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Share personal

opinions and beliefs


English Grade 10
Lesson 1
Objectives

• Listening: Independently interpret


statements that express abstract ideas
• Speaking: Independently and spontaneously
participate in discussions about abstract
ideas
Reading
• Identify the point of view used in a text and
analyze how this affects the message of the
text.
LISTENING STRATEGIES
Top-Down Listening

• listening for general knowledge/life


experience

• making connections and drawing


conclusions based on what you have
already known previously + new
information
LISTENING STRATEGIES

Bottom-up Listening

• Listening for specific details: place,


time, names, etc.

• Best used when listening to


something new, critical, or unfamiliar
to you
Guide Questions:

• How did the speaker define the “single


story?”
• What is the speaker’s view on the “single
story?”
• How did the speaker support her views?
LET’S WATCH

The Danger of a Single Story-


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9Ihs2
41zeg
SKILL PRACTICE

1. Read and identify the point-of-view.

"It was a dark and stormy night; the rain fell


in torrents, except at occasional intervals,
when it was checked by a violent gust of
wind which swept up the streets."

~Edward George Bulwer-Lytton's Paul Clifford


SKILL PRACTICE
I forgot to tell you about that. They kicked
me out. I wasn’t supposed to come back
after Christmas vacation on account of I
was flunking four subjects and not applying
myself and all. They gave me frequent
warning to start applying myself—
especially around midterms, when my
parents came up for a conference with old
Thurmer—but I didn’t do it. So I got the ax.
~The Catcher in the Rye, JD Salinger
SKILL PRACTICE

You are a sculptor. You climb a great


ladder; you pour grease all over a growing
longleaf pine. Next, you build a hollow
cylinder like a cofferdam around the entire
pine, and grease its inside walls. You
climb your ladder and spend the next week
pouring wet plaster into the cofferdam, over
and inside the pine. You wait; the plaster
hardens.
~Annie Dillard, Pilgrim at Tinker Creek
SKILL PRACTICE
Mary gets run-down. Crying is bad for your
face, everyone knows that and so does
Mary but she can't stop. People at work
notice. Her friends tell her John is a rat, a
pig, a dog, he isn't good enough for her,
but she can't believe it. Inside John, she
thinks, is another John, who is much nicer.
This other John will emerge like a butterfly
from a cocoon, a Jack from a box, a pit
from a prune, if the first John is only
squeezed enough.
~Happy Endings, Margaret Atwood
SKILL PRACTICE
I stood by the sirena stall and looked over what was
offered, fighting the rising disappointment fueled by
the memories of my childhood years. The mermaids
lay side by side and almost haphazardly on top of
each other, eyes closed and mouths agape, on a bed
of crushed ice, most of them barely a foot long, some
even smaller, and their tails had only the barest hint
of green. Sensing my disquiet, the vendor, a middle-
aged man with a red bandanna and a bulging belly,
explained in a lugubrious tone that it was the lean
season, and that all mermaids were that size
nowadays.
- Six from Downtown, Dean Francis Alfar
DEFINITION
FIRST PERSON POINT OF VIEW

• involves the use of either “I” and “we”.

• the narrator participates in the story: often


as the protagonist (hero), but also
sometimes as the antagonist (antihero or
villain).
EXAMPLE: FIRST PERSON
POINT OF VIEW
"I could picture it. I have a habit of
imagining the conversations between
my friends. We went out to the Cafe to
have an aperitif and watch the evening
crowd on the Boulevard.“

~Ernest Hemingway
DEFINITION
SECOND PERSON POINT OF VIEW

• employs the pronoun “you”.

• generally used in instructional writing


because it is the most difficult point of
view to write in narration.
EXAMPLE: SECOND PERSON
POINT OF VIEW

"You are not the kind of guy who would


be at a place like this at this time of the
morning. But here you are, and you
cannot say that the terrain is entirely
unfamiliar, although the details are
fuzzy."
DEFINITION
THIRD PERSON POINT OF VIEW

• uses pronouns such as “he”, “she”, “it”,


“they” or a name.
• the narrator does not participate in the
action of the story as one of the characters,
but often lets us know exactly how the
characters feel.
• the use of outside voice.
EXAMPLE: THIRD PERSON
POINT OF VIEW

“Mr. Stewart is a principled man. He


acts by the book and never lets you
deceive him easily.”
SUBTYPE: First Person

First Person Peripheral


• the narrator is a supporting character in the
story, not the main character.
• uses the "I" narrator but since the narrator
is not the protagonist, there are events and
scenes that will happen to the protagonist
that the narrator will not have access to.
SUBTYPE: Third Person

Third Person Omniscient


• uses the "he/she/it" narration but now the
narrator knows EVERYTHING

• can know things that others don't, can make


comments about what's happening, and can
see inside the minds of other characters.
SUBTYPE: Third Person

Third Person Limited


Limited means that the point of view is limited
to only one character – which means that the
narrator only knows what that character knows.

• can choose to view the action from right


inside the character's head, or from further
away, where the narrator has more access
to information outside the protagonist's
viewpoint.
SUBTYPE: Third Person

Third Person Multiple


• still in the "he/she/it" category, but now
the narrator can follow multiple
characters in the story.
• challenge is in making sure that the
reader knows when the author has
switched points of view from one
character to another.
EXAMPLE: THIRD PERSON MULTIPLE

So the African couple walked into the


restaurant with disbelief but an aura of poise
and confidence. The waiter, an African as I
may mention, lead them to their tables and give
them the menu for the night. The couple read it
with gusto and glanced at each other. Now, on
the other table, Markus, a South African
descendant looked at them with wonder. He
had been waiting for this couple the whole night,
these couple whom he longed to embrace long
before slavery snatched him from his native
soil.
What’s the difference?
Identify which of the following statements is
SUBJECTIVE or OBJECTIVE.

A.African writers promote Negritude that


focuses on Black is Beautiful because they
believed that Africa and its people deserve to
write their stories in the voice of its real
ancestors.
B. I believed these foreign invaders do not
respect our black culture and beliefs for they
are born savages who could not differentiate
primitive from advance settlers. Well,
colonizers have the same blood.
Subjective Point of View

• based on personal opinions,


interpretations, points of view, emotions
and judgment.
• not applicable for scenarios like news
reporting or decision making in business
or politics.
Example: Subjective Point of View

Apple only allows apps that the company


has approved to be installed
on iOS devices. The company does not
care about openness of their platform.
Example: Subjective Point of View

There is an open secret that says


Americans will never accept immigrants as
their own people. I think this stemmed
from their president’s belief in life that
other races are lower than the American
race.
Objective Point of View

Objective point of view is fact-based,


measurable and observable.
Example: Objective Point of View

More than 26 million Filipinos remain poor with


almost half, or a little more than 12 million, living
in extreme poverty and lacking the means to
feed themselves, according to official
government statistics for the first semester of
2015

The figures, however, reflect slight


improvements from the same period in 2012,
two years after President Benigno Aquino III
assumed power, as well as in 2009 and 2006,
under the Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo presidency.
Example: Objective Point of View

Based on a report made by the United


Nations in 2008, most countries in Africa
are now progressing in terms of poverty.
The international survey shows that from
50% of mortality rates due to
malnutrition, it now decreased to 10%.
LET’S WATCH

9 Best Things About Being Filipino-


America-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b2IHPI
qTNcI
GUIDE QUESTIONS

• How did the panel discussion start?

• What are the roles of the moderator?

• What are the roles of the panelists?


VIDEO

Panel Discussion-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hfVxrtF
8C88
PANEL DISCUSSION

• is a specific format used in a meeting,


conference or convention

• a live or virtual discussion about a


specific topic amongst a selected group
of panelists who share differing
perspectives in front of a large audience.
MODERATOR
• facilitates the panel discussion, which
means you do not take sides and your
personal opinion is not revealed.

• leading the panel discussion, inviting


panelists to speak, and being a liaison
between the audience and the panelists.
MODERATOR
• plans an introduction that states the topic
and why it is being discussed.
• provides background information on the
topic
• introduces each member of the panel
• ask questions to keep the panel going
and conclude the discussion
PANELIST
• prepare and keep track of what points
you will make/data you will present
during the discussion.

• be able to speak your identity's


opinion/perspective when put on the spot
(impromptu speaking.)
PANELIST
• prepares a short account of his/her view
on the problem or issue

• makes a statement of point-of-view on


the topic of the panel session
TASK GUIDELINES
✓Your panel discussion should not exceed
ten minutes
✓Everyone in the group must be given an
opportunity to speak.
✓No one is allowed to read their ideas.
The discussion should be spontaneous.
✓You may bring your notes as cue cards.
TOPIC

The Filipino Single Story and


How to Destroy It
Guide Questions – Panel Discussion

• What are the common misrepresentation you hear or


know about the Filipino people?
• How is the history of Filipino people written in the eyes of
the colonizers?
• What stories in Philippine history would destroy the
stereotypes or stigma linked by these colonizers?
• How does a single story affected our:
• life and culture?
• perspective and belief
• self-esteem and confidence
EXIT SLIP

Because I learned about the danger of a


“single story,” I will now
________________ and avoid
_____________________.

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