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THE TRANSGENDER MOVEMENT

Transgenderism Activists detach gender from biology. Kids down to


kindergarten are being taught their body is irrelevant to their authentic self. Your
real sex is what you choose to be and not what your born with.
-Antonio Bernard
Part 15
THE BRAIN
Differences in the brain and Nervous
System of a male and a female
LARRY CAHILL .PHD. NEUROBIOLOGIST

Larry Cahill, a neurobiologist at the University of


California, Irvine, reviewed the literature for Scientific
American in 2012 and reported: “a surge of findings
that highlight the influence of sex on many areas of
cognition and behavior, including memory, emotion,
vision, hearing, the processing of faces and the
brain’s response to stress hormones.”

-.Larry Cahill, “His Brain, Her Brain,” Scientific


American, October 1, 2012.
LARRY CAHILL .PHD. NEUROBIOLOGIST

There are differences in the size of various


regions and structures in the brain, as well
as differences at the cellular level..
In addition to Cahill, see Amber N. V. Ruigrok et al., “A meta-analysis
of sex differences in human brain structure,” Neuroscience &
Biobehavioral Reviews 39 (2014): 34–50.
LARRY CAHILL .PHD. NEUROBIOLOGIST

Larry Cahill, writing in the journal Cerebrum, grants


that human brains are in some sense “mosaics,” but
he emphatically rejects the argument that males and
females share an essentially “intersex” brain.

“Evolution,” he writes, “has produced in men and


women bodies that are filled with similarities and
differences, including in the heart, liver, lungs,
immune system, and even knees.”

-Cahill, “Equal ≠ Same: Sex Differences in the Human Brain.”


LARRY CAHILL .PHD. NEUROBIOLOGIST

“To insist that somehow— magically—


evolution did not produce biologically based
sex differences of all sizes and sorts in the
human brain...is tantamount to denying that
evolution applies to the human brain.”

-Cahill, “Equal ≠ Same: Sex Differences in the Human Brain.”


LARRY CAHILL .PHD. NEUROBIOLOGIST

While male and female brains are similar in many


ways, researchers have found “an astonishing
array of structural, chemical and functional
variations” between them. This is not to suggest
that either men or women are smarter, and “no
one has uncovered any evidence that anatomical
disparities might render women incapable of
achieving academic distinction in
math, physics or engineering,”

-Cahill, “His Brain, Her Brain.”


HER BRAIN AND HIS BRAIN

The documented differences between


male and female brains, on average,
cannot legitimately be used to justify
stereotypes or discriminatory treatment,
or to nullify the considerable variation
among males and among females.
HER BRAIN AND HIS BRAIN

We should appreciate each sex.


God created both males and females
differently , hence the same teaching
and learning styles used to teach a male
must be adapted and revised when
teaching a female, males and females
both process information differently.
TAKING SEX DIFFERENCES SERIOUSLY

In Taking Sex Differences Seriously, Steven E.


Rhoads notes that some differences are evident from
the first days of infancy:

“Compared with one day old male infants, one -


day old females respond more strongly to the
sound of a human in distress. One week old baby
girls can distinguish an infant’s cry from another
noise; boys usually cannot….”
-Steven E. Rhoads, Taking Sex Differences Seriously
(San Francisco: Encounter Books, 2004), 25. 

TAKING SEX DIFFERENCES SERIOUSLY

In Taking Sex Differences Seriously, Steven E. Rhoads


notes that some differences are evident from the first
days of infancy:

“….Four month old girls can distinguish


photographs of those they know from people they
do not; boys the same age generally cannot. On the
other hand, five month old boys are more interested
than girls in three dimensional geometric forms
and in blinking lights.”
-Steven E. Rhoads, Taking Sex Differences Seriously
(San Francisco: Encounter Books, 2004), 25. 

LESSONS FROM NATURE
“ Doth not even nature itself teach you, that, if a man have long
hair, it is a shame unto him ? ” 1 Corinthians 11:14
Pro 6:5 Deliver thyself as a roe from the hand of the hunter, and as
a bird from the hand of the fowler. Pro 6:6 Go to the ant, thou
sluggard; consider her ways, and be wise: Pro 6:7 Which having no
guide, overseer, or ruler, Pro 6:8 Provideth her meat in the summer,
and gathereth her food in the harvest. Pro 6:9 How long wilt thou
sleep, O sluggard? when wilt thou arise out of thy sleep?
Leonard Sax itemizes some of these: “Wherever you look among the
primates, you’ll find that young females show much more interest than
young males do in taking care of babies. That’s certainly true of baboons,
rhesus monkeys, marmosets, and vervet monkeys. It’s also true for humans:
girls, on average, are much more likely to embrace little babies and be
interested in babies than boys are.” -Sax, Why Gender Matters, 61.
DEBRA SOH .PHD. NEUROSEXISM

“VEDANTAM: In animals, researchers have observed


behavioral changes after birth if testosterone levels are
changed in utero. In the wild, male and female monkeys
behave differently.

SOH: Monkeys are not socialized to prefer certain toys


over others, and we see the same thing with male monkeys.
They tend to gravitate towards trucks and cars, wheels -
toys that boys tend to find more interesting. And we see the
same thing with female monkeys. They tend to gravitate
towards more socially interesting toys like dolls.”

https://www.npr.org/templates/transcript/transcript.php?
storyId=556116385&fbclid=IwAR1EkqMDUgTzdepYo0dfKYdL3i7CtFW3FLKda2WY6loVthAFipf8yQbAZSw
LARRY CAHILL .PHD. NEUROBIOLOGIST

Researchers did an experiment to observe the


play habits of vervet monkeys. Given a selection
of toys, “male monkeys spent more time playing
with the ‘masculine’ toys than their female
counterparts did, and female monkeys spent
more time interacting with the playthings
typically preferred by girls.”

-Cahill, “His Brain, Her Brain.”


LARRY CAHILL .PHD. NEUROBIOLOGIST

These results cannot be explained away by


reference to cultural stereotypes or the social
pressures that operate among humans. It’s also
difficult to blame socialization for the differences
in how newborn human babies respond to
objects and to people. Girls tend to show more
interest in their mothers than boys do. Girls
typically prefer movies showing faces, while
boys prefer movies showing cars.

-Cahill, “His Brain, Her Brain.”


LARRY CAHILL .PHD. NEUROBIOLOGIST

Cahill cites a study that found these


preferences in one-day-old infants, long
before nurture could have any effect: the
baby girls looked more at a face, while the
baby boys looked more at a mechanical
object. This pattern of behavior in the first
day of life indicates that “we come out of
the womb with some cognitive sex
differences built in.”

-Cahill, “His Brain, Her Brain.”


RYAN T. ANDERSON .PHD.
POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY

A recent study using MRIs suggested


that, on a whole Human, “male brains are
structured to facilitate connectivity between
perception and coordinated action, whereas
female brains are designed to facilitate
communication between analytical
and intuitive processing modes.”

-Excerpt From: Ryan T. Anderson.


“When Harry Became Sally”. Apple Books.

The William E. Simon senior research fellow


“SEX DIFFERENCES IN MATHS”
Males tend to dominate in mathematical brilliance. As
Steven Pinker notes in The Blank Slate, “In a sample of
talented students who score above 700 (out of 800) on
the mathematical section of the Scholastic Assessment
Test, boys outnumber girls by 13 to 1.”
“SEX DIFFERENCES IN MATHS”
In 1932, Scotland tested the IQs of every eleven year
old in the country and found that, at the highest end,
among those with IQs above 140, boys out numbered
girls 277 to 203, and among those with the lowest IQs,
boys outnumbered girls by a similar amount.
Outnumbered. That’s it. There are always some girls at
the very top, just fewer than the number of boys.
Mathematics Skills -“The math skills of males and females overlap
considerably. However, at the very top and at the very bottom, boys
outnumber girls by a large margin. At the high end of mathematical
test scores, there are between two and four boys and men for every
woman. The harder the test, the larger the gap (Geary 2014).”
-—Evolution and Gender: Why It Matters for Contemporary Life by Rosemary L Hopcroft ,p.118-119
“This is reflected in the lists of winners for the major mathematics
competitions in the United States, which are dominated by men. It
is also reflected in SAT scores, where males tend to outscore
females on the mathematics section of the test.”
-—Evolution and Gender: Why It Matters for Contemporary Life by Rosemary L Hopcroft ,p.118-119
“As noted above, because many more girls take the tests than boys,
SAT scores may inflate the sex difference in mathematical ability,
because they are only reflecting the abilities of the top group of boys”

-—Evolution and Gender: Why It Matters for Contemporary Life by Rosemary L Hopcroft ,p.118-119
“In the United States, boys also do better than girls, on average, on
advanced placement exams in mathematics and science. It has been
argued that mathematical ability is a manifestation of g, or the general
intelligence factor psychologists identify in IQ tests.”
-—Evolution and Gender: Why It Matters for Contemporary Life by Rosemary L Hopcroft ,p.118-119
“It is true that there are more males at the very top and the very bottom of
the IQ scale, which is similar to the distribution of mathematics skills.
When it comes to grades in school, girls do better in all subject areas,
including mathematics. Girls are also more likely to attend college, and
their grades in college are also higher than boys’ grades, on average.”
-—Evolution and Gender: Why It Matters for Contemporary Life by Rosemary L Hopcroft ,p.118-119
Females outperform males in many areas:
psychological insight, grades in school, high school
graduation rates, college graduation rates, lawfulness,
social connectedness, longevity. So why are we so
obsessed with the few realms, such as high-end
mathematical wizardry, in which men excel?
“Females, on average, outperform males on language
skills right out of the womb, which undermines the
socialization argument. Female babies typically start
speaking earlier and advance to whole sentences sooner.
Males catch up, but only much later. Girls speak faster
than boys and make fewer mistakes. Girls, on average,
score better than boys on reading and writing
throughout their school years.”
Psychiatrist Louann Brizendine was struck, as a
young physician, by the two-to-one ratio of depression
in females compared with males. “Because I had gone
to college at the peak of the feminist movement, my
personal explanations ran toward the political and the
psychological. I took the typical 1970s stance that the
patriarchy of Western culture must have been the
culprit.”
But then she noticed that the higher rates of
depression in girls did not show until after puberty.
If depression were caused by patriarchy, wouldn’t
its effects show up in childhood, when girls were
supposedly being devalued and oppressed? This
spurred Brizendine to investigate the role of
hormones in brain function.
She found that the brains of boys and girls differ
in their responses to puberty. “Many gene
variations and brain circuits that are affected by
estrogen and serotonin are thought to increase
women’s risk of depression,” she wrote.
“The same is true at the bottom of the
scale. In general, boys have more
difficulties than girls. They’re more
likely to experience mental retardation,
dyslexia, stuttering, and behavior
problems than girls. Color blindness is
found among about 8 percent of males but
only 0.5 percent of females. Autism is five
times more common in boys than girls.”

-Sex Matters: How Modern feminism lost touch with


science, love, and common sense by Mona Charen
“ADHD is three times more common
(in males). Haemophilia affects one in
five thousand males but almost no
females. Some of this can be explained
by chromosomes. Men have an X and
a Y chromosome. Women have two
copies of the X. Girls have fewer
disorders carried on the X
chromosome because they
have a spare.”

-Sex Matters: How Modern feminism lost touch with


science, love, and common sense by Mona Charen
Dr. Simon BaronCohen of Cambridge University
postulated that autistic spectrum disorders are examples
of extreme male orientation in the brain. Individuals with
autism and related disorders such as Asperger syndrome
are often good at tasks requiring systematizing abilities
such as math, music, mechanics…

-Sex Matters: How Modern feminism lost touch with science, love, and common sense by Mona Charen
-Sex Matters: How Modern feminism lost touch with science, love, and common sense by Mona Charen
…or computer skills, but they lack, sometimes
completely, the ability to understand other people’s
emotions or what goes on their minds. BaronCohen has
labeled this “mind-blindness.” In other words, the autistic
brain is an extreme version of the typical male brain:
stronger on math and weaker on emotions.

-Sex Matters: How Modern feminism lost touch with science, love, and common sense by Mona Charen
-Sex Matters: How Modern feminism lost touch with science, love, and common sense by Mona Charen
“There is wide agreement among researchers—and this includes many
female scholars—that male and female brains differ anatomically and
operate in a slightly different fashion. As with strength or height or
musical ability or many other traits, there is a spectrum.”
-Sex Matters: How Modern feminism lost touch with science, love, and common sense by Mona Charen
“Still, on average, women are superior to men at interpreting facial
expressions, noticing different tones of voice, mathematical
calculation, visual memory, empathy, and spelling.”

-Sex Matters: How Modern feminism lost touch with science, love, and common sense by Mona Charen
“Men outperform women on spatial relations skills (mentally rotating an
object in space); abstract mathematical thinking; map reading, which is
related to spatial skills; and hand-eye coordination. Anne Moir and David 16

Jessel report that women have “tactile sensitivity so superior to men’s that in
some tests there is no overlap between the scores of the two sexes.” 17

-Sex Matters: How Modern feminism lost touch with science, love, and common sense by Mona Charen
Men are better at reading maps; women at reading people. Psychologist
Susan Pinker could have been thinking of my motherinlaw when she
explained this male/female distinction: “Men are better at forming mental
maps of a route (go north for three miles, then turn east for half a mile).
Females are more likely to navigate using landmarks (drive until the
red roofed church, turn right, and continue until the river).”
-Sex Matters: How Modern feminism lost touch with science, love, and common sense by Mona Charen
In the new study, a team of researchers led by psychologist Stuart
Ritchie, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Edinburgh, turned
to data from UK Biobank, an ongoing, long-term biomedical study
of people living in the United Kingdom with 500,000 enrollees. A
subset of those enrolled in the study underwent brain scans using
MRI. In 2750 women and 2466 men aged 44–77, Ritchie and his
colleagues examined the volumes of 68 regions within the brain, as
well as the thickness of the cerebral cortex, the brain’s wrinkly outer
layer thought to be important in consciousness, language, memory,
perception, and other functions.
Adjusting for age, on average, they found that women tended to
have significantly thicker cortices than men. Thicker cortices
have been associated with higher scores on a variety of cognitive
and general intelligence tests. Meanwhile, men had higher brain
volumes than women in every subcortical region they looked at,
including the hippocampus (which plays broad roles in memory
and spatial awareness), the amygdala (emotions, memory, and
decision-making), striatum (learning, inhibition, and reward-
processing), and thalamus (processing and relaying sensory
information to other parts of the brain).
When the researchers adjusted the numbers to look at the subcortical regions relative to
overall brain size, the comparisons became much closer: There were only 14 regions
where men had higher brain volume and 10 regions where women did.

Volumes and cortical thickness between men also tended to vary much more than they
did between women, the researchers report this month in a paper posted to the bioRxiv
server, which makes articles available before they have been peer reviewed.

That’s intriguing because it lines up with previous work looking at sex and IQ tests. “[That
previous study] finds no average difference in intelligence, but males were more variable
than females,” Ritchie says. “This is why our finding that male participants’ brains were, in
most measures, more variable than female participants’ brains is so interesting. It fits
with a lot of other evidence that seems to point toward males being more variable
physically and mentally.”
Despite the study’s consistent sex-linked patterns, the
researchers also found considerable overlap between men and
women in brain volume and cortical thickness, just as you
might find in height. In other words, just by looking at the brain
scan, or height, of someone plucked at random from the study,
researchers would be hard pressed to say whether it came
from a man or woman. That suggests both sexes’ brains
are far more similar than they are different.

The study didn’t account for whether participants’ gender


matched their biological designation as male or female.
The study’s sheer size makes the results convincing, writes Amber Ruigrok, a
neuroscientist at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom who has
studied sex differences in the brain, in an email to Science. “Larger overall
volumes in males and higher cortical thickness in females fits with findings
from previous research. But since previous research mostly used relatively
small sample sizes, this study confirms these predictions.”

Ruigrok notes one factor that should be addressed in future studies:


menopause. Many of the women in the study were in the age range of the
stages of menopause, and hormonal fluctuations have been shown to
influence brain structures. That may have played some role in the sex
differences noted in the study, she says.
... this difference has been found in every nation where psychologists have looked
for it (e.g., 53 out of 53 nations in this large-scale study) (N ≈ 200,000)

Archives of Sexual Behavior


June 2010, Volume 39, Issue 3, pp 619–636 | Cite as

Sex Differences in
Personality Traits and
Gender-Related
Occupational Preferences
across 53 Nations: Testing
Evolutionary and Social-
Environmental Theories
“ … sex differences in
occupational preferences appear
to be shaped to a significant
extent by prenatal hormones.”
...or that nations with greater gender equality have a *lower* percentage of female STEM graduates than nations with less gender equality

The Gender-Equality Paradox in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education

Gijsbert Stoet, David C. Geary


National hiring experiments
reveal 2:1 faculty preference for
women on STEM tenure track

-Wendy M. Williams and Stephen J. Ceci

“...or that the evidence bearing on


the role of discrimination in
shaping STEM gender gaps is
decidedly mixed, with some studies
finding discrimination in *favour*
of women, rather than against.”
National hiring
experiments reveal
2:1 faculty preference
for women on STEM
tenure track

-Wendy M. Williams and


Stephen J. Ceci

National hiring experiments


reveal 2:1 faculty preference
for women on STEM tenure
track

-Wendy M. Williams and


Stephen J. Ceci

Men, Women, and Science



Why the Differences and
What Should be Done?
Steve Stewart-Williams

School of Psychology, University
of Nottingham Malaysia Campus
Lewis G. Halsey

Department of Life Sciences,
University of Roehampton, London
REFERENCES BELOW
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/mc08vpdjz1gzke0/
AAAQ517HZnf5ntn9jVX4dxxua?dl=0
-Antonio Bernard , dindinbernard1@hotmail.com

Part 15