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Natural Disaster Packet

Notebook Pages & Worksheets

Made by Liesl
©homeschoolden.com

Feel free to make as many copies of these pages as you need for your kids or the
students in your classroom.
This file may not be shared or uploaded to any file-sharing website.
This packet has notebook pages about:
• Floods,
• Mudslide
• Tsunami
• Tornado
• Hurricane, cyclone, typhoon
• Blizzard
• Heat Wave
• Drought
• Wild fire
• Sinkhole

Note: This does not cover earthquakes and volcanoes. We covered


those topics in depth in our Earth Science Unit.
Floods
What is flooding? What causes it?

What causes flash floods?

What damage can be done by flooding?

Find a specific example of this type of disaster. When did it happen? Where? What
damage was done? What was the death toll?

©homeschoolden.com
Mudslide

What is a mudslide? What causes it?

What damage can be done by a mudslide?

Find a specific example of this type of disaster.


When did it happen? Where? What damage was done?
What was the death toll?

©homeschoolden.com
Tsunami

What is a tsunami? What causes it?

What damage can be done by a tsunami?

Find a specific example of this type of disaster. When did it happen? Where? What
damage was done? What was the death toll?

©homeschoolden.com
Tornado

What is a tornado? What causes it?

What damage can be done by a tornado?

Find a specific example of this type of disaster. When did it happen? Where? What
damage was done? What was the death toll?

©homeschoolden.com
Types of Tornadoes:
Tornadoes that come from a supercell thunderstorm are the most common, and
often the most dangerous.

Gustnadoes, (below left) whirls of dust or debris at or near the ground with no
condensation funnel, which form along the gust front of a storm.
Landspouts, (below middle) narrow, rope-like condensation funnels that form while
the thunderstorm cloud is still growing and there is no rotating updraft. The
spinning motion originates near the ground.
Waterspouts, (below right) similar to landspouts, except they occur over water

Picture Credits Above: http://www.nssl.noaa.gov/education/svrwx101/tornadoes/types/

©homeschoolden.com
Hurricane
Cyclone, tropical cyclone, hurricane, and typhoon are
different names for the same phenomenon, which is a
cyclonic storm system that forms over the oceans. The
determining factor on which term is used is based on
where they originate.
In the Atlantic and Northeast Pacific, the term "hurricane" is used. Wind blows
counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere due to the Coriolis effect.

What is a hurricane? What causes it?

What damage can be done by a hurricane?

Find a specific example of this type of disaster. When did it happen? Where? What
damage was done? What was the death toll?

©homeschoolden.com
Typhoon or Cyclone
Cyclone, tropical cyclone, hurricane, and typhoon are different
names for the same phenomenon, which is a cyclonic storm
system that forms over the oceans.
In the Northwest Pacific it is referred to as a "typhoon" and
"cyclones" occur in the South Pacific and Indian Ocean. The
wind blows clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere due to the
Coriolis effect.
What is a typhoon or cyclone? What causes it?

What damage can be done by a typhoon or


cyclone?

Find a specific example of this type of disaster. When did it happen? Where? What
damage was done? What was the death toll?

©homeschoolden.com
Blizzard
What is a blizzard? What causes it?

What damage can be done by a blizzard?

Find a specific example of this type of disaster. When did it happen? Where? What
damage was done? What was the death toll?

©homeschoolden.com
Heat Wave
What is a heat wave? What causes it?

What damage can be done by a drought?

Find a specific example of this type of disaster. When did it happen? Where? What
damage was done? What was the death toll?

©homeschoolden.com
Drought
What is a drought? What causes it?

What damage can be done by a drought?

Find a specific example of this type of disaster. When did it happen? Where? What
damage was done? What was the death toll?

©homeschoolden.com
Wildfire
What is a wild fire? What causes it?

How can it be prevented?

How can it be stopped?

What damage can be done by a wild fire?

Find a specific example of this type of disaster. When did it happen? Where? What
damage was done? What was the death toll?

©homeschoolden.com
Sinkhole

What is a sinkhole? What causes it?

What damage can be done by a sinkhole?

Find a specific example of this type of disaster. When did it happen? Where? What
damage was done? What was the death toll?

©homeschoolden.com
Interactive notebook pieces:
On the following pages you’ll find lapbook pieces with photos in the middle. Have the students cut
around the outside. Fold along the solid lines in the middle. Then cut along the dotted lines.
Students can write information on the flaps or if they are younger, they can cut out the information
provided and glue it onto the side flap.
A tsunami (also known as a seismic
A flood is an overflow of water sea wave) is a series of waves in a
that submerges land which is water body caused by the
A mudslide is a rapid surging
usually dry. In other words, a displacement of a large volume of
flow of debris often including
flood is a covering by water of water, generally in an ocean or a
clay.
land not normally covered by large lake. It is caused by an
water. underwater earthquake, landslide, or
volcanic eruption.

A hurricane is a rapidly rotating storm A tropical cyclone is a rapidly rotating


system characterized by a low-pressure storm system characterized by a low-
A tornado is a violently rotating pressure center, strong winds, and a spiral
center, strong winds, and a spiral
column of air that is in contact arrangement of thunderstorms that arrangement of thunderstorms that produce
heavy rain. It often lasts for a week or
with both the surface of the produce heavy rain. It often lasts for a
more. It can be up to 600 miles across and
week or more. It can be up to 600 miles
earth and a cumulonimbus have strong winds spiraling inward and
across and have strong winds spiraling
cloud. inward and upward at speeds of 75 to 200 upward at speeds of 75 to 200 mph.
mph.

A blizzard is a severe snowstorm A heat wave is a prolonged A drought is a period of below-


characterized by strong sustained period of excessively hot average precipitation in a given
winds of at least 35 mph (56 km/h) weather. Generally, a heat
and lasting for a prolonged period of region, resulting in prolonged
wave is period of at least two or shortages in its water supply.
time—typically three hours or more.
Blowing wind generally creates low more days of excessively hot
visibility. weather.
A sinkhole is a depression or A wildfire is an uncontrolled
hole in the ground caused by fire in an area of combustible
some form of collapse of the vegetation that occurs in the
surface layer. countryside.

flood mudslide tsunami

tornado hurricane cyclone

blizzard heat wave drought

sinkhole wildfire
On the worksheets that follow are the 10 types of natural
disasters we explored in this packet.
• The first 3 pages use the same photos.
• The last two pages use the different photos.
Name: ______________________________________

What type of natural disaster is this?

©homeschoolden.com
Name: ______________________________________

Natural Disaster Matching Page


hurricane, cyclone,
typhoon

blizzard

mudslide

drought

sinkhole

heat wave

flood

tornado

tsunami

wildfire
©homeschoolden.com
Name: ______________________________________

Identify these Natural Disasters

©homeschoolden.com
Name: ______________________________________

What type of natural disaster is this?

©homeschoolden.com
Name: ______________________________________

Natural Disaster Matching Page

sinkhole

heat wave

hurricane, cyclone,
typhoon

drought

flood

tornado

blizzard

mudslide

tsunami

wildfire ©homeschoolden.com
Name: _________________________________

Think About It
Natural disasters can often have devastating effects.

Can natural disasters be prevented? If so, which ones? How?

What kinds of assistance do people need after natural disasters?

How can other people help?

What kinds of global disaster alerts and communication infrastructure can help
mitigate the effects of natural disasters?
Quick Notes
Flood: A flood is an overflow of water that submerges land which is usually dry. In
other words, a flood is a covering by water of land not normally covered by water.
Mudslide: A mudslide is a rapid surging flow of debris often including clay.
Tsunami: A tsunami (also known as a seismic sea wave) is a series of waves in a
water body caused by the displacement of a large volume of water, generally in an
ocean or a large lake. It is caused by an underwater earthquake, landslide, or
volcanic eruption. More rarely, a tsunami can be generated by a giant meteor impact
with the ocean. These waves can reach heights of over 100 ft. About 80% of
tsunamis happen within the Pacific Ocean’s “Ring of Fire.”
Tornado: A tornado is a violently rotating column of air that is in contact with both
the surface of the earth and a cumulonimbus cloud.
Hurricane, Cyclone, Typhoon: A tropical cyclone is a rapidly rotating storm
system characterized by a low-pressure center, strong winds, and a spiral
arrangement of thunderstorms that produce heavy rain. It often lasts for a week or
more. It can be up to 600 miles across and have strong winds spiraling inward and
upward at speeds of 75 to 200 mph.
Blizzard: A blizzard is a severe snowstorm characterized by strong sustained winds
of at least 35 mph (56 km/h) and lasting for a prolonged period of time—typically
three hours or more. Blowing wind generally creates low visibility.
Heat Wave: A heat wave is a prolonged period of excessively hot weather.
Generally, a heat wave is period of at least two or more days of excessively hot
weather.
Drought: A drought is a period of below-average precipitation in a given region,
resulting in prolonged shortages in its water supply.
Wildfire: A wildfire is an uncontrolled fire in an area of combustible vegetation
that occurs in the countryside.
Sinkhole: A sinkhole is a depression or hole in the ground caused by some form of
collapse of the surface layer.
Fun Hands-On Activities
(Ages 4-8 or so)
Make your own tsunami
Our next activity was to recreate a tsunami. In a flat pan, the kids built up a sandy beach (sand, corn flour) and
built little houses.

Then they added water and created an earthquake. It didn't work when the kids hit the table with the bat, but
when the table was given a good shake (see picture top right) the tsunami hit fill force.
Make your own mud slide
Mud slides and landslides are related. Mud slides usually occur after heavy rains. We just used
sand and corn flour mixed together and covered a plastic butter container. We then watered our
“hill” for a time and the mud slid down the “mountain.”
Make your own tornado tower

Hurricane Activity
The majority of damage from hurricanes comes from heavy winds. We watched a youtube
video about hurricanes where the wind blew the roof off of a house. Then we did our own
activity. We built a house out of index cards and then tested their strength with level one winds
(one straw). Seeing that the house blew down, we reinforced it (with more tape). It then
withstood the level one winds but succumbed to level two winds (two straws).
Hurricane Activity
What is the "eye" of the hurricane? The "eye" is a roughly circular area of comparatively light winds and
fair weather found at the center of a severe tropical cyclone.

What are spiral bands? Convection in hurricanes is organized into long, narrow rainbands which are oriented
in the same direction as the horizontal wind. Because these bands seem to spiral into the center of a tropical
cyclone, they are sometimes called "spiral bands".

We tried to make our own spiral bands with a bowl of water, a spoon and some blue food coloring! Stir the
water (counter-clockwise if you are in the Northern Hemisphere, clockwise if you are in the Southern
Hemisphere). Drop in some food coloring and watch the bands form! :)
High Pressure System and Hurricane Florence: Florence is forecast to stall out after the storm makes
landfall. The stall is the result of the historic high pressure to the north of storm, refusing to budge and trapping
Florence in one location for several days. With such a strong area of high pressure directly to the north of
Florence, the storm has no pathway to curve out to sea as many other tropical systems usually do.

Online Hurricane Simulation for Kids: There is a fabulous app that lets kids play around with high pressure
systems and the kids can move the high pressure system to the northeast of the U.S. to "trap" the hurricane --
just like Florence is forecast to stall! You can find this online hurricane simulation here: SciJinks.gov

https://scijinks.gov/hurricane-simulation/
Name: _______________________________

Hurricane Question Sheet

What is a hurricane?

What direction does a hurricane spin?

Why?

How do high pressure systems affect hurricanes?

What is the "eye" of the hurricane?

What are spiral bands?

What do hurricane category numbers mean?

©homeschoolden.com
Name: _______________________________

Hurricane Category

Category Wind Speed Extent of Damage

5
Name: _______________________________

Hurricane Question Sheet

What is a hurricane? Hurricanes are massive storm systems that form over warm ocean waters and move
toward land. Hurricanes are called tropical cyclones by meteorologists, and actually they are only called
hurricanes in certain parts of the world. In the northwest Pacific, they are called typhoons, and in the Indian
Ocean they are called cyclones.

What direction does a hurricane spin? The direction of that spin depends on what hemisphere of the world
the hurricane is brewing in. In the lower troposphere (near the earth's surface), winds spiral towards the center
of a hurricane in a counterclockwise direction in the Northern Hemisphere. In the Southern Hemisphere
hurricanes spin clockwise. Why? A hurricane's spin and the spin's direction is determined by a super-powerful
phenomenon called the "Coriolis effect." It causes the path of fluids — everything from particles in the air to
currents in the ocean — to curve as they travel across and over Earth's surfaces. Here is a NOVA video about
the Coriolis Effect.

High Pressure System and Hurricanes: High-pressure systems often cause hurricanes to stray from their
initially east-to-west movement and curve northward. Florence is forecast to stall out after the storm makes
landfall. The stall is the result of the historic high pressure to the north of storm, refusing to budge and trapping
Florence in one location for several days. With such a strong area of high pressure directly to the north of
Florence, the storm has no pathway to curve out to sea as many other tropical systems usually do.

Online Hurricane Simulation for Kids: There is a fabulous app that lets kids play around with high pressure
systems and the kids can move the high pressure system to the northeast of the U.S. to "trap" the hurricane --
just like Florence is forecast to stall! You can find this online hurricane simulation here: SciJinks.gov

What is the "eye" of the hurricane? The "eye" is a roughly circular area of comparatively light winds and
fair weather found at the center of a severe tropical cyclone.

What are spiral bands? Convection in hurricanes is organized into long, narrow rainbands which are oriented
in the same direction as the horizontal wind. Because these bands seem to spiral into the center of a tropical
cyclone, they are sometimes called "spiral bands".

What do hurricane category numbers mean?

Meteorologists rely on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale to help us understand the magnitude of the
hurricane’s impact.

©homeschoolden.com
What do hurricane category numbers mean?

The hurricane in this simulation will either have an L on it, or be labelled with numbers 1 through 5. "L" stands
for low pressure, and the numbers are the category of the hurricane:

Category Wind Speeds Extent of the Damage


Some damage to homes and trees. Power outages could
1 74-95 mph
last a few days.

Extensive damage to homes. Trees with shallow roots may


2 96-110 mph
be uprooted. Power outages could last for several days.

Devastating damage to well-built homes. Many trees are


3 111-129 mph
snapped or uprooted, blocking roads.

Catastrophic damage to homes. Most trees are snapped or


4 130-156 mph
uprooted. Power outages will last weeks or months.

Seriously catastrophic damage. Homes are destroyed. The


5 157 mph or higher
area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.

Source: NOAA National Hurricane Center

Left: Hurricane Harvey Right: Hurricane Katrina

©homeschoolden.com
Picture Credits:
Flash Flooding

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cyclone_Evan,_Samoa,_2012_%2810690782393%29.jpg

Tsunami Picture Credit:

By David Rydevik (email: david.rydevik@gmail.com), Stockholm, Sweden. - Originally at Bild:Davidsvågfoto.JPG., Public Domain,
https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=177627

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:US_Navy_050102-N-9593M-
040_A_village_near_the_coast_of_Sumatra_lays_in_ruin_after_the_Tsunami_that_struck_South_East_Asia.jpg

Tornado Picture Credits:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:F5_tornado_Elie_Manitoba_2007.jpg

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dszpics1.jpg

This is a photograph of the Seymour, tornado of 10 April 1979. http://www.spc.noaa.gov/faq/tornado/torscans.htm


Category:Tornadoes: The National Severe Storms Laboratory

http://www.nssl.noaa.gov/education/svrwx101/tornadoes/types/

Hurricane Cyclone Typhoon Credits:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hurricane-en.svg

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:NOAA-Hurricane-Katrina-Aug28-05-2145UTC.jpg

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Typhoon_saomai_060807.jpg

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hurricane_katrina_damage_gulfport_mississippi.jpg

Blizzard Picture Credits:

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Blizzard2_-_NOAA.jpg

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Tochal_sport_complex_16.jpg

Wild Fire:

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/99/Northwest_Crown_Fire_Experiment.png

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Wildfire_in_California.jpg

Heat wave

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Heat_Wave.jpg

Drought:

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cracked_ground_151.jpg

Sinkhole:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Chinch%C3%B3n_dolina_c1991.jpg

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sinkhole.jpg

Clipart credit for the following pages: Clipart was purchased from canstockphoto.com, Studio Devanna, TpT and
Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah Designs, TpT
Name: _____________________________________

Floods

Mudslide

Tornado

Hurricane, cyclone, typhoon

Blizzard

Heat Wave

Wild fire

Drought

©homeschoolden.com
Interactive Notebook Pieces/Lapbook Pieces
On the next few pages are some interactive notebook pieces. Choose either
the black-and-white or the color versions. The colored set generally has
two pictures of each natural disaster.

Your students can cut out each piece, fold it in the middle and glue it onto
a notebook page or into a lapbook. Or, your students can just write their
descriptions in the space provided and place the page straight into their
science notebooks.
I put labels for the pictures on the previous page (so you know what each
drawing represents!). Younger students might just want to color that
previous page if they aren’t writing much yet.
Hope these are helpful!
If there’s anything you’d like added to this packet, just let me know!
Liesl@homeschoolden.com Also, I love when you share what your kids
have been working on and how you used this material. 😊

~Liesl
homeschoolden.com
©homeschoolden.com
©homeschoolden.com
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©homeschoolden.com
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©homeschoolden.com
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You may be interested in some of our related packets over
at homeschoolden.com:
Be sure to check out Our Store. or check out some of the packets we have available with the links below.

I created a Homeschool Science Unit Checklist for Elementary and Middle School that I think about as we
move from unit to unit. I have a general goal of what I’d like for the kids to have covered K to 8, but we’re also
flexible and go off on tangents when it’s warranted! It many of the units we hope to cover in elementary and
middle school.
You might also be interested in these packets:
Earth Science Packet (150 pages)
Earth Science Packet (more pictures of what’s included...)
Layers of the Atmosphere Packet
Magnet Packet: Magnetic Fields, The Magnetosphere, and Animal Migration
Simple Machines Packet (30 pages)
A Study of Cells (100 pages)
States of Matter

Physical and Chemical Properties of Matter


Chemistry Packet Learn about the periodic table, the
elements & their groups, valence electrons, Bohr
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Electricity and Circuits Packet
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Circulatory Packet (40 pages)


Digestive System Packet (75+ pages)
States of Matter Packet (50 pages)

Physical and Chemical Properties of Matter (45 pages)


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Big Animal BUNDLE

The Big Animal BUNDLE includes 5 packets. 1) Animal Unit, 2) World Animals Packet, 3)
Rainforest Packet, 4) Life Cycles Packet, 5) Winter Packet.

You can scroll down below to see more pictures or click on the “Quick Preview” links below.

Quick Previews

• Animal Packet Quick Preview


• World Animal Packet Quick Preview
• Rainforest Packet Quick Preview
• Life Cycle Packet Quick Preview
• Winter Packet and Hibernation Unit Quick Preview

The Animal Unit is 100+ pages. It covers basic animal classification, animal characteristics, body coverings:
feathers, fur, scales or skin, vertebrate groups, invertebrate groups, herbivores vs. carnivores, domesticated vs.
wild animals, animals and their tracks, nocturnal vs diurnal animals, animal homes and shelters and more!

The World Animal Packet is 75+ pages. It covers animals of the 7 continents. There is a new section all about
African animals of the savanna.

The Rainforest Packet is 50+ pages. Here’s the table of contents for this packet:

• Amazon Rainforest Facts – Notebook pages and answers pp. 3-4


• Amazon Rainforest Biodiversity and Deforestation pp. 5-6
• Map Work –South America – Brazil pp. 7-8
• Amazon River Notebook Page and answers pp. 10-11
• Average Rainfall in Temperate vs. Tropical Climates (Activity) pp. 12-13
• Amazonian Animals Montessori 3-Part Cards pp. 14-18
• Amazonian Animals Matching Page and answer sheet pp. 19-20
• Animals of the Amazon Blank Research Cards pp. 21-31
• Amazon Animal Fun Fact Tracing Pages pp. 33-35
• Insects of the Amazon pp. 36-37
• Insects of the Amazon, Montessori 3-Part Cards pp. 38-39
• Insects of the Amazon Matching Page and Answer Sheet 40-41
• Insects of the Amazon blank research cards pp. 42-44
• Layers of the Rainforest Activities pp. 45-58

The Life Cycles Packet is 50+ pages. It helps kids become familiar with the different stages in the life cycles of
the chicken, sea turtle, frog, mosquito, butterfly, dragonfly, bee, mouse, and ladybug.

The Winter Packet is 100+ Pages. It also includes the Hibernation Unit. The first part covers Growing
Crystals, Months/ Seasons, Earth’s Axis and the Seasons, Arctic vs. Antarctica, Polar Animals, Penguins, Seals,
Whales, about a dozen PreK Activity Pages. The Hibernation Unit covers: why animals hibernate, terms such as
torpor, brumation, estivation, diapause, endotherms vs. ectotherms. Plus, it covers where animals spend the
winter and the dangers of hibernation. It includes various activities such as notebook pages, interactive
notebook/lapbook pieces, matching and tracing pages.

These packets can be purchased here at the Big Animal BUNDLE page or in Our Store.
More pictures of what is included in this Bundle:

1) Animal Unit (100+ pages)


2) World Animal Packet – Animals around the world – from the 7 Continents (75+
pages)
3) Rainforest Unit (50+ pages)

Amazon Rainforest Packet


4) Life Cycles Worksheets and Activities (50+ pages)

This 50+ page Life Cycles Packet helps kids become familiar with the different stages in the life cycles of the
chicken, sea turtle, frog, mosquito, butterfly, dragonfly, bee, mouse, and
ladybug.
5) Winter Packet and
Hibernation Unit (100+ pages)
The Winter Packet is now 100+ pages because it has been updated to include the Hibernation Unit.
The Winter Packet is now 100+ pages because it has been updated to include the Hibernation Unit:
Biology BUNDLE of 3
We also have a Biology BUNDLE of 3: 1) Biology Unit (Biomes, habitats, food chains/webs, feeding
relationships) 2) Scientific Classification & Taxonomy Packet 3) Ocean Unit & Layers of the Ocean/Ocean
Zone Activities

• Biology Packet Quick Preview

• Scientific Classification and Taxonomy Quick Preview


• Ocean Packet Quick Preview

After our family did the Animal Unit, we went on to study the biosphere. We talked about the different biomes,
animal feeding relationships and more.

Biology Unit: Biomes, habitats, ecosystem, biological interactions (symbiosis,


mutualism, amensalism, etc.), feeding relationships (70 pages)
Biology Unit (continued):
Ocean Unit – Layers of the Ocean/Ocean Zone
Scientific Classification and Taxonomy Packet
World Facts Packet Do your kids know the 4 largest countries? Which countries
have the most people? The longest river? This packet covers basic world and U.S.
facts. Plus, it covers geographic features, landforms, world landmarks,
topographic maps, and more! This packet also includes geographic features,
landform words, deserts of the world, topographic maps and more!
World Facts Packet (cont.)
Creating Your Own Homeschool Curriculum: These are some resources I made that might
be helpful as you create your own homeschool plans. These are somewhere between 30 and 50
pages and are FREE to download:

• Creating a Homeschool Curriculum: Kindergarten – Grade 1


• Creating Your Homeschool Curriculum: Grades 2-3, Resource Guide

• Creating Your Homeschool Curriculum Grade 4-5 — Free Resource Guide

Creating a Homeschool Curriculum for Grades 6-8 – Free Resource Guide


Homeschool Planning for Next Year (Free Planning Pages)

These are some free Homeschool Planning Pages that I use as I try to figure out our long-range homeschooling
goals. This post shares share the process I go through… and also will share the planning pages that I’ve been
using the past few years. I like having colorful planning pages to work on. This isn’t really a weekly/monthly
planner, but rather a homeschool vision planner. This 30+-page pdf is currently FREE to download! Let me
know if it’s helpful! ~Liesl

Free Homeschool Planning Pages

And, if you are looking for some printables to create your own Homeschool Planner, you might want to check
out our free Homeschool Planner. This unique homeschool planning packet is currently FREE to download! It
is nearly 100 pages! Not only does this packet include daily and weekly planning pages, checklists and record
keeping pages, but it also includes various homeschool journaling pages… think gratitude journal meets
homeschool goal setting! Again, you’ll find it at this post: Free Homeschool Planner and Discovery Journal.
I tend to change up my homeschool planning pages regularly as our needs change, so this packet of materials

has steadily grown in size! There might be something you can use there!