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U.S.

Department of State Foreign Affairs Handbook Volume 12 Handbook 7 – Local Guard


Program

12 FAH-7 H-000
LOCAL GUARD PROGRAM

12 FAH-7 H-010
BACKGROUND
(CT:LGP-04; 03-23-2006)
(Office of Origin: DS)

12 FAH-7 H-011 GENERAL


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The Bureau of Diplomatic Security (DS) is responsible for providing a


secure environment in which to conduct U.S. Government business at
Foreign Service posts. This responsibility embraces all agencies which
normally are associated or co-located with diplomatic and consular
establishments and under the direct control of the chief of mission (COM.)
Responsibility for individual units is specified in the COM Commander-in-
Chief (CINC) Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) on security for the
respective country. Part of this secure environment is provided through
the development of a Local Guard Program (LGP) which may include the
use of local guard force (LGF) personnel for access control, building and
residence security, and, if required, for personal protection of key
personnel. Another important aspect of the LGP is the Surveillance
Detection Program (SDP). This is a defensive program designed to
enhance the safety and security of U.S. Government personnel and
resources under the COM by detecting and reporting of pre-operational
terrorist surveillance activities directed against U.S. Government
personnel and facilities.

b. The regional security officer or post security officer (RSO and/or PSO)
under the direction of the COM or principal officer (PO), has primary
responsibility for establishing and managing LGPs.

12 FAH-7 H-012 PURPOSE


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

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U.S. Department of State Foreign Affairs Handbook Volume 12 Handbook 7 – Local Guard
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The purpose of this Foreign Affairs Handbook (FAH) is to prescribe uniform


policies, criteria, and standards for the LGP at U.S. Department of State
(DOS) installations abroad and to provide guidance on how to initiate and
manage a LGP.

12 FAH-7 H-013 SCOPE OF DS PROGRAMS


AND POLICIES
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The Omnibus Diplomatic Security and Antiterrorism Act of 1986 (Public Law
99-399) requires the Secretary of State to develop and implement policies
and programs, including funding levels and standards, to provide for the
security of U.S. Government diplomatic operations abroad.

12 FAH-7 H-014 STANDARDS


(CT:LGP-04; 03-23-2006)

This handbook sets forth the procedures for managing LGP implementation
standards for security services provided for protection of official facilities and
residences abroad which fall under the authority of the COM. These
standards are detailed in 12 FAH-6, Security Standards Handbook, which has
been approved through the Overseas Security Policy Board (OSPB). (For
detailed guidance on the SDP, see the Surveillance Detection Management
and Operations Field Guide, Version 2, dated 2002).

12 FAH-7 H-015 THROUGH H-019


UNASSIGNED

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12 FAH-7 H-020
LOCAL GUARD PROGRAM (LCP) CONCEPT
AND PHILOSOPHY
(CT:LGP-04; 03-23-2006)
(Office of Origin: DS)

12 FAH-7 H-021 CONCEPT


(CT:LGP-04; 03-23-2006)

a. The Omnibus Diplomatic Security and Antiterrorism Act of 1986 created


the Bureau of Diplomatic Security (DS) with an Assistant Secretary of
State at its head. The act directed the Secretary of State to develop and
implement policies and programs, including funding levels and standards,
for the protection of diplomatic operations abroad. This includes the
establishment of LGPs.

b. DS will assist each post to:

(1) Develop the post’s LGP to be responsive to the actual threat level;

(2) Contract with one competent LGP firm that will provide security for
all employees and agencies at the mission or DS will assist post in
initiating a Personal Services Agreement (PSA) to provide such
security;

(3) Deploy the LGP to achieve optimum security; and

(4) Initiate within the LGP a Surveillance Detection Program (SDP)


dedicated to observation activity to detect, record, report and col-
late reports of hostile surveillance directed against U.S. Govern-
ment facilities and personnel. This program enables a post facing a
potential terrorist attack to take defensive measures and work with
local authorities to prevent a possible (for detailed guidance on the
SDP, see the Surveillance Detection Management and Operations
Field Guide, Version 2, dated 2002).

12 FAH-7 H-022 PHILOSOPHY


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

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U.S. Department of State Foreign Affairs Handbook Volume 12 Handbook 7 – Local Guard
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All security standards and guidelines were institutionalized in an official


Foreign Affairs Handbook (12 FAH-6) as promulgated on November 3, 1997.
When designing a LGP, the standards referenced in 12 FAH-6 pertaining to
political violence and crime threat must be addressed. In the physical and
personal security context, “threat” generally refers to the weapons and
tactics that have been used against U.S. facilities and personnel. The
“threat level” for a post, as identified in the Security Environment Threat List
(SETL), published semi-annually by the Office of Intelligence Threat
Analysis, is the current likelihood, arrived at after analysis, of those weapons
and tactics that could possibly be used against U.S. Government facilities
and/or personnel. Experience has shown that the most common and most
dangerous physical threats to official facilities at Foreign Service posts come
from:

(1) Mob violence and civil disturbance; and

(2) Explosive and incendiary devices (to include bomb laden vehicles).

12 FAH-7 H-023 THROUGH H-029


UNASSIGNED

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12 FAH-7 H-030
REFERENCES
(CT:LGP-04; 03-23-2006)
(Office of Origin: DS)

12 FAH-7 H-031 REFERENCE LISTING


(CT:LGP-04; 03-23-2006)

The following is a listing of references which are quoted or cited in the text
of this handbook or which may be of assistance to users of this handbook.
Except where specifically noted below, all references are unclassified:

(1) Public Law 99-399, The Omnibus Diplomatic Security and


Antiterrorism Act of 1986;

(2) Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations and Optional Protocol on


Disputes, dated April 18, 1961;

(3) 12 FAM 300, Physical Security Programs;

(4) 12 FAH-6, Security Standards Handbook;

(5) President's Letter of Instruction to Ambassadors;

(6) Foreign Service Act of 1980 (Pub. L. 96-465), 22 U.S.C 3927,


Section 207;

(7) Surveillance Detection Management and Operations Field Guide,


Version 2, dated 2002;

(8) Special Protective Equipment (SPE) Annual Telegram.

12 FAH-7 H-032 THROUGH H-039


UNASSIGNED

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12 FAH-7 H-100
CREATING A LOCAL GUARD
PROGRAM (LGP)

12 FAH-7 H-110
SCOPE AND AUTHORITY
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 H-111 SCOPE


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The host government has responsibility for protecting diplomatic missions


and accredited personnel as stated in the Vienna Convention on
Diplomatic Relations (1961). Similar responsibility extends to consulates
under the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations (1963). Host
government support for meeting the security needs of U.S. diplomatic
missions and consulates is a significant factor in determining the scope
and structure of LGPs. See also 12 FAM 322, Host Government Role.

b. To complement host government support, security standards have been


developed by the Bureau of Diplomatic Security (DS) in consultation with
representatives of other foreign affairs agencies through the Overseas
Security Policy Board (OSPB). For LGPs, DS has developed standards for
the categories of both crime and terrorism. For more information refer to
12 FAH-6, Security Standards Handbook.

c. Other factors, such as threat levels and available funding, are also
determining elements in the overall structure of LGPs.

12 FAH-7 H-112 LEGAL AUTHORITY


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The Omnibus Diplomatic Security and Antiterrorism Act of 1986, Section


105, (22 U.S.C 4804) is the legal authority for the establishment and
operation of LGPs.

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12 FAH-7 H-113 THROUGH H-119


UNASSIGNED

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12 FAH-7 H-120
DETERMINING REQUIRED SECURITY
MEASURES
(TL:LGP-02; 04-30-2003)
(Office of Origin: CIS/PSP/FPD)

12 FAH-7 H-121 GENERAL


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The mission is responsible for determining specific security measures


required in accordance with policies and guidance from the Department.
The nature of the threat to each post is assessed and published semi-
annually in the Security Environment Threat List (SETL) distributed by the
Office of Intelligence and Threat Analysis (DS/DSS/ITA). Each post is
assigned to one of four threat categories: low, medium, high, or critical.
Threat factors are considered in all categories that bear on:

(1) Internal political stability and existing or latent violence;

(2) The existing or potential threat to personnel or facilities from mob


violence, terrorist attack, or other violence; and

(3) The existing or expected nature of criminal attacks against


personnel and residences.

b. The level of threat drives the specific security measures to be employed


at a post. Missions are responsible for developing their security
programs. This will include a LGP. Posts must obtain approval from DS,
per guidelines provided in this handbook, for their LGP. The program
must include coverage for vehicle access, perimeter security, explosive
detection, surveillance detection, bodyguards, residential security, etc.

c. In selected instances, a post may seek to implement residential security


standards above and beyond those required for the overall threat rating
in the SETL. In these situations, the post must coordinate their requests
with the Facilities Protection Division (DS/CIS/PSP/FPD) before taking any
action unless an immediate or emergency situation dictates otherwise. If
an RSO and/or PSO seeks to make residential security changes
permanent, the Emergency Action Committee (EAC) will be required to
provide specific justification for the permanent changes to

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DS/CIS/PSP/FPD for review and approval.

12 FAH-7 H-122 SECURITY MEASURES


CONTINGENT UPON THREAT LEVEL
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

Security measures employed by posts involving a LGF should be responsive


to and be designed to match threats, taking into account the commitment of
security resources by the host government. No LGF would normally be
authorized for residential security for those posts in the low threat category
except for the EMR. If there are unusual local circumstances that require
consideration for guard forces and/or bodyguards even though the threat
level per se does not warrant this coverage, this information must be
provided in the request for approval by DS. For example, a LGF may be
needed to effectively counter an endemic high level of criminal activity
directed against residences and/or their occupants.

12 FAH-7 H-123 FACTORS FOR


DETERMINING LGP SCOPE
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The governing factors for determining the scope of the mission’s LGP
include:

(1) The nature of the threat to U. S. Government assets (personnel,


official facilities, residences);

(2) The extent to which the host government can and does provide
protection for them;

(3) The nature and extent of the assets to be protected;

(4) 12 FAH-6, Security Standards; and

(5) Post's threat ratings as identified in the SETL.

b. Each mission should document its assets. Assets are defined in terms of
people, things or property. This documentation has value not only for the
purpose of planning the LGP, but it directly affects the post’s emergency
action plans (EAP).

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12 FAH-7 H-124 OFFICIAL FACILITIES


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The RSO should be familiar with all official buildings, offices, structures and
space, including consular agent offices, other than residences, of all agencies
under the purview of the COM. A summary of such facilities is found in the
Real Estate Management System (REMS) Report. This report should be on
file at the General Service Officer's (GSO) office, giving the function,
address, and agency name of each property. This serves as the basis for the
conduct of the security survey used by the RSO to determine the level of
security protection required. NOTE: U.S. Government sponsored or other
international schools are not official facilities for the purpose of this
handbook. If requested, RSOs can provide schools with assistance in
determining security requirements. See 12 FAM 334.1, International
Schools, for details.

12 FAH-7 H-125 PERSONNEL AND


DEPENDENTS
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

Personnel falling under the COM's responsibility for security should be


identified where:

(1) Their residence will require guard protection; and

(2) Where additional protection will be needed, such as an armed


escort.

12 FAH-7 H-126 RESIDENCES


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The COM or the principal officer (PO) and the Marine security guard (MSG)
residences are considered to be at risk, regardless of the general level of
threat to U.S. assets. Although not required for the principal officer
residence (POR) and Marine security guard residence (MSGR) at low threat
posts, guards may be authorized for any or all of these residences if there
are unusual local circumstances.

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12 FAH-7 H-127 LGP SECURITY FORCE


DEPLOYMENT
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The LGF should be deployed to achieve maximum security by having


guards stationed as the initial barrier against threats to U.S. assets. LGF
personnel must deter or fend off attacks, and serve as an early alert
capability. Key to the success of such a force is:

(1) The identification of specific posts and related security work and
procedures needed in light of the threat;

(2) The nature and extent of host government protection and U.S.
Government physical security measures used; and

(3) Proper training, supervision, and management.

b. The surveillance detection (SD) force should also be deployed to achieve


maximum effectiveness in the identification of possible hostile
surveillance. Successful deployment of this force requires:

(1) Identification of specific posts to include vulnerabilities and


locations from which hostile surveillance would probably be carried
out:

(2) Identification of choke points along routes commonly used by


employees;

(3) Agreement with the host government on the operation of the SDP;

(4) Good communications between SD personnel and the RSO; and

(5) Proper training, equipment, supervision, and management.

12 FAH-7 H-128 MISSION DETERMINES


REQUIRED SECURITY MEASURES
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. U.S. missions determine post-specific security measures in accordance


with policy guidance and security standards developed by the OSPB.
After receiving DS/CIS/PSP/FPD approval for a LGP, the RSO, with the
concurrence of the COM, will establish implementation measures.

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b. Post requests for authorization and funding of security services from


DS/CIS/PSP/FPD which exceed Department standards will require the
post's emergency action committee (EAC) recommendation and the COM
or PO's approval.

12 FAH-7 H-129 OVERSEAS BUILDINGS


OPERATIONS (OBO)
(TL:LGP-02; 04-30-2003)

a. Certain types or sizes of OBO construction or renovation projects may


require the use of local guards to ensure security at a mission or
construction site. OBO Security Management (OBO/PE/SM), OBO Area
Management (OBO/OM/AM), and DS/CIS/PSP/FPD will discuss and assign
responsibility for security funding at OBO projects. For construction
and/or major renovation projects, the RSO and the site security manager
(SSM) (if one is assigned to the project) are responsible for deciding on
the appropriate level of security and what costs are related to the project.

b. Additional guards needed as a result of an OBO construction project are


funded by OBO. The additional guards needed for OBO construction
projects are usually obtained through a contract modification to an
existing NPS guard contract. Posts using a PSA arrangement for guard
staffing may need to hire additional guards.

12 FAH-7 H-129.1 Site Security Manager (SSM)


(TL:LGP-02; 04-30-2003)

a. For major projects, OBO designates an individual as the manager of


security for the project. This individual is known as the site security
manager (SSM). Whether or not the SSM is in the chain of command, the
SSM will monitor performance of the local guard force at the project site
and is expected to maintain frequent contact with the LGF shift
commander. The SSM, in monitoring guard performance, is required to
inform the RSO of any guard who does not provide services in accordance
with the guard force general orders or the post orders for the post to
which the guard is assigned.

b. The RSO is normally the COR for all local guard services under a NPS
contract, including those guards supervised by the SSM at a construction
site. Local guard general and post orders should specify the SSM’s
authority and the local guards be advised accordingly. When changes are
required in general or post orders, the SSM submits the changes to the

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RSO for approval. The SSM has no authority to change the scope of work
of a guard force contract or to otherwise modify the terms of the
contract. If changes are needed, the SSM consults with the COR, who
then makes a request to the CO for a modification of a NPS contract.

c. In the absence of the SSM, a cleared American guard (CAG), if present,


may monitor guard performance, issue technical guidance and act as a
point of contact for the RSO. CAGs do not have the authority to
supervise or discipline guards.

12 FAH-7 H-129.2 Controlled Access Area (CAA)


Construction-Related Guard Posts
(TL:LGP-02; 04-30-2003)

a. Local guard positions at access and/or egress points which are primarily
used for OBO construction activities at new and/or ongoing construction
sites involving a CAA, are funded by OBO/PE/SM. The guard positions are
administered through the RSO or PSO even though a designated site
security manager (SSM) may be assigned for project security.

b. The SSM is responsible for preparing comprehensive guard orders for the
LGF, and for assuring that local guards assigned to the construction site
perform work in accordance with the guidelines expressed in terms of the
existing local guard contract.

c. The SSM will coordinate all security requirements with the RSO and/or
PSO to ensure that these requirements are properly implemented and
administered. OBO/PE/SM funded positions include, but are not limited to
access control facilities, construction vehicle gates, auxiliary entrances for
OBO personnel or construction materials, and any other entrances
necessary for OBO project operations exclusive of mission business. All
local guard orders must be written in both English and the local language,
and posted in the access control facility. Additionally, after consultation
with the RSO, the SSM should define the role of the LGF in response to
emergency plans.

d. Static guards and/or the creation of a mobile patrol for coverage of


buildings (including warehouses used solely by OBO) or properties that
are used primarily for OBO activities, such as offices which may be at a
different location then the actual point of construction, are also included
in the OBO/PE/SM funding.

12 FAH-7 H-129.3 Non-CAA Construction-Related

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Guard Posts
(TL:LGP-02; 04-30-2003)

Local guard positions at access and/or egress points primarily used for OBO
construction activities and involve non-CAA projects will be funded by
OBO/OM/AM. Local guard administration will be through the RSO or PSO
even though an SSM may be assigned. The SSM will coordinate all security
requirements with the RSO and/or PSO to ensure requirements are properly
implemented and administered. Static guards and the creation of mobile
patrol coverage of buildings or properties used primarily for OBO non-CAA
related activities would also be funded by OBO/OM/AM.

12 FAH-7 H-129.4 Non-Construction Guard Posts


(TL:LGP-02; 04-30-2003)

Local guard positions at access and/or egress points which are primarily
used for embassy and/or consulate business are funded by DS/CIS/PSP/FPD
(using both International Cooperative Administrative Support Services
(ICASS) and non-ICASS funds), and administered through the RSO or PSO
for the given post. This may include perimeter entrances, chancery and/or
office building entrances, consular entrances, general public access, and any
other access and/or egress points exclusive of OBO construction operations.
Static guards and/or mobile partrol mobile coverage of official facilities used
primarily by mission personnel and/or service a mission function, also
remain funded by DS/CIS/PSP/FPD.

12 FAH-7 H-129.5 Guard Posts at Vacant Official


Properties or in Response to Specific Vulnerabilities
(TL:LGP-02; 04-30-2003)

a. Property, which is vacant pending OBO construction or disposal activities,


may require static and/or mobile patrol guard coverage in order to
prevent vandalism or homesteading. DS/CIS/PSP/FPD will not support
the creation of a mobile patrol solely for property that is unoccupied,
pending OBO development, sale, or other form of disposal. Under these
circumstances, OBO is responsible for funding static and/or mobile patrol
guards, based on RSO and OBO agreement on the recommended level of
guard coverage required. Under other circumstances, DS and/or post is
responsible for guard coverage. When OBO is responsible and
determines a need for local guard coverage, it will submit its request to
DS/CIS/PSP/FPD for approval. This approval must precede any contract
modification action, change in Personal Services Agreement (PSA) staffing

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level, or other action that may entail OBO funding commitments.

b. In response to specific vulnerabilities, due to distance from perimeter


screening to work site, or due to limited clearance of local construction
workers, additional guard presence at the construction site may be
required. If OBO agrees that additional guard coverage is required, OBO
will fund the requirement whether it is a non-CAA or a CAA construction
project.

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12 FAH-7 H-130
TYPES OF LOCAL GUARD PROGRAMS
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 H-131 GENERAL


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Regardless of type, all LGPs have the same security function. The type of
program is primarily determined by the source of the guards. Local
guards come from one of three sources:

(1) The guards may be the employees of a professional security firm


working under a non-personal services (NPS) contract with the
mission;

(2) The guards may be employees of the U.S. Government working


under personal service agreements (PSAs); or

(3) The guards may be employees of the host government serving as


members of a police or other security force.

NOTE: For facility access control and inspection functions, host government
forces should be used only when NPS or PSA employees are not an option.

b. The Department requires that posts attempt to obtain local guard services
from the host government. However, if the level of coverage is not
sufficient, then the preferred alternative is a NPS contract with a
professional security firm. Only when both of the above options are
clearly established as unfeasible, will DS consider approving the use of
PSAs to establish and maintain a local guard force.

12 FAH-7 H-132 HOST-GOVERNMENT LAW


ENFORCEMENT
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The security environment maintained by the host government through the


use of its police resources whether responding to criminality and violence in
the form of bombings, terrorist attacks, and riots, influences the kind and

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size of the LGP for a post. Each post must rely on the local security forces to
respond to criminal events in a manner prescribed by the host government
laws. Further, additional security resources may be needed for protection of
U.S. Government assets where there is civil disturbance or other forms of
violence directed against these assets. How prepared the host government
is to do this effectively has a bearing on plans that the mission must make
for its protection under such circumstances. Mission requirements for
response to criminal or other incidents vary according to the nature of the
threat to mission assets. Host country response time will vary from country-
to-country and it is the mission's responsibility to determine the response
time and whether or not it meets the mission's needs.

12 FAH-7 H-132.1 Host-Government Local Guard


Support
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Posts must make formal notification to host governments before taking


any measures to create or maintain a LGF for the protection of mission
employees, dependents, residences, and facilities. The nature of the
threat and the vulnerability of personnel and facilities will be the basis for
the proposed security measures.

b. The post must submit the above information to DS/CIS/PSP/FPD, with the
formal host government response. This should be done as part of a
request for approval of all new programs, or where there is a substantial
modification or increase in the scope of an existing program. If local
conditions dictate caution in taking this initial step with the host
government, the reasons and an alternative strategy should be
communicated by the post to DS/CIS/PSP/FPD.

c. If the post concludes that local guard resources are needed only for
certain security procedures, within the confines of post buildings or
grounds, then no representation need be made to the host government.
These guards enhance the U.S. Government facility internal security
program and will not operate outside of the facility perimeter. Examples
of this are guards who are used for examining packages or vehicular
cargo within a diplomatic compound, operating a metal detector or access
control device inside a chancery or consulate lobby, checking identity
documents, etc. Identify these guard services separately in the approval
submission to DS/CIS/PSP/FPD.

d. The U.S. Government provides conventional protection for foreign


missions in the United States and bodyguard services to selected resident
foreign diplomats. Reciprocity is a political issue with some nations.

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Consequently, it is critical that embassies carefully review requests to be


made of the host government and to coordinate these with the
Department. If there is any indication that the host government may
request reciprocity, a full discussion of the extent of the request
contemplated should be forwarded to DS/CIS/PSP/FPD and the Office of
Foreign Missions (DS/OFM) along with comments and recommendations
by the COM. DS/OFM will then provide guidance in anticipation of
possible reciprocal requests in the United States. When reciprocity
problems arise, posts should provide:

(1) Details of the protection assistance to be provided; and

(2) Post views relative to the reciprocity problems.

The Department will then provide specific guidance on a case-by-case basis.

e. It is U.S. Government policy that missions where local guard services are
provided by the host government, responsibility for any questions or
problems related to liability for the action or inaction of the host
government forces is the sole responsibility of the host government. This
should be made clear to the host government before conclusion of any
MOA and/or MOU and should be included in the final MOA and/or MOU.
See 12 FAH-7 Appendix III, Suggestions for Host-Government MOU
and/or MOA, for additional information.

f. Before any approach is made to the host government, the RSO should
discuss the local guard needs with the administrative officer and the DCM
or COM, as appropriate. It should be understood that discussions with
the host government would represent an official statement of the mission
relative to the host government services. A decision may be taken to
approach the host government in an informal manner.

g. Before signing any final agreement between the post and the host
government, the post should send the final draft to DS/CIS/PSP/FPD for
review and appropriate department clearances, e.g., A/OPE, L/LM/DS,
regional bureau, etc.

12 FAH-7 H-132.2 Host-Government Security


Services
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The host government security forces may consist of civil, paramilitary, and
military forces of various proficiencies. Such forces vary from country to
country. The RSO or PSO should become aware of the responsibilities and

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capabilities of such forces at the post of assignment. Detailed information


regarding the scope and nature of guard services provided should be
determined. This includes information on the numbers of personnel, the
posts of assignment, the nature of arms used, the manner in which such
personnel are supervised, and the hours of coverage for each post.

12 FAH-7 H-132.3 The Vienna Convention on


Diplomatic Relations and Optional Protocol on
Disputes (1961)
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Most countries, including the United States, are parties to the Vienna
Convention on Diplomatic Relations, a multilateral international
agreement concerning diplomatic privileges and immunities. The full
language of the Vienna Convention is generally available in the mission’s
political section. The key provisions include:

(1) Article 1—Provides definitions of diplomatic staff and premises;

(2) Article 22—States the inviolability of the premises of the mission


and states the duty of the receiving state to take all appropriate
steps to protect the premises of the mission against any intrusion
or damage and disturbance of the peace or the impairment of its
dignity;

(3) Article 27—Requires the receiving state to permit and protect free
communication by the mission for all official purposes, but requires
host government consent for the use of a wireless transmitter;

(4) Article 29—States the immunity from arrest or detention of a


diplomatic agent;

(5) Article 30—Provides the same level of inviolability for the


residence of a diplomatic agent as that accorded to the mission;
and

(6) Article 37—Provides the same level of immunity for diplomatic


agents and their families and defines the privileges and immunities
of administrative and technical staff.

b. The Convention formalized rules of conduct that have existed for


centuries. Whether or not a host country is a signatory of the
Convention, its provisions have become the accepted norm in
international relations.

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12 FAH-7 H-133 NONPERSONAL SERVICES


(NPS) CONTRACT
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. It is the general policy of the U.S. Government, Office of Management


and Budget (OMB) Circular A-76, to rely on commercial sources to supply
the products and services that the U.S. Government needs. U.S.
Government performance of the commercial activity of providing guard
services may be authorized when:

(1) No commercial source is capable of providing the needed products


or services;

(2) Use of such a source would cause unacceptable delay or disruption


of an essential program; or

(3) A cost comparison demonstrates that the U.S. Government is


operating or can operate the activity on an on-going basis at an
estimated substantially lower cost than a qualified commercial
source.

b. DS/CIS/PSP/FPD has a cost-estimating model that must be used to


establish whether or not personal service agreements (PSAs) would be
less expensive than continuing a NPS contract. However, if a post is able
to substantiate that it could operate a LGP with PSAs, at a lower cost than
a NPS contract, DS/CIS/PSP/FPD agreement is required.

c. The 12 FAH-7 H-400 covers in detail the benefits for the U.S.
Government, the post and the RSO and/or PSO of operating a LGF
through the use of a NPS contract as well as the procedures needed to
execute a contract. The majority of LGPs use NPS contracts and every
effort should be made by the mission to, where possible, maintain a NPS
contract with a commercial security firm.

12 FAH-7 H-134 PERSONAL SERVICE


AGREEMENT (PSA)
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. PSAs are used to employ guards at missions where no suitable


commercial security contractors are available. The host government, for
example, may prohibit the establishment or operation of such companies.

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b. Under a PSA, each personal service contractor is treated as if he or she is


directly employed by contract by the U.S. Government, and therefore,
direct supervisory authority is exercised over that employee through an
established employer-employee relationship. See 12 FAH-7 H-440 for
complete information on establishing and maintaining a PSA staffed LGF.

12 FAH-7 H-135 THROUGH H-139


UNASSIGNED

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12 FAH-7 H-200
PROGRAM MANAGEMENT

12 FAH-7 H-210
FACILITY PROTECTION DIVISION
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 H-211 FACILITY PROTECTION


DIVISION RESPONSIBILITIES
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. DS/CIS/PSP/FPD is the program office with the responsibility of reviewing


all mission local guard programs (LGPs), including surveillance detection
programs (SDPs). DS/CIS/PSP/FPD approves the program content,
prepares and manages the worldwide budget, and provides funding (or
allotment authority) for the implementation of mission security programs,
including residential security and surveillance detection. This office also
functions as the focal point for all activities needed in support of the
mission’s LGP. DS/CIS/PSP/FPD will coordinate with other elements of
DS, other bureaus, (i.e., A/OPE, L/LM/DS for contract administration and
solicitation and/or award process), and other agencies as the need arises.
DS/CIS/PSP/FPD is composed of program and budget officers.

b. The Department’s LGP is managed through the Chief of the Facility


Protection Division (DS/CIS/PSP/FPD).

c. DS/CIS/PSP/FPD develops policies and procedures, responds to requests


for information from missions, prepares statistics, and monitors
disbursement of funds for the LGP worldwide. It is also responsible for:

(1) Assisting in training RSOs, PSOs, and others in Washington and


abroad;

(2) Approving program content and program changes;

(3) Monitoring the implementation of program contracting and assisting


in the development of solicitations for guard services and contracts;

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(4) Providing assistance in the design and implementation of programs,


utilizing technology where possible;

(5) Conducting program and financial reviews to ensure that minimum


LGP and residential security standards are met at posts;

(6) Allocating funds for posts’ LGPs;

(7) Coordinating LGP issues within DS, other Department offices and
bureaus, and other foreign affairs agencies.

(8) Assisting RSO and/or PSOs in determining the need and level of
protection to be provided to residences; and

(9) Providing assistance in the establishment and operation of


programs for surveillance detection.

12 FAH-7 H-212 THROUGH H-219


UNASSIGNED

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12 FAH-7 H-220
PROGRAM DESIGN AND APPROVAL
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 H-221 GENERAL


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The RSO designs and adapts LGPs to address post threat levels, taking into
account the security provided by the host government. The design of the
program is determined by the facilities and residences the U.S. Government
must protect and what protective measures will be used. A major design
issue for many LGPs is whether or not the LGF should carry firearms and
under what circumstances they should be used. The program design should
also consider the need for security enhancements installed in residences
and/or using mobile patrols in residential areas. Static residential guards
may be authorized for certain categories of residences according to the
threat level at post.

12 FAH-7 H-222 IDENTIFYING GUARD


SERVICE NEEDS
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. After identifying the facilities and personnel the post must protect, the
RSO is responsible for determining the extent of guard services required.
Principally, the threat and the type of scope of other security measures
already in place will influence this determination. Within policy
guidelines, the RSO identifies guard posts, specifies hours of coverage per
day and days per week, and the function of each guard on post.

b. LGF personnel should be the initial barriers against harm to U.S.


Government personnel and facilities. The LGF provides an early alert of
possible attacks against U.S. Government assets. Guards are expected to
resist attacks, thereby providing a first line of defense from such violence.

c. Demand for guard services is dependent on how well the host


government protects U.S. Government personnel and facilities and on
how well it is able to respond to and deter criminal incidents in general.

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d. The types of guard services provided are:

(1) Access control for visitors and their packages—The


examination and inspection of all non-U.S. Government employees
entering an official facility, on foot or in a vehicle, to ensure that
they and any packages or other material in their possession do not
contain weapons, explosives, or other items prohibited from entry
into the mission;

(2) Control of visitors within official facilities—The maintenance of


order and the control of any disturbances created by visitors who
have been permitted entry into the mission. For example, visa
applicants who refuse to accept in an orderly manner rejection of a
visa application;

(3) Examination of vehicles for contraband and explosives—The


check of all vehicles, official and non-official, including cars, vans
and trucks before allowing entry into official facilities in order to
ensure that the vehicles do not contain weapons, explosives, or
other items prohibited from entry into the mission;

(4) Foot patrol of secure perimeters—The patrol by a guard or


guards either inside or outside of the exterior of the mission and its
outer perimeter;

(5) Protection of employees at work and at home—Ensuring the


security of employees while working in official facilities and at
certain posts providing security to employees and dependents at
their residences through mobile patrols or static posts;

(6) Mobile patrols—One or two guards, with a vehicle, who may


conduct security checks at official facilities or residences on an
irregular basis and/or be responsive to alarms and calls for
assistance in the event of criminal or terrorist attack;

(7) Reaction forces—In countries with a high threat level, an armed


mobile force that is prepared to respond to alarms and calls for
assistance in the event of criminal or terrorist attack;

(8) Bodyguard and/or armed escort for the chief of mission


(COM) and others—Guards employed by the U.S. Government,
solely or in concert with host government security personnel,
assigned to protect the COM or any other member of the mission,
determined by the Emergency Action Committee (EAC), to be under
extreme risk of personal violence or assassination;

(9) Surveillance detection—Often accomplished by LGF observations,

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but the objective of surveillance detection is considered so


important that it has been assigned its own staff and program
management (See 12 FAH-7 H-222, paragraph g); and

(10) Such other security functions as determined by the RSO—


Depending on the local security situation, threat level and
intelligence reporting, local guard forces may be assigned to tasks
above and beyond those described above.

e. Where the host government provides security guards or patrols, or


participates in the LGF mobile patrols, the post will be responsible for
determining whether or not these services are adequate to meet the
post's needs. In instances where a unit of the host government's security
force is detailed to the post, the RSO or PSO will usually exercise
professional oversight of this unit. Custom or circumstances may require
the provision of a stipend and/or food, shelter or other forms of support
for services rendered. Such costs are authorized if they are restricted to
the LGF program and approved by DS/CIS/PSP/FPD. They should be
accounted for under the RSO's input to the post's annual International
Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) budget submission.

f. A major element in the post's LGP is the SDP. Surveillance detection


(SD) is the identification of planned terrorist activities targeted at a
mission through the use of personnel specially trained to detect and
report on surveillance or other suspicious activity directed against the
mission. This program requires a significant commitment in personnel
and financial resources. U.S. Government surveillance detection
requirements will normally not be met by host government forces, but the
nature of the program requires host government concurrence before
implementation.

g. An optimum and appropriate amount of host government protective


services should be sought and its performance monitored by the RSO. In
addition, where a LGP is required, it should be managed by the RSO. It is
U.S. policy that missions should contract commercially with a suitable and
qualified local firm for the provision of all guard services to meet the
mission’s needs. This contract should provide coverage of specific posts
for the required hours per year by trained guard personnel, transportation
equipment, communications equipment, weapons, expendable supplies,
and such operational costs as can be anticipated at the time of signing of
the contract. Where this is not feasible or can be shown to be more
costly and less effective, the mission may contract for guard services
directly, using a personal services agreement (PSA). The mission then
selects, trains, supervises, and disciplines guard personnel. The mission
must also maintain proper records concerning the management and
operation of the force. The administrative overhead costs to support the

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LGF personal service agreements must be borne by the mission and are
not chargeable to the LGP.

12 FAH-7 H-223 NEED FOR ARMED GUARDS


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Several factors must be taken into account by the RSO when making a
determination that armed guards and/or bodyguards are needed to
protect mission personnel and assets. The RSO must obtain Department
approval for arming SD personnel. Should the RSO consider the use of
firearms necessary for any security personnel the Department requires
the following items to be taken into consideration:

(1) Mission policy, as developed by the EAC, supported by the RSO and
approved by the COM concerning the need for armed guards;

(2) The 12 FAH-6, Security Standards, as related to special protective


equipment (SPE);

(3) The host government laws, regulations and policy concerning


weapons in the hands of a local guard force. NOTE: In those rare
cases where an armed SD force is needed, particular attention must
be paid to host government regulations on carrying and use of
concealed weapons;

(4) Other local laws which may restrict the type and/or caliber or
weapons that can be used (i.e., weapons exclusively for military
forces use);

(5) Host government and U. S. Government policies on use of deadly


force.

(6) Establishment of a clear line of responsibility for personal injury,


loss of life or property damage (liability). Particular attention must
be paid to differences in responsibility between a non-personal
services (NPS) contract guard forces and PSA guard forces as well
as local liability law.

(7) DS policy with regard to types and capabilities of weapons


requested by the RSO to accomplish the mission. Heavy caliber or
high rates of firepower (semi-automatic and automatic) weapons
are usually restricted to bodyguards and certain high-threat
situations;

(8) Procurement sources for weapons and ammunition, i.e., contractor,

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U.S. Government. See 12 FAH-7 H-626;

(9) The host government licensing and firearms training requirements


for armed guards; and

(10) Training program for NPS contract or PSA guard forces, in the
absence or unacceptability of host government standards. (i.e.,
Who will provide training, what are qualifying standards?).

12 FAH-7 H-224 HOST-COUNTRY


CONSIDERATIONS
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Due to the size of the mission and the number of personnel, dependents
and official facilities that require protection, the LGF in many countries
can constitute a substantial force. Posts and RSO and/or PSOs should
make every effort to ensure that appropriate host government agencies
and officials are fully aware of the size and function of the LGF. They
should also ensure that a post's LGF is fully in compliance with any host
government laws, regulations or policies governing the establishment and
operation of a "private" guard force.

b. Many countries are also very sensitive about weapons and ammunition in
the hands of any other entity other than their own police or military
forces. Restrictive requirements or outright prohibitions may preclude
the use of armed guards. Where the use of an armed LGF is
contemplated, information relating to the above considerations must be
fully researched and documented. This information must be maintained
in the post's LGP files and records. A copy of this information should be
provided to DS/CIS/PSP/FPD. Post specific, in contrast to nation-wide
information, concerning host government regulations on weapons and
ammunition should also be included in the post records.

12 FAH-7 H-225 PROGRAM APPROVAL


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

DS/CIS/PSP/FPD reviews each post’s LGP submission to ensure that the


program request is in accordance with established standards. Adjustments
may have to be made if the program submissions for all posts exceed the
funding available to DS/CIS/PSP/FPD for the worldwide local guard program.
If an adjustment is needed, DS/CIS/PSP/FPD will notify the posts effected.

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12 FAH-7 H-226 THROUGH H-229


UNASSIGNED

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12 FAH-7 H-230
PROGRAM MANAGEMENT REVIEW
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 H-231 GENERAL


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The Facilities Protection Division (DS/CIS/PSP/FPD) is responsible for


managing the local guard, residential security and surveillance detection
programs. Due to the large amount of money invested in these
programs, periodic program management reviews (PMR) will be
conducted to determine how effectively DS/CIS/PSP/FPD programs are
being administered and whether the funds are being used judiciously for
the purposes for which they were allotted. See 12 FAM 323.2, Program
and Financial Reviews, for additional information.

b. The PMR team will consist of program officers from DS/CIS/PSP/FPD and
contractors when performing reviews at larger posts. One program officer
will be designated as the team leader. At posts with a significant security
budget, a financial management officer from DS/CIS/PSP/FPD will also
accompany the team. A separate telegram will advise posts of the details
and schedule of a program management review, including any special
requirements or requests.

c. A PMR will cover the post's local guard, residential security, surveillance
and explosive detection programs, as well as funding and contractual
issues,

d. A sample program management review checklist, which can be used by


the RSO and/or PSO, to prepare for a program review or to evaluate the
current state of the LGP can be found in 12 FAH-7 Appendix VIII.

e. Information reviewed at the post will include:

(1) Copies of LGP contracts with exhibits and modifications;

(2) Copies of invoices of payments;

(3) Records of deduct actions or sub-standard contract performance


issues;

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(4) A listing of all LGP and SD vehicles;

(5) LGP and SD training records;

(6) Residential security files and/or records; and

(7) Post's input regarding LGP, SD and residential security concerns.

12 FAH-7 H-232 THROUGH H-239


UNASSIGNED

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12 FAH-7 H-240
LCOAL GUARD PROGRAM (LGP) CHANGES
AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 H-241 SUBMISSION GUIDELINES


FOR LGP CHANGE REQUESTS
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Various events or conditions at the post may indicate a need for changing
the scope of the current LGP, to an extent that will have resource
implications. These changes may mean that additional resources will be
required or that there is no longer a need for the current level of services.
Examples include, but are not limited to:

(1) Acquisition or reduction of office space in a location outside of the


chancery;

(2) A long term change in the threat level that requires additional
protection;

(3) A decision that firearms are now needed or no longer needed; and

(4) Opening or closing of a consulate in a city outside of the capital.

b. These changes or others may require formal discussions with the host
government. They may also involve the modification of existing contract
guard services, the procurement or disposal of non-expendable
equipment, or the increase or decrease in funding for supplies or for LGP
operations.

12 FAH-7 H-242 LGP RESOURCE INCREASES


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

Where the RSO perceives a need for an increase in resources (i.e., guard
services, surveillance detection, additional non-expendable equipment,
operational expenses, etc.), which have funding implications and which
cannot be absorbed within the authorized level of funding for the LGP, a

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message should be sent to DS/CIS/PSP/FPD. The message should give full


details regarding the specific reasons for the needed increase, identifying the
amount of funds that would be required and noting that the request has
been coordinated with the contracting officer (CO), normally the GSO, and
the financial management officer (FMO). The funding information concerning
the request should be covered, giving appropriate message references, in
the post's annual ICASS budget submission.

12 FAH-7 H-243 LGP RESOURCE DECREASES


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

Mission needs for resources may decrease during the current fiscal year, as
in the case of an overestimation of need or where the nature of the threat is
reduced. The decrease may also be the result of downsizing or other long-
term changes. These changes may affect security posts for guard services,
vehicles, radios, weapons, or operating expenses. With a NPS contract, the
decrease in the need for guard personnel and contracted-for non-expendable
equipment must be made through modification of the existing contract using
the procedures specified in the contract. Otherwise, guidelines for making
appropriate changes in the LGP scope are the same as that used in the
mission’s request for increases in resources. DS will provide approval for
changes that do not involve the contract modification. Modifications of the
contract should be followed by the mission sending an information copy of
the contract modification to DS/CIS/PSP/FPD and A/OPE. Since LGP funding
resources cannot be used by the mission for other purposes and because DS
must manage LGP program funding worldwide, missions should notify
DS/CIS/PSP/FPD when decreases in resources become apparent, indicating
the dollar amount. DS will provide instructions for the disposition of excess
equipment items and for return of excess funds to DS for reallocation.

12 FAH-7 H-244 DS/CIS/PSP/FPD


NOTIFICATION
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The RSO should advise DS/CIS/PSP/FPD as soon as a need for additional or


decreased resources is identified. The documentation can follow, but it is
important that DS/CIS/PSP/FPD knows of the mission's needs and can take
early action to provide prompt support. It is expected that the RSO and
DS/CIS/PSP/FPD will communicate freely during the process of program and
funding approval in order that action in support of the mission can be
expedited.

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12 FAH-7 H-245 THROUGH H-249


UNASSIGNED

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12 FAH-7 H-300
PROGRAM FUNDING AND BUDGET
PROCESS

12 FAH-7 H-310
OFFICE RESPONSIBILITIES AND
PROCEDURES RELATED TO THE LGP
BUDGET PROCESS
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 H-311 GENERAL


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The funds used by the Local Guard Program (LGP) originate in an annual
appropriation from Congress. This appropriation is based upon a budget
request submitted by the Department. The Department request is based
upon a compilation of existing and projected needs submitted annually by
all posts and missions. The individual posts develop their financial inputs
from integration of the post threat level as published in the security
environment threat list (SETL) and local elements such as post housing
profile, numbers of employees and dependents, and number and location
of official facilities.

b. When the Department has received the Congressional appropriation for


the LGP the amount received is compared to the total requested. Posts'
requests are then considered based on a priority that considers threat
level, existing programs, contractual obligations, planned changes, etc.
DS then determines what percentage of the original post request can be
funded. Advice of allotments are prepared and the funds are allocated to
the posts periodically during the fiscal year.

c. The RSO manages the expenditure of funds allotted to the LGP including
key elements such as cost estimates, rates of expenditure and approval
of invoices. The mission’s primary budget document is the annual
International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS)
budget submission. This budget submission includes the local guard,

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surveillance detection and residential security program costs which are


cited under non-ICASS and regular ICASS budget codes. This budget
submission is prepared by the financial management officer (FMO) using
information provided by the RSO and/or PSO. DS uses LGP information
from this budget submission to develop its portion of the Department's
annual budget request to Congress.

d. The LGP portion of the annual ICASS budget submission is reviewed by


DS/CIS/PSP/FPD for approval. It also provides the rationale to support
the request for approval of the proposed program. The ICASS budget
submission (ICASS and non-ICASS portions) includes personnel,
equipment, supplies, and other operating expenses for the LGP, including
guard services for all foreign affairs agencies at post.

12 FAH-7 H-312 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT


OFFICER (FMO)
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The post FMO is responsible for preparation of the annual ICASS budget
submission for the planning year. The FMO relies on the RSO to provide data
for preparation of this document. The FMO provides guidance as to the
information required. The FMO is responsible for approving the billing form
and procedure for payment of the guard force contractor. The FMO provides
information regarding the current status of obligations and expenditures of
funds for the LGP.

12 FAH-7 H-313 REGIONAL SECURITY


OFFICER (RSO)
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The RSO prepares detailed LGP information along with his or her LGP
budget requests. The program and fiscal information is required by
DS/CIS/PSP/FPD in order to meet its responsibility for worldwide LGP
management. Annually an ICASS budget submission is provided by the
post and includes local guards, surveillance, explosives detection and
residential security program costs. The RSO must review the applicable
sections of the post's budget submission prior to informing the
Department. Upon information receipt by the Department the data is
entered into the ICASS Service Center's global database for department
office use. The data serves to justify the post's overall budget plan.

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b. The RSO in his or her management role should:

(1) Base requests on need;

(2) Monitor actual expenditures;

(3) Initiate change requests;

(4) Certify service provided; and

(5) Approve payment of invoices.

c. The RSO is an ICASS service provider representative and attends ICASS


council meetings as an executive office member. The RSO is responsible
for presenting ICASS security budgets.

12 FAH-7 H-314 DS/CIS/PSP/FPD


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. DS/CIS/PSP/FPD plays a major role in the budget process as a central


point for accumulating data, validating LGP programs, and balancing
requests and resources. To do this, DS/CIS/PSP/FPD performs the
following functions:

(1) Reviews post's ICASS budget submissions to ensure that they are in
accordance with DS standards and Department policy. This
includes paying particular attention to changes in size or direction
of a program, training initiatives, threat level changes, changes of
contractors or types of program, and currency devaluation and
changes in rates of exchange;

(2) Approves LGPs and forwards the budget submission to other offices
for the issuance of advice of allotments;

(3) Initiates disbursement actions; and

(4) Coordinates and adjudicates requests for changes throughout the


budget year.

b. The final approved total for any posts LGP is determined by


DS/CIS/PSP/FPD based on a variety of factors, including amounts
appropriated by Congress and priority of post's needs relative to all other
post's security situations.

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12 FAH-7 H-315 THROUGH H-319


UNASSIGNED

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12 FAH-7 H-320
PROGRAM FUNDING
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 H-321 INTERNATIONAL


COOPERATIVE ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT
SERVICES (ICASS) FUNDING
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The ICASS system is used to budget and distribute the cost of local guard
services to participating U.S. agencies abroad. Developed to respond to
changing conditions and the large increases in staff abroad, ICASS
stresses local empowerment, transparency of administrative costs, post
selection of service providers, and customer satisfaction.

b. The key financial management mechanisms supporting ICASS are:

(1) A working capital fund through which all funds flow. All costs are
clearly identified, recorded, and accounted for. It operates on a no-
year basis and most funds can be carried forward from one fiscal
year into the next.

(2) A contingency fund system that allows bureaus to address


unbudgeted or unanticipated ICASS needs that arise after
allotments have been made. See the FMO for additional
information on this or any other aspect of ICASS funding.

c. The ICASS Service Center (FMP/ICASS) provides post ICASS budget and
cost distribution software to each post to facilitate the budget formulation
and execution process for identifying the actual costs of shared
administrative services by cost center (function code) and each agency’s
share. The ICASS councils use this information to manage their resources
including preparing their budget submissions. Post ICASS budget and
cost distribution software is further described in 6 FAH-5 H-808.1-3.

d. ICASS funding for non-residential local guard services is charged against


cost center Function Code 5826, for shared facilities such as chanceries,
annexes and shared warehouses which State and other U.S. Government
agencies occupy.

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12 FAH-7 H-322 NON-ICASS FUNDING


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Non-ICASS funding is everything that the Department provides through


the appropriation that it receives from Congress for its operating
expenses. This includes all items, (i.e., salaries, supplies, equipment,
bodyguard travel and subsistence, etc.) that are used for the exclusive
support of the Department's employees and programs. It also includes
funding for many employees and services which, although they provide
support for other agencies, would still be provided in the absence of the
other agencies. Non-ICASS funding is used to fund all residential local
guards, mobile patrols, bodyguards and office sites that are DOS only or
directly charged to another agency. It remains Department policy to
make every effort to identify costs that are the legitimate expense of
other agencies and to charge those costs to the identified agency.

b. Non-ICASS funding is distributed under Function Code 5820. Actual


expenditures are accounted for under the individual codes listed in 12
FAH-7 Appendix IV.

12 FAH-7 H-323 SECURITY FUNDING FOR


REPRESENTATIONAL EVENTS
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. In the event that funding is required for LGP services for representational
events hosted by the chief of mission (COM), deputy chief of mission
(DCM) or other Department officers, the costs should be charged as
additional and emergency services under a NPS contract. For a personal
service agreement (PSA) staffed LGPs, the costs are charged to the
applicable function code.

b. Additional costs for LGP services for representational events hosted by


non-State agencies are the responsibility of the non-State agency hosting
the function. Payment should be made through a transfer of funds at the
post.

c. Additional LGP services may be provided for a non-representational event


hosted by a U.S. Government employee, but all of the costs of the LGP
services are the responsibility of the employee.

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12 FAH-7 H-324 SECURITY SUPPLEMENTAL


FUNDING
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Occasionally, the Department receives additional funding for programs


related to security. These funds are generally targeted for specific
improvements in security and, in some cases, may involve capital
expenditures and new programs or changes in existing programs. For
example, the creation of surveillance detection teams at embassies
originated as a result of a supplemental appropriation for security
improvements. If a program becomes long-term or permanent, it is
included in the appropriate annual budget.

b. Security supplemental funding cannot be anticipated. The Department


may initiate requests for additional security appropriations when a need is
identified, but the actual decision as to whether or not funds will be
appropriated and the terms and conditions of any appropriations are
Congressional prerogatives, the outcome of which is difficult to predict.

c. In the event that security supplemental funds affecting the LGP are
anticipated, posts will be notified by telegram of the intent for which the
funds have been appropriated. The posts will be informed of the
guidelines necessary to utilize the supplemental funds in order to meet
the requirements of the legislation.

12 FAH-7 H-325 THROUGH H-329


UNASSIGNED

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12 FAH-7 H-400
LOCAL GUARD SERVICES

12 FAH-7 H-410
CONTRACTING FOR LOCAL GUARD
SERVICES
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 H-411 GENERAL


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The U.S. Government has found that a non-personal services (NPS)


contract with an established professional security firm is generally the
most effective, efficient and least expensive option for providing LGP
services to a mission. This chapter provides an RSO with information and
assistance to develop, finalize, and administer such a contract. A NPS
local guard contract provides the following benefits to the RSO and/or
PSO and the mission:

(1) Shifts some of the burden of day-to-day responsibility for


administration, scheduling, logistics and personnel to the
contractor;

(2) Generally reduces the U.S. Government liability for accidents,


malfeasance, misfeasance, and other long-term obligations as the
contract makes most liabilities the responsibility of the contractor;

(3) Reduces some of the administrative burdens of the program;

(4) Shifts recruitment, screening, and selection to the contractor;

(5) Makes the contractor responsible for some or all of the equipment;
and

(6) Makes the contractor responsible for removal and/or replacement of


personnel.

b. A sample contract for solicitation can be found on the Department’s

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intranet site at http://aope.a.state.gov/ and on the Internet site at


http://www.statebuy.gov/opehelp/opehelp.htm. The RSO and
contracting officer (CO) must use this sample document to ensure the
proper contract terms are included.

c. The RSO should work closely with the CO to take into account post-
unique requirements, as well as local law and conditions, in tailoring the
sample local guard solicitation to satisfy LGP needs.

12 FAH-7 H-412 NONPERSONAL SERVICES


(NPS) TIME AND MATERIALS CONTRACTS
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The sample LGP solicitations found on the intranet or internet are based on a
time and materials basis. Items of particular interest to RSOs and PSOs can
be found in 12 FAH-7 Appendix V. The contractor provides hours of service
based on a specific requirement (by post and hours of coverage) at a rate
fixed in the contract. The contract also provides for both changes in work
level requirements and temporary additional and/or emergency services.
This type of contract has the following features:

(1) Responsibility for Supervision—A NPS contract shifts some of


the burden of day-to-day supervision from the RSO and/or PSO to
the contractor. Although the RSO and/or PSO should retain overall
control and supervision of the LGF, the daily operation, supervision,
inspection, and discipline are the contractor’s responsibility. This
includes preparation of duty rosters and records maintenance (pay,
allowances, etc.), all of which are subject to RSO and/or PSO review
and/or approval. The fact that the contractor has corporate
responsibility under the contract to manage the guard force does
not eliminate the need for proper monitoring by the RSO. The RSO
as the contracting officer's representative (COR) must be vigilant in
reviewing the work of the contractor and documenting cases of poor
performance.

(2) U.S. Government Liability—A NPS contract reduces the U.S.


Government liability for many long-term obligations normally
incurred in the direct hiring of local employees. These include
coverage under retirement and medical programs, social security,
and other benefits required by U.S. or local law. The burden of
participation in these programs as required by local custom or law
is included in the terms of the contract. Severance pay may or may
not be a U.S. Government liability under a NPS contract. See 12

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FAH-7 Appendix V.2, paragraph (40). The rates and prices in the
contract include all direct costs, indirect costs (fringe benefits), and
profit.

A NPS contract also reduces the U.S. Government liability for personal injury
or property damage caused by actions or inactions of the contractors guard
force employees. The responsibility for liability for injuries or damage on the
part of guards should be clearly spelled out in the contract. See 12 FAH-7
Appendix V.2, paragraph (41).

(3) Mission Administrative Workload—A NPS contract changes but


does not eliminate mission workload. The RSO is not personally
responsible for records preparation and/or maintenance in
administering a group of employees for individual payroll, leave,
health programs, other social services, and administrative details.
Contractors are held responsible for all of these functions rather
than the mission’s administrative staff. NOTE: Nevertheless, the
RSO as the COR is responsible for inspecting the contractor’s work
and reviewing the contractor’s invoices. The RSO as COR must
ensure that the contractor performs acceptably. The U.S.
Government pays only for acceptable hours worked, and all items in
each invoice must match the terms of the contract.

(4) Selection and Screening—A NPS contract shifts some of the


burden of pre-employment selection and screening from the
mission to the contractor. The mission can require the contractor to
perform much of the preliminary work in processing prospective
guards. This may include verification of birth, education, military
service, previous employment, health examinations, and police
checks. Results of all of these should be subject to the mission’s
final review, internal record checks and approval. The RSO is
responsible for reviewing the sample LGP solicitation and ensuring
that the selection and screening process meets post’s needs.

(5) Equipment—A NPS contract can require contractors to furnish


some or all of the needed equipment. Where possible, this is the
most desirable method of equipping a contracted LGP guard force.
It relieves the mission of the burden of funding, procurement, and
maintenance of equipment. It eliminates or reduces the level of
inventory of U.S. Government property and related administrative
work. However, the mission is responsible for periodic reviews and
testing of equipment, and the prices offered by competitors may
require review during the proposal evaluation process to ensure
that they are reasonable.

(6) Removal and/or Replacement of Personnel—A NPS contract

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makes the contractor responsible for the removal and/or


replacement of personnel for cause. The sample solicitation and/or
contract has a clause covering the removal and/or replacement of
personnel for cause upon the written advice of the CO or the COR.

12 FAH-7 H-413 STEPS IN CONTRACTING LGF


SERVICES
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

Once the decision has been made to contract the LGF services, the
procedure generally involves the following steps:

(1) Development of a Request for Proposals (RFP)—Assemble all


the information necessary to allow prospective offerors to fully
understand the scope of work to be performed under the contract.
Include the numbers of posts, numbers of guards, kinds and
numbers of equipment, etc. A full list of the information needed to
develop a RFP can be found in the sample solicitation on the A/OPE
Intranet site at http://aope.a.state.gov and on the Department's
Internet site at http://www.statebuy.gov/opehelp/opehelp.htm.
The RSO should coordinate with DS/CIS/PSP/FPD and A/OPE for the
required inputs.

(2) Public Announcement Information—Distribution of the mission's


intention to contract for LGF services is publicized through
announcements in the Commerce Business Daily, local papers and
other sources.

(3) The Solicitation—This is the process of requesting and receiving


proposals from offerors in accordance with the terms laid out in the
request for proposals (RFP).

(4) Technical Evaluation—A panel is assembled to review each


proposal to ensure that the offeror has fully understood and is able
to comply satisfactorily with the terms and conditions of the
contract. Only offerors with acceptable technical proposals, as
determined by the panel, can be considered for the award of the
contract.

(5) Award of Contract—The CO awards the contract to the technically


acceptable responsible offer with the lowest evaluated price. A 10
percent price preference is available for qualified U.S. firms.
Contract awards must be reviewed by A/OPE and L/BA before the
contract can be signed.

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12 FAH-7 H-414 CONTRACTING OFFICER


(CO)
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The CO is the U.S. Government's authorized agent for dealing with


contractors and has sole authority to solicit proposals, negotiate, award, and
modify contracts on behalf of the U.S. Government. For a LGP, the CO
performs duties at the request of the RSO and/or PSO and relies on the RSO
and/or PSO for technical advice concerning the supplies and services
needed. A close and cooperative relationship between the CO and the RSO
is necessary to ensure successful management of these contracts. The CO
has the following roles and responsibilities in the contracting process:

(1) Determining the method of acquisition and type of contract to be


used;

(2) Appointing the COR. The COR must be a State Department


employee unless alternative procedures have been approved by
A/OPE. For local guard force (LGF) contracts, the RSO and/or PSO
or an A/RSO are usually appointed as the COR;

(3) Advertising the procurement action in the Commerce Business


Daily;

(4) Developing the solicitation mailing list;

(5) Obtaining approval for the solicitation from DS/CIS/PSP/FPD and


A/OPE;

(6) Issuing the solicitation;

(7) Providing guidance to the technical evaluation panel;

(8) Negotiating with offerors;

(9) Executing the contract;

(10) Debriefing the unsuccessful offerors;

(11) Administering the contract including execution of contract


modifications; and

(12) Rendering final decisions regarding protest, claims, and disputes.

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12 FAH-7 H-415 CONTRACTING OFFICER'S


REPRESENTATIVE (COR)
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The COR acts as a technical resource to the CO by providing a detailed


scope of work for the required services. The RSO or PSO are usually
designated as the COR and, as such, is responsible for day-to-day
monitoring of the contractor’s performance. NOTE: Only the CO may
modify the terms and conditions of the contract. The COR’s duties are
described in detail in 6 FAH-2, The Contracting Officer's Representatives
Handbook, subchapter H-142, and include the following:

(1) Defining project requirements and developing a statement of work


(SOW);

(2) Initiating, developing and transmitting a complete procurement


request package to the CO with all required administrative
approvals;

(3) Assisting the CO in obtaining certification of the availability of


funds;

(4) Obtaining appropriate justification for other than full and open
competition, if necessary;

(5) If serving as chairperson of the technical evaluation panel, directs


the evaluation of the technical proposals;

(6) Assists the CO during discussions and/or negotiations;

(7) Monitors progress of work under the contract;

(8) Performs inspection and acceptance work, including a thorough


review of all invoices submitted by the contractor;

(9) Informs the CO, in writing, of any performance or schedule failure


by the contractor;

(10) Resolves technical issues;

(11) Informs the CO of any changes needed in the SOW;

(12) Ensures that the U.S. Government meets its obligations to the
contractor (e.g., provide U.S. Government furnished equipment and
services and timely review and approval of documents);

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(13) Reviews contractor records and files, as needed; and

(14) Maintains the COR file.

12 FAH-7 H-416 COR LIMITATIONS


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The COR is not authorized to direct the contractor to undertake any activity
which will change any of the following:

(1) Total price or estimated cost;

(2) Products or deliverables;

(3) Statement of work;

(4) Delivery dates;

(5) Total period of performance; or

(6) Administrative terms of the contract.

12 FAH-7 H-417 COR APPOINTMENT


PROCEDURES
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

Specific appointment procedures for a COR are as follows:

(1) A COR is nominated by the requirements office, using the COR


nomination form (See 6 FAH-2 H-143 Exhibit H-143.2A). The COR
nomination form should be completed and included in the
procurement request package, unless the COR will be nominated at
a later date.

(2) If approved by the contracting officer, the COR is appointed using


Form DS-1924, Certificate of Appointment (6 FAH-2 H-143 Exhibit
H-143.2B). In addition, the CO prepares an accompanying
delegation memorandum which outlines the scope of the COR's
authority, including duties, responsibilities, and prohibitions. (See 6
FAH-2 H-143 Exhibit H-143.2C for a sample generic designation
memorandum.) The CO shall ensure that the contractor receives a
copy of the memorandum.

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(3) If the COR is replaced during the term of the contract, the CO
prepares an appointment memorandum for the replacement COR
and ensures that the contractor receives a copy.

12 FAH-7 H-418 OFFICE OF THE


PROCUREMENT EXECUTIVE (A/OPE)
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Direct any questions that arise at posts regarding the correct drafting,
approval or interpretation of a LGF contract to A/OPE.

b. A/OPE is the office responsible for the appointment of contracting officers


and approving contracts. A/OPE has posted the sample LGF contract on
the Intranet and Internet. The office also keeps this sample contract up-
to-date and makes any changes in contracting procedures or language
that may be required as a result of new laws or changes in policy.

12 FAH-7 H-419 UNASSIGNED

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12 FAH-7 H-420
GUARD CONTRACTING PROCESS
(TL:LGP-3; 12-31-2003)
(Office of Origin: DS/IP/FPO)

12 FAH-7 H-421 GENERAL


(TL:LGP-3; 12-31-2003)

a. Local guard services (which may include a surveillance detection


program) may be acquired through a Non-Personal Service (NPS)
contract with a company or by Personal Service Agreements (PSAs). PSAs
are covered in 12 FAH-7 H-440. Under a NPS contract with a company,
the guards and surveillance detection personnel remain employees of the
company.

b. The guard contracting process consists of several phases:

(1) Pre-solicitation which is advance planning and publicizing of the


upcoming contract, preparing the solicitation;

(2) Soliciting and evaluating offerors and awarding the contract;

(3) Administering the contract after award (contract administration);


and

(4) Contract closeout.

12 FAH-7 H-422 SOLICITATION

12 FAH-7 H-422.1 Pre-Solicitation


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

This is the initial phase of an LGP contract. The RSO's thoughts and efforts
are devoted to defining the security problems, analyzing various solutions
and developing initial or draft plans to operate a LGP.

12 FAH-7 H-422.2 Statement of Work (SOW)

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(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

RSO and CO actions taken in the pre-solicitation phase of the acquisition


process result in the completion of an advance acquisition plan and a
procurement request package, including the development of the SOW,
independent U.S. Government cost estimate, and technical evaluation plan.
(See 6 FAH-2 H-312 Exhibit H-312 for a list of COR responsibilities versus
CO responsibilities in the pre-solicitation phase.)

12 FAH-7 H-422.3 Solicitation


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. When a contract is used, the Competition in Contracting Act of 1984


(CICA) and specific legislation related to the local guard program
generally require that the U.S. Government allow full and open
competition. To do so, the U.S. Government must solicit proposals from
all responsible sources.

b. The CO will prepare solicitations for guard services with input from the
RSO. Full and open competition requires the U.S. Government to publicize
its intent to issue a solicitation in the Commerce Business Daily. The CO
either posts the solicitation on the Internet (with assistance from A/OPE)
or provides each prospective offeror a copy of the solicitation.

c. Because the mission must evaluate the technical capability of the offerors
in addition to their prices, a negotiated acquisition is required. The type of
solicitation used is a request for proposal (RFP).

d. By law (22 U.S.C. 4864), the U.S. Government must award the contract
to the technically acceptable offeror with the lowest price, subject to a 10
percent price preference for eligible U.S. firms.

12 FAH-7 H-423 OTHER THAN FULL AND


OPEN COMPETITION
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The CO and RSO are responsible for preparing the written justification in
those rare instances where full and open competition is not desirable or
possible. In preparing the justification the CO may call upon the RSO to
assist in documenting the basis for limiting competition. In these cases, the
RSO must provide the CO a written, signed statement providing accurate
and complete data to support a justification for other than full and open

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competition (JOFOC). For example, when unusual and compelling urgency


will not allow full and open competition, the U.S. Government may document
the reasons for limiting the sources solicited. In some cases, host
government restrictions may limit competition. If this is the case, legal
requirements under the CICA and the Department's own legislation mandate
documentation.

12 FAH-7 H-424 TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF


PROPOSALS
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The RFP requires evaluation of technical and price proposals. When


evaluating proposals, the CO will ask the RSO and the technical
evaluation panel to perform a detailed technical evaluation to document
whether each proposal is acceptable or unacceptable. A sample technical
evaluation plan is available from A/OPE and may be found on the
Department's intranet site at http://aope.a.state.gov and also found on
the Department's Internet site at
http://www.statebuy.gov/opehelp/opehelp.htm. The technical evaluation
must contain both a rating of acceptable or unacceptable for each offeror
and a narrative explaining the basis for the rating, citing any deficiencies
or weaknesses in the proposals.

b. While the CO does sit on the technical evaluation panel, he or she serves
only as a technical advisor. The panel is generally chaired by the RSO and
may have as other members, U.S. Government employees, regardless of
agency, considered able to help make a fair evaluation of whether or not
the technical proposals meet the standards required by the RFP.

c. Contractors should have a demonstrated performance record of


satisfactory delivery of services as well as a record of integrity and
business ethics. As part of the technical evaluation, the technical
evaluation panel or CO will review the past performance of each offeror
by contacting clients. The RSO must also examine prospective contractors
from the security point of view. This may require additional research, i.e.,
record checks, on both the personal background of principal officers as
well as the past activities of the firm.

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12 FAH-7 H-425 IDENTIFICATION,


DETERMINATION, AND SELECTION OF
RESPONSIBLE OFFERERS
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The CO makes the determination of “responsibility” on the part of the


prospective contractor. This determination is based on a review of the firm’s
capability to perform, as well as the firm's technical and financial resources.
The RSO may provide the CO with the information needed to make the
determination.

12 FAH-7 H-426 U.S. SOURCES AND LOCAL


PERMITS
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The U. S. Government must solicit all responsible sources when awarding


LGP contracts. In addition, the law requires special efforts to ensure that
U.S. firms are allowed to compete, and that a price preference is given
during the proposal evaluation process. As a result, many U.S. firms, as
well as local or international firms, have won local guard contracts. Many
countries require that non-local firms establish a local business entity for
the purpose of conducting business. This establishment is required to pay
taxes and obtain pertinent licenses. The host government may require
that any firm demonstrate or certify that it has met all or will meet all
such local prerequisites to be able to do business. U.S. law also requires
that the embassy and/or consulate assist U.S. firms in obtaining licenses
and permits from the local government. The CO and RSO should
document all efforts made in this regard.

b. Under U.S. law, preference must be given in the award of LGP contracts
to offerors qualifying as “U.S. persons or U.S. joint venture persons.”
Offerors must complete a certification, which is reviewed by A/OPE and
L/BA, to qualify for this 10 percent price preference. See the sample
solicitation found on the Department's Intranet site at
http://aope.a.state.gov and also found on the Department's Internet site
at http://www.statebuy.gov/opehelp/opehelp.htm for more information
on this subject.

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12 FAH-7 H-427 PAYMENT IN LOCAL


CURRENCY
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

Contracts awarded to non-U.S. firms are normally paid in local currency.


Contracts awarded to U.S. firms are often paid in dollars. Payment to U.S.
firms in U.S. dollars is required by U.S. law where payment in local currency
would be a barrier to competition by U.S. firms. Payment in U.S. dollars to a
local firm may raise legal issues under local law. Contact A/OPE with any
questions on payment matters.

12 FAH-7 H-428 POST AWARD


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. When a contract is awarded on a basis other than price, unsuccessful


offerors, upon their written request, must be debriefed by the CO and
furnished the basis for the selection decision.

b. A CO debriefing can be conducted orally or in writing. It should tell the


offeror in general terms why it was not selected for award. The debriefing
should tell an unsuccessful offeror which areas of its proposal were
deficient and whether the deficiencies were factors in its not having been
selected. The debriefing should not reveal confidential or privileged
commercial or financial information, trade secrets, or the proposal
contents of the other offerors.

12 FAH-7 H-429 CONTRACT MODIFICATION


AND PERFORMANCE WARNINGS
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

Each contract must state a performance period and must include clauses
allowing termination for the convenience of the U. S. Government or for the
default of the contractor. These elements are the primary responsibility of
the CO.

12 FAH-7 H-429.1 Duration


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. LGF services contracts should be for a period of one year with the option

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to renew for as many additional one-year periods as are appropriate, up


to a total period of five years (four one-year renewals). Further
extensions require approval by A/OPE and are only granted under unusual
circumstances. Both the basic performance period and the options must
have fixed rates and prices, subject only to adjustment due to increases
in the applicable mandatory wage law.

b. Periodic re-competition allows an opportunity to take advantage of new


market conditions and to promote fairness in the procurement process. If
offerors can project firm rates into the future, then a one-year contract
with four, one-year options may be appropriate.

12 FAH-7 H-429.2 Modification and/or Change


Orders
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The contract must contain clauses allowing the CO to modify the contract to
adjust to changed conditions. The "Changes" clause required by the Federal
Acquisition Regulation (FAR) allows the CO to change the SOW, for example.
The "Variation in Quantity" clause allows the contract to be modified to
increase or decrease the number of guard hours, up to plus or minus twenty
five percent without a change in rates. Major changes that are not within the
scope of the contract may require a new solicitation.

12 FAH-7 H-429.3 Unsatisfactory Performance


Warnings
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

There are several methods used to indicate unsatisfactory performance or


illustrate areas where improvements are needed. These are:

(1) The Deduct Schedule—As part of the contract (Exhibit C), there is
a complete schedule of specific items that subject the contractor to
deductions in the dollar amounts received if they are
unaccomplished or ignored. When the contractor has failed to
comply with any item on this list the RSO and/or PSO should inform
the CO to apply the appropriate deduction from the deduct
schedule. This serves two purposes. It puts the contractor on
warning of unsatisfactory performance and it saves the U. S.
Government from paying for a service that it did not receive.

(2) Cure Notice—If or when the RSO and/or PSO discovers a failure on

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the part of the contractor to adhere to any elements of the contract


the failure should be brought to the attention of the CO. A cure
notice can then be sent to the contractor, informing him of the
problem and/or lapse and identifying the actions needed to "cure"
the problem. A cure notice also includes notification of the possible
consequences of the contractor's failure to comply.

(3) Show Cause Notice—This is the last step before termination of a


contract for default. The CO provides the contractor with a list of
outstanding deficiencies, lapses and failures on the part of the
contractor. The order demands that the contractor "show cause" as
to why the contract should not be terminated.

12 FAH-7 H-429.4 Termination for Default and/or


Convenience
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The U.S. Government has the right to terminate a contract for default or
convenience. Terminations for default may be necessary when the contractor
fails to perform or make satisfactory progress. Terminations for convenience
allow the U.S. Government to terminate a contract when it is in the best
interests of the Government, through no fault of the contractor. If
termination is necessary, the CO must coordinate with A/OPE, L/BA and
DS/CIS/PSP/FPD. Terminations are rare. Terminations for default require a
considerable amount of documentation showing unacceptable performance
by the contractor and must be preceded by an opportunity to correct the
deficiencies. Whenever a termination for default is being considered, the CO
and the RSO must have a plan in place for a replacement contractor.

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12 FAH-7 H-430
LOCAL GUARD PROGRAM MANAGERIAL
RESPONSIBILITIES
(TL:LGP-3; 12-31-2003)
(Office of Origin: DS/IP/FPO)

12 FAH-7 H-431 GENERAL


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Daily supervisory actions are needed to assure that assigned guards are
efficiently performing the required work. Post inspections by contract
guard force inspectors or managers, as specified in the contractor’s
management plan, generally meet this need. However, the RSO or PSO
must also conduct personal inspections to ensure that the work of the
contractor is being performed properly, This is done through frequent
random verification of the work of the managers and inspectors and by
personal inspections of posts, records and files as needed. Early detection
and documentation of problems like missing equipment, poor
understanding of guard orders, or untidy and improperly clothed guards
are a basic necessity for ensuring that all LGFs, in general, and large
programs, in particular, are providing the required level of security.

b. The RSO and/or PSO must also be constantly alert for any changes in the
local security situation. These changes may result from factors as varied
as a VIP visit to information indicating a possible terrorist attack. These
changes form the basis for on-going analysis and review of the structure
and location of posts as well as the level of security in effect. Any
required alterations or adjustments should be communicated to the
project manager or guard force commander in writing. Verification of the
requested adjustments must be obtained.

c. Thus, while use of a contractor to provide guard services may relieve the
RSO from many of the management tasks, it does not relieve the RSO of
the responsibility for assuring that work is performed in accordance with
the terms of the contract and the security needs of the mission.

12 FAH-7 H-432 PROGRAM ELEMENTS

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(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

An RSO and/or PSO must address the following items when managing a
LGP:

(1) Initiate and maintain appropriate records and files (i.e., copy of the
contract, current Exhibit A, guard orders, equipment inventory,
record checks or background checks, incident reports, training,
personnel, deduct or compliance file);

(2) Ensure compliance of all guard orders;

(3) Update guard orders, as required;

(4) Ensure that all contract clauses are followed;

(5) Verify the accuracy of all invoices or bills;

(6) Forward all correct bills and invoices to the financial management
officer (FMO) in a timely fashion to ensure prompt payment;

(7) Correct any problems or deficiencies which develop and document


those which are appropriate for reductions in payment under the
deduct schedule;

(8) Monitor contractor performance through written records to prepare


and justify either exercising the next option or initiating a new
solicitation;

(9) Provide technical expertise to the CO in all phases of contract


operation;

(10) Provide information to the FMO to ensure accurate and up-to-date


budget forecasts and expenditure rates; and

(11) Keep Exhibit A updated.

12 FAH-7 H-433 LGP ADMINISTRATION AND


DOCUMENTATION
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The RSO and/or PSO, when acting as COR for proper administration and
documentation of NPS contracts for LGF services, must deal with the
following issues:

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(1) Performance and Evaluation—The COR must assess contractor


performance during the contract. The evaluation should be of both
price and performance. Renewals or new contracts should only be
awarded to contractors who have clearly demonstrated an
acceptable performance record. The standard LGF solicitation
requires each offeror to address performance on similar contracts.
The offeror must list deductions and/or terminations that occurred
under similar contracts within the past three years. The offeror
must also list: technical problems and resolutions, terminations
(partial or complete), and type (convenience or default), as well as
cure or show cause notices.

(2) Exercising Contract Options—The CO may exercise a contract


option only after making a written determination that the exercise
of the option is the most advantageous method of fulfilling the U.S.
Government's need. If the COR (RSO or PSO) has failed to properly
document poor performance, the CO could possibly be required to
exercise an option with a marginal performer. This action could
place U.S. Government employees and/or property at a significant
risk.

(3) Notice of Option Exercise—All contracts with options contain a


provision as to the procedure required and the amount of
notification time necessary for the option to be exercised. The
exercise of an option is at the discretion of the CO, but unless the
correct notification procedures are followed, the U. S. Government
loses its right to unilaterally extend the contract and the contractor
may refuse to perform the option year. In these circumstances, it is
the contractors legal right to refuse the extension. The COR (RSO or
PSO) is responsible for communicating to the CO, on a regular
basis, information on the quality of the services being provided. The
COR must also recognize that the contract is for one 12 month
period at a time. Succeeding years of service only result if the CO
signs the option modification and sends it to the contractor in
accordance with the terms of the contract. Failure to do this
properly may put the post in jeopardy and cost the Department and
other agencies at post more than had previously been negotiated.
The RSO and/or PSO is the requiring office and should work with
the CO to determine if it is in the U.S. Government's interest to
exercise an option year.

12 FAH-7 H-434 INADEQUATE LGP


ADMINISTRATION BY COR

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(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The most common mistakes made by a COR in LGF administration are:

(1) Failure to take appropriate action when the contractor allows an


uncleared employee to work without RSO and/or PSO approval;

(2) Failure to take appropriate action when the contractor allows a


guard to work for more than 12 hours in a 24 hour period;

(3) Failure to take appropriate action when a contractor allows a guard


to be armed without the requisite training;

(4) Failure to take appropriate action when the contractor fails to


provide the required equipment;

(5) Failure to take appropriate action when the contractor fails to


provide the required training, and

(6) Failure to use the deduct schedule.

12 FAH-7 H-435 INVOICES


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The receipt of an invoice or bill from the contractor, verification of its


accuracy and submission to the FMO for payment are among the most
important functions for the COR in administering a LGF. Proper review
and payment of an invoice requires the following information:

(1) Name of contractor;

(2) Invoice date;

(3) Contract number;

(4) Description, price, and quantity of services or supplies delivered or


rendered;

(5) Shipping and payment terms, if any;

(6) Other substantiating documentation or information as required by


the contract;

(7) Name, title, phone number and complete mailing address of the
responsible person to whom payment is to be sent, and

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(8) Name, title, phone number and mailing address of the person to be
notified in the event of a defective invoice (one that does not
contain the proper or required documentation).

b. The contractor must submit to the RSO and/or PSO an original and three
copies of each invoice for processing.

c. Copies of invoices provided to the RSO by the contractor for approval


should be retained in a file. All approved extraordinary expenses should
also be recorded. The operation of the guard force will require the
availability of funds for operational expenses that should be under the
control of the RSO though disbursed by the FMO. Examples of such
expenditures are RSO authorized guard travel and subsistence, guard
services to meet unscheduled security needs, and other unanticipated
operational needs, such as procurement of radios or weapons to
accommodate an increased guard force or to procure new uniforms.
Records of such expenditures should be maintained showing the date, the
reasons for the procurement, and the cost. Procedures to be used for
such expenditures will be in accordance with the contract and consistent
with those of the mission for other items and may involve the use of
purchase orders in some cases. Such costs are also included in sections of
the annual ICASS budget submission regarding the LGP that are sent to
DS yearly.

12 FAH-7 H-436 LGF TRAINING


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Section H of all local guard NPS contracts includes specific requirements


for both basic and recertification training. The contractor is required to
subject its personnel to the U. S. Government's approval prior to their
posting. Contractor personnel are prohibited from providing guard
services if they have not successfully completed basic and/or
recertification training. Recertification training shall include any new
material bearing on the performance of the local guards that is deemed
necessary by the COR.

b. If the contractor is not meeting the minimum training requirements, the


CO should be notified by the COR. A contractor's failure to provide the
required training is considered a serious breach of the contract and
necessitates timely and effective corrective action.

c. The Mobile Security Division (MSD) of DS is available at times to assist


posts in the training of local guard forces. However, given the number of
requests and other assigned duties, MSD must prioritize their

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requirements. Fiscal resources generally allow only a few scheduled


training missions each year and these are generally not scheduled with
posts that have NPS contracts.

12 FAH-7 H-437 GENERAL AND POST


ORDERS
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

Whether staffed through NPS contract or PSAs and regardless of the size of
the guard force, general and post specific guard orders must be written.
These documents establish the standards for guard performance and the
basis for guard training in many respects. All post inspections are based on
these guard orders, and they form the basis for any disciplinary actions that
may be required. General orders are defined as those that apply to all
guards, regardless of where they are assigned. Post orders pertain to the
duties and responsibilities of a guard assigned to a specific post. At a
minimum, all orders should be reviewed as to adequacy as a part of the
annual review of the contractor’s performance. Although normally a
responsibility of the RSO, the preparation of general and post orders may be
required of the contractor. If so, the RSO must approve, by signature
endorsement, each order prior to its issuance. See also 12 FAH-7 Appendix
I.

12 FAH-7 H-437.1 General Orders


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

All guard orders should be maintained at the post and available for reference
and inspection. Guidelines for the preparation of general guard orders
follow:

(1) Use the Proper Language—The language of the order should be


in the language used by the guards. Such orders should also be
written in English to facilitate the RSO post inspection.

(2) Cover All Work Aspects—General orders should cover all aspects
of guard work requirements that are applicable to all guards,
regardless of their specific post or assignment. Examples include,
but are not limited to; wearing the uniform, personal appearance,
display of name tags and official identification, conduct while on
duty, maintenance of logs and preparation of records, statements
regarding use of force and power of arrest; use of radios, tape
players or TV while on duty, sleeping on duty, manning of posts and

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reporting for duty, use of alcohol and proscribed drugs, violations of


orders, eating while on post, post relief, visitors on post; conducting
of personal business on post, and the use of the telephone for
personal business.

(3) Relations with the Marine Security Guards (MSG)—The


responsibility of the MSG for monitoring the work performance of
the guards does not require that they perform supervisory or
administrative functions. However, the LGF guards do have a
responsibility to respond to the directions of the MSGs for assuring
that security is maintained. Instructions should be included in the
general orders to clearly define the relationship between the LGF
and the MSG.

(4) Relations with Host Government Security Forces—RSO and/or


PSO should ensure a clear understanding by PSA and NPS contract
guards of the roles, responsibilities and relationships with host
government forces assisting in protection of the mission. In like
manner, RSO and/or PSO should ensure that the host government
forces have a clear understanding of the roles, responsibilities and
relationships of the PSA and/or NPS guard force.

(5) Unacceptable Performance and Discipline—Violations of


general or post orders should be uniformly dealt with by either the
contractor or the RSO. The RSO must be able to require that a
particular guard be relieved for cause and that a replacement be
provided immediately. Orders and/or the deduct schedule should
specify that, where orders are violated, immediate removal from
post will ensue and that the guard will be discharged. In some
cases, local law requires that warnings be given prior to dismissal.
Missions should seek relief from such a law and require immediate
dismissal where guards violate general or post orders.

(6) Illness or Incapacitation—Instructions should be provided for


guards who become ill or believe that they would not be able to
perform work for any reason. This includes notification of inability
to report to duty so as to allow for assignment of replacement
personnel.

(7) The Power of Arrest and Use of Force—A specific statement in


the orders is warranted on this subject and the use of deadly force
because of their importance, not only in the conduct of work by
guards, but for the protection of the contractor and the U.S.
Government from liability arising from guard actions. For example,
host country rules must be complied with to ensure that the U.S.
Government has appropriate liability protection for such things as

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the a guard’s use of mace or pepper spray.

(8) Carrying and Handling of Firearms—A special section of the


general orders should apply to the carrying, handling and use of
firearms by armed guards, or those providing bodyguard services.
The post orders for such posts should include specific details, but
general instructions should deal with procedures to be used when a
firearm is discharged, for malfunctioning equipment, and in cases of
emergency.

(9) Communications Discipline—Where guards use radios in the


performance of their work, orders should specify how they are to be
used, with emphasis on communications discipline and the use of
codes or signals. Orders should also state action to be taken when a
radio unit is inoperable. Reference should be made to emergency
and evacuation (E&E) net and shared frequencies, where
appropriate.

(10) Maintenance of Post Logs—The responsibility of the guard for


maintenance of post logs and the manner in which this is to be
carried out should be included in general orders. The procedures for
the preparation of reports of security incidents should be
addressed. NOTE: It is suggested that the RSP and/or PSO consult
with the COM and/or PO on appropriate routine entries (i.e.,
repairman, tradesmen, visitors, etc.) for post logs at the EMR and
POR.

12 FAH-7 H-437.2 Post Orders


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Post orders should have essential operational information provided, such


as specific tasks required, call signs, and telephone numbers for persons
that must be notified under various circumstances.

b. Post orders should also contain instructions for guards on items such as
the following:

(1) Specific times for events;

(2) Search requirements for visitors' and vendors' trucks or vans;

(3) Use of imminent danger notification systems (IDNS) or duress


alarms; and

(4) Raising and lowering of flags.

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c. The maintenance of proper operational records is an essential


requirement of the guard force. It allows the details of security incidents
that arise to be documented and allows the guard to note for the record
other items of operational concern. There are two kinds of records
prepared by LGF personnel: post logs and incident reports.

12 FAH-7 H-437.3 Post Logs


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Post logs should be maintained in a bound notebook with serially


numbered pages. This should allow for recording the following
information, at a minimum:

(1) Date and time of guard relief;

(2) Name of the guard on watch;

(3) Name of the guard supervisor;

(4) Receipt and condition of issued equipment;

(5) All breaches of security occurring, including date, time, incident


report number, time guard supervisor was notified and how
notified;

(6) Special instructions received from the guard supervisor or the RSO;
and

(7) Date and time of inspection of the post by the guard supervisor or
RSO.

b. Additionally, the mission may wish to require:

(1) Arrival and departure times for the COM, RSO, other officials of the
mission, or of special work parties; and

(2) In the case of vehicles, the vehicle's make and license number and
purpose of entry or departure (cargo or personnel transfer).

12 FAH-7 H-437.4 Incident Reports


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

These are intended to be used to record the information surrounding a


specific security incident. For example, what happened, when, where, to

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whom, and what actions the guard took. Instructions for the preparation of
incident reports will include the notification procedure to be used by the
guards. The date and time of notification should be shown on the incident
report form. A sample form, showing the minimum information that should
be required, is given in 12 FAH-7 Appendix VI-3.

12 FAH-7 H-438 LGP RECORDS AND FILES


(TL:LGP-3; 12-31-2003)

The RSO will maintain various files to support his or her responsibilities.
RSOs are urged to maintain the information and accuracy of files in the
same manner as they would like to find them on their arrival at a new post.
Accordingly, LGP files should be established to deal with the subjects
indicated below.

(1) Personnel—Names and qualification information concerning all


contractor guard personnel should be maintained, including those
submitted for approval but disapproved by the RSO. This includes
the initial application, background information, training records,
examination test scores, firearms qualification scores and timing,
leave records, etc. When PSAs are used a copy of the contract,
signed by the guard, should be included. All records regarding
commendations or disciplinary actions with related investigative
reports should be included.

(2) Funding—Program funding files should be maintained on post’s


Local Guard, Surveillance Detection, and Residential Security
Programs. The files should include post and Department
correspondence.

(3) Equipment Inventories—Where the U.S. Government rather than


the contractor provides personal equipment or non-expendable
items for the guard force, inventory files must be maintained. Such
files should include items such as date of last procurement;
numbers of items and cost; items issued and on hand; serial
numbers, if applicable; rate of use; and a re-ordering time table.
Issuance records and accountability forms should be used to show
to whom uniforms and personal equipment was provided and when.
Inventories, including serial numbers as appropriate, should be
established and maintained for all items of non-expendable
equipment. Procurement records for each category should be
maintained. A re-order schedule should be determined for non-
expendable items that takes into account the procurement and
shipping lead time. From these records, cost estimates can be made

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for replacement or for increase in the inventory. Maintenance and


repair records should be maintained for each item of equipment.
For vehicles, mileage records should be maintained. Weapons
inventories should be checked monthly and all weapons examined
to be sure that no repairs are needed.

(4) Contract File—Copies of all contracts, contract modifications, and


correspondence regarding the guard force should be filed.

(5) Incident Reports—The originals of all incident reports are to be


filed along with all information regarding follow-up actions. Copies
of statistical analyses made regarding such reports are also filed
here under a subheading.

(6) Inspection and Evaluations—Documentary results of all post


inspections and program evaluations conducted by the RSO are
included here. This information will assist in determining whether or
not to exercise additional option years.

12 FAH-7 H-439 UNASSIGNED

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12 FAH-7 H-440
PERSONAL SERVICE AGREEMENT (PSA)
(TL:LGP-3; 12-31-2003)
(Office of Origin: DS/IP/FPO)

12 FAH-7 H-441 GENERAL


(TL:LGP-3; 12-31-2003)

a. Local guard services (which may include a surveillance detection


program) may be acquired through PSAs. Under a PSA, each individual
personal service contractor is treated as an employee of the U.S.
Government, and direct supervisory authority is maintained through this
employer-employee relationship. The use of PSAs can be an expensive
option, one that places the greatest risk of liability on the part of the U.S.
Government, and makes the most time consuming demands on the RSO.

b. The creation of a Local Guard Program (LGP) through the use of PSAs will
generally only be approved when:

(1) The host government prohibits the presence or operation of


commercial security firms within the country;

(2) Although not prohibiting commercial security firms, the host


government raises enough legal, technical or bureaucratic obstacles
to their use by the U.S. Government to make a contract unfeasible;

(3) Commercial security firms are allowed and operate within country,
but no acceptable firm responds to the mission's solicitation;

(4) There are no commercial guard companies in country;

(5) RSO determines that the post's LGP and SD program would be
more effective if staffed using PSA employees rather than through a
NPS contract; and

(6) Prior to any final decision to staff a LG force or SD team with PSA
employees, posts must obtain approval from DS/IP/FPO. Posts will
need to conduct a cost benefit analysis (Contract versus PSA) and
also determine the additional administrative support required if
under a PSA guard force.

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NOTE: The administrative overhead costs to support a PSA LG force or SD


team are borne by the mission and are not chargeable to the local guard
program.

12 FAH-7 H-442 HUMAN RESOURCES


OFFICER (HRO)
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The human resources officer (HRO) is the primary resource for RSOs or
PSOs when operating a LGP through the use of PSAs. The HRO has the
responsibility for the administrative and management work necessary to
obtain Department agreement for the use of PSAs, drafting of individual
agreements, recruiting, and most other tasks necessary for the use of PSAs
to staff a LGP. On a practical basis, a close and cooperative relationship
between the HRO and the RSO is necessary to ensure successful oversight of
these agreements.

12 FAH-7 H-443 REGIONAL SECURITY


OFFICER (RSO)
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The RSO acts as a technical resource to the HRO by providing complete and
accurate position descriptions of the duties and responsibilities assigned to
local guard positions. The RSO should also provide LGP-related tests (one for
uniformed local guards, one for surveillance detection personnel), for
personnel selection and training, special skill qualifications, and performance
standards. The RSO should also provide information on security concerns
regarding supervision, discipline, awards and incentives, the relationship of
the LGF to the MSG and host country security forces, etc. to the HRO. The
RSO or a designated member of his or her staff is the overall supervisor for
a PSA LGF and, as such, is responsible for day-to-day monitoring of the
performance of the guard force. NOTE: Only the HRO can make any
substantive changes in the terms and conditions of an employee's PSA.

12 FAH-7 H-444 RSO RESPONSIBILITIES


WHEN ACQUIRING SECURITY PERSONNEL BY
PSA

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12 FAH-7 H-444.1 Uniformed Local Guard Force


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

Where missions must acquire security personnel by using PSAs, the


monitoring responsibilities will be greater than those when using a NPS
contract. The RSO, in effect, becomes the LGP program manager. As such,
the RSO will be required to monitor in some detail all expenses regarding the
operation of the LGP. Included are funds used for administrative supplies,
office equipment, maintenance and repair costs for non-expendable
equipment, guard force uniforms, insignia, and equipment inventories, and
supplies as well as all other costs relative to the administration and
operation of the guard force. An individual security personnel file must also
be maintained. The RSO and/or PSO must also perform background checks,
ensure weapons qualifications when guards are armed, and provide other
needed training. The RSO will have to ensure that the required equipment,
including vehicles, is obtained, maintained, inventoried and replaced, as
necessary. In summary, all of the requirements satisfied by a NPS contract
must be met by RSO and/or PSO actions in managing and supervising a PSA
staffed LGF.

12 FAH-7 H-444.2 Surveillance Detection Team


Members
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

All of the managerial responsibilities listed in 12 FAH-7 H-444.1 apply to the


use of PSAs as SDP team members. Position descriptions in the FSN-710
series apply to surveillance detection positions and should be used in
completing the Form OF-298, Interagency Foreign Service National
Employee Position Description, required for each PSA. Posts should consult
their HRO for position descriptions for SDP team members. In addition, to
avoid compromising active SD employees, the HRO and RSO must make
every effort to ensure that the prospective SD personnel are selected, hired
and briefed in ways that keep them isolated from other candidates and
serving team members. If possible, candidates should be kept away from
mission facilities. Ideally they should be screened, hired and processed into
the job without once entering the mission.

12 FAH-7 H-445 PSA PROCEDURES AND


FORMAT
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

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In instances where the use of PSAs is necessary to obtain local guard


services, the mission will follow instructions provided by HR/OE in 3 FAM
7260 and the post's HRO.

12 FAH-7 H-446 AUTHORITY TO ENTER INTO


PSA
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

A PSA cannot be awarded unless prior Department approval is obtained from


DS/CIS/PSP/FPD. Requests for PSA approval must contain detailed
information as to numbers of personnel involved and intended deployment
or use and justification for selecting this method over the use of a NPS
contract.

12 FAH-7 H-447 CONDITIONS OF


EMPLOYMENT
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The terms of PSAs will conform to the conditions of employment for


direct-hire Foreign Service National (FSN) employees (excluding
participation in the U.S. Civil Service Disability and Retirement System).

b. Pay and benefits provided to PSA employees will be determined by


guidelines, policies, and standards contained in 3 FAH-2 H-400, Foreign
Service National Position Classification, and paid in accordance with the
appropriate grade and step of the local compensation plan. This plan
includes premium pay, severance pay, bonus payments, and other fringe
benefits for which direct payment is made.

c. Each PSA position shall be classified in accordance with 3 FAM 7500, FSN
Position Classification and Pay Administration, on the basis of duties
assigned as described in Form OF-298. The RSO must draft or use
standard job descriptions. It is anticipated that the mission will have a
series of guard classifications under the FSL-700 Security Group series
(Guard Series FSL-710). These should be descriptive, with general
functions, duties, responsibilities, and desired qualifications for each class
of guard and guard supervisor. Specific work requirements should be
contained in the guard force general and post orders. Classifications for
pay purposes is based on the content of these descriptions; thus, it is
important that the RSO assure that they are as complete and accurate as
possible.

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12 FAH-7 H-448 LIABILITY


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. When PSAs are used to staff a LGP, a major issue is the question of
liability for actions (either accidental or deliberate) of the guards. This
could have an additional potentially significant impact on the U.S.
Government where the LGF is armed.

b. The members of a PSA staffed guard force are treated in the same
manner as FSN employees when questions of liability arise. The
circumstances of any liability claim against the U. S. Government or an
FSN or PSA employee for the actions of that employee while on duty
should be reported to the Department with as much detail as possible.
Each case is examined, evaluated and responded to on an individual
basis. Posts will be informed by the Department of the proper response to
the claim. The response may vary from an offer of monetary or other
compensation to a claim of sovereign immunity. For additional
information, see 2 FAM 280, Claims Against the United States.

12 FAH-7 H-449 UNASSIGNED

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12 FAH-7 H-500
LOCAL GUARD TRAINING AND
SECURITY AWARENESS

12 FAH-7 H-510
CONTRACTOR PROVIDED TRAINING
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 H-511 GENERAL OBSERVATIONS


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Missions will usually draw guard personnel from the general labor pool
available in the country. The suitability of candidates and their
availability will be influenced by:

(1) The rate of unemployment;

(2) Local attitudes regarding the attractiveness of the position; and

(3) The conditions of work offered by the position (including the salary
offered).

b. Care must be exercised to assure that the guard force performs work in a
satisfactory manner and that turnover is not an indicator of controllable
problems in factors such as rates of pay, workload, training or morale.
Training is an important element in ensuring proper performance along
with constant security awareness.

12 FAH-7 H-512 GUARD LOYALTY


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

Missions desire that the guard force represent a security resource that can
be counted upon under all circumstances to protect the assets and interests
of the mission. The mission should be able, through the manner in which
guards are selected, trained, and managed, to assure a measure of
dependability and loyalty to the job. There are many instances where guards

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have been prepared to risk physical injury to protect U.S. facilities and
personnel.

12 FAH-7 H-513 GUARD TRAINING

12 FAH-7 H-513.1 Sources of Guard Training


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Local guard training responsibilities and programs vary according to the


sources of the guards.

(1) Non-Personal Services (NPS)—Under a NPS contract, the


contractor is responsible for providing training and ensuring that
only qualified and approved guards are assigned to the mission.

(2) Host Government Forces—When the host government provides


guards for a mission's local guard force (LGF), the host government
usually does all of the training, but the Department or post may
have to provide some supplemental training for mission specific
needs or equipment. The post should also attempt to evaluate the
qualifications of the forces assigned to protect official facilities.

(3) Personal Service Agreements (PSA)—When the LGF has been


hired and is operated using PSAs, the RSO is responsible for
ensuring that all guards have received appropriate training and
have been certified as qualified for whatever positions and
responsibilities they will have.

b. Security awareness and its maintenance are universal goals with a shared
responsibility among participants regardless of the source of the guards.
Good two-way communication is necessary to establish and maintain a
high level of individual guard and supervisor ability to correctly apply both
their training and their security awareness to the current security
situation. The ultimate goal is a proactive and LGF not merely one which
only reacts to a terrorist or criminal's initiative.

12 FAH-7 H-513.2 Types of Guard Training


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The types of training required to be provided to guards by contractors


include:

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(1) Basic training;

(2) Firearms qualification training;

(3) Annual recertification training; and

(4) Guard electronic monitoring system (GEMS) training.

b. Training requirements apply to all employees assigned a position listed in


Exhibit A. The contractor is required to maintain employee-training
records to document the training each employee receives. These records
shall be part of the administrative files and available for inspection by the
contracting officer's representative (COR). For more information, see
C.1.5.9.2 of the sample LGP solicitation.

12 FAH-7 H-513.3 Basic Training


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

Prior to assigning an employee to a position, the contractor is required, at


the contractor's expense, to have the employee satisfactorily complete a
program of basic training approved by the COR. This program shall be for no
less than 80 hours. Where guards are armed, the training shall include an
additional 40 hours of firearms training as discussed in 12 FAH-7 H-522. This
basic training requirement may be waived by the CO, in coordination with
the RSO and/or PSO, for incumbent employees rehired by a successor
contractor. The training program must cover at least the following subjects:

(1) Orientation—Introduction to the training program, training


objectives, and the role of the guard force in the mission security
plan. The post RSO shall participate in this block of instruction.

(2) U.S. Government Assets—This includes a description of U.S.


assets to be protected, their names, locations, and functions. The
RSO shall provide this information.

(3) Local Law and the Power of Arrest—The powers and legal
limitations of the guard to use force and arrest offenders and the
relationship of the guard force to the host government security
forces.

(4) Terrorism and Criminality—A description of the nature of the


threat to U.S. assets with examples should be provided by the RSO
and/or PSO.

(5) Fires and Explosions—A description of the threat to assets caused

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by fire and explosions with examples of attacks in the past.

(6) Emergency Action Plans—The role of the guard force in cases of


fire, explosions, bomb search and building evacuation. The RSO
shall provide this information based upon the post's emergency
action plan (EAP).

(7) Physical Security Measures Employed by the Mission—A


description of the access control systems employed and of alarms
used (anti-intrusion and fire).

(8) Basic Guard Duties—A general description of guard actions for


protection of facilities and residences. The denial of access to
unauthorized persons, maintenance of guard force records, logs and
the preparation of reports.

(9) Guard Force Communications—The procedures to be used in


case of incident; the chain of notification and the use of radio
equipment.

(10) General Orders and Post Orders—Details of the approved Exhibit


B—U.S. EMBASSY and/or CONSULATE GUARD INSTRUCTIONS—
GENERAL ORDERS AND POST ORDERS, must be in training
programs for the guards and supervisors. Emphasis should be
placed on guard responsibilities, deportment, penalties for
violations of orders.

(11) Maintenance of Post Logs and Preparation of Incident


Reports—The procedures for preparation of daily logs of incident
reports must be covered.

(12) Unarmed Defense and Restraint of Disorderly Persons—The


procedures for defending against physical attack, procedures for
restraining others and guidance on the use of force.

(13) Use of Personal Equipment—The procedures for the use of the


baton, handcuffs, and mace, as appropriate, must be taught.

(14) Access Control Equipment Use and Procedures—The use of


electronic body (magnetometer and hand-held devices) and
package search equipment (X-ray or physical); manual body
search, vehicle search, building search for suspected bombs; and
visitor control systems, including badge issuance and control.
General coverage of this subject is for all guard personnel, with
special hands-on training to be provided to those to be assigned to
access control duties.

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(15) Observation Techniques—The use of observation techniques for


static guards, mobile patrol units, and foot patrols to identify,
report and record suspicious acts and persons, with special
emphasis on surveillance detection techniques for all guards.

(16) U.S. Government Employees and General Public—The


procedures to be used when dealing with U.S. Government
employees and the general public; actions to be taken when
confronted by hostile individuals and mentally disturbed persons.

12 FAH-7 H-513.4 Annual Recertification Training


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Each employee must successfully complete a total of 16 hours of annual


recertification training. The purpose of this training is to re-enforce and
verify continued understanding of the material covered during the initial
basic training. The recertification training shall include any new material
bearing on the performance of local guard duties.

b. The annual retraining time of an employee is computed from the


completion date of the previous training for that particular employee.
Employees are prohibited from providing services under the contract if
they are not certified on all required training.

12 FAH-7 H-514 THROUGH H-519


UNASSIGNED

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12 FAH-7 H-520
U.S. GOVERNMENT PROVIDED TRAINING
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 H-521 GENERAL


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

When a LGF is staffed through the use of PSA employees, the RSO or PSO
are responsible for ensuring that all of the guards are trained and qualified in
all of the subjects previously address in 12 FAH-7 H-513.2. The training
must be accomplished before the guards assume their posts and the
requirement for recertification training applies to PSA guards as it would to
contractor provided guards.

12 FAH-7 H-522 FIREARMS TRAINING


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The 12 FAH-6, Security Standards Handbook, contains the Department's


firearms policy. All contract guard employees who must be armed in the
performance of their duties must qualify as a "marksman.” The qualification
standards will depend on the weapons selected and will be determined by
the post and host government laws. The qualification standards must be
approved by DS/CIS/PSP/FPD. As part of a contract, the CO must specify
the appropriate period, e.g. semiannually or annually for requalification.
Specific qualification standards should be requested from DS/CIS/PSP/FPD.
For NPS contracts, the qualification standards should be included as Exhibit
G in the contract.

12 FAH-7 H-523 GUARD ELECTRONIC


MONITORING SYSTEM (GEMS) TRAINING
AND X-RAY TRAINING
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Each supervisor and any other employee utilizing U.S. Government


furnished GEMS will receive initial training in system operation by the

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U.S. Government. All subsequent required GEMS training, including


recertification training, shall be the responsibility of the contractor.

b. Each supervisor and any other employee utilizing contractor furnished


GEMS will receive training from the contractor in the proper use of the
system. GEMS training shall also be part of their annual recertification
training.

c. Each employee utilizing the X-ray inspection equipment will receive initial
training in system operation by the U.S. Government.

12 FAH-7 H-524 THROUGH H-529


UNASSIGNED

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12 FAH-7 H-530
SURVEILLANCE DETECTION PROGRAM
(SDP) TRAINING
(CT:LGP-04; 03-23-2006)
(Office of Origin: DS)

12 FAH-7 H-531 INTRODUCTION


(TL:LGP-3; 12-31-2003)

The SDP objective is to enhance the prospects of preventing a terrorist


attack by recognizing pre-operational hostile surveillance directed against
mission facilities and personnel. Proper training and supervision of
surveillance detection personnel is key to realizing this goal.

12 FAH-7 H-532 TRAINING RESPONSIBILITY


FOR SD SUPERVISORS AND SPECIALISTS
(CT:LGP-04; 03-23-2006)

a. The U.S. government shall provide initial and periodic refresher training
to surveillance detection supervisors and specialists. DS/IP/OPO will be
responsible for providing the trainers and coordinating their visits to post
to conduct the training. As part of the training, trainers will review post
SD operations and provide the RSO with an assessment of the proficiency
of the SD team and make recommendations for corrective action.

b. Post will be notified of proposed SD training via a country clearance


request cable. This cable will include requests for various types of
support. Questions regarding support requirements should be directed to
the appropriate DS/IP/FPO desk officer.

c. Prior to departing post, the SD trainers will outbrief the RSO’s office on
training results as well as their assessment of post SD operations. The
senior RSO should make every effort to attend this out brief.

d. The RSO should keep records of periodic in-service training.

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12 FAH-7 H-533 SDP GENERAL AND POST


ORDERS
(CT:LGP-04; 03-23-2006)
RSOs are required to ensure the SD program follows written guidance
contained in post specific management and operational plans. These plans
must be supplemented with post-specific Standard Operating Procedures
(SOPs). Detailed guidance for drafting these plans and procedures is
contained in the Surveillance Detection Management and Operations Field
Guide (For detailed guidance on the SDP, see the Surveillance Detection
Management and Operations Field Guide, Version 2, dated 2002).

Note: This field guide should be available at post, but if not, RSO should
request a copy from DS/IP/FPO. Periodic updates are made to the field guide
so post should ensure it maintains the latest version.

12 FAH-7 H-534 FUNDING


(TL:LGP-3; 12-31-2003)

DS/IP/FPO is the office that authorizes funding for post surveillance


detection programs. Include SD funding requirements in post’s annual ICASS
budget submission under the DS program function code of 9912. RSOs are
also required to prepare an annual LGP Field Budget Plan (FBP) and funding
for the SD program requirements should be submitted as part of this plan.
Funding requests made during the fiscal year should be submitted by
telegram and include detailed justification and an itemized cost breakdown.

12 FAH-7 H-535 THROUGH H-539


UNASSIGNED

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12 FAH-7 H-540
EXPLOSIVES DETECTION TRAINING
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 H-541 INTRODUCTION


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The objective of the Explosive Detection Program is to enhance the


prospects of preventing a terrorist attack by deterring or detecting any
attempt to use explosive devices directed against mission personnel or
facilities. The program also seeks to give all possible support, directly or
by calling for assistance, in case an imminent attack is uncovered.

b. Local guards play an important role in detecting attempts to introduce


explosive devices onto or near official facilities and instructions and
procedures to support this program should be included in guard orders
and training.

12 FAH-7 H-542 GENERAL AND/OR POST


ORDERS
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The general and post orders should include the following information, as
appropriate:

(1) Explosive detection operations are overt and include both visual
inspection of visitors and vehicles and the use of special sensing
equipment to detect either explosives or traces of explosives;

(2) Explosive detection operations are intended to deter as well as to


detect attempts to use explosives in an attack on a post; and

(3) In the event that explosives are detected, coordination and


cooperation with host country police and/or security forces will be
required.

b. Appropriate methods of explosive detection operations include:

(1) Visual inspection of all vehicles and visitors entering official

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facilities; and

(2) The use of sensitive technical equipment to detect explosives traces


on visitors, and/or vehicles which may have either transported or
been in contact with explosives or the components of explosives.

c. If explosives or traces of explosive are detected, either visually or with


inspection equipment, the guard must take the following actions:

(1) The suspected device should not be touched or moved and if


attached to a vehicle the vehicle should not be moved; and

(2) The discovery should immediately be reported to the RSO and/or


PSO and/or the MSG Post One.

12 FAH-7 H-543 EXPLOSIVE DETECTION


EQUIPMENT OPERATOR TRAINING
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

DS/CIS/IST/FSE/FS shall provide the explosive detection training at post to


local guard personnel, the RSO and/or PSO and others, as required. This
training will include the operation of all explosive detection equipment.

12 FAH-7 H-544 EXPLOSIVES DETECTION


EQUIPMENT
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

Different types of explosive detection equipment are in use at different


posts. Specific information on the operation and maintenance of explosive
detection equipment will be provided to the personnel assigned to operate
and maintain the equipment.

12 FAH-7 H-545 ALARM RESOLUTION


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The kind of alarm and the actions required necessary to resolve that
alarm, depend upon the kinds of explosive detected and the detector in
use. Explosive detection equipment operators should be provided with
written information outlining the range of alarms and the steps required

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to resolve the alarm. Alarm resolution questions should be addressed to


DS/CIS/IST/FSE/FS.

b. A format for reporting alarms is in 12 FAH-7 Appendix VI-2.

12 FAH-7 H-546 FUNDING


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

Funds for explosive detection (i.e., procurement, maintenance and/or parts


and shipping) are provided by DS/CIS/IST/FSE/FS.

12 FAH-7 H-547 THROUGH H-549


UNASSIGNED

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12 FAH-7 H-550
CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL (CB)
COUNTERMEASURES TRAINING
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 H-551 INTRODUCTION


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. This subchapter provides an overview of the chemical and biological


terrorist threat and, drawing on the lessons learned from the chemical
and biological incidents to date, suggests some basic means of detection,
defense, and decontamination.

b. Local guards can play an important role in preventing a chemical or


biological attack. Therefore, RSOs should incorporate countermeasures
into guard orders and training.

c. The U.S. Government provides training and equipment appropriate to


chemical and biological incidents.

12 FAH-7 H-552 BRIEFING LOCAL GUARD


PERSONNEL
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The following instructions should be incorporated in briefings to all local


guards:

(1) Be alert for unusual clothing or use of breathing protection by


pedestrians or drivers in the neighborhood of mission facilities (e.g.,
wearing long sleeved shirts or gloves on a hot day, etc.);

(2) Know which way and how strong the wind is blowing. A CB attack
from outside the perimeter is most likely to come from upwind of
the facility. (NOTE: Winds over 25 MPH (40 KPH) or under 5 MPH
(8 KPH) are not ideal conditions for this type of attack.);

(3) Guards should be especially alert at sundown, sunup and at night.


These are normally times when temperature inversions, which

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create ideal conditions for an external plume attack, occur; and

(4) Always suspect chemical agents with conventional explosions,


especially when a device explodes with significantly less force than
one would expect.

12 FAH-7 H-553 GENERAL AND/OR POST


ORDERS
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

General and post orders should instruct all guards to stay alert for the
following indicators of chemical or biological attack and report immediately
to the appropriate supervisors, MSG, RSO, or PSO, if they are detected:

(1) Unusual dead or dying animals in the area;

(2) Unusual liquid sprays or vapor;

(3) Droplets or oily film on surfaces;

(4) Large numbers of strange or unseasonable insects or vermin not


typical for the time of day or year. (Fleas, lice, mosquitoes and
ticks have all been used to spread biological agents in tests);

(5) Unexplained odors (smell of bitter almonds, peach kernels, newly


mown hay, or green grass);

(6) Low flying cloud formations unrelated to weather; clouds of dust; or


suspended, possibly colored particles;

(7) People dressed unusually (long-sleeved shirts or overcoats in the


summertime) or wearing breathing protection, particularly in areas
where large numbers of people tend to congregate, such as
subways or stadiums.;

(8) Suspicious devices, especially spray devices, used or found in the


area;

(9) Any type of unusual or unauthorized spraying upwind of mission


buildings;

(10) Sudden difficulty in seeing, especially dimness or vision while in


broad daylight. (Nerve agents affect vision at lower doses than
other chemical agents.);

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(11) Numerous individuals experiencing unexplained blisters or rashes;

(12) Unexplained casualties, including multiple victims;

(13) Victims displaying symptoms of nausea, difficulty breathing,


convulsions, disorientation, or patterns of illness inconsistent with
natural disease;

(14) Security personnel should first screen letters from unknown


sources. If opened, letters allegedly containing anthrax or another
toxin should be handled carefully. NOTE: If there was a puff of
dust or particles from the envelope when it was opened, be sure to
report that when assistance arrives. Carefully place such a letter
and its envelope in a sealed plastic pouch. Thoroughly wash hands
first and then face with warm soapy water before calling for
assistance;

(15) When searching bags and packages, look for and carefully examine
containers that could carry chemical or biological agents in powder,
liquid, or aerosolized form, i.e., aerosol cans, perfume bottles,
thermos jugs, glass and/or plastic bottles, baby bottles, etc. These
items should not be allowed into the building unless the owner can
demonstrate to designated supervisors (e.g., through drinking or
spraying on skin) that the substance is safe;

(16) The presence of breathing devices, air filters, nose clips, hospital
masks, rubber gloves, etc., should be cause for immediate concern
and require further investigation. Visitors should be questioned
regarding their use of these items and the supervisor, or RSO
and/or PSO should be notified before access is permitted;

(17) Be alert to visitors displaying unusual nervousness or care when


handling liquid containers in their possession or who ask questions
about location, type or protective measures for air conditioning or
heating systems;

(18) Mail and package screeners should be alerted to possible


introduction of chemicals or biologics through their areas. Most
current mailroom screening procedures (letter bomb indicators, X-
rays) will also help in detecting CB agents. Personnel should report
any unusual odors from mail or packages and be alert for envelopes
containing granular material. Anthrax hoax letters have come in
such envelopes (NOTE: Suspect packages or envelopes should only
be opened by security personnel wearing at a minimum a CB
protective mask and butyl rubber gloves and at a location away
from building ac vents.);

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(19) Be alert to the use of any device inside or outside the building
perimeter that could be used to spray a toxic cloud toward the
building. This could include commercial spraying equipment, paint,
insecticide or garden sprayers, air pumps, or even a crop duster
airplane. When possible, persons conducting such spraying should
be challenged, and, in all cases, supervisors and the RSO and/or
PSO should be immediately alerted;

(20) When patrolling public areas, look for abandoned spray liquid
containers. If found, immediately alert the supervisor and RSO
and/or PSO. Particular attention should be paid to insure building
air vents can not be approached by anyone using such devices;

(21) Non-employees requiring access to or near building air intake vents


or drinking water storage tanks should be escorted by LGF or
employee personnel;

(22) At posts with wells or accessible water storage tanks, LGF orders
should include regular patrols of those areas; and

(23) A chemical or biological attack or incident won’t always be


immediately apparent given the fact that many agents are odorless
and colorless and some cause no immediately noticeable effects or
symptoms. Nevertheless, be alert to the possible presence of an
agent as indicated by the presence of symptoms.

12 FAH-7 H-554 LGF ACTIONS IN CASE OF


ATTACK AND/OR DETECTION OF WARNING
SIGNS
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. LGF personnel noting suspicious activity and/or the above indicators


should immediately report the incident to his and/or her supervisor and
the RSO and/or PSO. If the attack is in progress, avoid contact with the
agent being delivered and attempt to stop the attack if at all possible.

b. Local guards should assist in evacuation, and, if necessary, direct police


and/or HAZMAT response and if properly equipped with masks, gloves,
and protective coveralls, assist in stopping the attack or helping in
decontamination.

c. If assisting in building evacuation, guards should be sure to direct


evacuees upwind of the building to avoid further contamination and be

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alert to the possibility of attack using conventional weapons on the


gathered evacuees. NOTE: If the mission is in a high-rise building, it
may be advisable to move to upper levels as many chemicals are heavier
than air and will sink or stay close the ground.

d. If exposed to CB agents, evacuate the area as soon as possible. Once out


of range, take immediate steps to decontaminate using soap and/or
diluted bleach solution and lots of water. Medical treatment should be
sought as soon as possible after decontamination. NOTE: Clothes tend
to retain toxins so they should not be put on again after decontamination.

12 FAH-7 H-555 THROUGH H-559


UNASSIGNED

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12 FAH-7 H-600
PROGRAM EQUIPMENT

12 FAH-7 H-610
GENERAL
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 H-611 INTRODUCTION


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Items such as vehicles, weapons, and radios are the kinds of equipment
considered non-expendable. Equipment that has been purchased or
provided by the U.S. Government, must be controlled and kept
inventoried from acquisition to disposal. As with other aspects of the
Local Guard Program (LGP), where and how necessary equipment is
obtained, depends on whether the local guard force (LGF) is operated
under a non-personal services (NPS) contract, using host government
forces or with personal services agreements (PSAs).

b. Only equipment, which is fully dedicated to the LGP, can qualify for
funding by DS/CIS/PSP/FPD. Queries on eligibility for LGP funding of
specific items should be directed to DS/CIS/PSP/FPD. Queries must
include a description of the item along with the intended use and any
other pertinent data.

c. For guidance on accountable property, see:

(1) 6 FAM 221.4a, Accountable Property;

(2) 6 FAM 224.1-1, Criteria for Accountability; and

(3) 6 FAM 226, Physical Inventory and Reconciliation.

12 FAH-7 H-612 HOST-GOVERNMENT


RESTRICTIONS
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

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Most countries have laws or restrictions governing the categories of


equipment normally used in the LGP. To preclude problems with the host
government, the RSO should ensure that all items ordered are in
conformance with host government imposed restrictions. Restrictions may
include, but are not limited, to the following:

(1) Uniforms—The configuration and colors shall not be similar or


identical to police or military uniforms;

(2) Weapons—There may be a total prohibition or a restriction on


caliber, type, number of weapons, and kind and quantity of
ammunition that can be used by the LGF;

(3) Vehicles—Certain colors, size, weight, engine horsepower or


displacement and configurations may be restricted. Right-hand
drive may be required;

(4) Communications—Frequency, power rating, and licensing


requirements are usually subject to host government regulation;
and

(5) Emergency Lights and Sirens—The use of these colored lights on


a vehicle may be limited to official host government vehicles and
ambulances. The color of lights on vehicles may also be restricted.

12 FAH-7 H-613 NONPERSONAL SERVICE


(NPS) CONTRACTS
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Under a NPS contract, every attempt should be made to have all needed
equipment and supplies, including non-expendable items such as
vehicles, weapons, radios, etc., and expendables such as, batteries,
flashlights, whistles, gasoline, uniforms, etc., provided by the contractor
as a part of the contract. Although the contractor may be unable to fund
major items such as vehicles, weapons, and radios, it is reasonable to
expect they should furnish uniforms, weather-protective clothing,
flashlights, batons, whistles, and other selected items. A competent
contractor, who supplies equipment, will amortize the costs by prorating
them, based on the expected life of the item. This should be reflected in
the contractor’s bid as an overhead or operating expense and identified
as such for each category of equipment. Equipment needed for the LGF
may be funded as a program expense provided all efforts have been
exhausted to have such equipment supplied by the LGF contractor.

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b. The contract must have exhibits to specify all items of equipment to be


provided by the U.S. Government and/or the contractor. The contractor
should provide for equipment maintenance and repair, insurance,
expendable supplies, and operational costs for the use of the equipment.
Where costs are substantially greater than if the U.S. Government
provided the equipment, it may be necessary and advantageous for the
post to provide equipment for use by a contractor. In these situations,
the mission must retain title to the equipment and in the contract hold
the contractor liable for loss or damage beyond normal wear and tear to
U.S. Government furnished equipment.

12 FAH-7 H-614 HOST-GOVERNMENT FORCES


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Host government security forces may not have all of the equipment and
supplies required to equip a fully effective LGP. Post may provide funds
for the procurement of supplies to assist the host government in meeting
U.S. Government requirements. Generally, the U.S. Government does
not provide vehicles or weapons to host government forces. Only in rare
instances with detailed justification, EAC, and chief of mission support
and/or approval, will such requests be considered.

b. In some cases, the host government may request meals, supplementary


uniform items, civilian clothing for bodyguards, and equipment or
financial compensation. Funding is available for justifiable requests and
should be accounted for according to FMO budget codes.
DS/CIS/PSP/FPD approval is required before funds are allocated or
equipment procured. See 12 FAH-7 Appendix III for further information.

c. The Procurement Executive has determined that security agreements with


local security forces under the control of host government authority
(including payments of police stipends) shall not be subject to any of the
requirements of the FAR.

12 FAH-7 H-615 PSA LOCAL GUARD FORCES


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

When using a PSA staffed LGF, the U. S. Government furnishes all of the
necessary equipment and supplies to include vehicles, weapons, and radios,
when justified. The types of equipment, quantities needed, and estimated
cost should be included as part of the annual International Cooperative
Administrative Support Services (ICASS) budget submission for approval by

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DS/CIS/PSP/FPD. Provision should be made for including projections on


maintenance costs and equipment repair as well as any required liability
insurance. A complete system of inventory and control has to be established
as well as procedures for ensuring compliance with U.S. Government
regulations governing the procurement and disposal of non-expendable
equipment. Expendable supplies can be obtained using purchase orders
provided the price does not exceed the dollar threshold for such purchases.
The RSO and/or PSO must also obtain the required approvals from
DS/CIS/PSP/FPD for the program and the planned equipment before any
acquisitions have begun.

12 FAH-7 H-616 MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS

12 FAH-7 H-616.1 General


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. As with the previous categories of equipment, the contractor should


supply any other items necessary to equip the LGF. This requirement
should be identified in the solicitation for guard services and made a part
of the contract. All contractor-supplied equipment should be subject to
prior approval by the RSO. In the case of uniforms and personal
equipment, the RSO may provide the specifications and list of what
constitutes a “basic issue” and what the replacement cycle will be for
specific items.

b. When furnished by the U.S. Government, other equipment should be


procured through mission procurement channels. The GSO is the
responsible officer to initiate and monitor these actions in accordance
with the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) and the Department of
State Acquisition Regulations (DOSAR).

12 FAH-7 H-616.2 Uniforms


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Uniforms provide a distinctive appearance and visually identify the official


nature of the wearer’s position. Each post should decide the most
effective type of clothing for the local guards to wear while on duty.
RSOs have to take into consideration local restrictions as to style, color,
and cut. Often, certain colors are limited to use by the military and police
forces. The same applies to a military cut. Under certain cultural or
ethnic conditions, the use of a “blazer” with shirt and tie would be more
acceptable and create less of an authoritarian or military image. Some

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posts provide a distinctive patch to be worn on a sleeve or breast pocket.

b. Wherever possible, the contractor should be required to provide uniforms


for guards and to replace them on a prescribed schedule. Such costs
then become a part of the overhead costs of the contract. See 12 FAH-7
Appendix V-2, paragraph (28) for sample contract language regarding
contractor provided uniforms.

c. Where posts use PSA employees as local guards, the post is responsible
for providing the uniforms. In these cases, posts must follow the
provisions of 6 FAM 240, Uniforms and Protective Clothing, when making
decisions on the kinds and cost of uniforms for the LGF.

d. When the host government provides local guard service, uniforms for the
guards are the responsibility of the host government.

12 FAH-7 H-616.3 Belts, Holsters, Whistles,


Flashlights, Batons, etc.
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

With a NPS contract, the contractor should supply belts, holsters, whistles,
flashlights, batons, etc. These ancillary items should be stipulated in Exhibit
D of the contract. If the U.S. Government provides any of these items, they
should be included in Exhibit E, U.S. Government Furnished Equipment.
Where a PSA staffed guard force is in place, these items are provided by the
post. The control and accountability of this equipment remains the
responsibility of the post whether provided under Exhibit E for a NPS
contractor or to the post's own PSA LGF.

12 FAH-7 H-616.4 Civilian Clothing


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. In cases where the COM or other employee is assigned the protection of a


bodyguard(s) to enhance security, it may be necessary for the U.S.
Government to provide or pay for suitable clothing for the bodyguard(s).
Generally, this is required in countries where such clothing must be
provided for security reasons, i.e., to lower the guard profile. This may
be authorized under the LGP, but before purchasing clothing, or paying
an allowance, the post should contact DS/CIS/PSP/FPD for approval. The
request should include a justification and estimate of costs.

b. Most SDPs require the team members to wear civilian clothing. In some
cases, in order to allow the employee to maintain a low profile or

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otherwise assist in surveillance detection, additional or special clothing


may be necessary. This may be authorized under the SDP, but before
purchasing clothing, or paying an allowance, the post should contact
DS/CIS/PSP/FPD for approval. The request should include a justification
and estimate of costs.

12 FAH-7 H-616.5 Supply Sources to Consider


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

With the exception of U.S.-made vehicles and weapons and other special
protective equipment, the following sources should be considered:

(1) The General Services Administration (GSA) Stores Stock Catalog;

(2) The Federal Supply Schedule (FSS);

(3) Individual manufacturers;

(4) Police and uniform supply companies; and

(5) Local suppliers.

12 FAH-7 H-616.6 Expendable Supplies


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

Expendable supplies are items that are designed to be depleted in normal


operations. Supplies required for the operation of the guard force and for
training are included in this program element. Examples of expendable
supplies are:

(1) Petroleum, Oil and Lubricants—In instances where such costs


are included in the guard force contract costs, they should be
separately identified. U.S. Government furnished vehicles
dedicated to the guard force are maintained by the mission motor
pool, and such vehicles receive fuel from this source. Such costs
are not to be isolated as separate LGP costs, but absorbed in the
overall costs of the operation of the mission motor pool.

(2) Radio and Flashlight Batteries—It is recommended that battery


powered equipment be the type using rechargeable batteries;
appropriate replacement batteries and spare parts are a part of this
program element.

(3) Personal Equipment—Examples of personal equipment are

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nightsticks, whistles, web or leather belts, nightstick holder, MACE


or pepper spray with holder in some cases, and notebook. The
contractor providing guard service normally should provide these.
If such items are not provided for in this manner, the costs will
represent a separate program element.

(4) Administrative Supplies—Appropriate office supplies and printed


forms for record keeping needed by the RSO in carrying out his or
her responsibilities regarding the guard force are included in this
element.

12 FAH-7 H-617 THROUGH H-619


UNASSIGNED

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12 FAH-7 H-620
FIREARMS
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 H-621 FIREARMS PROCUREMENT


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. For LGFs staffed by PSAs, DS/CIS/PSP/PEL will continue to procure and


ship weapons, ammunition, and the other special protective items
contained in the DS Special Protective Equipment (SPE) Catalog (dated
January 2000). Equipment procured from the SPE catalog will be
provided by DS/CIS/PSP/PEL at no cost to the post, provided it is issued
to PSA Guards or is listed in Exhibit E, U.S. Government Furnished
Equipment (GFE), of a NPS contract. Equipment not contained in the SPE
catalog is not available from DS/CIS/PSP/PEL and must be procured by
post. Funding for items not available in the SPE catalog must be
requested from DS/CIS/PSP/FPD. Requests should include a full narrative
justification and cost estimate. If funding is approved, procurement
remains a post responsibility. All requests for firearms must be
accompanied by a detailed explanation of their intended use. Rifles and
submachine guns are normally limited to use by the RSO and
bodyguards. These weapons are not authorized in inventories at posts
that do not have an RSO resident.

b. In the solicitation for an armed LGF, the types and numbers of weapons
required must be identified. Local laws and regulations may govern the
selection of types of weapons. Unless prohibited by local laws or not
possible for other legitimate reasons, the proposal from commercial
security firms for a LGF, which will be armed, should include the cost of
furnishing all weapons, ammunition, training, and the actions and
expenses necessary to obtain any required licenses and insurance. When
furnished by the contractor, the weapons remain the property and
responsibility of the contractor. The RSO and/or A/RSO acting as
contracting officer's representative (COR) must ensure through written
documentation that any weapons used as part of a local guard contract
have been obtained, are stored, and used in accordance with local laws
and regulations. When the contractor is unable to provide weapons
required by the LGF, equipment procured from the SPE catalog will be
provided by DS/CIS/PSP/PEL at no cost to the post provided it is listed as
GFE in the LGP NPS contract.

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c. When the host government provides an armed force as part of the LGP,
the host government is responsible for furnishing weapons. In some
cases where a host government has provided an armed force, the host
government may not be able to provide sufficient ammunition to ensure
an acceptable level of training. Should an RSO determine that this
condition exists at his or her mission, a request for supplemental
ammunition can be made to DS/CIS/PSP/FPD and DS/CIS/PSP/PEL. The
request should explain the local situation and indicate kinds and
quantities of ammunition required.

d. Regardless of the source of weapons used for the security of the mission,
the RSO and/or PSO must ensure that they are clean and maintained in a
serviceable condition.

e. Trigger locks, shotgun racks, and/or safes for local guard weapon storage
are to be post purchased and/or procured items when listed as U.S.
Government furnished property in a NPS guard contract or under a PSA
arrangement. Funding will be provided by DS/CIS/PSP/FPD. If not
provided as GFE under a NPS guard contract, posts should ensure that
the contractor is providing and accounting for weapons securing
equipment.

12 FAH-7 H-622 SPECIAL PROTECTIVE


EQUIPMENT (SPE) TELEGRAM (ANNUAL)
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The SPE telegram, prepared annually by DS/CIS/PSP/PEL, contains


valuable information concerning acquisition of weapons, ammunition, and
other special protective equipment. It lists specific make and model
information and nomenclature for ammunition.

b. All requests for SPE in support of LGPs should be addressed to


DS/CIS/PSP/FPD as well as DS/CIS/PSP/PEL. Instruction and formats for
these requests are contained in the annual SPE telegram and should be
followed when ordering weapons, ammunition, and other items listed.
This includes the type and number of items required, firearms request
justification, ammunition request justification, current firearms inventory
by types and quantities, and confirmation of the nearest available Air
Force Air Mobility Command (AMC) terminal for special flight information,
if applicable. A statement that the chief of mission (COM) or principal
officer (PO) concurs with the request must also be included.

c. The current formula for calculating ammunition requirements is contained

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in the SPE catalog. When ordering training ammunition, use the


formulas outlined in the SPE catalog to indicate how quantities requested
were determined and that this quantity does not exceed the authorized
level.

d. The RSO or PSO is responsible for an annual inventory of firearms at


post. This inventory is submitted to DS/CIS/PSP/FPD and
DS/CIS/PSP/PEL.

12 FAH-7 H-623 STANDARD TYPES OF


WEAPONS AND/OR AMMUNITION FOR LGF
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The standard issued weapons for LGFs depend on the post, country,
threat rating, and the RSO request. As required in accordance with 12
FAH-6, Security Standards Handbook, the DS Firearms Policy Review
Board reviews requests before approval is granted. Specific details as to
make, model, configuration, etc., for current DS standard weapons are
contained in the SPE catalog.

b. Only in rare cases will any surveillance detection (SD) personnel be


armed. The requirements that apply to obtaining approval for an armed
LGF also apply if there is a need to arm all or part of the SD personnel.
In addition, the issue of carrying concealed weapons must be met with
confirmation of host government approval as part of the request.

c. DS/CIS/PSP/PEL recommends the RSO order for the LGF a reserve supply
equal to 10 percent of the required inventory to assure an adequate
supply of weapons to replace those that become unserviceable or are
under repair. Weapons, which need repair or replacement, must be
returned to the Department; the turn-around time for weapons returned
to the Department for repair may be 90 days or longer. It is, therefore,
essential to have an adequate number of reserve weapons on hand. The
contractor or host government is responsible for maintenance and repair
as well as ensuring an adequate number of reserve weapons when they
are responsible for the supply of weapons.

12 FAH-7 H-623.1 Procurement Lead Time


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

RSOs should be aware that due to transportation restrictions and availability


of suitable shipping channels, there may be up to one year or more of lead-

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time from the time weapons are ordered before shipments could arrive in
country. Emergency requests will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

12 FAH-7 H-623.2 Ammunition Procurement


Alternatives
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Prior to requesting DS/CIS/PSP/PEL assistance in obtaining ammunition,


the RSO should explore alternative sources including the following:

(1) Commercial sources in the local economy;

(2) Purchase from host government sources; or

(3) Offshore commercial sources. If appropriate, the post should


request host government approval for a “declared” entry via
commercial sources.

b. If none of these alternatives are feasible and DS assistance is required,


delivery will be to the closest USAF Air Mobility Command (AMC) terminal
or by other special flight arrangements as may be available, such as small
commercial charter or any U.S. military aircraft operating in the area. For
further guidance, check with DS/CIS/PSP/PEL.

12 FAH-7 H-624 WEAPONS SAFETY AND


DISPOSAL

12 FAH-7 H-624.1 Weapons Safety


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Missions having uniformed armed local guard personnel and/or armed SD


personnel are required to review their guard orders and make periodic
random inspections to ensure weapons safety and handling procedures
are being followed according to regulations. Constant attention should be
paid to proper weapons control (i.e., loading, unloading, carrying,
storage, etc.). Posts may also need to review and/or update their general
guard orders to cover, at a minimum, the following issues:

(1) How a weapon will be passed from shift to shift;

(2) How a weapon will be secured when not in direct possession of a


guard; and

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(3) Stern reminders that weapons will not be left unattended unless
they can be secured.

b. Violations of weapons handling and/or storage procedures and rules are


grounds for immediate dismissal of any guard. Accidental discharge of a
firearm or weapon use resulting in a discharge should be investigated by
the RSO and reported expeditiously by DS channel telegram to
DS/CIS/PSP/FPD, DS/DSS/OP, and DS/DSS/ICI/CR. See also 12 FAM
228.3-6, Alien Employees, Contractor, and Contractor's Employees.

12 FAH-7 H-624.2 Weapons Disposal


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Disposal of weapons no longer needed or non-repairable is the


responsibility of the contractor when the contractor has furnished the
weapons.

b. Disposal of weapons that are the property of the host government is the
responsibility of the host government.

c. When weapons have been furnished to the contractor by the U.S.


Government or when PSA guards are armed, disposal of any excess or
unrepairable weapons is the responsibility of the RSO or PSO with
instructions from and approval of DS/CIS/PSP/PEL. Before returning any
weapons, the post should notify DS/CIS/PSP/PEL of the intention to
return weapons as excess or for repair, and request authority to ship
them. These weapons should be returned to DS/CIS/PSP/PEL in
accordance with the correct shipping procedures.

12 FAH-7 H-625 THROUGH H-629


UNASSIGNED

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12 FAH-7 H-630
VEHICLES
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 H-631 GENERAL


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Vehicles may be required for transport of guard force supervisors, mobile


patrols, reaction forces, transporting guards for shift relief, surveillance
detection (SD) operations, or ambassadorial-follow cars. SD teams will
likely need a vehicle(s) which may include bicycles, motor bikes as well as
automobiles to deploy into positions and maneuver on the street. SD
vehicles should be of a make, model, and color that will readily blend in
with other local vehicles; the use of diplomatic or official license plates
should be avoided.

b. Under a local guard contract, vehicles used for all local guard operations
will be provided by the contractor, whenever possible. However, in cases
where this is not feasible, or for a PSA staffed LGF, this requirement may
be met by vehicles funded and provided by DS/CIS/PSP/FPD. Post must
coordinate with DS/CIS/PSP/FPD before any vehicles are purchased or
otherwise obtained. When LGP and/or SDP vehicles are funded by
DS/CIS/PSP/FPD, they must be used exclusively for these or other
approved LGP and/or SDP activities.

c. All vehicles used of U.S. Government property must be fully licensed,


inspected and insured in accordance with local laws and regulations.

12 FAH-7 H-632 CONTRACTOR PROVIDED


TRANSPORTATION
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Vehicles provided by the contractor are maintained and controlled by and


are the responsibility of the contractor. The type of vehicle provided by
the contractor should be specified in the solicitation (i.e., utility, pickup,
van, four-wheel drive, etc.).

b. In some cases where high vehicle import duties may make it prohibitive

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for the post or the contractor to reasonably meet transportation


requirements under the contract, the post should consider using its duty-
free import privilege, but with the contractor paying the cost and
assuming all responsibility for the vehicle. Prior to using this method, the
post must consider the host government’s attitude towards such a
transaction. It may also be prudent to firmly establish that should a
contractor’s services be terminated prior to the date when the vehicle
could be disposed of without payment of tax or import fee (usually two or
three years from the date of import), the contractor will be responsible
for all such payments. It may be advisable to establish an “escrow”
account in a local bank, funded by the contractor, to cover such an
eventuality.

12 FAH-7 H-633 VEHICLE ACQUISITION


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Vehicles are acquired through purchase, lease, or transfer. Funds for the
purchase of vehicles are obtained through Congressional appropriations
and proceeds from the sale of vehicles. Vehicle replacement coordination
efforts are made through post, DS/CIS/PSP/FPD, and A/LM/OPS/RLC/MV.

b. Posts abroad must obtain prior approval from A/LM/OPS/RLC/MV before


acquiring any vehicle by purchase, lease, transfer, or other means,
except as provided in 6 FAM 228.9. The General Services Administration
(GSA) is the mandatory procurement source for the purchase of U.S.
manufactured vehicles from the United States. A/LM/OPS/RLC/MV is
responsible for submitting purchase requests to GSA.

c. Foreign made vehicles are purchased abroad by the post, either through a
regional procurement office, third country procurement, or locally. All
purchases abroad must be authorized by A/LM/OPS/RLC/MV.

d. Due to the Balance of Payments Program, it is the Department‘s policy to


acquire and use U.S.-manufactured vehicles except when:

(1) There are special requirements which cannot be met by U.S.


manufacturers (e.g., right-hand drive);

(2) The total cost of acquisition and use (including maintenance and
repair) of non-U.S.–made vehicles is at least one third less than
that of U.S.-made vehicles. This is generally due to the availability
of parts and service, suitability to local conditions, and more
efficient fleet operations; and

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(3) It is necessary due to local conditions to use non-U.S.-made


vehicles for the SDP or special operational needs. Justification to
procure a vehicle under this provision must be submitted to
A/LM/OPS/RLC/MV. If security is a consideration, the justification
must be routed through DS/CIS/PSP/FPD for approval.

e. It is also the Department’s policy that when the use of foreign-made


vehicles is determined to be in the best interests of the U. S.
Government, consideration will be given to vehicles manufactured by U.S.
subsidiary firms.

12 FAH-7 H-633.1 U.S.-Manufactured Vehicles


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. DS/CIS/PSP/FPD will approve the acquisition of U.S.-manufactured


vehicles to meet LGP transportation requirements based on information
from the post. Vehicle specifications and funding information will be
provided by DS/CIS/PSP/FPD to A/LM/OPS/RLC/MV to initiate
procurement action through the GSA. See 6 FAM 228, Use and Control of
Official Vehicles. A/LM/OPS/RLC/MV will continue to procure and ship all
U.S.-manufactured vehicles in accordance with established procedures
(consult the GSO for details).

b. Transportation costs from the manufacturer’s facility to the port of entry


of the receiving country are included in the overall funding level approved
for the procurement action. However, all local post, handling, clearance,
or other fees, including inland freight, are chargeable to the post's
salaries and expenses (S&E) account.

12 FAH-7 H-633.2 U.S.-Affiliated Manufacturers


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. It is the policy of the U.S. Government to purchase, to the greatest


extent possible, equipment manufactured by companies either in the
United States or, when abroad, owned by U.S. citizens or corporations.

b. When a post determines that no U.S.-manufactured vehicle meets the


post's requirements and a foreign manufactured vehicle must be
procured, the first option available to a post is selection of a suitable
vehicle from a U.S. owned company or the subsidiary of a U.S. company.

c. Requests for foreign–manufactured vehicles manufactured by a company


with a U.S. affiliation must be submitted to and approved by

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DS/CIS/PSP/FPD with the concurrence of A/LM/OPS/RLC/MV. The post


should include specifications that illustrate the need for a foreign-
manufactured vehicle. The following material must be included in the
request:

(1) A request from post for an exception to purchasing a U.S.-


manufactured vehicle under this provision must be accompanied by
a cost benefit analysis as cited in 6 FAM H-228, Use and Control of
Motor Vehicles, justifying the exception. Requests must be
accompanied by pro forma invoices for suitable vehicles, available
locally, or through third-country sources. In each case, the post
will be advised whether procurement is approved and what action
will need to be taken to procure the required vehicle.

(2) When right-hand drive vehicles are required, priority should


continue to be given to vehicles manufactured in the U.S. or by
U.S. affiliated companies. A cost analysis is needed for right-hand
drive vehicle requirements only when the recommended
replacement vehicle is non-U.S. affiliate manufactured.

(3) A list of U.S. affiliated vehicle manufacturers can be obtained from


A/LM/OPS/RLC/MV.

12 FAH-7 H-633.3 Non-U.S.-Manufactured Vehicles


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

Requests for foreign–manufactured vehicles will be approved by


DS/CIS/PSP/FPD with the concurrence of A/LM/OPS/RLC/MV provided the
post generates specifications that call for a foreign-manufactured vehicle
with a full explanation of the circumstances. The same material required in
12 FAH-7 H-642.2 must be included in the request.

12 FAH-7 H-633.4 Acquisition for Use by


Contractor Personnel
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

In cases where it is not feasible for the contractor to provide required


transportation, the post may submit a request to DS/CIS/PSP/FPD for U.S.
Government procured vehicles. The post should explain why the contractor
can not provide vehicles or why it is necessary to use U.S. Government-
owned vehicles, with info copy to A/LM/OPS/RLC/MV, as required. Vehicles
will be funded through an ICASS appropriation designated for the LGP.

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12 FAH-7 H-623.5 Acquisition for Use by Host-


Government Police and/or Security Forces
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

In cases where it is not feasible for the host government to provide required
transportation, the post may submit a request to DS/CIS/PSP/FPD for U.S.
Government procured vehicles. The post should explain why the host
government can not provide vehicles or why it is necessary to use U.S.
Government-owned vehicles, with info copy to A/LM/OPS/RLC/MV, as
required. Vehicles will be funded through an ICASS appropriation
designated for the LGP.

12 FAH-7 H-634 U.S. GOVERNMENT


PROCURED VEHICLE USEAGE

12 FAH-7 H-634.1 Use by Contractor Personnel


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The vehicles will be maintained and controlled under the regulations and
procedures governing the use and control of all U.S. Government-owned
or leased vehicles. See 6 FAM 228, Use and Control of Official Vehicles.
When U.S. Government-furnished equipment is provided to the
contractor, the terms and conditions of the contract will govern use,
maintenance, control, and responsibility for the vehicles.

b. The contractor should identify to the RSO and/or PSO all LGF personnel
who are properly licensed to operate a motor vehicle.

12 FAH-7 H-634.2 Use by PSA or FSN Personnel


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The regulations in 6 FAM 228, Use and Control of Official Vehicles, govern
the use of U.S. Government provided LGP vehicles are driven by PSA or FSN
employees.

12 FAH-7 H-634.3 Use by Host-Government Police


and/or Security Forces
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

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a. The vehicles will be maintained and controlled under the regulations and
procedures governing the use and control of all U.S. Government-owned
or leased vehicles. See 6 FAM 228, Use and Control of Official Vehicles.
When U.S. Government-furnished equipment is provided to the host
government, the terms and conditions of the MOU and/or MOA or other
written agreement will govern use, maintenance, control, and
responsibility for the vehicles. NOTE: In order to protect the U.S.
Government from property loss or liability claims, the post must purchase
an appropriate commercial insurance policy from a local provider.

b. The host government should be requested to provide a list to the RSO


and/or PSO of all personnel authorized to operate a U.S. Government
provided vehicle.

12 FAH-7 H-635 LEASED VEHICLES


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Posts may lease or rent a vehicle to meet temporary requirements for


periods not to exceed 60 days. Leases in excess of 60 days, or a series
of individual leases, must be approved in advance by A/LM/OPS/RLC/MV.
For additional guidance, see 6 FAM 228.9-3(D), Lease Acquisition
Methods.

b. If a post believes that unusual circumstances favor leasing over purchase,


a proposal must be submitted to A/LM/OPS/RLC/MV with a comparison
of: purchase price, maintenance and repair costs, operating costs, and
proceeds of sale, to the annual lease costs, length of agreement, and
contract maintenance and repair costs. The comparison should be for
similar makes and models. The provisions of 6 FAM 228, Use and Control
of Official Vehicles, concerning vehicles of foreign manufacture apply to
lease as well as purchase. Approval of a lease extends for the life of the
lease, but not for renewals. A renewal requires a new request and
justification in the same manner as the original.

c. Vehicles leased by a post for LGPs, as an alternative to the purchase of


vehicles, will also be funded by DS/CIS/PSP/FPD with approval by
A/LM/OPS/RLC/MV. If a post believes that it would be more practical and
economical to provide leased vehicles, the request should be submitted to
DS/CIS/PSP/FPD.

12 FAH-7 H-636 LGP VEHICLE INVENTORY


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

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Inventory records for U.S. Government provided LGP vehicles (with the
exception of two and three-wheeled vehicles, which should be accounted for
by the post through appropriate entries into the ICASS Global database) are
maintained by A/LM/OPS/RLC/MV. This office annually requests a vehicle
inventory from country fleet managers and posts without an immediate
supervising mission. The inventory printout appended to the request lists the
vehicles currently authorized and on-hand at a post. The post must annotate
any corrections directly on the printout, sign the certification statement
stamped on the inventory, and return the signed inventory printout by the
date indicated.

12 FAH-7 H-637 REPLACEMENT CRITERIA


AND FLEET INCREASES
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Rigid replacement cycles will not be established for vehicles provided for
this program. Replacement will be made, as required, based upon
information supplied by the post. When a post determines that a vehicle
needs to be replaced, a condition report (describing condition, projected
repair costs, mileage, assigned use, etc.) similar to the one required for
A/LM/OPS/RLC/MV provided vehicles, should be submitted to
DS/CIS/PSP/FPD. This should be done as far in advance as possible for
planning purposes. At this time, the post should reassess the need for
the U. S. Government to procure the replacement vehicle or if the
contractor can now be expected to provide them.

b. A/LM/OPS/RLC/MV funds and controls the replacement of motor vehicles


abroad, evaluating the size and composition of post fleets when reviewing
replacement requests. Approval of vehicle replacement is based on the
mileage and condition reported by the post. A vehicle due for
replacement may not be replaced if the program has been reduced in size
or if other vehicles in the fleet are under utilized.

12 FAH-7 H-638 LOSS OR EXTENSIVE


DAMAGE TO OFFICIAL VEHICLES
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The repair of official vehicles is a post responsibility and does not require
prior approval from A/LM/OPS/RLC/MV. Accidents involving official
vehicles must be reported in accordance with 6 FAM 617.3-5. If a vehicle
is lost, stolen, or damaged beyond repair, the post must forward Form

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OF-132, Property Disposal Authorization and Survey Report, after survey


action has been completed.

b. If a replacement vehicle is required, the post should first request


disposition authority, then follow the procedures described in 6 FAM
228.9-1 to request replacement.

12 FAH-7 H-639 LGP VEHICLE DISPOSAL


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The Department authorizes disposal of official vehicles on a case-by-case


basis. Advance approval must be obtained from DS/CIS/PSP/FPD and
A/LM/OPS/RLC/MV when a vehicle is to be disposed of before the
replacement vehicle is received. If the vehicle is not being replaced, the
post should inform DS/CIS/PSP/FPD and A/LM/OPS/RLC/MV when a
vehicle is no longer serviceable or economical to maintain.

(1) Normally, vehicles are to be sold on a competitive basis as re-


placement property. While disposal authorization must be
obtained, the property disposal officer is responsible for
determining the proper disposal method (see 6 FAM 227.3, Methods
of Disposal).

(2) Disposal of vehicles should be accomplished within six weeks after


receipt of authorization. If disposal action cannot be completed
within two months, A/LM/OPS/RLC/MV should be advised by
memorandum, stating the reason for delay and what action is being
taken. If disposal is delayed because of host country requirements,
the Office of Foreign Missions (DS/OFM), in addition to
A/LM/OPS/RLC/MV, should be advised by memorandum, with copies
of pertinent correspondence.

(3) When a vehicle is lost or destroyed by accident, natural causes, or


civil strife, a non-U.S. Government entity may provide replacement.
In those circumstances, acceptance of the vehicle must be
approved by A/LM/OPS/RLC/MV. Complete details relating to the
incident should be provided, including a full description of the
vehicle proposed as a replacement, and copy of Form OF-132,
Property Disposal Authorization and Survey Report.

b. Funds obtained from the sale of official vehicles shall be deposited in


accordance with instructions provided by A/LM/OPS/RLC/MV, normally
included with the disposal authorization.

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12 FAH-7 H-640
ACCESS CONTROL AND INSPECTION
EQUIPMENT
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 H-641 GENERAL


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

All official facilities, regardless of location, threat level, or local conditions,


are mandated to use access control procedures for all visitors, and their
handbags and packages. All posts are also mandated to use access control
procedures for all vehicles, deliveries, and packages. These access control
procedures require the use of certain kinds of equipment for effective
inspection and control of access to official facilities. Members of the LGF
normally operate this equipment.

12 FAH-7 H-642 PEDESTRIAN INSPECTION


EQUIPMENT
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The kinds of equipment most often used for access control and inspection
of pedestrians and packages include:

(1) Walk-through metal detectors;

(2) Hand held metal detectors; and

(3) X-ray machines.

b. The Department funds and procures access control and inspection


equipment. The RSO and/or PSO identifies the need and specifies the
types of equipment required by the post. A request should be sent to
DS/CIS/PSP/FPD and DS/CIS/PSP/PEL. The request should include:

(1) Types of equipment needed;

(2) Number of each item;

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(3) Location within the official facility; and

(4) A justification for the need.

NOTE: DS/CIS/PSP/PEL orders and funds the required equipment.

c. The installation and set up of new equipment should be coordinated with


DS/CIS/PSP/PEL. If funding is needed for equipment repair or
replacement, contact DS/CIS/PSP/PEL.

d. The operator ordinarily accomplishes preventive maintenance of the


inspection equipment. Preventive maintenance depends on the type of
equipment in use and is taught as part of the training course to certify
operators. Equipment repair is ordinarily the responsibility of
DS/CIS/PSP/PEL, the security engineering officer (SEO), security
technician specialist (STS) and seabee. Therefore, they should be
contacted when problems with the equipment develop. In some
countries, it may be possible to have a service contract with a local
company to accomplish any required maintenance and repair.

e. Disposal of access control and inspection equipment should be


accomplished in accordance with 6 FAM 227, Disposal of Personal
Property.

12 FAH-7 H-643 VEHICLE INSPECTION


EQUIPMENT

12 FAH-7 H-643.1 General


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The Department provides the following types of equipment to supplement


the conduct of vehicle inspections:

(1) Inspection mirrors for viewing the underside of vehicles;

(2) Chemical detection equipment; and

(3) Explosive detection equipment.

b. Each of these types of equipment is stocked by DS/CIS/PSP/PEL.

12 FAH-7 H-643.2 Inspection Mirrors

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(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

DS/CIS/PSP/PEL is the program office that approves deployment of


inspection mirrors, and provides guidance for their utilization. Inspection
mirror repair is coordinated with DS/CIS/PSP/PEL. Broken equipment is
usually replaced.

12 FAH-7 H-644 CHEMICAL DETECTION


EQUIPMENT
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

DSS/CCBC is the program office that approves deployment of chemical


detection equipment, and installs or provides guidance for post-installation
and utilization. Chemical detection equipment is replaced, rather than field
repaired. Contact DS/DSS/CCBC for guidance and instructions.

12 FAH-7 H-645 EXPLOSIVE TRACE


DETECTION EQUIPMENT
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. DS/CIS/IST/FSE/FS is the program office that approves deployment of


explosive trace detection equipment, and installs or provides guidance for
post-installation and utilization.

b. Explosive trace detection equipment maintenance and calibration are


important and must be accomplished daily. Post LGF resources perform
these operations in accordance with the user manual included with the
equipment. The maintenance cycle has daily, weekly and monthly
routines specified by the respective manufacturer. Basic troubleshooting
requires no technical expertise and must be performed by post personnel
in accordance with the user manual. If troubleshooting indicates
technical support is required, contact DS/CIS/IST/FSE/FS for guidance.
Many field-related problems may be correctable with basic guidance to
non-technical personnel. Field level repairs may be performed by
technically qualified personnel and by DS/CIS/IST/FSE/FS trained
ESC/ESO staff. The manufacturer and/or DS/CIS/IST/FSE/FS will provide
needed parts.

c. The decision to return the equipment for manufacturer repair is


determined by DS/CIS/IST/FSE/FS. If needed, a replacement unit will be
provided. Should the equipment be designated for a major repair, it shall

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be shipped via pouch to DS/CIS/IST/FSE/FS, SA-7. If commercial


shipping is necessary, coordinate funding with DS/CIS/IST/FSE/FS.

12 FAH-7 H-646 EQUIPMENT DISPOSAL


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

Disposal of explosive detection equipment should be coordinated with


DS/CIS/IST/FSE/FS, and, when necessary, the manufacturer.

12 FAH-7 H-647 THROUGH H-649


UNASSIGNED

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12 FAH-7 H-650
COMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 H-651 GENERAL


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Two-way radio communications are an important part of an effective LGP,


particularly when telephone service is limited or undependable. Vehicles
used for supervisory duties, mobile patrol, or rapid response by a reaction
force should be equipped with mobile radios. It is important that bilingual
dispatchers be used so that messages received from employees or
dependents calling for assistance or reporting incidents will be clearly
understood and that instructions to member of the LGF are clear.

b. The Department recommends that, wherever possible, cellular


telecommunications equipment be used to support surveillance detection.
The use of cell phones lowers the profile of SD personnel and enhances
their ability to perform their duties outside of the mission environment.
DS/CIS/PSP/FPD recommends, at minimum, the RSO, each team leader,
and command post (CP) have a cellular phone. Where cell phones are
used, the RSO needs to monitor phone usage and require reimbursement
if personal calls are made.

c. Where cellular phone capabilities are lacking, SD personnel should be


equipped with radio equipment compatible with existing mission
equipment. There should be at least one separate channel for SD
operations. If radios are used, the procedures in 12 FAH-7 H-642 and 12
FAH-7 H-643 must be followed for their acquisition and operation. Radios
should also be used with prudence as they may expose team members to
the public or hostile surveillance teams.

d. The RSO should include LGP cellular phone and radio requirements in the
LGP contract. The LGP contract should include initial funding for
equipment, maintenance costs, and replacement parts. If the contractor
is unable to provide radio communication as part of the contract, the RSO
should coordinate with the information management officer (IMO) and
regional information management center (RIMC) to obtain purchasing
information on compatible VHF or UHF radio systems for LGP programs.
The RSO should coordinate funding requirements for LGP radios with IRM

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and DS/CIS/PSP/FPD. RIMC can provide limited assistance with


maintenance repairs, but will not supply replacements for inoperable LGF
units.

12 FAH-7 H-652 INFORMATION


MANAGEMENT OFFICER (IMO) OR
INFORMATION PROCESSING OFFICER (IPO)
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The IMO or IPO is the embassy’s focal point for all radio matters. The
functions of the IMO or IPO is:

(1) To manage all Department HF, UHF and/or VHF radio systems and
provide guidance to users of other radio systems under the
authority and direction of the COM, as required, to maintain
network discipline and operational efficiency. This includes
consulting with host government authorities for operating licenses
and frequency approvals;

(2) To provide radio operating procedures and maintenance guidance to


radio equipment users;

(3) To assure that all users have provided the IPO with the information
and operator instructions needed to isolate and correct faults when
radio assets cause existing post or host country networks to
degrade;

(4) To determines test schedules and procedures; and

(5) To establish the area custodian of IM property.

12 FAH-7 H-653 REGIONAL INFORMATION


MANAGEMENT CENTER (RIMC)
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The RIMC should be consulted on all matters pertaining to


communications needs for the LGP. The RIMC provides direct technical
and operational support to each COM within its geographic area of
responsibility. The RIMC reviews and approves post and contractor
equipment specifications and technical plans to ensure compliance with
the Department’s established radio program standards and specifications.

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For post or Bureau funded systems, the RIMC assesses the probability of
and recommends resolutions to interference problems. It also provides
technical assistance on integrating new systems or major changes in
existing systems with other existing and planned radio systems.

b. It is the responsibility of the RIMC to ensure appropriate operating


frequencies are requested from the host government for official mission
use. The question of reciprocity must be considered and Department
approval received prior to requesting operating frequencies from the host
government. The RIMC will be aware of legal restrictions on types of
equipment, transmitter power limits, and licensing requirements. The
RSO should provide the RIMC with sufficient information about the LGP
communications requirements to allow identification of the options
available in terms of organization of the net and the selection of proper
equipment to do the required work. At a minimum, this information
should include:

(1) The function and purpose of the net;

(2) Anticipated guard post locations (great distances or obstacles may


require the use of repeaters);

(3) Anticipated shift arrangements in terms of hours (this can affect the
recharging program and the kind of portable equipment selected in
terms of power pack capability); and

(4) Number of hand-held and mobile units required to man the net.

c. Based on the total number of radios required, the RIMC will recommend a
suitable number of spare units to provide replacements for units out for
repair or other reasons.

12 FAH-7 H-654 FUNDING


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Department funded cell phones and radio systems may be owned or


leased. DS/CIS/PSP/FPD funds LGP, including SDP, cell phones, and/or
radios. The post or regional bureau funds all other communication
requirements.

b. All proposals relating to introducing new radio systems or making major


changes to existing systems must be coordinated with the COM and the
Department. The RSO should coordinate with the IMO and/or IPO for
acquisition of UHF and/or VHF radio systems for the LGP.

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12 FAH-7 H-655 COMMUNICATION


EQUIPMENT SELECTION
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. An important consideration in determining radio requirements is


compatibility with the post's E&E radio network frequencies. The RSO
and others should be able to maintain contact with the emergency action
network and the guard force. Based on requirements identified by the
RSO, the RIMC should provide detailed specifications for all radio
equipment needed, including hand-held mobile units, repeaters, chargers,
antennas, and spare rechargeable batteries. Consideration should be
given to the use of a clip-on lapel microphone in conjunction with a belt
unit. Such a configuration facilitates the use of the radio without the
need for removing it from the belt carrier.

b. Although not available on all models of radios, high-risk posts should


strongly consider the use of a distress and/or duress button on the units.
When depressed, these buttons will transmit a signal to the base station
signifying the fact that the guard is in danger or needs assistance. An
alternative at a fixed post is a hardwired duress device.

c. The post may decide that the radio communications system for the
operation of the guard force or the surveillance detection team will
require a separate and dedicated communications center or base station.
The RIMC should be consulted as to the minimum requirements even if a
contractor is providing all radios and a complete communication system.
This information will be of value to the RSO where the contractor provides
such a facility in assuring that proper base station equipment and related
items are adequate for the purpose.

d. The post may select cellular phone equipment based on locally available
equipment, financial options, and the operational requirements. Every
attempt should be made to acquire the most suitable equipment for the
lowest possible cost.

12 FAH-7 H-656 COMMUNICATION


EQUIPMENT PROCUREMENT
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The preferred method for meeting the need for cellular phones and radio
equipment is to require the contractor, as part of the contract, to supply
and maintain all needed equipment. This shifts the burden of

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procurement and maintenance from the mission. When buying the units,
the contractor has the freedom of choice, under local laws and regulation,
of any equipment that satisfies the program's communication
requirement. The contractor may choose to procure non-U.S.-made
equipment.

b. If the contractor is unable to provide the radio equipment, the post


should identify the requirement to the Department’s Diplomatic
Telecommunications Services Program Office (DTSPO) so that available
equipment may be issued. If the required equipment is not readily
available, the Department may authorize post to purchase or lease
equipment on a long-term basis. In all cases, full coordination with the
RIMC is required for technical advice and assistance. If the Department
has authorized the post to purchase and/or lease locally, then pro forma
invoices should be obtained. Generally the department seeks the most
expeditious, efficient, and cost-effective method of procurement.

c. If the host government is supplying security forces for the LGF, the host
government usually provides adequate communication capability. Should
the host government not have adequate radios or should there be a
compatibility problem, consult with the RIMC and DS/CIS/PSP/FPD for
information on actions and equipment necessary to ensure satisfactory
communications.

12 FAH-7 H-657 MAINTENANCE


CONSIDERATIONS
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. When the contractor provides communications equipment, all repair,


replacement, and maintenance problems are the responsibility of the
contractor. This should be stated in the contract and failure to provide
continuous or acceptable communications should be one of the elements
of the deduct schedule.

b. When the U.S. Government is providing the radio equipment the


availability of a suitable maintenance capability should influence the
selection of the make of equipment. To reduce downtime and the
number or spare units that must be kept on hand, a local repair capability
is preferred. However, many developing countries lack this, and it is
necessary to return units to the manufacturer or a suitable repair facility
in a third country. This often results in undue delay in returning a unit to
operation. The RIMC can provide guidance on maintenance matters and
the selection of the best option in terms of quality of service and turn-

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around time.

12 FAH-7 H-658 COMMUNICATIONS


EQUIPMENT DISPOSAL
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Disposal of excess or unrepairable cellular phones or radio equipment,


which is the property of a contractor, will be accomplished by the
contractor.

b. Where the communications equipment is the property of the U.S.


Government, the equipment must be inventoried and excess or
unrepairable equipment will be returned to the IMO, IPO or RIMC where
appropriate action will be taken. For additional guidance on disposal of
GFE LGP radio equipment, see 6 FAM 227, Disposal of Personal Property.

12 FAH-7 H-659 UNASSIGNED

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12 FAH-7 H-660
GUARD ELECTRONIC MONITORING
SYSTEM (GEMS)
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 H-661 INTRODUCTION


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. To effectively supervise a guard force which may be assigned to widely


separated locations and to ensure that the proper schedule of inspections
is maintained, the RSO or PSO may elect to use a GEMS.

b. The system collects data by scanning bar codes using an electronic hand
held bar code reader; downloads the information to a computer; and
creates computer generated reports designed to document guard
activities and supervisor oversight. The system should have an archival
capability so that historical information can be accessed via the computer.
The integrity of the system shall be such that information, once collected,
can not be altered or modified. Bar code labels should be assigned to
individual guards, supervisors, guard posts, and certain defined incidents
or events that will be contained on an incident card.

c. Each supervisor will receive a bar code scanner at the beginning of a


shift. Each supervisor, mobile patrol or guard responsible for security
checks at multiple locations will be strictly responsible for scanning all of
the bar-code labels at each post along his route and completing the
required number of visits to each post throughout his daily and/or nightly
tour. During supervisory rounds, the supervisor is required to report all
incidents using the electronic bar code incident card and follow up with
written reports, as necessary.

12 FAH-7 H-662 CONTRACTOR-PROVIDED


GEMS
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. When it is desirable to use a GEMS and local guard services are provided
through a NPS guard contract, every effort should be made to have the

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contractor provide a GEMS. The RSO and/or PSO must approve the
system selected by the contractor before installation and use. The
contractor shall then utilize the GEMS for supervision and quality control
of guard services.

b. The contractor shall provide a complete GEMS which shall include the
system software, bar code readers, bar code labels, data transmitter,
computer, and printer. The contractor shall provide training to the
employees who will be using the system and be responsible for the
maintenance, replacement and support of the system to ensure
continuous operation.

c. The contractor is responsible for ensuring the correct use of the bar code
scanner, for the integrity of the system, ensuring that supervisors scan all
bar codes for the route and ensuring the data is properly entered into the
computer. Any software changes and/or revisions must receive prior COR
approval.

d. The contractor's technical proposal should describe how the contractor's


system would meet the requirements of the solicitation and/or contract.
This should include a complete description of the monitoring system to be
provided, whether new or used, the number of scanners to be provided,
maintenance programs, how the integrity of the system is maintained,
etc. The plan should detail the type of reports to be generated and their
frequency.

12 FAH-7 H-663 U.S. GOVERNMENT-


FURNISHED GEMS
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Where the use of a GEMS is necessary and the contractor cannot provide
a system or when the LGF is staffed through the use of PSAs, the U.S.
Government shall furnish all necessary equipment to operate a GEMS.
The U.S. Government will provide initial training in system operation. This
will include supervisors and others who will be required to use and
operate the bar-codes readers and related computer equipment to
generate the required information and reports.

b. Where the U.S. Government has provided the GEMS, the contractor is
responsible for ensuring the correct use of the system and is responsible
for loss or damage of bar code equipment and other U.S. Government
furnished equipment. The contractor will be required to identify where
within his headquarters the GEMS computer is to be located.

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12 FAH-7 H-664 GEMS MAINTENANCE


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Where the contractor has furnished the GEMS, the contractor should be
responsible under the contract for all maintenance and repair of the
system.

b. Where the U.S. Government has furnished the GEMS, the post will be
responsible for maintenance and repair of the system. For assistance,
contact the SEO having responsibility for the mission.

12 FAH-7 H-665 GEMS DISPOSAL


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The contractor is responsible for the disposal of a GEMS system, which


was provided by the contractor as part of the local guard contract.

b. When the U.S. Government has provided the GEMS, disposal should be
accomplished in accordance with 6 FAM 227, Disposal of Personal
Property.

12 FAH-7 H-666 THROUGH H-669


UNASSIGNED

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12 FAH-7 H-670
CENTRAL ALARM MONITORING SYSTEM
(CAMS)
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 H-671 GENERAL


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

A CAMS is an alarm system whereby alarms from official facilities and/or


residences are routed to a central location. Personnel at the central location
then notify police or dispatch response forces to the site of the alarm.

12 FAH-7 H-672 CAMS SECURITY


ASSESSMENTS
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Generally, the deployment of static guards in lieu of a CAMS will only be


considered by the Department after alternatives are determined to be not
suitable or cost effective. The methodology of selecting guards or CAMS
shall consist of a systematic assessment of the specific post threat,
vulnerabilities, assets to be protected, practicality of available
countermeasures, and a cost-benefit analysis. The assessment
methodology is as follows:

(1) Threat analysis—Identify the specific nature of the threat, criminal


and/or terrorist;

(2) Assets—Identify all assets (e.g., material, information, human);

(3) Countermeasures—Identify procedural, technical, and human


countermeasures. Then, identify vulnerabilities for each
countermeasure and the effectiveness of each countermeasure;

(4) Practicality—To assess the practicality of a CAMS, obtain answers


to the following:

(a) Do local entities have the technical infrastructure to utilize


technical measures such as CAMS?

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(b) Must post utilize phone lines or RF signals?

(c) If phones are unreliable, will the geographic terrain allow a


CAMS to operate using a RF signal?

(d) Will the host government grant approval for a RF signal?

(e) Are qualified personnel who are capable of operating the


system locally available to the post? and

(f) Are fuel supplies and maintenance for vehicles available and
reliable?

(5) Cost analysis—Compute and compare costs for each


countermeasure. Include costs for vehicles (e.g., procurement,
maintenance, and fuel), alarms (e.g., procurement, installation, and
maintenance), and guards (to monitor alarms and provide a react
capability).

b. Upon completing this assessment, the post should advise


DS/CIS/PSP/FPD of its overall conclusions. If the Department and post
not concur in the best method or systems to counter the threat, the
matter will be referred to OSPB for disposition. DS/CIS/PSP/FPD can
provide further guidance upon request.

12 FAH-7 H-673 THROUGH H-679


UNASSIGNED

12 FAH-7 H-670 Page 2 of 2


U.S. Department of State Foreign Affairs Handbook Volume 12 Handbook 7 – Local Guard
Program

12 FAH-7 H-680
SURVEILLANCE DETECTION (SD)
EQUIPMENT
(CT:LGP-04; 03-23-2006)
(Office of Origin: DS/IP/FPO)

12 FAH-7 H-681 INTRODUCTION


(CT:LGP-04; 03-23-2006)

The SDP uses a variety of equipment and clothing. DS/CIS/PSP/FPD


recommends the SDP be equipped with the following:

(1) Binoculars (full sized or compact);

(2) Cameras (35 MM, digital, and possibly video);

(3) Micro-cassette recorders;

(4) Computer equipment and peripherals to process and analyze SD


information on Department approved software;

(5) Office equipment (copier, shredder, modest furniture, etc.);

(6) Specialized equipment such as night vision goggles (NVG) and


camera adapters; and

(7) Miscellaneous items such as umbrellas, strollers, etc.

NOTE: Determining exactly what equipment is appropriate for any mission


depends on local conditions. Generally, local guard employees engaged in
surveillance detection efforts are in plain clothes (for detailed guidance on
the SDP, see the Surveillance Detection Management and Operations Field
Guide, Version 2, dated 2002).

12 FAH-7 H-682 FUNDING


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

Funds for the SDP are controlled by DS/CIS/PSP/FPD. Initial requests for
funds to start a SDP should be addressed to DS/CIS/PSP/FPD. The request

12 FAH-7 H-680 Page 1 of 3


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should include a complete explanation of estimated costs, number and kinds


of items required, a justification for each item, and the total estimated cost.
Funds for subsequent years are included in the post's annual ICASS budget
submission.

12 FAH-7 H-683 PROCUREMENT


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Vehicles required for the program are procured in accordance with the
procedure outlined in 12 FAH-7 H-632 when provided under a commercial
local guard contract. When the U.S. Government provides vehicles for
this program, the procedures outlined in 12 FAH-7 H-633 - H-634 should
be followed.

b. Posts using NPS contracts have the option of having the contractor
provide and maintain the SDP equipment or use U.S. Government
furnished equipment. If U.S. Government furnished equipment is
provided, the post should use appropriate local purchase procedures to
purchase all required equipment.

12 FAH-7 H-684 MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. When the contractor furnishes equipment or vehicles, maintenance and


repair should be included in the contract as the responsibility of the
contractor.

b. When the U.S. Government furnishes equipment or vehicles, maintenance


and repair are the post's responsibility and should be accomplished in
accordance with the appropriate regulations.

12 FAH-7 H-685 DISPOSAL


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

Disposal of equipment furnished by the U.S. Government, which was used


for the SDP, should be accomplished in accordance with 6 FAM 227, Disposal
of Personal Property.

NOTE: Night vision equipment may not be disposed of locally. Contact


DS/CIS/PSP/FPD for disposal instructions.

12 FAH-7 H-680 Page 2 of 3


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12 FAH-7 H-686 THROUGH H-689


UNASSIGNED

12 FAH-7 H-680 Page 3 of 3


U.S. Department of State Foreign Affairs Handbook Volume 12 Handbook 7 - Local Guard
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12 FAH-7 H-690
IMMINENT DANGER NOTIFICATION
SYSTEM (IDNS)
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 H-691 INTRODUCTION


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The Imminent Danger Notification System (IDNS) was established to allow


security personnel responsible for access control and perimeter security to
alert mission personnel of an imminent attack as soon as it is recognized.
The system allows a local guard at an access point or on the perimeter to
independently activate the selectone system in case of terrorist attack. The
RSO is responsible for determining which official facilities require an IDNS.

12 FAH-7 H-692 FUNDING AND


PROCUREMENT
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The IDNS should be created by a hard-wired connection; button activated


circuit from all perimeter and access control posts directly to the selectone
system. DS/CIS/IST/FSE has switches and installation instruction that will be
shipped to posts on request. Other parts and needed equipment can be
procured locally and mission maintenance staff can do installation of the
wiring up to entry into Post One. The final hook up into the selectone
system is the responsibility of the SEO. Installation may include an override
switch to turn off the alarm should the situation prove non-threatening, but
no disabling device can be installed which will interfere with the initial
activation of the alarm.

12 FAH-7 H-693 MAINTENANCE


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

Maintenance of the portion of the IDNS outside of Post One is the


responsibility of the post. The SEO is responsible for maintenance inside of

12 FAH-7 H-690 Page 1 of 2


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post one. Replacement switches are available from DS/CIS/IST/FSE. An


estimate of costs for repair should be included under the S&E portion of the
posts annual ICASS budget summary.

12 FAH-7 H-694 DISPOSAL


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The post in accordance with 6 FAM 227, Disposal of Personal Property, can
dispose of unwanted or unworkable parts of the IDNS.

12 FAH-7 H-695 THROUGH H-699


UNASSIGNED

12 FAH-7 H-690 Page 2 of 2


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12 FAH-7 H-700
PROGRAM COVERAGE FOR
AGENCY AND/OR FACILITY AND/OR
PERSONNEL

12 FAH-7 H-710
CHIEF OF MISSION (COM)
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 H-711 COM AUTHORITY


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The President's Letter of Instruction to ambassadors and section 207 (22


U.S.C 3927) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980, (Pub. L. 96-465) gives
COMs ultimate responsibility for the security of employees, dependents
and official facilities under their control. The President's letter states in
part: the Secretary of State and, by extension, COMs abroad must
protect all U.S. Government personnel on official duty abroad (other than
those under the command of a U.S. area military commander) and their
accompanying dependents. The President's letter also expects COMs to
take direct responsibility for the security of their mission. The COM and
post management, including the RSO and/or PSO, must ensure that all
those under COM authority, regardless of agency affiliation, receive
equitable security protection.

b. Section 103 of the Diplomatic Security Act, (Pub. L. 99-399) authorizes


the Secretary of State to set security standards for all personnel under
COM authority, including military personnel not under the command of a
military area commander.

12 FAH-7 H-712 THROUGH H-719


UNASSIGNED

12 FAH-7 H-710 Page 1 of 1


U.S. Department of State Foreign Affairs Handbook Volume 12 Handbook 7 - Local Guard
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12 FAH-7 H-720
THE PEACE CORPS
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 H-721 GENERAL


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The Peace Corps is a signatory to the local guard standards contained in 12


FAH-6, Security Standards. Therefore, Peace Corps employees and facilities
must receive the same level of protection as all other U.S. Government
facilities and direct hire employees at post. Peace Corps volunteer
employees are not, however, considered to be U.S. Government employees
for the purposes of this handbook. At posts where there are no direct hire
Peace Corps employees, the post will not fund any Local Guard Program
(LGP) activities for the Peace Corps.

12 FAH-7 H-722 PEACE CORPS OPTIONS


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The Peace Corps has the option of not using the local guard services
provided by the post’s LGP. If the Peace Corps wants to obtain guard
services outside of the post’s LGP, advance consultation with the RSO
before acquisition of the other service is required.

NOTE: Any guard service obtained by other means than through the LGP
must be approved in advance by the RSO. Guard services obtained through
a separate contractual instrument by the Peace Corps must conform to the
post’s local guard standards. All guards must meet established training
requirements and have clothing and equipment similar to that used by the
post’s LGP. Additionally, all guards must be cleared and approved by the
RSO prior to performing guard services.

b. The Department encourages the Peace Corps to obtain guard services


through the post’s guard contract. Consolidating the programs at post
simplifies the lines of command and control, better integrates the efforts
of the LGP abroad, eliminates duplicative efforts, saves costs through
economies of scale, and provides for equal levels of protection for
personnel and facilities in similar threat level categories.

12 FAH-7 H-720 Page 1 of 2


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12 FAH-7 H-723 FUNDING


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. When the Peace Corps elects to obtain local guard force (LGF) services
through a separate contractual instrument, the Peace Corps is fully
responsible for all costs of that contract.

b. When the Peace Corp obtains LGF services through the post’s LGP, the
Peace Corps shall reimburse the State Department at post on a pro rata
share basis to include all other security costs.

12 FAH-7 H-724 THROUGH H-729


UNASSIGNED

12 FAH-7 H-720 Page 2 of 2


12 FAH-7 H-730
OTHER AGENCIES
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 H-731 OFFICE OF PUBLIC


DIPLOMACY FACILITIES
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

DS/CIS/PSP/FPD funds the local guard program (LGP) requirements at Office


of Public Diplomacy facilities (formerly USIA) abroad. However, at present,
greater attention is focused on the specific guard needs and whether there is
an official U.S. Government presence which falls under the authority of the
chief of mission (COM). Requests for temporary or permanent guard
coverage at Office of Public Diplomacy sponsored events (e.g., for speakers
and/or performing groups, Fulbright Commission offices, bi-national centers,
English teaching facilities and/or institutions, libraries and cultural centers)
will be addressed by post on a case-by-case basis through the RSO and the
Emergency Action Committee (EAC).

12 FAH-7 H-732 OTHER AGENCY


RESPONSIBILITIES
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. All other agencies at a mission (USAID, DOD, IBB, DOC, DOA, etc.) are
required to meet, at a minimum, the security standards required by the
COM, with guidance provided by the RSO. The standards to be met are
determined by the RSO using 12 FAH-6, Security Standards Handbook,
under the authority of the COM.

b. Requests by other agencies for LGP security protections above the level
currently approved at a post must be considered and approved by the
RSO and the Emergency Action Committee (EAC). The principle of fair
and equitable treatment for all U.S. Government employees at post
should be the primary concern. This principle may lead to a denial of a
request even when funding is available.

c. When elements of the LGP requested by an individual agency are for the

12 FAH-7 H-730 Page 1 of 2


exclusive use of an individual agency, after approval by the RSO and EAC,
all of the costs related to those elements are the responsibility of the
requesting agency.

12 FAH-7 H-733 THROUGH H-739


UNASSIGNED

12 FAH-7 H-730 Page 2 of 2


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12 FAH-7
APPENDICES

12 FAH-7 APPENDIX I
GENERAL AND POST ORDERS (SAMPLES)
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 APPENDIX I-1 GENERAL ORDERS


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The specific orders, based on these samples, modified to local conditions,


drafted by the mission will appear as Exhibit B in the guard contract
solicitation. A copy of the latest documentation, information, and sample of
guard orders can also be found on the Internet at
www.statebuy.gov/opehelp/lgporders.htm. These sample orders include the
requirement for chemical and/or biological awareness and countermeasures.

12 FAH-7 Appendix I-1.1 U.S. Embassy at


(Location of Embassy) Instructions: General
Orders and Post Orders

12 FAH-7 Appendix I-1.1-1 Purpose


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

General orders for the guard force provide directions and instructions of
general application to all members of the Local Guard Program (LGP). Each
member of the guard force is responsible for being fully familiar with and
responsive to the general orders. These orders will not be modified or
revised without the written authority of the regional security officer (RSO)
for the U.S. embassy at ________.

12 FAH-7 Appendix I-1.1-2 Mission


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 Appendix I Page 1 of 22


U.S. Department of State Foreign Affairs Handbook Volume 12 Handbook 7 - Local Guard
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The primary mission of the local guard force is to provide protection for U.S.
personnel and U.S. Government employees and to protect U.S. facilities and
equipment from damage or loss due to violent attack and theft. The local
guards act as an early warning signal to the Marine security guard (MSG) on
duty and the RSO. The local guard force also will carry out specific actions
as described in these orders and individual guard post orders in case of
emergencies.

12 FAH-7 Appendix I-1.1-3 Manner of Performance of


Duty and Uniform
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Guard personnel will be firm yet courteous, efficient and tactful at all
times while in the performance of their duties. They will never engage in
arguments with any person, and will refer disagreements and
misunderstandings to their supervisor and the RSO. Guard personnel
must read, fully understand and comply with all general and post guard
orders.

b. Guard personnel will, at all times, maintain a neat and clean appearance
and, while on duty, be fully dressed in the prescribed guard uniform and
equipment. Guards will be subject to inspection at any time.

c. The local guards must not participate in or support any activities that
would be disruptive to the performance of their duties or would decrease
the efficiency of the guard force operation.

d. Guard personnel will perform only those security duties identified by the
guard contractor and the RSO. Guards will not perform any other
nonsecurity-related or unauthorized functions during duty hours, i.e.,
gardening, housekeeping chores, maintenance duties, or any other duty
or act which distracts the guard from his or her intended purpose.

e. Where appropriate, guards will maintain in a neat, orderly, legible


fashion, all logbooks, ledgers, record books, incident reports, or any other
written record of duties performed or of any security event.

f. Guard personnel will not offer or divulge any information about embassy
operations or personnel to anyone. They will report any attempt by
individuals to solicit information regarding U.S. Government personnel or
facilities immediately to their supervisor and the RSO.

g. The relief guard will take complete charge of duties from the guard he or
she relieves, including the post logbooks and all other equipment
maintained at the post.

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h. Guards will brief and pass on any special instructions to their relief guard
concerning outstanding or significant events that occurred during the
previous shift.

i. Guards will be alert to their surroundings and report any vehicles or


individuals acting in a suspicious manner to the senior guard, shift
commander, or supervisor.

j. Guard personnel will control access to U.S. Government facilities and


properties, protect life, maintain order, resist criminal attacks against
mission personnel, visitors, dependents and property, and resist any
other form of violent attacks against same to include terrorist attacks in
accordance with Department and mission policies.

k. Guard personnel will intercept, identify, and make the proper log entries
for visitors and other appropriate persons to U.S. Government facilities.
Furthermore, guards will conduct inspections of persons, property, or
vehicles, confiscate unauthorized items, and issue appropriate access
control identification badges according to Department and mission
policies.

l. Guards will ensure that only authorized persons displaying a valid form of
identification and legitimate visitors enter the area the guards are
assigned to protect. Guards will not hesitate to challenge persons who do
not have proper identification or who attempt to avoid specified access
control procedures or policies.

m. Guard personnel will conduct periodic, nonroutine inspections of their


areas of responsibility and immediately report any unusual incident or
circumstances, or emergency situation to the senior guard, shift
commander or supervisor, and the RSO.

n. Guards will not leave their assigned post until a relief guard properly
relieves them.

o. Guard personnel will maintain a high standard of professionalism while on


duty. Guards will be polite and courteous in the performance of their
duties. They will not use abusive language, be late for work, or be
inattentive. Guard personnel will not act in any manner detrimental to
the reputation of their company or the U.S. Government.

p. Guard personnel at U.S. Government facilities must be able to


demonstrate a working knowledge of the post's emergency action plans
(fire, bomb, intruder, etc.).

q. Guard personnel will comply with all orders or instructions given to them

12 FAH-7 Appendix I Page 3 of 22


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by the senior guard, shift commander, supervisor, and the RSO.

r. Guards will not abuse their authority for personal or monetary gain.

s. Guard personnel will not gamble or engage in any illegal activity while on
duty or while in uniform.

t. Guard personnel will not provide information about U.S. Government


personnel or facilities to anyone without the specific approval of the RSO.

u. Guards will prepare an incident report immediately after observing a


security incident. The incident report is given to the shift commander or
supervisor during post inspection.

v. Surveillance detection: Guards will be aware of and attempt to detect


surveillance directed at U.S. Government facilities and personnel. If
surveillance is detected, the information will be entered in the logbook
and an incident report will be prepared. The supervisor and RSO will be
notified immediately.

w. Guard personnel are not to salute pedestrians or vehicles with the


exception of the ambassador, the deputy chief of mission (DCM), and
officers in military uniform.

x. All staff members or employees of the embassy are required to show


proper identification or authorization before being permitted to enter the
embassy compounds. Proper identification to the embassy will be one of
the following:

(1) U.S. embassy ID card;

(2) U.S. Department of State ID card;

(3) Current U.S. military ID card or Department of Defense (DOD)


dependent ID card;

(4) All U.S. passports; and

(5) Passes authorized by the RSO.

y. Improper identification card or no identification card: A person without


an ID card or a person in possession of a card which differs from those
listed in paragraph x of this section, will be required to furnish the guard
with the name of the person or office he or she wishes to visit. The guard
will call the person or office concerned and state the circumstances
involved. Either a section chief or the person concerned will give
permission for the visitor to proceed to the office of that person, or the

12 FAH-7 Appendix I Page 4 of 22


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guard will be advised that someone from that office will come to the gate
to escort the visitor. The guard will record the visitor's identity.

z. Telephone and radio communication: The guard, while on duty and


handling official telephone calls or inquiries, will be courteous and polite
and assist the caller, if possible. All official information calls and inquiries
will be referred to the proper person or the MSG on duty.

aa. Removal of U.S. Government property: The guards will be observant


of all employees or visitors departing the embassy compounds to prevent
unauthorized removal of any U.S. Government property. A memorandum
signed by the U.S. supervisor will properly authorize any property
removed from the embassy or other official facilities by Foreign Service
nationals (FSNs) or third-country nationals (TCNs). The memorandum
will be retained by the guard and delivered to the shift commander or
supervisor at the time of the guard's next post inspection.

bb. Use of force: The use of force is defined as the physical application of
violence upon or against a person in any way, including the use of the
baton (nightstick). The baton serves as a defensive weapon for the
guards. Its use by the guards is defined as follows:

(1) The baton will only be used after all nonviolent efforts are
exhausted to quell a disturbance at any post manned by the
guards;

(2) It will only be used to protect the guard or persons on the post
premises from actual bodily harm by another person or persons.
The oral threat of bodily harm is insufficient justification for the use
of the baton;

(3) Abusive and/or obscene language directed at the guard or a third


party is insufficient justification for the use of the baton;

(4) Any person attempting to strike the guard, in the performance of


duty or to forcibly detain the guard, causing a serious disturbance
on the post premises by striking or assaulting the guard or another
party, or in any way causing injury, constitutes sufficient
justification to use the baton; and

(5) Only the minimum use of force necessary for the restoration of
order is authorized.

cc. Use of deadly force: The use of deadly force is defined as the application
of lethal force by use of a firearm upon a person attempting to inflict
bodily harm to, or threatening the life of, the guard or another person.

12 FAH-7 Appendix I Page 5 of 22


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The use of a firearm by local guards serves as a defensive weapon. A


guard's use of a firearm to apply deadly force is justified as follows:

(1) Deadly force will only be used after all nonviolent efforts are
exhausted to stop a life-threatening disturbance at any post
manned by the guards;

(2) Deadly force will only be used to protect the life of the guard or
person on the post premises from lethal bodily harm by another
individual or individuals. The oral threat of bodily harm is
insufficient justification for the use of deadly force;

(3) Abusive and/or obscene language directed at the guard or another


individual is insufficient justification for the use of deadly force;

(4) Any person attempting to use lethal force on a guard, or lethally


assaulting the guard or another individual, or in any way causing
the death of another individual, constitutes sufficient justification
for the use of deadly force; and

(5) The use of deadly force represents the last resort by a guard for the
restoration of order.

dd. Fire prevention and reporting: In the event of an emergency, it is


important that only correct and prescribed procedures are followed in
order to minimize the emergency. Notify the MSG on Post One, the RSO
and/or PSO and the shift supervisor. Local police or emergency
responders shall be called only with authorization of the RSO and/or PSO
or the MSG, Post One, in consultation with the senior officer present
and/or duty officer, if the RSO and/or PSO are not present. More specific
instructions concerning emergencies for each guard post are in the post
orders. The objectives of fire prevention and reporting, in the orders of
their importance, are:

(1) If the guard discovers a fire, he or she should report it immediately


and request assistance: inform MSG Post One or activate the fire
alarm, prior to attempting to extinguish the fire;

(2) Prevent the fire from spreading;

(3) Inform employees in the immediate vicinity of the fire and order
them to evacuate the area immediately;

(4) Prevent the loss of life and property in case a fire should start;

(5) Confine the fire to its place of origin; and

12 FAH-7 Appendix I Page 6 of 22


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(6) Secure all elevators, return to ground floor, and throw "emergency
stop" switches within the elevators.

ee. Bombs and incendiary devices: If a bomb or incendiary device, or


what may have the appearance of a bomb or incendiary device, is
discovered, the guard(s) should immediately clear the area and notify the
MSG at Post One and the RSO through the supervisor. Also:

(1) "Under no circumstances should the guard touch or in any way


disturb the suspicious article or package." DO NOT TOUCH OR
MOVE any item suspected to be a bomb or incendiary device. The
guard(s) should stand by to prevent its being touched or disturbed
by other persons. Employees working in the area where the
suspicious article or package is located should be evacuated until
the cause of the danger is removed. The general rule to follow is:
"Clear the immediate area and call the appropriate authorities";

(2) Should the guard(s) on duty receive a bomb threat from any
source, he or she will immediately contact the MSG on Post One
and the RSO through the shift commander or the supervisor. If the
guard receives a bomb threat, the guard will try to determine where
the bomb is located, when the bomb is set to detonate, what it
looks like, who placed the bomb, and why the bomb was placed.
The most important information is when the bomb is set to
detonate and where the bomb is located. Other information like the
description of the voice and background noise is important for the
guard to determine. This information will be reported in the post
log and an incident report will be prepared; and

(3) Should a bomb explode on or near the guard post, keep the area
clear of people. Remember, during the confusion of a bomb
blast, the guards must still provide security for employees or
other people in the area.

ff. Weapons: The guards will not allow anyone to enter the embassy
compound or other official facilities who has an open or concealed
firearm, knife, explosive, or any other type of weapon in his or her
possession except for authorized embassy personnel. The guards will be
especially watchful for attempted entry of firearms or explosives under
cover. In the event such devices are detected, the guard will
immediately report it to the MSG on duty and to the RSO through the
shift commander or the supervisor.

gg. Any person demanding to speak to a U.S. official at anytime should be


immediately referred to the MSG on duty at Post One.

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hh. The U.S. Government may require the contractor to remove any guard
who fails to comply with any general order.

12 FAH-7 APPENDIX I-2 POST ORDERS


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The purpose of post orders is to provide the guard force with specific
directions and instructions in order to perform specified duties and tasks at
specific posts or assignments. Each member of the guard force is
responsible for being fully familiar with and responsive to those post orders
that apply to them. These orders will not be modified or revised without the
written authority of the RSO.

12 FAH-7 Appendix I-2.1 Post Orders for


Surveillance Detection (SD) Specialist
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. NOTE: Telephone number and radio call sign, if applicable, will be


provided after contract award

b. Function: Under the direction of the RSO, Surveillance Detection (SD)


supervisor and/or SD shift supervisor, observes areas of assignment and
provides discreet security services as part of the surveillance detection
unit.

c. Hours: As set forth in Exhibit A of the contract.

d. Specific duties: Occupy surveillance detection points in the areas of the


assets being observed. At these points, maintain a log, recording the
license plate numbers of vehicles moving suspiciously (slow or fast) when
passing the front, side or rear of the patrol area. Also record license plate
numbers and descriptions of vehicles where the passenger(s) appear to
be taking pictures, person(s) acts suspicious, appear to be out of place,
or makes an effort to blend into the area. Photograph and/or video
and/or record the suspicious acts. Also:

(1) If ordered, conduct further surveillance to determine if the activity


is coincidental or if possible surveillance is being conducted;

(2) Report significant security-related events through the chain of


command. This includes, but is not limited to, surveillance
detection, security incidents, and accident reports;

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(3) Become acquainted with the merchants and people living in the
patrol area who can be a valuable source of information on
strangers or vehicles. This information, including any photos and
videos of the individuals or vehicles, will be forwarded to the RSO
through the SD supervisor and/or SD shift supervisor;

(4) Duties and assignments shall be performed in a professional and


consistent manner as set forth by the general and specific guard
orders. SD personnel shall be polite, courteous and professional in
dealing with police or mission employees, and be on time for their
shift or assignment. While on duty, surveillance detection (SD)
personnel will be expected to wear clothing appropriate to the area
assigned;

(5) SD personnel shall be responsible for being familiar with the use
and maintenance of all assigned equipment, the hand-held radio
and the vehicle mobile unit. All radio transmissions will be brief and
to the point and radio discipline will be maintained. Any inoperable
item of equipment shall be immediately reported, corrected,
repaired, or replaced if these items are contractor-provided. Any
inoperable or damaged items of equipment, which are U.S.
Government furnished equipment (GFE), shall be immediately
reported to the shift supervisor in accordance with the requirements
of the contract pertaining to GFE;

(6) At the beginning of each shift, each vehicle, if applicable, will be


inventoried to ensure that emergency equipment is present. The
LGP office shall be notified immediately of any missing items;

(7) No personal use of vehicles or equipment shall be tolerated;

(8) No passengers shall be allowed in a vehicle unless it is in the


context of the operation and/or duties. This includes transporting
mission employees to the hospital, police station or to their
residence if their vehicle is rendered inoperable. Additionally, if the
local police are assisting in an investigation, you may transport
them;

(9) Excessive speed or reckless driving shall be considered


unacceptable. In the event of an emergency, excessive speed may
be required and may be considered acceptable if it does not
endanger lives, i.e., pedestrians or self; and

(10) Should an SD guard be involved in an accident with an embassy


vehicle, the RSO office will be notified immediately. Appropriate
accident forms will be filled out. Do not leave the scene of the

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accident without gathering all information possible regarding other


vehicle(s) or person(s) involved in the accident.

e. Emergency procedures: Notify the MSG on Post One, the RSO and/or
PSO, and the shift supervisor. Local police or emergency responders shall
be called only with the authorization of the RSO and/or PSO or the MSG,
Post One, in consultation with the senior officer present and/or duty
officer, if the RSO and/or PSO are not present.

f. If there is a bomb or suspicious package:

(1) Clear and secure the immediate area;

(2) Notify the Marine security guard at Post One via telephone;

(3) Make no attempt to move the device; and

(4) Do not use your radio.

g. Since all SD personnel are responsible for knowing the location of all fire
equipment and are knowledgeable and familiar with the use of fire
extinguishers and other fire fighting equipment, if a fire should occur:

(1) Clear the area;

(2) If it is a small fire, suppress it with a fire extinguisher. If not, alert


the local fire brigade (use appropriate nomenclature); and

(3) Notify the MSG at Post One (or use appropriate nomenclature)
immediately.

12 FAH-7 Appendix I-2.2 Post Orders for Vehicle


Gate Guard
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Telephone number: To be provided after contract award.

b. Radio call sign: To be provided after contract award.

c. Function: To control and operate the electric gates and the delta barrier
at the main vehicle entrance gate of the embassy, and to inspect all
authorized vehicles entering the embassy.

d. Hours: As set forth in Exhibit A of contract.

e. Specific duties: The gate guard will observe the following instructions:

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(1) Assure that appropriate entries are made in the post log in
accordance with the general orders;

(2) Except during entry or exit of vehicles, the main gates will remain
closed at all times;

(3) The guard will first visually identify the vehicle as approved for
access before opening the gate and before the delta barrier is
lowered;

(4) The delta barrier should always be maintained in the raised position
except when vehicles are entering or exiting;

(5) Open the outside gate only when it is necessary to allow access and
when the inside gate is closed;

(6) Open the inside gate only after the vehicle has been inspected; the
identification card of each occupant of the vehicle has been
checked; and the outside gate is closed;

(7) Do not permit anyone inside the guardhouse except those having
official business;

(8) Guards will not permit pedestrians to gain access to the embassy
compound through the vehicle entrance. Guards will request that
pedestrians utilize the pedestrian entrance;

(9) In the event that force is used to prevent unauthorized entry, the
guard will immediately notify the MSG at Post One;

(10) Guards will be alert for any person who appears to be conducting
surveillance of the embassy. During embassy business hours, the
guard will immediately report any possible surveillance to the shift
supervisor and the RSO. After business hours, the guard will report
the same to the shift supervisor and the MSG at Post One; and

(11) Guards will remain at their post until properly relieved. During the
period 1800-0600 hours the guard will conduct a radio check with
the dispatcher or shift supervisor every 30 minutes.

f. Emergencies: Should any of the events listed below occur, the gate
guard must make an appropriate entry in the post log, following
instructions in the general orders, and may be required to prepare an
incident report as directed by the supervisor. Notify the MSG on Post
One, the RSO and/or PSO, and the shift supervisor. Local police or
emergency responders shall be called only with authorization of the RSO
and/or PSO or the MSG, Post One, in consultation with the senior officer

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present and/or duty officer, if the RSO and/or PSO are not present.

(1) In case of fire, have a fire extinguisher in the guard post. Know
where it is located and how to operate it for the type of fire being
fought. Suppress the fire, using the fire extinguisher and notify the
MSG on Post One and the RSO through the shift supervisor;

(2) If a bomb or incendiary device is discovered, notify the MSG on


Post One and the RSO through the shift supervisor. Clear the area
and do not touch the suspected device;

(3) If the embassy is attacked, maintain the order and security of the
embassy compound. Notify the MSG on Post One and the RSO
through the shift supervisor; and

(4) If a chemical and/or biological device is discovered or if a threat or


attack occurs, notify the MSG on Post One and the RSO and/or PSO
through the shift supervisor. Clear the area and do not touch the
suspected device.

12 FAH-7 Appendix I-2.3 Post Orders for


Pedestrian Gate Guard
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. NOTE: Telephone numbers and radio call signs, if applicable, will be


provided after contract award.

b. Function: To control pedestrian traffic at the main entrance to the


chancery.

c. Hours: As set forth in Exhibit A of contract.

d. Specific duties: The pedestrian entrance guard will observe the following
instructions:

(1) Assure that appropriate entries are made in the post log in
accordance with the general orders;

(2) The guard will inspect the identification card of each employee
before granting access to the embassy compound;

(3) The guard will grant access to legitimate visitors to the embassy.
The guard will request guidance from the MSG at Post One if any
question should arise as to who should be allowed entry;

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(4) The guard will visually inspect the purses, briefcases, packages, or
other belongings of all visitors for weapons or suspicious objects;

(5) During business hours, the discovery of a weapon or suspicious


object will be immediately reported to the shift supervisor, MSG at
Post One and the RSO;

(6) After business hours, the guard will report the above to the shift
supervisor and the MSG at Post One;

(7) The guard will immediately seize the weapon and/or suspicious
object, deny entry to the visitor and await instructions;

(8) The guard will allow entry to any person, who, in the considered
opinion of the guard, is not a threat or poses no danger and who
requests to speak to a U.S. embassy officer. After business hours,
the MSG at Post One will be notified before access is granted;

(9) The guard will deny access to unauthorized persons attempting to


penetrate the embassy compound perimeter. The minimum
amount of force required will be used to prevent entry;

(10) The guard may summon a member of the local police authority
assigned to the embassy for assistance if necessary. The guard will
immediately notify the shift supervisor and the MSG at Post One in
the event force is used to deny entry to the embassy compound;

(11) The guard will be on constant alert for criminal or terrorist


surveillance directed toward the embassy or embassy personnel.
During business hours, the guard will immediately report any
possible surveillance to the shift supervisor and the RSO. After
business hours, the guard will report the same to the shift
supervisor and the MSG at Post One; and

(12) The guard will remain at his or her post until properly relieved.
During the period 1800-0600 hours, the guard will conduct a radio
check with the dispatcher or shift supervisor every 30 minutes.

e. Emergencies: Should any of the events listed below occur, the pedestrian
entrance guard must make an appropriate entry in the post log, following
instructions in the general orders, and may be required to prepare an
incident report as directed by the supervisor. Notify the MSG on Post
One, the RSO and/or PSO and the shift supervisor. Local police or
emergency responders shall be called only with authorization of the RSO
and/or PSO or the MSG, Post One, in consultation with the senior officer
present and/or duty officer, if the RSO and/or PSO are not present.

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(1) In case of fire, have a fire extinguisher in the guard post. Know
where it is located and how to operate it for the type of fire being
fought. Suppress the fire, using the fire extinguisher and notify the
MSG on Post One and the RSO through the shift supervisor;

(2) If a bomb or incendiary device is discovered, notify the MSG on


Post One and the RSO through the shift supervisor. Clear the area
and do not touch the suspected device;

(3) If the embassy is attacked, maintain the order and security of the
embassy compound. Notify the MSG on Post One and the RSO
through the shift supervisor; and

(4) If a chemical and/or biological device is discovered or if a threat or


attack occurs, notify the MSG on Post One and the RSO and/or PSO
through the shift supervisor. Clear the area and do not touch the
suspected device.

12 FAH-7 Appendix I-2.4 Post Orders for


Explosives Detection and X-Ray Inspection Guard
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Telephone number: To be provided.

b. Radio call sign: To be provided.

c. Functions: Vehicle and/or pedestrian perimeter access control inspection


and inspection of suspect vehicle and packages.

d. Hours: As set forth in Exhibit A of contract.

e. Specific duties: The following instructions apply to the use of explosive


detection equipment and x-ray inspection machinery:

(1) The guard shall inspect every employee or visitor vehicle. Each
visitor’s or delivery person’s package, personal bag, and designated
mail delivery will be inspected before allowing it to be introduced
into the embassy or consulate grounds or building. In addition, any
vehicle or package suspected of containing explosives or other
dangerous items discovered in proximity to the embassy or
consulate shall be inspected. No vehicle or container shall be
allowed onto the grounds or into the facility without completion of
the prescribed inspections and subsequent clearance. No searches
will involve touching another person or removal of any article of
clothing from the person. Only the RSO and/or PSO can except the

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prescribed initial or secondary inspection;

(2) Explosive detection equipment shall be employed as a complement


to full visual inspection of each vehicle and the contents of delivery
vehicles before allowing entry onto the chancery grounds.
Inspections will be conducted to prohibit entry of explosives onto
the controlled grounds;

(3) X-ray machinery shall be used to inspect every hand-carried


package, bag, and briefcase at the pedestrian entrance to the
chancery property. These inspections will be conducted to detect
and prohibit the introduction of prohibited items onto the grounds
or into the facility. Prohibited items include explosive devices,
flammable liquids, guns, edged weapons, recording devices,
electronic devices, still cameras, and video cameras;

(4) X-ray machinery may also be situated at the delivery dock to


inspect boxes, furniture and equipment before allowing entry into
the facility;

(5) In the event that an explosive or prohibited item is detected by use


of the equipment, the vehicle or person shall be denied entrance
until full secondary inspection is completed. If an explosive device
or prohibited item is found, the RSO and/or PSO will be notified
immediately and requested to provide guidance on the disposition
of the detection situation. In addition, the MSG, Post One, and the
guard supervisor will be immediately notified for appropriate follow-
on action;

(6) The inspecting guard will not touch the explosive device. The guard
will take possession of any other prohibited item, and will be careful
to guard against allowing the person possessing the item to use it
during the inspection process. The prohibited item may be held for
safekeeping at the guard station until the departure of the owner,
except weapons, which may only be taken into safekeeping if
presented in a safe, unloaded state (weapons clearing shall be done
only outside the facility). Furthermore, weapons in safekeeping
may only be returned to the owner if the owner has legal license to
carry the weapon. Confiscated items will be brought to the
immediate attention of the RSO and/or PSO, MSG, Post One, and
the guard supervisor;

(7) Equipment or machinery operator maintenance will be conducted by


the guard or equipment supervisor as prescribed with the operation
and/or maintenance guidebook instructions and at the beginning of
each day shift. Completion of maintenance will be logged in the

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guard post log and in the equipment maintenance logbook; and

(8) Guards shall direct any question about their procedures or guard
orders to the RSO and/or PSO.

f. Emergency instructions: Should any of the events described below or


any observed act offer danger to any person, property or facility, the
guard shall call for assistance, then immediately notify the RSO and/or
PSO, MSG, Post One, and the guard supervisor. Police or emergency
responders shall be called only with authorization of the RSO and/or PSO,
or MSG, Post One, if the RSO and/or PSO are not available.

(1) If a bomb, explosive device or incendiary device is discovered,


immediate action to warn all persons away from the area and to
take cover in the facility are crucial to protect against injury. Notify
all persons within calling distance to move away and advise the
MSG, Post One, of the situation in order to activate the appropriate
alarm. Secure the gates and entry barriers to protect against the
device being brought closer to the facility;

(2) Any suspect vehicle or package left within close range to the
embassy or consulate may be an emergency and should be fully
inspected with explosive detection equipment to provide an early
warning. The first steps for any suspect vehicle or package are to
warn everyone away, and to immediately notify the RSO and/or
PSO and the MSG, Post One. Call for assistance to conduct an
inspection of the suspicious vehicle or package with the explosive
detection equipment. If an explosive is detected or a bomb
discovered, immediately depart the area for cover and advise the
MSG, Post One, to sound the alarm; and

(3) If the embassy or consulate is under attack or an intrusion is


detected, secure the entry gates and the guard booth. Notify the
MSG, Post One, and the RSO and/or PSO. Notify the guard
supervisor to provide back-up assistance. Prepare to withdraw to
the emergency fall-back position, in coordination with the MSG,
Post One.

g. Medical emergency: Notify MSG, Post One, and the RSO and/or PSO.
Call the guard supervisor for back-up assistance. Be prepared to guide
medical response personnel to the location of the victim. Provide first aid
assistance to the victim.

h. Fire: Notify MSG, Post One, and the RSO and/or PSO. If possible,
attempt to use extinguishers against the fire. Be prepared to direct the
emergency response team to the fire. Call the guard supervisor for back-

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up. Obtain authority from the RSO and/or PSO or MSG, Post One, to
allow the fire fighters to enter the embassy or consulate grounds, if
needed to fight the fire.

12 FAH-7 Appendix I-2.5 Post Orders for Chancery


Lobby Walk-Through Metal Detector (WTMD) Guard
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Telephone Number: To be provided after contract award.

b. Radio call sign: To be provided after contract award

c. Function: To control pedestrian access of persons desiring to enter the


chancery.

d. Hours: As set forth in Exhibit A of contract.

e. Specific duties: The lobby WTMD guard will observe the following
instructions:

(1) Assure that appropriate entries are made in the post log in
accordance with the general orders;

(2) The guard will visually inspect the contents of purses and briefcases
belonging to embassy visitors. These items will be left on the
counter and the visitor will be requested to pass through the
WTMD. If the visitor clears the WTMD, the purses and/or briefcases
will be returned and the visitor will be issued a visitor's pass, which
will be recorded in the post log;

(3) Packages and bags, other than purses and briefcases, are not
allowed inside the embassy. They will be retained by the guard and
returned when the visitor departs. The visitor will then be directed
to the receptionist's booth. The RSO is the only person who can
override this order;

(4) In the event the visitor activates the alarm of the WTMD, he or she
will be politely requested to place any large metallic objects he or
she may be carrying on the counter and pass through the WTMD
again. If the alarm again activates, the hand-held metal detector
(HHMD) will be used. If it cannot be resolved, the MSG at Post One
will be consulted for guidance;

(5) The guard will not physically touch a visitor or request that a visitor
remove any articles of clothing such as belts or shoes;

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(6) In the event a weapon or suspicious object is discovered the guard


will seize the weapon and/or object and notify the MSG at Post
One;

(7) Cameras, recording devices and knives are not allowed in the
embassy without the approval of the RSO, and the guard will retain
such items for return when the visitor departs the chancery, unless
given specific instructions by the RSO; and

(8) All persons entering the property are subject to inspection, except
for those exempted, if any, by the post's RSO.

f. Emergencies: Should any of the events listed below occur, the guard
must make an appropriate entry in the post log, follow instructions in the
general orders, and may be required to prepare an incident report as
directed by the supervisor.

(1) In case of fire, have a fire extinguisher in the guard post. Know
where it is located and how to operate it for the type of fire being
fought. Suppress the fire, using the fire extinguisher and notify the
MSG on Post One and the RSO through the shift supervisor;

(2) If a bomb or incendiary device is discovered, notify the MSG on


Post One and the RSO through the shift supervisor. Clear the area
and do not touch the suspected device;

(3) If the embassy is attacked, maintain the order and security of the
embassy compound. Notify the MSG on Post One and the RSO
through the shift supervisor; and

(4) If a chemical and/or biological device is discovered or if a threat or


attack occurs, notify the MSG on Post One and the RSO and/or PSO
through the shift supervisor. Clear the area and do not touch the
suspected device.

12 FAH-7 Appendix I-2.6 Post Orders for Access


Control Booth Guard
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Telephone Number: To be provided after contract award.

b. Radio Call Sign: To be provided after contract award.

c. Function: To control access doors and maintain surveillance of the


consular section lobby.

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d. Hours: As set forth in Exhibit A of contract.

e. Specific duties: The following instructions will be observed by the access


control booth guard:

(1) Assure that appropriate entries are made in the post log in
accordance with the general orders;

(2) The guard will constantly maintain surveillance of the consular


section lobby and visa section waiting room, citizens' services, and
CCTV monitors, being alert to problems or disturbances;

(3) In the event of a disturbance, the guard will immediately lock down
all doors, notify the MSG at Post One, the RSO, and await
instructions. In the event the RSO is not immediately available, the
shift supervisor should be contacted;

(4) The guard will electronically open the door to the American Services
area to U.S. citizens who seek admission;

(5) In the event a weapon or suspicious object is discovered by the


consular section lobby guards, the access control booth guard will
take possession of the item and notify the MSG at Post One; and

(6) The guard will not give information to applicants concerning


consular operations or assist in filling out visa applications. Visa
applicants with questions about nonimmigrant visas should be
referred to the information sheets available at the entrance or
advised to call the consular section during business hours.

f. Emergencies: Should any of the events listed below occur, the guard
must make an appropriate entry in the post log, follow instructions in the
general orders, and be required to prepare an incident report as directed
by the shift supervisor. Notify the MSG on Post One, the RSO and/or PSO
and the shift supervisor. Local police or emergency responders shall be
called only with authorization of the RSO and/or PSO or the MSG, Post
One, in consultation with the senior officer present and/or duty officer, if
the RSO and/or PSO are not present.

(1) In case of fire, have a fire extinguisher in the guard post. Know
where it is located and how to operate it for the type of fire being
fought. Suppress the fire, using the fire extinguisher and notify the
MSG on Post One and the RSO through the shift supervisor;

(2) If a bomb or incendiary device is discovered, notify the MSG on


Post One and the RSO through the shift supervisor. Clear the area
and do not touch the suspected device;

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(3) If the embassy and/or consular section is attacked, maintain the


order and security of the embassy compound. Notify the MSG on
Post One and the RSO through the shift supervisor; and

(4) If a chemical and/or biological device is discovered or if a threat or


attack occurs, notify the MSG on Post One and the RSO and/or PSO
through the shift supervisor. Clear the area and do not touch the
suspected device.

12 FAH-7 Appendix I-2.7 Post Orders for


Residential Exterior Guard
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Telephone Number: To be provided after contract award.

b. Radio Call Sign: To be provided after contract award.

c. Function: To control pedestrian traffic, maintain surveillance of the


exterior of the residence, and deny access to the residence compound.

d. Hours: As set forth in Exhibit A of contract.

e. Specific duties: The residential exterior guard will observe the following
instructions:

(1) Assure that appropriate entries are made in the post log in
accordance with the general orders;

(2) The guard will maintain constant surveillance of the exterior of the
residence, being alert for any problems or disturbances. In the
event of a disturbance, the guard will immediately notify the shift
supervisor;

(3) The guard will deny access to the residential area (house or
compound) by using the minimum amount of force required to
prevent access;

(4) If necessary, the guard may summon the mobile patrol guards on
patrol in the area for assistance. The guard will immediately notify
the shift supervisor of an incident in the event force is used to deny
access to a residence or residential compound; and

(5) The guard will be on constant alert for criminal or terrorist


surveillance directed at the residential post or embassy personnel
residing at the residence. If hostile surveillance is detected, the

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guard will report it to the shift supervisor and the RSO during
business hours. After business hours, the guard will report the
information to the shift supervisor and the MSG at Post One. Also,
an incident report will be prepared and an entry in the post log will
be made.

f. Emergencies: Should any of the events listed below occur, the guard
must make an appropriate entry in the post log, follow instructions in the
general orders, and be required to prepare an incident report as directed
by the shift supervisor. Notify the MSG on Post One, the RSO and/or PSO
and the shift supervisor. Local police or emergency responders shall be
called only with authorization of the RSO and/or PSO or the MSG, Post
One, in consultation with the senior officer present and/or duty officer, if
the RSO and/or PSO are not present.

(1) In case of fire, notify the occupant of the residence and evacuate
the premises. After notifying the occupants of the residence, notify
the shift supervisor and if possible the MSG on Post One. If a fire
extinguisher is available know how to use it and suppress the fire;

(2) If a bomb or incendiary device is discovered, notify the occupant


immediately and evacuate the premises. Notify the MSG on Post
One and the RSO through the shift supervisor. Clear the area and
do not touch the suspected device;

(3) If the residence is attacked, maintain the order and security of the
residence (and or compound). Notify the MSG on Post One and the
RSO through the shift supervisor; and

(4) If a chemical and/or biological device is discovered or if a threat or


attack occurs, notify the MSG on Post One and the RSO and/or PSO
through the shift supervisor. Clear the area and do not touch the
suspected device.

12 FAH-7 APPENDIX I-3 POST LOGS


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

Each guard post is provided with a post log. Post logs provide specific
instructions relative to the guard service to be provided at the guard post. It
is the responsibility of each guard assigned to maintain the post log in the
following manner:

(1) Upon assuming the duty, the guard must enter the time, date and
his or her name;

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(2) Upon assuming duties at a post, the relief guard will inspect the
post to insure that all guard equipment and supplies are present,
and that all guard and/or security equipment is in good working
condition. Such equipment may include telephones, radios,
flashlights, vehicle inspection mirrors, HHMDs/WTMDs, CCTV
monitors, and vehicle barriers. Any malfunctioning or broken
security equipment will be noted in the post log and will be reported
to the shift commander or supervisor immediately, and an incident
report prepared;

(3) During the time assigned, the guard is required to note the time
and make an entry as to the nature of any event considered to be
of a security nature (e.g., an attempt to enter the facility or destroy
U.S. Government property, and direct attacks by force on the guard
post or guard personnel, etc);

(4) Where any security event occurs, the guard:

(a) Notifies his or her supervisor and others as instructed in the


post orders;

(b) Makes the appropriate entry in the post log;

(c) Prepares an incident report; and

(d) Reports orally to the shift commander or supervisor at the


time of the next post inspection and provides that person with
the incident report;

(5) During the time assigned, when the supervisor provides specific
instructions for the guard, such instructions are to be entered in the
log, with the time indicated when they are received;

(6) If, at any time, a guard is relieved on post for any reason, the
guard assigned in relief must enter the time, his or her name and
the reason for the relief; and

(7) At the end of the assigned tour of duty, the guard must initial the
log, assuring that all entries have been made properly during his or
her period of assignment.

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12 FAH-7 APPENDIX II
PSA STAFFING DETERMINATION
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 APPENDIX II-1 GENERAL


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. When forced to use personal service agreements (PSAs) to provide


guards for the local guard program (LGP) much of the basic work for the
RSO is similar to that needed for a non-personal service (NPS) contract.
The RSO has to determine the numbers and kinds of posts as well as the
schedule for manning each post. A determination of transportation and
communication needs is the same. The kinds of other equipment needed
by the guards are the same as needed for a NPS contract. The
acquisition of transport, radios and other equipment will use the same
procedures as required for U.S. Government furnished material in the
appropriate sections of this handbook.

b. The major difference will be in the requirement for the RSO to determine
the actual number of guards and their job classifications. Although the
personnel officer will actually prepare and sign contracts, neither the
personnel officer or any other person at post is competent to decide how
many of what kind of guards are needed. This is solely the responsibility
of the RSO.

c. The complexity of the guard force and the ultimate pay grade of the
guard members are contingent upon the size of the program. For
planning purposes, however, the average local guard force (LGF) under a
PSA system will consist of:

(1) One guard commander—The senior member of the LGF


responsible for direct supervision and operation of the guard force
under the direction of the RSO;

(2) Up to four shift commanders—The next lower level of seniority.


Shift commanders are responsible for oversight and supervision of
the entire program for a specific shift. When coverage is on a 24
hour-per-day basis for seven days-per-week four shift commanders
may be needed; and

(3) Guards—The number of guards and/or a possible additional layer

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of supervision is entirely a function of the size of the program, i.e.,


number of guards, number of posts, schedule of coverage.

12 FAH-7 APPENDIX II-2 DETERMING


STAFFING NEEDS
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

To determine the number of guards needed to staff a LGF, there are two
pieces of information needed:

(1) Total number of hours of coverage required; and

(2) Number of hours of guard coverage time available for each


employee.

2 FAH-7 Appendix II-2.1 Calculating Coverage—


Number of Hours
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. To calculate the total number of hours of coverage required by the


mission, a list of every post should be produced. This list should show
the coverage required by the post. This may vary from a post which
requires 24 hour, seven day-per-week coverage to one which is only
manned during business hours (not manned on weekends or holidays) or
even one which may only be manned at certain times of year.

b. Once the list has been produced, the total number of hours required
to man each individual post should be calculated. For example, a 24-hour,
seven-day-per-week post requires 8,760 hours of staffing (24 hours times
365 day). The total for each individual post is then added up to produce the
total number of hours of staffing required for the program.

NOTE: Do not forget to calculate the number of hours required for


supervisory and support personnel. This is also required to determine the
numbers of such personnel needed for the program.

2 FAH-7 Appendix II-2.2 Calculating Number of


Hours of Guard Availability
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

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a. The total number of hours that are available for guard force employees to
actually stand post or directly perform guard force assignments will vary
substantially from post to post. To determine the correct number for a
post:

(1) Begin with the number of hours per week that an employee is
legally authorized to work at his or her basic salary. This is
generally 40 hours per week, although in some countries the basic
workweek is as much as 48 hours. Do not include availability for
overtime in deciding on what constitutes a basic workweek;

(2) Multiply the number of hours in a basic workweek by 52 to


determine the total number of hours per year of availability; and

(3) Subtract the number of hours of unavailability to determine the


actual numbers of availability for each kind of guard or supervisor.
The following items are normally causes of unavailability and should
be totaled to determine the hours of unavailability:

(a) Vacation time—Generally required by host government labor


law or local tradition and conditions. Include a reduction for
the total number of hours authorized;

(b) Sick leave—Generally required by host government labor law


or local tradition and conditions. Include a reduction for the
total number of hours authorized;

(c) Local holidays—Include a reduction for the total number of


local holidays;

(d) U.S. holidays—Include a reduction for the total number of


U.S. holidays; or

(e) Training—Include a reduction for the planned number of


hours of training.

b. When the total number of hours of unavailability have been determined,


subtract them from the number of hours determined in step 2. The result
is the total number of hours per year an employee is available to perform
his or her basic function.

2 FAH-7 Appendix II-2.3 Determining Number of


Guards Needed
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

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a. The final step is to divide the total number of hours of coverage required
for each category, by the total hours of availability for employees in that
category. The result is the number of employees needed in that
category. When the result produces an answer less than X.5, the total
should be rounded off to the lower number. When the result is a number
equal to or greater than X.5, the total should be rounded off to the next
higher number.

b. Example of shift commanders:

According to the compensation plan, shift supervisors are available to work


48 hours per week. The program requires 24-hour, seven day per week
shift commander availability by one shift commander. The total number of
hours of coverage required is 8,760. (24 times 365 days). Each shift
commander is theoretically available for 2, 496 hours (48 times 52 weeks).

Hours of unavailability for a shift commander are:

Vacation time 15 days = 120 hours

Sick leave 13 days = 104 hours

Local holidays 10 days = 80 hours

U.S. holidays 10 days = 80 hours

Training 3 days = 24 hours

TOTAL = 408 hours

Actual availability of a shift commander is 2, 088 hours per year (2,496


minus 408)

Number of shift supervisors required is 4.2 (8,760 divided by 2,088). Since


the decimal is less than .5 the number is rounded down to a requirement for
4 shift commanders.

c. The method illustrated above should be applied to each category of guard


to determine the numbers needed for the LGP when staffing is by a PSA.

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12 FAH-7 APPENDIX III


SUGGESTIONS FOR HOST GOVERNMENT
MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING
(MOU) AND/OR MEMORANDUM OF
AGREEMENT (MOA)
(TL:LGP-08; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 APPENDIX III-1 GENERAL


(TL:LGP-08; 08-10-2001)

In some countries, the host government may provide all or much of the
support required for the security of the mission. In these cases, it is
preferable that the support provided by the host government be based upon
a written understanding with the mission. This written agreement is
normally called a memorandum of understanding (MOU) or a memorandum
of agreement (MOA).

12 FAH-7 APPENDIX III-2 AREAS COVERED


IN MOU AND/OR MOA
(TL:LGP-08; 08-10-2001)

The following are key examples and/or elements of an MOU and/or MOA
between a post and the host government:

(1) The agreement is between post and representatives of the host


government, the MFA or National Police. Agreement(s) shall not be
with individual police units or organizations. A MOU and/or MOA
normally requires final approval and/or signature of the COM;

(2) The agreement recognizes the local government may provide such
services (i.e., legal basis of the arrangement, law or decree, etc.);

(3) The agreement states liability for actions and/or inactions on the
part of any guard who is a member of the host government forces
is the responsibility of the host government and not of the U.S.
Government;

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(4) The agreement describes the services to be provided in as much


detail as possible. Numbers of guards, locations and hours of
coverage should be listed in a manner similar to an Exhibit A for a
NPS contract;

(5) The agreement describes how services are ordered. For example,
the regional security officer (RSO) and/or post security officer
(PSO) shall request from the police headquarters, in writing, and
with a minimum of 24 hour notice, the services required for each
month, indicating the amount of monthly hours required as well as
the locations and address where such services is to be provided. If
the RSO and/or PSO does not send a request for any month, or
does not inform the police headquarters of any changes in the initial
request, it shall be understood that such initial request is still in
force;

(6) The agreement describes the relationship or responsibilities


between police, local guards (PSA or NPS contract), MSG (if
present) and the RSO and/or PSO;

(7) The agreement describes how services will be invoiced, where to


send invoices at the post, how payments will be made by the post
(check made payable to _______ or lump sum cash in what
currency) and to whom payments are made. Payments should not
be made to individual guards by the post. The invoice should only
cover the actual hours worked;

(8) The agreement should describes how price(s) for the services are
determined (key for insuring rates are reasonable) and the basis for
any changes to the rates (i.e., ministry decree);

(9) The agreement should state or describe that the man hour rates
include all amounts due the police including salary, benefits, social
security, severance, retirement, etc., what ever is required under
local law. Under certain conditions, this may include clothing of a
specific style or nature;

(10) The agreement should specify the terms and conditions of any
funding or other assistance requested by the host government;

(11) The agreement should not provide for payment in advance.


Services should be paid for after they are performed or delivered;
and

(12) The agreement describes the length of time services are to be


provided and the rights of the parties to immediately terminate the

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agreement by written notice to the other party.

12 FAH-7 APPENDIX III-3 MOU AND/OR


MOA DEPARTMENT APPROVAL
(TL:LGP-08; 08-10-2001)

Before the post signs any final agreement with the host government, the
post must send the final draft to DS/CIS/PSP/FPD for review and appropriate
department clearances, e.g., L/LM/DS and regional bureau.

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12 FAH-7 APPENDIX IV
FINANCIAL FUNCTION CODES
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. The program function code for the Overseas Local Guard Program is FC
5820. All direct costs for the Local Guard Program (LGP) are obligated
and expended against the following subfunction codes. Function codes
5821 through 5824 are non-International Cooperative Administrative
Support Services (ICASS) function codes.

• FC 5821—Security Guard Services for Residences. Costs for secu-


rity guards for all residences, including the ambassador’s residence
and the Deputy Chief of Mission (DCM’s) residence.

• FC 5822—Security Guard Services for Non-residential Buildings.


Applies to Department of State only occupied buildings.

• FC 5823—Mobile Patrol Security Guard Services. Costs of roving


security guard services for chancery, residences and other mission
buildings and facilities.

• FC 5824—Bodyguards and/or armed escorts for mission personnel


and guests. Costs of bodyguards for the ambassador, DCM, and
other personnel, as required.

• Cost Center 5826—A code representing the service provided by


the LGP for ICASS non-residential properties, for example, shared
facilities such as chanceries, annexes and shared warehouses which
State and other agencies occupy.

• FC 5841—Perimeter and internal security: residential security up-


grades including expenses for grilles, alarms, locks, lights, substan-
tial doors, etc. Funds also cover the cost of shipping and installa-
tion of equipment as well as the salary of a residential security co-
ordinator if applicable.

• FC 5843—Maintenance and repair (M&R) of installed residential se-


curity equipment: M&R contract and other residential security ex-
penses including labor, parts and supplies.

b. Occasionally, events occur which result in the appropriation of security


supplemental funding. In these cases, new and/or different function
codes may be used to account for the funds.

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12 FAH-7 APPENDIX IX
GLOSSARY
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 APPENDIX IX-1 TERMS


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

Acceptance—The act of an authorized representative of the U.S. Government


acknowledging that the supplies or services are in conformity with the con-
tract requirements.

Acquisition—The acquiring, by contract with appropriated funds, of supplies


or services (including construction) by and for the use of the Federal Gov-
ernment. This may be accomplished through purchase or lease, whether the
supplies or services are already in existence or must be created, developed,
demonstrated, and evaluated. Acquisition begins at the point when agency
needs are established. It includes the description of requirements to satisfy
agency needs, solicitation and selection of sources, award of contracts, con-
tract financing, contract performance, contract administration, and those
technical and management functions directly related to the process of fulfill-
ing agency needs by contract. (FAR 2.1)

Acquisition Planning—The process by which the efforts of all personnel re-


sponsible for an acquisition are coordinated and integrated through a com-
prehensive plan for fulfilling the agency need in a timely manner and at a
reasonable cost. It includes developing the overall strategy for managing the
acquisition. (FAR 7.101)

Administrative Controls—Safeguards ensuring that contracting will be carried


out in conformity with applicable regulations and Department policy.

Allotment—A funding authorization by the head of an agency, or other au-


thorized official (i.e., the comptroller), to a responsible officer of a desig-
nated organization unit (i.e., DS), making funds available for obligation for
the purpose of carrying out the program of the unit. Also see Field Allot-
ment.

Amendment—Revision made to a solicitation. Normally, an action to im-


prove or alter. In the context of the handbook, it means those actions taken

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periodically to modify or change the language or the forms used in the hand-
book.

Annualization—The projection of costs or obligations for a fiscal year based


on rates of costs or obligations incurred for like items during only part of the
preceding fiscal year. For example, a guard contract in effect at $1,000 per
month for only 3 months of the year would be annualized as $12,000.

Asset—An asset is any person, building, equipment or property required by


the mission in order for it to conduct its business. In the context of this
handbook, U.S. assets include all of these things, except classified facilities
and information.

Brand Name or Equal—A type of purchase description in which an agency


specifies its requirement by reference to a particular brand name product
followed by the words “or equal” and a listing of the essential characteristics
of that product that an offered “equal” product must possess. This tech-
nique should only be used when an adequate specification or more detailed
description cannot feasibly be made available by means other than inspec-
tion and analysis in time for the acquisition under consideration.

Budget—A financial plan serving as an estimate of, and a control over, future
operations.

Budget Call—A request of components that are authorized allotments for a


new budget or budget update.

Budget Year—The fiscal year beginning on the next October 1. At the time
of the preparation of the program submission, the mission will already have
received information concerning approval of the Local Guard Program (LGP)
for the budget year.

Central Alarm Monitoring System (CAMS). An alarm system that sends


alarms from official facilities and/or residences to a central location.

Change Order—Unilateral action taken by the contracting officer in order to


modify an existing contract.

Choke Point—Any location through which foot or vehicle traffic must pass to
get to a destination.

Cluster Housing—Several residential housing units of U.S. citizen employees


situated in one area so as to allow more effective response of a mobile secu-

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rity patrol to any security threat within minutes.

Commerce Business Daily—Published by the Department of Commerce. It


provides industry with notices concerning current U.S. Government contract-
ing and subcontracting opportunities, including information on the identity
and location of contracting offices and prime contractors having current or
potential need for certain requirements. Missions must notify the Commerce
Business Daily of its intent to issue a solicitation for guard services so pro-
spective bidders may request a copy.

Competitive Procedures—Procedures under which an agency enters into a


contract pursuant to full and open competition.

Competitive Proposal—An offer submitted to the U.S. Government in re-


sponse to a request for proposal (RFP). This method of contracting permits
bargaining and usually affords bidders an opportunity to revise their offers
before award of a contract.

Compound—As used here, this means the kind of housing group where there
is an actual or perceived perimeter and an entrance gate. All houses or liv-
ing structures within the compound may or may not be occupied by U.S.
Government employees.

Congressional Budget—The initial budget for the planning year of the budget
cycle.

Constituent Post—An RSO may have responsibility for the mission to which
assigned and to one or more other posts. A constituent post is a consulate
outside the capital city or the mission of a nearby country. At a constituent
post, many of the duties of the RSO are assigned to the post security officer
(PSO).

Contract—An agreement or order for procuring supplies or services. An


agreement, enforceable by law, between two or more competent parties to
do or not do something not prohibited by law, for a legal consideration. All
contracts require the essential elements of offer and acceptance. These
elements constitute the means by which a contract is consummated, and the
absence of either element prevents the formation of a contract. In U.S.
Government procurements, the RFP constitutes a request by the U.S. Gov-
ernment for offers of a certain nature. The proposal submitted in response
to the solicitation is, in fact, the offer, and the subsequent contract award
constitutes acceptance.

Contract Administration—The monitoring of the contractor's performance in


order to assure compliance with performance requirements and contract
provisions.

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Contract Modification—Any written change to an existing contract.

Contracting Officer—A person, usually the general services officer (GSO),


appointed by the Procurement Executive (A/OPE) in accordance with the
DOS acquisition regulations, vested with the authority to enter into and/or
administer contracts and make related determinations and findings. No
other person may amend or otherwise change the terms of existing con-
tracts.

Contract Officer Representative (COR)—The officer of the embassy who is


charged with the responsibility for monitoring the performance of the con-
tract. This officer normally represents the first point of contact used by the
contract supervisor concerning the performance of work. The COR for LGPs
is usually the regional security officer (RSO) or post security officer (PSO).

Contract Project Manger—The person with managerial responsibility for the


day to day performance of work on the part of employees of a contract firm.
His or her responsibilities are defined in the contract.

Contracting—Purchasing, renting, leasing, or otherwise obtaining supplies or


services from nonfederal sources.

Contractor—A firm that is in the business of providing guard services. Such


a firm may be local or may be a subsidiary of an international firm in such
business.

Correlation—Any movement or activity of a suspicious nature that appears to


happen in conjunction with the movement of a U.S. official. Any suspicious
activity or event in the vicinity of a U.S. facility.

Cost Estimate—A written calculation of all items included in the scope of the
work, tabulated under appropriate cost headings (direct costs, labor, over-
head, and profit).

Cure Notice—A document the contracting officer sends to a contractor to no-


tify the contractor that the contract may be terminated by reason of default
if the condition endangering performance of the contract is not corrected in
10 days.

Determinations and Findings—Written approval by an authorized official re-


quired by statute or regulation as a prerequisite to taking certain contracting
actions.

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Excusable Time Delay—Failure to perform which is beyond the control and


without fault or negligence of the contractor.

Expendable Supplies—Miscellaneous items required for the function of the


LGP that have a useful life of less than one year. Such items include training
ammunition and targets; weapons cleaning supplies; training supplies and
training aids; whistles; nightsticks; guard badges and insignia; guard force
forms; pens and pencils; and paper.

Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR): The single, U.S. Government-wide


procurement regulation issued and maintained jointly by General Services
Administration (GSA), Department of Defense (DOD), and National Aeronau-
tics Space Administration (NASA).

Financial Plan—A part of the annual International Cooperative Administrative


Support Services (ICASS) budget submission, providing U.S. dollar cost es-
timates for the LGP for the planning year.

Firm Fixed-Price Contract—A contract that provides for a price which is not
subject to any adjustment by reason of cost experience of the contractor in
the performance of the contract.

Fixed Post—A guard post at one location where the assigned guard does not
have to move to another location in the performance of his duty.

Fixed Surveillance Detection—Detection observation points from which sur-


veillance detection can remain in place for an extended period of time.

Follow-on Contract—Defined as a new noncompetitive acquisition (whether


by separate new contract or modification outside the scope of the original
contract) placed with a particular contractor to continue a specific program.

Full and Open Competition—When used with respect to a contract action, the
term means that all responsible sources are permitted to submit competitive
proposals on the procurement. (41 U.S.C. 403(7)); (FAR 6.003)

Funding Accountability—The method of coding classifications for obligations


and costs from the allotment or funding authorizations. Coding classifica-
tions generally include subfunctions and subobject classes (codes). See sub-
function and subobject class.

Guard—A person who is assigned security duties such as access control, ve-
hicle inspection, fixed post or mobile patrol, escort or bodyguard duties or

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part of an emergency response force. Guards may also be assigned to resi-


dences.

Guard Force Commander—The person responsible for the day-to-day per-


formance of work on the part of employees of a contract firm. His or her re-
sponsibilities are defined in the contract.

Guard Post—A location where one or more guards is assigned.

General Orders—Those instructions, directives, and guidelines that apply to


all guard personnel.

Guard Post Schedule—A listing of all posts manned for each shift, giving the
post number, name of guard assigned, hours of coverage.

Inspection—Examining and testing supplies or services to determine whether


they conform to contract requirements.

Labor-Hour Contract—A contract that provides for the procurement of prop-


erty or services on the basis of direct labor-hours at specified, fixed hourly
rates (which include direct and indirect labor, overhead, and profit).

Local Guard Force (LGF)—The LGF is a non-U.S. citizen protective force used
to provide protection for U.S. facilities and, in some cases at residences, to
deter attacks on U.S. personnel or facilities. Such services are normally
provided under contract to the mission to augment the host government’s
efforts and complement the security provided by marine guards inside the
mission.

Local Guard Program (LGP)—The sum of all of the equipment and services at
a mission or post devoted to the control of visitors and the protection of em-
ployees, dependents and U.S. Government property and facilities against
crime and the threat of terrorism.

Log—A written record, a book or binder with appropriate pages, for re-
cording chronologically specific information relative to the guard post or sur-
veillance detection operation for use by local guards. Instructions for re-
cording of information in the surveillance detection program (SDP) logs are
provided in the post orders for the SDP posts.

Mission—The official U.S. delegation to a foreign country, including all agen-

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cies falling under the purview of the chief of mission (COM), wherever lo-
cated in the country. A mission may consist of more than one facility.

Mobile Patrol—This refers to a vehicular patrol of guard personnel to provide


improved prevention of criminal activity and to provide a response capability
where security incidents occur. Mobile units are usually radio equipped and
often include two guard personnel.

Mobile Surveillance Detection—Movement or transportation used to assist


surveillance detection that occurs on the move.

Modification—See Contract Modification, above.

Negotiation—The procedure for awarding contracts without sealed bidding.


This method of procurement is used when sealed bidding is not feasible or
practicable. Under negotiation, the lowest offeror does not necessarily re-
ceive the award, since technical and other factors are considered as well as
cost.

Non-Expendable Equipment—This is equipment that generally has more than


one year of useful life. In the context of the LGP, examples of non-
expendable equipment are vehicles, computers, cellular phones, cameras,
radios, weapons, etc.

Non-Personal Services Contract (NPS)—A contract with a commercial com-


pany under which the personnel rendering the services are not subject, ei-
ther by the contract’s terms or by the manner of its administration, to the
supervision and control usually prevailing in relationships between the U.S.
Government and its employees.

Obligation—A valid claim against the U.S. Government resulting from action
by an authorized official pursuant to orders placed, contracts awarded, ser-
vices ordered, and similar transactions payable from funds available to an
U.S. Government agency.

Observation Post—Static location outside of an official facility from which a


surveillance detection team member can survey without being discovered.

Overt—In the open, without any attempt to deceive or mislead; done with-
out attempt at concealment.

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Perimeter—The boundary that defines U.S. Government-owned or leased


property. Inside the perimeter are U.S. Government operations, functions
and employee work spaces; outside of the perimeter is host country area
and property. The perimeter may be a fence, a wall or the walls of a build-
ing. In a security sense, the perimeter is the first point where access to U.S.
Government property or facilities is controlled.

Personal Services Agreement—An agreement that, by its express terms or as


administered, makes the contractor, in effect, a U.S. Government employee.

Police Stipend—Usually a financial payment made to the host government


for additional expenses incurred in providing officers as part of the LGF. Ex-
amples of expenses include; meals, uniforms, other clothing, equipment or a
financial consideration. The stipend may also take the form of a meal or
equipment.

Post Orders—Detailed instructions to persons assigned to a specific guard


post.

Post Security Officer (PSO)—A post security officer is a U.S. citizen Foreign
Service employee designated by the COM or principal officer (PO), at posts
with no permanent RSO, to perform certain security functions in the imple-
mentation of the security program at the post where he or she is assigned.
PSOs receive guidance and assistance from RSOs.

Pre-award Survey—An evaluation of a prospective contractor’s capability to


perform a proposed contract.

Request for Proposals (RFP)—The U.S. Government's written solicitation to


prospective offerors to submit a proposal based on the terms and conditions
set forth therein. Proposal evaluation and contractor selection is based on
the factors for award as stated in every competitive RFP.

Responsible Source—In general, a prospective contractor who:

(1) Has adequate financial resources to perform the contract or the


ability to obtain such resources;

(2) Is able to comply with the required or proposed delivery or per-


formance schedule, taking into consideration all existing commercial and
government business commitments;

(3) Has a satisfactory performance record;

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(4) Has a satisfactory record of integrity and business ethics;

(5) Has the necessary organization, experience, accounting and opera-


tional controls, and technical skills, or the ability to obtain such organization,
experience, controls, and skills;

(6) Has the necessary production, construction, and technical equip-


ment and facilities, or the ability to obtain such equipment and facilities; and

(7) Is otherwise qualified and eligible to receive an award under appli-


cable laws and regulations.

Revision—In the context of the handbook, it means an updating or repub-


lishing of the entire handbook, as necessary, to facilitate the incorporation of
amendments and to facilitate the use of the handbook.

Rover or Roving Patrol—This term refers to a foot patrol where the guard pa-
trols a specified area.

Show Cause Letter—A document the contracting officer sends to a defaulting


contractor to notify the contractor that the contract may be terminated by
reason of default unless the contractor can prove in 10 days that the condi-
tion was not his or her fault.

Sole-Source Acquisition—A contract for the purchase of supplies or services


that is entered into or proposed to be entered into after soliciting and nego-
tiating with only one source.

Solicitation Mailing List—The list of firms requesting copies of the solicitation.

Solicitation—The document describing what the U.S. Government is seeking


in terms of equipment, and supplies or services. It provides all information
needed by an offeror to prepare and submit an offer.

Specification—A description of the technical requirements for a material,


product, or service that includes the criteria for determining whether these
requirements are met. Specifications are required to state only the U.S.
Government’s actual minimum needs and be designed to promote full and
open competition, with due regard to the nature of the supplies or services
to be acquired.

Statement of Work (SOW)—Written definition of work to be performed that


establishes standards sought for the goods or services to be supplied.

Surveillance Detection Program (SDP)—A program designed to detect and

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report through the proper channels potentially hostile surveillance against


any person, building, equipment or property required by the mission in order
for it to conduct its business.

Surveillance Detection Team—A group of trained observers who operate to-


gether to determine if U.S. assets are under hostile surveillance.

Technical Evaluation Panel (TEP)—One or more technical staff members des-


ignated by the requirements office to evaluate technical proposals.

Termination for Convenience—The U.S. Government's termination of a con-


tract when it no longer needs or requires the products or services.

Termination for Default—The U.S. Government's termination of a contract


when the contractor fails to perform or fails to make progress so as to en-
danger performance.

Terrorism—The calculated use of violence or the threat of violence to incul-


cate fear; intended to coerce or to intimidate governments or societies in the
pursuit of goals that are generally political, religious or ideological.

Time-and-Materials Contract—A contract that provides for payment of sup-


plies and services on the basis of incurred direct labor hours (at fixed rates)
and materials (at cost).

Time Delay—An interruption during which services, supplies, or work are not
delivered in accordance with the performance time schedule stated in the
contract.

U.S. Embassy—A diplomatic or consular mission of the United States of


America.

12 FAH-7 APPENDIX IX-2 ACRONYMS


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The following acronyms are used throughout this Handbook:

A/DTSPO Diplomatic
Telecommunications
Service Program
Office

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A/LM/OPS/RLC/MV Supply,
Transportation,
Procurement, Motor
Vehicles

A/OPR/ACQ Office of
Acquisitions

ARSO Assistant Regional


Security Officer

A/SDBU Office of Small and


Disadvantaged
Business Utilization

ASBCA Armed Services


Board of Contract
Appeals

BPA Blanket Purchase


Agreement

CBD Commerce Business


Daily

CFR Code of Federal


Regulations

CG Comptroller General

CICA Competition in
Contracting Act

CO Contracting Officer

COM Chief of Mission

COR Contracting
Officer's
Representative

CR Cost-
Reimbursement
Contract

D&F Determination and

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Findings

DCM Deputy Chief of


Mission

DOSAR Department of
State Acquisition
Regulation

DS Diplomatic Security
Service

DS/DSS/ITA Office of
Intelligence and
Threat Analysis

DS/DSS/OP Overseas
Operations

DS/CIS/IST/FSE Facilities Security


Engineering

DS/CIS/IST/FSE/FS Facility Support

DS/PPB/FMD Financial
Management
Division

DS/CIS/PSP/FPD Facilities Protection


Division

DS/CIS/PSP/PEL Protective
Equipment and
Logistics

FAH Foreign Affairs


Handbook

FAM Foreign Affairs


Manual

FAR Federal Acquisition


Regulation

FBP Field Budget Plan

FFP Firm-Fixed-Price

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Contract

FMO Financial
Management Officer

FMP Bureau of Finance


and Management
Policy

FOIA Freedom of
Information Act

FSI Foreign Service


Institute

FSN Foreign Service


National

GFP U.S. Government


Furnished Property

GSA General Services


Administration

GSO General Services


Officer

HCA Head of the


Contracting Activity

HG Host Government

ICASS International
Cooperative
Administrative
Support Services

L/BA Office of the Legal


Adviser, Building
and Acquisitions

L/LM/DS Office of the Legal


Advisor for
Diplomatic Security

LGF Local Guard Force

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LGP Local Guard


Program

LGP/FBP Local Guard


Program Field
Budget Plan

M/OBO Management,
Overseas Buildings
Operations

MSG Marine Security


Guard

NPS Non-Personal
Service

OFPP Office of Federal


Procurement Policy

OIG Office of the


Inspector General

OMB Office of
Management and
Budget

OSAC Overseas Security


Advisory Council

PO Principal Officer

PSA Personal Service


Agreement

PSO Post Security


Officer

PSOH Post Security


Officers Handbook

RAMC Regional
Administrative
Management Center

RFP Request for

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Proposals

RSO Regional Security


Officer

S&E Salary and


Expenses

SBA Small Business


Administration

SDP Surveillance
Detection Program

SETL Standard Form

SOW Statement of Work

T for C Termination for


Convenience

T for D Termination for


Default

TCN Third Country


National

TEP Technical
Evaluation Panel

UCF Uniform Contract


Format and

U.S.C U.S Code.

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12 FAH-7 APPENDIX V
SOLICITATION EXTRACTS (SAMPLES)
FOR RSO ACTING AS COR
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 APPENDIX V-1 GENERAL


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The contracting officer (CO) is responsible for the format and contents of
non-personal service (NPS) contracts. However, it is incumbent on the RSO
to work closely with the CO to assure that key elements are adequately
covered in the solicitation and the contract.

NOTE: The solicitation becomes the contract when the solicitation provisions
are reserved at time of award, and Sections B through J (including exhibits)
of the solicitation become the award document. The information and
guidance that follows deals with specific sections of the sample solicitation
and/or contract. When it is determined an optional element of the sample
is not applicable to the mission’s effort, it should be reserved. Law or
regulation requires most of the sample solicitation and/or contract, so care
should be taken before reserving or changing any clauses or provisions.
A/OPE and DS/CIS/PSP/FPD must approve all such changes. Because the
sample solicitation and/or contract changes frequently (due to Federal
Acquisition Regulation (FAR) changes and for other reasons), a copy is not
reproduced here. A copy of the most current complete contract may be
obtained from A/OPE or downloaded from the intranet (http://99.1.1.18/) or
internet (http://www.statebuy.gov/opehelp/opehelp.htm).

12 FAH-7 APPENDIX V-2 SPECIFIC PARTS OF


THE SOLICITATION AND/OR CONTRACT
FORMAT
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The following extracts are keyed to the sample solicitation and are identified
by the alphanumeric indicator used in the related section of the solicitation
in the uniform contract format.

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(1) Level of Effort (B.2)—Both the solicitation and the contract must
reflect the levels of services required for the guard force program.
Standard services are stated in hours of effort needed and are
calculated by the RSO based on a comprehensive study of services
needed, post by post, including any supervisory and mobile patrol
input. The hours for additional or emergency services are the RSOs
best estimate based on the mission’s past experience; usually, 5%
of the annual figure is adequate.

(2) Standard Services (B.2.2.)—The hourly rates for standard


services are fully loaded rates, inclusive of all direct costs (labor,
including any premiums relating to overtime, holidays or night
shifts, etc., and materials, excluding vehicles and communications
equipment), insurance, indirect costs, and profit; however, Defense
Base Act (DBA) insurance shall be separately reimbursed.
Severance pay may be included in these rates if the post wishes
(see H.7.3). Materials costs, exclusive of vehicles and
communications equipment that may be in separate firm fixed price
line items, shall be included as well in standard services hourly
rates.

(3) Additional or Emergency Services (B.2.3 and C.2.2)—Price


adjustments for these services (B2.3). Additional or emergency
services are services within the scope of this contract but not
specified in Exhibit A. Under no circumstances shall the
performance of duties listed in Exhibit A constitute additional or
emergency services. The contractor shall not subcontract or lease
for the additional or emergency services. The hourly rates for
additional or emergency services, as defined at C.2.2, are loaded
rates, inclusive of all direct costs (labor, including any premiums
relating to overtime, holidays or night shifts, etc.), and insurance;
however, DBA insurance shall be separately reimbursed, per B.2.7,
indirect costs, and profit.

(4) Prices (B.3)—The number of hours by labor category is necessary


so that contractors can provide a fixed hourly rate when responding
to the solicitation. An estimate based on the past three years
experience should provide a good base for preparing this total. See
the standard service table in section B.3.1. Post should use only
approved categories in a solicitation. Any variation should be
discussed with DS/CIS/PSP/FPD.

(5) Contract Price (B.3)—The total contract price consists of the


hourly totals for each labor category as well as the fixed price
monthly rates for other services such as vehicle, communications
equipment, etc. The grand total price is the aggregate of the rates

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and prices for each base and option year, for all line items.

(6) Advance Payments (B.3)—The Department will not approve such


payments. A contractor needing such payments does not meet the
requirements that relate to financial responsibility.

(7) Premium Pay (B.3)—Overtime or premium pay is not included as


a separate line item in the contract. Any such pay must be figured
into the contractor's fixed hourly rate and will not be separately
paid or reimbursed. Specific legal holidays by date and title should
be listed in the appropriate exhibit to the contract.

(8) Price Adjustments (B.5)—The sample solicitation and/or contract


allows an adjustment based only on changes in the applicable
mandatory wage law. No price adjustment is allowed for guards
already paid above the applicable mandatory wage law (no parity of
pay), and any exchange rate gain will be deducted from any
requested price adjustment.

(9) Statement of Work (C.1)—This is perhaps the most important


part of the LGP contracting process. It clearly states what is
needed in terms of service and materials. It defines the quantity
and kinds of services wanted; the hours and locations where the
services will be performed; the qualifications of personnel;
contractor-furnished and U.S. Government-furnished equipment
needed to perform the services; and the contractor’s reporting
requirements. The information provided must be complete enough
to allow the contractor to submit an offer on the contract. Also, the
statement of work must be specific enough to allow monitoring by
the RSO and/or PSO and assurance that the work performed
provides the required level of protection of U.S. assets. Due to the
technical content of the scope of work, the RSO should be
responsible for drafting this part of the contracting documentation.

(10) Personnel (C.1.2)—State in Section C and the appropriate exhibit,


in detail, the posts to be manned, hours of coverage, and number
and category (i.e., static guard, mobile patrol, supervisor, etc.) of
personnel required for each shift. Identify posts requiring armed
guards. Identify the time period covered by each shift. This
information should be shown in tabular form as an exhibit with
guard posts and schedule of guard coverage. Include post orders
that detail specific duties, including log keeping and reporting
requirements, either directly in an annex or by reference. NOTE: It
is important that key personnel are identified and their duties
specified as defined in section H.12. (i.e., project manager, guard
commander)

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(11) Explosive Detectors, Magnetometers and/or X-Ray


Inspection Equipment (C.1.2.2)—Operation of this equipment is
a senior guard responsibility. Explosive detector and/or x-ray
inspection equipment operator personnel shall be provided by the
contractor to enhance inspection of vehicles and materials for the
detection of explosives and prohibited items prior to entering the
embassy and/or chancery grounds. These personnel must operate
in accordance with the instructions and procedures set forth in the
embassy’s specific post orders.

(12) General Orders and Post Orders (C.1.3)—It is essential that the
general orders and post orders are clear and concise. Sample
orders are available in the sample contract solicitation.

(13) Posts (C.1.4)—The list of posts is the basis for calculating the
annual standard service requirement. Accuracy is very important
for a contract with fixed price rates. Each location may have more
than one post. For example, the embassy pedestrian entrance may
have three guards assigned during normal operating time with only
one or two after hours, weekends, and holidays. For planning
purposes, these are three posts: one is 24-hours, seven day a
week, the other two are less according to the mission work
schedule.

(14) Duties and Responsibilities (C.1.5)—This section should be


modified and adapted to satisfy local conditions and requirements.

(15) Guard Electronic Monitoring System (GEMS) (C.1.5.1)—GEMS


is a Diplomatic Security (DS) approved electronic system for
monitoring performance of and adherence to the patrol
requirements of the contract. The system collects data to produce
reports and document guard activity and supervisory oversight.
Where the RSO determines a need the contractor shall provide a
(GEMS) for supervision and quality control of guard services. GEMS
reports can substantiate deduct claims.

(16) Contractor Furnished Equipment (C.1.5.3)—Equipment


required to implement the contract may be furnished in part or
totally by the contractor as part of the contract or the U.S.
Government may furnish it. Contractors shall ordinarily furnish all
materials for performing U.S. Government contracts. However,
agencies should provide material to a contractor when necessary to
achieve significant economy or standardization, or when it is
otherwise in the U.S. Government’s interest. In certain instances,
there may be a separate contract with another contractor to supply
such items as vehicles or communication equipment. If the

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contractor is required to furnish equipment, such items must be


listed in specific detail as to quantity, description, and specifications
to ensure proper items are obtained. This list is part of the
solicitation and contract and is shown in Exhibit D.

(17) Escorts (C.1.5.3)—Local guards do not normally provide escort


services nor do they have escort duties. This task should not be
reflected in Exhibit A. Under very special circumstances, as
approved by the RSO and/or PSO, they may be required for
temporary and/or short-term escorts on special projects.

(18) Surveillance Detection Operations (C.1.6)—The RSO may


choose to have the contractor provide surveillance detection
operations as part of this contract. Surveillance detection
operations are overt and are not to be considered as a replacement
for ongoing efforts; they will only supplement activities already in
place. Surveillance detection operations are intended to be an early
warning vehicle to detect rather than protect. Since coordination
and cooperation with host country police and/or security forces will
be required, it will be essential to recognize any political
sensitivities that may arise and be able to adapt the program to
accomplish its objectives while easing any concerns by either the
mission or the host country.

(19) Additional or Emergency Services (C.2.2)—The contract allows


the contracting officer's representative (COR) to order additional or
emergency services, not to exceed the limits shown in Section B.
The requirement for written confirmation precludes informal change
and restructuring of the contract. The CO must sign a written
modification for any permanent changes, including any period of
time exceeding the duration of the emergency requiring the added
service. This is also necessary to keep contracts current and to
prevent claims or disputes by the contractor. Confirmation, in
writing, provides the necessary "paper trail” for future audits.

(20) Guard Duty Hours Limits (C.3.1.1)—The specific number of


hours worked should be governed by local practice, but under no
circumstances should it exceed 12 hours in any 24 hour period.

(21) Supervision (C.3.2)—Specify, in detail, the supervisory


responsibilities of the contractor including the frequency of
inspection of posts, number of supervisors per shift, if appropriate,
and include the relationship with the RSO or COR. The contractor is
responsible for continuous supervision of all guard force activities
under the contract. The LGF guard commander and the project
manager are the principal contacts for the RSO. Under normal

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circumstances the guard commander should not concurrently man a


post except in an emergency and then only long enough to find a
suitable replacement. The number of posts covered per shift will be
a factor in determining the manning level for supervisory personnel.
The statement of work should list specific supervisory requirements
to be performed. The scope of work should also indicate the logs to
be maintained and the frequency of inspection or review of such
records by the supervisor and should briefly describe the oral and
written performance system to be used by the LGP contractor.

(22) Inspection and Acceptance (E)—This section includes required


FAR clauses that give the U.S. Government a right to inspect and
accept or reject the work performed, as well as to apply deductions
for inadequate performance. When a contractor fails to provide the
services required by the contract, the U.S. Government shall
extract a deduction for each instance of failure in accordance with
the acceptable quality and deduct schedule, Exhibit C. NOTE: The
COR is authorized by the contract to inspect contractor
administrative files as defined in C.1.5.9.2.

(23) Period of Performance (F.4)—The usual period is one year. Up


to four optional one-year renewals may be included, in addition to
the base year, as part of the contract.

(24) Notice to Proceed (NTP) (F.5)—This is an important part of the


transition into a contract or from one contractor to another. The CO
should not issue the NTP until the contractor has acceptable
evidence of all required licenses, insurance and permits. There may
be an instance where the CO determines that a NTP must be issued
prior to all licenses, insurance and permits being obtained. This
action should not be taken without the concurrence of A/OPE/EAD.
L/BA and DS/CIS/PSP/FPD.

(25) U.S. Government Approval and Acceptance of Contractor


Employees (H.2.1)—The contractor shall subject his or her
personnel to the U.S. Government's approval. All employees must
pass a suitable investigation conducted by the contractor, including
proof of successful employment during the past three years as well
as recommendation(s) from their respective supervisor(s). Also
required is a police check covering criminal and/or subversive
activities, a check of personal residence, and a credit investigation.
All such investigations shall be provided in summary form to the
COR for review and approval or disapproval. The investigation
record shall be part of the administrative file, see subsection
C.1.5.9.2. Local conditions may dictate the degree to which this
investigation can be conducted. Should a contractor-conducted

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investigation not be possible the minimum requirement is a check


of using mission sources. The contractor shall not use any
employees under this contract without RSO approval. The
contractor shall not bill for employees who have not received
approval under this clause.

(26) U.S. Government-Furnished Property (H.3)—This is an


important clause, and the RSO should be assured the contractor
fully understands the implications of the intent of this clause
concerning contractor liability for U.S. Government furnished
property. An exhibit to the solicitation and/or contract must list
specific items that the contractor should furnish also with an
indication of the items to be furnished to the contractor by the U.S.
Government. Subject to the terms of the contract and the
circumstances surrounding a particular case, the contractor may be
liable for shortages, losses, damage or destruction of U.S.
Government furnished property. The RSO should periodically audit
all inventories, require accounting for shortfalls, and make spot
checks to verify totals, serial numbers, etc.

(27) Standards of Conduct (H.4.1)—The contractor shall maintain


satisfactory standards of employee competency, conduct,
cleanliness, appearance and integrity and shall be responsible for
taking such disciplinary action with respect to employees as may be
necessary. Each contractor employee is expected to adhere to
standards of conduct that reflect credit on themselves, their
employer, and the U.S. Government. Guards must at all times use
politeness and courtesy when dealing with visitors to the U.S.
Government's offices and residences.

• The contractor shall notify the COR of proposed disciplinary actions


24 hours in advance. In addition, the U.S. Government reserves
the right to direct the contractor to remove an employee from the
work site for failure to comply with the standards of conduct. The
contractor shall immediately replace such an employee to maintain
continuity of services at no additional cost to the U.S. Government.

(28) Uniforms and Personal Equipment (H.4.3)—As with other


equipment, the contractor normally should furnish uniforms for
guards. Uniforms should be subject to approval by the RSO and
conform to any restrictions placed by the host government as to
color, style, marking, badges, etc. Some contracts may specify
what a basic issue of clothing includes. In some instances, the
mission may furnish uniforms or material and reimburse the cost of
tailoring. Blazers with an appropriate shirt, tie, pants and shoes are
an acceptable alternative to the more traditional uniform. If the

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individual guard provides shoes they should be uniform as to style


and color. Surveillance detection personnel should wear
appropriate civilian clothing. The contractor should bear the cost of
purchasing, cleaning, pressing, and repair of uniforms. The
contractor should ensure that no items of the uniform are worn,
displayed, or used while in an off-duty status unless directly
transiting between home and work.

• The RSO should determine what basic personal equipment the


guards should use. These include leather gear such as belts,
holsters, ammunition pouches, and keepers for flashlights and
batons, as well as batons, radios, flashlights, whistles, etc.
Regardless of who furnishes this gear, the RSO should require that
it be uniform in appearance, serviceable, of good quality, and
approved by the RSO. Periodic inspection by contractor supervisors
and/or the RSO should be required to assure continued
serviceability and quality.

(29) LGF-Marine Security Guard Relationship (H.4.4)—The Marine


security guard (MSG) has no direct command authority over LGF
personnel. However, as a matter of practice, the MSG does serve
as a two-way communications channel between LGF personnel, the
RSO, the Marine detachment commander, and selected mission
personnel. Often, the MSG is the first person notified of an
incident. In the absence of a guard supervisor or the RSO and/or
PSO, guards should be instructed to contact the MSG for assistance.
Under certain conditions, the LGP contractor may contact local
police or fire services directly in the interest of time and security,
prior to reporting to a supervisor or the MSG. In such cases,
instructions concerning this procedure should be contained in each
post.

(30) Intoxicants (H.4.7)—At some posts, there may be a problem with


alcohol and drug abuse. In all contracts, there should be a clause
prohibiting the consumption of these materials during a period
before and while on duty. This subject may also be covered in
general orders.

(31) Personnel Requirements (Qualifications) (H.5.1)—All LGF


employees, except residential guards, must be literate to the extent
that they can read and understand printed orders, maps and
instructions. This part of the contract states personnel
qualifications in terms of education, experience, work-related
training, and other general conditions for satisfactory performance.
Requirements need to be valid, clear, concise, and reasonable when
measured against local conditions, customs and laws.

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(32) Language Proficiency (H.5.1.1)—Employees assigned to certain


guard posts must have sufficient English language ability to
converse with English speaking employees and visitors and read
some printed material. The required levels of language proficiencies
as defined below are required at guard posts as indicated in Exhibit
A, Guard Posts and Schedule of Guard Coverage.

• Level 1—Can initiate and maintain predictable face-to-face


conversations and satisfy limited demands. Must have sufficient
reading comprehension to understand simple expressions in printed
form for informative purposes.

• Level 2—Able to verbally satisfy routine demands and limited work


requirements. Sufficient reading comprehension to read simple
written material in a form equivalent to usual printing or typescript
on subjects within a familiar context.

• Level 3—Able to satisfy most work requirements with language


usage that is often, but not always, acceptable and effective.
Sufficient reading comprehension to understand most factual
material of a non-technical nature as well as some discussions on
concrete topics related to special professional needs.

• Level 4—Able to speak English with sufficient structural accuracy


and vocabulary to participate effectively in most formal and
informal conversations on practical, social, and professional topics.
Able to read with almost complete comprehension prose on
unfamiliar topics.

NOTE: If fluency in one or more local languages, in addition to English, is


required, the contract must state so.

(33) Health (H.5.2)—All employees must be well proportioned in height


and weight and in good general health without physical defects or
abnormalities that would interfere with the performance of their
duties, including standing for prolonged periods in performance of
guard duty. They shall be free from communicable disease. They
shall possess binocular vision, correctable to 20/30 (Snellen) and
shall not be colorblind. They shall be capable of hearing ordinary
conversation. Physical fitness shall be evidenced by a certification
from a licensed physician, based on a physical examination
conducted prior to the employee's assignment to duty and annually
thereafter. This certification will be maintained in the
administrative file referenced in C.1.5.9.2.

(34) Training (H.5.4)—This section governs all aspects of basic guard

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training whether contractor or U.S. Government provided, including


recertification. GEMS training is covered in section H.5.4.4.

(35) Firearms Qualification (H.5.4.2)—No guard should be assigned


to duty as an armed guard until being trained and qualified as a
“marksman” according to either host government or Department
standards, whichever are the higher standards. Complete records
of all training and firing for qualification and re-qualification must
be maintained as part of the permanent record of all training.

• All contract guard employees who must be armed in the


performance of their duties must qualify as a "marksman" utilizing
the qualification standards shown in Exhibit G, prior to assignment
at the activity. The CO must specify the appropriate period, e.g.
semiannually, annually, biannually for recertification training.

• Each employee must successfully complete a total of 16 hours of


annual recertification training. The annual retraining time of an
employee is computed from the completion date of the previous
training for that particular employee. Employees are prohibited
from providing services under this contract if they are not certified
on all required training. The training shall include any new material
bearing on the performance of local guard duties.

(36) Annual Recertification Training (H.5.4.3)—Each employee must


successfully complete a total of 16 hours of annual recertification
training. The annual retraining time of an employee is computed
from the completion date of the previous training for that particular
employee. Employees are prohibited from providing services under
this contract if they are not certified on all required training. The
training shall include any new material bearing on the performance
of local guard duties.

(37) Surveillance Detection Training (H.5.4.5)—The U.S.


Government shall provide the initial surveillance detection training.
The RSO will ensure that either the contractor or the U.S.
Government meets subsequent training requirements.

(38) Weapons (H.6)—This section should state whether or not the


guards will be armed. Where guards are armed, the U.S.
Government prefers that the contractor furnish weapons, but the
U.S. Government may furnish weapons if the contractor is unable to
do so. The RSO should use current data on weapons provided by
DS/CIS/PSP/PEL to determine what should be the standard type of
weapons for the mission LGF. The RSO also should be aware of
local laws concerning firearms. The contract should specify weapons

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to be furnished. Weapons, other than standard items, require prior


DS/CIS/PSP/FPD and DS Firearms Policy Review Board approval
based on mission justification and supporting data. DS plays a
major role in procurement of these weapons. Weapons furnished
by the U.S. Government will be listed in an Exhibit E to the
contract. Those furnished by the contractor will be listed in an
Exhibit D to the contract.

(39) Authority (To Detain and/or Arrest) (H.7.1)—The authority for


contractor personnel to detain and/or make arrests is usually that
of a private citizen as defined by host government law, but should
be thoroughly researched and documented by a competent local
legal authority.

(40) Employee Salary Benefits (H.7.3)—The U.S. Government shall


have no responsibility or liability for payment of any wages or
benefits to contractor's employees, including those associated with
severance pay as defined by local law. The U.S. Government, its
agencies, agents, and employees shall not be part of any legal
action or obligation regarding these benefits which may
subsequently arise. Where local law requires bonuses, specific
applicable mandatory wage levels, premium pay for holidays,
payments for social security, pensions, severance pay, sick or
health benefits, child care or any other benefit, the contractor is
responsible for payments of such costs and must include all such
costs in the hourly rates incorporated in this contract.

• Except for reimbursement to the contractor for payment of


severance benefits, as set forth herein, the U.S. Government shall
have no responsibility or liability for payment of any wages or
benefits to contractor's employees. The contractor shall not include
severance pay (as defined by local law) accrual in his and/or her
labor hour rates, but shall be reimbursed for severance payments
actually made to employees providing direct service labor under
this contract, to the extent that such payments are required by
local law and are made with respect to periods of direct service
labor provided under this contract. Severance pay is as defined by
local law. Any claim for reimbursement for severance pay must be
made not later than sixty (60) calendar days after the expiration of
the contract term, and must be supported by proof that the
amounts claimed have actually been paid to the employees. No
profit, overhead, or other additional charge will be allowed in
severance pay reimbursements.

(41) Personal Injury, Property Loss or Damage (Liability)


(H.7.4)—The contractor hereby assumes absolute responsibility

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and liability for any and all personal injuries or death and/or
property damage or losses suffered due to negligence of the
contractor's personnel in the performance of the services required
under this contract or any cause arising from accidental, careless or
irresponsible discharge of firearms assigned to the contractor's
personnel. The contractor's assumption of absolute liability is
independent of any insurance policies.

(42) Insurance (H.7.5)—All LGP contracts require the contractor to


provide insurance for its employees in conformity with local law.
DBA insurance is also a reimbursable item when any U.S. citizens
will work for the contractor on site. See H.7.5.2 for DBA guidance.
All other insurance must be included in the hourly rates in Section
B.

(43) Permits (H.7.6)—Without additional cost to the U.S. Government,


the contractor shall obtain all permits, licenses, and appointments
required for the prosecution of work under this contract. The
contractor shall obtain these permits, licenses, and appointments in
compliance with applicable host country laws. By law, the embassy
must assist a U.S. citizen or company contractor in this process.

(44) Continuity of Services (H.11)—A FAR addresses the orderly


transition from one contractor to another. The clause requires the
contractor to provide an orderly and efficient transition to a
successor. In addition, Section L of the Request for Proposal (RFP)
requires offerors to submit a preliminary transition plan with their
proposals. In this way, problems associated with changeover to a
new contractor can be minimized.

(45) Variation in Quantity (H.13)—The estimated hours shown in


Section B may be changed. Normally, the CO would modify the
contract to show new hours, posts, etc. Changes to each category
of labor are allowed up to 25% below or above the numbers in
Section B. If a change greater than 25% is required, the contractor
has the right to request a price adjustment. All changes should be
made in the form of a written modification, although Section H
includes procedures for emergency ordering.

(46) Renewal Options (I)—The sample solicitation and/or contract


includes a FAR clause allowing the CO to unilaterally renew the
contract for as many option years as the contract provides (no
more than four options). A contract modification is required to
exercise any option.

(47) Travel and Subsistence Payments (I.2)—The sample

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solicitation and/or contract allows post to reimburse the contractor


if travel is required. The FAR cost principle on travel cost
allowability should be followed.

(48) Changes (I.5)—If the mission deems it necessary to change the


statement of work, the FAR "Changes" clause provides authority to
do so. The CO may modify the contract unilaterally or bilaterally to
make the needed changes.

(49) Payment Due Date (I.1.3.)—The Prompt Payment Act applies to


local guard contracts. A mandatory FAR clause is included in
Section I of the sample solicitation and/or contract. Payment is
required within 30 days. The RSO as COR must review and certify
the invoice for payment. Since this is a time and materials
contract, the contractor must provide evidence that the guards
have been paid; the hours and rates in the invoice must match
what the contract says. Late payments are subject to a penalty,
which comes from the program office's budget, not FMP.

(50) Section J, List of Attachments (Annexes)—Information


contained in the various exhibits is necessary to complete the
statement of work and for prospective contractors to develop fixed
rates and prices for their offers. The RSO should have primary
responsibility for the contents of the exhibits. Of particular note is
the exhibit listing the guard posts, the exhibit providing guard
orders, and the exhibit providing a schedule of deductions for
unacceptable performance.

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12 FAH-7 APPENDIX VI
REPORTING FORMATS
(TL:LGP-3; 12-31-2003)
(Office of Origin: DS/IP/FPO)

12 FAH-7 APPENDIX VI-1 SURVEILLANCE


DETECTION REPORTING FORMAT
(TL:LGP-3; 12-31-2003)

In an attempt to standardize post surveillance reports, posts should use the


format and guidelines addressed below when reporting surveillance
incidents. Telegrams should be sent sensitive but unclassified except in
circumstances where classified information must be included in the cable. All
surveillance reporting telegrams should be slugged for DS/DSS/ITA,
DS/DSS/IP, DS/DO/ICI/PII, DS/DO/ICI/CI and DS/IP/FPO.

(1) Post;

(2) Date and time of surveillance activity;

(3) Summary of surveillance activity (e.g., methods used, use of


vehicle, use of video camera, etc.);

(4) Source(s) of the report;

(5) Number and description of surveillants (names, sex, and bio


information, if available);

(6) Probable target(s) of the surveillance (e.g., post buildings or


operations, post personnel, official residences, vehicles, etc.);

(7) Post investigative actions (e.g., record checks by another agency,


consular checks, vehicle traces, surveillants confronted and/or
interviewed);

(8) Post security/operational actions (e.g., security augmentation


measures, briefings);

(9) Requests made by post for host government security assistance;

(10) Security actions taken by host government (e.g., police or host

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country intelligence checks, vehicle traces, surveillants confronted


or interviewed; and

(11) Additional comments by post and/or request for investigative


action.

12 FAH-7 APPENDIX VI-2 EXPLOSIVE


DETECTION ALARM (RESOLUTION
REPORTING FORMAT)
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

Reports are required on alarms generated by explosive detection equipment


and the actions taken to resolve the alarm should be reported to
DS/CIS/IST/FSE/FS via DS Channel cable using the format below.

• Detailed narrative of the circumstances of the detection, include


date, time and description of where the sample was taken.

• Type of explosive detected.

• Steps taken to resolve the alarm, for example, describe detailed


search conducted.

• Describe responses by the vehicle operator, occupants or carrier of


the suspect bag or package.

• Report if an explosive ordnance disposal unit (EOD) was called and


describe the assistance provided by the EOD or other host
government element.

• Describe explosive or explosive device found, if any. The discovery


of an explosive device should be reported via TERREP CHANNEL.

• Was the emergency bomb response plan initiated?

• Was the IDNS activated?

• Report the operating condition of the explosive detection


equipment.

12 FAH-7 APPENDIX VI-3 SAMPLE OF


INCIDENT REPORTING FORMAT

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(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

Report Number_________________

Date of Report_____________Time________
Post No._______Location_________
Type of Incident:

Breach of Security___________

Attempted Breach of Security______________

Equipment Malfunction_______

Guard Malfeasance______________________

Other_____________________

Date of Incident________________Time of Day___________________

Time of Day Guard Supervisor Notified_________________

How Notified____________

Time of Day RSO and/or PSO Notified________________

How Notified___________________

Details of Incident:
Guard Assigned to Post
(Print Name)___________________________________
Signature_______________________________________________
_____
Guard Supervisor's Name (Printed)
(Print Name)________________________________
Signature_______________________________________________
Follow Up Actions Taken (Describe and indicate by whom and when):

Original to RSO and/or PSO Date and Time


Received_________

cc: Guard Supervisor, RSO and/or PSO

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12 FAH-7 APPENDIX VII


CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL
COUNTERMEASURES
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. All guard personnel shall stay on alert for indications of chemical and/or
biological attack or agent, which could include the following:

(1) Unexplained dead or dying animals in the area;

(2) Unusual liquid sprays or vapor or suspicious devices;

(3) Unexplained droplets or oily film on surfaces;

(4) Unexplained odors or low flying clouds and/or fog unrelated to


weather, some of which would be similar in scent to bitter almonds,
peach kernels, newly mown hay or green grass;

(5) Large numbers of strange insects or vermin not typical for the time
of day or year;

(6) Individuals displaying symptoms of nausea, difficulty breathing,


convulsions, disorientation or patterns of illness inconsistent with
natural disease, unexplained blisters or rashes or sudden difficulty
in seeing, especially dimness of vision while in broad daylight; and

(7) Unexplained casualties.

b. If any of the conditions identified above are discovered the guard(s) must
immediately clear the area and notify the Marine security guard (MSG) at
Post One and the RSO and/or PSO and the guard supervisor.

c. The guard must not touch or in any way disturb the suspicious article or
package. DO NOT TOUCH OR MOVE any item suspected to be a possi-
ble chemical and/or biological device. The guard(s) should stand by to
prevent its being touched or disturbed by other persons. Employees
working in the area should be evacuated until the cause of the danger is
removed. The general rule to follow is: "Clear the immediate area and
call the appropriate authorities."

d. If the guard(s) on duty receive a chemical and/or biological threat from


any source, the guard must immediately contact the MSG on Post One
and the RSO and/or PSO through the shift commander or the supervisor.

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Relay all pertinent information, including the type of chemical and/or bio-
logical agent, the location and time of the attack, if known, the descrip-
tion of the voice and background noise is important. This information will
be reported in the post log and an incident report prepared.

e. If a chemical and/or biological threat or attack occurs, keep the area near
the guard post clear of people. REMEMBER, DURING THE
CONFUSION OF THIS TYPE OF ACT, THE GUARDS MUST STILL
PROVIDE SECURITY FOR EMPLOYEES OR OTHER PEOPLE IN THE
AREA.

f. The guards will not allow anyone to enter the embassy compound or
other official facilities with; an open or concealed firearm, knife, explosive
or any other type of weapon or container that could carry chemical and/or
biological agents, in powder, liquid, or aerosolized form (i.e. aerosol cans,
perfume bottles, thermos jugs, glass and/or plastic bottles, etc.), in his
and/or her possession, unless authorized by the RSO and/or PSO. The
guards must be especially watchful for attempted entry of firearms or ex-
plosives or chemical and/or biological agents under cover. The presence
of breathing devices, air filters, nose clips, hospital masks, rubber gloves,
etc., must be cause for immediate concern and requires further investiga-
tion. If such devices are detected, the guard must immediately report the
situation to the MSG on duty and the RSO and/or PSO through the shift
commander or the supervisor.

g. All guards shall be aware when performing grounds and/or perimeter pa-
trols of the following:

(1) Be alert to use of any device inside or outside the building perime-
ter that could be used to spray a toxic cloud toward the building.
This could include commercial spraying equipment, paint, insecti-
cide or garden sprayers, air pumps, or even a crop duster-type air-
plane. When possible, persons conducting such spraying should be
challenged and in all cases, supervisors, RSO and/or PSO immedi-
ately alerted.

(2) When patrolling public areas look for abandoned spray devices or
liquid containers. If found immediately alert the supervisors, RSO
and/or PSO. Particular attention must be paid to insure buildings air
vents cannot be approached by anyone using such devices.

(3) Non-employees requiring access to or near building air intake vents


or drinking water storage tanks must have authorization from the
General Services Officer (GSO), coordinated with the RSO and/or
PSO. In all cases, the local guard force (LGF) or employee person-
nel shall escort these non-employees.

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(4) At posts with wells or accessible water storage tanks, regular pa-
trols of those areas are required.

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12 FAH-7 APPENDIX VIII


PROGRAM MANAGEMENT REVIEW
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

12 FAH-7 APPENDIX VIII-1 GENERAL


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

The following items are indicative of the areas surveyed during a Local
Guard Program (LGP) Program Review:

• Country

• Post reviewed

• Dates of review

• Date of last review

• Threat levels

• Name(s) of reviewer(s)

• Reason for review (provide summary only if needed):

____________Length of time since last review

____________Financial issues ((FBP), cost distribution, funding, etc.)

____________Specific issues (contractor claims, work stoppage, etc)

____________Preparation of a new contract

____________Change in threat rating

____________Ensure compliance with security standards

____________Address office of the Inspector General (OIG) compliance

____________Part of a regional review

____________Other (provide details below)

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12 FAH-7 APPENDIX VIII-2 FUNDING


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Review International Cooperative Administrative Support Services


(ICASS) and non-ICASS funding levels:

(1) Is the current funding level sufficient?

(2) Does cost appear to be correctly distributed between ICASS and


non-ICASS?

(3) Is funding distributed correctly under security supplemental cost


centers?

(4) LGP costs proportionately distributed to each agency?

(5) Is each agency proportionately billed for LGP supervisory costs?

(6) Is each agency proportionately billed for LGP equipment and vehicle
costs?

b. FMO records of 5827-x106 expenditures for this fiscal year.

(1) Field Budget Plan submitted?

(2) Mid-Year Review submitted and accurate?

(3) Post maintaining separate records for Local Guard Force (LGF) and
Surveillance Detection (SD)?

(4) SD funds separated by sub-cost categories?

c. Address any outstanding claims, which may effect the funding levels.

12 FAH-7 APPENDIX VIII-3 SURVEILLANCE


DETECTION PROGRAM
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Personnel:

(1) Number of surveillance detection personnel;

(2) Personal service agreement (PSA) or contract_________

(3) Other (identify and/or describe)_________

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(4) Personnel dedicated to SD (including supervisor, analyst, admin)?

(5) How many 24 x 7 positions? Other positions?

(6) Have all SD specialists and supervisors received initial training?

(7) What was the date surveillance detection training was completed?

(8) Does RSO or contractor maintain training records?

(9) Do team members speak the local language?

(10) Does the supervisor speak and/or write English?

b. Deployment and/or Operations:

(1) Date program was activated?

(2) Number of compounds?

(3) Number of hours of coverage for main compound?

(4) Any off-site offices or OPs?

(5) Have rotating SD teams? Deployment controlled and verified?

(6) Describe interaction with LGF.

(7) Provide deployment details.

(8) Reporting procedures and chain-of-command.

(9) Maintaining a SD database?

(10) Reporting significant sightings to DSS/ITA and DS/CIS/FPD/SD?

(11) Explain SD arrangements with host country.

(12) Attach copy of SD guard orders.

(13) Do they personally challenge suspects?

(14) Attach a copy of a typical SD end-of-shift report.

c. Equipment:

(1) Provide list of SD equipment (including radios, cellular phones and


computers, bikes).

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(2) Type and number of vehicles (including motorcycles, scooters)?


VIN?

(3) Are any SD personnel armed? Attach special protective equipment


(SPE) inventory.

(4) If SD personnel have cell phones, what safeguards are in place to


minimize personal calls?

12 FAH-7 APPENDIX VIII-4 GUARD FORCE


OPERATIONS
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

a. Personnel:

(1) Number of contract guards:_____________

(2) Number of PSA guards:________________

(3) Number of Foreign Service national (FSN)


guards:________________

(4) Number of police and/or military:_______________

(5) Other (identify and/or describe):_______________

b. Security supplemental positions (post and/or personnel):

(1) Number of perimeter security guards:________________

(2) Number of vehicle inspection guards:________________

(3) Number of post standers:__________________________

(4) Other (identify and/or describe):___________________________

(5) Identify all U.S. Government agencies represented at post:

(6) Identify any U.S. Government agency, which is not part of the
embassy contract or not being provided guard service through the
embassy? Explain?

(7) Identify all compounds, facilities and residencies, which are covered
by guards:

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(8) If guard force personnel are utilized as bodyguards describe


deployment?

c. Access control and/or perimeter security:

(1) Are guards assigned to perimeter positions to augment setback?

(2) Are vehicle inspections being carried out at all facilities?

(3) Is explosive detection equipment being used?

(4) If no, is there a date of anticipated delivery?

(5) Are guards properly trained in vehicle searches?

(6) Are drills being done to assess their effectiveness?

(7) Does each post have guard orders? (English and host nation)

(8) Are guard orders complete and address surveillance awareness?

(9) Do guards project a professional image? If no, provide details.

(10) Are guards properly equipped for assigned posts?

(11) Does the Exhibit A or guard schedule reflect current posting?

(12) Do guards conduct package and/or bag inspections?

(13) Are walk through and/or hand held metal detectors available?

(14) Is x-ray equipment being used?

d. Response capabilities of the guard force:

(1) Do guards know what to do in emergency situations?

• Fire

• Bomb Threat

• Demonstration

• Intruder Attack

• Natural Disaster

(2) Do guards participate in drills?

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e. Vehicles:

(1) How many vehicles are available? React? Mobile Patrols?


Surveillance Detection? Protective Detail?

(2) Are vehicles U.S. Government-issued or contractor provided?

(3) Identify year, make, model and VIN Number?

(4) Provide operational details. Staffing? Armed? Mobile? Stationary?

(5) Is this sufficient for post’s requirements?

(6) Any vehicles that should be replaced?

f. Guard Electronic Monitoring System (GEMS):

(1) U.S. Government and/or contractor furnished? Operational?

(2) Are the GEMS being utilized as stipulated by the contract?

(3) Would this program benefit by having a GEMS?

g. Weapons and/or firearms:

(1) Does Host Government prohibit or allow firearms?

(2) Is any part of the guard force armed? Police? Military?

(3) What types of weapons are used? Basic load of ammunition?

(4) Are guards (PSA and/or commercial guards) properly licensed to


carry firearm?

(5) Does the RSO maintain a copy of the firearms training requirements
to include recertifications?

(6) Do records (PSA guards and/or NPS guards) indicate the initial
qualification and subsequent recertification of guards?

(7) Has the RSO reviewed the records, when?

(8) How are weapons and ammunition secured when not issued?

(9) How are rifles and/or shotguns secured when on post or in a


vehicle?

(10) If NPS contract Review Exhibit G – Firearms

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h. Radios:

(1) How many guard radios are available and what type is used?

(2) Is this sufficient for post’s requirements?

(3) Are the radios U.S. Government furnished equipment or contract


provided?

(4) Are guard force radios compatible with MSG and RSO radio nets?

(5) Describe LGP radio net integration with post emergency communi-
cations plan.

i. Training:

(1) Review training records for type and/or amount of training that
guards receive?

(2) Basic training

• Basic Firearms qualification

• Annual recertification

• GEMS training

• Explosive detector and/or X-ray inspection equipment operators

(3) Is the contractor maintaining training records in accordance with


the requirements of the contract?

(4) Are guard training records available? If contractor maintains re-


cords, has the RSO reviewed the records?

(5) Date when Mobile Security Division (MSD) last trained guard force?

j. Guard recruitment:

(1) Are guard’s files reviewed by RSO prior to employment?

(2) Background check including police and U.S. Government records


checks?

k. Supervision and management:

(1) Is contractor management responsive to the RSO and/or PSO?

(2) Is the day-to-day supervision by the contractor or chief of PSA

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guard force adequate? Superior? Unacceptable? Briefly describe.

(3) Do guard postings meet or exceed standards for the threat rating
assigned to post? Provide details?

(4) Are there any areas where guard posts or guard hours should be
added or deleted? Provide details.

(5) Have any areas been identified where technical equipment could be
used to replace a static guard? Identify and describe.

12 FAH-7 APPENDIX VIII-5 RESIDENTIAL


SECURITY PROGRAM
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

• Does the RSO maintain residential security files?

• Has the RSO conducted physical security surveys of all residences?

• Are residences in compliance with applicable FAH standards? (Grills,


locks, Alarms, doors, door viewer, etc.)

• Number of residences at post?, U.S. Government-owned, short-


term, long-term (Obtain Real Estate Management System (REMS)
report for post)

• Is there a residential security coordinator at post?

• Are guards assigned to residences? Hours? (Review Exhibit A.)

• Residential security equipment and supplies. Review stock, inven-


tory and procedures for control and issue of items.

• Is there shatter resistant window film (SRWF) for residences on-


hand?

• Are residential security items (locks, grilles etc) recovered from


property no longer leased?

• Are mobile patrols being used to support residential security? How


many? Frequency? Staffing?

• Who is performing residential security upgrades?

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12 FAH-7 APPENDIX VIII-6 CENTRAL ALARM


MONITORING SYSTEM (CAMS)
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

• Are CAMS being utilized as stipulated by the contract?

• If provided under a separate contract, provide details?

• Is a reaction force used in support of CAMS? How many? Fre-


quency? Staffing?

• Would this program benefit by having CAMS?

• Are react vehicles being used to support CAMS? How many? Fre-
quency? Staffing?

12 FAH-7 APPENDIX VIII-7 NPS CONTRACT


GUARD OPERATIONS

12 FAH-7 Appendix VIII-7.1 Contract Compliance


(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

• What is the name of the guard company?

• If joint venture, explain.

• If guard services are provided for under more than one contract,
provide details.

• What is the effective date of the present contract?

• How many options does the contract contain?

• What is the current option?

• What is the exact date that the current option expires?

• Review Exhibit A - Guard Posts and Schedule of Guard Coverage.

ƒ Is the exhibit up to date

ƒ Does the exhibit accurately reflect the current guard post and
postings?

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ƒ Does the exhibit match the hours described in Section B of


the contract.

• Review Exhibit D, Contractor Furnished Property.

ƒ Is the exhibit up to date

ƒ Is the contractor providing all the equipment, materials, sup-


plies, clothing, etc., listed in Exhibit C?

ƒ Is the contractor providing replacements when necessary in a


timely fashion?

• Review Exhibit E, U.S. Government Furnished Property (GFP).

• Is the exhibit up to date?

• If the U.S. Government furnishes vehicles in accordance with


the exhibit, who is responsible for maintaining the vehicles?

• Is the responsible party properly maintaining the vehicles?

• Is an inventory conducted annually of all GFP provided to the


contractor?

• Is a copy of the inventory on file?

12 FAH-7 Appendix VIII-7.2 Contract Administra-


tion
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

• Does the RSO maintain a contract file?

ƒ Contract file checklist

ƒ Current copy of contract to include current Exhibit A

ƒ Contracting Officers Representative (COR) designation


letter

• Documentation backup for additional or emergency services. File


should document each occasion when additional or emergency ser-
vices were requested. File should contain evidence that RSO con-
firmed oral requests for additional or emergency services in writing
within 48 hours of the oral request (see C.2.2.2).

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• Documentation supporting any deductions for deficient service. File


should contain evidence that contractor is notified in writing of de-
ductions for deficient service?

• Documentation that RSO periodically performs a headcount (num-


ber of approved guard positions by hours worked matched against
the time cards)?

• Documentation that RSO periodically examines time cards and sign-


in sheets.

• Does COR review time cards or time sheets to determine if em-


ployee hours exceed the 12 hour tour length (or other length estab-
lished in the contract)? If there are such occurrences, has the COR
determined an emergency situation exists and the contracting offi-
cer authorized the contractor in writing to work its employees more
than 12 continuous hours.

• Address any outstanding contractual issues, which may impact the


guard program.

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12 FAH-7 Appendix VIII-7.3 Invoices (see at-


tached invoice checklist)
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

• If the hours contracted do not match the hours billed, has the con-
tract been modified to reflect the increase or decrease?

• Is the invoice received after the work has been performed and re-
viewed for completeness and signed by the COR?

• Is the invoice submitted on monthly basis? If less than once a


month, does the contract provide for such billings?

• Are deducts in accordance with Exhibit C and applied to next


month’s invoice pursuant to Section E (normally, E.4) of the con-
tract?

• Has the RSO coordinated a letter through the Contracting Officer to


notify the contractor of any deducts to be taken?

12 FAH-7 APPENDIX VIII-8 PERSONAL


SERVICE AGREEMENT (PSA)
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

Develop a profile of job series FSN 710 by position level and staffing:

• Are guard companies (foreign and domestic) prohibited from oper-


ating in country?

• If no, briefly explain why post utilizes PSA guards.

• When did post last have a NPS guard contract?

• Does RSO maintain updated guards schedule much like that of the
Exhibit A?

• If not, what does RSO use?

• Are the PSA guard contracts administered for all agencies from
state Human Resources and Budget and Fiscal (B & F)? If not, has
RSO management of personnel been hindered?

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• Is number of PSA guards within the Diplomatic Security (DS) ap-


proved PSA ceiling?

• Obtain and attach a copy of post compensation plan:

• Does post use exception rate(s) for PSA guards?

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12 FAH-7 APPENDIX X
ALPHABETICAL INDEX
(TL:LGP-01; 08-10-2001)

ACCEPTANCE, A-V.2, paragraph (25)

ACRONYMS, A-IX.2

ADDITIONAL SERVICES, A-V.2, paragraphs (3) (19)

ADMINISTRATION, H-433

ADVANCE PAYMENTS, A-V.2, paragraph (6)

AGENCIES, H-720

ALARM RESOLUTION, H-545, REPORTING FORMAT, A-VI.1

––UNITED STATES SOURCES, H-426

AMMUNITION PROCUREMENT ALTERNATIVES, H-615

ARMED GUARDS, H-222

ATTACHMENTS, A-V.2, paragraph (49)

AUTHORITY TO ARREST, A-V.2, paragraph (39)

BIOLOGICAL ATTACK WARNING SIGNS, H-554

BIOLOGICAL COUNTERMEASURES, H-540, A-VII

BRIEFING GUARD PERSONNEL, H-552

BUDGET PROCESS, H-300

CENTRAL ALARM MONITORING SYSTEM (CAMS), H-670, A-VIII.6

––SECURITY ASSESSMENT, H-672

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CHANGE ORDERS, H-429.2

CHANGES, A-V.2, paragraph (48)

CHEMICAL ATTACK WARNING SIGNS, H-554

CHEMICAL COUNTERMEASURES, H-540, A-VII

CHEMICAL DETECTION EQUIPMENT, H-644

COM AUTHORITY, H-701

COMMUNICATION WITH DS/CIS/PSP/FPD, H-244

CONCEPTS AND PHILOSOPHY, H-020

CONTINUITY OF SERVICE, A-V.2, paragraph (44)

CONTRACT

––ACQUISITION PROCESS, H-420

––ADMINISTRATION, A-VIII.7.2

––CHANGE ORDERS, H-429.2

––COMPLIANCE, A-VIII.7.1

––DURATION, H-429.1

––MODIFICATION, H-429

––PRICE, A-V.2, paragraph (5)

––STEPS IN, H-403

––TERMINATION, H-429.4

CONTRACTING, H-400

––OFFICER RESPONSIBILITIES, H-411

––OFFICER'S REPRESENTATIVE, H-412

––OFFICER'S REPRESENTATIVE LIMITATIONS, H-413

––OFFICER'S REPRESENTATIVE APPOINTMENT PROCEDURES, H-414

CONTRACTOR

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––FURNISHED EQUIPMENT, A-V.2, paragraph (16)

––PROVIDED GEMS, H-662

––PROVIDED TRAINING, H-510

––PROVIDED TRANSPORTATION, H-632

CONTROLLED ACCESS AREA (CAA) H-129.2

DECREASES IN LGP RESOURCES, H-243

DEPENDENTS, H-125

DEPLOYMENT

––LOCAL GUARD, H-127

––SURVEILLANCE DETECTION, H-127

DETERMINING GUARD NUMBERS, A-II.2.3

DETERMINING REQUIRED SECURITY MEASURES, H-120

DOCUMENTATION, H-433

––INADEQUATE, H-434

DS/CIS/PSP/FPD, H-314

DUTIES, A-V.2, paragraph (14)

DUTY HOUR LIMITS, A-V.2, paragraph (20)

EMERGENCY SERVICES, A-V.2, paragraphs (3), (19)

EQUIPMENT, H-016, H-600

––ACCESS CONTROL, H-640

––CONTRACTOR FURNISHED, A-V.2, paragraph (16)

––DISPOSAL, H-646

––EXPLOSIVE DETECTION, H-544, H-645, A-V.2, paragraph (11)

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––HOST GOVERNMENT FORCES, H-614

––HOST GOVERNMENT RESTRICTIONS, H-612

––IMMINENT DANGER NOTIFICATION SYSTEM, H-690

––INSPECTION, H-640, H-642

––MAGNETOMETERS, A-V.2, paragraph (11)

––MISCELLANEOUS, H-616

––PEDESTRIAN INSPECTION, H-642

––PSA LGFs, H-615

––SURVEILLANCE DETECTION, H-680

––VEHICLE INSPECTION, H-643

––X-RAY, A-V.2 paragraph (11)

ESCORTS, A-V.2, paragraph (17)

EXPENDABLE SUPPLIES, H-616.6

EXPLOSIVE DETECTION EQUIPMENT, H-645, A-V.2, paragraph (11)

––ALARM REPORTING FORMAT, A-VI.2

––TRACE DETECTION EQUIPMENT, H-646

––TRAINING, H-543

FACILITY PROTECTION DIVISION, H-210

FACILITY PROTECTION PROGRAM REVIEW, A-VIII

FILES, H-438

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT OFFICER, H-312

FIREARMS, H-620

––DISPOSAL, H-624

––PROCUREMENT, H-621

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––LEAD TIME, H-624

––QUALIFICATION, A-V.2, paragraph (35)

––SAFETY, H-624

––SPECIAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT TELEGRAM, H-622

––STANDARD TYPES OF WEAPONS, H-623

––TRAINING, H-522

FUNCTION CODES, A-IV

FUNDING, H-320, H-534, H-546, H-654, H-682, H-692, H-714, A-VIII.2

GEMS (GUARD ELECTRONIC MONITORING SYSTEM) H-660, A-V.2,


paragraph (14)

––CONTRACTOR PROVIDED, H-662

––DISPOSAL, H-665

––U.S. GOVERNMENT PROVIDED, H-663

––MAINTENANCE, H-664

GENERAL ORDERS, H-437, A-V.2, paragraph (12)

––BIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL COUNTERMEASURES, H-553

––EXPLOSIVE DETECTION, H-542

––SAMPLES, A-I

––SURVEILLANCE DETECTION, H-532

GLOSSARY, A-IX

GOVERNMENT

––APPROVAL OF CONTRACTOR EMPLOYEES, A-V.2, paragraph (25)

––FURNISHED GEMS, H-663

––FURNISHED PROPERTY, A-V.2, paragraph (26)

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––FURNISHED VEHICLES, H-634

––PROVIDED TRAINING, H-520

GUARD AVAILABILITY, A-II.2.2

GUARD ELECTRONIC MONITORING SYSTEM (GEMS), H-661, A-V.2


paragraph (15)

––CONTRACTOR PROVIDED, H-662

––DISPOSAL, H-665

––U.S. GOVERNMENT FURNISHED, H-663

––MAINTENANCE, H-664

GUARD FORCE OPERATIONS, A-VIII.4

HEALTH, A-V.2 paragraph, (33)

HOST GOVERNMENT

––CONSIDERATION, H-224

––FORCES, H-614

––LAW ENFORCEMENT, H-131

––USE OF U.S. GOVERNMENT VEHICLES, H-634.3

MOU and/or MOA, A-III

––AREAS OF COVERAGE, A-III.2

––DEPARTMENT APPROVAL, A-III.3

––RESPONSE, H-131

––RESTRICTIONS H-612

––SECURITY SERVICES, H-131.2

HOURS OF COVERAGE, A-II.2.1

HUMAN RESOURCES OFFICER, H-442

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ICASS FUNDING, H-321

IDENTIFYING BIDDERS, H-425

IDENTIFYING NEEDS, H-222

IMMINENT DANGER NOTIFICATION SYSTEM, (IDNS), H-690

––DISPOSAL, H-694

––FUNDING, H-692

––MAINTENANCE, H-693

––PROCUREMENT, H-692

INADEQUATE ADMINISTRATION, H-434

INCIDENT REPORTS, H-437.4

––SAMPLE FORMS, A-VI.3

INCREASES IN RESOURCES, H-242

INFORMATION MANAGEMENT OFFICER, H-652

INFORMATION PROCESSING OFFICER, H-652

INSPECTION, A-V.2, paragraph (22)

INSPECTION EQUIPMENT, H-640

INSPECTION MIRRORS, H-643.2

INSURANCE, A-V.2, paragraph (42)

INTERNET, H-401

INTOXICANTS, A-V.2, paragraph (30)

INVOICES, H-435, A-VIII.7.3

LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY, A-V.2, paragraph (32)

LEGAL AUTHORITY, H-112

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LESS THAN FULL AND OPEN COMPETITION, H-424

LEVEL OF EFFORT, A-V.2, paragraph (1)

LIABILITY, A-V.2, paragraph (41)

––NPS CONTRACTS, H-400

––HOST GOVERNMENT, H-131.1 (e.), A-III.2, paragraph (3)

––PERSONAL SERVICE AGREEMENTS, H-440

LOCAL CURRENCY PAYMENT, H-427

LOCAL PERMITS, H-426

LOYALTY, H-502

MAGNETOMETERS, A-V.2, paragraph (11)

MANAGERIAL RESPONSIBILITIES, H-431

MARINE SECURITY GUARD, A-V.2, paragraph (29)

MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT, H-616

NON-ICASS FUNDING, H-322

NON-PERSONAL SERVICES TIME AND MATERIALS CONTRACTS, H-132, H-


402, H-613

NOTICE TO PROCEED, A-V.2, paragraph (24)

––GUARD OPERATIONS, A-VIII.4

OFFICE OF THE PROCUREMENT EXECUTIVE, A/OPE, H-415

OFFICIAL

––FACILITIES, H-124

––PERSONNEL, H-125

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OPTIONS, A-V.2, paragraph (46)

OVERSEAS BUILDINGS OPERATIONS, M/OBO, H-129

PAYMENT DUE DATE, A-V.2, paragraph (49)

PEACE CORPS, H-710

––FUNDING, H-713

––OPTIONS, H-712

PEDESTRIAN INSPECTION EQUIPMENT, H-642

PERFORMANCE WARNINGS, H-429

PERIOD OF PERFORMANCE, A-V.2, paragraph (23)

PERMITS, A-V.2, paragraph (43)

PERSONAL

––EQUIPMENT, A-V.2, paragraph (28)

––INJURY, A-V.2 paragraph, (41)

PERSONAL SERVICE AGREEMENT, H-133, H-440, A-VIII.8

––AUTHORITY TO ENTER INTO, H-446

––CONDITIONS OF EMPLOYMENT, H-447

––FORMAT, H-445

––LAYOUT, A-II

––PROCEDURES, H-445

PERSONNEL, H-125, A-V.2, paragraph (10)

––REQUIREMENTS, A-V.2, paragraph (31)

POLICE STIPEND, H-614

POLICY, H-111

POSTS, A-V.2, paragraph (13)

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––AWARD, 428

––LOGS, H-437.3, A-I.3

––ORDERS, H-437, H-533, A-V.2, paragraph (12)

––SAMPLES, A-I

––ACCESS CONTROL BOOTH GUARD, A-I.2.6

––CHANCERY LOBBY WTMD GUARD, A-I.2.5

––EXPLOSIVES INSPECTION GUARD, A-I.2.4

––EXTERIOR RESIDENTIAL GUARD, A-I.2.7

––PEDESTRIAN GATE GUARD, A-I.2.3

––SURVEILLANCE DETECTION SPECIALIST, A-I.2.1

––VEHICLE GATE GUARD, A-I.2.2

––X-RAY INSPECTION GUARD, A-I.2.4

PREMIUM PAY, A-V.2, paragraph (7)

PRE-SOLICITATION, H-422

PRICES, A-V.2, paragraph (4)

––ADJUSTMENTS, A-V.2, paragraph (8)

PROGRAM, H-000

––ADMINISTRATION, H-433

––APPROVAL, H-220, H-225

––CHANGES, H-240

––CONCEPT, H-021

––COVERAGE, H-700

––DESIGN, H-220

––ELEMENTS, H-432

––EQUIPMENT, H-600

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––FUNDING, H-300

––MANAGEMENT, H-200

––MANAGERIAL RESPONSIBILITIES, H-430

––RECORDS, H-438

––REVIEW, H-230

PROPERTY LOSS OR DAMAGE, A-V.2, paragraph (41)

PURPOSE, H-013

RADIOS, H-650

––DISPOSAL, H-658

––FUNDING, H-654

––MAINTENANCE, H-657

––PROCUREMENT, H-655

––SELECTION OF EQUIPMENT, H-656

RECORDS, H-438

REFERENCES, H-030

REGIONAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT CENTER, H-653

REGIONAL SECURITY OFFICER, H-313, H-443

––RESPONSIBILITIES FOR PSA'S, H-444

RENEWAL OPTIONS, A-V.2, paragraph (46)

REPRESENTATIONAL EVENT FUNDING, H-323

RESPONSIBILITIES, A-V.2, paragraph (14)

RESPONSIBLE BIDDERS, H-425

RESIDENCES, H-126

RESIDENTIAL SECURITY PROGRAM, A-VIII.5

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SALARY BENEFITS, A-V.2, paragraph (40)

SCHOOLS, H-124

SCOPE AND AUTHORITY, H-110

SCOPE OF DS PROGRAMS AND POLICIES, H-014

SECTION J, A-V.2 paragraph (50)

SECURITY AWARENESS, H-500

SECURITY ENVIRONMENT THREAT LIST, H-121

SECURITY SUPPLEMENTAL FUNDING, H-324

SITE SECURITY MANAGER, H-129.1

SOLICITATION, H-423

––EXTRACTS, A-V

STAFFING

––DETERMINATION, A-II

––NEEDS, A-II.2

STANDARD SERVICES, A-V.2, paragraph (2)

STANDARDS, H-015

––OF CONDUCT, A-V.2, paragraph (27)

STATEMENT OF WORK, H-421.1, A-V.2, paragraph (9)

SUBMISSION OF REQUESTS FOR CHANGES, H-241

SUBSISTENCE PAYMENTS, A-V.2, paragraph (47)

SUPERVISION, A-V.2, paragraph (21)

SUPPLIES, H-016, H-616.6

SURVEILLANCE DETECTION , H-000, H-022, H-222, H-530, H-680, A-I.1

––PERSONNEL, H-444.2

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––REPORTING FORMAT, A-VI.1

SURVEILLANCE DETECTION EQUIPMENT, H-680,

––DISPOSAL, H-684

––FUNDING, H-682

––MAINTENANCE, H-683

––PROCUREMENT, H-682

––TRAINING, A-V.2, paragraph (37)

SURVEILLANCE DETECTION OPERATIONS, A-V.2 paragraph, (18)

––PROGRAM REVIEW, A-VIII.3

TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF PROPOSALS, H-425

TERMINATION, DEFAULT OR CONVENIENCE, H-429.4

TERMS, A-X.1

TRAINING, H-436, H-500, H-503, A-V.2, paragraph (34)

––ANNUAL RECERTIFICATION, A-V.2, paragraph (36)

––CONTRACTOR PROVIDED, H-510

––EXPLOSIVE DETECTION EQUIPMENT, H-540, H-543

––FIREARMS, H-522

––U.S. GOVERNMENT PROVIDED, H-520

––SURVEILLANCE DETECTION, A-V.2, paragraph (37)

TRAVEL, A-V.2, paragraph (47)

TYPES OF LGP'S, H-130

UNIFORMED LGF, H-444-1

UNIFORMS, H-616.2, A-V.2, paragraph (28)

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UNSATISFACTORY PERFORMANCE, H-429.3

VACANT PROPERTIES, H-129.5

VARIATION IN QUANTITY, A-V.2, paragraph (45)

VEHICLES, H-630

––ACQUISITION, H-633

––NON-U.S. MANUFACTURED, H-633.3

––U.S. AFFILIATED, H-633.2

––U.S. MANUFACTURED, H-633.1

––DAMAGED, H-638

––DISPOSAL, H-639

––FLEET INCREASES, H-637

––USE OF U.S. GOVERNMENT FURNISHED, H-634

––INSPECTION EQUIPMENT, H-643

––INVENTORY, H-636

––LEASED, H-635

––LOST, H-638

––REPLACEMENT, H-637

VIENNA CONVENTION, H-131.3

WEAPONS, A-V.2, paragraph (38)

X-RAY INSPECTION EQUIPMENT, A-V.2, paragraph (11)

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U.S. Department of State Foreign Affairs Manual Volume 12 – Diplomatic Security

12 FAM 320
LOCAL GUARD PROGRAM (LGP)
(CT:DS-129; 08-20-2007)
(Office of Origin: DS/IP)

12 FAM 321 SCOPE AND AUTHORITY

12 FAM 321.1 Policy


(TL:DS-78; 08-10-2001)
a. The host government’s responsibility to protect diplomatic missions and
accredited personnel is addressed in the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic
Relations and Optional Protocol on Disputes (1961). Similar responsibility
extends to consulates under the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations
(1963). Host government support for meeting the security needs of U.S.
diplomatic missions and consulates abroad is a significant factor in
determining the scope and structure of local guard programs (LGPs).
b. Posts will develop a local guard program and incorporate host
government police and/or security support, where applicable. LGPs may
include the use of personnel in a local guard force (LGF) for access
control, real property (e.g., buildings and residences) security, and, if
required, for personal protection of key personnel. Another important
aspect of the LGP is the Surveillance Detection Program (SDP). This is a
defensive program to enhance the safety and security of U.S.
Government personnel and resources under the chief of mission (COM).
The SDP discreetly detects and reports on pre-operational terrorist
surveillance activities directed against U.S. Government personnel and
facilities.
c. Security standards used to determine the minimum acceptable level of
local guard coverage for a post’s threat ratings are contained in 12 FAH-
6, Security Standards. For LGPs, the Bureau of Diplomatic Security (DS)
uses the standards for the threat rating categories of political violence
(includes inter-state war, civil disorder, coup, and insurgency) and crime.
The security standards were developed in consultation with
representatives of other U.S. Government agencies through the Overseas
Security Policy Board (OSPB).
d. Other factors, such as post-specific threat environment and available
funding, are additional elements in determining the overall structure of
LGPs. (See 12 FAH-7, Local Guard Program Handbook, for complete

12 FAM 320 Page 1 of 8


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information on the creation and operation of a local guard program.)

12 FAM 321.2 Legal Authority


(TL:DS-78; 08-10-2001)
The legal authority for the Bureau of Diplomatic Security is found in Section
102 of the Omnibus Diplomatic Security and Antiterrorism Act of 1986 (22
U.S.C. 4802).

12 FAM 321.3 U.S. Missions and Required Security


Measures
(CT:DS-129; 08-20-2007)
a. U.S. missions develop their post-specific LGP and SDP in accordance with
policy guidance and security standards (for detailed guidance on the SDP,
see the Surveillance Detection Management and Operations Field Guide,
Version 2, dated 2002). Post-specific proposals must be submitted to the
Facility Protection Division (DS/OPO/FPD) prior to implementation. After
receiving DS/OPO/FPD approval and funding, the regional security officer
(RSO), with the concurrence of the chief of mission (COM), shall establish
the necessary implementation measures.
b. Post requests for authorization and funding from DS/OPO/FPD for security
programs which exceed Department standards must include the post’s
emergency action committee (EAC) recommendation and the COM or
principal officer’s (PO) approval.

12 FAM 322 HOST GOVERNMENT ROLE


(CT:DS-129; 08-20-2007)
a. Posts must make formal representations to host governments for the
protection of mission employees, dependents, residences, and facilities,
under the terms of the Vienna Convention, before taking any measures to
create or use a LGF. The relationship with the host government, the
nature of the threat, and the vulnerability of personnel and facilities will
be the basis for the security measures requested.
b. The post must submit a copy of their formal representation and the
formal host government response to DS/OPO/FPD. This should be done
as part of a request for approval of an LGP and is required where there is
a substantial modification or increase in the scope of an existing program.
If local conditions dictate caution in requesting host government security
services, the reasons and an alternative strategy must be communicated
to DS/OPO/FPD by post.

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U.S. Department of State Foreign Affairs Manual Volume 12 – Diplomatic Security

c. The Surveillance Detection Program (SDP) requires host government


approval and support before it can be initiated by post. Should the host
government approval not be granted for new programs, or withdrawn
from existing programs, DS/OPO/FPD must be notified immediately.
d. The U.S. Government provides protection for foreign missions in the
United States and protective services to selected resident foreign
diplomats. The level of mobile patrol, static guard and/or other
protective service varies, as does the level of support provided by the
host government to our missions and/or diplomats abroad. When posts
anticipate or encounter reciprocity problems, they should provide details
to DS/OPO/FPD with an information copy to DS/OFM.

12 FAM 323 PROGRAM MANAGEMENT

12 FAM 323.1 Facility Protection Division


Responsibilities
(CT:DS-129; 08-20-2007)
a. The Director for the Office of Overseas Protective Operations (DS/IP/OPO)
oversees the Department’s Local Guard Program (LGP), Surveillance
Detection Program (SDP), and Residential Security Program (RSP). All
are managed by the Division Chief of the Facility Protection Division
(DS/OPO/FPD).
NOTE: The Explosives Detection Program (EDP) is managed by Facility
Support (DS/C/ST/FSE).
b. DS/OPO/FPD develops policies and procedures, responds to requests for
assistance and information from missions, prepares statistics, and
monitors disbursement of funds for the LGP and SDP worldwide. It is also
responsible for:
(1) Assisting in training RSOs, PSOs, and others in Washington and
abroad;
(2) Approving program content and program changes;
(3) Monitoring the implementation of program contracting and assisting
in the development of solicitations for guard services and contracts,
and providing assistance for contract modification actions;
(4) Providing assistance in the design and implementation of programs;
(5) Conducting program and financial reviews;
(6) Allocating funds for posts’ LGPs and SDPs; and
(7) Coordinating LGP and SDP issues within DS, other Department

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U.S. Department of State Foreign Affairs Manual Volume 12 – Diplomatic Security

offices and bureaus, and other U.S. Government agencies.


c. The RSO will provide post-specific program and funding information to
DS/OPO/FPD. DS/OPO/FPD will, in consultation with the RSO, determine
approvals of program content and funding prior to program approval.

12 FAM 323.2 Program Management Reviews


(PMRs)
(CT:DS-129; 08-20-2007)
a. DS/OPO/FPD conducts program management reviews (PMRs) at selected
posts each year. The PMRs encompass the management of the LGP and
SDP by the RSO. Additional elements evaluated include the contracts for
guard services, explosive detection program, residential security
program, budget accountability and funding management. The PMRs
ensure that guard services for the post address minimum, but adequate
requirements for political violence (includes inter-state war, civil disorder,
coup, and insurgency) and crime contained in 12 FAH-6, Security
Standards. Guard services which are above standard must have
Emergency Action Committee (EAC) approval prior to becoming
permanent. During the review, officers from DS/OPO/FPD will assess all
aspects of a post’s DS/OPO/FPD programs and provide comments and/or
recommendations for action.
b. The RSOs should periodically evaluate the post’s security programs to
ensure that the appropriate level of protection is being provided given the
standards for the current threat ratings at post. The RSO should
determine what changes may be needed in the scope and content of the
programs. The evaluation should include the post’s threat ratings,
mission assets, security needs, responsiveness of the host government in
meeting post needs, and the quality of performance of either the non-
personal services (NPS) contractor or personal services agreement (PSA)
provided guard services
c. The RSO will review the overall LGP and SDP in terms of its content and
cost and include this information, where appropriate, when preparing
post’s International Cooperative Administrative Support Service (ICASS)
annual budget submission.

12 FAM 323.3 Program Funding

12 FAM 323.3-1 Post Profile and ICASS Budget Submission


(CT:DS-129; 08-20-2007)
a. The LGP is primarily funded through Department appropriated funds.

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U.S. Department of State Foreign Affairs Manual Volume 12 – Diplomatic Security

These funds are supplemented by other agencies based upon the use
and/or distribution of guards at posts using ICASS. Missions are required
to provide detailed information concerning their LGP and SDP in post’s
annual ICASS budget submission. This information is itemized and
includes all pertinent data on the LGP and SDP at the mission and all
constituent posts. Additionally, the ICASS budget submission provides
estimates for the funding required in five categories affiliated with the
non-ICASS LGP, ICASS LGP and SDP services:
(1) Residential (non-ICASS LGP);
(2) Official facilities including warehouses (ICASS and non-ICASS LGP);
(3) Mobile patrols (non-ICASS LGP);
(4) Bodyguards (non-ICASS LGP); and
(5) Surveillance detection (security supplemental).
b. The post’s ICASS budget submission includes the current personnel and
financial requirements of the LGP and estimates for the upcoming fiscal
year. Posts must provide written justification for any requested changes
to their program and related costs to DS/OPO/FPD, as well as through the
ICASS budget submission process.
c. The RSO is an ICASS service provider representative and attends ICASS
council meetings as an ex officio member. The RSO is responsible for
presenting the ICASS LGP portion of the budgets to the post ICASS
council.

12 FAM 323.3-2 Approving Local Guard and Surveillance


Detection Programs
(CT:DS-129; 08-20-2007)
DS/OPO/FPD reviews each post’s annual ICASS budget submission as well as
any other formal request for program changes to ensure that the program
request is in accordance with established standards. After this review,
DS/OPO/FPD makes funding recommendations on ICASS funds to the ICASS
Budget Committee and provides the approved funding target to post.
Adjustments may have to be made if the total LGP target amount for all
posts exceeds the funding appropriated by Congress for the current fiscal
year. If adjustments are required, DS/OPO/FPD will notify the affected posts
of the adjusted amounts.

12 FAM 323.3-3 Allotment of Funds


(CT:DS-129; 08-20-2007)
a. The Financial Management Division (DS/EX/PPB/FMD) authorizes posts to

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obligate and expend non-ICASS funds. This authorization of funds allows


the post to incur obligations for the fiscal year within specified amounts,
under certain conditions, and for specific purposes. DS/OPO/FPD
approves funding levels for all posts and forwards them to DS/MGT/CFO
for authorization and transmission of advices of allotment to the post.
b. Posts can request additional funds for non-ICASS local guard and
surveillance detection security supplemental requirements.
NOTE: Security supplemental funds are temporary. The SDP has been
funded under security supplemental, but is to convert to non-ICASS. All
funding requests should be sent to DS/OPO/FPD and include a full
justification as well as a complete cost estimate. The DS/OPO/FPD staff
will review these requests and provide increases in the LGP allotment if
funds are available.
c. DS/OPO/FPD recommends ICASS LGP funding levels to the ICASS budget
committee, who, in-turn, authorizes all LGP funding levels. The ICASS
service center processes these funding levels through the ICASS funding
mechanism and the regional bureaus issue advices of allotment to the
posts.
d. Posts can request additional funds for ICASS LGP needs through the
ICASS budget hearing or contingency fund process.

12 FAM 324 RESPONSIBILITIES AND


SUPERVISION

12 FAM 324.1 RSO and/or PSO Responsibilities


(CT:DS-129; 08-20-2007)
a. RSOs are responsible for assessing the type and scope of guard services
and surveillance detection operations provided at post per applicable
security standards and policy guidelines (for detailed guidance on the
SDP, see the Surveillance Detection Management and Operations Field
Guide, Version 2, dated 2002). Where their recommendations differ from
the view of the head of an agency represented at post, the post
emergency action committee (EAC) should consider the issue(s) and
make recommendations to the COM or PO. If the head of the agency
feels that the COM or PO’s decision is unacceptable, the matter should be
referred to that agency’s security director and the Assistant Secretary for
DS through the chief of mission or principal officer, for final resolution.
b. The RSO has the responsibility for the implementation and overall
management of the post’s LGP and SDP. The RSO is responsible for the
following:

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(1) Designing the guard and surveillance detection programs;


(2) Maintaining liaison with host government security personnel;
(3) Assessing the effectiveness of host government provided security
services;
(4) Acting as the contracting officer’s representative (COR), assisting
the mission contracting officer in the preparation of solicitations for
local guard and/or surveillance detection services and evaluating
offers received;
(5) Ensuring that background checks are conducted on prospective
guard personnel; and
(6) Evaluating the contractor’s performance on a recurrent basis and
formally once each contract year prior to contract renewal.
c. The PSO assumes many of the same functions as the RSO at constituent
posts where no RSO is resident. For all substantive matters concerning
the design of the LGP and SDP, the use of host government security
personnel, contracting for guard services, and evaluation of contractor’s
performance, the PSO takes direction from the RSO. For all program
changes or funding requirements, the RSO’s approval is required prior to
submitting the post request to DS/OPO/FPD.

12 FAM 324.2 Routine Supervision


(CT:DS-129; 08-20-2007)
a. Where services are provided by non-personal services (NPS) contract, the
contractor’s management plan will show which day-to-day activities are
to be managed and supervised by the contractor.
b. The size and complexity of the LGF and SDP may warrant consideration of
the services of an additional full-time employee. In such cases, after
obtaining DS/OPO/FPD approval, the mission may hire an individual who
is to be responsible to the RSO for:
(1) The quality of local guard and surveillance detection work
performed;
(2) Investigating, at the RSO’s direction, LGF or surveillance detection-
related security incidents;
(3) Maintaining day-to-day contact with the contract manager,
inspectors, and shift supervisors; and
(4) Supervising a PSA guard force.
c. At some posts where a guard electronic monitoring system (GEMS) is in
place, posts must include language in contracts for guard services
regarding the use of this equipment. (See 12 FAH-7, Local Guard

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Program Handbook.)

12 FAM 324.3 Personal Services Agreements


(PSAs)
(CT:DS-129; 08-20-2007)
a. The RSO is responsible for all implementation activities of a PSA-staffed
local guard and/or surveillance detection program. The RSO (or PSO)
and/or other mission personnel are responsible for all administrative and
management activities. (See 12 FAH-7, Local Guard Program Handbook.)
b. The burden of recruiting, screening, training, managing, and providing all
administrative support, including maintenance of personnel files, leave
records, and training records, rests with the post. The post is also
responsible for the disbursement and accounting of all funds from its
DS/OPO/FPD allotment, including payment of salaries, fringe benefits,
bonuses, and severance pay.

12 FAM 325 PROGRAM CHANGES


(CT:DS-129; 08-20-2007)
a. When an RSO determines that an approved LGP or SDP should be
expanded or reduced, he or she will advise DS/OPO/FPD of the reasons
for the change and provide specific details. The RSO will provide
DS/OPO/FPD with a cost-benefit analysis that will include the following
factors:
(1) Number of guard posts and/or surveillance detection positions;
(2) Functions;
(3) Hours of coverage;
(4) Cost in dollars (both for the remaining fiscal year and annualized for
the subsequent fiscal year); and
(5) Details regarding implementation.
b. When an approved change affects the post’s LGP or SDP funding level,
DS/OPO/FPD will adjust the post’s LGP and SDP allotment and authorize
the contracting officer to modify the NPS contract or the human resources
officer to change the number of PSAs.

12 FAM 326 THROUGH 329 UNASSIGNED

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12 FAM 420
POST SECURITY MANAGEMENT
(CT:DS-122; 10-19-2006)
(Office of Origin: DS/DSS/IP)

12 FAM 421 CHAIN OF COMMAND


(CT:DS-122; 10-19-2006)
a. Regional security officers (RSOs) are responsible to the Assistant
Secretary of State for Diplomatic Security (DS) and the chief of mission at
Foreign Service posts for the establishment and operation of Department
security policies and programs abroad.
b. The RSO or post security officer (PSO) and their staff are subject to the
administrative direction of the chief of mission or principal officer in
countries assigned, or where they are detailed on official temporary duty.
c. The deputy chief of mission (DCM) is the direct supervisor and designated
rating officer for the senior RSO at post. The Ambassador is the
designated reviewing officer for the senior RSO. RSOs rate their
immediate subordinates and the DCM serves as the reviewing official. At
constituent posts, RSOs report directly to and are rated by the principal
officer. The senior RSO in country is the reviewing officer. (See 3 FAH-1
H-2813.3)
d. All RSOs report to the Director of the Diplomatic Security Service
(DS/DSS) through the Assistant Director for International Programs
(DS/DSS/IP).

12 FAM 422 REGIONAL SECURITY OFFICER


(RSO)

12 FAM 422.1 General


(CT:DS-122; 10-19-2006)
a. The RSO is a U.S. Foreign Service security officer serving abroad at an
embassy or consulate. RSOs are responsible for implementing and
managing the Department’s security and law enforcement programs for a
geographic region, which includes at least one Foreign Service post.
RSOs are resident at a particular post and may have constituent posts

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within their region for which they are responsible. The RSOs or PSOs are
responsible for overseeing the day-to-day management of security
programs at their constituent posts.
b. The RSOs responsibilities and duties are enumerated in sections 422.2
through 422.5. In accordance with 2 FAM 110, the chief of mission may
reassign some of the specific elements to other post personnel. If the
chief of mission changes RSO duties, the RSO must notify DS/IP/RD.

12 FAM 422.2 Security Briefings


(TL:DS-39; 08-15-1994)
RSOs, PSOs, and security officers provide security briefings at post directed
primarily toward maintaining a high level of security awareness on the part
of post employees by providing the necessary knowledge of specific security
regulations, procedures, and techniques. See 12 FAM 424 for types of
briefings.

12 FAM 422.3 Reporting


(CT:DS-122; 10-19-2006)
a. See 12 FAM 425 for RSO reporting requirements to DS/IP/RD.
b. At all posts without a resident RSO, the PSO must send copies of all
correspondence relating to the post’s security programs to both DS/IP/RD
and the responsible RSO.

12 FAM 422.3-1 Reporting Security Incidents


(CT:DS-122; 10-19-2006)
a. PSOs must immediately report to the responsible RSO and to the Bureau
of Diplomatic Security (DS/DSS/IP) all incidents (e.g., actual or possible
demonstration directed at U.S. persons or the embassy; planned or actual
kidnapping of U.S. diplomat; planned or emergency absence of RSO from
post; Marine security guard or guard force problems/issues; other
life/facility protection issues) that could adversely affect a post’s security
status.
b. Security incidents involving the possible or actual compromise of
classified information (see 12 FAM 553) must be reported within 24-hours
of discovery to DS/IS/APD via DS channels and C-LAN e-mail. Initial
reports must be made by telegram, entitled “POSSIBLE SECURITY
COMPROMISE—(DATE OF INCIDENT)”, and use the following format:
(1) Summary of incident;
(2) Circumstances of discovery;

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(3) Name of person suspected of or responsible for incident;


(4) Highest classification of material involved;
(5) List of potentially compromised material;
(6) Action taken by RSO to avert further unauthorized disclosure of
material; and
(7) The RSOs assessment of the degree of compromise.
c. If additional reports by telegram are necessary, they must be sent via DS
channel and to DS/IS/APD on C-LAN e-mail, and include the following (at
minimum):
(1) Additional information since initial report;
(2) Status of post’s damage assessment; and
(3) Any requests for DS/IS/APD assistance.
d. RSOs must initially fax or e-mail to DS/IS/APD all forms OF-117, Notice of
Security Incident, as they receive or initiate them, and all forms OF-118
Record of Security Incident as soon as they are realized (see 12 FAM 553
and 12 FAM 553 Exhibit 553.1B).
e. The preferred transmission method is to e-mail scanned forms OF-117
and/or OF-118 in the portable document format (PDF) to “DS SECURITY
INCIDENT PROGRAM,” via the C-LAN. OpenNet e-mail transmissions are
acceptable. However, due to privacy and operational security reasons
unencrypted transmissions via the Intranet are not authorized.
f. RSOs must inform DS/IS/APD if the Form OF-118 completion date is
expected to occur more than 30 days from the date of the incident.
g. RSO must pouch the Form OF-117 and Form OF-118 record copies to
DS/IS/APD within 45 days of the most recent forms completion date.
DS/IS/APD must include these record copies in the security history file of
the individual involved in the incident.

12 FAM 422.3-2 DS Channels—General Guidance


(CT:DS-122; 10-19-2006)
a. DS channel caption messages provide control over communications
between DS and the RSO or PSO on security matters of a highly sensitive
nature and must be used only for this purpose. The strictest need-to-
know principle applies to such communications. The need-to-know
principle does not relieve the security officer of the obligation to keep the
principal officer, or other responsible officers, informed of matters of
official interest relating to personnel or operations of any post under the
general supervisory jurisdiction of the chief of mission. Since telegram
distribution is appropriately restricted to the RSOs at post, sharing such

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information with the chief of mission (COM) should when possible be


person-to-person to preclude disclosure to others (see 5 FAH-2 H-444).
b. The DS channel is used for telegrams between the Assistant Secretary
and/or Deputy Assistant Secretaries and Assistant Directors of Diplomatic
Security, and other appropriate DS personnel, and the responsible DS
officer concerning criminal investigations involving U.S. citizens or foreign
nationals, who are not U.S. Government employees; special protective
equipment; and other sensitive subjects which the drafter deems should
be restricted to DS personnel at posts or within the Department. RSOs
must ensure that communication program unit (CPU) distribution is in
accordance with 5 FAH-2 H-444. The Executive Director for Diplomatic
Security (DS/EX) authorizes access to DS channel message traffic at the
headquarters level. This caption may be used laterally in the field. Use
ASEC as the only TAGS on this message traffic.
(1) The Diplomatic Security Background Investigations (DSBI) channel
should be used exclusively by RSOs for cable reporting of
information (derogatory and non-derogatory) developed during the
course of background investigations (BI) or periodic reinvestigations
(PRI) to the Personnel Security and Suitability Division of
Diplomatic Security (DS/SI/PSS) and other RSOs. This channel:
restricts, for Privacy Act reasons, distribution of cable reporting only
to RSOs and DS/SI/PSS; creates a direct channel of
communications between RSOs and DS/SI/PSS; and is not available
to Department personnel outside of DS/SI/PSS. The Senior
Coordinator for Security Infrastructure (DS/SI) authorizes access to
DSBI channel message traffic at the headquarters level. This
caption may be used laterally in the field. Use ASEC as the only
TAGS on this traffic.
(2) The DSX channel is used for telegrams between the Assistant
Secretary and/or Deputy Assistant Secretaries and Assistant
Directors of Diplomatic Security and other appropriate DS
personnel, and the responsible DS officer concerning criminal and
special investigations involving U.S. citizens, U.S. Government
employees or DS employees; counterintelligence investigations;
adverse personnel security actions; investigations concerning
spouse or child abuse; confidential sources; undercover operations;
and other sensitive subjects which the drafter deems highly
restricted. RSOs must ensure that communication program unit
(CPU) distribution law is in accordance with 5 FAH-2 H-444. The
Director for the Office of Investigations and Counterintelligence
(DS/DO/ICI) authorizes access to DSX channel message traffic at
the headquarters level. This caption may be used laterally in the
field. Use ASEC as the only TAGS on this traffic.

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12 FAM 422.4 Other Responsibilities and Duties


(CT:DS-122; 10-19-2006)
The RSOs other responsibilities and duties are, but not limited to:
(1) Serving as the focal point at post for programs to protect U.S.
classified and sensitive information, facilities, and personnel from
terrorism, weapons of mass destruction, hostile foreign intelligence
activity, and criminal acts.
(2) Monitoring and inspecting the security programs at constituent
embassies or consulates and providing comprehensive training and
planning guidance to PSOs at these posts through periodic visits
and exchanges of correspondence.
(3) Managing the Regional Security Office, including the supervision of
any assigned:
(a) Deputy regional security officers (DRSOs);
(b) Special agents (SAs);
(c) Assistant regional security officers for investigations
(ARSO-Is)
(d) Security engineering officers (SEOs);
(e) U.S. Marine security guards (see 12 FAM 430);
(f) U.S. Navy Seabees;
(g) Foreign Service national investigators (FSNIs) (see 12 FAM
423.6);
(h) Local guards under personal services contracts (see 12 FAM
320 and 12 FAH-7, Local Guard Program Handbook);
(i) Special bodyguards; and
(j) Office management specialist (OMS) staff.
(4) Maintaining official liaison with host-country, third-country, and
U.S. intelligence, security, and law enforcement organizations to
conduct exchanges of current terrorist, counterintelligence, and
criminal investigative data and to coordinate post defensive security
programs or planning.
(5) Reporting and interpreting information of security significance
developed through host-country liaison activity.
(6) Serving as a member of the embassy emergency action committee,
other pertinent committees, and the country team, providing
security insights to other members based upon information received
through foreign liaison and specialized knowledge of the security

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policies or programs.
(7) Establishing and managing, where required, a special security
program for the personal protection of the chief of mission and
other U.S. officials targeted by terrorist groups, closely monitoring
all available intelligence to determine the need for changes in
operational protective tactics and techniques.
(8) Arranging and providing protective security coverage, host-country
security liaison, and other services for U.S. VIP visits and
conferences within the region.
(9) Developing, as the chief of mission or principal officer may direct,
the security portion of the post emergency action plan (EAP) to
address security issues including terrorist attacks, weapons of mass
destruction, internal defense, riots, coups, and demonstrations.
(10) Participating in the conduct of bureau training or other programs
that ensure the effectiveness of the EAP and the efficient utilization
of post personnel and resources.
(11) Continually assessing the vulnerability of resident and constituent
posts to terrorism and hostile foreign intelligence information
gathering activities, adjusting post defensive counterintelligence
and/or counterterrorist planning and programs.
(12) Reviewing current and near-term intelligence, Foreign Service
reporting, and local news reporting on political, military, security,
and intelligence developments in a region to identify security
concerns.
(13) Preparing and coordinating comprehensive threat assessments for
use by the Department and the post, including revising
assessments when intelligence information is received.
(14) Providing unclassified security threat countermeasure briefings and
other professional security advice to U.S. business executives and
other U.S. private citizens at a level of frequency commensurate
with host-country threat conditions.
(15) Performing defensive counterintelligence functions and coordinate
activities involving U.S. officials or Foreign Service national (FSN)
employees who are targeted by hostile intelligence services.
(16) Maintaining current knowledge of tactics and techniques being used
locally by hostile intelligence services.
(17) Participating in the post counterintelligence working group (CIWG).
(18) Conducting, when directed by DS headquarters or the chief of
mission, investigations of allegations or occurrences involving
violations of U.S. criminal law or U.S. Government regulations by

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official employees, in accordance with 12 FAM 220.


(19) Conducting full-field background investigations of all applicants for
appointment to FSN positions within the limits imposed by existing
liaison agreements with the host government. This includes making
maximum use of host-country investigative records or resources
when possible to ensure the fullest development of investigative
leads and evaluating all information developed as a basis for the
issuance or denial of a security certification for employment (see 3
FAM 7222).
(20) Conducting full-field background investigations of all contract
employees of a U.S. mission and/or reviewing investigations
conducted by contractors on their employees; evaluating all
information developed as a basis for the issuance or denial of a
security certification for employment (see 3 FAM 7222).
(21) Conducting update investigations on all FSN and contract
employees on a 5-year cycle and evaluate the results for the
purpose of issuing or denying recertification for employment (see 3
FAM 7222).
(22) Conducting security surveys of resident and constituent posts to
include official office buildings and residential areas utilized by
mission personnel and, as necessary, recommending major physical
security changes or improvements revealed by such surveys to
chiefs of mission; coordinating the implementation of all approved
and proposed projects until completed; and modifying internal
defense planning concepts as necessary to incorporate improved
physical security features as they are added.
(23) Designing, implementing, and managing post’s local guard program
(see 12 FAM 320).
(24) Designing, implementing, and managing post’s residential security
program (see 12 FAM 330).
(25) Providing professional security advice to dependents and employees
of all U.S. country team elements at post.
(26) Formulating and conducting education and training programs
pertinent to the conduct of post information security programs and
ensuring adherence to Foreign Service and other pertinent U.S.
Government security regulations.
(27) Investigating and reporting to DS/IS/APD all instances of possible
information security incidents (see 12 FAM 550).
(28) Serving as the mission focal point for the general oversight and
coordination of special security programs managed by DS offices.

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(29) Coordinating the conduct of technical surveillance countermeasures


inspections at posts with DS/C/ST, the regional engineering service
center (ESC) and, if resident, the post security engineering officer
(SEO).
(30) Coordinating with the private sector on threat levels and help
establish country councils for the Overseas Security Advisory
Council (OSAC).
(31) Offering to provide professional security advice and unclassified
security threat briefings to administrators of schools in which
dependents of U.S. Government direct-hire employees are enrolled.
(32) Where appropriate at post, serving as the contracting officer’s
representative (COR) for local guards and residential security
contracts.
(33) Designing, implementing, and managing post’s surveillance
detection program (for detailed guidance on the SDP, see the
Surveillance Detection Management and Operations Field Guide,
Version 2, dated 2002).
(34) Performing additional duties as directed by a chief of mission or the
Bureau of Diplomatic Security.

12 FAM 422.5 RSO and PSO Systems Security


Responsibilities
(CT:DS-122; 10-19-2006)
a. RSOs and PSOs work closely with the information systems security officer
(ISSO) at post (see 12 FAM 613) on systems security issues and have
specific responsibilities for:
(1) Ensuring that all personnel with access to a classified system have
an appropriate security clearance;
(2) Coordinating briefings with the ISSO for system users upon their
arrival at post, concerning the security considerations of classified
systems;
(3) Issuing Form OF-117, Notice of Incident, for security incidents on
the system based upon either the RSOs or ISSOs investigation;
(4) Periodically checking alarm systems that protect computer
equipment to ensure proper functioning; and
(5) Conducting or verifying the security clearances of local vendor
personnel who service system components.
b. Pursuant to their role as the overall manager for security at a post, RSOs
or PSOs must also provide the ISSO with guidance and/or information

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regarding the:
(1) Department prohibition on processing classified security information
on an unclassified system;
(2) Physical and equipment security measures;
(3) Security processing for staff and maintenance employees with
access to an automated information system;
(4) Identification of a secure storage area for backup copies of system
data files and software;
(5) Suspected incidents of fraud or manipulation of data on a system,
the unauthorized disclosure or the destruction of data, or the
personal use of system resources; and
(6) Coordination and monitoring of the conduct of periodic security
indoctrination and training sessions for personnel assigned to a
post.

12 FAM 423 SECURITY PERSONNEL

12 FAM 423.1 Post Needs


(CT:DS-122; 10-19-2006)
a. Posts are encouraged to identify breaks in security personnel staffing that
may require temporary duty (TDY) coverage. Direct requests for TDY
security personnel to DS/DSS/IP. RSOs must notify their respective
DS/DSS/IP regional director at least 2 months prior to any anticipated
absences.
NOTE: If there is a deputy regional security office or special agent (see
12 FAM 423.3) resident at post, DS will consider that post appropriately
covered.
b. During an RSOs absence from post due to a permanent change of station,
home leave, medical evacuation, or annual leave, DS/DSS/IP will consider
providing TDY coverage to post if:
(1) The post is at the critical or high-threat level in the terrorism and/or
crime categories, or it is facing a specific threat even though the
post is not in a high-threat category;
(2) The request is received with sufficient lead time to permit an
orderly selection and briefing of the TDY replacement; and
(3) Sufficient funding for the TDY is available.
c. DS/DSS/IP will notify DS/ICI/CI of breaks in security personnel staffing at
critical human intelligence threat posts and will coordinate requests for

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TDY support from those posts with DS/ICI/CI (see 1 FAM 260).

12 FAM 423.2 Deputy Regional Security Officer


(DRSO)
(CT:DS-122; 10-19-2006)
a. For some RSO posts, DS/IP/RD may approve (with the concurrence of
DS/DSS) the establishment of a deputy regional security officer (DRSO)
position because of the exceptional priority security is accorded there.
The DRSO is a professional security officer with prior RSO experience and
reports to the RSO.
b. DRSO responsibilities and duties are similar to those of an RSO. DRSOs
are usually assigned to posts with a large (three or more) number of
special agents (SAs) and serve as the rating officers for the SA.

12 FAM 423.3 Special Agent (SA)


(CT:DS-122; 10-19-2006)
A special agent (SA) assists an RSO with all matters pertaining to post
security programs. At posts without an assigned DRSO, and in the RSOs
absence, the SA becomes the acting RSO. SAs perform a wide range of
duties designated by the RSOs.

12 FAM 423.4 Assistant Regional Security Officer


for Investigations (ARSO-I)
(CT:DS-122; 10-19-2006)
An assistant regional security officer for investigations (ARSO-I) is
responsible for the criminal investigations program at post, in particular
passport and visa fraud. The ARSO-I has specialized consular training and
law enforcement experience. The ARSO-I works with Consular Section on
anti-fraud efforts and criminal investigations of passport and visa fraud. The
ARSO-I reports to the RSO and the consul general. The ARSO-I also
provides routine reporting to the DS Criminal Investigations Division on their
investigative activities.

12 FAM 423.5 Post Security Officer (PSO)


(CT:DS-122; 10-19-2006)
a. Post security officers (PSOs) are U.S. officers whom the chief of mission
or principal officer designates to manage security programs at posts that
do not have a resident RSO. PSOs assume responsibility for day-to-day

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security matters. Most tasks assigned to PSOs are similar to those


assigned to RSOs, but are limited in scope because PSOs are not Bureau
of Diplomatic Security officers.
b. PSO duties consist of:
(1) Administering post security policies and procedures;
(2) Administering the security incident program;
(3) Providing arrival and departure briefings to all U.S. employees and
their dependents;
(4) Reporting threats and other post security situations to the RSO;
(5) Conducting investigations as requested and directed by the RSO;
(6) Conducting investigations of FSN applicants, in accordance with
existing liaison agreements with the host government, and
submitting results to the RSO;
(7) Supervising the Marine security guard detachment commander and
maintaining control of the Marine security guards;
(8) Managing the local guard program and supervising local guards
hired under personal services contracts;
(9) Maintaining liaison with host-country officials and post officials;
(10) Formulating and coordinating emergency plans and conducting
drills;
(11) Conducting physical security surveys on proposed new-lease or
purchase residential and/or official building properties, as directed
by the RSO; and
(12) Managing and supervising the Surveillance Detection Program.
c. The chief of mission must designate each PSO in writing and send a copy
to the RSO who has regional responsibility for the post.

12 FAM 423.6 RSO Office Management Specialist


(OMS)
(CT:DS-122; 10-19-2006)
U.S. citizen employees may be hired or assigned as RSO OMSs to posts
where there is a resident RSO. They perform many specialized tasks not
typically performed by other OMSs and are knowledgeable of security
policies and procedures, in addition to secretarial skills. RSO OMSs are also
responsible for:
(1) Typing specialized reports such as the security survey reports,
investigative reports, security incident reports, and quarterly status

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reports;
(2) Disseminating threat information and information regarding policy
changes; and
(3) Answering questions and resolving minor security problems in the
RSOs absence.

12 FAM 423.7 Locally Hired FSN Investigators


(FSNI)
(CT:DS-122; 10-19-2006)
a. Foreign Service national investigators (FSNIs) work in the security office
and perform a variety of tasks that support the entire security program
abroad primarily by:
(1) Providing expertise concerning the language, culture, and customs
of the host country;
(2) Maintaining contacts with police and other host-government
authorities;
(3) Obtaining information concerning potential security threats to the
post; and
(4) In accordance with 12 FAM 220, conducting investigations as
assigned by the RSO to include background/security investigations,
investigations for other department elements, investigations for
other U.S. Government departments or agencies and criminal
investigations abroad.
b. The RSO or PSO is the FSNI supervisor. They control FSNI access to
information pertaining to U.S. citizens and minimize the use of FSNIs in
investigations involving U.S. citizens. FSNIs are prohibited from access to
the security files of U.S. citizens and their access to the investigative files
of other FSNs is controlled on a need-to-know basis. FSNIs may not
interview U.S. sources or review U.S. citizen-controlled post files.
c. RSOs must ensure for all posts under their regional responsibility that
within the first calendar year of employment, all FSNIs receive the
Diplomatic Security Training Center’s (DSTC) Basic Foreign Service
National Investigator’s course. Only FSNIs who successfully complete the
course will be eligible to retain the investigator position.
d. The RSO must ensure that each FSNI is enrolled in DSTC’s Advanced
Foreign Service National Investigator’s course every 5 years following
their initial training.

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U.S. Department of State Foreign Affairs Manual Volume 12 - Diplomatic Security

12 FAM 424 TYPES OF SECURITY BRIEFINGS

12 FAM 424.1 New Arrival Briefings


(CT:DS-122; 10-19-2006)
a. The RSOs or PSOs must provide a mandatory comprehensive security
briefing to employees shortly after their arrival at post. The briefing must
acquaint newly arrived personnel with the security situation at post and
the total security environment, including the general security
requirements and procedures in effect. The briefing must also highlight
the importance of attention to personal security and include a personal
security self-assessment checklist. The baseline checklist can be found on
the DS Web site.
b. Routine arrival briefings must include general counterterrorism and
counterintelligence policy and procedures relating to the post and country
of assignment. As threat situations change, RSOs and PSOs must provide
briefings for senior post officials and other employees and dependents to
minimize the dangers posed.
c. The officer must use an outline at each briefing to ensure that all required
subjects are covered and include the Personal Security Self-Assessment
checklist. RSOs and PSOs must maintain a record of all briefings,
including the dates and identities of all employees briefed, and they must
establish procedures for ensuring employee participation. The employee
must sign a statement that he or she has been briefed, received a copy of
the checklist, and that he or she understood the material covered. The
statement must also indicate topics covered during the briefing.

12 FAM 424.2 Spouse and Dependent Briefings


(CT:DS-122; 10-19-2006)
a. Post management must strongly emphasize the advisability of having all
spouses and adult dependents briefed on the security situation at post
and actively encourage them to attend all security briefings.
b. The RSO or PSO must make unclassified security briefings available for
spouses and other adult dependents of post employees as soon as
possible after their arrival at post. Regularly scheduled post orientations
may be used for this purpose. However, if a post does not have a formal
orientation program, the security officer should make arrangements with
the post’s community liaison office (CLO) to establish a dependent
briefing program that would include all adult dependents.
c. The CLO can assist in the subsequent dissemination of general security
information to dependents. The security officer and CLO should jointly

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U.S. Department of State Foreign Affairs Manual Volume 12 - Diplomatic Security

work out such a mechanism that possibly includes having the security
officer participate in scheduled CLO dependent or community briefings.
d. The briefing must address all real threats and dangers to post personnel
and dependents, and other related issues. The following are suggested
topics of discussion for such a briefing:
(1) Local criminal activity affecting personal and residential security;
(2) High-crime areas of the city and country;
(3) An overview of narcotics available in the country and in the U.S.
community, including local law enforcement and judicial action;
(4) An unclassified discussion concerning terrorist activity in the
country directed against the host country, the diplomatic
community, and U.S. interests;
(5) An unclassified discussion of the post’s emergency action plan with
emphasis on the warden system, actions to take during civil
disorders, emergency plans for dependent schools, etc.;
(6) The post’s specific problems, cultural differences, sensitivity to
host-country customs and attitudes;
(7) The location where dependents can obtain information concerning
the security situation; and
(8) Emergency telephone numbers including local police, fire and
medical, and post security elements.

12 FAM 424.3 Re-briefing or Refresher Briefing


(CT:DS-122; 10-19-2006)
Security officers must periodically repeat briefings on the security
situation at certain posts where personnel live under hostile intelligence
or terrorist threats for long periods of time. Updating and restating
procedural details reduces their vulnerability to approach or surveillance.
Re-briefing or refresher briefings must also highlight the importance of
personal security and include a personal security self-assessment
checklist.

12 FAM 424.4 Security Incident Program


(CT:DS-122; 10-19-2006)
a. Security officers must brief all employees during their arrival on the
security regulations and methods concerning the safeguarding of
classified information. This briefing underscores the importance of
handling classified material and helps to prevent security incidents.

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U.S. Department of State Foreign Affairs Manual Volume 12 - Diplomatic Security

b. RSOs and PSOs must also brief each employee who receives a security
incident report and sign as a witness to the employee’s signature
acknowledging receipt of the notification packet. The briefing must
include why the employee was responsible for receiving an incident
report, how to prevent getting others, and the type of disciplinary action
he or she may receive for further repeated incidents (see 12 FAM 557).

12 FAM 424.5 Special Travel Briefings


(CT:DS-122; 10-19-2006)
Special travel briefings cover the counterintelligence regulations pertaining
to employee travel to critical human intelligence threat posts (see 12 FAM
264).

12 FAM 424.6 Departure Debriefings


(CT:DS-122; 10-19-2006)
a. The RSO or PSO must schedule an exit interview for all U.S. citizen
employees before their permanent departure from post. Each departing
employee should be interviewed separately and given an opportunity to
comment on any aspect of the post security program including:
(1) Any significant contacts with foreign nationals of designated
countries;
(2) International travel during their tour of duty; and
(3) Any security problems encountered.
b. The security officer must make a record of the exit interview, including
any security-related comments received from the employee, and maintain
these records in the post security office files.

12 FAM 424.7 Separating Employees


(CT:DS-122; 10-19-2006)
a. Security officers must give a detailed security debriefing to personnel who
are terminating their employment abroad and are not returning to the
United States, or are otherwise to be separated for a continuous period of
60 days or more.
b. The employee must sign Form OF-109, Separation Statement (see 12
FAM 564.4), and the security officer must advise him or her of the
applicable laws on the protection and disclosure of classified information.

12 FAM 425 QUARTERLY STATUS REPORT

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U.S. Department of State Foreign Affairs Manual Volume 12 - Diplomatic Security

(CT:DS-122; 10-19-2006)
a. Each RSO must submit a Quarterly Status Report (QSR) to the
Directorate for International Programs by the fifth working day of the
appropriate month:
(1) April 5th – 1st Quarter (calendar year) for January, February, and
March;
(2) July 5th – 2nd Quarter for April, May, and June;
(3) October 5th – 3rd Quarter for July, August, and September; and
(4) January 5th – 4th Quarter for October, November, and December.
NOTE: QSRs must not be sent over the DS channel.
b. RSOs must review QSR reports carefully for sensitive or classified
information. The RSO must either remove such information from QSR
reports and report it separately or mark paragraphs appropriately. QSRs
are internal documents and not for distribution to other agencies.
Internal post distribution, as RSOs deem appropriate, is encouraged.
Additionally, the QSR is meant to be an overview of RSO activities and
not a daily log of RSO action.
c. Security officers must always use the caption TERREP or TERREP
EXCLUSIVE on telegrams pertaining to terrorism subjects including:
(1) Terrorist groups, threats, or acts;
(2) Anti-terrorist measures by other governments; and
(3) Conversations with foreign officials about terrorism.

12 FAM 426 THROUGH 429 UNASSIGNED

12 FAM 420 Page 16 of 16