Você está na página 1de 107

Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

INGLÊS TÉCNICO
UNIDADE 8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO
TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

1
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

Índice

Introduçã o / Enquadramento................................................................................................................... 4

Referencial de Inglês Técnico.................................................................................................................... 5

Motivational Activity – Travelling in Portugal.................................................................................... 8

Travelling in Portugal – article................................................................................................................. 9

Suggestion of activities.............................................................................................................................. 15

Motivational Activity – Oporto............................................................................................................... 16

Oporto – articles........................................................................................................................................... 17

Motivational Activity – Guimarã es........................................................................................................ 25

Guimarã es – article..................................................................................................................................... 26

Motivational Activity – Lisbon................................................................................................................ 30

Lisbon – article............................................................................................................................................. 31

Motivational Activity – Alentejo............................................................................................................ 37

Alentejo – articles........................................................................................................................................ 38

Motivational Activity – Algarve.............................................................................................................. 57

Algarve – articles......................................................................................................................................... 58

Gastronomy - documents......................................................................................................................... 76

Customer Service......................................................................................................................................... 87

Idiomatic expressions (or idioms)........................................................................................................ 96

Helpful documents - Grammar revisions........................................................................................... 99

Simple Present - rules................................................................................................................................ 99

Exercises with the Simple Present..................................................................................................... 101

Simple Present and Present Continuous......................................................................................... 103

Bibliografia.................................................................................................................................................. 107

2
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

Introdução / Enquadramento

Este manual de Inglês Técnico - Língua Inglesa – Informação Turística da


Região visa ilustrar e fundamentar o desenvolvimento de competências específicas da
língua inglesa técnica, nomeadamente na área de turismo e hotelaria, através da análise de
documentos ingleses, visionamento de pequenos vídeos e/ou documentários, leitura de
artigos (entre outros), por parte dos formandos cujo intuito é aprender e aperfeiçoar a sua
aprendizagem na língua estrangeira. Desta forma, encontrarão respostas para as suas
necessidades quotidianas e profissionais e, em simultâneo, aprenderão a comunicar em
língua estrangeira de maneira adequada.

Assim sendo, o presente manual servirá de referência para o desenvolvimento de


conhecimentos em Inglês Iniciação e Intermédio, servindo os seguintes documentos (que
poderão ser adaptados consoante as necessidades do público-alvo), como exemplo da
informação teórica e prática a ser ministrada nas sessões, o que permitirá um adequado
desenvolvimento do perfil de proficiências proposto no referencial de competências-chave
desta unidade.

3
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

Referencial de Inglês Técnico


Unidade 8218 – Língua Inglesa – Informação Turística da Região (25h)

 Objetivos

 Interpretar e produzir textos de diferentes matrizes discursivas em inglês, a


nível do utilizador elementar, adequando-os às diversas situações
comunicativas do quotidiano.
 Interagir e comunicar em inglês, a nível do utilizador elementar.
 Caracterizar a oferta turística e gastronómica da região, a nível do utilizador
elementar.

 Conteúdos

 Funcionamento da língua inglesa:

 Regras gramaticais de sintaxe e semântica


 Unidades significativas: parágrafos, períodos, tipos de fase, estrutura frásica
 Adequação discursiva

 Funções da linguagem:

 Comparar e contrastar
 Ouvir e exprimir opiniões
 Sugerir
 Descrever
 Perguntar e exprimir preferências
 Aconselhar
 Apresentar
 Pedir autorização

4
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


 Descrição e identificação:

 Património geográfico e cultural


 Atrações turísticas da região
 Oferta turística da região
 Gastronomia e hábitos alimentares
 Expressões idiomáticas inglesas

5
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

Motivational Activity – Travelling in Portugal

1. Watch the following video and comment on it as far as Portugal as a tourist


destination is concerned.

«Visit Portugal»

In https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=13JzhYcS0mw

Notes:

__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________

6
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

Travelling in Portugal – article

1. Read and translate the following article by larry olmstead.

Portugal by Pousada

April, 2012

Driving around rural Portugal without a decent map seems like a bad idea, at least
to my wife. I understand her concern. Relying only on a Portugal-at-a-glance map supplied
by our rental-car company probably isn’t the best way to navigate from one small medieval
town to another.

Unbeknown to her, I have a secret plan for finding each night’s destination: When
in doubt, go uphill.

To fully experience Portugal’s charms, we’ve booked a week’s worth of stays at


pousadas, lodging options unique to the Iberian Peninsula. In the 1940s, the Portuguese
government had a bold idea to promote tourism while rescuing and preserving some of its
ancient wonders. They began to convert historic structures such as castles, monasteries,
and churches, most of them centuries old, into visitor lodgings. The result is an array of
overnight accommodations unlike any imaginable. This chain of small inns remains a

7
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


success with both visitors and Portuguese. Today there are nearly 40 pousadas in the
country, including the offshore Azores.

As a bonus, these stunning edifices typically command the grandest sites in town —
meaning the top of the highest hill. I guess, correctly, that driving upward at every fork, no
matter how narrow the cobblestone road or precarious the arched castle gate, will lead us
to our nightly dwellings.

One way to think of a Portuguese pousada: a bed-and-breakfast on steroids.


Pestana, the Portuguese hotel company that operates the properties, humbly calls its
offerings “living history hotels,” but this hardly does them justice. The Santa Marinha, in
Guimarães, near the port wine epicenter of Porto, is the kind of building you might expect
to see in Tuscany or Provence. Radiating charm, it resides within a 12th-century monastery
amid a park of landscaped grounds and gardens overlooking the town. Inside its walls the
scale is epic, with impossibly high ceilings, innumerable drawing rooms, astounding
balconies, and grand vaulted entryways to the cavernous dining room and lobby — all
available to the guests of the 49 rooms and two suites. With its stone walls and candlelight,
the dining room is in many ways the crowning feature of Santa Marinha. While pousada
rates often include breakfast, all-inclusive meal plans are an attractive option, especially
since pousadas often have the best restaurant in town.

What is the chicken in brown sauce?” my wife inquires during dinner at Santa
Marinha. We’re both thrown off by the menu translation from arroz de cabidela. “Oh,
chicken cooked in its own blood,” the waiter enthusiastically replies. He seems surprised by
the looks on our faces, and quickly adds, “with rice!”

One of the many benefits of pousada vacationing is the full-service restaurants.


Americans often shy away from hotel dining while traveling, but leaving the inn to eat is
usually a mistake. Each pousada restaurant offers local and regional specialties along with
a large and affordable Portuguese wine list.

8
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

In seaside Sagres, the southern peninsula region, the specialties include fish soup
and stuffed sardines. In Estremoz, the hilly country of eastern Portugal, the choice is roast
lamb with rosemary. In the whitewashed walled town of Óbidos, north of Lisbon, the forte
is roast suckling pig. This is perhaps the nation’s most popular pousada, or certainly the
hardest to reserve. Like Italy’s much better known Lucca, Óbidos is a walled hill town so
well preserved that you can walk atop the parapets for the entire circumference of the city,
beginning and ending at the pousada — built into the very walls of a castle that dates to
the 12th century. Yes, that’s really old, but its rooms are a testament to modernity: air-
conditioning, cable TV, mini-bar, hair dryers, and other amenities.

A vast variety of cuisine, history, and architecture is contained in a country that can
be driven end to end in a single day. But too much driving would be missing the point.
Portugal is not to be rushed, and so it is not surprising that many pousada fans schedule
nights at properties as little as 30 miles apart. Almost all such explorations begin in Lisbon,
the international gateway, the capital, and Portugal’s most vibrant city. Like Porto, its
modern, urban nature precludes the rustic pousada, but fortunately, the Pestana company

9
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


allows visitors to include modern hotels when booking pousada vacations. Lisbon lies on
the western coast in southern Portugal, and from there you can easily visit and enjoy the
entire country with a two-week stay.

The south is mainly the Algarve area, Portugal’s Florida, popular for its beaches, golf
courses, and warm weather. But most of the historic wonders and visitor attractions lie east
and north of the area. Immediately north is the Alentejo region, home to vast fields of rare
and gorgeous cork oak trees from which wine stoppers are crafted, as well as most of the
nation’s olive trees. The Alentejo is sparsely populated, but boasts many of the best
preserved prehistoric sites in the country, including Évora, a thriving walled city and college
town with its historic center included on UNESCO’s World Heritage List. Évora has its own
pousada, a former convent just steps away from Roman ruins.

Along the coast north of Lisbon, several charming, upscale suburban beach towns
bleed into Estremadura — a region that includes some of the nation’s most important
attractions, such as the famous religious pilgrimage town of Fátima. It’s near Fátima that
the popular pousada at Óbidos (and its decadent roast suckling pig) is located. Farther
north is Porto, perhaps Portugal’s ultimate tourist attraction and home to port lodges, the
equivalent of wineries for the nation’s trademark wine. The town is a unique mix of urban
bliss and wine-country adventure. The Santa Marinha pousada, and a second one in
Guimarães, are closest to this wine action.

It’s no exaggeration to say that Portugal’s distinctive historic inns offer something
for everyone, from history buffs to adventurers. Pestana bundles nearby properties for
pousada-to-pousada biking and hiking tours. It links up golf country properties for
weeklong golf vacations. It mixes city and country destinations for Portugal immersion
vacations, and even offers gastronomy and jazz packages. Bonus: In almost every case,
pousadas are less expensive and more memorable than conventional hotels.

Portugal is one of the least expensive countries in continental Europe, and virtually
every tourist site in the country is within an easy day’s drive of Lisbon. Visits can be
customized to any length, even a long weekend. But no matter how long a stay, as any
first-time visitor to Portugal will discover, departure always seems to come too soon.

10
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

As You Like It

The network of pousadas — around 40 properties — are divided into four


categories: historic, historic design, nature, and charm. The settings range from castles and
palaces to convents and churches. The pousadas are also organized by theme and circuits
in order to make planning a driving vacation easier. All information and no-fee reservations
are available at pousadas.pt . Many other deals and special promotions, including pousada
packages, can be found at the Portuguese Tourism Office’s U.S. site, visitportugal.com .

Pousada specials abound, including packages for seniors, families, couples, and
long-stay discounts for individual pousadas. Pousada Passports, the lodging equivalent of a
Eurail pass, offers a certain number of nights for a set price. A typical offer is a circuit with
five nights in five popular pousadas, with breakfast daily and one dinner, from 515 euros
(about $675) per person. Ongoing specials offer nightly rates as low as 50 euros (about
$65). There is also a frequent-stay Pousada Card program with additional discounts and
benefits.

11
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


In http://www.usairwaysmag.com/articles/portugal_by_pousada/

Getting There: US Airways offers direct daily summer service from Philadelphia to
Lisbon.

________________________________________

Larry Olmsted is a travel and golf writer based in Vermont, New England, U.S.A. He
travels frequently to Europe.

http://www.larryolmsted.com/

12
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

Suggestion of activities

1. Each group chooses a region, analyses the article and does some research on the

internet and presents that place.

OR

2. You can also choose one region and each group presents a city or a town from that

region.

13
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

Motivational Activity – Oporto

1. Watch the following video and comment on it as far as Oporto is concerned.

«Portugal Tourism Official Video - Porto and the North - The


Essence of Portugal»

In https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ImGllehMCU

Notes:

__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________

14
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

Oporto – articles

1. Read the following articles about Oporto.

Urban treasures in Porto

by ADAM SKOLNICK· 09 January 2012

It never takes long before people realize that Porto is an extraordinary city. Perhaps
they will be standing along the Douro River in Villa Nova de Gaia – the neighbourhood built
and sustained by fortified port wine -- captivated by the way Portugal’s second largest city
looks like a pop up town, with medieval relics, soaring bell towers, extravagant baroque
churches and stately beaux-arts buildings piled on top of one another, illuminated by
streaming shafts of sun.

Or maybe it will be the quiet moments that grab them: the slosh of the Douro
against the docks, the snap of laundry lines drying in river winds, the shuffle of a widow’s
feet against the cobblestone, the sight of young lovers tangled in the notch of a graffiti
bombed wall, the sound of wine glasses clinking under a full moon.

15
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


Yes, Porto is a tumbledown and artistic, historic and young, wine-drenched town
that can make you weak in the knees in hundreds of different ways. Consider just three.

The night is alive

Porto is a college town, and the narrow cobblestone streets just north of Rua das
Carmelitas, especially Rua Galeria de Paris, fill with young nocturnal marauders for an all-
out street party on warm summer nights and on weekends throughout the year. Rockers
and bohemians pile into Plano B , where the upstairs art gallery and cafe are atmospheric
and social, but the cosy basement is kinetic with international indie rock, DJs, performance
art and engaging theatre.

Read more: http://www.lonelyplanet.com/portugal/travel-tips-and-articles/76956#ixzz3BN4cxzbq

16
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

36 Hours in Porto, Portugal

By SETH SHERWOOD

Published: November 23, 2011

From left: Dining in the Galeria de Paris bar in downtown Porto; a Thomas Struth
exhibition in the Fundação Serralves; Manteigaria do Bolhão at the old Bolhão market, opened
in 1914.

FOR years, Porto’s motto was, in essence, “You’ve tried the wine; now try the city!”
But these days Portugal’s second-largest metropolis — an attractively faded hillside city of
venerable town houses and Baroque churches — no longer needs to coast on the
reputation of its famous digestif. A jam-packed new night-life district is taking shape, and a
blossoming creative scene features everything from an upstart design center to the avant-
garde Rem Koolhaas-designed Casa de Música, a stunning concert space. And there’s great
news for oenophiles as well. With the Douro region’s emergence as a hotbed of prize-
winning red wines — not just port — Porto (also known as Oporto ) can now intoxicate you
with myriad vintages, new ambitious restaurants and even wine-themed hotels.

17
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


Friday

6 p.m.

1. GO WEST

A cheap tour (2.50 euros, or $3.35 at $1.34 to the euro) of Porto (also known as
Oporto) awaits on tram line No. 1, which starts near Praça do Infante square and heads
west to the Atlantic coast. Outfitted with old leather seats and wood paneling, the hourly
(or half-hourly, depending on the season) tram cars clatter on their rails alongside the
Douro River, past city squares, churches and port wine houses. The 20-minute journey
drops you in the seaside district of Foz do Douro, where you can easily stop at Shis (Praia
do Ourigo, Esplanada do Castelo; 351-22-618-9593; shisrestaurante.com ), a stylish
beachfront restaurant-bar. The terrace is great for sunset views and Super Bock beer (2.50
euros).

9 p.m.

2. NOT FOR DIETERS

The Francesinha is a cardiologist-unapproved local sandwich of ham, beef, sausage


and cheese with a warm tomato-beer sauce. At Restaurante DOP (Palácio das Artes, Largo
Santo Domingos 18; 351-22-201-4313; ruipaula.com ), a crisp minimalist space opened last
year by the celebrity chef Rui Paula, the working man’s snack is elevated to an epicure’s
ambrosia, with ingredients like tenderloin beef, artisanal sausage, mozzarella and a bit of
lobster in the meat gravy. Also first-rate are moist John Dory filets with a delicate triple-
cheese sauce. The 60-page wine list features vintages from the Douro region, including a
medium-bodied silky and acidic 2005 Quinta de Roriz red (8 euros a glass). Dinner for two,
without wine: around 80 euros.

11 p.m.

3. A MARKET REBORN

Nearby, the venerable Beaux-Arts-style covered market known as Mercado Ferreira


Borges was reborn this year as Hard Club (Praça do Infante 95; 351-70-710-0021; hard-
club.com ). Four years in the making, the renovated glass-and-steel structure houses a
bookstore, an art exhibition area, a restaurant, a patio, bars and concert halls. The hardest

18
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


thing about Hard Club is simply deciding among all the events, from indie rock concerts to
crafts fairs. For weekend club nights, crowds arrive after 2 a.m. and don’t leave before
sunrise. The cover charge varies.

Saturday

10 a.m.

4. SOME LIKE IT OLD

Unlike Mercado Ferreira Borges, the still-functioning Mercado do Bolhão (corner of


Rua Formosa and Rua de Sá da Bandeira) seems untouched since it was opened in 1914.
Majestic and dilapidated, the huge indoor-outdoor space recalls a classic European rail
station thanks to acres of wrought iron, grand staircases, white tile walls and pointed
domes. Inside, the aging vendors gossip amid chestnuts, octopus, sardines, dangling pigs’
hooves and live roosters. Upstairs, in the northeast corner, a stall called Manteigaria do
Bolhão stocks enough cured meat to feed a corporate picnic (or spark a PETA protest):
chourico (2.40 euros per kilo), presunto (9.50 per kilo), salpicao sausage (6 per kilo) and
much more.

12:30 p.m.

5. BEEF, BUNS AND BEYOND

To the many paintings, sculptures and installations showcased in the galleries along
Rua Miguel Bombarda, we can add two new types of creative endeavors: beef and fish
preparations. In the airy confines of Bugo Art Burgers (Rua Miguel Bombarda 598; 351-22-
606-2179; bugo.com.pt ), the burgers are culinary collages of local materials. The Porto e
Serra Burger is beef soaked in port and topped with serra da estrela cheese. The Cod
Burger transforms bacalhau into a patty served with classic acorda (bread purée and
coriander). And if you like to eat your burger with chopsticks, the Oriental Assortment is a
three-meat medley — grass-fed beef, Azores tuna, free-range chicken — with noodles. An
excellent panna cotta comes with a port-raspberry-black-currant sauce. Lunch for two: 35
euros.

19
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


2 p.m.

6. SATURDAY AT THE MALL

Hip and innovative aren’t words that normally describe shopping malls. But Centro
Comercial Bombarda (Rua Miguel Bombarda 283-285; ccbombarda.blogspot.com ) is an
exception. Devoted largely to independent Portuguese designers, the complex houses cult
brands like Storytailors (351-22-201-7409; storytailors.pt ), known for their fairy tale-
inspired fashions for women, and Piurra (351-22-201-6012; piurra.com ), a haven of
minimalist cabinetry enlivened with colorful textiles.

4:30 p.m.

7. WHORLS AND ANGLES

Resembling a jagged white meteorite, the futuristic Casa da Música (Avenida da


Boavista 604-610; 351-22-012-0220) is both Porto’s architectural masterpiece and music
mecca. Daily tours in English at 4:30 p.m. (3 euros) take visitors through the whorls of the
angular 17-sided building, designed by the Dutch star architect Rem Koolhaas and opened
in 2005. Treats include the VIP Room, an angled salon covered with blue ceramic tiles, and
the so-called Orange Room, whose floor gives off wild sounds — bird chirps, percussion —
as you step on it. But the highlight is the main hall, decorated with gold tiger-stripe
designs. Be sure to check the roster of concerts and monthly D.J. parties.

8 p.m.

8. FEED BETWEEN THE LINES

Books abound — holding the menus, lining the walls — at Book (Rua de Aviz 10;
351-91-795-3387; restaurante-book.com), a cozy, candlelit and self-consciously literary
restaurant that opened this fall. Thanks to nouveau Portuguese cuisine that burnishes
prosaic ingredients into poetic dishes (witness pork cheeks with tripe or veal steak in Torres
wine sauce), the restaurant is already a best seller. Fish soup has a zesty tomato base,
chunky texture, crunchy croutons and nuggets of local shrimp. The rack of lamb is also
fine, thanks to a port wine reduction with hints of vanilla and spice. Sponge cake, a Porto
obsession, arrives as a lush mush with orange and kiwi slices. The smooth house wine, a
Terras do Grifo red, is additional proof that Porto can do more than just port. Dinner for
two, without wine: about 55 euros.

20
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


10 p.m.

9. JOIN THE CONGREGATION

Formerly a haven of dowdy fabric shops, the neighborhood of Clérigos (Clergymen)


now bursts with bars and a Mardi Gras-like crush of partiers — college kids, young
professionals, 50-something socialites — who pack the streets by night. Galeria de Paris
(Rua Galeria de Paris 56; galeriadeparis.com) is filled to its soaring rafters with vintage
radios, old sewing machines and other retro finds. Even the pump that pours the Sagres
beer (1 euro) is Jules Verne-ish. More contemporary is the low-lighted Baixa bar (Rua
Cândido dos Reis 52; baixa.pt), where a boulder-size disco ball hangs over the dance floor,
and cocktails like the Cosmo Porto (Cointreau, port wine, red fruit; 6 euros) are featured on
the menu.

Sunday

10 a.m.

10. A SOLID FOUNDATION

Art is everywhere at the Fundação Serralves (Rua Dom João de Castro 210; 351-80-
820-0543; serralves.pt): in the gardens, where oversize outdoor works like Claes
Oldenberg’s trowel sculpture loom; in the exceptional bookshop, lined with tomes covering
Art Nouveau jewelry, to modern photography. And it’s abundant in the foundation’s
museum, which hosts contemporary art exhibitions. Lasting until Feb. 5, “From Page to
Space: Published Paper Sculptures” displays cutouts, pop-ups and other paper creations by
artists like Marcel Duchamp, Keith Haring and Barbara Kruger.

Noon

11. ENTER SANDEMAN

Why do most port wines — Graham’s, Cockburn, Taylor — have British names?
What’s the difference between a white, a tawny and a ruby port? The answers come
pouring out during guided tours (4.50 euros) of the cellars of Sandeman (Largo Miguel
Bombarda 3, Vila Nova de Gaia; 351-22-374-0534; sandeman.eu). If you don’t have
enough money for a bottle of 40-year-old tawny (127 euros), a box of chocolates made
with port wine is a more affordable Porto souvenir (10 euros).

21
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


IF YOU GO

You can’t pop a cork at The Yeatman (Rua do Choupelo, Vila Nova de Gaia; 351-22-
013-3100; the-yeatman-hotel.com) without hitting something wine-related. Billed as a
“luxury wine hotel,” this year-old 82-room establishment has a wine cellar, wine bar, wine
restaurant, special wine dinners and even a wine spa. Doubles in December from 139 euros
(about $184).

And you can’t accuse the owners of the new Gallery Hostel (Rua Miguel Bombarda
222; 351-22-496-4313; gallery-hostel.com) of skimping. The town-house-style space
features a bar, a cinema lounge, a library, a garden, a winter garden, karaoke nights, wine
tastings, exhibitions and city tours. Dorm beds from 20 euros; double rooms, 50.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/27/travel/36-hours-in-porto-portugal.html?_r=0

22
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

Motivational Activity – Guimarães

2. Watch the following video and comment on it as far as Guimarães is concerned.

«Guimarães»

In https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z2cMsnP7vco

Notes:

__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________

23
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

Guimarães – article

Glorious Guimaraes: Chic and cheerful in Portugal's new European Capital of Culture

By VICTORIA GOOCH

UPDATED: 09:29 GMT, 15 February 2012

Year in the spotlight: Guimaraes is one of the European Capitals of Culture for 2012

You might not expect to find a corner of New York in an ancient city barely 30 miles
from Porto. But here it is, in a former textile factory, in Guimarães.

Wandering into this unassuming building, I find a gleaming new blackbox theatre,
production studios and exhibition spaces.

24
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


Guimarães, the original capital of Portugal, is having a resurgence in 2012, thanks in
no small part to its new status as a European capital of culture.

With cultural figures including Jean-Luc Godard and Manoel de Oliveira heading its
way to get involved this year, the 'cradle city' is swiftly becoming a rocking one. Once the
hub of Portugal's textile industry, the threads of a new kind of town are being woven
together by one of the youngest populations in Europe - half are under 30.

In designer shades and skinny jeans, the university city's youth gather in the old
town's cobbled squares to drink espressos and, as I see later, dainty glasses of regional
brew Super Bock.

But while a fizzing social scene is centred around its heart, in recent years its young
entrepreneurs have turned their attention to its semi-derelict industrial zones.

Many factories were left vacant after cheap overseas labour lured business away in
the Nineties, but there is little sign of a decaying town in dire economic straits. The Centre
for Ar t and Architecture Affairs, a factory turned co-operative, is part of an explosion in the
Guimarães arts scene.

Local architect and the gallery-cum-theatre's director Ricardo Areias was quick to
spot the opportunities opening up on his return from studying and working in New York.

'It was the right time to come back: Guimarães is an exciting place to be right now,'
the 34-year-old explains to me over canapés and his family's own vinho verde.

A slender young woman dressed in black wanders over to join in, adding in near-
perfect English: 'Young people would move to Porto after leaving school, but I think that's
changing and they're coming back. 'The social scene here is terrific - you've got places like
this opening up, plus bars and clubs that will be packed until five or six in the morning - but
it's also an affordable place to live, and they're finding it's a great place to raise a family.'

It's not just industrial zones that are getting a facelift: the areas around the Unesco
World Heritage centre have been spruced up, with gleaming new pedestrian areas,
rejuvenated inner-city districts, and new hotels being built.

25
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

Pretty pictures: Portugal's first capital has a Unesco-listed medieval centre

The cultural landscape, too, has been changing in recent years, with the Vila Flor
Cultural Centre opening in a converted 18th century palace in 2005.

The city's ambitions for this year include holding performances in locals' homes as
well as in public spaces to encourage visitors. As Carlos Martins, head of the city's 2012
committee, puts it: 'We don't want visitors, we'd like non-permanent residents.'

Among them this year, it is hoped, will be contributing artists such as Godard,
encouraged to live in Guimarães while they create projects for exhibition later this year.

With its motto Aqui nasceu Portugal ('Portugal was born here') displayed on one of
the last remaining city wall towers, you can get a sense of its past by staying in the 900-
year- old pousadas overlooking cobbled streets with overhanging eaves, in the castle that
dominates the skyline, in the beautiful Alberto Sampaio museum and through glimpses of
the ancient walls.

But you also get a strong sense of Guimarães's future. The central plazas, Praça de
Oliveira and Praça de Santiago, busy by day, throng at night with revellers enjoying
alfresco tapas.

26
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


For more sophisticated fare, the well-heeled head to restaurants such as Historico,
tucked into a renovated 17th-century palace, while those in search of something more laid-
back pack around the horseshoe bar in Cervejaria Martins, a rough-'n'-ready sports pub.

For a few euros, American-style portions of hearty fare such as Francesinhas, a


beefed-up croque monsieur, are sold to young and old underneath a riot of football scarves
and a blaring TV.

Whether it's high culture or low culture you're after, Guimarães has something to
satisfy every taste.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/article-2101132/Portugal-city-breaks-European-Capital-Culture-


Guimaraes-lights-2012.html#ixzz3BNCFovok

27
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

Motivational Activity – Lisbon

3. Watch the following video and comment on it as far as Lisbon is concerned.

«Lisbon in Portugal tourism - Lisboa Portugal turismo - travel film


about Portuguese capital»

In https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VUnM4KZSlbc

Notes:

__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________

28
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

Lisbon – article

Electrifying Lisbon: Bars, beaches and bright lights in the city that has everything

By SIMON LAMBERT

PUBLISHED: 09:50 GMT, 22 March 2012

On the cobbles: the 28 tram route offers visitors and locals a taste of an antique Lisbon

As dilemmas go, it can be a tough one. Plotting a break and having to decide
between city and beach is a recipe for heated debate, especially for couples with opposing
views on what constitutes a relaxing weekend away.

Which is why, as I lie on the sand, feeling the sun beat down, I give thanks that
Lisbon exists.

The Portuguese capital sits 30 minutes by train from the beach towns of Estoril and
Cascais. This positions it as an ideal destination for those who want to combine sun-
seeking and culture – and makes it a god-send for my wife and me, whose holiday plans
are frequently a tug-of-war between the lure of museums and galleries (my wife) and the
pleasures of a day by the sea (me).

29
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


There are, of course, other reasons to visit this great city, which sits pinned to the
estuary of the river Tejo, halfway up Portugal’s west flank:

Unlike many Eurozone capitals, it is still good value for money. The climate is lovely,
offering warmth and blue skies for much of the year.

It is a place ripe for exploration – easily dissected on foot, yet also blessed with an
efficient, inexpensive public transport system that ranges from underground trains and
nostalgic trams to quirky elevators and funiculars.

And it revels in a winning atmosphere, its centre a compact blend of grand avenues
and delightfully cluttered old quarters where close-knit alleys send out an invitation to
roam.

We opt to stay slightly north of the centre at the Corinthia, a tall tower hotel with
commanding views over the city. But a 15-minute hop on the metro quickly has us at the
heart of the matter, looking for somewhere for lunch.

Lisbon spreads out across seven hills, but much of its daily movements happen in
the flat Baixa district on the edge of the Tejo – the main shopping and business area.

Heart of the matter: Lisbon's Baixa district spreads out around the colourful Praca do
Comercio

Interspersed with impressive squares and public buildings, Baixa is the result of a
grand rebuilding plan conducted by the Marques De Pombal following the devastating

30
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


earthquake that hit the city on 1 November 1755 – a disaster that is reported to have killed
40,000 of Lisbon’s then-270,000 inhabitants.

Pombal’s urban plan represented a carefully co-ordinated attempt to restore order,


with individual streets given over to different crafts and trades.

Two-and-a-half centuries on, this policy is reflected in street names that no longer
quite fit, but which still recall this former era: Rua da Prata (silversmiths) and Rua dos
Sapateiros (cobblers) now play host to a rich mix of shops, cafes, restaurants and bars in
spite of their history-defined identities.

Baixa is an ideal start-point for a city tour. We begin at the southern end, where the
Praca do Comercio, with its substantial arch, is flanked by elegant arcades as it overlooks
the river.

From here, we wander along Baixa’s wide boulevards, quickly working up an


appetite. And the Rua dos Portas de Santo Antao, lined with places to eat, proves a perfect
spot for a lucky-dip choice of restaurant to sample a plate of grilled sardines and a cold
beer or two.

Post-lunch, it is time to take a journey into Lisbon’s past. I am not sure what the
lisboetas make of the tourists who pack the more quirky parts of their public transport
network – but there is something both charming and comical about the incongruous
combination of visitors and everyday inhabitants squeezing onto the trams and elevadores.

These elevadores – three short funiculars and one ornate street lift - help save
tourist legs by whisking people up from one level of central Lisbon to the other, while the
trams run along five criss-crossing routes – most notably the Number 28, which takes in
Baixa, the Se cathedral and the steep hill of the Alfama district as it trundles on its antique
way.

Despite their must-ride reputation, the trams are best approached as an experience
rather than a sightseeing opportunity. Don’t expect to be able to sit, see much, or take any
photos.

On the other hand, tram 28 is the easiest way to reach the Castelo de Sao Jorge,
which, with its walls, pathways and pleasant grounds, perches imposingly on one of
Lisbon’s highest points.

31
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


The castle has a rich history that takes in a period as a Moorish royal residence, a
lengthy 12th century siege by Crusaders and its partial destruction in the 1755 earthquake.
We spend a happy two hours strolling the ramparts and gardens, and absorbing the views.

A further romantic step into Lisbon’s back-story can be found in the streets of the
Alfama, which tumble down the hillside below the castle. Ambling downwards, we pop our
heads into the Se Cathedral, and make note of several tempting restaurants as dinner
options.

Many of these eateries specialise in live performances of fado – the mournful and
poetic music for which Lisbon is famous. It typically involves a singer accompanied by a
guitar (and sometimes strings) – and to my British ear, sounds almost sea-shanty-tinged.

However, for a taste of Lisbon’s legendary nightlife, you need to venture to another
of the city’s elevated enclaves – the more modern but equally atmospheric Bairro Alto
district, which comes alive as night falls.

A night on the tiles: Lisbon comes alive after dark in the cluttered bars of the Bairro Alto

Here, endless bars and restaurants throw open their doors to locals and tourists,
and dining possibilities range from cheap-and-cheerful to extravagant. We plump for Louro
& Sal, which, with its elegant wood and tiled interior, falls firmly into the trendy camp, but
serves delicious food at prices that seem extremely reasonable compared to the UK.

The menu features dishes such as game sausage with roasted vegetables, and a
two-course meal – with aperitifs, a good bottle of wine and coffee – sets us back little more
than 60 euros.

32
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


Afterwards, we join the happy crowd that spills onto the streets, shuffling between
bars clutching bargain cocktails, including potent mojitos and caipirinhas.

Like all great cities, Lisbon is also fringed by enticing day-trip destinations, linked to
the centre by regular trains. The picturesque outpost of Sintra – where you find botanical
gardens, the former royal summer residence and an epic Moorish fortress – is 45 minutes
away by rail.

And if you are hoping for beach time, the popular resorts of Estoril and Cascais (tied
together by a promenade that hugs the shore between them) are in close proximity.

We take the train from Cais do Sodre (one of the stations in Lisbon’s centre) to
Estoril - where we jump off and walk remaining distance to Cascais.

Despite their neighbourly positioning, the two resorts have distinct characters.
Estoril has a long strip of beach, backed by Riviera-style hotels, while Cascais has a handful
of sandy bays and more of a self-contained feel, with a small centre of little shops,
restaurants and bars.

Seaside neighbour: Simon found the beach he was seeking in the pretty coastal enclave
of Cascais

A 20-minute walk away, where the Tejo meets the Atlantic, the Boca do Inferno
(Mouth of Hell) caves supply subterranean diversion. And the energetic can hire bikes and
take the cycle path that runs five miles around the headland to the surf-hotspot beach of
Praia do Guincho.

But as soon as I catch sight of Cascais beach, I know that I will go no further. And
as I lie there, I reflect that Lisbon might be the perfect European short-break destination –
but for the fact that, on this score, there is one obvious flaw: You will certainly be tempted
to stay for longer.

33
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/article-2117806/Lisbon-Portugal-city-breaks-Culture-sun-city-


halves.html#ixzz3BN9KI6fM

34
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

Motivational Activity – Alentejo

4. Watch the following video and comment on it as far as Alentejo is concerned.

«Alentejo Tempo para ser Feliz - Alentejo Time To Be Happy»

In https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9IyNsusb7Zo

Notes:

__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________

35
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

Alentejo – articles

A guide to Portugal’s Alentejo region, home of Europe’s finest beaches

Forget Ibiza. Forget the Riviera. In fact, forget the Med altogether. Portugal’s
Alentejo region is lined with glorious beaches – but not many people seem to know about
them.

Praia da Zambujeira, Portugal. Photograph: Municipio Odemira/Turismo do Alentejo

It’s 7pm on a balmy Saturday night in June, and I have just ordered my first Sagres
beer in I Cervejaria , a restaurant in Zambujeira do Mar, one of the prettiest villages on
Portugal’s south-west coast. The place is empty, but this doesn’t surprise me at all. I have
spent two weeks in this area, driving along empty roads, playing with my son on empty
beaches, and staying in B&Bs where we are the only guests.

No doubt the restaurant, run by two brothers for the past 28 years, is buzzing in
July and August, when Portuguese holidaymakers descend on the Alentejo coast. But for
the other 10 months of the year, the trickle of diners who come to feast on fantastically
fresh seafood reflects the general pace of life in the Alentejo: sleepy, bordering on
comatose.

36
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

One of the poorest, least-developed, least-populated regions in western Europe, the


Alentejo has been dubbed both the Provence and the Tuscany of Portugal. Neither is
accurate. It’s scenery is not as pretty and, apart from in the capital Evora, its food isn’t as
sophisticated. The charms of this land of wheatfields, cork oak forests, wildflower meadows
and tiny white-washed villages, are more subtle than in France or Italy’s poster regions.

To travel here is to step back in time 40 or 50 years. Life rolls along at a treacly
pace; there’s an unnerving stillness to the landscape. But that stillness ends abruptly at the
Atlantic Ocean, where there is drama in spades. Protected by the South West Alentejo and
Costa Vicentina national park , the 100km of coastline from Porto Covo in the Alentejo to
Burgau in the Algarve is the most stunning in Europe. And yet few people seem to know
about it. Walkers come to admire the views from the Fisherman’s Way, surfers to ride the
best waves in Europe, but day after day we had spectacular beaches to ourselves.

The lack of awareness is partly a matter of accessibility (these beaches are a good
two hours’ drive from either Faro or Lisbon airports) and partly to do with a lack of
beachside accommodation. There are some gorgeous, independent guesthouses in this
area (see right), but they are hidden in valleys or at the end of dirt tracks.

Our base was Herdade da Nespereira , a beautiful 600-acre estate of uncultivated


land covered in rock-rose, eucalyptus and wild flowers 13km inland from Zambujeira. Our
one-bedroom home, Azenha, was once home to the miller who tended the now-restored
watermill next to it. A kilometre away from the main house, pool and restaurant, it is
gloriously isolated. If Julian Assange ever leaves the Ecuadorian embassy in London, I
suggest he hotfoots it to an Alentejo hideaway. He’d be safe for months.

37
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


Stepping out of the house in the morning to greet our neighbours – wild horses on
one side, donkeys on the other – with nothing but birdsong filling the air, I felt a sense of
adventure you normally only get with wild camping.

“When people first arrive, they feel a little anxious wondering what they are going
to do the whole time,” Sarah Gredley, the English owner of Nespereira, told me. “But it
doesn’t usually take them long to realise that the whole point of being here is to slow
down, to enjoy nature.”

Herdade da Nespereira windmill house, Alentejo, Portugal. Photograph: PR

We followed her advice, walking down to the stream in search of terrapins and
otters, or through clusters of cork oak trees, their branches hairy with lichen like the
ancient trees of a fairytale forest. On some days, we tramped uphill to the windmill, now a
romantic house for two, for panoramic views across the estate and beyond.

When we ventured out, we were always drawn back to the coast – the gentle sands
and shallow bay of Farol beach close to Vila Nova de Milfontes, the rock pools of Almograve
or the cove at Carvalhal. At the end of the day, we would head, sandy-footed, to the
nearest restaurant, knowing that at every one there would be a cabinet full of fresh
seafood to choose from – bass, bream, salmon, lobster, prawns, crabs, goose barnacles,
clams … We never ate the same thing twice.

A kilometre or so from I Cervejaria, on Zambujeira’s idyllic natural harbour is O


Sacas , originally built to feed the fishermen but now popular with everyone. After scarfing

38
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


platefuls of seafood on the terrace, we wandered down to the harbour where two
fishermen, kitted out in wetsuits, were setting out by boat across the clear turquoise water
to collect goose barnacles. Other than them, the place was deserted – just another empty
beauty spot where I wondered for the hundredth time that week how this pristine stretch
of coast has remained so undiscovered.

WHERE TO STAY

100km of the Alentejo coast is natural park, so there are no hotels directly on the
beach. The accommodation below is within easy reach of the coast by car (a car is
essential in this region, which has virtually no public transport).

Monte West Coast, Odeceixe

6km from Odeceixe beach

Newly opened this summer, Monte West Coast is a 50-hectare estate in a lush
valley where an old watermill and outbuildings on the Seixe river have been converted into
six stylish self-catering houses (sleeping between two and six; two have fridges but no
kitchen). It has been renovated by Portuguese architect Pedro Oliveira, grandson of the
film director Manoel de Oliveira , who is 105 years old and still making movies. The owner,
half-Swedish, half-Portuguese Catarina Östholm Pinho, has transformed the traditional
stone buildings with Alentejo tiles in the bathrooms and kitchens, and film posters on the
60cm-thick white walls. The hilltop pool offers gorgeous views of the valley, and a
Moroccan-style tent provides an open riverside lounge area.

• +351 91 444 37 17, facebook.com/pages/Monte-West-Coast , from €50 a night


for a one-room house sleeping two.

39
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

Catarina’s tip:

Pont’a Pé (+351 282 998 104, pontape.pt ) restaurant next to the river in the
historic part of Aljezur, serves some of the best traditional dishes, such as clams in white
wine and coriander, grilled fresh fish and roast lamb. I always leave completely full. And if
you want to stay longer, the owner’s brother owns the bar next door, overlooking the river.

Casa da Diná, Malavado

8km from Zambujeira beach

Tucked away up a dirt track on the outskirts of tiny Malavado, Casa da Diná is a
four-room B&B run by Dina and her husband Walter, a painter whose works decorate their
tasteful home. Whitewashed rooms have simple wooden furniture, and the garden is lush
with peach, lemon, apricot and fig trees, but the real highlight here is breakfast. Three
“courses” might comprise, say, yoghurt with fruit, then smoked salmon and cream cheese
or Mexican-style eggs, then homemade cake, all beautifully served on delicate white china
with white linen napkins. On at least one night of your stay it’s worth booking one of Dina’s
three-course dinners (€25 a head). There’s nothing in particular to make it child-friendly
but small people are welcome, and Dina and Walter were endlessly patient with my four-
year old, who loved hunting for lizards in their garden and feeding treats to their poor
decrepit old dog.

• No phone, casadadina.com , doubles from €75 a night B&B (minimum two-night


stay)

Dina’s tip: Café Central (+351 282 947 419) in the village of Brejão is my favourite
restaurant in the area. The food is great, mainly grilled fish and seafood cooked to
perfection, and the wine list is huge. From around €20-€25 per person.

40
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

Cerca do Sul Brejão,

4km from Carvalhal and Amália beaches

Cerca do Sul guest house is painted in the traditional Alentejo colours of white with a
blue trim.

A group of low-slung white buildings surrounded by the empty expanses of the


Alentejo, Cerca do Sul has seven rooms, including one family room, all opening on to the
terrace. With chill-out music playing in the background, hammocks strung from the rafters,
yoga classes (daily on demand and free once a week) and an inviting pool, the vibe here is
relaxed. But there is plenty of action nearby: Carvalhal beach is a short drive away, and
owner Sara Serrão keeps noticeboards updated with local festivals, activities and events.
Breakfast is a buffet of fruit, eggs, scones, iced tea and homemade custard tart, taken on
the terrace.

• +351 93 110 5167, cercadosul.com , doubles from €70 B&B

Sara’s tip: The Historical Way is the romantic side of the Rota Vicentina, as opposed
to the dramatic scenery of the Fisherman’s trail. The section between Odeceixe and São
Teotonio, which you can access at Odeceixe bridge, is really beautiful and diverse, running
along the Seixe river, then through eucalyptus forest – take a picnic.

41
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

Herdade da Matinha, Cercal

15km from Malhao beach

Hidden in a valley 5km south of Cercal, this country house is bursting with colour,
thanks to owner Alfredo’s vivid paintings and red, pink and orange doors, chairs, sofas and
cushions. Guests lounge in daybeds and by water features looking like they never want to
leave. And if you make the most of the yoga studio, horse riding and cool pool it would be
easy not to. Those who want to walk the Rota Vicentina could not be better placed as it
runs right through the property. Dinners are prepared by Alfredo and Monica and served at
high tables laden with vases of wild flowers and vintage kitchenware (meals are not cheap,
though, at €38 a head for three courses, excluding wine). Family suites have bunk beds in
a separate space visible from the parents’ room.

• +351 93 373 92 45, herdadedamatinha.com , from around €100-€170 B&B

Monica’s tip: Choupana (+351 283 996 643) is a very simple wooden restaurant
directly on the beach in Vila Nova de Milfontes. Not many people go there – but we often
go as a family and love it. It’s a great spot to end the day as the sun sets right in front of
you.

42
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


Três Marias

4km from Aivados beach

An unpaved road running through fields of wheat and wild flowers brings you to
Três Marias, a 10-room B&B, run by Balthasar Trueb (half-Swiss, half-Portguese in case
you’re wondering). A passionate advocate for the area and a mine of information, he
helped set up the Rota Vincentina walking route (see below). Ten rooms, including two
family rooms with kitchenettes, are arranged in two houses, with polished concrete floors,
mossie nets and small bathrooms. There’s no pool but the coast can be reached on the
hotel’s free bikes. Outside there’s a shaded chill-out area with cushions and a telescope
(night skies are dazzling) and the fields are home to donkeys and an ostrich – a lone
survivor from Balthasar’s former life as an ostrich farmer. But that’s another story.

• +351 965 666 231, casasbrancas.pt , B&B doubles from €80.

Balthasar’s tip: Herdade do Pessegueiro is a great riding school offering


everything from a one-hour lesson to overnight trekking programmes, staying at hotels en
route. In the low season they also offer rides along the beach. From €20 per hour.

GREAT BEACHES

Best for children, Vila Nova de Milfontes

Most of the beaches along Portugal’s west coast are pounded relentlessly by Atlantic
Ocean waves and the Altentejo is no exception. Few are safe for children to swim from, so

43
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


the gently sloping sands of Farol beach, protected from the rollers by a headland, are
perfect for families.

There’s a restaurant right on the beach, so parents of older kids could feasibly sit on
the terrace with a beer as their children paddle in the shallows. At low tide, kids can also
busy themselves searching for crabs under the rocks.

Best for drinks with a view, Odeceixe

Odeceixe beach is breathtaking: a broad expanse of sand with a shallow river


running through it (ideal for young children). The cherry on top of this natural
gorgeousness is Bar da Praia, a tiny space with just three or four tables inside, and
benches outside for taking in the view. It’s laid-back enough for you to rock up with sandy
feet, sophisticated enough to serve good Portuguese wines in decent-size glasses and high-
quality Spanish tapas. The cool soundtrack, the easy charm of the Spanish owners, the
gobsmacking view… I didn’t want to leave. Next door, if you want something more
substantial, is a more traditional restaurant and bar, with the same stonking view and a
more extensive menu, including €4.50 burgers, plates of prawns, and pork chops with
chips.

Best for rockpooling, Almograve

Every child loves rockpooling, and at low tide Almograve is a great place for hunting
down crabs, shrimp and small fish in the many pools. You’ll need to stay with younger
children and keep a keen eye on older ones – the waves here are rough – but it’s a great
spot to while away a couple of hours with a bucket and a net.

44
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

Best for isolation Carvalhal

In July and August, Alteirinhos is the beach of choice for holidaying Lisboans, who
prefer its slightly more isolated location over the busier beach at Zambujeira. It’s great if
you want to feel part of the short-lived summer buzz. But if you want peace and quiet,
even in the height of summer, try Carvalhal, an idyllic cove that is rarely crowded. There
are no restaurants or kiosks at either beach so remember to take food and water with you.

THINGS TO DO

Walking

Of the few tourists I saw in the Alentejo, most were wearing hiking boots. The Rota
Vicentina is a 350km path between Santiago do Cacém, about 100km south of Lisbon, and
Cabo de São Vicente at the south-western tip of the country. The route comprises two
sections: the inland Historical Way, which runs through cork oak tree forests, valleys and
villages, and the Fisherman’s Way, which follows the cliffs, offering superb views of empty
golden sands, crashing waves, and the chance to see unique wildlife such as nesting storks
at Cabo Sardão. With easy access on to the path and clear waymarking, it’s very easy to
walk sections of the route independently, but several tour operators have packages,
including British walking specialists Headwater (headwater.com ) and Inntravel
(inntravel.co.uk ), and local outfits such as Ramblin’tejano (ramblintejano.com ).

• Find maps, GPS coordinates and places to eat and sleep at rotavicentina.com

Surfing

Portugal has some of the best surfing in Europe and hosts numerous international
competitions, but you don’t have to be a professional to take to the waves. There are
several surf schools along this stretch of coast. The Odeciexe Surf School offers one-,
three- and five-day courses starting at €50 in low season (equipment extra).

Kayaking

45
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

If surfing is too hardcore, kayaking offers a gentler way to enjoy this coastline.
Nature Activities is a new company run by Lisbon escapee Carlos Lourenço, offering
kayaking excursions at the mouth of the river Mira, opposite the town of Vila Nova de
Milfontes. Paddle across the delta, the sea winds at your back, spotting storks, herons and
kingfishers along the shore (three hours from €25). Shorter trips (one-two hours) can be
enjoyed by children from eight years up. Further upstream, Eco Trails offers a different
view of the river, starting in the town of Odemira and following the river as it narrows,
spotting numerous species of bird in the bankside reeds (three-five hours from €15pp, 5-
15-year-olds half-price).

Donkey trekking

A donkey’s plod is the perfect pace for this languid region. Burros & Artes offers
tailormade tours from two to eight days from an idyllic base in the Vale das Amoreiras near
Aljezur, just over the border in the Algarve. You spend a couple of hours getting to know
your trusty steed, learning how to handle him or her, before setting off on a mapped route
along the Rota Vicentina, staying in pre-booked guesthouses or hotels en route. You don’t
actually ride the donkey – it’s there to carry your baggage and/or tired child. Owner Sofia
also offers 1½-hour walks along a valley trail lined with rock-rose, lavender and eucalyptus
– ideal for children.

46
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


• +351 282 998 331, donkey-trekking-algarve.blogspot.co.uk , accommodation from
€40pp a night, donkey €60 a day, 90-minute trip €30

Way to go

How to do it

Accommodation was provided by Herdade da Nespereira (+351 283 958723,


herdadedanespereira.com ); doubles from €120 B&B, watermill house from €185 (high
season). Flights were provided by Monarch (monarch.co.uk ) which flies to Faro from six
UK airports from £90 return including taxes. Car hire was provided by Carrentals
(carrentals.co.uk ) which offers seven days’ hire from Faro airport from £88.

http://www.theguardian.com/travel/2014/jul/12/-sp-portugal-alentejo-region-
europe-finest-beaches

47
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

10Best: Portugal's Alentejo Region

What to expect, where to go, what to see, eat and do

By Paul Bernhardt

Portugal Travel Expert

AUGUST 12, 2014

Évora at dusk

Photo courtesy of Paul Bernhardt

Portugal's Alentejo region is immense. Occupying nearly one-third of Portugal, this


sunbaked province of vast undulating plains is peppered with cork oak and olive trees and
whitewashed villages. In summer, swaths of golden wheat blanket its southern reaches and
flecks of wild flowers provide a tapestry of colour and fragrance.

To the north the Alentejo countryside is more austere in character, a landscape


defined by the remote Serra de São Mamede. A rugged escarpment of weather-worn

48
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


granite facing the border with Spain, the remote hill range is sprinkled with medieval
hamlets and the shells of once mighty castles built to protect the frontier.

Rooted to this beautiful and richly diverse region are the neatly combed vineyards
embroidering the land like ribbons of emerald corduroy, a reminder that the Alentejo is one
of the most fertile and productive wine regions in the country.

Yet despite its tantalizing allure, this is still one of the least visited areas of Portugal.

Évora's central square

Photo courtesy of Paul Bernhardt

49
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


All about Évora

Just 90 minutes by car from Lisbon and reached by an often-empty motorway,


Évora is the perfect introduction for anyone wishing to unlock the Alentejo’s best-kept
secrets.

A picture-book town of compelling beauty, Évora’s old quarter is still partially ringed
by ancient walls that enclose a collection of architectural and cultural treasures so precious
and rare that UNESCO declared it a World Heritage Site in 1986.

Nestling among the monuments and museums is the M’AR De AR Aqueduto, a five-
star boutique bolthole housed within a restored 16th-century palace. As its name suggests,
the hotel is situated close to the city’s ancient aqueduct, constructed between 1531 and
1537 – the mar and ar mean sea and air, a poetic nod towards the seemingly endless
wilderness of the Alentejo plains. The stylish retreat is a splendid base from which to
explore this enchanting destination.

Hotel M'Ar De Ar Aqueduto

Photo courtesy of M'Ar De Ar Aqueduto

50
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


In his book Journey to Portugal, Portuguese author José Saramago describes Évora
as possessing “more monuments than any other Portuguese city,” a place that “has
definitely History’s continual presence on its streets and squares, in every stone or
shadow”.

Indeed, saunter through the maze of narrow, cobbled lanes and across fountain-
laden squares and you’ll eventually gaze upon such wonders as the landmark Roman
temple. Nearby is the impressive 13th-century cathedral. Pause and study the ornate
sculpted figures of the Apostles that flank the portal: Évora’s stonemasons must have been
balancing on dragonflies to achieve such delicate handiwork.

Évora Roman Temple

Photo courtesy of Paul Bernhardt

But it’s the less illustrious Igreja de São Francisco that very often steals the
limelight, because hidden away in this otherwise non-descript 15th-century church is the
most macabre visitor attraction in Portugal, the Capela dos Ossos.

The gruesome chapel of bones is lined with the remains of 5,000 monks, a
disquieting mosaic of bleached, fragmented skeletons. It’s an astonishing tableau made all
the more creepy by the hundreds of disembodied skulls that stare blankly across the floor
in a collective look of solemn indignation.

51
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


Nightlife in Évora revolves around the many excellent restaurants nestling in and
around the central Praça do Giraldo. Their menus typify the superb cuisine cooked up in
this part of Portugal.

Eating in Évora

Alentejo gastronomy has its roots firmly planted in the countryside. The region is
celebrated for its honest, no-nonsense cooking – rich, rustic fare prepared to recipes
handed down from generation to generation. Complementing this rural palate is a veritable
ocean harvest of fresh fish and seafood landed at ports dotted along its wild and
windswept Atlantic Ocean coastline.

One of the finest eateries in town is Fialho, Travessa Mascarenhas 16, where a
specialty is the oven-baked lamb stew. The tiny Tasquinha do Oliveira, Rua Cândido dos
Reis 45, is another culinary hotspot. And the kitchen at M’AR De AR’s own Degust’ar
restaurant conjures up inspired dishes like octopus tentacle in garlic and olive oil.

The Alentejo is fantastic road-trip territory, which is just as well really because
public transport options are somewhat limited.

Watersports

An hour southeast of Évora is Lake Alqueva. This immense body of water draws
boating and watersports enthusiasts from across Portugal, but to really take advantage of
Europe’s largest man-made reservoir, hire a houseboat from Amieira marina.

A great family activity option, the fully equipped boats can accommodate 2-12
persons and you’re free to pilot the vessel yourself. You can even tie up at designated
pontoons along the shore and overnight in glorious silence under skies so clear and bright
the area has been described as a celestial pearl for stargazing.

52
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


Southern Destinations

Venture further south, through traditional towns like Serpa (renowned for its
deliciously creamy sheep’s cheeses) and you’ll eventually reach the fortified riverside town
of Mértola. This is one of the Alentejo’s most fascinating destinations, a vila museu, or
museum site, where a cluster of Phoenician, Roman, Moorish and Visigoth treasures are
imaginatively displayed in several museums. Stay at the Hotel Museu and you’re literally
sleeping on 1000 years of history – the reception hall is built over an excavated
archaeological site!

Vineyards, Wines and Tastings

The Alentejo is justly famous for its wines, and enotourism is big business. By
following the Rota dos Vinhos do Alentejo the visitor is able to tour some of the most
celebrated wineries in the country. Most require advance booking, which guarantees you a
guided tour of the vineyards, cellars and tastings of selected reds and whites. Occasionally
the producers themselves are on hand to elaborate upon the production process and to
answer questions.

Cartuxa winery

Photo courtesy of Paul Bernhardt

There are nearly 70 adegas scattered across the region. Some, like Herdade da
Malhadinha Nova in Albernôa, offer accommodation, gastronomy and an exciting
programme of outdoor activities. Others are part of noble estates. Dona Maria Vinhos, for

53
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


example, is housed in a beautiful early 18th-century mansion, and the old winery is 150
years old. The cellar features rare and magnificent pink marble lagares.

Winetasting at Cartuxa

Photo courtesy of Paul Bernhardt

The Rota dos Vinhos do Alentejo is coordinated from a smart showroom in Évora, at
Praça Joaquim António de Aguiar 20, where you can taste a number of wines for free.
However, just outside the city walls is another historic adega certainly worth exploring,
Cartuxa at Quinta de Valbom. The old winery is in fact a former refectory used by
Carthusian monks and dates from 1776. A glass or two here can be enjoyed over mellow
Gregorian chant.

In http://www.10best.com/interests/travel-features/10best-portugals-alentejo-
region/

Motivational Activity – Algarve

5. Watch the following video and comment on it as far as Algarve is concerned.

54
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

«[Promotional video - UK] Algarve. Europe's most famous secret»

In https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EbG4M--OlsU

Notes:

__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________

55
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

Algarve – articles

Eden of the Algarve

From March 2001 By Lewis H. Lapham

God probably didn't want Adam playing golf in Paradise—which may explain why He
replicated its warm sun, exotic birds and flowering trees in Portugal.

The broad plain of the Algarve occupies the whole of Portugal's southern coast, but
as recently as thirty years ago the only golf courses on the premises were made of oil and
sand. Portugal in the sixties hadn't yet been incorporated into the magic kingdom of late-
twentieth-century tourism, and the hoteliers in the Algarve offered golf as mere
amusement, a distraction as trifling as quoits or bumper pool for the holiday crowds
enjoying what was then the cheapest beach vacation in Europe. The south coast was for
the most part unimproved, the long shoreline--approximately 100 miles west to east from
Cabo de São Vicente to the Spanish frontier--as empty as the winter horizon. Like the
fishing quays at Albufeira and Portimão, the picturesque towns of Lagos and Sagres looked

56
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


much as they had when they served as fifteenth-century ports of embarkation for the small
wooden ships sailing in search of new sea routes to the Indies.

When the scenery began to change in the late sixties, the first rush of land
speculation circumvented the nuisance of building and environmental codes. Within a
matter of five or six years, so much construction was in progress that the directors of the
region's tourist traffic began to worry about destroying the wonders of nature from which
they fashioned their postcards and handsome returns on investment. What if the southern
coast of Portugal turned into another vulgar ruin? What then?

Fortunately for all concerned, somebody mentioned golf. Golf was a game played by
rich people, and if the Algarve could be reconfigured as a golfer's garden of earthly delights
(something along the lines of Peter Pan's Neverland or Henry Adams's "banker's Olympus"),
maybe the money could be made at the high end of the tourist trade. Sir Henry Cotton, a
retired British Open champion, had designed the first of the region's courses at Penina in
1966, supervising its construction while seated on the donkey that he also employed as his
caddie. The success of Cotton's enterprise encouraged the authorities to think of the game
as a means of aligning environmental concerns with commercial interests, and the golf
architects began with the advantages of a warm sun, exotic birds and the same flowering
trees--orange, fig, oleander, almond--believed to have bloomed in Eden.

By 2000 they had completed twenty-odd courses. On being given the chance
recently to review them, I came first to the question of what constituted a fair measure of
judgment. So many golf courses have been set up in so many parts of the world over the
last thirty years (advancing different principles of design, different intimations of
immortality) that it's hard to know how to rate the several theories of the good, the true
and the beautiful. Before leaving New York, I looked through a number of books on the
subject. Because most of the Algarve courses had been built by Englishmen, I thought it
fair to rely on the authority of Dr. Alister MacKenzie. He published a slim volume in 1920
under the simple title Golf Architecture (reprinted in 1987, with a foreword by Herbert
Warren Wind and an afterword by my father). MacKenzie believed in the supremacy of
mind over matter and regarded a well-made golf course as "largely a question of the spirit
in which the problem is approached. Does the player look upon it from the 'card and pencil'
point of view and condemn anything that has disturbed his steady series of threes and
fours, or does he approach the question in 'the spirit of adventure' of the true sportsman?"

57
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


Taking the doctor's point, I also took his book to Portugal. This proved to be a lucky
choice, for on the early-morning plane from London to Faro I found myself seated across
the aisle from a British golfer whose home course was the one that MacKenzie had
designed at Moortown. The man busied himself with his newspapers during the first two
hours of the flight, clearly indicating that he didn't wish to be disturbed.

But when he saw that I was reading MacKenzie's chapter titled "Ideal Holes," he
extended me the privilege of his acquaintance. As a general rule, he said, he didn't speak
to Americans--too many of them turn out to be the kind of people who talk too much about
wedge shots gone missing in a pond --but anybody who knew enough to know MacKenzie
clearly could be trusted to bear in silence the misfortune of a dead stymie behind a
eucalyptus tree.

"One's own damned fault, of course," he said. "Like a poorly played marriage."

"Stroke and distance," I said, and then, after a pause of maybe two or three
minutes, long enough to signify disdain for the card-and-pencil point of view, ". . . same as
an expensive divorce."

The economy of the remark enlisted my companion's confidence, and before the
plane reached Faro he'd named the golf courses in the Algarve that he thought worthy of
an approach in "the spirit of adventure." He owned a property at Vilamoura, had played a
round at Vale do Lobo with Cotton and the donkey, and thought that the real estate
speculation on the coast had inclined too many of the natives toward the corrupting
worship of Mammon.

58
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


"The Portuguese know three hundred and sixty-five ways to cook a codfish," he
said. "A different recipe for every day of the year. They also know three hundred and sixty-
five ways to stuff a tourist."

Knowing nothing about the several hotels that I'd seen illustrated in the travel
brochures, I had arranged to stay at Hotel Quinta do Lago on the assumption that the
expense ($195, out of season) guaranteed a view of the Algarve from one of its more
favorable points of vantage. The road from the airport at Faro turns off the highway at
Almancil, wanders for a few miles among rows of signs--in German, English and
Portuguese--advertising properties at bargain rates, passes a number of campgrounds and
threadbare restaurants, and in a matter of no more than thirty minutes comes to the
entrance of a two-thousand-acre estate similar to the upscale resort communities in the
States.

The hotel is recently renovated, owned by Orient-Express (which also owns the
Cipriani in Venice and 21 in New York City) and built in such a way that it agrees with the
lie of the land, the architecture fitted into the face of a steep embankment fronting on the
beach, almost all of the glass and cantilevered concrete impossible to see from the road.
(Most of the hotels in the Algarve stand within the boundaries of similarly large
plantations.) The management goes to considerable trouble to make good on its promise of
an escape from the world of death and time with a spa and heated swimming pools, an
Italian chef in the two restaurants, the stillness of polished marble and the reassurance of

59
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


burnished wood, and a view of fishing boats on the horizon that might have been painted
by van Gogh. The young ladies at the golf desk discuss the fine points of the many courses
in the region, arrange tee times, provide transportation, complete foursomes. Basically,
they do everything except line up the putts.

Heeding The Words Of My Companion on the plane, I first played the three courses
that he thought deserving of MacKenzie's approval. They proved to be the best of the eight
courses that I saw over a period of four days, each of them so arranged that in reply to the
doctor's leading question, "What kind of difficulties make interesting golf?" they presented
three splendid variants of his own answer:

"We can, I think, eliminate difficulties consisting of long grass, narrow fairways and
small greens, because of the annoyance and irritation caused by searching for lost balls,
the disturbance of the harmony and continuity of the game, the consequent loss of
freedom of swing and the production of bad players."

The San Lorenzo course lies within both the Quinta do Lago estate and the Ria
Formosa Natural Park, which encompasses around 45,000 acres of wetlands protected by
the Portuguese government as a refuge for migrating birds. Designed by William "Rocky"
Roquemore and Joseph Lee and rated among the three best on the European continent,
the course makes wonderful use of what MacKenzie would have recognized as "the
innocent and natural undulations of the ground," the fairways wide enough to suggest
alternate routes to the bottle-shaped greens, the distances from the back tees not
oppressively long. The justly famous home hole borders the far shore of a lake, which
presents itself as a hazard to the golfer but not to the birds that rest among its reeds. I

60
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


saw sultana chickens, egrets and purple gallinules. The gentlemen in my group mentioned
prior sightings of storks, hoopoes and an Egyptian vulture.

The Vilamoura plantation spreads across more than four thousand acres and
provides the conveniences of a yacht basin, a small airport and a gambling casino. Of its
four golf courses, the best is The Old Course, completed in 1969 and designed by Frank
Pennink. The feeling is that of an English park, graceful and calm, the umbrella pine trees
now grown to stately heights and the bunkers placed in such a way as to bear out
MacKenzie's observation about the like-mindedness of the golf architect and the
camoufleur: "Surprise is the most important thing in war, and by camouflage you are able
to attain this not only on the defence but in the attack." The pine between the tee and the
green at the 178-yard, par-three fourth forces the player to carry the ball directly over it
and so deploys an otherwise "innocent-looking feature of the landscape" in a manner likely
to "give pleasurable excitement to the golfer" and restore "confidence and improvement in
the morale to the solider."

The third course that I thought exceptional is the one Cotton built in 1968 on the
edge of the sea at Vale do Lobo. The adjacent real estate development has since been
greatly enlarged, allowing for the construction of another eighteen holes, myriad holiday
villas and the Le Meridien Dona Filipa. The two golf courses have been formed with
combinations of older and newer holes, but those designed by Cotton--most magnificently
the par-three sixteenth on the Royal course (a carry of 224 yards across a precipice of
honey-colored cliffs)--satisfy MacKenzie's definition of the ideal hole: "One that affords the
greatest pleasure to the greatest number, gives the fullest advantage for accurate play,
stimulates players to improve their game, and never becomes monotonous."

Within the span of a week I managed to play another five courses, all but one in the
eastern Algarve. On the Quinta do Lago course, most of the approach shots must be played
uphill to a blind green, and despite some fine effects on both the front and back nines, the
steepness of the fairways forces the use of a cart, which, as MacKenzie would have
guessed, disturbs "the harmony and the continuity of the game." The courses at Vila Sol
and Pinheiros Altos also present a number of fine holes, but not enough of them to warrant
the doctor's unqualified praise.

61
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

The Algarve is known as the best place to play golf in mainland Europe

By the end of the third day I discovered why I never had any trouble arranging a
tee time and why I seldom needed more than three and one-half hours to play a round.
Because the weather in late November and early December can turn wet and cold, the
agencies that book golf tours send their clients to the Caribbean. But if it so happens that
the skies stay blue and warm (as they did when I was on the coast), then the fortunate
traveler from the land of death and time stumbles, "from a golfing point of view," into the
best possible world. The starters greet the new arrival as if welcoming a long-lost friend,
and the golfer who hits a poor shot from a fairway or a tee can recover his faith in a just
Providence with the playing of a second ball.

The local attitude toward tourists, however, didn't need much explanation. If the
Portuguese know 365 ways to prepare a codfish, they also know 365 ways to cook mullet,
prawns, lobster, tuna and bream, and they don't make fine distinctions between the
different species of golfer that comprise the day's catch at the airport in Faro. All are
welcome; all can be accommodated. For those who don't play golf, the Algarve offers the
full complement of lesser attractions (hang gliding, horseback riding, tennis), as well as
shopping, arcades, discotheques, Roman ruins and an assortment of restaurants famous
not only for fish but for the native wines and sweet desserts made with eggs and almonds.

On Friday I Drove The Entire length of the two-lane highway from Faro to Cabo de
São Vicente with the hope of maybe playing the courses at Palmares or Penina. A few miles
west of Portimão the road begins to look as if it is running backward in time. Fishing
villages take the place of hotels; the trees on the parched hillsides dwindle into gorse

62
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


bushes; at the outdoor tables of the roadside cafés, old men in wool caps drink coffee and
play dominos, their donkeys tethered to the signs promising miracles of real estate
development as yet unseen in Heaven or on earth. Between Portimão and Lagos I stopped
at Penina, the original Sir Henry Cotton course (now equipped with a first-class Le Meridien
hotel). A tournament was in progress, but from what I could tell by looking at the map on
the card, the design resembles Vale do Lobo's Ocean course, with its similarly treacherous
arrangement of bunkers and multiple angles of approach on the long, doglegged holes.

Another thirty miles west, I came upon Parque da Floresta, a golfing plantation built
in 1987. I played the round with Gary Silcock, a Scotsman employed as the resident
teaching professional who hoped to become a golf architect. An admirer of MacKenzie's
precepts, Silcock thought that despite two fine finishing holes, the steepness of almost all
of Parque da Floresta's slopes asked the player for "too much walking between greens and
tees."

After our round, enough light lingered in the sky to warrant the fifteen-mile drive
west to Cabo de São Vicente. I don't remember ever having seen a more majestic sight,
the sea surge bursting into tumults of white foam and rising to heights of two hundred feet
against the somber headland at the westernmost edge of Europe. Slightly to the south and
cast in poetic outline by the angle of the setting sun, I could see the fifteenth-century
castle on the cliffs at Sagres, where Henry the Navigator commissioned a college of
mapmaking astrologers to find the way to the Indies and the Americas.

Five hundred years later, the cartographers of the Algarve have come up with a
different set of coordinates for the location of the earthly Paradise--man-made instead of
God-given, the province of greenskeepers instead of a promise from priests. The wind
shifted into the north as the last light dropped below the horizon, and by the time I again

63
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


passed through Lagos, it had begun to rain. In the darkness on both sides of the road, at
least five new golf courses were under construction. On the evidence of what I had seen
during four days of extraordinary luck with both the wine and the weather, I thought it safe
to infer that the builders had in mind the same prescription against age and mortality once
recommended by Dr. MacKenzie:

"How frequently have I, with great difficulty, persuaded patients who were never off
my doorstep to take up golf, and how rarely, if ever, have I seen them in my consulting-
rooms again!"

Orientation

The Algarve lies west of Spain at the southwestern tip of Europe. It averages three
hundred sunny days a year. Fly into Lisbon or London and change planes to Faro, the
provincial capital; Continental (800-525-0280), British Airways (800-247-9297) and TAP Air
Portugal (800-221-7370) have connecting flights. For more info, visit www.algarve-golf.com
or portugal.org, or call the Portuguese Golf Federation at 011-351-214-12-3780, or the
Algarve Office of Tourism at 011-351-289-80-0400.

Where To Play

All of the Algarve's courses insist on proper dress and proof of competence
(handicaps often no higher than twenty-eight for men and thirty-six for women). Most
clubs don't supply caddies, but some will provide one with advance warning. Algarve Golfe
(011-351-289-39-1030), a regional association, offers a thirty-day "passport" for reduced
green fees at select courses; numerous hotels also offer discount golf packages.

In http://www.travelandleisure.com/articles/eden-of-the-algarve

64
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

Nothing doing

Kevin Gould

The Guardian, Saturday 9 May 2009

People-watching, snoozing, meandering - the most relaxing holidays are all about
simple pleasures, says Kevin Gould, who perfects the art of idling in a sleepy enclave of the
Algarve.

At Faro airport there's a scrum of resort reps ready to meet and greet new arrivals.
In an hour or so they'll be hitting their charges with the usual options: Do you want to play
golf? Go go-karting? Cycle through mountains? Be dragged around important museums and
art galleries?

65
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


No, not me thanks. I want to kick back and do sweet nothing. In fact, I want a
place where the locals have elevated doing not much to an art form. So, instead of turning
left to the all-in, attraction-rich resorts, I catch a cab for the 15 minutes to Olhão.

Pronounced "oll-yow", Olhão is the Algarve's largest fishing port. A rare gem, its
centre is crumbling, charming, faded, and stuffed full of appealingly batty characters. The
occasional tourist wanders about, wondering quite why they're here. Olhão is a top place
for a relaxing long weekend. I'm intent on being inert, but rouse myself sufficiently to
discover that the jewel in its crown isn't actually in town, but a lovely ferry ride away.

Ria Formosa is an estuarine national park, with Olhão at its mouth and the wild
Atlantic beyond. Around 80% of Portugal's clams are fished here, around its four low
islands. Farol and Armona are where Lisbon folk maintain their holiday homes; Deserta is a
sandy empty place for the Robinson Crusoe in you; Culatra is where the fishermen live, and
they are delighted for you to be as active as you wish, as long as that includes watching
the waves, counting your toes, playing dominoes, drinking cold drinks, and eating delicious
fish.

There are four sailings a day to Culatra, and a return trip on the Rio Bello costs the
price of a beer in an Algarve resort. Battalions of tartan shopping trollies bursting with
green vegetables and juicy fruits from Olhão's markets are lashed to Rio Bello's blue-
washed funnel, and we're off. The ferries are operated by men of a certain age who leap
hither and thither, offering twinkly chivalrous winks to the ladies aboard. Though Culatra's

66
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


only a mile or so offshore, we sail the long way over to avoid sandbanks and shrimp nets.
The air smells clean and salty, families natter about everything and nothing, lapdogs snap,
an earnest student sketches another earnest student, young lovers gently snog and
strangers strike up friendships.

Culatra feels like the start of a love affair right from the moment we nudge
alongside its long slender jetty. I amble along the sandy concrete path towards Café
Janoca, past the stout whitewashed chapel and the rusty anchor outside it. A table of
fishermen plays noisy dominoes next to a family of quiet pale newly-arrived townies; when
I pass again four hours later, the family are still there, only now playing dominoes with the
fishermen and laughing like drains.

Ten steps on, next to Rui's cafe, there's a grocery where you buy everything you
need for a perfect picnic. It's hot outside, and the light is the intense, saturated light you
find only on islands, so I drain a couple of long cold Sagres beers in Rui's. Rui has a long
covered terrace where I sit with more fishermen, all of whose faces are tanned as your
mum's old handbag; one of them actually smokes a pipe and has an anchor tattooed on his
bicep. They have buckets and trowels as they're going clamming, and Popeye leaves first,
navigating the sand with a gratifyingly bandy gait.

Save a few tractors for dragging boats up the beach, there are no motor vehicles on
Culatra. There are no roads either, so I walk the sandy path into the settlement's cluster
of low-built houses and cottages. About 700 people live here year round. Their homes are
huddled close to each other and at first sight, appear unremarkable. Up close, I see that

67
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


the Culatrans coax exquisite gardens out of the sand with wildflowers, succulents, shell
patterns and mad blushes of bougainvillea. Old fishing nets and briny ropes enclose the
gardens, and lines of washing flap in the Atlantic breeze.

Towards the end of the settlement is the spotless yellow Casa Marina, which
Senhora Lidia rents out by the fortnight. Rooms and other houses to rent on the island are
available informally through Cafes Rui and Janoca. The houses soon give way to dunes
crowned with clumps of wild chamomile, and a new boardwalk, which leads over a low
lagoon.

The boardwalk deposits me on a beach so long that its edges are lost in heat haze
shimmer. The beach is wide, clean and empty: it is May Day holiday weekend, and there
are 11 people on it, including me, and I'm the only one not lying flat on my back. Instead, I
get a healthy blast of ocean ozone, a rush of blood to the head and lope off to the left,
deciding vaguely to circumnavigate the island.

The sun shouts down from a sapphire sky clotted with three tiny cottony clouds.
The sand scintillates in the bright island light and, coolly tonic on my hot feet, the Atlantic
sparkles like chainmail. There are well-fed seagulls wheeling above and wagtails dipping
their beaks where the rippled water recedes. There are no nasty oil-marks on the beach,
nor weedy sewage outfalls. There are no Fantas or Magnums on ice, no sellers of
souvenirs, no racks of postcards, no loutish boomboxes, no plastic rubbish, no deckchairs
for rent, no jet-skis to annoy me, no windsurfing lessons not to take. For ages there is
nobody but me, alone with my thoughts, which have slowed down with the rhythm of the
sea.

68
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


I'm joined at a distance by four fishermen. They are waist deep in the water,
harnessed by yellow straps to box nets that they wiggle backwards through the sandy
shallows in search of cockles. A sailboat tacks over the horizon and, after an hour or so of
fast walking, I'm at one end of the beach. Every now and again, a jet glides high overhead
with its pink cargo of resort-bound action seekers. The way back around the other side of
the island to the settlement is even emptier, save for a dozen clam diggers in the distance,
bent like question marks over the sand.

I lope into Café Rui and in a trice they've laid me a place and grilled me some fat
small sardines, and found a handful of small squid, which they fry in good oil with cloves of
golden garlic. These arrive with a sharp salad of sweet tomatoes and crunchy onion. Time
being elastic on Culatra, lunch lasts long enough for me to floor plenty of chilly vinho verde
and to make friends with just about everyone on the terrace. Jorge, the island's plumber,
fado singer and domino maestro explains the insular philosophy to tourism. "There's no
'them' and 'us' here", he says: "You are on Culatra. So am I. We are the same". I badly
want to rent a place here. And possibly never leave.

Instead, and having missed the ferry, I join some other dreamers to share a
speedboat water taxi back to the mainland. We pay €5 each and fall into the 7 Estrellas bar
(Travesa Alexandre Herculano, opposite the meat market), where small tumblers of
excellent wine from the cask are 30 cents a throw. We're joined by one of the town
barbers, who paints beautiful watercolours between punters. A shirtless man walks past,
braying like a donkey. "You think he's crazy?" asks our barber/painter: "His brother the
mayor is madder."

Olhão is home to many a nutty enthusiast. Some come from outside, drawn by the
abandoned, gloriously tile-fronted, 19th-century townhouses which are yours for a song.
One, a velvet-slippered, part-English dandy, owns 15 such properties, and can't bear to
touch any of them. Some come from here and spend their days eating snails and clams,
and talking hilarious philosophical rot for each other's gentle entertainment. The mayor has
established a zoo on the prettily gardened seafront. And stocked it entirely with terrapins.

The most stylish Olhãonense are architects Filipe Monteiro and Eleonore Lefebure. I
stay with them at White Terraces, their super-cool, sensitively restored townhouses, and
feel like Herbert flipping Ypma from Hip Hotels. Filipe and Eleonore take me for a meander
through the old medina barrio, where alleys double-back on each other, where the sun-and

69
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


time-faded walls could have been painted by Mark Rothko, where the smell of sardines
grilling outside is narcotic, where the air resounds to endless "bom dias" and church bells.

They also take me to La Taxca (Rua Correio Olhãoense, opposite the fish market) a
tiny, tiled joint where - if Fernando likes the look of you - he'll feed you until you beg for
mercy with simply sumptuous home-cooked grub. Some poshies from Lisbon come in,
demanding a table. Fernando doesn't want their type here. "This looks like a restaurant"
explains our flush faced host, "But if you want to eat here, you must bring your own food."
Cue general confusion, hilarity among the rest of us, and carafes of wine on the house. The
spirit of generosity that pervades La Taxca is matched only by Fernando's personal intake
of overproof almond aguadiente.

Leaving Olhão and Culatra was the most difficult thing I did in all my days there.
Getting the best out of the town and its island heaven requires dedication only to the art of
idling. People-watching, navel-gazing, and gentle meandering are all that are really
required of you, and doing so little actually allows you to find yourself too. When you visit
you'll probably find me back in the 7 Estrellas, discussing the finer points of terrapin
keeping, spending lazy days on Culatra's beaches, and my nights on Olhão's tiles.

Way to go

Getting there

70
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


Monarch (08700 40 50 40, monarch.co.uk ) flies to Faro from Birmingham, Gatwick,
Luton (summer season only) and Manchester from £86 rtn inc taxes. A taxi from Faro
airport to Olhão costs around €25, or take the bus to Faro, then train to Olhão every 30
minutes, €1 one way. The Ferry from Olhão to Culatra costs €3.40 rtn; water taxi €25 one-
way.

Where to stay

In Culatra, Senhora Lidia rents Casa Marina (00351 914 983 619, she speaks some
Spanish) for €500-750 per fortnight (sleeps 4). Ownersdirect.co.uk also offers
accommodation on the islands. Café Rui (+962 508 746) can also help find rooms and
houses to rent. In Olhão, White Terraces (+289 119 616, whiteterraces.com) has five
sensational townhouses from €40-€130 per day, or €225-€850 per week, depending on the
size of property and season.

Praia do Vau

In http://www.theguardian.com/travel/2009/may/09/algarve-portugal-relaxation-
beach-holiday

71
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

Gastronomy - documents

1. Read and translate the following texts and articles.

Gastronomy in Portugal

Portugal has a gastronomy which is as rich and varied as its countryside and its
heritage. However, it is the sea which has made the greatest impression on Portuguese
cuisine. A simple charcoal-grilled fish or a plate of fresh seafood is always a guarantee of
an excellent meal. When summer arrives, the streets of the cities, towns and villages are
flooded by the smell and smoke characteristic of charcoaled sardines and, at the seaside,
the esplanade cafés serve a traditional octopus salad, clams and an endless variety of
freshly caught fish, in particular rock bass (robalo), gilthead seabream (douradas),
scabbard fish (peixe-espada) and horse mackerel (carapaus).

But meat also forms part of the nation's preferences. And cozido à portuguesa - a
succulent boiled mixture of meats, vegetables and stuffed sausages - is one of the most
appetising recipes in the world. If you are in the North, you can also savour tripe (tripas)
cooked in the style of Oporto, and a type of feijoada, which can also be made à la

72
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


transmontana in the interior of the region. In the Alentejo, the bread-based açorda and
migas are two unmissable delights and if you travel near Bairrada do not miss the
opportunity to savour the famous Leitão assado (roast suckling pig).

Wine and olive oil are also permanent presences on the Portuguese table. Our
national wine, considered one of the best in the world, varies from region to region along
with the grape varieties. Portuguese olive oil, of great quality, is the base of most of our
traditional recipes, and in particular the soups and the more than one thousand recipes for
salted codfish (bacalhau) which are said to exist.

And, to finish, let us not forget the delicious national cheeses and desserts,
especially those whose recipes were forged in the convents, almost all made with eggs and
sugar which make us «give thanks to the Lord». At the end of the meal, if you want to
appear a true Portuguese person, always ask for a coffee. Drink a strong espresso. Then
you will understand why the Portuguese spend so much time at the table.

In http://measuringchanges.lnec.pt/b6_gastronomy.html

73
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

2. Read the following article.

Eating in Alentejo

Several books have recently been compiling the most characteristic of Alentejan
cooking. To start off, the bread! Present at any meal. Central to migas, açordas, ensopados
and to fatias douradas.

The legacy of aromatic herbs fills the air, around the houses. Next to the pot,
coriander, pennyroyal, oregano, parsley, and rosemary, and a dash of olive oil that goes
well with everything.

Alentejan cheeses and wines are consolidating their fame. Excellent starters and
even better to finish off a meal. The garlic sausages are yet another regional speciality - or
rather, many specialities, such is the repercussion of little knacks and of t. the different
seasoning and smoking on the end result.

Fish and shellfish reach the dockside fresh from being caught, and quickly disappear
from the boxes. And joy abounds for the return of the unmatched dogfish soup to the
menus.

Pork, lamb, beef, all bred in the open without a manger, snuffling under the cork
oaks, with neither roof nor animal feed.

While merely to think of the sweets of the old convent recipes is in itself a sin!

74
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


Much of the best of Portuguese sweets and desserts is rooted in the art of cooking.

Undertaken in the convents. Eggs, sugar, honey, almonds or pine kernels, in


miraculously worked proportions, with cooking times that require great patience and secret
seasoning, continue to provide moments of unequalled pleasure, both in the buns and
cakes and in the sweets and desserts. Their great quality was the result of competition
between the convents to attract the favours of the better patrons. The spread of the use of
sugar in Portugal as from the 15th century, the noble provenance of the nuns (with their
refined habits, bearers of family recipes) and the abundance of fine raw materials donated
by the devote -these are just a few of the reasons behind the creation of so many good
recipes (many of them still kept secret) in these places of seclusion.

In http://www.genuineland.com/content.aspx?g=d&idr=1&idt=17&idc=1183&lang=1

75
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


3. Read the following article.

Oporto and North

The gastronomy of Porto and the North of Portugal is amongst the most varied in
the country and includes fish and seafood from the coast and tasty meats from the
countryside. Make a «Portonic» (a mixture of Port and tonic water) as an aperitif and start
your meal with a characteristic caldo verde broth. This, the most popular soup in Portugal,
has round slices of chouriço, with stuffed or smoked sausages from the northern
countryside, along with its famous hams from Chaves and Lamego, its alheiras from
Mirandela, or salpicões from Vinhais. You can purchase all of these products at the annual
Vinhais market fair.

Caldo Verde soup

There are different traditions along the coast, with fish occupying pride of place in
Matosinhos, Leça da Palmeira, Póvoa de Varzim and Viana do Castelo. Some of the best
salted codfish (bacalhau) recipes originate from here and the sardine enlivens the coast, as
well as the tradition festival of S. João, in Porto. Fish and seafood are washed down with
vinho verde in the Minho region; whether red or white, it is always served chilled. A definite
choice is lampreia (lamprey), trout and other river fish.

Rojões

The famous red wines of Douro are best when accompanying pork dishes, which in
the north take the form of rojões or arroz de frango, which give off heavenly flavours, or
dishes of veal, whether barrosã, maronesa, mirandesa or another kind.

Just room left for a delicious dessert: in Braga it can be the creme caramel «Abade
de Priscos», in Amarante «Papos de Anjo» or the universal leite-creme or arroz doce since
their presence is always, at least in the north of Portugal, guaranteed. And washed down
with a glass of Porto to finish the banquet from Porto and the North.

In http://measuringchanges.lnec.pt/b6_gastronomy.html

76
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


4. Read the following article.

Centre

The Centre of Portugal has some of the most well-liked dishes in the Gastronomy of
Portugal.

This region, with its green forests containing some of the most ancient historical
and archaeological remains in the country, is an excellent location to travel in, with one of
the main reasons to do so being the quality of its traditional gastronomy.

One good example of the cuisine of the Centre of Portugal is the Leitão (Suckling
Pig) from Bairrada, eaten with a sparkling wine from the region.

Leitão from Bairrada

The coast also offers seafood and fresh fish cooked in caldeirada and ensopado
dishes, which can also be prepared using fish from rivers and lakes, all washed down with
a white wine from Bairrada.

In the sierras, you can try the Dão red wines with recipes for goat, such as
chanfana (cooked in red wine) or roast kid (cabrito assado) as well as veal (vitela), cooked
to a special recipe of its own in Lafões.

Chanfana

The stuffed sausages (enchidos) of the countryside regions include maranhos,


morcelas de arroz and others, each one with its own particular characteristic, such as a
particular herb to imbue it with flavour.

There are well-known cheeses, such as the famous Serra da Estrela, Castelo
Branco, Alcains or Rabaçal. Creamy or cured, they are all excellent.

In http://measuringchanges.lnec.pt/b6_gastronomy.html

77
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


5. Read the following article.

Alentejo

Alentejano bread

The Alentejo cuisine brings creativity to every dish with a characteristic flourish of
imagination.

The Alentejo has always been a great wheat region, sprinkled with cork tree areas
and large herds of pigs grazing on the plains. As such, bread pork and olive oil are the
bases of one of the most delicious cuisines in Portugal, seasoned with herbs which bring
the aromas of the fields to the table.

Soup is a main dish, and may be cold when gaspacho, filled with bread in the sopa
de cação, or salted codfish (bacalhau) or tomato or the linguiça stuffed sausage. Bread also
forms part of the migas dumplings which accompany pork and lamb (ensopado de borrego)
or the simple Alentejan açorda. You can try these delights in any restaurant in Estremoz,
Évora or Beja, or also a dish of game, which is also very characteristic of the cuisine of the
Alentejo and which provides a real taste of pleasure!

Gaspacho soup

This is also the case on the coast, where fish and seafood take on a special flavour.
If you have never heard of the quality of the fish of the Southwest Alentejo, then you do
not know what you are missing?

Regional dessert

Also not to miss are the regional cheeses and the desserts originating from the
religious convents. Cheeses with a particular good reputation are those from Nisa, Serpa
and Évora, which is also an appropriate excuse to try a red wine from Borba, Redondo,
Reguengos or Vidigueira. The desserts' well, there were many convents in the Alentejo and
for all the work of the nuns, beating their eggs with sugar and almonds, we give thanks to
God!

In http://measuringchanges.lnec.pt/b6_gastronomy.html

78
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


6. Read the following article.

Algarve

From Sagres to Guadiana, the Algarve is a region of sun, fish and seafood. The
quality and variety are so great that a grilled fish or some barnacles eaten on the Vicentine
coast can seem a true delicacy from the Gods. There are also the region's own recipes
worth mentioning, with cataplanas, caldeiradas, fish soups or starters or hors d'oeuvre
(petiscos and acepipes) that provide relief to any day on the beach, playing golf or just fine
weather.

Seafood

Try some horse mackerel (carapaus) or the traditional charcoaled sardines in


Portimão. Order them with a Cacela mountain salad, and see that there is nothing finer
than tasty simplicity.

Charcoaled sardines

Or tuna steak in Tavira or octopus, from Santa Luzia. The Algarve is an excellent
place for this fare, as well as the delicious clams, cockles , razor clams, and oysters from
Baleeira, Alvor and the Formosa river or the little squid and cuttlefish ever present in the
Algarve - after all, it is a home to the fishermen!

However, the Algarve also has a sierra and recipes coming down from the land such
as boiled chick peas, or the fruits which flavour desserts, such as almonds, oranges and
figs, as well as the «Morgados» and «Dom Rodrigos» cakes which nobody can resist?
Among these fruits are those which provide flavour to the liqueurs and spirits
(aguardentes) such as medronho da serra and amêndoa amarga, the latter to be drunk
when chilled.

What more do you want for a romantic dinner, afternoon or a chance to set the
world on fire?

In http://measuringchanges.lnec.pt/b6_gastronomy.html

79
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

7. Read the following article.

Madeira

Limpets

Madeira has its own characteristic gastronomy, which mixes the Atlantic with the
exotic, which can be sampled in the elegant surroundings of the numerous hotels and
resorts.

Right in the Atlantic, the fish and seafood of the archipelago are tasty and cooked in
traditional ways, such as fillets of black scabbard fish (peixe-espada preto) or tuna steaks
(bifes de atum), served with crispy fried maize; there is also octopus and delicious seafood,
such as limpets and winkles.

The most traditional meat dish is the famous beef on a skewer made of a laurel
stick, which gives it a unique flavour.

With its exceptional climate, Madeira grows a large variety of crops, in particular
sugar cane and tropical fruit (such as the much appreciated banana, pineapple and passion
fruit), to be found in the drinks and the delicate desserts.

The famous Madeira wine, whether drunk as an aperitif or digestif, goes well with
the traditional honey cake (made with sugarcane honey). Sugar cane is also used to make
the aguardente to mix in to the famous punch, to be tried when climbing the Pico do
Areeiro.

Finally, we just need to mention the bolo do caco. Except that this is not a bolo
(cake) but a type of bread, which, through being baked on a piece of tile, was given this
name. It is also worth mentioning that bread is also made from sweet potatoes in Madeira:
you will just have to try the appetising ring-shaped biscuits (rosquilhas) made from this
sweet-potato.

80
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


If you travel to Porto Santo, the other island in the archipelago equally blessed with
a seaside life, let yourself be rocked by the memory of the meals and good moments
experienced on Madeira.

In http://measuringchanges.lnec.pt/b6_gastronomy.html

81
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


8. Read the following article.

The Azores

The gastronomy of the Azores includes some species of fish and seafood which are
unique in Portugal.

In the nine islands of the archipelago, the seafood is amongst the tastiest, and
there are barnacles and limpets to offer a gastronomic delight on all the islands. Fish can
be grilled freshly caught, or cooked in caldeiradas or fish soups. Stewed octopus is another
common delicacy.

The rump of beef from Terceira island is well known throughout the islands as well
as the much enjoyed boiled meat dish cozido das Furnas, on the island of S. Miguel, where
hermetically sealed containers are placed under the earth and the food is cooked in the
natural heat present in the ground. And there is also the traditional recipe for yams with
the linguiça sausages from the various islands.

Cozido das Furnas

The islands are home to excellent cheeses. The most famous of these is that of the
island of S. Jorge, which in continental Portugal is simply known as «cheese of the island»
(queijo da ilha).

Any talk of wines requires mention of verdelho, the Pico variety being the most well
known, with the picturesque patchwork countryside of the wine growing region having
received the status of a UNESCO World Heritage site, not to mention Biscoitos wine, from
Terceira Island.

As regards desserts, pastries are the most common, but there are also tasty
queijadas from the island of Graciosa and other desserts on each island. But do not forget
to try the pineapple from the Azores; the sweet taste will leave you will an excellent
souvenir of your stay on each island.

In http://measuringchanges.lnec.pt/b6_gastronomy.html

82
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


Customer Service
1. Translate and role-play the following dialogue.

Taking reservations by phone – at the restaurant

83
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

84
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


Taking reservations by phone – at the hotel

1. Role-play the following.

85
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

86
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


Taking a reservation by phone – at the hotel - translation

1st page

- Pine Ridge Hotel - E quando irá chegar?

- Olá, gostaria de obter um


quarto para o próximo mês, por favor.

Maryn Karini ligou para o Pine


Ridge Hotel para fazer uma reserva.
A Pat perguntou quais as datas da estada.

- Deixe-me verificar para si. - Quantas pessoas - Será possível


(são)? termos um quarto
com duas camas
Ela abriu o calendário de grandes (tamanho
reservas do hotel no seu terminal de A Pat perguntou “queen”)?
computador. quantas pessoas estariam
na festa da Maryn.
A Maryn pediu
um quarto duplo com
duas camas grandes.

A Pat procurou (procurou Ela citou à Maryn o preço do quarto e a


confirmar) o sistema de reservas para Maryn apontou-o.
(verificar) a disponibilidade.

87
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


2nd page

A pat pediu-lhe para soletrar o A Maryn deu-lhe o número do cartão de


seu último nome e deu entrada aos crédito para fazer a reserva.
seus dados na base de dados dos
hóspedes (clientes).

- Quando é que termina/expira? - é um quarto duplo O seu número


com duas camas grandes de confirmação é…
para quatro noites…

A Pat repetiu os
… e leu à
A Pat pediu a data de validade detalhes da reserva…
Maryn o número de
do cartão.
confirmação para
(ela) anotar.

- Deseja mais alguma coisa, - Vejo-a (então) dia 4!


Sr.ª Karini.

… e despediu-se.
A Pat verificou/confirmou que a
hóspede estava satisfeita com a
reserva…

88
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


Checking into a hotel - dialogue

1. Read and translate the following dialogue.

“Good morning. Welcome to the Transnational Hotel. What can I do for


you?”

“Good morning. My name is Tom Sanders. I have a reservation for a single room for
three nights.”

“Alright, Mr. Sanders. Let me pull up


your reservation… I can’t seem to find a
record of your booking. Did you book the
room directly through us, or did you use a
hotel reservation service or a travel agent? ”

“I booked it directly through you. I’ve already also paid a deposit on the first night. I
have a reservation number if that helps.”

“Yes. Sure. Can I see that, please? … Thank you. … Oh, I see. Maybe
there was a glitch with the booking system. Well, we don’t have any more single
rooms available, with the exception of one adjoined room. But, you would then
be right next door to a family with children, which might get noisy. But that’s
not a problem. I can upgrade you to one of our business suites. They all come
with jacuzzis!”

“Oh! That sounds nice! But how much more is that going to cost?”

“That would of course be at no extra charge to you.”

“Oh, well, thank you.”

“My pleasure.”

89
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


“What about the wireless internet?”

“Oh, it’s really easy. This is your access code and instructions on how to
use it. If you have any problems, feel free to call the front desk. And this is a list
of all the hotel amenities, like the gym and the indoor pool. ”

“Ah. Thank you very much.”

“You’re welcome. Has the valet already taken your car or will you be
needing a parking pass? ”

“Oh. I don’t have a car. I took a taxi direct from the airport.”

“Alright. Could I have some form of ID, please? And could you just fill out
this registration form?”

“Sure. Here’s my driver’s license.”

“Thank you. Oh, you’re from


San Francisco.”

“Yes, I am. All the way from the


West Coast.”

“I hope you had a good trip.”

“Yes, I did. Thank you. The flight was long, but it was smooth and I slept almost
the whole way.”

“Oh, and is this your first time in the Big Apple?”

“Yes, it is. I have a business conference to attend, but I’m looking forward to
getting some sightseeing done as well.”

“Well, I’d be more than happy to give you some sightseeing tips if you
need any.”

“Thank you.”

90
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


“Alright. I’ve got you all checked in to your room. This is your room key.
You’re in room 653. Just take the elevator on the right up to the 6 th floor. When
you get off the elevator, turn right. Your room is at the end of the corridor on
the left-hand side… Just leave your suitcase here and the bellboy will bring it
up.”

“Great. Thank you very much.”

“If you need anything, please feel free to dial the front desk. Enjoy your
stay.”

“Thank you.”

“You’re welcome.”

91
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

Idiomatic expressions (or idioms)

1. Idioms, can you guess their meanings? (Answers below)

1. A penny for your thoughts

2. Add insult to injury

3. A hot potato

4. Once in a blue moon

5. Caught between two stools

6. See eye to eye

7. Hear it on the grapevine

8. Miss the boat

9. Kill two birds with one stone

10. On the ball

11. Cut corners

12. To hear something straight from the horse's mouth

13. Costs an arm and a leg

14. The last straw

92
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


15. Take what someone says with a pinch of salt

16. Sit on the fence

17. The best of both worlds

18. Put wool over other people's eyes

19. Feeling a bit under the weather

20. Speak of the devil!

93
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


Meanings

1. This idiom is used as a way of asking someone what they are thinking about.

2. When people add insult to injury, they make a bad situation even worse.

3. This idiom is used to speak of an issue (especially in current affairs) which many

people are talking about.

4. This is used when something happens very rarely.

5. When someone finds it difficult to choose between two alternatives.

6. This idiom is used to say that two (or more people) agree on something.

7. This means ‘to hear a rumour' about something or someone.

8. This idiom is used to say that someone missed his or her chance at something.

9. This means ‘to do two things at the same time'.

10. When someone understands the situation well.

11. When something is done badly to save money. For example, when someone buys

products that are cheap but not of good quality.

12. To hear something from the authoritative source.

13. When something is very expensive.

14. The final problem in a series of problems.

15. This means not to take what someone says too seriously. There is a big possibility

that what he/she says is only partly true.

16. This is used when someone does not want to choose or make a decision.

17. All the advantages.

18. This means to deceive someone into thinking well of them.

19. Feeling slightly ill.

20. This expression is used when the person you have just been talking about arrives.

In http://www.englishforums.com/content/lessons/20-most-common-idioms-in-english-and-what-they-mean.htm

94
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


Helpful documents - Grammar revisions

Simple Present - rules


Os verbos só se alteram em inglês no Simple
Present (Presente Simples) na 3ª pessoa do Singular:

HE / SHE / IT

Nas restantes (I, YOU, WE, YOU, THEY), fica tudo


igual (isto é, colocamos o verbo sem TO).

Assim, neste tempo verbal iremos ter alterações


apenas quando estivermos perante a 3ª pessoa do
singular (he, she, it) ou algo equivalente.

Neste caso, temos de ter atenção aos verbos terminados em:

 Verbos terminados em -o ---» fazem a 3ª pessoa em –es (e.g. do, does)


 Verbos terminados em -ch, -x, -sh, -z, -s ---» fazem a 3ª pessoa em –es (e.g. kiss,
kisses; watch, watches…)
 Verbos terminados em vogal + -y ---» só acrescentamos um –s (eg. play, plays…)
 Verbos terminados em consoante + -y ---» o –y passa a –i e acrescentamos –
es (e.g. cry, cries…)

Quando um verbo não termina em –o, -ch, -x, -sh, -z, -s ou em –y, acrescentamos
somente um –S, que é a regra geral.

95
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


RESUMO!!!

Assim sendo,

1 – regra geral: ACRESCENTAR –S

2 – quando os verbos terminam em –O, acrescentamos –ES.

3 – quando os verbos terminam em -CH, -X, -SH, -Z, -S, acrescentamos –ES.

4 – quando os verbos terminam em –Y, há que ter atenção:

*VOGAL + -Y ---» apenas se acrescenta –S

*CONSOANTE + -Y: o –Y passa a –i e acrescentamos –ES.

96
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

Exercises with the Simple Present

1. Write the verbs in the Simple Present.

1. They ____________ (to play) hockey at school.

2. She ____________ (to write) e-mails.

3. She ____________ (to speak) English.

4. My parents ____________ (to like) fish.

5. Anne____________ (to have) lots of hobbies.

6. Andy's brother ____________ (to work) in an office.

7. Leroy ____________ (to try) to drive very fast.

8. Jim and Joe ____________ (to water) the flowers every week.

9. Yvonne's mother ____________ (to ride) a motorbike.

10. Elisabeth ____________ (to drink) cola.

11. Melanie ____________ (to play) tennis.

12. Shakespeare’s descendants ____________ (to witness) a lot of prejudice.

13. Mary ____________ (to try) to study at home.

14. Peter ____________ (to smash) a big apple and he ____________ (to laugh) a
lot.

15. Samantha ____________ (to watch) T.V. during the weekend.

97
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

16. They ____________ (to fly) with Martha and Arthur every year, they

___________ (to go) to France together. They ____________ (to stay) a big house with a

beautiful garden and a cute yellow dog. The dog’s name ___________ (to seem) very

strange.

17. Fritz _____________ (to relax) in the lawn.

18. Priscilla _____________ (to miss) her boyfriend a lot.

98
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

Simple Present and Present Continuous

1. Study the following information.

Present Continuous

O Present Continuous forma-se assim:

To be (am /are / is) + main verb + -ing

Constrói-se com uma forma do presente do verbo To Be (am / are / is) com a
forma -ing do verbo principal. (Junta-se –ing ao infinitivo do verbo.)

E.g.:

I am travelling.

I am eating.

Utiliza-se sempre que se pretende exprimir uma acção que se está a realizar num
determinado momento e que ainda não terminou.

Essa ideia é, muitas vezes, reforçada por advérbios de tempo tais como:

At the moment (neste momento)

Now (agora)

Still (ainda)

99
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


E.g.:

At the moment he is talking on the phone.

Now, she is calling Anna.

He is still taking a shower.

Também se usa quando queremos contar o que planeámos para o futuro.

E.g.:

On Saturday evening I’m visiting my parents.

Next week I’m travelling to Scotland.

Tomorrow I’m taking a plane to Canada.

(Em Português a forma correspondente é: estar + preposição “a” + infinitivo +


verbo principal).

E.g. Que estás a fazer ? (Que estás fazendo?).

100
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


Mas há verbos que não se usam normalmente no Present Continuous (visto
usarem-se com o Simple Present).

Verbs of Verbs of feeling Verbs of


thinking perception

To think To want To see

To believe To wish To hear

To agree To like To notice

To understand To love

To know To hate

To remember

To forget

Verbs of Reporting verbs Other verbs


possession

To have To say To cost

To own To ask To weigh

To belong To tell To seem

To appear

To need

Resumindo: usamos o presente quando queremos dizer que uma ação está a
decorrer neste momento e quando queremos dizer o que foi combinado ou
planeado para o futuro.

Simple Present e Present Continuous

Simple Present Present Continuous

Ações habituais Ações ainda em curso/ a decorrer

Encontramos frequentemente Encontramos muitas vezes as

101
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


palavras como: palavras:
Every day Now
Sometimes Today
Usually At the moment
Often This morning
Always
Never
On Sunday

102
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO

Bibliografia

 A.A.V.V., Dicionário de Português-Inglês, Porto Editora, Porto, 1996

 A.A.V.V., Collins Paperback English Thesaurus, Harper Collins Publishers,


Glasgow, 1986/1999

 A.A.V.V., Guia de Conversação – Inglês, Porto, Porto Editora, Abril de 2004

 A. A. V. V., Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English, England, Longman,


2000.

 A.A.V.V., Really learn 100 Phrasal Verbs, Oxford University Press, Oxford,
2002/2004

 Carter, Ronald, Rebecca Hughes e Michael McCarthy, Exploring Grammar


in Context, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2000

Chorão, João Bigoite (dir.); TAVARES, Joaquim Farinha dos Santos,


Dicionário Verbo de Inglês Técnico e Científico, Lisboa/São Paulo, Editorial Verbo, 1994.

 Clemen, Gina D. B., British and American Festivities , Canterbury, Black Cat
Publishing, 2004

 CRYSTAL, David, The Cambridge Encyclopedia of the English Language ,


Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1997.

 C.V.S. SUBRAMANYAM; ”Production management” in ‘pharmaceutical


production and management’, VALLABH PRAKASHAN, Pg No.292-312.

 Dooley, Jenny e Virginia Evans, Grammar Way 4, Express Publishing,


Newbury (UK), 1999

 Duckworth, Michael, Business Grammar & Practice, Oxford University Press,


Oxford, 2003/2004

 Eastwood, John, Oxford Practice Grammar, Oxford University Press, Oxford,


1992/2003

103
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


 Fernandes, Maria do Amparo; DOMINGUES, Maria Emília, Saber Inglês,
vocabulário, Inglês Britânico e Americano, Cartas, Funções da Língua, Gramática, 13ª ed.,
Porto, Edições Asa, Setembro de 2003.

 Fitikides, T. J., Common Mistakes in English, Longman, Essex, 1936/2004

 Flower, John, Phrasal Verb Organiser with Mini-Dictionary, London, Language


Teaching Publications, 1998.

 Glendinning, Eric H. e John McEwan, Basic English for Computing, Oxford


University Press, Oxford, 2002/2003.

 GONÇALVES, Maria Emília; TORRES, Angelina; DAVIS, David, New Aerial


10, níveis 4/6, workbook, Porto, Areal Editores, 2003.

 Harkes, Rosemary e Teresa de Sousa Machado, A Dictionary of Verbal


Idioms, Porto Editora, Porto, 1999

 Hashemi, Louise e Raymond Murphy, English Grammar in Use.


Supplementary Exercises, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1995/1998

 Hornby, A.S., Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary , 6ª ed., Oxford, Oxford


University Press, 2000

 Hornby, A.S. e Christina Huse, Oxford Student’s Dictionary, 2ª ed., Oxford,


Oxford University Press, 1992

 Hughes, John, Quick Work. Business English Course, Oxford University Press,
Oxford, 2002/2005

LEON LACHMAN, HERBERT LIEBERMAN, JOSEPH KANIG; ”inventory


management” in ‘the theory and practise of industrial pharmacy’, 3rd EDITION, VARGHESE
PUBLICATION, Pg No. 747-759.

 Maggioni, Manuela e Maria Hélder Valério, English is Fun. Gramática de


Inglês 2º e 3º Ciclos, Plátano Editora, Lisboa, 1992

 Morais, Armando, Dicionário de Inglês-Português, Porto Editora, Porto, 1994

104
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


 Muckian, Michael e John Woods, The Business Letter Handbook, Adams
Media Corporation, Massachusetts, 1996

 Murphy, Raymond, English Grammar in Use with answers, a self-study


reference and practice book for intermediate students, Cambridge, London, New York, New
Rochelle, Melbourne, Sydney, Cambridge University Press, 1986.

 Murphy, Raymond, English Grammar in Use (Intermediate), Cambridge


University Press, Cambridge, 1985/1989

 Pelham, John, Essential Office English, Escolar Editora, Lisboa, 2005

 Redman, Stuart, English Vocabulary in Use Pre-Intermediate & Intermediate ,


Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1997/1999

 RIBEIRO, Maria do Carmo; OLIVEIRA, Maria Regina, Dynamic, 7/10, level 1, 3 –


Porto Editora.

 Santos, A. N. e P. Santos, New Dictionaries of Idioms, Edições João Sá da


Costa, Lisboa, 1998

 Summers, Della (editorial director), Longman Dictionary of English


Language and Culture, England, Longman, 1992.

 Sotto Mayor, Mª Manuela, Brush Up your Grammar 10º, 11º, 12º , Porto
Editora, Porto, 2002

 Swan, Michael e Catherine Walter, How English Works, Oxford University


Press, Oxford, 1997/1998

 Swan, Michael, Practical English Usage, Oxford University Press, Oxford,


1980/2002

 Tayfoor, Susanne, Common Mistakes and how to avoid them, Cambridge,


Cambridge University Press, 2004.

 Vince, Michael, First Certificate Language Practice , Macmillan Publishers,


Oxford, 1996

105
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


 Wright, Jon, Idioms Organiser – Organised by Metaphor, Topic and Key Word,
Boston, Thomson Heinle, 1999

CD-Rom / DVD

“English”, Curso Completo de Conversação, Porto Editora Multimédia, 2001

 Colecção BBC-Visão: Os Dias que Mudaram o Mundo, 2003/2004

Sítios na Internet

 www.onestopenglish.com

 http://abcteach.com

 www.mes-english.com

 http://www.longman.com

 http://www.schoolexpress.com

 http://www.teacherplanet.com

 http://www.wikipedia.org

 www.studyenglishtoday.net

 www.usingenglish.com

 www.anglisk.net

 www.learnenglish.org.uk

 www.tesol.net

 http://www.better-english.com/exerciselist.html

 http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/index.shtml

106
Inglês Técnico

8218 – LÍNGUA INGLESA – INFORMAÇÃO TURÍSTICA DA REGIÃO


 http://www.education-world.com

 http://www.better-english.com

 http://www.onlinenewspapers.com

 http://www.songtext.net

 http://www.jobsearch.co.uk

 www.google.com

 www.youtube.com

 www.englishclub.com/vocabulary/wh-question-words.htm

 www.tolearnenglish.com/exercises/exercise-english-2/exercise-english-7144.php

 www.grammarbank.com/wh-questions.html

 http://web2.uvcs.uvic.ca/elc/studyzone/330/grammar/irrplu.htm

http://www.english-zone.com/spelling/plurals.html

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inventory_management

107