «Surfing the
convertía en internauta, no eran contempla- Net: A Pathway to Participation for the Politi-
dos como un problema al ser, en un princi- cally Uninterested?». Policy and Internet, 3(1):
pio, relativamente homogéneos. Sin embar- 1-29.
go, en el caso de la brecha participativa, Castells, Manuel (1997). La Era de la Información.
estas variables determinan quién o quiénes Vol. I: La Sociedad Red. Madrid: Alianza Editorial.
pueden participar en un ámbito cada vez Castells, Manuel (2015). Redes de indignación y es-
más especializado e influyente. De igual peranza. Madrid: Alianza Editorial.
manera, aquellos que están en disposición
Correa, Teresa (2010). «The Participation Divide among
de participar crearán contenidos acordes “online experts”: Experience, Skills and Psycho-
con sus intereses y expectativas sin atender logical Factors as Predictors of College Students’
a las demandas y necesidades de aquellos Web Content Creation». Journal of Computer-
que quedan excluidos. De igual manera, se- Mediated Communication, 16(1): 71-92.

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, Octubre - Diciembre 2016, pp. 97-116
114 La nueva frontera de la desigualdad digital: la brecha participativa

Deursen, Alexander van y Dijk, Jan van (2009). «Im- Kreiss, Daniel; Finn, Megan y Turner, Fred (2011).
proving Digital Skills for the Use of Online Public «The Limits of Peer Production: Some Reminders
Information and Services». Government Informa- from Max Weber for the Network Society». New
tion Quarterly, 26(2): 333-340. Media and Society, 13(2): 243-259.
Dijk, Jan van (2005). The Deepening Divide. Inequal- Laraña, Enrique (1999). La construcción de los mo-
ity in the Information Society. Thousand Oaks, vimientos sociales. Madrid: Alianza Editorial.
California: Sage Publications.
Malhotra, Yogesh y Galletta, Dennis F. (1999). «Ex-
Dijk, Jan van (2006). «Digital Divide Research, tending the Technology Acceptance Model to
Achievements and Shortcomings». Poetics, Account for Social Influence: Theoretical Bases
34(4): 221-235. and Empirical Validation». Proceedings of the
Dijk, Jan van (2013). «A Theory of the Digital Divide. 32nd Hawaii International Conference on System
The Digital Divide». En: Ragnedda, M. y Muschert, Sciences, IEEE.
G. W. (eds.). The Digital Divide: The Internet and Norris, Pippa (2001). Digital Divide? Civic Engage-
Social Inequality in International Perspective. New ment, Information Poverty and the Internet World-
York: Routledge. wide. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
DiMaggio, Paul y Hargittai, Eszter (2001). «From the Olson, Mancur (1978). The Logic of Collective Action.
Digital Divide to Digital Inequality. Studying Inter- Public Goods and the Theory of Groups. Cam-
net Use as Penetration Increase». Working Paper bridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press.
15. Centre for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies.
Rheingold, Howard (2003). Smart Mobs: The Next
DiMaggio, Paul et al. (2004). «From Unequal Access Social Revolution. Cambridge, Massachusetts:
to Differentiated Use: A Literature Review and Perseus.
Agenda for Research on Digital Inequality». En:
Rice, Ronald E. y Fuller, Ryan (2013). «Theoretical
Neckerman, K. M. (ed.). Social Inequality. New
Perspectives in the Study of Communication and
York: Russell Sage Foundation.
the Internet, 2000-2009». En: Dutton, W. (ed.).
Hargittai, Eszter y Walejko, Gina (2008). «The Par- Oxford Handbook of Internet Studies. Oxford:
ticipation Divide: Content Creation and Sharing Oxford University Press.
in the Digital Age». Information, Communication
Ruiz, M. A.; Pardo A. y San Martín, R. (2010). «Mo-
and Society, 11(2): 239-256.
delos de emociones estructurales». Papeles del
Hassani, Sara N. (2006). «Locating Digital Divides at Psicólogo, 31(1): 34-45.
Home, Work, and Everywhere Else». Poetics,
Sampedro, Víctor (2014). El cuarto poder en red. Por
34(4): 250-272.
un periodismo (de código libre) libre. Madrid:
Hoffmann, Christian P.; Lutz, Christoph y Meckel, Icaria.
Miriam (2014). «Content Creation on the Internet
Shirky, Clay (2008a). Here Comes Everybody. New
a Social Cognitive Perspective on the Participa-
York: Penguin Press.
tion Divide». ICA Annual Conference 2014, CAT
Panel «Digital Divides«, Seattle, 26 de mayo. Shirky, Clay (2008b). Excedente cognitivo. Creativi-
dad y generosidad en la era conectada. Barce-
Hoffman, Donna L.; Novak, Thomas P. y Scholosser,
lona: Ediciones Deusto.
Ann E. (2001). «The Evolution of Digital Divide: Ex-
amining Relationship of Race to Internet Access Schradie, Jen (2011). «The Digital Production Gap:
and Usage over Time». En: Compaine, B. M. (ed.). The Digital Divide and Web 2.0 Collide». Poetics,
The Digital Divide. Facing a Crisis or Creating a 39(2): 145-168.
Myth? Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press. Surowiecki, James (2004). The Wisdom of Crowds.
Howard, Philip E.; Rainie, Lee y Jones, Steve (2002). New York: Anchor Books.
«Days and Nights on the Internet». En: Wellman,
Torres-Albero, Cristóbal; Robles, José Manuel y De
B. y Haythornthwaite, C. (eds.). The Internet in
Marco, Stefano (2013). «Inequalities in the Infor-
Everyday Life. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.
mation Society: From the Digital Divide to Digital
Jenkins, Henry (2006). Convergence Culture: Where Inequality». En: López Peláez A. (ed.). The Robot-
Old and New Media Collide. New York: New York ics Divide. A New Frontier in the 21st Century?:
University Press. (pp. 173-194). London: Springer.

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, Octubre - Diciembre 2016, pp. 97-116
José M. Robles Morales, Mirko Antino, Stefano De Marco y Josep A. Lobera 115

Walsh, Ekaterina O. (2000). The Truth about the Dig- Wring, Dominic y Horrocks, Ivan (2001). «The Trans-
ital Divide. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Forrester. formation of Political Parties». En: Axford, B. y
Huggins, R. (eds.). New Media and Politics. Lon-
Ward, Stephen y Gibson, Rachel (2009). «European
don: Sage.
Political Organizations and the Internet: Mobiliza-
tion, Participation, and Change». En: Chadwick, Zabludovsky, Gina (2013). «El concepto de individua-
A. y Howard, P. N. (eds.). The Routledge Hand- lización en la sociología clásica y contemporá-
book of Internet Politics. New York: Routledge. nea». Política y Cultura, 39: 229-248.

RECEPCIÓN: 27/08/2015
REVISIÓN: 23/11/2015
APROBACIÓN: 26/01/2016

Reis. Rev.Esp.Investig.Sociol. ISSN-L: 0210-5233. Nº 156, Octubre - Diciembre 2016, pp. 97-116
Copyright of Revista Española de Investigaciones Sociologicas is the property of Centro de
Investigaciones Sociologicas and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or
posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users
may print, download, or email articles for individual use.