/

.

.

/

J$C-OSgO °

__
_ _
' i_

.... SKYLAB 1/4
ONBOARD VOICE .._: _TRANSCRIPTION
RECORDED AND ON THE COMMAND MODULE MODULE AIRLOCK RECORDERS

PREPARED PROGRAM

BY OFFICE

TEST DIVISION OPERATIONS

4

t

z

_,_ ,

_

- "

! Aero_

Space Admin_rafion

!
., _

LYNDON"B.
:_

JOHNSON:

SPACE

CENTER

Houston, Texas

'_, :
'._

MARCH1974

-%

A
INTRODUCTION ' '_ This document is the transcription of the Skylab 1/4 1"light crew commt_nieation_ (i) as recorded on the command m odlLle (CM)data stor,_ge equipment (DSE) and (2) as recorded on the airlock module (AM) recorder. Data from 'these recorders are telemetered (dumped) to Space Tracking and Data Net%-ork (STDN) sites for retransmission to the Lyndon B. Johnson ./i Space Center. Traflscription of these tapes was managed by William Kelley, Test Division, Progrs/n 0perations Office, to whom inquiries regarding this document should be referred. A.

J

_ext. The Greenwich num.bers representing for the Julian dates

mean time (GMT) column consists of four mul%idigit days, hours, minutes, and seconds (e.g., 209 22 34 14) shown as the first three numbers of the time col_.

The speaker column indicates the source of a transmission; the text columnThe transcript verbatim contains the is divided into three columns -- time, speaker, transcript of the communications.

and

Y
_ : _

Speakers

in the

transcript

are

identified

as

follows:

Spacecraft: CDR PLT Commander Pilot Gerald P. (Jerry) Carr

William R. (Bill) Pogue

SPT i cREW MS _ !

Scientist

pilot

Edw@rd

O.

(Ed)

Gibson

Unident ifiable erewmember Multiple speakers

Mission Control Centers: AA CC Unidentified station Capsule communicator (CAP COMM)

! .i -

MCC

Unidentified speaker, other than CC, in the Mission Operations Control Room or a Staff Support Room. text, a series of three dots (...) is used to designate those

In the portions garbling. of

the communications that could not be transcribed because of One dash (-) is used to indicate a speaker's pause or a selfTwo dashes(- -) are used to indicate or a point at which a recording was emphasis by the speaker are an interruption by abruptly telnninated.

i !

_ /---.

interruption. another speaker Words given

u2_usual

underlined.

ii

/

!

The Skylab I mission began with lift-off of the orbital workshop at 17:30:00 GMT (12:30:00 c.d.t.) on May lh, 1973. _The third three-man team to occupy the workshop, the Skylab 4 crew, lifted off at lh:01:23 GMT (08:01:23 c.d.t.) o_November 16. The Skylab _ crew splashed down in the Pacific Ocean at 15:16:55 GMT (10:16:55 c.d.t.) on February 8, 197_.

\ q

'i

iii

/ /

DAY 339 (AM) _. 733

339 00 00 13 339 00 00 25

CDR CC CDR

The frame count SPT, Houston.

is now 20; 020. Are you - the exposure

On my mark, we're going to terminate at CARRIAGE RETRACT. Go ahead, _nk. Roger. We - We're curious - -

SPT CC CDR CC SPT _" 339 00 00 h3 CDR SPT CDR 339 00 00 56 CDR

Stand by. - - ... worked out. ... MARK. Going to widened, 90.

... no longer aligned. Okay. Stand by for a mark. ex - exposure. The time is now

MARK. Beginning the 90, widened Looking at a frame count of 21. O0: 01 Zulu. ... Roger. We copy.

SPT CC SPT 339 00 01 31 CDR CDR

... the optical system is working okay .... Passing 50 percent. to terminate the exposure

On mY mark, we're going terminate the exposure. Stand by -

CDR 339 00 02 12 CDR

MARK. Exposure terminated at 01 - correction 02:15 • Now we 're going to a 270, unwidened. Does that have to all the way run down? Yes, you don't want - you don't want that one running. Okay, here we go. Stand by -

-

PLT

CDR

CC

i..

339 00 02 38

CDR

MARK. SHUTTER is OPEN for a 270-second, unwidened. That - 4-1/2 minutes. No, it's more than that. Yes, that's right; 4-1/2 minutes. Now one of the things that I didn't do, it says momentum dump ... inhibited ... I did that. Okay, I was thinking if that hadn't been done, I would swear it was ... Okay, how about the nu z is 0.1? Just barely slipped under already

PLT

CDR PLT

339 00 03 18

CDR

We had 0.6; we the limit. Lt.

the - under

The nu z update on the ATMDC indicated a nu z of 0.6. The pad is 0.1; so correction is zero. 339 00 04 17 CDR While we're standing here waiting - this is the CDR - I'd llke a note - I'd like this note extracted from this particular batch of tape and given to FAO. FAO, you did it again. You assigned the same guy to the ATM and to the SO19 with no time in between. And all I had to do was get a little bit behind in the ATM, and it immediately impacted the S019 operations. I think it's a very poor way to plan. I think that your S019 - the operator Should be allowed to go into S019 with nothing else on his mind and be ready to do a Job on S019. He shouldn't have his mind all cluttered up with what he Just got finished doing. Now I had to work overtime on the ATM because we had problems with it. I did not even get to debrief the ATM pass that I Just did. I came hurtling down here. I had to call Bill away from another task - Bill Pogue away from another task, to make sure that S019 got started, so that when I got down here, we could get it z,,nnlng on time. Please, do not in the future assign us with - cut the time this close on us. It's Just - You're only going to cause us to make mistakes and ruin the experiments. CDR out.

339 00 05 03

CDR

339 O0 05 35

CDR

735

CDR CREW CDR CC

Oh, real ly? ... Up or down? ... here. What we did was we inhibited both ...

339 00 07 2h

CDR

This is the CDR again. One question that I'd like to ask of the S019 people is. After we've done the reference starafter we've done the reference star data - Okay MARK. We - we Just overexposed this particular frame, number 21. Next fra - next field is number 275 with a ROTATION of 240.5 and TILT of 02.5. Okay, that last one got exactly 5 minutes instead of 4 minutes and 30 seconds. All right, this one is a 270, widened. Verifying again, ROTATION is 240.5; TILT is 2.5. On my mark, we'll start. The time is comingup; is 008.5 [sic]. Standby MARK. This is field 275; ROTATION, 240.5; of 02.5; a 270, widened in progress. TILT

i

339 00 07 38

CDR

!

339 00 08 39

ODR

PLT

Okay, Jer, on the last exposure - think the last you've got to come a little bit past the CARRIAGE RETRACTED, but don't go all the way - Yes. And it's real wo_m_v in there. Okay. ... has a big ... And both times I worked it, •.. film hatch closed, it wouldn't work. I got another good photograph. Okay. Thank you, Bill. Getting back to my question - that is, Once you've looked at the reference star, is there any requirement that the - the house lights remain d_mmed during the rest of the S019 operation? It's much easier to - to use the regular house lights than it is to fiddle with the flashlight while workingthe equipmenthere.

CDR PLT CDR PLT

CDR

k__

w

736
339 00 09 36 CDR And the question is, Is there any danger of light getting back through the - the eyepiece and - and bothering your exposures? We're now 50 percent through the exposure. Jer, did you see that schedule to ...? Yes, I did, Bill. 80 percent on the exposure. On my next mark, Standby I'll be terminating the exposure.

-

339 00 l0 19

CDR PLT CDR

339 00 ll 29

CDR CDR

339 00 12 17

CDR

MARK. Exposure is terminated. 90 seconds. Stand by -

Setting 90 deg -

339 00 12 35

CDR

MARK. Commencing the next exposure. The frame count is 024. This is a 90-second exposure on field 275. 40 percent gone. Stand by for termination of the exposure.

339 00 13 03

CDR CDR

339 00 13 48

CDR

MARK. Termination. Okay, going for a new star field now, star field 283. The ROTATION is 232.7. ROTATION is in and locked. The TILT is 03.3. Okay, the TILT and the ROTATION are now good. The first exposure is 270, widened. 270, set. Winding it up. Stand by MARK. Commencing tur - exposure. Frame number 25. Reverifying, 232.7 ROTATION; TILT is 03.3; we're doing field number 283. The time now is 00:15 and 40 seconds. Hey, Ed. I got three-quarters of one MAR for you and one PATROL, SHORT bef - to try to catch up before things Just dissolved into a cocked hat and I had to abandon the ATM. I barely got the thing parked and in position for the ground for their unattended pass. They sort of work in a hurry over there, don't they?

339 00 l_ 46

CDR

CDR 339 00 16 49 CDR

SPT

_,

737

CDR

They sure do. I haven't even debriefed that pass yet, either. I've still got to do that. Going to have to report ...

SPT 339 00 17 30 CDR CDR

Now passing 80 percent on this exposure. Okay, on my mark I'll be terminating widened exposure. Stand by this 270,

339 00 18 18

CDR

MARK. Termination. CARRIAGE RETRACTED. for 90, widened. Stand by MARK. SHUTTER is OPEN.

Setting

339 00 18 35 339 00 19 29 i 339 00 19 47

CDR CDR

Counter is to 026.

Passing 80 percent now. On my mark, I'll be terthis widened minating 90-second, pass. Standby MARK. CARRIAGE RETRACTED. Now changing star field. Going to 247.0 on ROTATION. And locked in. And 00.3 in TILT. And locked in. 247.0, 00.3. This is star field 259. This'll be 270-second, widened. Winding up the counter. Standby MARK. SHUTTER is OPEN. Looking at frame 27. Okay, sunset is at 28; looks like we'll finish Hey, Ed, do we have any frozen food for dinner? I bet we do. Yes, Bill went to pick it up. 0h, great : 50 percent of the exposure's done. 70 percent. Okay, we're passing 90 percent now. Okay, on my mark I 'ii terminate the exposure. be going to CARRIAGE RETRACTED. Stand by I 'ii

CDR

339 00 20 49

CDR

it.

339 00 22 ll

CDR

SPT CDR 339 00 22 32 339 00 23 14 339 00 23 56 CDR CDR CDR CDR

339 00 24 26

CDR

MARK. That terminates the S019 exercise for today. Setting the ROTATION and TILT to zero. ROTATION and TILT are zero. mirror now. Going to retract the

339 00 25 12

CDR

738

---

339 O0 25 36 339 00 26 07 339 00 27 15

CDR CDR SPT

Retracted and locked. CDR out.

Closing the SAL door.

SPT at 00:28 on ED63. Well, looks like we blew it again. Problem here this time, however, is not with the optics but with the plants. Unfortunately, enough time has gone by, and apparently, the plants cannot survive in the light and/or zero-g atmosphere, which they have seen for the past 18 days. When I tried to extract a leaf from any one of the three plants, the leaves came off with no resistance. In some cases, the leaves broke right at the point of the tweezers, as opposed to at the root. This is a marked distinction to the way in which they behaved the last time, when I did ED63 a little over a week ago, when there was resistance and they broke off at the structure, right next to the stem. 't

339 00 28 18

SPT

I still took the - the healthiest-looking plant and made some specimens. Put those in the microscope and did take some pictures - 3 minutes' worth at six frames per second. However, there were some difficulties encountered here, also. The light through which I saw I don't believe was sufficient to give you good pictures. It was not high enough intensity, although I had done all of the things which had been requested. We put in the - the special mirror, we had fresh batteries, I turned the light up to - the light was on full, and we had the iris wide open. The second problem encountered with the reflecting mirror, in that the detent which - ... the right rotation. That is, when you screw it on, there is a detent which will cause it to stop. I believe was a little misplaced because the - there was light as coming in - in more at the top of the picture than there was at the bottom. I could vary this by twisting the mirror slightly and get the light on center; however, it would not stay in that position. The top part of the picture was rough - the correct intensitor the same intensity as I would get by rotating the mirror in; so probably about the upper two-thirds, I would say, of the picture is of the same intensity you would get had the mirror been rotating in the exact properposition.

339 O0 29 13

SPT

._

_

739

339 O0 30 07

SPT

The third one was the focus, and that was when I
would ever focus it with the slide on the bottom. When-

I would go by the point of optimum focus and try to move back, I found that I could not. I
believe that somehow the slide was being pushed

down, and the - it was impossible to retract once - once that happened. What I had to do was then lift the slide off a little bit, wait a little bit of time, and then try it again. And this time not to move by the point of optimum focus. 339 O0 30 43 SPT I think looking what you are going to see is some deadplants. The skeletal structure of the

plant is still intract - intact, but the part containing the protoplasm - correction - the part con - green part containing the chlorophyl looked I as thoughthat was rather soft and had come off the - the stem or the skeletal structure. So with my real regret to Cheryl Peltz at Arapahoe High School, who I know has ... a real long time on this and very hard, I'm sorry we couldn't make a "go" of it. And I hope she learned something in the - in the effort, and I hope it's been constructive. And it's my sincereregret then - that it hasn't worked out well for her. 339 O0 31 53 339 00 35 06 SPT SPT SPT out. SPT at 00:34, debriefing a ATM pass on a previous day, beginning at 21:28. Okay, we did a series of MIRROR, AUTO RASTERs on this one, and I'm afraid, due to time and an error, I Just flat never got the last - the last one done. Let me explain how we went. I had one to ma1_e up for the previous orbit - that is, one MIRROR, AUTO RASTER location I put in from the previous orbit. So I did the Sun center, 52 CONTINUOUS for 1 minute at a time of - before ESR. So I did not operate 56 at that point. I then moved in and got the MIRROR, AUTO RASTER for the previous location - or for the previous orbit done. Then stepped through and did essentially everything that was asked for here - all of the building block 10. However, when I got to the position of Lk'WT, minus 50 and DOWN, minus 1146, I found towards the end of it that I already had made an error and was doing it at 1046; so I went

J_

339 00 35 57

SPT

T_O

_

ahead and did i00 and minus around, oh, a in at correct

the following one, which was plus 1146, correctly. Came back and got little over one MIRROR, AUTO RASTER position of L_T, minus 50 and DOWN,

1146.
339 00 36 47 SPT Jerry Carr, who is going to pick it up on the following orbit, was going to try to make that one up in his observing time; however, he ran into a problem in two areas, which he'll explain. One is the door problem on 82A, and the other was trying to get the proper limb position, which I finally came up and worked through with him on 82B. I think the way the pad was written for the one which Jerry had on the following orbit - that is, JOP 2C, step 4, building block 37, on active region 17 - I think the pad could have been a little bit clearer. The plus 16 arc seconds, although I believe that's where you wanted H-alpha pointed - It was not really clear. I think you should have had a line in there that said, "Point H-alpha 1 plus 16 arc seconds from limb." There ! 1

was also some confusion in Jerry's mind how to get there with the LIMB OFFSET on 82}3 of zero. I came up and showed him how to go into LIMB POINTING and carry that one out. But the procedures were not written out explicitly for him, and that did slow him up. So he was never able to get in the complete set of MIRROR, AUTO RASTERs in location, which I did not get in completely either. I think he got in around two-thirds of a MIRROR, AUTO RASTER before 400 K. 339 O0 38 24 SPT So we'll try to get that one again, if the time comes up tomorrow. However, I don't think we lost - lost a great deal. We did get one - one MIRROR - a little over one MIRROR, AUTO RASTER there, and we did get one with 100 seconds more overlap than you wanted; so we missed the top 100 seconds. SPT out. This is the CDR at 00:_9. We took a shot at trying to get HH35-2 and HH35-4. The clouds were scattered to broken. I am not convinced that we - we got the target. We found a little - what looked like a small island or a little island all out by itself. And we quickly grabbed a couple of shots

339 00 38 52 339 00 48 58

SPT CDR

741
with the Nikon and a couple with the Hasselblad. And then after looking at the map more closely and consulting our watches, we were running about 40 seconds late. 339 00 49 33 CDR At the precise time, there was clouds below us, and we couldn't see anything; in fact, we did not even see the Bonin Islands. But about 40 seconds later, we - we found a picture - we found a small island that looked like a volcano. At first, we weren't sure it was an island; we Just thought it was Just a yellow area. I think what we got was the northernmost of the Volcano Islands, the one Just north of Iwo Jima, but I'm not sure. At any rate, what we took a picture of did not look like a sea mount or an under - underwater volcano after we finally 339 O0 50 16 339 00 52 h_ CDR CDR CDR out. This is the CDR at 00:53 Zulu. I've come back to the scene of the crime to try to recap what happened on my last ATM pass, which was the one that started at about 23:00 Zulu. When I got here, Ed indicated that there were some steps that we were going to try to pick up during the observing time, which was part of his building - building block l0 out of JOP 26. I got a briefing on that and was all set to go. We got into Slmrise, and I did the Sun-side prep. And I found that the 82A door had not opened. At that time, I Just reached up and hit the switch to the OPEN position, and it still remained white. So I turned the switch to OFF and left it for a while and went on. Then came back later, after I felt the door had had time to close, and hit open again. When I saw nothing there, then we grabbed the malfunction procedures and proceeded to go into them. And we ended up down in box 8 where it said, "One door has failed to indicate open." At that time we gave up on 82A, and I went ahead to JOP 6, step 2, the quickie, and got that out of the way. And S05_ was a/ready configured for shopping list 31; so I didn't go with that anymore. That was all set up for me. Then I went into J0P 2C, step number 4, and that's when it a]] broke loose. got finished shooting the pictures.

339 00 h9 51

CDR

339 00 53 39

CDR

742
339 00 54 3_ CDR Let's see. S056, you got past me unscathed. S082B, I - I did it to you. I cost you a frame. I started out 82B in WAVELENGTH, SHORT and decided to shift to LONG. And decided after I'd done that, that that was a dumb idea. So I terminated, got rid of the frame, set it up in LONG, and started the exposure all over again. And then that light bulb finally came on over my head later, and I realized - Nuts! If I had left it in SHORT, I could have done the 12-minute exposure first and then the 6. Everything would have been copacetic. So I've cost you one frame by not really thinking ahead too well. S055A, I waded through you okay. You got your data, and I managed to get all the different mirror positions and everything set up Just fine. The nu Z update I got at about 23:27 ended up with

339 O0 54 57

CDR

339 00 55 12

CDR

a ORBITAL PLANE ERROR up here of - of 0.6, and that's the value we used for our SO19. 339 00 55 49 CDR Well, by the time I got finished bumbling through all that, it was down to about - the time was about 2B, I think. I had no more observation time left, and I had no time to pick up the building block l0 that Ed had asked me to pick up for him. But notwithstanding, I decided to press on and give it a whirl anyway. So I set up building block l0 and got it started and figured I could power down for unattended very quickly if I cut it off at about l0 or 12 to go. That's about the time I realized that S019 was due to start at 23:52, and I've already said my words to FAO about scheduling S019 right next to an ATM pass. That's what got me in trouble last time. So I finally terminated my attempt to pick up building block l0 in the observing time. I moved the canister to the unattended precise pointing coordinates and set the GRATING up at 2434 and scampered off and left the mess laying here and picked up SO19 from Bill Pogue and finished that Job. I was sort of a side commenter on the problems that you went through on the ground trying to get the 82A door going, and I'm happy to hear that you

339 00 56 22

CDR

B39 00 57 04

CDR

743
did get it going. Things were in such a flap, I really didn't even have time to - to adequately look at the Sun and see anything. MY impressions were that there wasn't much there. I saw a filter

-

a filament - I guess that was F-37 - laying along the west limb. 87, of course, I couldn't even see at a] ] ; that was back behind the limb. 339 00 57 40 CDR I let myself get all buggered up trying to do the 82B pointing, and that cost about a minute - no, 2 minutes, I guess - trying to get the H-alpha 1 pointed plus 16 arc seconds off the limb and also get 82B in the offset pointed - offset - or LIMB POINTING mode at an OFFSET of zero. And after wading through that, we finally got it set up and running. And then of course, like I said, I got it running wrong - with the wrong wavelength, and I won't recount that mess again. I guess the upshot of the whole thing is, I got all the data. I wasted one frame of S082B film, I got no observing time, I got a good start on an ulcer, and that's about it. CDR out.

339 00 58 08

CDR

339 00 58 22

CDR

339 00 58 35

CDR

TIME

SKIP

339 02 45 26

CDR

This is the CDR at 02:45 Zulu, reporting on Earth observations. The site was HH]07. Was unable to get pictures of the fault zone desired because of the clouds right over the fault zone area. However, for the first time since we've been over New Zealand, the whole north island was reasonably clear. There was Just thin scattered clouds, altocumulus, over the area; so I took three photos and got complete coverage of the north island. The Camera used was a Hasselblad with a 100-millimeter lens. The magazine - the cassette was Charlie Xray 47. The times were 02:37, 02:38, and 02:39. The frame numbers were 52, 53, and [5]4. The setting was f/ll at 100 - on 100-millimeter lens and 1/250 of a second. CDR out.

339 02 47 06

CDR

This is the CDR again with more to say on New Zealand. I guess as it stands right now, we have

744
photo coverage of North Island and the southern half of the south island. And if we can just get the northern half of the - South Island, we'll have complete photo coverage of New Zealand. 339 02 47 25 339 02 59 00 CDR PLT CDR out. PLT debriefing from ATM pass starting at 02:08, approximately. The FRAMES R_AINING, I'll give first: H-alpha, 13289; 56, 4749; 82A, 14R; 82B, 1418; 52 is 6704; 54 is 4601. PLT continuing debrief. J0P 6, step l, building block l, was completed nominally as near as I can determine. I don't think I made any mistakes on that one. The nu z update was performed on time. JOP 2 Delta, step l, building block 10, active region 87 - I was somewhat mystified there about pointing. I know what it said, and obviously 87 was the active region. I pointed over there and tried to find it, and I wasn't sure that I had it. I wasn't sure whether 82B wanted to be on the Sun or on - off the Sun and then later on decided that they must be wanting to be on the Sun because the exposures were so short. But I wasn't sure. I went ahead and started it - the 56 and the 55 while I was trying to make up my mind whether or not 82B was - whether or not I was going to foul up 82B exposures. And I finally decided I 'd wait until the 82 - excuse me - 56 and - and 55, it was - 54 did not run - I was going to wait until they finished, and then I would point the pad: UP, 215; T.EFT, minus 934. Got to piddling around with that. By the time I got it, all I had time to do was give a 40-second exposure and then about - I had to cut it 1 second short to keep from going ESS; so I did not get the 10-minute and 40-second exposure of 82 Bravo. 3B9 03 OB 33 PLT I shall continue always to be extra cautious in 82 Bravo, regardless of what you say about wasting frames, because we've been trained that way. And I shall be very hesitant to start 82 Alfa and Bravo any time I have any doubt whatsoever. And I think that's probably a good policy for me to follow. That is why you did not get your 10-minute and 40-second exposure in 82 Bravo, and l'm not even sure that the 40-second exposure was where you wanted it. But it looked like I had the slit

339 03 01 48

PLT

i

T45

pretty well filled with something there. I couldn't tell whether that's active region 87 or not. And I didn't figure the pointing was still correct at this time. And there was something bright there in the H-alpha i monitor. It looked like the active region - there's a lot of activity on XUV MON, but I didn't know if that was behind the limb or not. In any event, that was why I was hesitant to use 82 Bravo. I did get one 20-second exposure, SHORT, on what I considered slit-filled conditions. Let's see. The film count, I've already given. I'll give it again in case it did not get on the tape the first time. And that's H-alpha, 13289; 56, 4749; 82A, 149; Bravo, 1418; 52, 6704; 54, 4601. Panel has been shut down. I think everything is nominal. MPC ROLL and POINT is INHIBITed, and everything else is shut down. 339 03 05 04 339 03 19 20 PLT PLT PLT out. Okay, this is the PLT starting the EREP workaround procedure - malfunction procedure, whatever it is. I will voice record all steps. Step l: Rotate camera to intermediate position - while pinching the hand with poorly designedlatch. Okay, that's in intermediate position. Remove front shield and stow. In work. Skylab, Houston through Canary and Madrid for 13 minutes. And we'll be dumping the data re voice recorder here. You can give them the last - the - the ATM film count there, Ed, if you would. Okay ...

339 03 19 55

CC

PLT

SPT PLT

I got it written down there on that - I put it on voice, if they - ... CDR .... setting ... is Alfa through frame count ... 688 ... 047 ... ...

CDR

339 03 20 _6

PLT

Okay, front shield's been stowed. Remove rear shield and stow. That'll be my next step. ... 0500_ ... ... anything ... and better in zero g, but they

CDR 339 03 21 06 PLT

didn'tant w to.

746

_-_

339 03 3h 44

PLT

Okay, the PLT on step 6. Circuit breaker FMC is OPEN. Let's check that again. Reach into FMC drive area and locate FMC drive gears. Rotate FMC screw one-half turn by rotating gear. Okay, let's see. I think I've found the gear. See if I can rotate it by - Okay, I'm doing it. I didn't think I was even going to find that little devil. Dave Kelley's training came through once again. Okay, there; it's rotated a half a turn. It didn't say which way; so I just went one way. Okay, I want to see where that thing is. Okay, there it is. All right, point down that way. Now. FMC circuit breaker CLOSEd, FMC screws should turn. Okay, get my head back down here where I can close that thing. a sec? There. Hey, Jer, could you come and help

PLT

Hey, maybe I can reach across this way. I did it, Jer. I got it. ...

There.

CDR PLT

Okay. When I was able to reach across there to close the circuit breaker, I got it. I didn't think I was able to do it. FMC screw should turn; it did not. Okay. And question is now, should I continue or not? Okay, well, let's see what the steps are ahead here. Let's see now .... Yes, it is in. Okay. If it operates at any speed, perform S190 camera check. Well, maybe I turned that thing the wrong way. It shouldn't have made any difference, though. Did Jer ever say when that next AOS is? In about 3 minutes. Okay, I'm going to discontinue the steps here. hit a - I got a negative response there. I

-

339 03 36 39

PLT

PLT SPT 339 03 37 hl PLT

339 03 42 14

PLT

Okay, the PLT. I can't see that it'd be any problem here in doing step 7. I think I'll go ahead and - and try it. Pull the circuit breaker. I'm going to try step 6 once more. Circuit breaker, OPEN. Okay. Turn this ... to half turn. Okay, I'm doing that. Okay, got it half turned.

T4T

Circuit breaker back in. Nothing happened. Okay. it doesn't. 339 03 43 17 PLT

Okay, Screw

nothing happened. should turn, but

Panel 106, SHUTTER CO_'£_OL, SLOW. Okay, it's working. Uh-oh. FMC circuit breaker Just popped. Okay, now I've got a SLOW, and I got a correct indication. FMC circuit breaker's popped; I'm going to leave it out. Checking _,:I_IUM. MEDIUM is good; waiting 2 seconds.

PLT PLT

Going to FAST. FAST is good. Okay, if rotary shutters operate at 8x_ speed, perform S190 camera check, EI_ checkout, page 1-5. Perform S190 camera check, EREP checkout, page 1-5 ; then do step 8. If rotary shuttersdo not operate,go to step 8. They did operate; so I'm going to go back. I'm going to turn - Let's see. It doesn't say to turn it off, though. Yes, I'm going to go back to SLOW. MmOIUM, correct; correct speed. SLOW.

I

PLT _ 339 03 44 59 PLT

Okay, get the EREP checkout - checklist. the recorder off momentarily. Okay, Panel checkout, page 1-5. 1-5. 106. Remove front shield.

Turn

S190 camera check. Stow on M-124.

Inspect all desiccants. Well, we've done that, but I'll do it again. Get my flashlight out. I think I aAready know the problem. I think FMC is dinging everything else up. Probably got a short down there in it some place. 339 03 45 44 PLT Okay, they're starting to turn a little bit, but they're still pretty blue and good enough for one more run, I'd say. Yes, pretty dark blue, in fact. A little white showing on the faces of some of the crystals. Okay, so I'm going to hold off on replacing the desiccants. Page 196, step 106 - excuse me - panel 106. Set six aperture control knobs to f/2.8. Man, I wish those detents were a little better. Feel like a safecracker trying to find a detent. Okay, all of them all fixed LOCAL. Stand by. LOCAL, verify. at 2.8. CAMERA CONTROL,

339 03 46 47

PLT

PLT

SHUTTER CONTROL,

SLOW.

748

339 03 46 58

PLT

Roger. Verify proper shutter speed on SHUTTER SPEED meter. That's verified. Note: Allow a minimum of 2 seconds between each shutter actuation. Verify capping shutter actuation by looking through lens while momentarily placing CAMERA ACTUATE switch to SINGLE position. Okay, that's in work. Number 1 works, number 2 works, number 3 works, 4 works, 5 works, number 6 works. Okay, verify proper shutter speed for MEDIUM and FAST positions of SHUTTER CONTROL switch. In work. MEDIUM's good; lO00, 2000.

339 03 47 16

PLT

339 03 47 46 339 03 47 55

PLT PLT

FAST is good. SHUTTER CONTROL, OFF. Okay, MEDIUM; wait 2 seconds. SLOW, 2 seconds. I OFF. SHUTTER CONTROL is OFF. Fine. CAMERA

339 03 48 06

PLT

CONTROL, REMOTE. REMOTE. Okay, panel ll0. S190 SHUTTER SPEED to SLOW. POWER, ON. Okay, I heard the shutter start up. MODE, AUTO SEQUENCE. 339 03 48 31 PLT Got a READY light. FRAMES PER SEQUENCE, 06. FRAME INTERVAL, 6. Verify magazine drive on each station and FMC motion after EREP SYST_, START. Okay, I'm not going to get any FMC; I can tell you that right now. There's one, two, three - yes four, five, six, and no FMC because the FMC breaker's popped. Okay, so I've verified magazine drive on each station, but ... Okay, now looks like what we're - what's happened here is, we're out FMC. Feel like it's J_med? Well, it's - Maybe ... out ... Yes, it's possible. ...

-

339 03 48 52

PLT

SPT PLT

SPT PLT SPT PLT SPT

749

PLT

Yes, I found the gear that you twist and everything. Verify magazine drive on each station and then - I'm going to try once more. Okay, all six of them are working. Everything's working. Okay, READY light is out; EREP SYST_ to STOP; all six ... ADVANCE MALFUNCTION lights on; S190 MODE to STANDBY; POWER, OFF. Unstow and install rear shield on camera. Rotate S190. InstAl1 190 filters. Unstow front shield. I'm going to hold off on that for Just a minute. Okay, so - then do step 8. Right. Panel 106, SHUTTER CONTROL, OFF; verify. CAMERA CONTROL, R_OTE; verify. Install front and rear shield on camera; rotate camera to stowage position; in work. Okay, I'm going to discontinue - Well, no, I won't. You said you wanted to record all steps, so I will. Okay, front shield going on.

339 03 50 32

PLT

339 03 51 15

PLT

t

339 03 52 03 339 03 53 44

FLT PLT

Okay, that's done; the shields are back on. Front and rear shields; rotate camera to stowage position; EREP, BUS i, OFF. Now. BUS 2, OFF. Okay.

339 03 53 54 339 03 53 55

PLT PLT

Now. PANEL DISPLAY, OFF; close C_D cover. Completes that and PLT out. This is the CDR at 04:07 Zulu, reporting on assigned site HH152-2 for Earth observation. I took one frame of Hasselblad 100, 100millimeter.

339 03 54 O0 339 Oh 07 09

PLT CDR

CDR

The f-stop was f/ll, 1/250. Frame number 55; the magazine is C_a_lie X-ray _7. The target was almost completely clouded over. The only photograph I got in,- that is 0f Just probably negligible value, was of the western tip of Malaysia. I only took it because it showed some pretty good sedimentation and it showed the mouth of the river that's right there at the western end of Malaysia, and that was about the only value I could see. There's Just about, oh, I would say

75O
scattered to broken cloud coverage, and it was Just enough to completely shade the vegetation and ground underneath to make it impossible to get any evaluation of geology or vegetation or land use. 339 04 08 27 339 04 12 18 CDR CDR CDR out. This is the CDR at 04:11 Zulu. Initiated squeezer bag dump. WASTE PROCESSOR EXHAUST PRESSURE pegged out high, so I turned it OFF. CDR out.

339 04 12 28

CDR

TIME

SKIP

339 12 23 40 339 12 23 48

SPT SPT

SPT at 12:23. SPT at 12:24. 38111.

PRD readings: PRD readings:

42260, 2 42260, 23131, and

339 12 30 44

SPT

SPT at 12:30. M133 log: Day 339; 7.7 hours; quality's good; remark, 3. Once during the middle of the night, got up to urinate. Could not go to sleep for about another, oh, 45 minutes until after that and upon awakening was sleepy. That's number

4.
339 12 31 12 339 12 31 16 SPT SPT SPT out. Oh, the - and after that, the quaJLity of the sleep was not impaired by a sleep cap at all, and both of the electrodes looked good - the middle of the night, the beginning, and at the end. SPT out.

339 12 31 35

SPT

TIME

SKIP

339 13 39 34

PLT

Ah. PLT at ATM debriefing at 13:39. J0P 6, building block 1 Alfa and Bravo, completed according to JOP _,mmary Sheets. VTR, 3 minutes of recording, as per pad, were executed; 52, XUVMON, H-alpha 1 and 2. Nu Z update performed

according to schedule. It was minus 0.1 before I did the update, plus 0.3 after. The Sun appears to be fairly quiet. I tried to see if there was activity above ac - prominence disappearing prominence 87. I couldn't anything. And that 's about it. 339 13 40 22 PLT PLT out. see

TIME SI_P

339 lh 54 29

SPT

SPT at 14:54, ATM - debriefing the ATM ops that began at 14:B2 Just before the Z-LV pass. Did building block 32, the quickie. Went straightforward. I did not give a PATROL, SHORT at that point after less than - I mean 400 K before ESR. At the conclusion, though, I did take some pictures of the corona and the XUV monitor. And at that point we're above h00 K, and I gave the PATROL, SHORT 50 seconds.

339 14 55 31

SPT

Following that, we did a quick look at - prominence 39. It's not quite as large and extensive as prominence 37 was, but it's still going to be a good one to study. We went over to the limb, got tangent to the limb around 20 arc seconds out. Gave 82B a long exposure in WAVELRNGTH, SHORT. Well, it went from - 14:44 to i_:46. Excuse me; from _6 MINUTES R_MAINING - down to about 30 38 MINUTES R]_MAINING; so I gave them an 8-minute

exposureand 56 got a PATROL, SHORT and a FILTER,
5; about 6-minute exposure .... 55 was given a little over a one MIRROR, AUTO RASTER looking at the prominence, although at the position we were, we were looking pretty much at the north side of it, per 55, as the best position of laying the slit. And I could not roll 180 from that position. 339 14 58 06 SPT Okay, in the amplifying, what I have seen on the pictures this morning for white light coronagraph, there appears to be some fairly faint, narrow streamers showing up - one at 2 o'clock, pretty much radial, and another one at, oh, about 04:30 or so, inclined slightly towards north, about 20 degrees off radial - 30 degrees maybe. That's a very faint spike. The - On the west limb, the primary one at 02:30 or so, fairly strong, looks

752

like it could be a helmet streamer. Still persists in a - in a relatively ... one at around 3 o'clock or 03:30, and both of those are inclined towards the north around 20 degrees off radial. 339 l_ 59 22 SPT Over on the west limb, the - what used to be a very diffuse area of streamers has now taken taken on some definition. At, oh, about 09:30, we had one almost radial; inclined slightlytowards the south, m_ybe l0 degrees. On about 8 o'clock or so, almost parallel to the one above it, both of equal magnitude, a small one in between that, and then another very small one down south at about, oh, 07:30 or so; very faint one. Then I see no - nothing but straight linear features, nearly radial; nothing to indicate a transient as we've seen them before. But when I compare the ... of yesterday with today's, I can't see the very faint one yesterday which I talked about at what - 0_:S0 or so. As a matter of fact, there yesterday we counted up four streamers along the west limb. In reality, there were actually five, if you can count that one small one down there to the south at 04:30. It's become a little more pronounced today. The one directly north of that has pretty much disappeared - _Imost disappeared. Whether they ... rotation or whether they're ... transient from the corona, I c_nuot be sure from looking at the two photographs. And again, the west limb - the east limb has taken on more definition. 339 15 02 29 SPT Okay, again looking at the XUV monitor display, I see the coronal holes on the north and south, the three active regions, of course, which are - show up fairly brightly - especially the one at the limb in active region 87; 94 and 95 also show up. Yesterday I noticed a series of bright points which are not quite as prominent today. The one curious feature, though, is in this relatively circular nearly circular, almost 11n_form XUV plage which kind of stands out all on its own. And I'm looking back in the photographs and I see it was - as of 24 hours ago, it was there. It - it was almost the same intensity plage as - most of the Sun yesterday. However, there was a - a ring of, well, plage, if you will, or channel around it which defined it. Again, it's on the equator, slightly north, perhaps, at about 0.5 solar radii out and

753

about,

oh, 0.15 or so solar

radii

diameter.

I've

not measured 339 15 Oh 06 SPT

it; it's Just eyeballed.

I could see it going back - Well, ... days - for 2 days, I could still see it. What is a little surprising is that even when I go back 2 days ago, it appears in rough]y the same location; so I'm going to dig back through all of m_ photos here and see whether we might have a real artifact in the system or whether it's something that really does exist. I'll try and give you a report on it later.

339 15 Oh 43 339 15 22 37
t

SPT SPT

SPT out. SPT at 15:23; ETC operation. clock will be reading 15:19. lMARK. Also on ETC setup this morning, I did put in a new desiccant. So we've got one good blue desiccant in here and one more good blue one left in stowage here, and the othershave turnedwhite or - or pink. SPT out. On my mark, the ETC Stand by; 4, 3, 2,

339 15 22 58 339 15 24 43

SPT SPT

339 15 25 01

SPT

TIME

SKIP

339 15 53 49 339 15 5_ 04

CDR CDR

This is the CDR at This is the CDR at 15:54, at Mike Tango 2 for the EREP CKD prep. Monitor Delta 6 reads 57 percent. CDR out. Okay. With the T minus l0 voice recording, this is the CDR. Alfa 2 is 60; Alfa 3 is 86; Alfa 4 is 70; Alfa 5 is 67; Alfa 6 is 0. Bravo 2 is 56; Bravo B is 76; Bravo 4 is 71; Bravo 5 is 75; Bravo 6 is 51; Bravo 7 is 32; Bravo 8 is about l; Bravo 9 is 58. Charlie 2 is 44; Charlie B is 87; Charlie 4 is 71_ Charlie 5 is 83; Charlie 6 is 47; Charlie 7 is 50 percent. Delta 2 is 86; Delta 3 is 85; Delta 4 is 72; Delta 5 is 14; Delta 6 is 57; Delta 7

339 15 54 17 339 15 59 44

CDR CDR

754 is I0. Charlie 7 is less than - than 80, so we're okay there. I verify S192 ALIGNMENT switch is OFF, and the cover is on. 339 16 01 19 CDR S192 MODE to READY. DOOR is OPEN; 60 seconds until the light goes out. DELTA T_4P - PRESS TO TEST is okay. 0VERTh_P is okay. Those are both on panel i17. The S190 H_.&TER SWITCH OFF light is off.

_

339 16 01 49

CDR CDR

Bill, what happened to our paper clip that was here? Do you know? No, I don't. S192 READY light's on. Okay, to preoperate configuration. TAPE RECORDER is ON; the READY is on. 192 is ON; I have a READY light on on 192; DOOR is OPEN. All right, 192 is in MODE, CHECK; that's where it belongs. The READY is out. The MODE is CHECK. The DOOR is OPEN. We're at 191: POWER is ON; the READY is on; the C00T._u_is ON; the DOOR is OPEN. $190: The POWER is ON; the READY light's out; we're in STANDBY; the door is open, verified visu_1]y. 193 Romeo is in STANDBY; READY light out. SCATTENOMETEN is in OFF; READY light out. The ALTI_'A'ER is in OFF; READY light out. 94 is ON; the READY light is on. TV Input Station 133: POWER has been turned ON; VIDEO SELECT is to TV. 3 minutes to EREP, START. Skylab, we're reading you loud and clear. side for 15 minutes. Roger, Story. Maneuver 's looking good. Have 1 minute to EREP, START. And for the PLT: On site 330, we expect it may be clear but there are some clouds to the north which are moving out. Your series 300 sites, all should be clear. Your series 500 sites will be about 4/lOths to 7/10ths, Bill. State-

PLT 339 16 02 28 CDR

339 16 04 13 339 16 04 57

CDR CC

CDR CC 339 16 06 09 CDR CC

PLT

Roger. Copy, Story. Thank you.

_-_

755

CC

And, Ed, you do not have to monitor the maneuver for 5 - the 5 se - 5-minute settling period. After 2 or 3 minutes there, we'll be here looking at it, and you feel free to go ahead to the ETC. Okay. ThAnks very much, Story.

SPT CDR SPT 339 16 07 09 CDR SPT CDR SPT

On my mark, it'll be 07:10. ... how I'ii monitor MARK. EREP, START. this. And in case I ... - -

- - ... a maneuver to new Z-LV ... - Stand by for VTS AUTO - - I think up ... - I would CAL. DAS to make

need the proper

CDR PLT 339 16 07 19 339 16 07 20 CDR PLT SPT

Bill, VTS AUTO Standing by MARK. MARK.

CAL.

Seeing as we'd ..., I would probably need one which would take care of the cumulative ... too, which you've already put in. On my mark, it'll be 07:30. MARK. SCATTEROMETER STANDBY. Stand by ALTIMETER to

CDR 339 16 07 30 CDR

to STANDBY;

CDR 339 16 08 30 CDR

On my mark, it'll be 08:30. MARK. S194 to MANUAL. ning on S190.

Stand by are still run-

Shutters

CC

Okay, Jer. And, Ed, you were cut out by the C&D ops. Could you repeat what you said, please? Yes, I could talk with you more on them later, but essentially what I would need is the fine maneuver up here, which is accumulative of a few I've already

SPT

756
put in, in case I would have to reinitiate m_neuver. Z-LV plus the fine. 339 16 09 44 CC CDR We got it, Ed. On my mark, it will be 16:10:00. S191 READY light. MARK. S191 READY light on at 10. Looking for an that

_.

339 16 10 00

CDR

REFERENCE going

to 6.
CDR 339 16 l0 48 CDR On my mark, it'll be 10:48. Stand by ON. On my

MARK. SCATTEROMETER, ON; RADIOMETER, mark, it will be 16 :ll. MARK. Downlink going to position 3. it'll be ll:17. Stand by MARK. MARK. S192 to READY.

339 16 ll O0

CDR

*** my mark,

339 16 ll 17 339 16 ll 23

CDR CDR CDR

At 23 - Stand by -

S190 MODE to AUTO. like the S190 is cllm_ing away

Okay, it sounds all right. Okay.

CC CDR 339 16 ll _3 339 16 ll 46 CDR CDR

On my mark, it ' ll be ll : h4. MARK. SCATTEEOMETER to STANDBY. At

MARK. RADIOMETER to SCANBY - STANDBY at 46. ll:50, the READY light on S190 went out. MARK. MARK. 192 MODE to CHECK; that was at 57. RADIOMETER, OFF. 12:08 -

339 16 ll 57 339 16 12 02 339 16 12 07

CDR CDR CDR

12:02 -

MARK. ALTIMETER going ON. 190 MODE to STANDBY; FRAME rate to 05. The next mark will be at 12:30. Stand by MARK. S190 MODE, SINGLE. Stand by -

339 16 12 31

CDR CDR

On my mark, it will be 13:20. MARK. S190 to SINGLE. Standy b

339 16 13 20

CDR

Next mark will be at 13:30. _-_

757
339 16 13 30 CDR MARK. S192 to READY. Ed, at 36 MARK. 5MAP/(. MARK. MARK. to 3. Okay, At 13:42, On my m_rk to _C to AUTO,

339 16 13 36

CD8

the downlink

is going

to position

339 16 13 42 339 16 13 53 339 16 14 00

CDR CDE CDR

Next m_vk

is at 13:53. AUTO.

Stand

by -

S190 to MODE, ALTIMETER

Stand

by MODE going

to STANDBY

at 14 even;

PLT

it's the VT8 operator.

On this

one side do

339 16 14 Ii

CDR

MARK. At 14:12, downlink going to 7. Got a little time now, i0 seconds. Stand by. At 14:28 you'll get a ma_k. MARK. ALTIMETER, ON.

339 16 14 28 339 16 14 34

CDR CDR

MARK. At 14 :34, the 192 MODE to CHECK. The 8190 READY light went out at 14:40; MODE is STANDBY; FR is going to 41. 14: 51, ETC to STANDBY. Okay, Ed? And SHUTTER 8pk_N_ to 140. At 15, the downlink is going off. Next mark is at 15:30. Okay, PLT here. Successful on 330, 305, 308, 307. Very good tracking sequences on all targets. Great, Bill. Next mark is at 15:30. Stand by it'll he

339 16 15 13

PLT

CC CDR 339 16 15 30 CDR

MARK. 190 MODE, SINGLE. 15:50. Stand by MARK. 190 MODE, SINGLE.

On my ma_k,

339 16 15 50

CDE CDR

Okay. in

Okay, Ed, at 16:26 the ETC to AUTO 5 seconds. Stand by MARK How's it. the weather down there

339 16 16 26

CDE CDE PLT

this morning,

Bill?

It's - was very good on all my stateside passes. I'm starting to pick up quite a few clouds down here in Central America.

758
PLT CDR 339 16 17 33 339 16 17 40 339 16 17 50 CDR CDR PLT The primary is 565.

On m_ mark, it 'll be 17 :33. MARK. MARK. S190 MODE to AUTO. S192 MODE to READY. target. *** 3 degrees ; MY _a_k, it ' ll be 17 : 40.

Okay, I got the primary good.

339 16 18 08

PLT

That thing looks like it has water in the top of it, in the cone. l'm looking for actives. Maybe it's smoke I see. On my mark, it ' ii be 18:h0. Okay. I'm going to try to get more than one, Story. I'm getting real good data on this primary one. Okay, Bill. I 'm going to track it down to about 20 degrees, then see if I can get another one. Okay, there's that one. All right, now - On my ma_k, MARK. 18:40. Stand by RANGE is - -

CDR PLT

339 16 18 28

CC PLT

CDR 339 16 18 40 CDR PLT CC

ALTIMETER

to STANDBY;

Yes, I had it. Beautiful.

CgR
CDR 339 16 19 01 PLT

- - 78.
MODE is going to 5. This is - No, I guess it was a cloud. getting it about 8 degrees, Story .... Started storm.

PLT

Interval. Got two of those boogers. Okay, I'm going to ... down the side of this thing .... I don't know if those are clouds or that's smoke. Back on the top of it. Skylab, we're 30 seconds to LOS; i0 minutes to Vanguard. You're looking very good. You may get a few desat firings. That 's all.

339 16 19 32

CC

759

CDR PLT

Roger, Story.

Thanks.

Beautiful' Man, got an extra one even. The extra one was 564. Got 565 and 564. Good tracking on both of them. Okay, now I set up for this other thing. On m_ mark, it will he 20:30. MARK. S192 MODE to CHECK. Stand by Stand by This is -

PLT CDR 339 16 20 30 CDR CDR 339 16 21 00 339 16 23 05 CDR PLT

On my mark, it'll be 21:00. MARK. ALTIMETER is ON.

Okay, we're going right headwaters anyway. The worst
NO -

across

the Amazon

now -

339 16 23 47

PLT

working

environments

I have ever seen.

CDR 339 16 24 00 CDR

On my mark,

it'll be 24:00.

Stand by -

MARK. S194 MODE to MANUAL. Looking for an S190 BEADY out. ETC to STANDBY, Ed. MARK. 190 READY light out at 24:20. for my mark on 24:32. MARK. ALTIMETER to STANDBY. Next mark will be 25:00 with Stand by MARK. EREP, STOP at 25:00. Stand by

339 16 24 19

CDR

339 16 24 32

CDR

190 MODE to STANDBY. an EREP, STOP.

339 16 25 00

CDR PLT

Okay, now, Jer, I've got quite a bit of data take here on this limb thing. I don't know what you're doing over there. Okay. What time?

CDR PLT CDR

Starting at 40, so it's about 15 minutes. Okay. At the 190 READY light, about the time it went out, we got a MALFUNCTION light, FILM ADVANCE light, on number 3. Probably out of film. I don't want to do that. That circuit brewer is IN. We got to raise this thing up and set the - set the aperturesand slam her back down again.

i_

760

CDR PLT 339 16 26 25 CDR

Boy, is this bright'.

All apertures going to 2.8.

Man, that's a real view, isn't it? Okay. finger At] the apertures are at 2.8. there. Put your

CDR

Okay. SHD'rA'_:R SPEED is going to SLOW now. Didn't have to open the FMC circuit breaker ; did that for
US.

339 16 27 09

PLT

By George, that was a good run. of that. Yes, it worked out great.

I'm real proud

CDR PLT

I was beginning to think I couldn't see stuff, you know? The clouds cooperated. Yes, that 's the big thing. Okay, we got quite a bit of time here now. This is the CDR. For the record, I never did get around yesterday after the EREP pass of recapping the - the frames that I took with the DAC. That was DAC 04. And the film in it was - I didn't mean DAC 0_; I meant DAC 05. Let's see. canister was Charlie Lima 09, isn't it? Film

CDR 339 16 27 37 CDR

PLT CDR

Yes, that's correct. Charlie Lima 09. I took about 12 frames of the Lake Titicaca. I started at the southern end and panned to the northern end and then back to the southern end again. And then I took about l0 frames of the Asuncion area, which is - There is a wheat survey being made there, and so the people interested in the wheat survey would be interested in those i0 frames. And then I took five frames of a little town on the - the coast of Argentina Porto Alegre. I think it's Argentina. called

339 16 28 52

PLT CDR

Yes, that's

right. little town because it

That was an interesting
W_S -- --

PLT

No, I think

it's Brazil.

761
CDB Okay. thing. An_, Porto AlegTe was an interesting I took five frames of that because the

town is much llke, oh, the Houston-Seabx_ok area, a little - a little town on an inland waterway. And I thought it would be kind of an interesting five frames for somebody interested in cultural patterns and land use. Got another 15 minutes until we start the Earth limb. CDR 339 16 29 54 CC Okay - Sky!ab , we're reading you loud the Vanguard for 9 minutes. and clear through

CDR

Roger, Story. We got FILM ADVANCE MALFUNCTION number 3 light on. I suspect that that roll's probably out of f_]m. The ALTIMETER worked according to Hoyle today. Okay, we were expecting South America. Yes. Okay. If we - if we got it, I didn't see it. ... you don't think you got it. They won't go out by themselves. That procedure, by the way, I had to put over there. Yes, I saw that. Okay. Sorry I didn't tell you about that. an UNLOCK down through

CC

PLT CDR PLT

CDR PLT CC

And, Bill, those are active volcanoes you were looking at. You may have been seeing smoke. Yes, I couldn't tell. Number 564 was smoking quite a bit. 565 was not ; it was pretty - pretty clear. I've gotten right - and I 'm down in the middle of the crater of it. Very clear; a good clear day. *** Snowing and covered with clouds today. From here, our best guess is that number 3 is out of film. Okay, Story.

PLT

339 16 31 19

PLT CC

CDR

762
339 16 33 05 PLT Okay. I'm going to take about five frames at the top of the good ... I see here. Okay, now I'm going to go to up here, Back off. ... b1,,_,,ers building PLT, Houston. Go ahead, Story. He's listening. up down there. clear area.

PLT

PLT 339 16 34 43 CC CDR CC

***

...

Okay, at the bottom of the C&D pad in post remarks, "Enable 190 FMC." Would you delete that, please? That ' in work. s About 9 minutes to go. ... I start some of mine approximately. Okay. Skylab, we're a minute to LOS and about an hour and h minutes to Goldstone at 17:41. You've only used 3 mibs to date. We show you looking good. There may be a couple desat firings at orbital midnight - orbital noon. And prior to the next sunrise, you may get a barberpole on ATM battery 13 and 15. It's no problem. Okay. Thank you, Story. are getting -out of ... 16:_0,

PLT CDR 339 16 35 45 PLT

CDR 339 16 38 45 CC

CDR SPT

Tb,nk you, Story. You guys down there smarter and smarter.

CC

Yes, we're trying hard, and it sounds like you guys ran an excellent pass. Thank you. They're Yes. - - let's go. still on. Okay, - -

339 16 39 24 339 16 39 44

CDR SPT CDR SPT

763

PLT

Okay, stand by for the first limb cal. cedure, I guess, is it? Right .... 40 :28. *** by. MARK. Okay. And the ang - UP angle

The pro-

CDR CDR PLT 339 16 40 30 PLT PLT PLT 339 16 40 52 CDR PLT FLT 339 16 41 38 FLT

is 2h degrees.

*** 7, h8, 49 MARK. Okay. OFF. And next one is at 41:39.

Staredby MARK. And that UP angle was 19 degrees at the start of the 41:39. Okay. *** lO. 5 seconds. MARK. DAC, OFF. Reestablishing the Alfa picture. **m 2:56. Stand by. i0 seconds. MARK. DAC, ON. And the UP angle at 42:56. Run into 43:28. MARK.
A minute

339 16 _2 10

PLT

339 16 42 55

FLT

is 14 degrees

339 16 43 28

PLT
CDR

43:28.
to

DAC, OFF.
START.

EREP,

PLT 339 16 hh 15 PLT

Stand by MARK.
*W*_ •

4_:14.

The UP angle is i0 degrees; 44:14.

CDR 339 16 4h 35 CDR

On my mark,

it will be hh :35.

Stand On _

by mark, it will

MARK. EREP, START at 44:35. be 44:45. Stana by MARK. S190 MODE; SINGLE.

339 16 44 45

CDR PLT CDR

DAC was turned OFF at 44:45. On my mark, it'll be h5:26. Stand by -

T64

339 16 45 25

CDR

MARK. 45:36. MARK.

S192 MODE to READY. Stand by S190 MODE, SINGLE.

On my mark,

it'll

be

339 16 h5 35

CDR PLT

45 : 50 MARK. h5:50. UP angle was 2 - 2 degrees UP angle at

339 16 45 51

PLT

CDR 339 16 46 21 CDR PLT CDR

On my mark, MARK.

it will be 46:21.

Stand by -

S192 MODE to STANDBY.

And DAC, OFF at 46:21. At 46 :30, I'll give a mark - 46 :34. on 46:3h. Stand by. MARK. S190 MODE, SINGLE. is my mark, and the UP/DOWN angle Coming up

339 16 h6 34

CDR PLT

Okay. 46:40 is 07.

PLT PLT PLT

Oh, dangit. It had an IMC. Angle is ll degrees, DOWN. 47:35, DAC, OFF. P is starting another ... sequence at h - at 48:07. Stand by MARK. 48:07. And the angle is 05 degrees, DOWN. Stand by -

4

339 16 48 06

PLT CDE

On my mark, MARK.

it'll be 48:22. SINGLE.

339 16 48 21

CDB PLT PLT

S190 MODE,

And DAC, OFF. 0kay. MABK. Standing 32. DAC, by for a 16 :49 :32. ON. Ib,=ning to 16:50:30.

339 16 49 31 339 16 51 25

PLT CDR PLT CDR

That camera Yes, it is. Oh.

still x,lnning?

765

PLT

This one, 52:30. Okay, setting is still correct, and the VTS _nning until 52:30. And a note for the people. I did not push the DATA pushbutton on these runs. The sequences were all correct except for the 1 Bravo. On my mark, it will be 52:30. Standby MARK. MARK. S190 MODE, SINGLE. -

CDR CDR/PLT 339 16 52 29 PLT CDR PLT

339 16 52 30

Okay, 191 CAMERA, OFF. Okay, debriefing on VTS sites. I got - On the decent data, I got 305 north, 308, 307. Break. MARK. Bill. On my mark, it will be 53:00. REFERENCE to 2 on S191. Got a minute,

CDR 339 16 53 00 CDR

PLT

Okay, and site 314 I threw in for good measure. So we got 305 north, 307, 308, and 314. It - Are these the - the valley pictures? Yes - No, they're Padre Island. Oh. I picked it up real early. Got good tracking good long tracking on all of them. And on site 307, I tried to get both the - the sand bottoms shallow and - and deep. So you'll see about three different pointing positions on area 307, but I got about a good 5 seconds on each one of them. And to repeat, on the - the limb, I neglected to push the DATA - Bill, we're going to need an AUTO CAL here. Okay. Standby in 4 seconds.

CDR PLT CDR PLT

CDR PLT CDR

339 16 5h 00 CDR

MARK. AUTO CAL.

766

PLT PLT CDR 339 16 5h l0 PLT

Got it. Anything coming up in the next -

No, that ' it. s Okay. On the Earth limb again, I did not push the DATA pushbutton. The times were all correct. The pointings were all correct with the exception of step 2. And I inadvertently hit IMC ON on on the Bravo setup. And other than that, all of the runs were as pads, within a fraction of a second. Okay, we're looking for a VTS READY light. The Sl91 READY light on at 56:40 and that will be the end of the pass. Okay, on my mark, come on. MARK. the S191 READY light will have

CDR

CDR

339 16 56 hO 339 16 56 44

CDB CDR

It came on at 41.

EREP to STOP. 33 percent.

MARK. At 56:45. Bravo 7 is reading S92 DOOR going CLOSEd now.

339 16 58 2h

SPT

SPT at 14:58 [sic]. ATM, the pass after - operations after the Z-LV pass was completed. We got the building block 2 in, had a call. Then the shopping list items: Went over to prominence number 37 and did a short version of building block shopping list item 28 Bravo. We were 21 arc seconds above the limb. Hey, let's go back. It's - it is building block 28, and it was a shortened version of it. I was not able to get in two. Frames were 56 for the complete three MIRROR AUTO RASTER for 55. We're 21 arc seconds above the limb. We can't get to it. The slit completely covered by prominence. 56, we got a SINGLE FRAME 2, 4 minutes, and we cut off at ESS. 82B, we got a TIME exposure, LONG WAVI_T,k'NGTH, 4-1/2 minutes. We were cut off by ESS; 55, given a MIRROR, AUTO RASTER. 400 K came at about line 50 for them. There are a few minutes remaining. We went into MIRROR, LINE SCAN for getting on in into sunset, prominence - Okay, that was prominence 39, in place of 37 which I said initi-]]y. Prominence 39 is not as definite, as clear as 37 was, but we can certainly, on monitor l, have all the clarity and detail we need for, I think, really good pointing.

767

339 17 00 53

SPT

I'd like to do some specific pointings and get a good spectra for specific locations. At the very top, where it appears relatively dense, and then at the bottom, we're probably seeing along - a lot of material along the line of sight. And also at the seat, down into the chromosphere, ... Apparently, we have a lot of work on this this afternoon, and I'll see what we come up with there. SPT out. This is the CDR at 17:04 Zulu. EREP tape der tape remaining is 2.3 centimeters. CDR out. (Music) SPT at 17:19, debriefing handheld photos. There were four of them. We'll discuss the - the first two. They were on CX20, frames number 25 and 24. Shutter depth 8, 55-millimeter, 1/50 of a second. One was over northwest Mexico, along the coastline; really showed almost ali of northwest Mexico next to the border in BaJa. And I believe that we covered the area of handheld photos ll4 and ll5. I looked for - It was fairly oblique. And I was looking for some of the fault zones in that area, and a quick look did not reveal them. However, perhaps the photos will show something. I was hoping that the oblique looking _lmost directly west would show them. It also did show the ... which was over BaJa at that time and over the ocean. It was quite an oblique view. That was taken at 16:12. And also at 16:12, I took one a little further south of that ; two cities with the one Just mentioned. And that would cover handheld photo lll2 - the ll2. I guess northwest Mexico ... to a fault zone. The next two handheld photos were taken at Brownsville, Texas, at 615. One was for urban/ rural development, which will take in the Brownsville, Texas, itself, and Harlingen area, looking almost straight down. The one right after that, also taken at - tonight at 16:15. The first one being frame number 23. And the second one, frame number 22, was right along the river coast along the coastline where the river empties into the Gulf at Brownsville, and it showed a lot of recor-

339 17 O1 22 339 17 04 28

SPT CDR

339 17 04 42 339 17 19 59

CDR SPT

339 17 21 38

SPT

768

the sediment and buildup in that area because of the river and a couple of sediment patterns out into the Gulf (music). Whether there was pollution evident, it was hard to say at a quick look. It may show up on the photo. 339 17 22 33 SPT SPT out.

TIME

SKIP

339 18 15 03

CDR

To the northwest of Bahia Blanca, Argentina, I took the pictures because this looks like the southern end of the Argentine wheat belt. And this particular pass, there were - there were no clouds; only an occasional scattered puff and no smoke. I thought this was a particularly good - good day for these photographs, and this ought to really fix up the people who are doing the wheat study. CDH out. ... to LOS ... CDR continuing. I need to give you more imformation. The cassette is Charlie X-ray 20. The two frames taken were frames number 21 and 20, and the f-stop was 8; 55-millimeter lens; 1/250. CDR out. SPT debriefing the ATMpass which began at 17:39, working on prominence number 39. Okay, the first building block 32 was carried out, no problem. The next building block over on prominence 39 was building block 28 and there I chose to try to find a ma_mum in Lymau beta using a GRATING POSITION of 0028, DETECTOR 3. I did not find a very pronounced maximum. I was looking at the slit parallel to the limb, around 20 arc seconds off, in the north foot of the prominence. I believe I had fairly substantial counts for a Lyman beta. However, as I said, the ma_imumwas not very pronounced. And moving in closer to the limb did not change it very much, which surprised me until I got in very close. So I Just chose what appeared to be a reasonable distance from the limb and far enough into the - above the limb that

CC 339 18 15 28 CDR

339 18 15 45 339 18 20 44

CDR SPT

_,

769 we're really looking at prominence material. And it came out to be 21 arc seconds measured off a LIMB SCAN. For all three exposures used LIMB POINTING. 339 18 22 34 SPT for 82B, I've

Okay, that one was carried out all right except for 55. And there, as I went around to pick up the - after going to 0028, and I went around to pick up the new one, I got a call from Houston and got diverted. Missed going to MECHANICAL REF and took another lap around the GRATING. Came back and did not add 102 on, as they were talking to me again. And net result was, I Just got behind there. What 55 got then essentially was two GRATING, AUTO SCANs and a MIRROR, AUTO RASTER at MECHANICAL REFERENCE zero. You know, this thing really is like trying to put socks on an octopus; you can't let up for an instant. And when Houston calls again, I'll Just have to ignore them if I'm doing something. There 's Just no way around it. Okay, second one: I then moved 60 arc seconds - From our discussion this morning, I assumed that what they wanted to do was to - by up, they meant away from the prominence, not away from the limb. I would hope that could be clarified in the future if they really did mean away from the limb. I asked in real time after - slightly after I started the building block and it was said that I had gone in the right direction. What I did was to move away from the prominence, but at the same elevation; that is, 21 arc seconds towards the north. I was 21 arc seconds above the limb, and I moved 60 arc seconds to the north. Had the slit still tangent to the limb, which by eyeball ... gave me an UP/DOWN of around minus 16, which I stuck with because that's what I used on the first exposure. Okay, those exposures were carried out without any problem. 55 again got a MIRROR, AUTO RASTER at the right location or at the right setting, although it was - there was a false start involved there. They didn't get one at 696 MECHANICAL. And the last exposure was carried out with no problem, in a quiet region - a non-prominence region, if you will further north than the previous view sites,

339 18 23 00

SPT

_

339 18 24 l0

SPT

770

tangent to the limb at a level of plus 9455. And those were all carried out without any problem except we did not get the full lO-minutes exposure in. We got - We're going to get - we're still in the process; it's going right now. We're going to get about 9 minutes and - Well, let's see. 339 18 25 35 SPT We started at 12:40. Yes, we'll utes and i0 seconds or so before get about 9 minwe hit ESS. I

did find the instructions for the pointing a little confusing. I understand the principles of what you're after, but the way in which it was the pointing was written was a little confusing on the - on the second one. Pointing changed 60 are seconds UP from last. Well, UP - We have UP/DOWN on here, and if you caa't get to the limb, whieh most likely you will, that means you move along the limb. But to try to second guess on which side of the prominence you've been working is kind of hard. I would prefer to have more detailed instructions in there to tell us what you're really after. 339 18 26 37 339 18 29 50 SPT SPT SPT out. Okay. SPT again; an addendum on the last ATM report. 55 requested a new setup for the MLS for the next orbit, and they have been positioned with the MLS tangent to the limb, 20 arc seconds 21 arc seconds above the limb, with the - headline 32 pointed right at the bottom center of the prominence. So you ought to get some good MIRROR LINE SCAN data, come ... 40 K on the next orbit. And also, you're in MIRROR, LINE SCAN right now, going into ESS - or going into a 40 K sunset. And you got about a little over a minute's worth of data here. So you're looking at the same spot when you come up. SPT out. This is the CDR at 18:36 with readings for housekeeping 2 Charlies, which is rate gyro temperature. For X-ray 6, 9h degrees; Yankee 6, 93 degrees; Yankee 5, 94 degrees ; Zulu 6, 96 degrees ; X-ray 5, 95 degrees; Zulu 5, 94 degrees. Now come the questions : Where - There is a possibility that

339 18 30 53 339 18 36 53

SPT CDR

??l

Zulu 6 could be - could read 98 and X-ray 5 could read lOO, and the reason why is because on the on the line that ends with 97 degrees, the color had not completely - had not turned complete blue. However, the next line down, which ends with, I believe, lll - that line had begun to turn from brown toward the green. So therefore, if you if you accept the fact that the second line - the third line is moving toward brown to green, you would say that Z-6 is 98 and X-5 is 100. If you say no, the line above that has not really reached its blue maximum yet, then you can say that Z-6 is 96 degrees and X-ray 5 is 95 degrees. Now the other four rate gyros, there doesn't seem to be any question; it's pretty clear. But in these two particular ones, it looks like the third row, the - the one that ends with llO degrees -lll degrees - begins to - begins its color the row above completes its. 339 18 38 00 CDR CDR out. change before

TIME SKIP

339 19 59 50

CDR

This is the CDR at 19:59 Zulu. M092 subject, SPT. Left legband, Alfa November; right legband, Alfa Quebec. CDR out. This is the CDR at 20:06 Zulu, reporting the start of the LBNP run, M092, with the subject the SPT, at 19:_0. This information is for M151. CDR out.

339 20 05 3_

CDR

339 20 05 _3

CDR

TIME

SKIP

339 20 32 _

CDR

This is the CDR for the M155 folks - correction, 151 folks. LBNP, M092: Exercise was terminated at 20 :33 Zulu. CDR out.

339 20 32 56

CDR

772

339 20 44 27

CDR

This is the CDR at 20:44 Zulu. GAS PRESSURE, CAL N2, 02, C02 was 1223; GAS PRESSURE, CAL N2, H20 was 1277 ; CABIN AIR, PERCENT OXYGEN, 75.07; PRESSURE was 5. 086 ; 3.10; PER-

PERCENT

WATER,

CENT, C02, - correction, 339 20 44 59 339 20 52 19 CDR CDR CDR out.

C02, 1.98.

This is the CDR at 20:53 Zulu. is the SPT. VITAL CAPACITIES: CDR out.

Ml71-1; the subject 4.790, 4.802, 4.805.

339 20 52 34 339 20 56 48

CDR PLT

This is PLT reporting on the video downlink that I'm sending down right now. It's of prominence on - I think it's number 89 - correction - 86 -yes, prominence number 39. Excuse me; prominence nl,mber 39. MY pointing is EXPERIMENT; minus 0902. UP/DOWN, minus 105; Lk_T/RIGRT, plus 985. This isn't the highest point in the prominence but is the hottest one I could find on DETECTOR 3. And I did use the 102 plus the 28 - the 130 - to get Lyman-beta. You told me we were in MECHANICAL REF to start with, and I went around and made sure. Anyway, there's the prominence in H-ALPHA l; there it is in H-ALPHA 2 - see if I can - Okay. And now a little XUV MON in the same area and the time hack right now is 20:57. Okay; and stand byl. Okay, getting another AUTO SCAN started; another PATROL, SHORT started. Okay, so the - show the XUV M0N coming down. I 'm starting the show off in a 2-second sequence, prominence 39. Okay, I guess that's about it. You would have gotten the XUV slit. Don't think it's worth looking at. Okay, another H-alpha 1. Alpha 2. You want more integrate sequence? Okay, PLT out. This is the CDR at 21:06 with a revision to an earlier report of VITAL CAPACITY measurements on MITI; the subject, SPT. The correct values are: 5.296, 5.261 and 5.175. CDR out.

339 20 58 42

PLT

339 20 59 47 339 21 04 17

PLT CDR

339 21 04 33

CDR

773

TIME

SKIP

339 21 28 37

CDR

This is the CDR at 21:28. The MITI run was terminated at 21:20. The SPT has kept his hioharness on - his VCG harness on. We have now shifted to the ERGOMETER, ON ; VCG mode, 0N. Recorders - EXPERIMENT RECORDERs A and B are still ON. And you'll get instrumented exercise on the ergometer. CDR out.

339 21 29 04

CDR

TIME SKIP

339 21 55 06

SPT

SPT at 2-1:55. PERCENT

Post M171 run: PERCENT

PERCENT

02, 73.25;

H20 , 05.01;

02 [sic], 02.06.

339 21 55 3h 339 21 58 17 339 21 58 20

SPT PLT PLT

SPT out. Okay, I'm reading 58:20. at 59 if you think That will give me

MARK now. I'm going to start it's going to be good enough. an exact 2-minute delta.

PLT

Okay, this is PLT. We're having trouble with the settling time on the maneuver; so I'm going to be delaying the exposures for 2 minutes. Does it look good enough, Jer? No, it 's still Okay, I'ii make settling. it delta 3 minutes then.

CDR PLT CDR PLT PLT

Okay, it looks good now. Okay. And POWER will be going ON at - on the hour. I'll be exactly 3 minutes late in all the activities. Standing POWER, MARK. by; 20 seconds.

PLT 339 22 00 00 339 22 O0 O1 PLT PLT

ON on my mark. Start.

774

.__

339 22 00 02

PLT

MARK. White light is flickering. The brown light came on. Okay, now I hear mechanical noise but no - nothing but the green light or brown light. Okay, mechan_cal noise stops, and the white light flashes twice. And that was about 20 seconds. It'll be 22:08:26. Send everything downstream 3 minutes. I hope that doesn't screw up the pointing. More mechanical noise at - starting about 45. Flash of white light at 55. Flash again at 58 and 59. Another flash. Okay, recorder's going off now. Okay, this is PLT. on ... I see that green light is now

PLT

339 22 01 59 339 22 04 45

PLT PLT

339 22 07 03

PLT

Okay. I picked up 1 minute through there. I will go camera ROTATION, 214.7 and TILT, 25.1. At 22:06:44, POWER switch will be going ON - or at 22:07:4_, POWE_ switch will be going ON. And at 45, RESET switch to START. Stand by POWER switch, ON. START now. Okay, I have an operate light - FILM ADVANCE light. And I think there may have been a mistake on the pad. My pad reads for the - For the T-II exposure, it read: "22:05:26, RESET switch to START" and "22:05:27, POWER switch to OFF." And it seems like there's something wrong in there. But that's exactly what I did. I feel like I started that sequence I really didn't want. And that's what the pad says. Well, that's the way it works down below, though. Okay. Okay. At - It should have been ii:i0. I started the exposure at 07:_. At ii minutes and i0 seconds, the so-called green light - the brown light - went out. Okay, it Just doesn't quite sound good - Just what it says on the pad, 1-minute delta. Go 2 more minutes in the delta.

339 22 07 44 339 22 07 45

PLT PLT

PLT

339 22 09 01 339 22 ii 15 339 22 ii 16

PLT SPT PLT

SPT

775

PLT PLT

2:14

[sic], I'm supposed

to -

Okay, we're running into a problem again. Coming into daylight and so have to terminate the - Oh, I need to actuate this RESET switch to START and that POWER switch to OFF prematurely. Okay, if you could, give me a countdown l0 seconds ahead of time. All right. 30 seconds. 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1START. MARK. OFF. Okay, Jer, press on. Okay, the exposure was terminated Just about on the minute_ lh minutes. And we got a - That was terminated a minute earlier than the pad calledfor. We startedat 07:4 - We're starting to get sunlight all right. about

PLT

339 22 13 l0

CDR CDR CDR

339 22 13 57 339 22 13 58 339 22 14 00

PLT CDR PLT

CDR PLT

We started at 07:44 and stopped about 14 minutes early; 1 minute short on the comet sequence. Did you have a snnrise time on your pad? that a little our times up

CDR PLT

Negative. SepmR to me they called close. That maneuver time screwed on the observations here. That's what I think, too.

CDR PLT

Well, that's how you learn. Okay, the PLT to recap that. The exposure of T-11 field was started at 21:00 even. It was terminated at 22:05:26. Comet was started at 22:06 - 22:07:44 and terminated at 22:14. PLT out. SPT at 22:10. Subject, M092/171, and this will go to the Pls of those experiments and Jerry Hordinsky,the medical director. Okay. No problem

339 22 15 25 339 22 18 18

PLT SPT

776

_,

with M092 today. Probably felt better for this one than I have any one we've had since I've been up here. The only thing I did to prepare for it was take a lot of fluids - probably about, oh, 40 ounces' worth of fluid within the past - the 2 hours before the run. And also, I've been doing a lot of exercises with the legs. Riding the bike is one. I've been riding up at fairly high watts, 300 watts, for periods of t_me in order to build up the leg strength, as well as the endurance. And also, the work with the "Thornton's Revenge," the Jumps and ... springs, if you will, with toe rises, which I think have done a lot to strengthen the calf or at least keep them from deteriorating. On the M171, looks as though it's getting a little better shape; probably part of the phenomena that Ed Burchard talked me into. 339 22 19 41 SPT The heart rate at the upper load was just around 160 a little bit over there towards the end. On the ground, it was up around 170, 173 or 4, I think, at times. So I guess the bike-riding up here is getting me in better shape for that. I wasn't overly impressed with the oxygen consumption, however. It seems to be lower than what I had on the ground. I'm going to plot those things up when I get the chance to. I'm going to ask for some time to plot up all that good medical data and then get back with you a little bit more on it. Looked like a good series of runs from m_ standpoint. Be interested in hearing from you if you get any good comments. 339 22 20 27 SPT SPT out.

TIME

SKIP

339 23 13 52

PLT

PLT at 23:14. million. I added million

Water tank 5 tested out 6 parts per

339 23 lh 01

PLT

20 units and brought it up to 9 parts per as per instructions on the pad.

###

DAY 340 [AM]

777
340 00 46 20 SPT SPT at 00:46, debriefing the ATM pass which began at 23:54. Okay, the first building block 32, Sun center, went with no problem. I looked at the TV and could not see any evidence at all of a transient or of changes - significant changes in the structure - even relatively small changes in the structure. Compared it with the picture which I took this morning; had all of the same streamers, which remained unchanged. The biggest one - no difference evident. Okay, the work on the prominence P-39 went pretty well. We worked in the first JOP 4A, step 4, building block 37. Went with the 82B SLIT, again tangent to the limb. And again the best part to look at for 82B standpoint was the foot of the prominence in the north end. Houston, Skylab; you at Ascension 1 minute to LOS. at 00:54. We will have

340 00 47 19

SPT

340 O0 47 51

CC

340 00 48 00

SPT

Okay. I did the Lyman beta line on 55 - 0028 GRATING at DETECTOR 3 with a relatively broad peak in distance along the limb. And in height it was a little sharper but still not - was not really a real peak. In height it came in from high altitudes to finally reaching a peak of around 200, leveled off at 200 at around 13 arc seconds or so, and then - approximately 200 - and then went on until it got very close to the disk, and of course, it went up. So I worked with the slit parallel to the limb in the north foot, with plus 13 arc seconds off the limb. And I used LIMB POINTING on 82B for all of their exposures in this orbit. I found that the peak, in searching around with Lyman beta, corresponded quite well with the brightness seen in H-alpha. I could predict where it would drop down by looking at H-alpha, not Just the edges but relatively weaker locations in the prominence itself.

340 O0 49 40

SPT

56 was given a PATROL, SHORT every 6 minutes. 55, because there was no mirror position change or anything, received four MIRROR, AUTO RASTERs. I'm sorry, received four GRATING , AUTO SCANs at the MIRROR position of 1232. Building block 33B,

T78
no problem; second 33B, I moved the SLIT. We were located about Sun center and there the best place to do that was - and still get any of the 55 MAR on the prominence - was to go south of the prominence, And I had about one-half of the MAR on the south end of the prominence. Okay. At the end, I Just rolled 90 degrees and put the - the limb - or the top of the prominence - on the H-ALPHA i crosshair, and the limb was above it; and then - I was hoping to get in quite a few GRATING, AUTO SCANs down to, say, around line 12 to bring out the prominence; and, unfortunately, I didn't have time. I got in one - one GRATING, AUTO SCAN down to line 12 and then down to line 5 before I sit - hit 400 K. 340 00 51 22 SPT I went through and I gave it another one. I told you I had two, but looks like it one - most of it was under - half of it was under 400 K. The GRATING POSITION, for that was 594, and I changed the REFERENCE to OPTICAL at that point. So we were looking at several good lines, which I know you've used earlier today for the prominence, Lyman alpha. Some of the continuum of Lyman - Lyman continuum in two places - neon VIII, helium continuum, and m_gnesium VIII. SPT out. The PLT; time is 02:00. I'm going to debrief my pass. Let's see, in viewing prior to the start of J0P 6, building block i, looked at S052; I didn't see anything startling; I'd noticed a fine structure. However, at - at 10,800, I think I was hiding one of the more interesting features, because when I rolled back to minus 5400 at the start of building block 1 Bravo, I noticed a small brightened area, sort of con - pyramid or sharp cone - at about 070, extending about - oh, a third of a radius. And sort of noted it, and then went ahead and did the first STANDARD on 52. And I looked at it again, and it was - this was much more distinct this time. And I called Ed up to take a look at it, and he agreed that it was probably enhanced activity in the corona, and so I went ahead and continued on with the CONTINUOUS. We finished the STANDARD, JOP 6, building block l, and Ed is now set up and is continuing the 52 surveillance, and we've got

34C 00 52 09 340 02 03 33

SPT PLT

??9

a LONG EXPOSURE panel shortly. 3_0 02 05 Oh PLT

going in 56.

I'ii be leaving

the

And I am going to prevail upon him to give the film count. Other than that, it was nothing more than Just a mechanical operation of the JOP. I did inadvertently hit T to T [?] in time, and lost one exposure there, about 5 seconds LONG in time, at Sun center. Other than that the JOP was performed nominally, and there doesn't seem to be a lot of fine structure in the corona on the west limb, and extending - There's one very, very fine needle-like streamer down around _ o'clock. It extends out - looks like several radii. Other than that I think the structure in the corona appears to be _Imost the same as it was, with the exception of the enhanced brightened area mentioned previously.

3_0 02 05 57

PLT

PLT out.

TIME

SKIP

F

340 02 26 l&

SPT

SPT at 02:26 with a handheld briefing - handheld photos debrief. MAg ID was CX47, GMT was 01:37, frame number 56. And here we looked at a - what appeared to be a major land division in Outer Mongolia. There was the mountains on the south and west; the line itself ran from the northwest to the southeast. Now, the right-hand side was comparatively flat land, although not completely flat, and there was also a color contrast. The mountains of the - on one side of the divide were exceptionally dark, and on the other side the land was relatively bright - color being _lmost a dark brown for the mountains and a - a tan, in some cases _Imost a reddish color on the opposite side of the divide. It was such a clear division of two types of land that we thought it was, if not for research, certainly for illustrative purposes, an excellent photograph.

340 02 27 50

SPT

Okay, also on CX_7, frame number 57, and taken at 01:38 Out over - well, let's go back to the previous one: that was taken at 01:34. The next one, frame 57, was taken at 01:38 out off the coast of Taiwan. And we were looking at a weather system, looked like a frontal system, lot of low-lying

78o

clouds.

And embedded

in that were

a lot of cumulus

cells and some very pronounced overshooting cloud tops. It was a good illustration of overshooting cloud tops. I realized it was not over land and you could not correlate it with tornado occurrence. However, it was one of the better overshooting cloud top illustrations we've seen. There was probably about a dozen or so in the vicinity, most of them on a line that well displayed the frontal system. 340 02 28 58 340 02 43 07 SPT PLT SPT out. Don't sweat it. I don't think I - I'm not sure I'm going to be able to see this anyway. Could you give me a mark on 45, Ed, if it's convenient, so I idon't get myself all involved here, trying to feed this thing and - Hey, you got it, Jer! Dang! That's 45 you're giving me, right? I don't know if I'm seeing my own eyeball or what. Okay. Pressing ahead on faith. I ain't about to change that rotation and tilt. Okay, my first exposure is at 46:25; ROTATION, 213.3; verified; 21 point - right, thank you - 21.7 on the TILT. SPT, Houston. Thank you. This is the CDR, go ahead. ahead. This is the CDR, go

PLT

PLT 340 02 44 27 PLT

CC PLT CDR

340 02 45 36

CC

Jerry, could we get someone to m_ke a couple on the teleprinter? We're unable to command at the moment. Okay, I'm right next to it.

checks it

CDR CC

What do you need?

Okay. We want you to check the Tk_.k_PRINTERcircuit breaker on panel 200. Verify that it is IN. If it is IN, then check all the removable plugs on the rear to be sure that they are in. Okay, it's in work.

CDR

781

340 02 46 15 340 02 46 26

PLT PLT

Okay,

coming up on 46:25.

Stand

by.

MARK. 46:25, starting 30-second exposure on filter A-3. That is not filter A-3; that's a blank. Trying to see the dang comet. Minute now. Stand

by.
340 02 46 55 PLT MARK. There's filter A-3 there. Okay, film advance. Start another one. Okay, this will give you 30 seconds. Houston, CDR; I checked the plugs and they're good, and I cycled the switch to ON and back to COMMAND. Okay, stand by to terminate, which will be at 47:35. IN?

CDR

PLT CC CDR PLT 340 02 47 34 _ 340 02 47 39 340 02 47 45 PLT PLT PLT CC

And was the panel 200 circuit brewer That' s affirmative. And I'ii give you 5 seconds. MARK. MARK. MARK. Starting Advance 5-second film. exposure

Stand by -

on A-3. to Charlie 3.

Change

filter

CDR, we'd like for you to cycle switch to ON - Charlie 3.

the TELEPRINT_

PLT CC

- - and hold it there so that we can observe on telemetry.

PLT 340 02 48 00 PLT

Okay, starting a 90-second exposure

at - -

MARK. Hey, I made it. 48 minutes even. 90-second exposure, Charlie 3. Yes. Got it. Everything looks good. Okay, we got - I wasted one - I used one 30-second exposure on a blank. Now, take it back to COMMAND. Now there 's the filter.

CC PLT

782

CC

We now have command of it. Thank you. going over the hill in about a minute. you again at Cs_ns_von at 03:18.

You're We'll have

PLT

All right, it 's 49. That 's i minute of the 90-second exposure on Charlie 3. Stand by on my mark. MARK. Advance film. Okay, we're going to start a 20-second exposure on Charlie 3 on my mark at

PLT 340 02 49 30 PLT

49: 40.
340 02 49 40 340 02 50 00 PLT PLT MARK. Next will be Bravo 1. Stand by -

MARK. That's completion of the 20-second exposure; changing filters. Charlie back in the box. Bravo and I want Bravo 1. Bravo 1 is installed. Film is advanced - 50:50 coming up - okay. 15 seconds, I want a 90-second exposure on Bravo 1. I got it set. Stand by -

340 02 50 51

PLT PLT PLT

MARK.

Starting

90-second

exposure. -

i minute o go. t And 30 seconds to go. I'm holding a flashlight in my mouth. That 's why it 's - speech is distorted. Stand by MARK. That's the end of the 90-second exposure on Bravo 1. Okay. Everything is nominal except for the first two. I took an extra 30-second exposure with no filter. This made me start my first 30-second exposure in Alfa 3 with a late time. I made up the time. I got the 5-second exposure, and I started the third exposure 02:48 on time. Everything else was nominal. The time, as I understand, is not critical. So we accomplished the purpose and intent successfully except for the fact I got one extra exposure, 30 seconds, with no filter. PLT out. Going RECORD, OFF.

340-02

52 19

PLT

340 02 53 02 340 03 59 17

PLT CDR

This is the CDR at 04:00 Zulu. The subject is time lines and schedules, flight plannlng. The addressee for this message would be the FAOs and anyone else who's interested in the workaday

783

routine up here. I think - In the beginning, I think I can say that our efficiency is definitely up now; we're beginning to feel quite a bit better about how we can get our Jobs done up here. I think it's become quite apparent that it took us about 2 weeks to get ourselves adjusted to our new environment. And after about 2 weeks, you began to see improvement in the way we were doing things. It seems to me we're getting things done quite a bit quicker than we were, and I think we're making fewer mistakes. 340 04 00 I0 CDR Let's review some scheduling pitfalls that have really eaten our lunch a couple of times and try to avoid those. I think probably the most important one is the scheduling of two time-critical tasks close together. And that is - On the two occasions for me, for instance, were coming off the ATM and going to something like S019 or S183. And the problem here is, if you ever get hung up on the first of two time-critical tasks for any reason, it 9mmediately impacts the other one. And you need to schedule those two things - either two different people or schedule them far enough apart so that you've got a little bit of flexibility left in order to - to get from one to the other. I think it would be much smarter, on the days when you have an S019, and S18S, and S06S out the SAL anything that requires a m_ueuver, possible TACS expenditure, or anything that is - is critical in the way - in the sense that we don't have much film, that we could give every - m_e every possible insurance that we can - that we're going to get that particular Job done correctly, because we can't afford to screw up S019 very many times or SI8B or the rest of those. So when we have two rather time-critical tasks like that, I think we either ought to give them to two different people or we should schedule them in such a _ner that there's ample time to finish one and get to the
next.

B40 04 01 46

CDR

Another pitfall that we hollered about - and I think you pretty well have taken it to task and that is getting exercise too soon after a meal. You got three guys up here who do not like to exercise after a meal. There are some people in this world, I guess, who think it's neat to do that, but we don't. And we would prefer not to do so. We would prefer also not to have our PT

784

sessions split up. We do understand your problems, I think. If you can, whenever possible, do not split Ed Gibson's up. It's all right if you split mine. I would prefer to have it all in one chunk, but if you do have to split it split somebody, go ahead and split me. 340 04 02 27 CDR Now the reason for this is that you do some heavy PT and then you've got to clean yourself up before you can go do something else. And if you have two PT periods, a]] that means is you've got two personal hygiene periods. And what it essentially does is cut your PT down. Now on a - on an average hour and a half period of PT, I think you can get about an hour and 5 to l0 minutes of exercise. And it's going to take you 25 minutes to clean yourself up afterwards. And if you don't believe it takes that long, go over to the Skylab workshop, get a washcloth, and try - try to take a bath. Wash your entire body with nothing but a washcloth and a - and a pail of water and see how long it takes you to do it. Okay, the next subject is the presleep and postsleep periods. I think it's becoming apparent to me that these two periods are being impacted more and more as the days go on. Yesterday, as I remember, was - we had a few items that we picked up in a presleep and postsleep, and tonight we had S063. And the problem here is that right as of today, none of us has as yet had any time to sit down and read or write or just stare out the window unless we do it after bedtime when - when the ground stops talking to us. Now I would like to request that these periods be kept Just as open as possible in order for us to get some relaxation. The exception to this is ATM. If you want to run ATM periods, one presleep and one postsleep; we're willing to go along with that. But we don't need a lot of the other stuff that goes with it. I think - On the ground I don't think we would be expected to work a 16-hour day for 85 days on the ground, and so I really don't see why we should even try to do it up here. I think that you'll - you'll find that you'll get better work out of us, we'll be more rested and much more efficient if we can do the following things: That is, eat at regular times and have -

340 04 03 15

CDR

340 04 04 28

CDR

785

some time for Just plain quiet relaxation with nothing bugging us - no requirements on our time but Just a period of time to be quiet. There's nothing worse than having to gobble your meals in order to get some tasks done during the presleep or postsleep period that really should be scheduled at some other time. 340 0h 04 59 CDR So please - I think in the future, if you would, please, loosen up on the presleep and post postsleep periods of time. Give us - give us Let us have that full hour and a half to get ourselves cleaned up and ready to go in the morning, have a fairly leisurely breakfast without having to gobble our food or - or gobble food between tasks that are thrown into the middle of the presleep 340 04 05 26 CDR or postsleep area.

In the postsleep area, I think that's the time when we ought to have some time - Just quiet, to read or look out the window or anything like that. And I think if we get these periods of relaxation, we'll be considerably more efficient in our work. Now moving on to the days off, I don't think that we should work too much on our days off. I think that our day-off wakeup time should be lh :00 rather than 12:00. I think an EREP pass is okay, but on that day when we have an EREP pass, there should be only two ATM passes for Ed because working an EREP pass with us and then working four ATM passes Just completely bombs out his whole day. And I think it's too much. On the days when we have no EREP, I think four ATM passes for Ed will be fine for a maximum. And for Bill and I, we can m_ke Kohoutek observations, and we can consider a shopping list, though I would suggest that you send up to us a couple of days before the days off, and we'll select items from a shopping list of things to do. So _11 in all, my message is - on time lining - is that we're finally beginning to get up on the curve and get our stride, and this is not the time to load us down again and bring us back down behind the power - of the curve again because it's demoralizing and I think that it tends to make us - cause us to make more mistakes and we become much more inefficient in our work.

340 04 05 45

CDR

340 04 06 16

CDR

i

i

786

340 04 07 04 CDR 340 04 19 20 SPT

This is CDR.

End of message.

SPT at 04:19. Subject for M131 and spatial orientation Judgment. Okay, I think I've ta1_ed once before about phenomena of your mind all of a sudden snapping to recognition of a one-g orientation or a one-g situation. Briefly, what I alluded to, I believe, was in the 0WS if you are upside down-sideways, you recognize everything, but it doesn't seem familiar until you almost can get yourself relatively close to a one-g orientation, say, within 30, 40, 50, degrees. Then all of a sudden your - your mind recognizes it as something you're very familiar with. In the MDA there are some other interesting sensations. One is, if you're looking out of the - one of the hatch windows, one of the STS windows, or looking out of the EREP window, you find that when you come back - move your head back inside and look down the axis of the MDA, say, toward the 0WS, you feel that your'e looking down a long tube. I mean down - that is, a long tube which - in which there is a bottom, and it is in a one-g sense a down.

340 04 21 03

SPT

You know, of course, that you're not going to fall down it. But you do have a sensation that it's down. When you then move into the - away from the window and into the MDA a little bit, then all of a sudden old familiar landmarks come into being. And then when you look along the axis towards the 0WS it's no longer down but Just across - just a - another - another distance with no real direction associated with it except maybe Just a very neutral across.

340 04 21 45 SPT

In working on the walls in the 0WS, I find that it's kind of interesting. And I'll give you Just for - Just for the interesting sensation, I'll work upside down or - sideways, and I no longer feel that I am in a one-g enveronment, which I am very familiar with in Houston, but that I actually am in a three-dimensional zero-g space station. When I'm oriented in a one-g.orientation with my feet in triangles, I feel l'm floating, but it's still a one-g geometry in a one-g situation. But if I change my attitude, I - then all of a

340 04 22

12 SPT

Y87

sudden, esting, 3)40 04 22 3)4 SPT What

little transition. It's kind of interand I've had a lot of fun with it. me is that even after - been about

surprises

3 weeks now, that that still persists. Apparently, that familiarlty with the - that we acquired in the one-g trainer in Houston really stuck with
US.

340 04 22 46 SPT 3)40 12 24 4)4 SPT

SPT out. SPT at - at 12:24. readings. Bill, are you using 42212, 23143, 38}_81; PRD

340 14 _5 05 340 lh _5 ll

CDR CDR

the tape

recorder?

_

This is the CDR at lh:h5, debriefing the last ATM pass. The ATM pass commenced at about 13:)45 and consisted of some downl_nk and some setting up of of the canister for downlink data for J0P 13. And then after all that was finished - let me think now about the downlink. The downlink was about 9 minutes long, and the ground was pretty much We were in real time conversation during that time. I didn't think the white light coronagraph information was too dandy because it seemed to me that with a ROLL of 10,800, we had really rolled part of the - the structure of the corona up underneath the pylon. And I suggested that we ROLL to minus 5)400, but the ground didn't want to do it. Skylab, Houston. We're at Carnarvon for 6 minutes.

CC CDR

So we left it the way it was and got their downlink what they wanted. And the next thing done was J0P number 6. No problems with Say, we notice H-ALPHA 1 is in OVERRIDE, and we'd like to have it in NORMAL. And J0P 6 went pretty much according to Hoyle. Let me review it a little bit here. I had no great problems; was a little bit late getting started with it. Ended up - I finished the whole thing but was a little bit late. But there was still adequate time to do 82A and - correction, the 82B. The slew calibration worked. I think the last exposure of the 82B slew calibration probably got

CC

CDR 3hQ lh 47 05 CDR

788
down into the 400 K area. When I - The last time I checked the light, it was about - right about 034:0 to go and it was still operating. And then I was concentrating again on keeping m_ slew to plus or minus B0. The next time I looked up, it was about 3 minutes to go and the light was out. I think - I think that's what the time was. 340 14 48 01 CDR But I think - 11nless I don't understand something I think we probably got enough - enough slew data before 400 K so that I didn't - didn't mess up anything. CDR The nuZ update went without any problem, and the nu Z that we ended up with was minus O.1. The Sun is very, very quiet, very plain; it looked like o_tmeal to me. I saw one very small filament. And I'm trying to remember Just where it was. I believe at that particular time the ROLL was 1080. And so that would have put the filament up around 220 to 230 degrees. And as I remember, it was out about 0.8. It was not a very large filament, and that is Just about it. There's not a whole lot that could be said. The XUV, when we looked at that, showed a few bright spots, one bright spot on each limb, indicating there was activity behind the limb. And I think active region 76 or T is coming arouud the east limb now. There was one • spot right near the middle of the XUV spot, right near the middle. But, of course, all these were visible only upon - with INTEGRATION. You couldn't see anything on XUV without integrating, WHITE LIGHT CORONAGRAPH, as I mentioned before, didn't show much. The west limb was pretty much under the pylon for most of the time that I got to see it, so I couldn't see much of that action down there. Of course, that's the area where Bill saw the activity last night. The east limb was very regular and very uninteresting as far as the white light coronagraph was cerned concerned. The XUV SLIT, when we were Sun centered, I took a look at it. And in the area we were looking there was nothing, you could see. That's much more that can be like we Just had this 340 14 5028 CDR CDRout. no spots of any kind that about it, I can't think of said about a - a quiet Sun morning.

3_0 14 49 35

CDR

789

340 15 04 28

PLT

The PLT at 15:05 and with timing for the first sequence - Stand by i. It's about to complete the 1260 sequence. It was started on time at about 44:05. TILT, I'ii recheck, 325.4 - excuse me, ROTATION is 325.4; TILT is 12.1.
- yOU.

3_0

15

05

03

CC

when we have a good answer, we'll get back to

PLT

And both fans did come on when I put them back to SECONDARY, PRIMARY, respectively, MOL SIEVE A and B. Okay. Understand. Okay, PLT. Still waiting for the end of the first sequence on PLATE number 1. The ROTATION is verified as 325.4; TILT, 12.1; PLATE, O1. Let's see There was one comment I did want to ma_e when I was setting this up. Everything was done according to pad. Recorder's _nning and everything else.
Okay, I'll think of it in Just a minute.

340 15 05 12

CC PLT

B_0 15 06 39

PLT

Okay, after completion of PLATE l, I'm resetting ROTATION to 246.0, 246.0. Extend to 246.0 ; Roger. TILT, 21.0; TILT, 21.0; I'ii check it again, 21.0. Okay. PLATE is verified as 02; EXPOSURE is O, 0, and 620 sec. Okay, I'm going to stop this exposure by 15:18, but I don't think I'll have to worry about it. All right, everything else is nominal. Okay, this is going to be PLATE number 2. And I'm going to see what - Stand by, I'll get you the other one. 0kay. 0, 0, 0. Okay, now go back to 620. SEQUENCE START now, And that should be finished about 15, so we should have plenty of time to get it before sunrise, The comment I wanted to m-_e was the nuz. Nuz was - for the pad is minus 0.5. Let's see, I think it was. Yes, minus 0.5. NuZ actual was minus O.1; there is no correction required. That was the comment I wanted to make.

3h0 15 08 30

PLT

3h0 15 09 02 3h0 15 13 09

PLT PLT

PLT out. PLT reporting completion of the 620-second exposure at approximately 13; that's 15:13. And I am terminating 183 activities for this orbit.

790

3h0 15 15 h0

SPT

SPT at 15:15. Subject Mll0. The results follow: Urine specific gravity: CDR, 1.0295; SPT, 1.0306; PLT, 1.017. Hemoglobin: CDR, 16.1; SPT, 14.4; PLT, 15.7; that's 16.1, lh.h, and 15.7. Time of the blood draw was approximately 12:45. You have it on TV. And see the spread and time; it took roughly around one every, oh, 5 to 8 minutes, I guess - 5 to 7 minutes. Centrifuge started at 13:05. The plasma color on all three of the samples was a very golden straw color, the way I understand it should be. There was no problem no red in any of the plasma. It all worked real well. Serial numbers: for the CDR it's 156; SPT, 190; PLT, 182. And the day of the draw is also marked on the sample along with - on the colored decal for each crewman. Had one anomaly, and that was - Well, three on each one of us, I guess, in a way. PLT at the - when it came time to do a hemoglobin concentration, the needle and syringe was nowhere to be found. So I had to do a finger stick on him. I had the - the blood onto the - the glass slide and the hemolysis applicator working inside 15 seconds. So I don't think we had any problem there. And the reading is fairly consistent with what you wottld expect. On the CDR and SPT I took two readings both - on both of them. The CDR, the first one was a little bit higher, somewhere in about mid-16, 16.5 or so; and then in the second one was 16.1. This is all on the blood out of the same syringe. And I Just put it - cleaned off the - the glass slide and read it again. And in each case, I'm giving you the second one because I was extremely careful in m_king - preparing the slide and in reading the second one. The first one I was careful, but Just to douhlecheek I went back and found out that I did have a - a slight deviation, and I was surprised. On the SPT, the first one was down in 13.9, and the number - second number I gave you was lh.h. This is not a real large spread but it is a significantly larger sl_read than I would get by reading the meter. I think it would be pretty good on the meter to say plus or minus 0.2 at best, at least, and it may be plus or minus 0.1. If you have any words on that on the ground of what - whether this is a - a

340 15 17 52

SPT

340 15 19 21

SPT

791

standard occurrence or whether perhaps the procedures must have deviated between the two readings, I'd appreciate knowing. I've not had time to go on back and - and take third and fourth and fifth readings. I've noticed that we do not have that many hemolysis applicators. If there is, though I wanted to save some for extra blood draws and contingencies that may arise there also. But other than that - those slight anomalies, it all worked real well. The - using the vacuum line that the LBNP uses was no problem. It's sort of easy to get to and a straightforward 340 15 20 23 SPT SPT out. procedure.

TIME

SKIP

340 15 43 12

CDR

This is the CDR at 15:43 Zulu, reporting on the special observations for Earth observations. HH33 is the site number. The site is the Yucatan current between the Yucatan Peninsula and the tip of the Hon - and the tip of Honduras. We very definitely did see a general pattern of cloud streets. The The pattern was not general throughout, but was rather limited, I would say, to the - the center of the area between the Yucat_u Peninsula and the tip of Honduras.

340 15 43 54

CDR

The - The pattern of linear flow in - in the ocean itself was - I would say - impossible to see. We couldn't see it. I think that's mainly because we didn't have any sunglint to help us. With a Sun angle of 36 degrees, there was no sunglint available for us to see any - any sort of patterns in the the ocean itself. We did, however, see some discoloration in the ocean. It was for the most part close toward the - the land. And I think what we were seeing were indicate shallow Just the typical waters. light colors that

340 15 44"35

CDR

We did see the light green and the deeper blue, out further in the deep water. We were unable to see any kind of current eddies or anything like that because of - as I mentioned before, the lack of of sunglint. However, the cumulus buildup which • Overlaid [sic] the pattern of cloud streets was very definitely there. And we snapped some photos of

792

it. And the camera used was the Nikon, with the 55-millimeter lens, and the - the magazine was Charlie X-ray 20. The settings were f/8 and f/ll at 1/250. I will give you the - the exact frame ntmber. Frame number 16 was mainly the cu buildup the cumulus cloud buildup. That was frame 16, f/ll, 55. And then as the area got bluer with a little less clouds, we stopped it down to 8 and frame number 15 was a cloud street and some of the smaller cu buildup arcs - was the f/8 at 55. Frame number 14 is the same. And then as we got in toward Yucatan - As we got in over toward the coast of - of Honduras, we took two more frames, 13 and 12, looking back toward Yucatan. Then we have a very oblique shot of the Yucatan area which is - frame number ll again taken f/8 at 1/250. 340 15 46 49 340 15 46 57 CDR CDR CDR out.

-

This is the CDR again, following up the HH33 special that I was Just talking about a couple of seconds ago. And - Just a general recap then is that we were unable to see the ocean current or any of the eddies due to lack of sunglint. But the cloud streets and the - the cumulus-overlaid [sic] clouds are definitely there. And that - Let 's see, it 's i0 o'clock in the morning in that area. That's a little bit early. I'll bet later in the day the the cumulus buildups will be even more than now. And so hopefully, if we get another chance at a higher Sun angle on another day, we'll ...

340 15 h7 44

CDR

TIME

SKIP

340 16 19 i0

PLT

Okay, PLT at - PLT at 16:20, completion of ATM pass started at 15:28. And I truncated with 4752 Bravo, FRAMES REMAINING. I will pick up with using the - the chart on the limb scan diagram on next orbit; complete that. Let's see, okay. Not much to report. This is a very mechanical sort of thing. I did have one question. When I was setting up for step 3, building block 13, I pointed H-ALPHA 1 at the H-alpha inner limb at the roll specified. I did ROLL until I got UP/DOWN, 0, 0; _/RIGRT, 1 radius. And I - it didn't look like the XUV slit was quite tangent,
f_

793

but I used that.

I sort of felt bad about it.

I

guess I - I really was torn between using by head there, lining the slit up with my eyeball, and going by the directions on the sl,mm,_y sheet. I went by the direction on the sl,mmA_y sheet because I figured there - there was a reason for that because of vidicon distortion and that sort of thing. Anyway, I 0, 0. In any event, tangent, or at least limb. The setup was the PATROL, SHORT in SINGLE FRAME EXPOSURE went ahead and used UP/DOWN, the slit was very close to parallel to tangent at the nominal. I got as far as 56 and I'll pick up with the next orbit. Finished the

second MIRROR, 3 RASTER in 55A and set up the GRATING for that and will continue on the next orbit. 340 16 21 04 PLT I saw no particular activity in that area of the limb. It looked like a quiet area selected for Just that, Just a limb study. And no more comments from PLT. SPT at 16:24. M092/171 run; subject CDR. Left leg, 13.0; right leg, 13-1/4. And for the 151, we started this run at 16:15. SPT out. PLT starting the S190 checkout procedure. 16:25. l'm going to do step i now. It's

340 16 21 Ii 340 16 24 ii

PLT SPT

340 16 26 I0

PLT

340 16 28 18

SPT

SPT at 14:28. SPT at 14:28 [sic] recording legband identification. Alfa Nancy on the left and Alfa Quebec on the right. SPT out. Okay, out. PLT continuing the steps in the EREP checkPanel 106, CAMERA CONTROL is going to LOCAL

340 16 28 58

PLT

now; SHUTTER CONTROL to OFF, verify; FMC, 5.0 and in work. Okay, FMC is 5.0; FMC circuit breaker, OPEN. It is OPEN. 340 16 30 04 PLT Panel ii0, open C&D cover. It's in work. BUS i, OFF, verify. That is verified. BUS 2, OFF, verify. That is verified. Panel 202; 190, circuit breakers Stand by. l, 2 and 3, CLOSEd.

PLT

340 16 30 56

PLT

Okay, step 4 is verified. Step 5, panel 106, reach into the FMC drive area, move gear causing FMC

7914

screw to turn until limit is reached. May already be at limit. No, it's - it's all - I'm pretty sure it's at the limit. It's at one limit anyway. You didn't tell me which limit, so I'll Just assume that whatever limit it has is good enough. I'm getting ready to turn until limit - limit is reached. May already be at limit. Yes, it is. Reverse direction and count FMC screw turns. Mark screw for reference point to other limit of travel. Count FMC screw turns. Okay, I'm - I'm going to do it. 0kay, that's in work; it's going to take a while. There's one turn. Dave Kelley must b_ve been staying up nights to figure this one out. And Ernie Lay (laughter) that's good - a lot of trouble. Two turns. And by the way, it is turning in a clockwise direction as I face the screw. 340 16 33 03 PLT Three turns and looks like we're getting close to the stop. I'd say about 3-1/16 turns, or maybe about, oh, let's see, 20 - 30 degrees past three full turns as the screw turned in a clockwise direction as I faced it - end of it. Three okay, a little over three turns. tion and turn FMC screw one-half Reverse directhe number of

turns between limits and stop. 0kay, that 's in work. I want to go l-l/2 and a tad over. About 15 degrees more than l-l/2 turns. Okay, there's one turn. There's l-l/2 and about 15 degrees more. Okay, that's the completion of step five. 340 16 34 47 PLT Step 6 coming up. Panel ll0; EREP, BUS l, ON. Yes. EREP, BUS 2, ON now. Panel 106, FMC circuit breaker, CLOSEd. stand by. Going CLOSEd Okay,

340 16 3_ 59

PLT

B40 16 35 06

FLT

Now. It stays closed. Remaining eight circuit breakers, CLOSEd, verify. That 's verified. SHUTTER CONTROL to SLOW. FMC may move slightly; it did. Just a tad. Circuit breaker's staying in, however. CAMERA ACTUATE, SINGLE. Let's see now, I'm going to read ahead first. FMC should move slightly. I should do that twice. Okay. I'm going to move it to SINGLE now. I_o, it moved more than slightly. It's giving me a nice big dip. Okay, I'll do it again. Okay, now that's considerable more FMC than I've noticed before. It doesn't usually use - move that much. the two SINGLEs. Okay, so I've done
f_

795

340 16 36 01

PLT

FMC to 15.7. Okay, going back to 15 - 15.7 in lock. CAMERA ACTUATE to SINGLE, going now. By George, looks like we may have done it. CAMERA ACTUATE, SINGLE; FMC should move; it did. CAMERA ACTUATE, SINGLE; FMC should move; it did. SHUTTER CONTROL, OFF. Going to R_MOTE. Install front and rear shields on camera; rotate camera to stowage position. That 's in work. Congratulations, fellas' Very, very clever. Looks like you did it. Hardest part of all is putting the dang covers back on. Knobs are terrible. There we go; very good. Okay, final step. EREP, BUS 1, OFF ; EREP, BUS 2, OFF. C&D cover closed. PLT out. And looks like a good check.

340 16 38 19

PLT PLT

340 16 39 02

PLT

RECORD, OFF.

TIME

SKIP

p_

3h0 17 ii 01 340 17 13 22

SPT SPT

Conclusion of M092 run. SPT at 17:12. S - M092/M171.

Time is 17:10.

SPT out.

CAL of N2, 02, CO 2 is 1273 for SPT out. MI71 run CAL, N2, H20 , 1273.

340 17 21 23 340 17 21 37 340 17 32 h0 340 17 33 55

SPT SPT SPT SPT

SPT at 17:21. SPT out. SPT at 17:32. MI71 run: PERCENT

MI71; CABIN PRESSURE, 02 is 7528;

5074. C02, 0296;

PERCENT

PERCENT

CO 2 , 0197. CAPACITY readings are 5.02_,

3h0 17 41 36

SPT

SPT. MI71: VITAL 5 •017, 5 •019. SPT out.

3h0 17 hi h4 3h0 17 h8 57

SPT SPT

SPT at 17 :_9. Handheld photos on CXh7 ; frame number 58, 59, and 60; thatis with the 100millimeter lens on the Hasselblad. First f-stop setting was at f/ll and the rema4 ning two were f/8, 1/250 of a second. Taken at 17:05, 17:05

796

and 17:06. They were taken of the southern California area and BaJa, in particular looking for the fault zones. The Sun angle was early - a midmorning Sun, and it did show up the ground contours and some of the fault zones which I could see, but did not have time to really pick out and distinguish as well as taken the photos. I think this will cover handheld photos lll area. Certainly, if the Sun angle had been a little bit lower we could have done a little bit better job. We were off the coast quite a bit so it was a oblique view looking towards the east - actually, the northeast. And as I say, the shadowing was such that a good part of the - a good number of faults, I think, do show up. B40 17 51 BB SPT One fault zone I was looking for in particular which I did have time to check out in the time between photos was the Agua Blanca Fault. And I was trying to determine whether it meets the Gulf of California. I could not see any evidence of that. It looked as though it did end at the San Felipe Valley. However, again, it was a very fleeting look and perhaps not the optimum in terms of location as well as lighting. If you had the time, that is, if your spacecraft were not moving at 4 miles a second, I think you could pick out a large number of these faults and - and work it. However, we feel that we're best off, at least on these first few runs, trying to get good photographic coverage, and perhaps on the later times, we'll try to pick more things out by eye. B40 17 52 30 SPT But I think having the time to sit down in an office with a good photo, you're going to be able to do a lot more and gain a lot more information than we could in a couple of fleeting glances early in the mission. However, we do feel it's a fairly important objective to determine what a man can really do from orbit. So we do feel that later on in the mission, after we've got some good photos of these handheld targets, we'll try to pick things more of these things out by eye. I think as a passing remark, the Photo 0ps Book we have here for handheld photos is excellent. The more I work with it, the more I reslize that it really hits the spot as far as what we need up here. The only regret I have is that we have
E--

B40 17 52 57

SPT

797

not had more time to work it in flight, as I find it both very productive and a very enjoyable way to pass the day. I Just wish we had more time for it. 340 17 53 23 3h0 17 53 36 SPT PLT SPT out. PLT debriefing the ATM pass started at 16:56 approximately. After the schedule, I continued with the J0P 5 Charlie, step 3 which I had started on the previous orbit at 15:28. And how I pieced this together was I - I picked up with the 82 Bravo as per the limb scan charts, and continued ending up at the end of the present - the orbit Just completed; that is, the one that started at 16:56. I ended up at plus 12 in the f_Im; that is, in 82 Bravo, LIMB SCAN position. So that was at plus 12. And the film count at the end was 1327. The 56 experiment, I got the SINGLE FRAME, 1 at the first part of the orbit, and SINGLE FRAME, h a little bit later. I did a SHORT to NORMAL in a SINGLE FRAME, _ and a SINGLE FRAME, i, 9 minutes, but at NORMAL position. I forgot to put it to LONG. Toward the end I didn't have enough t_me to do a - a PATROL, LONG when I got down to the - thro_,gh with the two long exposures, a SHORT and a PATROL, NORMAL. So that's how the 56 went. 55, I did a 3 RASTER on 868 at the first part of the orbit instead of a - Just a single raster. Stopped at about 2-1/2, and then I went to 696 and got a 3 RASTER, 732 and got a most of a - Yes, I got a 3 RASTER there; but I did not get the 1255. The - In monitoring the Sun with the XUV MON during this activity, it appeared as though there's some XUV activity at about zero, zero degrees at about a third of a radius, that area of activity in XDV, and also at about 300 degrees at about 0.6 radius. And the - the westexcuse me, the east limb I had - XUV appeared to have activity all up and down. Looks like there may be some stuff coming around the corner or it may Just have been the limb brightening that I saw. Let's see. I didn't have t_me to get a good look at the coronagraph because white light coronagraph didn't come up in time. So I went ahead and switched back the

3h0 17 5h _4

PLT

540 17 56 08

SPT

PLT

798

camera and got at least a couple of frames on a 52 for you, for purposes of comparison at the end of the orbit. PLT I can't think of anything else that I could see, because in - in H-alpha, at least in H-ALPHA 2, it looked completely dead on the - the disk. PLT out.

3h0 17 56 59

PLT

TIME

SKIP

3h0 18 37 51

CDR

This is the CDR at 18:23 [sic] Zulu. I have stored cabin air after the completion of my exercise period. The exercise period followed the M171-1 period. At the end of the M171-1 we did - we did a HIGH CAL and a LOW CAL, mud then I proceeded on to finish up my exercise 73.35; period. PERCENT 02 in stored CABIN AIR in C02 is 2.02.

PERCENT

WATER

is 5.02; PERCENT

34018 38 34 CDR 340 18 51 22 SPT

CDRout. SPT at 18:40 [sic]. On the TV VTR we have a short picture of the WHITE LIGHT CORONAGRAPH camera. The first part is without the corona; there is the switch in the CAMERA position. The second part is with the switch in the TV position, and you can see the corona up here. A bright spot shows up in both and a hor - black horizontal line. It appears that we have a problem, perhaps a burned-in spot in the low-light-level vidicon. GRID DISCHARGE, which was called for in malfunction 8 Bravo, step 2, did not clear the problem. I'll let you take a look at it before I take any further action on it. SPT out. PLT reporting on handheld photograph supporting the I{H30-1, off the coast of Chile. I took one photograph with the Hasselblad. I think it probably was a poor decision, but I did see some light-colored streaks in the water, and the location is 74 degrees west, 36 degrees south off the coast of Chile about i00 miles, oh, southsouthwest from Santiago. The Forel - estimate of the color on that Forel scale is probably

340 18 52 17 3h0 19 07 31

SPT PLT

799

_o_d

1

t

_ing

_OU_

the

stre_

c_

1

around

_

1

between 7 and 8. In other words, it was definitely lighter and greener colored than the surrounding ocean. It was fairly small in area. I'm not sure it was upwelling, but it seemed pretty far away from populated areas to Just a pollution streak. 340 19 08 32 PLT Anyway, I got a hot - a picture with the Hasselblad. And it was a very difficult angle to shoot because of the - the view out the window. There may be part of the window in the frame. Let's see. And the area I would estimate the streak was about was ru,ning roughly east-northeast to west-southwest, about, oh, 30 to 40 miles long, it looked like. Maybe not - maybe not quite that - Yes, about that long, and less than a half a mile wide, fairly linear. And the reason I say -I say it may have been a bad decision, because it was _,nning roughly perpendicular to the coastline. I would have expected it to more or less parallel it. 340 19 09 20 340 19 17 19 PLT CDR PL - PLT out. This is the CDR at 19:17 Zulu up on the loop for S183 operations. Sunsetis 19:23. Okay, I have Just turned the POWEH, ON, and I 'm looking at PLATE 03, which is my first plate. The nu z at the moment is minus 0.3. The pad nu z is minus 0.6; so the ROTATION correction is zero.

340 19 20 04

CDR

340 19 20 37

CDR

Okay, at 19:20 and a half and open the SAL window. extending the mirror. Okay, the mirror's

I'm going to go ahead Window is OPEN and I 'm

340 19 21 06 340 19 2_1 18

CDR CDR

extended

and locked.

Our first field is field number Charlie 29. ROTATION is 253.2. The TILT that goes with 253.2 is 00.4. And the lock is on. Reverifying 253.2 on the ROTATION; O0.h on the TILT. All right, the exposures are 0 and 0 and 6 - 0620. And I have set that on 3. I'm going to activate EXPERIMENT RECORDER i. The time is now MARK. 19:23. Got to operate the DAC first for 1 second at 12. That's complete. Going back to

340 19 22 43

CDR

340 19 23 00

CDR

80O

time and 1/60. 1/60 is verified. All right, I'm going to start the SEQUENCE now; ve - reverifying the ROTATION and TILT are good; the EXPOSURE is good. Going to SEQUENCE, START at 340 19 24 03 CDR MARK. number 24 even, 19:2_. As I said before, the PLATE is 03. The ROTATION is 253.2. The TILT is

oo0.4.
CDR Okay. The next exposure will be on field Charlie Mike 8, and it's available at 19:32. I'm going to terminate the tape recording at this time, and I'll be back up again at 19:32. CDR out. This is the CDR back on the tape recorder. This is S183. The PLATE number 3 exposure is complete on S183. We 've SEQUENCEd to PLATE number 4, changing ROTATION at this time to ll9.0. And the TILT is going to 07.8. Okay, the EXPOSURE settings are 0 and 0 and 1260. All right, the film pla - let's see. Let's make sure we've got everything right here. 119.0 on ROTATION; 07.8 on TILT; 0, 0, and 1260. All right, I 'm going to begin the exposure with a - with a STANDBY and a START. Okay. PLATE The sequence was co_enced at 37:40. The is 04. The TILT and the ROTATION I have given already,

340 19 25 55 340 19 35 55 •

CDR CDR

340 19 37 hl

CDR

given already; the settings I have end you have the start time. 340 19 56 05 SPT

SPT at 19:56 debriefing the ATM pass which began at 18:30. All went according to plan, no problems. We got a - three - two extra MIRROR, AUTO RASTERs at the end before 400 K at a GRATING POSITION of 2999; that makes a total of three at that position. 56 got a SINGLE FRAME, 1 for 20 minutes. And at the very beginning, after the building block 2 when I looked at the WHITE LIGHT CORONAGRAPH TV display, is when I noticed been mentioned earlier. the problem which has

340 19 56 58 340 19 58 20

SPT CDR

SPT out. This is the CDR; the subject is S183. And promptly at 19:58, sunset time, I terminated the exposure on S183 - that's PLATE 04. The sequence had not completed yet. I think I probably cheated you out of

801

about 40 seconds' worth of exposure time, according to my calculations. Next time I'll try to start a little bit earlier and get - get the whole thing finished. We're now looking at PLATE number 5. The EXPOSURE light is still on, on number 3. I'm going to turn it to zero now and EXPOSURE light is out. I'm going to let her sit now. We have another - another set of exposures coming up at 22:10. 340 19 59 I0 CDR CDR out.

TIME

SKIP

3_0 20 4_ 35

PLT

This is the PLT reporting on three frames the Hasselblad's taken; one off the west coast of South America and two off the east coast of South America, about on the same latitude as the Falkland Islands. (Music) The first picture that was taken was of a rainbow and it was a curiosity of the cloud cover and, I don't know, I thought maybe the refraction pattern might give some kind of data. The last two - and these are frames number 62 and 63 on the Hasselblad - were taken of the area of discoloration or pollution or upwelling or whatever it is now. We were both under the - Jer and I were both under the impression that upwelling did not occur on the east coast of South America. But it has the color that's described for upwelling and it's the same general channel and location that we described, I think it was a couple of days ago. It extends almost all the way from Montevideo down to the FA1_land Islands and it's starting to break up. It was patchy when we saw it, and some of the areas were more or less linear and channeled, elongated, striated shape in the texture. And others were occupied sort of an irregular, closed pattern. They are - I'm going to look at the Forel scale. Stand by.

340 20 47 24

PLT

This is the PLT again reporting on the discolor discoloration in the ocean. Jer and I both independently arrived at a 7 to 8 on the Forel scale. And also I -I saw some distinct brownish spots and colorations in certain areas. And Jer was looking on further south - south of the Falklands down towards the straits - -

F

8O2

CC

Skylab, Houston. We're about a minute from LOS at Vanguard ... Hawaii at 21:h9. - - the Cape of Good Hope, and he saw what he thought to be some reds or some telltale marks of petroleum pollution, so it could be that. That 's all. Just off Santa Cruz. However, this whole area is enormous. I can't see how - unless it's just a continuing the pollution carried by something like the Gulf Stream or something - how you could pollute that large an area. But anyway that's what we took the picture of. SPT at 20:58. ATM - the pass which began at 20:03 with the no-CALROC alternative. Okay. The pointing for spicules seemed to be rather a challenging task even with the good monitor we have. I think we're Just barely on the threshold of being able to see individual ones. What I experienced was: Moving to the limb, occasionally the south pole, getting the CO_','At_ST and BRIGHTNESS adjusted throughout the roll, which is about a CONTRAST of 3 and BRI(_TNESS of 7 -

PLT

CDR 340 20 48 03 PLT

3h0 20 48 16 340 20 58 13

PLT SPT

340 20 59 13

SPT

Looking at the limb and seeing what I thought was an individual spicule, looking at it for about 5 seconds and then I would notice I would no longer be able to discern it. Which - It must be an optical, an effect which I've seen on other things when you stare at something for a period of time, you all of a sudden lose the ability to discern the very fine features. That's apparently what happened here. If I look away a little while, then I look back, I can see it. However, this, plus the fact that the H-alpha film or H-alpha TV has still got an oscillation in it - I mean, it's very hard if you try to locate on a single spicule. I did what I thought was a reasonable job of getting on at least the bottom cone of one. It turned out that it was one which was not inclined so I was nearly - had 82B nearly perpendicular to the surface.

8O3

3_0 21 00 17

SPT

And I then started the JOP ID. However, I'm afraid I took an awful lot more time in that pointing than - than it really - than it merited. And when we do it again on the following orbit, I'm sure I won't. Now I got through the first two pointings which nearly had 82B pa_allel to the limb and 3 arc seconds off of it. I think I could discern the 82B SLIT on the surface of the WHITE LIGHT LIMB quite well and the WHITE LIGHT DISPLAY hecause I could make a very sm_] i tweak and it was on the order of 1 arc second, and I could see it come on and go off. So I think that pointing went pretty well.

3h0 21 01 12

SPT

And of course, the 55, I turned out to be at a MIRROR POSITION of 1432. The first two pointings went quite well during the operations after the pointing, except on the second one I started 56 a little late which got me further behind. The net result being that when I got down to the last one, I had around, let's see, about 2 minutes or so before ESS when I got set up. So I gave the exposures anyway, although realizing that they are probably far shorter than optimum. And 56 again got something under 2 minutes. I do have a question on the instructions which say, "Do not maw_mize." And I imagine it must be because of the grating position we're at. At 200 we have - got nitrogen III there, 991. Or perhaps it could be that you don't feel it's the usual procedure for finding individual spicules, which could well be. Or maybe the counts are too low. I did not take the time anyway to even look at the counts or explore it. I would like to know, though, what your thoughts are on the feasi _ bility and desirability of using the 55 detectors and any particular wavelengths that you might choose to optimize or maximize. The TV downlink here called out for l0 minutes of TV downlink, and that was changed to VTR. I gave around - oh, I'm guessing now - between 5 to 7 minutes of it with several series of integrations on it. I also left it up while I was taking a XUV exposure. With the - XUV monitor exposure with the Polaroid. If we are not giving you the correct XUV monitor - VTR, please let us know. I think we've - this particular time I went

340 21 02 18

SPY

340 21 03 35

SPT

8Oh-

through it three times plus the extras. And if you're buying something by having it up without integration for a long period of time, I need to know that because I did cut it off. It was around 5 - after 5 or 7 minutes total. 340 21 04 41 SPT SPT out.

TIME

SKIP

340 22 00 42

FLT

PLT at 22:00, reporting on water tank sampling of water tank 6. It was indicating more than 6, a little bit less - definitely less than 9. I put in 20 units to bring it up to 9 parts per million. Also as a note of interest on the previous sampling of water tank 5, I reported reading 6 parts in it and adding 20 units but in actual fact for Delta 3, you're supposed to add 30. I caught myself on that one over - because I did a sample on water tank 5 and it - that read 9 parts per million. So it - it was actually reading a little bit above 6 even when I did it. But it's sort of hard to interpolate on that scale. Anyway if there was hard to interpolate on that scale. Anyway if there was any question about it on the part of ground, 5 is definitely up to 9 parts per million and 6 has been - when I sampled, it was definitely over - Water t,nk 6 was definitely over 6 on the scale, but I went ahead and added 20 units of iodine anyway. And that above. ought to bring it up to 9 or slightly

340 22 Ol 47

PLT

340 22 02 33

PLT

PLT once more at 22:03 Zulu. I did the inventory, remaining solids trap, although I called that down on air-to-ground, I'll go ahead and put it on here for the record. After installing the two solids traps today - this morning - there are nine remaining. There are nine still in stowage.

340 22 02 52

PLT

TIME

SKIP

8o5
340 22 28 48 PLT Okay, 22:29. We're this is the PLT - PLT at - coming up on Okay, I'm operating the DAC for 1 second. in night, according to the wardroom window.

That's it; going back to time; verified. Okay, 45 seconds to go before I have to start my exposure. ROTATION is 318.6 and 025.7; B18.6, 25.7. 0k_v. Coming up, 20 seconds. 0kay, now got to put m_ EXPERIMENT 1 RECORDER to RECORD. Okay. Tape mode, time to start. got 940 set. 3_0 23 30 03 340 22 30 58 PLT PLT MARK. Okay, start on time. Stand by; I've

Okay, this is the PLT. PLATE number 05 in progress and ROTATION, 318.6; TILT, 25.7; 0, 0, 940. And no comments. SPT at 22:32. ATM pass beginning at 21:36. All

340 22 32 24 SPT

three performances of building block 28 went along pretty well. I think we got everybody what they're after, except at the very end. 82B got a little something under 9 minutes. I cut them off Just before ESS, Oh, also at the very beginning, the first one, series of MIRROR, AUTO RASTERs were done with only DETECTORS i and 2 ON. I would cheek - set up fig - figure we're going to do the yes, I had set up thinking I was going to do the MIRROR, LINE SCAN in the previous one and then looked at this "55 back three steps" and also the MAR; DET, all. I thought about that a while and finally got 55 going but had to leave it in the right mode which was a series of MARs truncated at around 13 to 15 - 16 lines. However, I neglected to get the proper detectors on for that first one but they were on for the second and third one. 340 22 34 30 SPT Okay, I think on this I was able to observe and pick out a very prominent, a well defined spicule inclined around i0 degrees to solar vertical. However, by the end of the building block, that's the first building block, it had pretty much faded out of view. It was no longer discernible. There was a slight mound at the base where it was originally was, but it was gone. I rolled and did the second building block 28, and at the third building block 28, I was watching the screen and

SPT

806
was able to see a part of the chromosphere rise up and actually be a small minisphere, if you will, about 1/2 arc minute to the right of the H-ALPHA 1 center line, and it was about, oh, onethird of an arc minute or so high; quite pronounced. 340 22 35 36 SPT And I - During the performance of the third building block, I saw it rise and then slowly start to fade. I could not detect motion by looking at it, but by thinking of - remembering what it was like 1 minute ago or 2 minutes or S mlnutes, I could certainly see that it was - had moved up and was _quite pronounced. I don't believe that spicules get that large so - And we don't have activity up there. So I'm kind of - kind of at a loss as to exactly what it is. However, we did get some good 55 data on it. We've truncated - we're in GRATING POSITION of 594 and got a series of about six MIRROR. AUTO RASTERs, down Just to the disk or so, and I'd be interested when that data is recovered whether they're able to detect the same motion which I saw in H-alpha. 340 22 36 54 3hO 22 56 21 SPT PLT SPT out. Okay, PLT and waiting for the PLATE 5 exposure to terminate. And it's gone past the 9h0-second point. Oh, darn it! This is really going to foul up the second exposure too. There we go; now it's doing it. Come on; do your thing. Hey, Jet, this is one of the reasons we've been running overtime. That thing took 955 seconds. Okay, now 243.7. 243.7; TILT, 24.0.

PLT PLT

Lock. Okay, check that again. 24.0, 243.7; PLATE 06; this is for field Charlie 40. Go to STANDBY; got 940 again. My cue card disappeared. Okay, let's seeOkay, stand by for - Okay, START. at 15, that was at h8:15. Yes, the green light is on. And that was

3h0 22 h8 04

PLT

PLT

807

PLT

Okay, it was almost a 16-minute exposure, 5 seconds short of it. That is, the first one that was on field Charlie Metro i, PLATE 5, and that ran 15 seconds over the 940-second period. Let's see now; daylight - Sunrise is at 23:04. It's going to be awful close whether or not we _A_e it. Close exposure time. Okay. PLT; RECORD, OFF.

340 22

49 46

PLT PLT

340 23 05 06

Okay, the AMS is retracted; I'm now indicating PLATE 7. Timer has not timed out yet. I will now be going to the shutdown procedure. Okay, SEQUENCE is to STANDBY. EXPOSURE switches, all three, going to zero. I operated the DAC for 1 second before sunrise. Okay, POWER is going OFF now, a_d EXPERIMENT RECORDER i is going OFF now. Okay, PLT, comments on 183. I did not get a O,11time sequence on the last one. 940, it appears, is - and I believe this cr,.,,,ents correct - the i 940 seconds is actually taking quite a bit longer than that. And with the constraints on not doing nothing before sunrise and sunset and not doing have everything done by sunrise, you don't leave us enough time to really get everything cracking. You have several things - several simultaneous events that are keyed to sunset and several simultaneous events which are keyed to sunrise.

340 23 06 05

PLT

340 23 06 47

PLT

No indication as to which one takes priority, although I ass_,mp the - Well, even though you operate the DAC for 1 second at 12 frames per second, after sunset and before sunrise implies that you want to get some film out of the way to protect the exposures you've taken during the night. And everything is started at the same time and costs you - all this stuff costs you only about a minute and a half. But the exposures that are called for are such that very little time is left for any intermediate operations. And this is why I think that we're running over on our time. That, together with starting the timer is considerably in error.

340 23 07 29

PLT

PLT out.

TIME
F k

SKIP

808

B40 2B 32 16

CDR

This is the CDR with several briefing items. First let's see, the time is 23:33 6_[f at this time. The first subject is M092, the one that I had this morning. I went through the M092 in good shape. I did prepare myself by drinking about 25 ounces of water. And I did some toe rises on the treadmill in order to stimulate circulation in my calves before the run. The run started late, and the reason for that was because the MIIO exercise this morning during pre - presleep - postsleep activities Just absolutely squarewaysed [sic] Ed and me. It took us much more time than was al Iotted to us.

340 2B 33 18

CDR

The upshot of it was that I did not get to eat my breakfast at the proper time. I had to take my breakfast with me up to the ATM and eat it on the fly while doing my turn at the ATM. What that all boiled down to was that we needed anywhere from 45 minutes to a 1-hour delay in the LBNP. So we took it - What we did is try to go ahead - a step ahead and do some of the housekeeping and checklist changes and things like that, to get it done. And then go back to the M092 at an appropriate time. As I said before, I did some exercise with - with the calves to stimulate circulation prior to this ; also drank the water. And during the M092 run, the only symptom I felt was with about 30 seconds to go at - at delta-P of 50 - I began to feel a break of cold sweat, and I began to feel that a little bit of - of reaction to the LBNP coming
on.

3_0 23 33 52

CDR

340 2B 34 23

CDR

I must s_m_t that it was a rather fast thing, but I found myself very, Very uncomfortable throughout the run because of the water I drank. Because, unfortunately, I took a lot of air - a lot of gas with the water in the form of bubbles. And laying there, being pulled down in the lower extremities, I found myself in a belch mode, and one - one does not belch dryly in a zero-g environment. It - I found myself tasting crispy bars and water and whatever else was available in my stomach all during that time. The yoke, for some reason this time, was extremely uncomfortable. I found it difficult to - to remain comfortable and relaxed during this particular LBNP pass.

809

B40 23 35 25

CDR

I _Imost think that those feelings - the sensations that I had, the gas problem, the belching, the discomfort on the yoke, almost overshadowed my ability to - to see symptoms coming on from the LBNP. And that may be the reason why I felt that my cold sweat and beginning reaction - by reaction I mean a little bit of dizziness, llghtheadedness Just beginning to gnaw at me - I began - Maybe that's why I felt these things late, because I was more concerned with the belching and the other - the yoke pressure - than anything else, on the crotch. As I said, I finished the MD92 run, and then upon completion of that run, we went over and started the M171-1 run. Had no great problems with M171-1. We did have a little trouble getting the metabolic analyzer set up and calibrated, but they were procedural problems, so we worked those out and got it running. We managed to throw a couple of switches at the wrong time and had to go back and recalibrate. That was completed and, as I mentioned earlier, I went into a HIGH CAL, LOW CAL after that run, and we - But we did not turn off the metabolic analyzer. After the HIGH CAL and LOW CAL and the electrode check, I began pedaling again. And although I did not have the blood pressure cuff on because it's really a bother, I pedaled a _800 watts total and I got my full exercise routine in on - on the ergometer. So much for the subJect of M092.

340 23 36 06

CDR

340 23 36 40

CDR

340 23 37 17

CDR

The next subject from the CDR is camera/DAC mAlfunctions. I began working on the cameras as Just sort of piecemeal throughout the day. And, of course, with general - permanent general message 008. On DAC hi,tuber2, I used paragraph 5.1.1 in the Photo 0ps Book. Andessentially what I did was I put another transporter on the DAC, transporter num1_er 06; and it worked fine. I - So I Just consider now that DAC 2 is fixed. I don't know what the problem could have been, but it's okay now, and it's back in - in an operational slot. DAC 06: The fuse that was in DAC 6 was the one that was bad. Bill did not leave it out of the camera; he put it back in the camera. What he did was, he took a fuse from another camera and put it in DAC 6 and took DAC 6's fuse and put it in

810

the other camera. The other camera worked, so he assumed the DAC 6 fuse was good, so he swapped them back to where they were. Now, so I pick up DAC 6 with a - a fuse in it that Bill put in it, and I checked the fuse with the multimeter. And I found zero resistance - or I should say infinite resistance - flashing once, indicating that the fuse had blown. blown. 340 23 38 44 CDR So with that, the mAJ function procedure - the little permanent message 008 says that we have an internal short ; that I should mark the DAC and restow it. Well, I wasn't satisfied with that because I didn't know what condition the - the fuse was in at first, so I - I applied the smoke test. I went and got another fuse. And I tested that fuse, and I found that the resistance on it was 2.0. And - the - So I put that fuse in and I applied power to the DAC correction, let - let me go back on that. Before I put that good fuse in, I took two 21-gage pins connectors and put them in the two holes where the fuse was connected. And I connected the DAC up to the power pack - or to the power cable and majored - measured the voltage across the fuse and it was 27.7 volts. With no power on - with the power cable disconnected, the - the two pins showed it open, so from then I decided to try a new fuse. I tried a new fuse, put on the power cable, hit the switch; and we lost the fuse immediately. 340 23 40 15 CDR So I'm convinced that we've got some sort of a short inside the DAC. And my next question of the photo people is, what would you like us to try to do next to see if we can't list [?] the short? I understand now, DAC 06 is red taped, and I'm ready to put it
away.

CDR

Then I moved on to DAC number 08. I performed 5.1.2, step l, in the Photo 0ps Book, and that worked out perfectly, indicating that the DAC was okay. But as I remembered from this DAC, it ran and sounded neat; it Just didn't pull any any film through. So I took transporter 06, which has about 8 percent of film on it, and I put it on the DAC 8 and tried all - all speeds. And it didn't feel - You can - When you hold on to the transporter, you can feel the f_Im moving. I did not feel the film moving. I pulled the trans-

340 23 41 06

CDR

811

porter off, and, sure enough, the film had not moved because I had put an X on it. And I looked at the little holes - the perforations in the film where the - the - the claw is supposed to grab it, and I found the holes were torn out - were badly da_ ged. CDR I moved the film in the transporter to another hole and put it back in. Put it on timed, and opened and closed the shutter several times. And I could see every time I opened the shutter that I was not pulling film. So as it stands right now, the word on - on DAC number 8 is, it does run, but the claw tears the film and will not pull the film. I looked at the alignment of the claw and the red line on the claw lines up with the A on the little bracket in - in between the fingers of the claw. And when I went to timed and had the claw retracted, the B line lines up with the red line. So it looks like the claw was properly in line. So the question on DAC number 8 is, what do we do next? 340 23 42 21 f-'_ 340 23 43 I0 CDR CDR This is the CDR; end of comments.

This is the CDR at 23:43 Zulu debriefing the ATM pass that commenced at 23 :i0. We still have over 18 minutes left to go to sunset. However, I'm on J0P 1 Delta, building block 18, with nothing but 55 x,,_ning in a MIRROR, LINE SCAN-MODE. So I figure I might as well take this time and go ahead and debrief the rest of the run. JOP 6, step 2, the quickie, went with no problem. At 23:10 we got a ground ENABLE on the AUTO GG DUMP. At about 42:30 1 finally got J0P I Delta going. When I went to the pad position of ROLL, 10,800 and UP, 965 and RIGHT, zero, I got out to the - I turned on the XUV SLIT. I set up the H-ALPHA 1 to - so I could see spicules, and sure enough I could see some - some very faint spicules. It appeared to me that the pointing that was given on the pad was, unfortunately, in a flat spot where there were no spicules, and there was a nice one Just to the right. So I changed the roll. And the ROLL reading, is minus 10,748. I also noticed and the white that the - the center light were both below of the slit the inner limb,

340 23 43 51

CDR

340 23 44 37

CDR

812

the white - the white light limb. So I moved them up a litile bit and I went - essentially took the 82B SLIT - the lower end of the slit and moved it all the way up to the white light limb, the end of it. And then that gave me an UP/DOWN of plus 998. And so then I went 3 more arc seconds up off the limb, and m_ final UP/DOWN was plus 1001, LEFT/ RIGHT was 000. So there we have it, the pointing for step 1 of J0P 1 Delta was minus 10,748; UP, plus 1001; and Lm_qA'/RIGHT, zero. Then I got to reading the next little goodie there - the next bullet that says, "Step the 55 MIRROR on to the disk." And in parentheses it says, "about plus or minus six steps from slit center," and then, "comma, O-ORDER talkback gray." Well, there's no way you're going to do that. And I don't understand that bullet at all. I'm going to try to get ahold of Ed and see if he can explain it to me, because there's no way you're going to step six steps down from slit center and - and be back on the disk again. 340 23 46 04 CDR So I was busy fussing and DJm_ng and worrying about that and finally woke up at _2-i/2, realizing that what I was going to do anyway was a MIRROR, AUTO RASTER, so it really didn't make a darn where I pointed 55A. So I finally fired up building block 27 and got it going, and I have no - had no problem with that. At the completion of building block 27, I - By the way, I did not maximize. I notice the pad says, "Don't maximize." When I completed that building block, I went on with the same pointing to building block 18. And that's pretty much of a big nothing because 56 and 82A and 54 were all cancelled, or omitted. So we're Just sitting here from about 33 minutes on down to sunset with 55A in a MIRROR, itself. 340 23 47 06 CDR LINE SCAN, Just running all by

And getting back to building block 27. I guess I owe you a couple of comments about S054. I left it in HIGH - or I found it in HIGH, 64. I switched the 64 to 256 but did not go to SINGLE. I went ahead and fired that rascal up. And then when going back over my pad to review, to make sure I had everything set up properly, I noticed it said, "Omit 5_." So I went back and turned it off. So, 54, my apologies to you guys for wasting your

813

pictures. There's some in HIGH, FRAME RATE and then some in SINGLE. And, again, as I said this morning, the Sun looks like oatmeal, or there certainly wasn't anything at a]1 to be seen. I didn't even see the - what I thought was a filament this morning. It's just a perfectly plain sphere. I took a quick look at XUV M0N while we were Sun centered during the quickie, and I noticed coming up over the east limb is a spot - a bright area a couple of bright areas across the equator of the - of the Sun and then a dimmer bright spot on the west limb. That is just about it. I did not have any observing time to speak of; in fact, I had none. And with this S055 going all the way to 400 K, there'll be no observing time on this end either. So that's about all the comments I can give you. 340 23 48 41 CDR CDR out.

###

DAY 341 (AM) I--. 815

341 01 23 35

PLT

PLT, for reporting handheld photography. And this is for frames 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, and 69. These are - all six of these frames are of what I interpreted to be plankton bloom, from the description in the photo ops hook. The several different angles of the bloom had what appeared to be possibly the upwelling. They were taken at approximately 175 degrees west, 40 degrees south, and estimated Forel scale 7 to 8. They look Just like the stuff that we saw off the coast of Argentina, from Uruguay down to Argentina. The approximate location is in relation to New Zealand. We had just passed north of the North Island headed slightly south, and we included a small island in the last frame for location purposes, which appeared to be something like, oh, 50 to 100 miles north of the Chatham Islands which are to the east of New Zealand.

B41 01 2_ 51

PLT

I hope the pictures speak for themselves. I'm still not confident myself I know what a plankton bloom looks like. From the description in the photo ops book, this must a very good exampleof a small area of open - ocean unwelling. And PLT again on the plankton bloom. There There were eddy patterns in this long sort of potent - sharply defined but ambiguous - more, sort of a meandering streaml ike pattern that we saw, and there were several unconnected portions of this. We're way south of the Equator, so you know, the idea of a countercurrent or anything like that's out of the question. But in any event, it did have - some of the patterns had considerable eddy action. At least, there appeared to be considerable eddy action in them. And some of the others were fairly more or less linearly striated in appearance. Also there appeared to be quite a 10t of mixing with the other water in the middle of these eddies and this is - it appeared almost to be brown. But after looking at the rest of the ocean, I guess it looked brown in contrast to this sort of light green, aqu_A_ine color. And it was really a part of the rest of the surface ocean surface that had been sort of trapped in the middle of this - these patterns.

341 01 25 12

PLT

341 01 26 12

PLT

816

_-

TIME SKIP

341 01 49 23

CDR

This is the CDR. The time is 01:49 and 30 seconds. The subject is S183. The first star field is Charlie 13_ Charlie 13. ROTATION is verified as 45.2. TILT is 18.3. EXPOSURE settings are 0, 300, and 0. Let's see, available time is 01:55, which is 5 minutes from now. We'll start the first exposure at that time. This is the CDR. Stand by MARK. SEgUENCE, We're coming up on 01:55.

341 01 52 51

CDR

341 01 54 59

CDR CDR

START.

This is - This experiment is S183, SEO_ENCE was started at 01:55. And Just a few minutes ago, I have already given you the EXPOSURE and the and the ROTATION and TILT settings. ... dump enable. Okay, I'm - I'm supposed to be finished with Kohoutek by 02 :ll. Okay. I'm going to turn off the lights and look in Just a second here. It's Just getting started. This is the CDR reluctantly terminating the exposure at ll:15. You S183 guys are screwing yourselves with the way you are setting up these pads. Now I finally - It's finally dawned on me that it takes this infernal contraption a minute andl4 seconds to do its clickity-clack thumping thing and get the danged frame out there ready to start its exposure. And if you only allow 5 minutes for the whole thing and you have a 5-minute exposure, you Just screwed yourself out of 1 minute and 15 seconds worth of exposure. Now if that's okay with you, then continue to schedule this way. But I don't - I don't think you're doing yourselves any good at all. I think that exposure of Kohoutek, instead of being a 300-second exposure, was 1 minute and 15 seconds short of that. And I watched and let it go a

CC 321 01 58 30 CDR

321 01 58 37 341 02 07 15

PLT CDR

321 02 ll 17

CDR

341 02 ii 54

CDR

817
little bit longer, watching you an extra lO seconds. 341 02 12 23 CDR for sunset. I gave

It was at 211 and l0 seconds when I finally hit the SEQUENCE. It wasn't 15. It was 10. And I Just didn't feel I could wait any more. I think yOU better give this some thought. Will you please respond to this message and let us know what you're doing, because this is becoming kind of strange here. We really don't - don't know what you mean by exposure time any more - whether that includes the machinations that go on inside or whether we're supposed to s_nehow magically figure out this 1 minute 15 seconds of machine clanking time and then figure out when - when the plate is supposed to finally swing out of the carrousel and consider that the beginning of the exposure. CDR out. Gosh -

341 02 13 06 341 02 15 54

CDR CDR

This the CDR on channel A. Subject, S183. The time is 02:16 Zulu. I did not give you 12 frames per second for 1 second prior to sunrise because I didn't have time. CDR out.

341 02 16 08

CDR

TIME SKIP

341 02 36 54

SPT

Handheld photo discussion number 70, Australia, the drought region. One water which we first crossed leading a river leading out from it - was a dark blue. We've Gulf seen numerous of Carpentaria. along the Gulf rivers,

coming over small body of - which had relatively

341 02 38 49

SPT CDR SPT CDR SPT

especially

along

the - -

- - especially Carpentaria.

of - -

- - Carpentaria. The rivers which read - lead into that show up quite well with the glitter pattern. The water itself is tough to discern. As far as its color, it appears relatively dark once the glitter is off of it. Vegetation is seen in the

818

river valleys and also in relatively plains but not very often. 341 02 39 24 SPT Most of it's in - in low structures rivers, riverbeds. The SPT again picking up on - -

low-lying

flat

cut out by

341 02 h5 44

SPT CDR SPT

... the photo log will come later

...

- - the handheld photos. Discussion of drought area in Australia. I noticed that my recorder was turned off on me when we came over a station, so I'm not sure how far we got on that. But essentially what we saw was - Okay, thanks. And on board now there's a crew ...

CC SPT CO 341 02 46 32 SPT

- - a fair number of - ... I'ii get with you later.

TIME

SKIP

341 03 09 47

SPT

SPT at 03:10, debriefing the ATM pass of previous day which began at 00:43. The building block i, JOP 6, step 1 went with no problem, nominal. With the remainder of the pass, I looked at the coronal hole boundaries. I looked at the coronal hole at the south pole. I rolled so that 82B SLIT was parallel to that boundary, which put the 82B SLIT running Just about north-south. Used a GRATING POSITION of 1941 to look at magnesium X on DETECTOR 3. Found that the reading outside of the coronal hole is about - something a little over 30 counts, as best I could read the flickering display, and something less than 5 in the coronal hole. I chose to pick a position which was about halfway between the two. I estimate I was averaging around 15 counts. At that location I gave 82B a SHORT EXPOSURE - a SHORT WAVF.Lk_NGTH; EXPOSURE, NORMAL. I did not quite finish the last exposure of 240; I think we got pretty close to it. I cut

341 03 i0 51

SPT

819

it off at 400 K. 55 received a MIRROR, AUTO RASTER at a GRATING of 1941. And we got down to line 50 or so before 400 K. And 56 received a SINGLE FRAME; FILTER, 2 for about 5 minutes and 18 seconds before 400 K. In general, I found the use of magnesium X a reasonable way to locate the coronal hole boundary. 341 03 12 07 SPT I did it in conjunction with the XUV MONITOR and the XUV monitor picture. My recollection, although I did not - couldn't measure it precisely, was that the width of the coronal hole boundary was something on the order of 20 arc seconds. But that's the only line I had time to work in. I had planned to work in helium 1584. But I did not have the time and I plan to do that in the future. I'm wondering there if the count - the counts might be a little bit higher outside and get a higher contrast and maybe a sharper boundary. SPT out. Oh, that I would expect Just because it's lower in the atmosphere. Magnesium X looks - well, looks like it's relatively high - high in terms of where itts formed. And helium 1584 is quite a bit lower so maybe that would be a better line. I'ii look at it in the future. SPT out.

341 03 13 l0

SPT

341 03 13 30

SPT

TIME

SKIP

341 04 08 21

SPT

SPT at 04:08. And the subject is TV-IIT, and this goes to the charged particle mobility people. Okay, this whole show was a long time in getting on the road. Reason being that first of all, I had never seen the gear before, and second of all , I'd never seen the procedure, and thirdly, I'd never had any idea of what we're after from the mechanics of setting it up and taking the pictures to what the experiment objective was. So it took a little while to get things all sorted out. I started trying to put it together in the MDA, as called for, and got things pretty well all lashed up with two extra cords hanging off of it and a DAC cable and the spider cage sitting off of well, I had it off of the EREP foot platform

82O

because locker 167 and there was Just

is _I1 covered up with no place to move that.

ATM

gear

341 04 09 40

SPT

So then we never found - or scheduled time to complete the experiment, and it was in the way of
all EREP moved it operations, so it had to be moved. So I down the OWS and finally got scheduled

for some time to try to get the show back on the road. And last night and this morning I worked on it and finally got it all put together with with the help of a good - better part of a roll of gray tape. And I think we got - except for two points which I'll bring up first - we did get some - some usable results, I hope. At least they were interesting to me. 341 04 I0 28 SPT The first point being that somehow this was not transferred to the food chiller early. This was apparently supposed to take - be taking place in the day i or 2 activation. And I believe it was
the PLT who w_s supposed to take care of it. And,

as you know, the plee - PLT was not feeling too steamy the first couple of days and somehow that item got overlooked. And for that we're
sorry. The second point bei_ that which w_s sent up to operate it had the 10ad a note at the

very end of it, after the operations number 2, that said to eliminate the bubbles from the chamber - or from the tube. Unfortunately, I did not read the note until I concluded the first ops, so there were some bubbles, although not many, but some bubbles in the chamber on number 1 side. 341 04 ii 33 SPT We'll discuss, though, how I redid this and I think you have got the results that you're after. Okay. The first one I ran this morning, that's day 340, we had a couple large bubbles which on the scale were from zero to one. At 21:15:15 we - number 1 was actuated to the forward position. 15 seconds later I took a photo. Okay, at 21:21 1 took another photo and there I noticed a slow drift of the bubbles toward the plus end of the scales. At 21:30 I took another photo, and again, moving to the plus end of the scale of those bubbles. 21:36, I took another photo and noticed that the - the red - and I'll Just call this red and clear from here on out, one being the red cells and the other your clear

341 04 12 09

SPT

821

solution, which I do 21:36 with the photo traveled to about 15 21:37, I reversed it 3_1 04 13 21 SPT

not Know what it was. At I noticed that the red had millimeters down the tube. and took a photo.

At 21:45, took another photo and noticed it had moved hack to around 13 millimeters. That is the red/clear interface. The interface was fairly flat and some of the bubbles were embedded in the red material. 21:47, I took another photo. 21:54, a photo. Let's see, at 21:47 it was - interface was back to 0.8. 21:54, it was at 0.5 and at 22 even I took another photo and it was still back at around 0.5. The exact times for these photos, of course, will show up on the portable timer which I had mounted in there. I tried to take them approximately every 5 minutes, but I had ATM going on at the same time. I was whistling back and forth between the MDA and the OWS trying to run two things at the same time, so I didn't hit it every even 5 minutes, but fairly close. Okay, then on number 2, about what I did between the two runs was, when I finally saw the note and read it, I took and closed the compartment on nl,m_er 1 again - that is, pulled it out the slide.

341 04 l_ 55

SPT

And then tried tapping, and I'll be darned, I could not get the bubbles to go one direction or the other. If anything, they tended to stay up towards the low end of the scale, or toward the source of red on n13m1_er1. But I found that by by giving it a - using a little inertia other than the tapping, _hat is, I would take and push it forward fairly rapidly and with a snap of the wrist pull it back fairly gently, though, but still in a - an abrupt movement, I was able to work alI the bubbles away from the chamber - the cylindrical chamber and back down into the larger chamber. We're set to go on number 2. That was started at 22:53:15, and that's - that was 15 seconds. And I took a photo and started. At 22:58 I saw nothing. And let's see, what would be the easiest way to report All this. _11 the way thro,_h I saw a big nothing. I was not able to distinguish any currents, changes in light patterns going through due to differences in density, if that's what we had in there. I did not notice any differences in color. For me, I was Just proving

341 04 15 _8

SPT

822

that the interface doesn't 341 04 16 ST SPY

between

two similar how you move

substances it around.

show up, no m_tter

But I'm not sure what the objective was there, but I carried out the photo program as called out for. Again I started a photo at 22:53, one at 22:58, 23:09, and 23:14, and 23:19, at which point I reversed it, took another series of photos. Another one at 23:23, 2B:B0, 23:35, and 23:40. Okay, then I said, well let's go on back and look again at nnmher l, seeing as it was actually see seeing something. And I should mention that between the runs on ntm.ber 1 and number 2, in the process of trying to get rid of bubbles, I had agitated enough to spread the small amount of red which was trapped in the cylindrical section. I had essentially diffused that through the rest of it. I should say, turbulent mixed, if you will, with the other clear fluids, so that the clear fluid itself was Just a - barely, barely, showed a trace of it. Then it was a uniform - uniform color, not completely clear, but Just a very small amount of red to it. It's Just very slight pink. You'll see it in the photos. Okay, I started another series of runs. And ended up - we started up with - at today it's 03:41. Started it at 02:00 in the forward position on nnmher 1 and took a photo 30 seconds after the start. Took a photo at 02:15. And by that time a rather well, let's see, the position of the interface was down around 0.8 on the scale. It was still a very clearly defined interface but the center had moved out a little bit. It reminded me very much of the - the cross section that they show for a limb, or a flow through a pipe, if you will.

341 04 17 04

SPT

341 04 17 58

SPT

3hl 04 18 37

SPT

341 04 19 09

SPT

Just a slightly elliptical - a bowed or elliptical interface to it with the center part extending further down the tube. Took another photo at 02:26 and there we were down to - the tip of the interface was down to 1.7. And now the interface, although still fairly sharp, had moved away from the walls quite a bit, all the way up to, I don't knaw, 1.2, 1.3 or so, where it

341 04 19 35

SPY

.f..

823

finally portion 341 04 19 58 SPT

got back to the walls. And the center had spread a11 the way down to 1.7.

The center portion was flat at the very end, but still it was noticeably away from the walls, going up to around 1.2 or 1.3. Got a photo at 02:23 and the same effect was noted, tho1_h I was now _own to about 2.3. And at 02:43:30 I took a photo and reversed it. By that time it had gotten down Just to the ver - Just to the very top of the large chamber at 3 - 3.0. It had Just gone a little bit beyond that and Just started to fan out. What I noticed was that, looking at _ times here and the progression down the tube - well now, maybe I really can't - really can't say that. Oh, yes, I gave you the incorrect time here. Let me give you the time for these photos. They started at 02:00. Then I had one at 02:15, one at 02:2 - 26, 02:33. I think I gave you 23 before; It should have been 02:23. And then at 02:43 I reversed it. It appearedthat it had startedto move a little faster, maybe it was a linear rate; I have not plotted it out. But maybe the progression down there was linear in time, or close to it. Okay, the color was the deep red all the way down the - the tube from the small numbered end, from the zero scale, all the way down the tube until the interface. And the interface was still very sharp. When we finally got down to the very end there was only a slight graduation [sic] in color. You'll see it in the photos, but it was only very slight. Okay, at that point, that's at 02:43 and 30 seconds, I reversed it and had a photo, Just at that point. Now, of course, there was no _m-_diate change when I reversed it. I took a photo at 02:54. And here now the interface became not as well defined and not as sharp. It was still - it was still further down the tube in the center, but now it had become very Jagged, and the transition was fairly grad,,al; very diffused interface. You could still see it but the color transition was very gradual.

341 04 20 33

SPT

341 04 21 02

SPT

_-_

341 04 21 43

SPT

341 04 22 12

SPT

824

3hl 04 23 12

SPT

Took another photo at 03:03, and it had moved at that point - well, let me give you - the first photo was at 02:54 and there it was up to about a position of 2.0. At 03:03 it had moved back to about 1.5, 1.4. And again the transition there was as I have described it previously. Then at 03:36 I took another photo. And the transition was slightly inclined; by that, I mean the left side was further down the tube, and it was very diffuse. Well, actually there was two transitions, if you will. There was one where the heavy red went to the clear fluid which was mixed now with with the red in a very pink. - so it became a very light

3hl Oh 24 17

SPT

Now re_m_er in my original fluid I already had something in it, but this was a - a much heavier concentration - concentration than that. So I had now three different concentrations of the red fluid, if you will. Starting off with the very heavy red at the top, and at 03:36 as it got down to 0.5, and was slightly inclined, with the further further side being on the left. Tmmediately below that, extending around another, oh, I'm estimating that now, I didn't write it down, but. as I recall, it was something like, oh, 5 millimeters or so.

3hl 04 24 56

SPT

A transition region where there was synchronous and very diffuse red material streaming down, and then finally into the relatively clear fluid which I have called clear here and had only a very trace amount of red in it. Then the interesting thing happened, which kind of surprised me. I thought it could of - All this up to now made sense because of the motion forward, it - it's the kind of thing I'm - I would expect from a diffusion - charged particle diffusion. Well, I shouldn't say that. I would not expect the interface to be so sharp in the diffusion process. I would expect that it would become a very diffuse interface. But anyways, the - the motion and the cross section across the tube made sense to me. Then at the last photo - oh, excuse me, I'm misreading my notes. I had a photo at 03:03. And then I went back up to 03:17, I had a photo and that was up at where the - the material had moved all the way up to 0.3. Then c_-_ my photo at 03:36. And what was interesting there is that it went back down to 0.5.

341 04 26 06

SPT

825
That is, even though I had not changed the polarity, was still in the reverse position, the red fluid had gone from 0.3 down to 0.5; and was a - slightly inclined with the lower side to the left. 341 04 26 42 SPT I took a photo there, and then also at 03:55, when I shut it a11 do%rn. I took another photo, and there it had moved a little bit beyond 0.5, with the left side 2 or 3 millimeters at least further down than the right, and it was not a straight cross section any more, but - as you'll see in the photos, but it was sort of an S-shaped one, with the left-hand side being the bottom of the S, and right-hand side being the top. It has - straight straightened out a little bit. So the surprising part was that it had started to move back down the tube and then - a phenomena I cannot explain. What I'd be interested in knowing is Just what you plan to do with this. Is this a way of - of separating different types of cells? If so, it's - I hope these results were useful to you. It was a fun experiment to do. I wish I had a little more training on it to begin with, so I understood what it was all about, and I could have gone

about it in a much more efficient and correct
manner. But than_s for the opportunity it. I hope you got something from it. 341 04 27 54 341 Oh 29 05 SPT CDR SPT out. This is the CDR at 04:30 Zulu reporting $233 observations earlier this evening. The initial photograph was started at exactly on time. And by the time I got to the last photograph, I was 45 seconds into the last photograph when sunrise occurred. That is, enough light was scattered on the window from the bright horizon to where I was sure that the - the frame had been ruined. Looks to me like we're Just about to the point now where we're going to have to change the number of exposures we take because there Just doesn't appear to be enough time between comet-rise and s___ise any more out the command module window. CDR out. of doing

341 Oh 29 57

CDR

TIME

SKIP

826

341 ii 05 37 341 ll 05 52

SPT SPT

SPT at ll:05. Out.

PRD readings:

42283, 23150, 38190.

TIME

SKIP

341 12 ll 00

PLT

Okay, PLT reporting frames 7 through - correction 9, 8, 7, 6, and 5; five frames taken - cassette number CX20, time 12:03 and a half to about 12:07 down off the southwest tip of southern Africa, Cape Horn, and the subject of the photograph is that sinuous sort of channel in the water which

-

appears again at Forel scale 7 to 8 and possible channels of upwelling or at least a current pattern. Started taking the frames as I approached the coast, and we were on a descending trajectory. And as we got closer to land, I started seeing more and more in several different Sun angles, trying to show the sort of subtle difference in the coloration and - However, there's one very good frame that shows the channel, which is sort of a - as I say is sort of a sinuous, snaky, serpentine path along the coast and then sort of Just shoots out into the open water. 341 12 12 ll 341 12 31 41 PLT CDR PLT out. This is the CDR at 12:32 Zulu, debriefing the ATM day pass that started at 12:09. Well, let's see the update here. This is the CDR, debriefing the ATM pass that started at 12:09 Zulu. First off the bat, he gave me 17 minutes to do a 25-minute Job. So that wasn't wasn't going to work. It was doomed from the beginning. J0P 6, step 1. That went without much problem. The Alfa part, building block 1 Alfa Let's see; nothing to debrief on that. That went pretty much according to schedule; just a late start. I think I started at 12:10 rather than 12:09, and then I made the change in roll, restepped the mirror, and started part D of that building block and only got - didn't even finish the GRATING, 3 SCAN or the PATROL, LONG.

341 12 33 19

CDR

827

341 12 34 23

CDR

And I got about one and a half of the S054 in before we had to terminate. I did the TV VTR work. I noticed that with the XUV we're getting a little bit of plage now, over the east limb. So that new active region, I guess - or the old active region 76 is beginning to peek over the edge. And you can see a little bit of the plage in H-ALPHA 1 - correction, H-ALPHA 2 - and it's nice and bright in the XUV monitor. Other than that, I can see very little on the - on the solar disk. I was a little bit busy Just trying to get things to _inning; so I didn't have much time to reaJ_ look things over very closely. The two other bright areas in XUV are still - are still on the solar disk. One is The one that was around the center of the Sun yesterday morning has now moved over to the right a little bit, as one would expect. Both of those bright spots were there, but I - they looked to me like they're d_mmer than they were yesterday. And of course the active region coming over the limb now is coming through bright and clear. And the plage in H-ALPHA 2 was pretty bright too, what little I could see. Hopefully, we'll get a little action out of that.

341 12 35 57

CDR

CDR out.

TIME

SKIP

341 12 56 03

SPT

SPT at zero - at 13:56 [sic] giving a time hack on the ETC camera. Standby. MARK. At that time, the ETC camera read 12:52, 30 seconds. I'll give it at 12:53. Stand by. MARK. ETC camera read 12:53 at that mark. And this is the SPT again at 12:57 now; I believe I gave 13 before. So that shows that the ETC camera is 3minutes and 53 seconds slow. SPT out.

341 12 56 23

SPT

341 12 56 53

SPT

341 12 57 54

SPT

TIME

SKIP

828

_-,,

341 13 46 15

SPT

SPT at 13:46, reporting the rate-gyro crystal thermometer temperatures taken at 13 and 20. 0kay, X-5, 96; Y-5, 94; Z-5, 95; X-6, 94; Y-6, 92; Z-6, 96. SPT out. SPT at 13:57. Ba_dheld photos on mag CX, frame number 10, f/ll, 55-millimeter, and 1/250. The GMT was 11:52. We're essentially at the Equator and what I thought was a very light, relatively small, but extensive linear ridge of clouds that acts as the bounaary between two types of cloud features, one that would be low-lying clouds on the left and what looks like four open Benard cells on the right. Although the cloud cover was extremely light on both sides, what was very impressive was the large extent of this very small ridge of clouds that acts as the interface between two different types of regions. And I'm not sure exactly what role they played in the intertropical convergence zone, but it was relatively close to it and not right on it. I did not see very much cumulus activity, if at all, but it looks like two very fair weather systems and an interface between them. Second photo was CX20, frame number 4, f/ll, 55-millimeter, 1/250, taken at 14:53. And this was taken down by Isle Kerguelen which is a K-E-R-G-U-L-N [sic]. It was an island wake in the clouds, and I thought I could see one vortice [sic], but I glanced at it rather quickly. I was up in the MDA at the time I first saw it. I had to whistle down here to the window and get the picture, and it was a fairly oblique view when I did. And right after that, I saw a second type of cloud which I have never seen before. And it was it - as though you had taken a closed B_nard cell and then just taken one axis and stretched it out. In other words, the cells themselves Oh, they're also a little angular. They were a long, diamond cloud, one right next to another like a cell formation, only each cell was long, diamond shaped. It remind me very much of what we run across in geology, of co_1,mn_r jointing. Now one laying right next to another, maybe a length to width ratio of 3 or 4 ..., but there was a very long ridge of them. ,....._

341 13 46 45 341 13 57 39

SPT SPT

341 13 59 12

SPT

829

341 14 00 47

SPT

The ridge was extending in the direction perpendicular to the long ayes, and these diamond elongated, diamond-shaped cells were just lined up one after the other for a very large distance. And this was taken on CX20, f/ll, 55-millimeter, 1/250. And I'm afraid it might overlap slightly the previous one, with the last frame number I call 3-1/2. It was the last one on the roll, and I could not quite ... get the manual shutter to function and got it with the electric. But I'm afraid it did overlap the other one slightly. SPT out. Okay, the PLT at 14:12:30, giving the monitor decals - readings rather. Monitor readings: Alfa 1 is reading 51. Alfa 2 is reading Alfa 2 is reading 93 percent. Alfa 2 is detector l; reading high. Alfa 3 is reading 87; that's okay. Alfa 4 is reading 92; Alfa 5 is reading 97; Alfa 6 is reading 21; Alfa 7 is reading zero. Bravo 2 is reading 91. Seem awfully high readings today. Alfa - Bravo - Bravo 2 is reading 91; Bravo 3 is reading 83; Bravo 4 is reading 91; Bravo 5 is reading 90; Bravo 6 is reading 48; Bravo 7 is reading 32; Bravo 8 is reading 1 percent; Bravo 9 is reading 58. Charlie 2 is reading 100; Charlie 3 is reading 89; Charlie 4 is reading 98; Charlie 5 is reading 46; Charlie 6 is reading 46; Charlie 7 is reading 51; Charlie 8 is reading 46. Delta 2 is reading 86; Delta 3 is reading Delta 4 is reading 84; Delta 5 is reading Delta 6 is reading 47; Delta 7 is reading proximately 10; Delta 8 is reading zero. Charlie 7 is okay. ... the VTR? 14: 45 :30 o negative. Okay. ... 1 minute until utes at 14:38. LOS. Goldstone in 16-1/2 min85; 15; ap-

341 14 01 41 341 14 12 31

SPT PLT

341 14 14 17

PLT

341 14 14 44 341 14 21 21

PLT CDR PLT CDR

341 14 21 29

CC

830

-_'

PLT

Roger_ and i0 seconds to EREP, START - correction, that's 2 minutes. Coming up on 14:22. MARK. SCAT to STANDBY. to need an AUTO CAL in about

341 14 22 00 341 14 23 35

PLT PLT

Okay, Jer, I'm going 30 seconds. Okay. About i0 seconds. MARK. Okay-. MARK. MARK. Okay. You got it.

CDR PLT 341 14 24 03 PLT CDR 341 14 24 07 341 14 24 08 PLT CDR PLT 341 14 26 31 CDR PLT CDR

EREP to START.

Stand by, Jer.

And 194, MODE to MANUAL at 24:06. sure your door is open.

Check and make Yes.

Okay. *** This nadir swath, there's nothing else nothing for me to do. There's no pushbutton and we got no DAC. Okay.

PLT 341 14 26 46 PLT CDE 341 lh 26 58 PLT CDR PLT 341 14 27 06 PLT CDE PLT

MARK, 26:46. 191, REFERENCE

to 6.

Stand by for 58.

Ed, would you turn off the TV input station? MARK. Okay. SCAT to ON and RADIOMETER And - to - -

On and - on the SCAT to STANDBY *** And RADIOMETER to STANDBY - - -

Let me know'when

you decide to leave

- - 194, MODE to MANUAL.

831

CDR

- - I might have to have you turn it on before you go. Okay. Standing by for 14:38. It's

SPT PLT 341 14 27 26 CDR

Okay. The nadir swath has - has started. 27:10 now. Whoops. 27:33 now. Okay. Where are we right now, Jer?

341 14 28 23

PLT CDR

Okay° lh:28 we're about in here, in the north Pacific. Okay. Doing a nadir swath, are we?

PLT CDR 341 14 28 40 PLT

Yes, yes, this is that - Though - The only data we're getting right now is

19h an_ 191.
CDR PLT CDR PLT This is a north Pacific antitropicalcyclone. I see. 12, lh: 32. Whoop.

Yes, they've got us going to EREP, STOP up here and save the tape. Yes. ._ getting up around

CDR 341 14 29 08 CDR

***teen _6 is when we start Abbeville. Done. Yes. Okay,
now.

PLT CDR 341 lh 32 19 CDR

*** look for those cloud patterns?

we're

Just

south

of the Aleutian

Islands

PLT

***tastic. It's almost - worse right at the start there, though. Yes.

CDR

832

341 14 32 54

PLT

And the PLT. Alfa 2 is now down to 60 percent and Charlie 3 is now reading 88, which is all I guess that is in limits, though, considering it's in such -that the attenuator is installed. Dark out. Do we have a tape recorder changeout procedure here, that little quickie? *** quickie. I thought we had that on a cue card. No, it may be on the odds and ends there. There it is; tape recorder re - reloading. I don't think so. No. That's not the one I was looking for. Well. About to run out of tape? Well, I think we're going to, to tell you the truth. I don't think they're going to ask us to do a tape recorder switchover. Give me that checklist. 0kay. It 's in the cupboard there.

341 14 35 00 341 14 35 14

CDR PLT

CDR CDR 341 14 35 33 PLT CDR PLT PLT 3hl i_ 35 5_ CDR PLT

CDR CDR 341 lh 36 48 PLT

Oh, yes. 92, MODE to CHECK_ TAPE RECORDER. POWER. OFF. And I got to kill 192. Got to kill what? Well, 192, MODE to CHECK. I don't know, that doesn't really kill it. No, it doesn't. You know there's a big flap when we have to do a tape recorder changeout, you know, you're going to lose 192 data. Uh-huh. I guess Yes.

CDR PLT

341 14 37 14

CDR PLT

CDR

_-_

833

341 14 37 31 341 14 37 32

PLT CDR PLT CDR

I think you have to turn the power off. Okay. Nadir swath is over.

Okay, standing by to go to EREP, STOP at 14:38. I sure can't figure out what at here. Stand by MARK. EREP, STOP; SCAT, OFF. Okay, TV input, ON, and VIDEO select, TV. I 'm going to go down and verify that. Okay, get with it a tad early. We're with you guys for about 17 minutes, and would you believe you were looking at the Pacific Ocean? Oh yes, I knew that. I got a funny display in the VTS now that we had once before, and I haven't quite figured out what it is. Must be the horizon, and it sure is sharp; like a knife edge. ***so. There goes something sailing by. I saw the same thing. Yes. thing Copy. But as soon as you get into sunlight everything is normal. It - but Bill was suggesting it must be sc_e sort of scattered light or something blinking light. If - if we could get Bill, or you, Jer, to recheck readings Alfa 6 and Charlie 5 we would appreciate it. We think maybe the - the reason they we' re off was we Just read them a little bit too soon. Okay. It looks like a door halfway open or somelike that. it is we're looking

PLT 341 14 38 00 PLT

CDR 341 14 38 12 CC

CDR

CC 341 14 38 47 CDR PLT 341 14 38 52 CDR

CC CDR

341 14 39 07

CC

CDR

834

341 14 39 19

PLT

Yes, I've already put a note - Alfa 6 is now reading zero, which is okay. And Charlie 5 is now reading 82, which is okay; and I concur with your comment. I'd already put the new comment on the tape. *** you. Okay, we've got TV input station, ON, and VIDEO select to TV. Yes, whatever that is, it's very slowly drifting out of the line of sight. It must be some reflection from someplace on the spacecraft. You know these discones are Just like a light bulb out there. Yes. They light up. Jer, can you tell us where the VTS is pointing when you're seeing this line? I've got it zeroed out. And it's a - a line right down near the center. It's drifting off to the right now. It's almost a vertical line. And it the right side of it is light with lots of white specks in it like stars, and then the dark part has got an occasional star in it too. Almost looks like you got some kind of condensation contamination. Yes. I can't tell what it is. It's Just about gone and I expect we'll start seeing some ground here in a minute. Yes• it scared me the other _ay. I though we had had something in the optical path. When, I thought m_ybe the door had closed again or something. That's when I was fiddling with the switch and looking under the tape to make sure the switch was open. All right, that - that's finally passed off to the right. It's gone now. and the the VTS now is all dark. And it's beginning to lighten up with sunrise.

CC 341 lh 39 51 PLT

CDR

PLT

CDR 341 14 40 07 PLT CC

-_

341 14 40 18

CDR

341 14 40 40

PLT

CDR

341 14 40 51

PLT

CDR

835

341 14 41 17

CC

Jer, that line was - was vertical, and-aft, is that correct? Yes _ that's right, fore-and-aft.

_,_nning fore-

CDR 3_1 l_ _l 28 CDR

Just like a door half closed or something. On the back side of the door looked like a piece of - of emery cloth, with light shining on it_ you know, and the light is reflecting off the - the granules on the emery cloth. Okay, now we're getting getting some clouds. It must be Just some sort of a reflection or something. Okay, the TV is on. And Bill, in about 3 minutes we're going to want to throw the VTR on to RECORD. Okay. At 14:_5 Okay_ MARK. and 30 seconds.

PLT CDR PLT 3_1 l_ _3 01 PLT CC CDR

coming up on 1_:_3. ALTIMETER to STANDBY.

We're watching the VTS with you. Okay, I'll try to do a little focusing here. Doesn't look like this big focus knob on the adapter does a whole beck of a lot of good. Looks - looks pretty fair - right here, from what we're observing. Of course, there's not much detail there. We're getting some cloud cover dark lines. Yes. Yes. Yes, there is. There's a little cirrus down there. I'll zoom in. There we go. That's a cultivated field with snow on it. Going by. And I would suspect we're probably darn close to Denver. Roger; I thought it was snow. Yes, indeed. the white stuff was clouds, but Well, there 's no clouds.

CC

CDR CC CDR

PLT

CDR

836

_-_

341 lh 44 15

PLT CDR

Okay, Ed, 3 minutes. Now I've is a big 9 o'clock straight

47:40 for ETC to AUTO.

zoomed back out again, Houston. There river Just passing down at - from to 6 o'clock, very sinuous. And the lines you see are clouds or smoke - -

PLT CDR

Looks like a cowtrail. - - might be smoke on the ground, might be steam. Right now I'm coming up on a big reservoir. Is that the reservoir at 9 o'clock? Yes. Then coming right down the center line is another reservoir. Zoom in on that one. Hey, Crip, do you notice a loss of focus • that last little bit of zoem when you're looking on the TV screen down there? It's kind of hard to tell. go a little bit. Okay, Jer. the - It seems like it might

341 lh 45 07

CC CDR

PLT

CC

341 14 45 29

SPT

At 45 - when did you want me to turn

341 14 45 32

CDR

Right now. VTR, ON. Okay, gang, coming up at your 12 o'clock is Toledo Bend. And one of our targets is - let's see what is it - number 350? No, 450. It's getting ready to cross into the crosshairs right now. Stand by MARK. There's number 450, I gave a couple on - All right, we're coming up on Abbeville. I see White Lake. White Lake is a beautiful lana_-rk. That's the way to go. Okay. Okay, Ed, about 1 minute for KTC, AUTO. Starting to collect data. There's a fairly uniform checker-board. It looks agricultural area. Standing by for 47 : 20 area; it's pretty pretty much like an

341 14 46 01

CDR

PLT CDR CDR

PLT

_-

83T

341 14 47 20

PLT

MARK. 47:20. EKEP, START; RADIOMETER, ready in - 1 or i0 seconds before MARK. 194, MODE to MANUAL mR_k MARK. MA/LK. Okay, ETC, AUTO. 47:50. terminate Stand and stand

OFF.

34,

341 14 47 34

PLT

by, Ed.

On

341 14 47 h0 341 14 47 50

PLT PLT CDR

by for 47:50

-

ALTIM_%'ER, ON. it on Abbeville. light. It's

341 14 47 54

PLT

Okay, I have an ALTIMETER UNLOCK gone out. Okay, good show. That's really impressive you can hold it. Yes. Start looking

CC

on that VTS, how stable

CDR PLT 341 14 48 16 PLT

for some Ueatan

current

here.

Standing by for 48:16 MARK. 48:16; 190, MODE, SINGT._. One frame. I got a MALF on camera 3, which we expected. I shouldn't even have loaded that thing. by, Ed, i0 seconds to ETC to STANDBY. Okay, Stand MARK. I'm zoomed by _C, STANDBY. a couple TACS firing out to MIN_ now. And

341 14 48 24

PLT

Stand

CDR PLT 341 14 48 40 CDR CC

You can probably anticipate here, no problem. Another one there.

PLT CC CDR

That ain't snow. Okay, it's pretty heavy cloud cover so far. see, I've got - Stand by - - about MARK. 20 - Let's

PLT 341 14 49 15 iCDR PLT

838

CDR PLT CDR

- - seconds 190 ..,

to go to the special

02 area.

And the clouds are starting to break up. Hey, we've even got Sun glitter here too. Maybe we can see some currents. Okay, I'm standing by to give you another frame on 190. Okay, Houston, I don't see any of those neat cloud streets with the - the - the ares of cumulus over them. I'm sweeping way out ahead - MABK. - - to see if I can't find them. 50:18; 190, SINGLE. Okay, Jer. Okay, I've lost my READY light. for 15 seconds on the ALTIMETER. I'm going in OFF

PLT

CDR

341 14 50 18

PLT CDR PLT CC

341 14 50 32

PLT

CDR

I'm going to try to stay in the Sun glitter, Houston. I think there's more data available from that. Well, here's - here's a peculiar-looking way the cloud streets are kind of formed up. I'll give you some data here.

341 14 51 04

PLT

Okay, I got rid of the ALTIMETER UNLOCK light. But it's about time to turn it off. Stand by. MARK. STANDBY: MODE to 5; RANGE, 77. by, at 51:28. MARK. MARK. again. ALTIMETER. ON. Stand by Standing

341 14 51 l0

PLT

3&l 14 51 28 341 lh 51 37

PLT PLT

for 190, SINGLE.

51: 36 ; 190, SINGLE.

ALTIMETER UNLOCK light

CDR

Okay, Going back out to MIN zoom. look for another target now.

I'ii try to

CC

Focus looked pretty sharp when you went

in then.

f'_

839

341 14 51 50

CDR

Yes. That was sort of an intersecting set of cloud streets. Okay, here's an interesting shot for you, Houston. We've got a - sort of an atoll, coral reef there. And we've got cloud streets and a cumulus that seems to cut right across the cloud street. I'm going into MAX zoom now. Try to hold the position for a little while. Lot of side drift. Okay, I'm going to come back out and see if I can find something else. Stand by MARK. 52:36, 190 frame, SINGLE. Still have a it

PLT 341 14 52 37 PLT

READY light on 190 - Just lost it. off for 15 seconds. CDR

Turning

Okay, here's some more of those arc clouds with cloud streets. It's MARK. a lot easier for you to see it if - -

CDR 341 14 53 01 PLT CDR

193 back ON.

- - I keep it in MINIMUM zoom. If I go in MAX, we're Just looking at one cloud. But I'll do it. Okay, I got the ALTIMETER UNLOCK light again. But the READy light is staying on. Okay, I want to track come back out again. this to - to NADIR, then

PLT

CDR

CC

Jer, if you could give us the angles of where you're at right now, we'll appreciate it. All right, I'm in NADIR right now. Zero zero and tracking to the right, 12 degrees. Okay, this I'm just going to kind of track along this one; this one is very interesting. You can see a bumch of cloud streets being intersected by cumulus. We're in an area of intensive cloud streets. MARK. And ETC to AUTO. Ed.

CDR

341 14 54 O0

PLT CC

Okay. We're 1 minute from LOS and we're going to see you over Vanguard in about lO minutes at 15:05 - correction, 15:04.

84o

CDR

Okay, I'm going to miss Barranquilla get with it here.

if T don't

341 l_ 55 36

PLT

Okay, I've got MALF lights from cam_eras 4, 5, and 6 Just came on. And just for kicks I'm going to check the circuit breakers. They all three came on at the same time, Just about. Let's see, I
think ... activity ...

341 l_ 56 23

CDR PLT

Okay, we're about 2 minutes from the Amazon. Okay, looks like we've coml01eted cameras and 6. I think we just crossed the Rio Negro. Okay, I'm tracking the Amazon, getting data from that portion ... and I'm left, 4 degrees. The part of the Amazon that was under me was under clouds. Now as I track this particular hunk of the Amazon I see an island up to my left in the middle of the river and what looks like a sandbar is Just right near the island. And I'm tracking out in the middle of the water of the Amazon, trying to avoid clouds and the banks of the river. Trying to stay in uniform water area. We have scattered clouds in this particular field of view. And a cloud stream. VTS, 1 minute for ETC to STANDBY. CONTIGUOUS. That completes the Amazon, CROSSTRACK 4, 5,

CDR 341 14 58 59 CDR

--.

PLT

CDR PLT 341 15 00 17 CDR

going northeast.

POLARIZATION, 1. Okay, Ed, I'm sure you're past this though, but it's 15 and about 30 seconds you go STANDBY and then at 01:10 you go back to AUTO. Want some marks, l0 seconds, on m_ mark, ETC. Stand by MARK. AUTO. MARK. MARK. ETC, STANDBY. 5 seconds. ETC, AUTO. 01:45. SCATTEROMETER to STANDBY. And on my mark, ETC to

341 15 00 50

PLT

341 15 01 ll 341 15 01 46

PLT PLT

841

341 15 01 58

CDR

Okay, tape recorder, this is VTS. I think we've got an error in the pad here, special 07 for Sao Paulo. It says we're going to get there at 05:14. No, I guess that's about right. I was going to say 07. Now, Sao Paulo should be easy to find because it's got a lake between it and the coast. Looks like they got about or better. Yes, a little better layers of clouds. 3/10ths cloud there,

CDR

PLT

341 15 02 58

CDR

than that.

They've

got two

PLT CDR

Oh, yes, it's better than that. It's got a high layer of cirrus which is to broken and then a low layer of cumulus next to those cloud streets. There must much wind down there. You see the - see cirrus above and the cloud streets below? Yes. Uh-huh. scattered there not be the

PLT 3hl 15 03 30 341 15 04 28 CDR CC CDR

Okay, I think I see the coastline coming up. Skylab, Houston. AOS Vanguard, 7 minutes.

Roger, Crip. We're coming up on Sao Paulo but it looks like it might be socked in. MARK. 190, MODE, AUTO.

314 15 04 35

PLT CC

Okay. Should - maybe clear up upst before you get there and we'd like to thank you for that fantastic show you gave us coming across. Roger. MARK. METER, You're welcome. 192, MODE, READY; SCAT, ON; and RADIOON.

CDR 341 15 04 45 PLT

(DR CDR

Boy, Toledo Bend was Just wide open and beautiful. Yes, I can make out the coastline clouds, but - Number 2 MALF light on. down below the

F

_

341 15 05 06

PLT

8_-2
CDR - - might not be able to see Sao Paulo until we're right smack dab over the top of it. Right now I'm looking ahead about h5 degrees and I can't see it for the clouds. Roger. Okay, Ed, about 20 - 30 seconds, put ETC to STANDBY.

CC PLT

PLT

What you got to do, Ed, you got to run up here and go to SOLAR INERTIAL. Stand by_ on my mark, ETC to STANDBY. Okay, the VTR goes off at 06:35, Bill; you a mark. MARK. 05:50, ETC to STANDBY. I'll give

CDR

341 15 05 50

PLT CDR

Now, Crip, I'm almost overhead now. And I can see one little piece of coastline, but it's broken to overcast. Two layers of clouds - one low layer of cumulus and one layer of broken to overcast cirrus. Well, I guess we had give up one, that - the rest of it was fantastic, though. SCAT to STANDBY. RAD to STANDBY. MANUAL and 190, MODE to STANDBY. 194, MODE to

CC

B41 15 06 19

PLT

CDR

I can see sunglint on rivers and things and swamp area underneath the clouds, coming up through at me. I think I'll go ahead and take data on it. And I've got END OF TAPE light. And I never did get a READY light at the end of that 190 sequence. You're Did you going to get mostly see the Amazon cloud data, I'm afraid.

3_1 15 06 32

PLT

CDR CC CDR

River

area that time?

Sure did. Found one little hunk of river standing open. Okay, we got some great glitter on the ocean and there's all sorts of streaks and things in the - out over the ocean that I think are pretty darn interesting, in the sunglitter. Lots of lines. You can see currents, ripple wave patterns. Man, it's really something. I'm getting some - -

843

341 15 07 17

PLT CDR PLT

Time.

EREP, STOP.

- - right now. Okay, looks like we end - we've used up the fiSm in all the cameras except one, Crip. Number 1 is the only MALF light that's not showing. Then we've got a END OF TAPE light about 30 seconds before the end of the run. That's pretty good timing• I'd say. Beautiful. EREP - EREP people do good work.

CC PLT

They sure did. They timed that right down to the wire. l'm impressed. Did you get the VTR off, Bill? Negative. Hey_ gang; sorry we're using your tape up. 08:13, we're Just getting the VTR off now. Copy. You used up 22 minutes. so we're in good shape. Hey _ good show. And we're going to go ahead and take VTR and rewind it at this time. Okay. What are we over now? Water? Yes. Let's see You were allotted 25 It's

341 15 08 06

CDR PLT

341 15 08 ii

CDR

CC CC

PLT CC

CDR 341 15 09 15 PLT CDR

We're out over the water. Where we headed? map here.

Take a look at my dandy slider

CC

Well, you're headed to come up around South Africa there. Yes. Bravo 7 is B-32.

CDR 341 15 09 32 PLT

844
CDR We go right up over Sumatra. Too bad it's dark in Japan. We're going to fly right over Sakura Sakurazima, that volcano on the southern end of Kyushu. Ed, would you turn OFF TV POWER. please? you. Thank

341 15 l0 20

CDR

CC

We see Ed getting ahead of us there, putting in the maneuver time for J0P 13 coming up. I figure though, Crip, the time fram ETC to STANDBY to SI in l0 seconds is calling it a tad close. I think maybe 30 seconds would do it. Roger. That's the way - we mentioned it this morning and we kind of left that up to you guys, if y'all really think that - that's a problem, we'll try to work it a little bit closer here. Yes, I think both those guys are fairly busy and if we can allow 30 seconds in there, that would give me a nice leisurely stroll up here. Okay, We'll take that into account. We're about 45 seconds frc_ LOS. We got a nice long one. We'll see you again in an hour and 4 minutes over Goldstone. And that's at 16:14. And the crimson team is saying good night. day off. We'll see you on your

SPT

CC

SPT

341 15 ll 02

CC

CDR

Okay, Crip, and all you red guys. redeyes. So long, Crip.

We call you

SPT CC CDR SPT 341 15 ii 50 CC

Have a nice weekend. Same to you. So long.

May your days off be as relaxing as ours. (Laughter) That's not very good (laughter).

TIME

SKIP

8_5

341 15 56 26 SPT

SPT at 15:56. This is a note to the urine world.
M092 - MO - M - I think it's the M071 folks. Okay. We have dumped a - three urine bags today. Yesterday _as boric acid day. And in mine I now see, after a - evacuation of the bag fr_n vacuum, I now see remains of two healthy solid chunks boric acid. One is about 1/2 an inch long, and hard. The second one is about 1/4 inch of round long -

make that B/8 of an inch long, round and hard. And the procedures were followed for mixing the bag well before sampling; that is, the bag was shsken vigorously. Before shaking, I saw many particles in there. After shaking, I could not detect any. I had assumed that they all had dissolved. I gave it about 1 full minute's worth of shake. So apparently a couple of these pellets did not dissolve. It was very selective in that only two of them I hold the bag up to the light and I do not see any other pellets at all, only these two. So apparently we must have some nonuniformities in dissolving those pellets. Whether it be - what's caused it - Whether it's initial nonuniformity of _ 3hl 15 58 01 SPT production where the SPT out. of the pellets, I'm not situation does stand. sure. But that's

TIME

SKIP

341 16 39 40

CDR

This is the CDR at 16:h0, reporting on the visual
observations photography. HHlll, BaJa California area. The photography The first California. border - stand down by. was extremely well defined. directly overhead, as well track and on the oblique. a K in the - in the ground. or Earth observation opportunity was 16:20 I took three pictures to - I believe the Zulu with

the Hasselblad100 that coveredthe area from the
Ensenada

3hl

16 hO 27

CDR

The Agua Blanca fault It could be seen from as extremely far down It looked very much

341

16

40

49

CDR

like

TIME

SKIP

846

3hl 17 lh Bl

SPT

SPT at 17:14, debriefing on two passes here; one, the ATM work which was carried on after the return from Z-local vertical after EREP. Take that one first. I went over and looked at active region 95 which was Just coming around the east limb. And looked at the region right above the limb. Took 82B, put it parallel to the limb - tangent to the limb using the WHITE LIGHT DISPLAY, 12 arc seconds off the limb, _mmediately above active region 95. That gave a series of exposures at 1040 and 160, I believe in the SHORT and the equivalent in the LONG, some combination thereof, which I do not recall exactly right now. I also gave a - h-minute exposure for 8?_B in the SHORT WAVE.LENGTH, and all at 12 arc seconds above the limb. And I was in LIMB POINTING were made. at the time those exposures

341 17 16 13

SPT

56 received an 8-minute exposure and SINGLE FRAME, FILTER. 2. And 55 received six truncated MIRROR, AUTO RASTERs. Okay, the next full ATM pass which began at 16:15 was a series of pointings off the limb, 6 arc seconds. They all went real well. I started, however, the first one I did in the right llmb at the east equator by the east pole - east limb which I was right for the ROLL of 1080. And then I did the left limb - or the west equator. I did that so I would only have to roll about Sun center to get to the third one. I used the WHITE LIGHT DISPLAY again to Judge UP/DOWN. I'll talk about the reason for that in a moment. I don't think I could do that quite accurately by Judging the when the XU - when the 82B SLIT is tangent to the limb.

SPT

341 17 17 49

SPT

55 received six truncated MIRROR, AUTO RASTERs at 0594 GRATING. And - that was at the first point. The second point, the same. Six MIRROR truncated MIRROR, AUTO BASTERs. The third point, again six truncated MIRROR, AUTO RASTERs. And in order to receive the exposures that it called for, I gave you LIMB POINTING and all of the 82B exposures. And at the conclusion, I had a little time so I went over and got the fourth point, over at the right limb with a ROLL of

847

minus 5400. And essentially gave you the same type of data. That is 82B, WAVELENGTH, SHORT, exposure, 5 minutes. 55, option B, MIRROR, AUTO RASTER, all DETECTORS; a GRATING of 0594. 56 received a FILTER 2, which is the only one we had not worked with. We gave them a 7-minute exposure. And 55 received six MIRROR - truncated MIRROR) AUTO RASTERs. 341 17 19 08 SPT I did a nu Z update at the conclusion of the pointing for - the third - the last limb position. I'll call it LB-5 and was surprised to find out that my roll - EXPERIMENT ROLL did not change at all. If it did change, it was only about 1 arc minute. So I think you got some very good references for east/west, north/south on that one. 341 17 19 40 SPT The reason I chose to use the WHITE LIGHT DISPLAY rather than UP/DOWN and zero in order to get to the proper position for 82B and for all of these pointings, is that I noticed when I would put the SLIT tangent to the limb, that on the right limb I had a UP of around 15. When I went to zero it was very noticeably that the SLIT was not tangent to the limb. When I went to the west limb, I'm sorry, the left limb - and put the SLIT tangent to the limb, I got a DOWN, minus 22. Approximately in - that ballpark I could - I had a plus or minus a couple arc seconds on that one for - it was probably my accuracy in positioning UP and DOWN and in the WHITE LIGHT DISPLAY. B41 17 20 43 SPT I've also noticed that during the - since I've done the four-limb coalignments when we first got on the ATM, and now that my Sun center reference for 52 has changed from something like UP/DOWN of minus B1, I believe it was initally, to an UP/DOWN of minus 36 and a RIGHT of - very small n11mber - which I've forgot now - to now a RIGHT of minus lO. So I'm suspicious of the bias that we have in there for the XUV SLIT and I would reco_,end that we do a four-limb coalig_w_nt in the near future whenever that bias that I've given you is critical.

_

848
341 17 21 34 SPT We still have the switch in the IN position. And I know what I can do right now to take a - well, no, I can't, we're on the dick - dark side. Well, maybe I can control through the computer. We'll take the BIAS switch OUT. Okay, let me do a little arithmetic here and I'll be right back. SPT out. Okay, SPT again at 17:24. And I'm looking at the FINE SUN SENSOR readout for the BIAS, IN and BIAS, OUT. I notice there a delta between the IN and the OUT in UP/DOWN is still minus 54 as it was when we did the four-limb coalignment. In LEFT/RIGHT, the delta is a plus 18. So the XUV SLIT biases have not changed, and it's hard for me to believe that there's that much drift in the instrument. So the only thing that I can recommend is a four-limb coaiignment. I did a real quick cumulative check before we went into sunset and H-ALPHA i and the white light slit or XUV SLIT are still in good agreement as to where the limb is - both UP/DOWN and LEFT/RIGHT. Still I 'm a little mystified right now by why we have this large difference between where the WHITE LIGHT DISPLAY says the - the SLIT is tangent to the limb and where the - FINE SUN SENSOR BIAS values in UP/DOWN says we're tangent. Wonder if there's any ROLL misalignment; let me think about it. 341 17 26 i0 341 17 27 48 SPY PLT SPY out. PLT, time is 17:30; reporting completion of housekeeping i0 Alfa-3, SUS loop checkout. Also housekeeping 2 Alfa and Bravo, housekeeping 60 Romeo i, 60 Romeo 2. I used both samplers and I used the reagent i with Sampler i, reagent 2 with sampler 2. Both samples to test 8 - to tank 8 tested out at 4 parts per million. I inJected 20 units to bring it up to 6 parts per million. And PLT out.

341 17 21 57 341 17 24 2h

SPY SPT

341 17 28 28

PLT

TIME

SKIP

849
341 17 48 57 SPT SPT at 17:48. Handheld photos beginning with on the - with the mag and frame number 90 was the first. It was taken at 14:44, 100millimeter; f/ll, 1/250. Snow patterns in a town which is slightly northwest of the Denver area which was done near the EREP pass but the - ETC was not operating. At 14:45 we had snow around the Denver area, still. 14:46, we got a exposure of Dallas-Fort Worth, for urban development. 14:47, the Houston area again, which showed a fair amount of the pollution in the - from the ship chsm/_el and also - and also the neck going out into the Gulf. 14:47 also, I took one of the

CXh7

Orange-Beaumont area. Again I could see a few small plumes down there. 14:48, I got one which I believe was by Lake Charles and it showed an exceptionally good plume form extending well out into the ocean. The frame numbers for these were respectively beginning 91, 92, 93, 94, 95. F_]m was shot at 1/250 of a second, 100-millimeter lens. The last four of them were f - f/8; first one was at f/ll. _341 17 49 45 SPT On CXh7 also at 14:51, frame number

96;

f/ll,

100-millimeter, 1/250, that was by Panama - and there was an awful lot of green discoloration to the water - very light green. And also fairly large sinuous - that I did not have time to pick out but I think is probably typical of the development. At 19 :50 - 14 :57, frame number 97 ; the same camera data as previously. Got one of the cloud streets over Brazil - -

341

17

50

21

CC

Skylab, this 1-1/2 minutes

is Houston, ...

through

Hawaii

for

341

17

50

23

SPT

-- the cloud streets over Brazil, I believe I've got a good shot of it ... yesterday, I didn't take any photos of it. The thing that impressed me is that Brazil Just has cloud streets continuously. And with ETC, I went over a good part of Brazil and picked these up. I got it from an oblique and I could not make sure that the ROLL . .. I did not bother taking any more, although we were going across one large continuous sheet of cloud streets as we took data over Brazil, but the ETC cameras ...

850

341 17 51 24 341 17 59 13

SPT CDR

SPT out. This is the CDR at 17:59 Zulu. Discarded one can

of peanut butter and got another from overage. The can discarded had peanut butter oil in the top of it, indicating that there had been some leakage in the can. 341 17 59 27 341 18 14 17 CDR SPT CDR out. SPT at 18:13. I did mention the orbit we scanned

at 17:48 before the JOP 13 maneuver. We got the building block 32 done with no problem. The TV downlink was missed, for which I'm sorry. We got up here late, not realizing we had a TV downlink in the schedule. It only had us getting up here for a short period on ATM, and I looked at the building block 32 and thought we had plenty of time for that, saw the observing time but missed the TV downlink. Okay, the remainer of the time I spent looking for a bright spot and at magnesium X, detector position - GRATING POSITION 1941, DETECTOR 3, found one with a - first of all, I used the XUV MONITOR picture and located what I thought was a fairly well isolated and - but prominent bright spot at about 7:03, 0.6 solar radii; got one keyed in position using the XUV MONITOR as a rough guide to get me in there, and then maximized my DETECTOR 3. That got a reading of over 200, maybe 220 or so. I then checked my crosshairs that I'm using on MONITOR 2, for the center of the 55 instrument relative to the XUV MONITOR and, sure enough, 341 18 15 32 SPT they were right on.

--

So the limb coalignment which I did the other day is certainly very good. And we got a good tool for pointing to locations in the XUV MONITOR, maybe better than I suggested earlier this morning on the air-to-ground. Okay, with that pointing at the maximum which I found to be fairly sharp, that is plus or minus 2 arc seconds made made it fall below 200. That's in either direction. I gave 82B a WAV_T._.NGTH, SHORT, 2.5 second, l0 seconds, and then an exposure of TIMES 4 sequence, so you got 2.5, lO, 20, and on up. And 55, I returned the GRATING to REF which gave a partial GRATING, AUTO SCAN and it now is getting in a MIRROR, AUTO RASTER. And if I can get this

_--

8}i

MIRROR, AUTO RASTER done in time, I can get one more GRATING, AUTO SCAN before we have to go on with JOP 13. 341 18 16 49 SPT SPT out.

TIME

SKIP

341 18 43 49

CDR

This is the CDR at 18:44 Zulu. again, Bruce.

Standby.

Say

341 18 44 32

CDR

This is the CDR at 19:45 Zuluwith a report on some handheld photography. Some of it was taken a while back, and haven't had time to report it. The first photography I want to report is - was taken at 16:23. This was an HH optional that was in the pad - HHlll, BaJa California. I took three Hasselblad 100 photos at f/ll, 1/250 frames 99, i00, and i01 of magazine Charlie X-ray 47. The weather over BaJa was Just absolutely clear as a bell. I took a mosaic essentially, somewhat of an oblique, from the California-Mexico coast or California-Mexico border down to about Ensenada. The area in question is the - the Agua Blanca fault area, the - oh, I can't remember the San Jos_ pluton, I think it was. And the photos were taken from the south, looking north. They were taken from about over the folding Just south of the pluton. I did not have much time to do any visual observation comments; however, one thing was quite evident. The Agua Blanca fault and the the offset there along the fault is extremely easy to see in clear weather and especially with a little obliquity. The - the offset - cross fault there, from where we were, - and from the oblique area we were at, looked like a great big K had been - the letter K had been branded right into the ground. The Blanca - Agua Blanca fault was extremely easy to see as well as the cross faulting, and the - I think maybe the photos that I got will very much - very easily show the - the movement along the fault. The next photo was taken at about 16:31. It was two photos. They were frames 102 and 103 of the - I attempted to get some intertropical-eonvergencezone clouds.

341 18 46 07

CDR

_

852

341 18 47 i0

CDR

I had the wrong f/stop in there - was f/ll; so I took two more at f/16, and those were frames 104 and 105. These are in response to a request on the pad for stereo pairs l0 seconds apart. Building block HH - correction - handheld site HHIO, frames number 104 and 105 were in north latitude of the - of the zone, taken at approximately l0 degrees north latitude, just north of the Galapagos Islands. The f/stop was 16 - over - lO0-millimeter lens. ... DETECTOR 3 will be commensurate with acquiring a target here or JOP 13. Over. You're on. Okay, let me - Did he turn me off? Okay, the the next pictures were at 16:B2. The next - the next picture was 16:B2, was also with the Hasselblad. All these pictures were taken out of the S190 _-indow, by the way - the ITZ clouds and the Galapagos picture and another set of ITZ clouds later - ITCZ clouds later. At 16:32 I took a picture of the Galapagos Islands in an attempt to get a picture of the Wolf Volcano, HH59, but our good old J-shaped island was completely covered over with clouds, and all you could see was the beach. But I went ahead and took the picture anyway because I figured if there was any activity on the Wolf Volcano, you might be able to detect it in the clouds - maybe some smoke or something in the clouds. Then at 16:B5 I took another stereo pair, this time in the south latitudes for HH10, and this was frame these were frames of 107 and 108. Again, an f of 16, 100 has - 100-millimeter Hasselblad lens, 1/250, and a magazine of Charlie X-ray 47.

341 18 48 03

CC

CDR 341 18 48 20 CDR

B41 18 49 44

CDR

And then at some time later, at 18:05 Zulu, I took frame number 109 at the same setting, and these were clouds in the mid-Pacific ITCZ. And right now, for the life of me, I can't remember what it is I saw in those clouds that was interesting eno,_gh to take a picture; so it's going to be a surprise to me when I get back and look at them.

853
341 18 50 09 CDR Then at 18:17, while Just west of the coast of Chile, I noticed a very abrupt change, an interface between two different kinds of clouds we had under us, directly under us, pretty much over the Islas Juan Fernandez Islands. The clouds looked very much like tortoise shell or scales on a fish. It It looked to me like they were cirrus. That tortoise-shell cirrus cloud, you know, very patchy, much like B_nard cells, only I'm pretty sure they were cirrus or at least high clouds. And then to the south, running from the northwest to the southeast, was a long line of cumulus clouds, some cumulonimbus. And then beyond that was clear water, indicating to me that we had a frontal system going there, but it was curved in the wrong direction; and so I thought it was interesting enough to take a picture of. 341 18 51 16 CDR Then as we zoomed in over the southern Argentina and Chilean area, I found that the land mass was quite clear; so I took another picture, which is frame lll, of the south Argentina and Chile area near and south of Golfo San Jorge. That was taken at 18:19 - frame lll, f/stop of 16, Hasselblad 100, Charlie X-ray 47 was 1/250. And then on the east side of Argentine, again I ran across the light green east serpentine current or blooming or whatever it is that Bill has been looking at for the last couple of days. And this one looks very, very much like a - like a stream or a flow because it's long and ropy or serpentine and there are eddies along the side of it. And they these pictures are frames 12 - ll2, ll3, and llh of Charlie X-ray 47 ; I took them at f/16, a hundred -lO0-millimeter Hasselblad lens, 1/250 of a second. In a couple of areas in this serpentine, green swirl of things or long serpentine swath of water, we could see something that looked reddish brown. And I'm wondering if maybe that is either seaweed or kelp or pollution; I'm not sure which. In close to the - In close to the - to the beach, I again saw what looked to me like petroleum - the kind of blues and reds and - and magentas that you get when you see gasoline on water and - or the lavenders that you see when you see gasoline on water. And it made me think of - of petroleum pollution.

854
341 18 53 14 CDR This is the CDR. End of message.

TIME SKIP

341 19 38 09

CDR

This is the CDR at 19:38 Zulu. The subject is handheld photography. I had two - two optlonals at 19:30 which I didn't get because I was still working on the ATM J0P 13. These were Kilauea and the island of Hawaii. I don't know what the weather was. I feel badly that I missed it. I think you probably should have put that on the PLT's details because he was available to - at that time and he might have been able to catch it. CDR out. PLT at - The subject is hand_held photographs. At 19:40 and a half, approximately, I took a picture of about i0 degrees south of the intertropical convergence zone in the Pacific. Very interesting combination of clouds - cloud streets; mixture of cu and an open Bgnard cell. Also the reason I took the picture - it was - appeared the striations developed this wave form but not in the water which paralleled the cloud streets; also, the - it wasn't the - the interesting gap - open gap in the clouds here, the clear areas that don't exactly look like Bgnard - open B4nard cells but are just areas of completely-clear-of-cloud area. Also in this area, there is considerable evidence of the cumulus cutting Just a little bit higher than the cloud streets cutting across them at what you - about a 20- to 30-degree angle. PLT again. The photograph in question is the Hasselblad, and the frame number is number llS. Also, I wanted to make one additional comment as far as the wave pattern on the surface of the water. It was emphasized and highlighted by a sunglint pattern.

341 19 38 43 341 19 41 17

CDR PLT

341 19 42 27

PLT

341 19 44 02

PLT

855 19 48 39 FLT FLT at 19:49makingan observation. We'venoted
the recurring appearance of a certain cloud form that we had no name for, but Jerry suggested what I thought was a pretty good name. It's called tortoise shell. Now what this is, it's usually a collection of them, and what they appear to be like a lot of cells, biological life cells. They're close together, have sharply defined boundaries, and they fit together sort of like a irregular pattern on a tortosise shell. And each one of these is fairly sharply defined around the perimeter, although the perimeter is irregular. 341 19 49 46 PLT And the - Although the texture is not homogeneous, these particular cells, they're - they appear to be flat with a very thin dimension of depth. But each one of them - almost all of them have a sort of what would conform to a nucleus of a of a cell, and it - it's Just a little bit more dense than the rest of the - or thicker than the rest of the clouds and of course brighter because of the thickness and greater reflectivity of light. I don't know. Maybe this is a classicalpattern-type cloud formation and well documented, but we - we have never seen it. We never heard of it before. And it's sort of interesting because it does have these sharply defined features. 3_1 19 50 36 PLT And I'm trying to see if there is anything on the surface of the water - any pattern, wave-forming closely associated with them, because they do have very sharply defined perimeters.

341

TIME

SKIP

341 20 15 35

SPT

SPT at 20:15, ATM, debriefing the two passes with a JOP 13 in between. Okay, I'll talk first about the JOP 13 and how that went, and then I can hit the solar work, which was done on either end of it. Okay. All the steps went along very straightforwardly up to - Well, first of all, let me go back and make a point about the update of the new commands. It's my understanding now that we will do a nu Z update maneuver at least an orbit prior to the co-m_nds can be

341 20 16 07

SPT

so that the corrected

856

_-

uplinked in time to make the changes on the J0P S1_m_ry Sheet and insert them for the m_ueuver. 341 20 16 53 SPT Okay, everything went as advertised all the way throught the maneuver on up to - Well, let's talk about when we finally got on attitude. We hit the ENTER up to initialize strapdown when we got the attitude error to zero. The star tracker was already positioned to the right gimbal angle; so we Just went ACQ AUTO and got a star right away. And the INI_k'HGIMBAL on number 1 was O0 - plus 0007; on number 2, it was plus 0378. So we're only 5 off on star 1 and 3 off on star 2; not too bad. Jerry was working the star tracker and I did all of the entries on - at the - the DAS and followed the JOP S1,mm,ry Sheet. I used the HP-35 for the calculations ; came out with a delta PHI X of minus 0.037 degrees and minus 0.214 degrees. I had the maneuvers all set to ENTER, which was a 52021, 5100h, 51025, and 50000. 341 20 18 51 SPT Jerry confirmed that my head calculations - that we had the right values. Hit the ENTER and rather quickly got a 375 for the INNER GIMBAL on 2. At that point, we were ready to start the exposures. That was at the time of 19:04. Spica-available time was 19:07; so we started the sequence at that time. 52 got the exposures I'm sure I'll use for correlation of data at exactly every 5 minutes. And unfortunately - I think it was twice in there - we have them a second exposure in addition to 27-second exposure before I hit the STOP switch. And also, which I'll talk about a little bit, we got FAST SCAN data on the back of their door. We monitored DETECTOR 3 and could see nothing but noise. By that, we mean that all four digits on the left remained zero and the one on the right would Just occasionally flicker out of zero. And we could never identify what the figure was ; but most likely, a 1. At the first, llne 58, the first scan - First MIRROR, AUTO RASTER, we hit line 58; gave a 2 at that - and we do not take that too seriously. We want to take another lap through it. And we watched it again and noted that our STAR TRACKER, INNER GIMBAL angle had dropped down to 373, a whole 2 arc minutes change. And I felt at that

341 20 20 17

SPT

_

8_T

point, we'd be lucky 53, and we did not. 3_1 20 20 51 SPT

if we'd

see anything

on the

We observed it with the XUV M0N and could observe nothing but - on the long INTEGRATION except just random counts or noise, if you will, showed up more prevalent in the center of the screen. So recapping then, 52 got the correlation data; 55 got the MIRROR, AUTO RASTERs; 56 got a 20-minute exposure exactly. And at the very conclusion, in order to make it a - an even 20 minutes, we hung on there until 1 minute before the maneuver, which I think was probably calling it a little close. The net result was that in our hurry to shut down the experiment and to get the - get ourself [sic] thinking about the maneuver, in 1 minute we started 52 at that 1-minute remaining in order to get that last exposure in there as an even 5 minutes, realizing now we should have gone 1 minute earlier on that. And before we got the OPERATE light, we got in the DOOR CLOSEd mode and closed the door and promptly forgot we had it going in FAST SCAN. So I was really glad the ground was looking over our shoulder. We may have noticed the FRAMES REMAINING decrement in a little while, but we probably would have blown some film. Okay, maneuver went back; no problems. I watched the INNER GIMBAL, OUTER GIMBAL on the CMGs and also the HX,y,z, and HT. All seemed to work out fine, all well within acceptable limits. And we got back and settled out, and it took around 2 minutes before we got the attitude error to zero, at which time I reinitialized the strapdown. And at that point, when we were - we initialized the strapdown, we had fairly good-sized errors in the ACQUISITION SUN SENSOR. They were not zero. As a matter of fact, they were roughly X plus 15 percent; and in Y, about a minus 6 percent. That's the best of my recollection. I hope you have that data on tape.

SPT

3_i 20 22 40

SPT

SPT

And everything else went fine. I thought the procedures worked well with the CM - three CMGs and doing it on two with merely a mib fired. I was very happy with the planning that went into

858

it. Thought it came off rather smoothly. Another piece of data: When we got back and I did a nu Z update, our nu Z jumped up to minus 1.0 from a relatively small value close to zero, which I do not recall - which I'm sure you have on - have stored, and the experiment ROLL jumped from plus I'm sorry - minus 5401 to m_nus 5482, 81 arc minutes change. 341 20 2h 52 SPT Okay, that concludes the discussion of JOP 13. Solar work, which was done before and after: First, we got the building block 32 straightforward. And as I believe I mentioned before, I did a little work on a bright point. The first time that's before the J0P 13 - I did it on a bright point and maximized in magnesium X, and that discussion I think you had previously. I went back to the same bright point after the JOP 13 and maximized the oxygen VI ; it got a reading of between 900 and 1000. And it was really sensitive. And I think I was getting a little more accurate pointing - Well, by accurate, at least I was looking at a little sharply - more sharply defined bright point in oxygen VI, which I'd expect because it's lower in the atmosphere. The exact coordinates which I worked at - and these were _m_ediately after the nu z update - were a ROLL of minus 5482 and UP of plus 440 and a LEFT of minus 460. Again, it was a fairly prominent one. 3hl 20 26 40 SPT I went to it using the XUV monitor, which is an excellent tool for that particular type of work. And the crosshairwith the crosshairs, I was able to put it right on there and then did some fine tweaking; using the 55 readout got me right in there. The fine - fine tweaking, though, in the 50 - with 55 does take a fair amount of time, mostly because of the dynamiCS of the MPC. It cannot step 1 arc minute or 1 arc second at a time very easily. And you make a little input with the hand controller, and you'll end up with anything between zero and 3 and h arc seconds. Just an aside here. If I were to design or try to put some specs on that MPC for a second time, I'd ask for a scale switch on that one also, where we could go hardover and get a relatively low rate. So it does take a little while to - to tweak up flma]ly and - with the MPC because you use -

_-_

859

usually end up going, say, LEFT/RIGHT maximize, UP/DOWN m_ximize, another LEFT/RIGHT, and another UP/DOWN until you've homed in on it and the numbers keep coming out to the same value. 341 20 28 12 SPT Okay. Unfortunately, when I did get back there, all I had time for was a little over - well, almost two GRATING, AUTO SCANs, maybe a one and a half GRATING, AUTO SCANs before we hit 400 K for 55; a PATROL, SHORT in 56; and a WAVELENGTH, SHORT for 82B with a time mode of se - exposure s of 2.5, 10, h0, 160. And I was Just going into the 640 when - when I cut out - when I - where it got to 400 K, and I cut it off. Had I been quick enough, I would have gotten it before we blew that one extra frame of film; that is, when I saw the READY light come on for 3-1/2 seconds. SPT out. Hello again. This is the friendly SPT at 20:32. ATM JOP 13, additional piece of information, and a request. As I was scrubbingup the JOP 13 sheet here, I remembered that in looking at X, Y - that we are given a value of minus something which we had to subtract from 360. I think it would be useful in the future if we have any negative values, that they are subtracted from 360 and set up in that form, as that's what we read out on PHIx,y, z. 3hl 20 33 34 341 20 51 O0 SPT SPT SPT out. SPT at 20:50. The MO92-run data on the PLT: Leg blood pressure, 158 over 78; left legband, Alfa November; and right legband, Alfa Quebec. SPT out. Friendly SPT at 23:05 PLT, subject of M092. right leg, 13-1/2. SPT out. - Make that 21:05. Left leg is 13-5/8 (Music) and Thank you.

B41 20 29 18 341 20 32 48 I--

SPT SPT

341 20 51 30 341 21 05 23

SPT SPT

341 21 05 44

SPT

TIME

SKIP

860

-

341 21 42 05

SPT

SPT at 21:42. (Music: "Lara's Theme") Subject M092. Okay, we had two diversions during the run; so the timing did not come out as specified, but I think we got you what you wanted. We had a battery malfunction on the Nikon 04; so we could not get a READY light for the flash, and that took 5 minutes to change out. So the subJect then had l0 out - lO minutes of resting at zero tilt in the cage before we started, rather than 5. And then I got a call from Houston at Just about the time I went to switch over to 50 millimeters. They want the tape recorders in that - in our 1 minute off when we - or 1-minute wait to go into 50 millimeters, and we've given you an extra minute's worth of data at 50. The problem with the tape recorder, though, is because there's a looseness in the knob, and it depends on which way you're turning it as to which reading you'll come out with. In the particular case I had, I was going over to - from H to Bravo and the knob was loose enough to extend over to Bravo while it was still - very close to Bravo while it still was in Charlie. So we're just going to have to try and think out which one we're in now a little more carefully. SPT out. (Music) SPT at 21:45, message for MI51. We started the run at 19:25 and we're now going over into the M093 portion. A problem arose, and it was very offnominal. The CDR helped the PLT get the electrodes on while I was still up at the ATM. And then we had a problem over getting all the camera equipment squared away for the facial photos. Finally, when we were ready to take the photos, we had a battery malfunction and that had to be fixed before we could continue. So all in all it was fairly offnominal, and the time duration reflects that.

-_

341 21 43 47 341 21 45 46

SPT SPT

341 21 46 32 341 21 47 00

SPT CDR PLT

SPT out. The exposure on S183, that's plate 04. Testing MARK.

341 21 48 34

PLT

8gl

341 21 56 33

CDR

This is the CDR at 21:56 Zulu, debriefing the ATM pass that started at 20:55 Zulu. Let's see, started out with building block 6, step 2 and with a roll change to 10,800. And building block 2 went witheut any problems at all. And then we went to a ROLL of 5400 and I stepped into building block 28 and thought that was going beautifully until I noticed that the S056 terminated by itself early. And it terminated - let's see, the exposure was to have been 5 minutes long and it - it terminated early. So I was a bit confused by that; but nonplussed, I pressed on anyway. Went on to J0P 24, step l, where I encountered my old friend, building block 28 again. Made the same boo-boo the second time. And that is on a 56, I started the exposure, SINGLE FRAME, 4, LONG with an exposure of 8, but I did not turn the CAMERA switch OFF, so the thing shut itself down automatically and then, finally, after the second blunder, I finally woke up, realized what I had done wrong; but unfortunately I wasn't thinking quick enough to recover it for you. I think if I had turned right around and initiated it again and used another frame and set it up properly, there was time because I did not realize there was flop time at the end of the second building block 28 and J0P 24; the one that starts at 17. So, S056, I did it to you; instead of giving you the nice long 8 minute - correction a 5-minute and an 8-minute exposure that you wanted on SINGLE FRAME 4, I gave you a shorter exposure, which of course, belongs to the normal mode of running SINGLE FRAME 4 and the long - long exposure - LONG WAV_L_NGTH. So, I apologize for that. If I had thought quicker I could have recovered one of them for you, but the first one was lost forever. And of course, so was the second one. Now, finally having run building block 28 the third time, I finally got it right. I feel like Schultz the Butcher. Anyway, the third time I ran it, I ran it properly. You got 9056 got its fu11 8 minutes on frame 5, or I should say FILTER, 5. And I truncated it at - the whole thing at 400 K. That is, I should say Just 55; option 3 was _nnl rig. I sneaked a few peeks at

341 21 58 35

CDR

341 21 59 15 341 21 59 21

CDR CDR

862

the XUV M0N while we were Sun centered, and I didn't see anything new and spectacular. In H-ALPHA l, while Sun centered, I - or H-ALPHA 2, I should say, I can see a little bit of that plage peeking over the - peeking over the limb, on the east limb. Really I didn't see anything new this afternoon that I didn't see this morning. 341 22 00 24 CDR There are some filaments beginning to come around the east limb up about, I think 30 degrees from the - from the e - equator. There is no special activity as far as PMEC or anything like that. It's lower than a snake's belly. It's running around 150 down to 71 up to about 200. So it's not anything to crow about. I did notice the polar coronal holes while fooling around with the XUV M0N ; but, of course, Ed's got some beautiful pictures up here with the Polaroid, too, so there was nothing new and startling there for me either. To the 56 guys, I'm sorry. I just didn't completely follow the checklist as closely as I should have, and I cost you a couple of underexposed frames. CDR out.

341 22 01 28

CDR

TIME

SKIP

341 22 h0 48

SPT

SPT at 22:40, ATM. An addendum to the previous report - previous two reports where I had the discussion of the bright point. The last report I gave a - what I called precise coordinates which were taken right after a nu Z update. And those

coordinates were given; however, the BIAS switch was OUT at that point so that the UP/DOWN, rather than a plus 440, it should be plus 386. And in LENT/RIGHT, rather than a minus 460, it should be minus 442. 341 22 41 43 341 22 48 31 SPT SPT SPT out. SPT at 22:48. Subject is handheld photos, and it's on weather systems, low-pressure areas. We're over the South Atlantic, and I got a good look at a low-pressure system which had three bands leading in towards the center. The three bands were adjacent to one another, running parallel, or nearly --_

863

parallel as they spiralled in a clockwise direction towards the center. There were thunderstorms along each of the three bands even though they were relatively close. 341 22 49 29 SPT At the very center there was a lot of cirrus and poking up through the cirrus was some overshooting cloud top, all in the same locale; not isolated overshooting cloud - cloud tops, but it looked to me Just all one unit. I think in the fUture when I get one of these, if we have any data acquisition camera film left over, I'll try and get you some at two frames a second, and see if we can't detect any motion. By eye I could not detect a great deal of motion, if any at all. 341 22 50 02 SPT I think most of the change that appears occurs because of our change in position relative to it. Correction on that. We were in the Atlantic just coming up to South America and we'll be going into the - I'm sorry, we are in the Pacific and we will be coming up to the Atlantic in Just a moment. SPT out. We're - correction, we're coming up right on Samoa. SPT out. SPT again on the weather description which I just gave of the low-pressure area. The photograph which was taken was on CX_7, frame number llT, taken fil6, 100-millimeter, 1/250 of a second, at 22:48 C_T. SPT out. PLT at 23:05. This will be handheld photograph n11mber ll8 out of the Hasselblad, magazine Charlie X-ray _7. The subject is rather unique. I have called it a cloud fracture pattern. What it is - appears to be lower clouds that have Just separated, but have the - the line of separation sticks together like a Jigsaw puzzle, but the clouds have been pulled apart, oh, some distance. Now the one or two areas in this photograph that has that, and one of them appears to be like more or less center, upper left center of the photograph, looks like the Florida peninsula. But there's a complete separation around that and it looks like, you know, a pull-apart. It looks like there's an interesting morphology or dynamics involvedin this particular pattern.

341 22 52 26

SPT

341 22 52 48 341 23 05 41

SPT PLT

864

341 23 06 40 341 23 08 54

PLT PLT

PLT out. PLT. I - we Just passed over another region taining considerably more exhibition of that ture I Just talked about, what I call a cloud fracture pattern. Obviously that's not what but it looks like it; a pull-apart line. And that's frame nnmher 119 out of Charlie X-ray confeait is, 47.

341 23 13 02

PLT

PLT reporting on a visual observation without any photographic documentation. Looking through the binoculars at the southern coast of Chile - well, actnally western coast, but southern Chile on about, let's see, about h8 south, 46 south, 48 south, somewhere along in there, about 75 west and there's a very interesting feature there. Two lakes that feed down onto a glacier, it looks like. There was a lot of frozen snow. And there are what it does, it puts a certain striation on those glaciers, if that's what they are, if they are glaciers. I guess I could have - well, I'm asking the question, would something like that be of interest? To - to notice that you've got a body of water apparently higher than a glacier and seeps down on top of it. And it appears to be sort of an interesting unique interface. And the fact that it's providing the contaminates on top of the glacier and giving you a sort of bow pattern on top. Now I don't know what it is, I don't know if I'm interpreting it right, but that's what it looks like. And that location is correct. Probably within 60 miles.

341 23 14 21

PLT

TIME

SKIP

341 23 39 50

PLT PLT

Okay, this is the PLT; S019, day 341.

Okay, Jer.

Time is 23:40 and l0 seconds on my mark. MARK. First. Okay, I've got ROTATION, 164.9, 0.9. Actual was

341 23 40 12

PLT

and TILT, 06.7; nu z was minus

plus 0.1. The correction is at 1 degree. So, let's see - minus, I want 160. 2.9, darn it. There we go. Okay. At 41, even. Okay, I'm ready to go. Standby, on m_ mark -

_-_

865

341 23 41 02

PLT

MARK. Right now. Uh-huh. Okay. And this is slide 29, and ROTATION is 162.9. Okay - Okay, Jer. Field is 823 and this is a 270-second, widened, exposure. And I _Imost goofed up that time. Correction. I done that. Correct the rest of these things. minute check. Good thing I made that one last-

341 23 41 55

CC

Skylab, Madrid. for the have it dumping

Houston. We're about i minute from LOS Guam comes up at 00:08. And a reminder SPT, that's his fsm_ly comm site. We'll all set up at Guam. And also we'll be the data/voice recorder at Guam.

SPT CDR

Thank you, Dick. You notice they're ence any more. ... That 's all right. Okay. PLT here again. Coming up on i00 percent. Looks like this is going to be terminated about well, I'll give them a mark. Okay, stand by. Time is 44:15. MARK. Okay, that's the end of that exposure. Now it's set to 197.9. Okay, and TILT of 13.9. Okay, I want the first one to be 90, change to 90. Crank it up here. And we're ready to go. MARK. Okay, now at 197.9 and 13.9; it's field number and slide number 30, 90 seconds, widened. Well, there are two stars in there close 830 not calling it private confer-

SPT CDR 341 23 43 36 PLT

341 23 44 20

PLT

341 23 45 08

PLT PLT

PLT PLT

together.

There goes another one, I, 2, 3. One very bright one. Okay, stand by. Coming up on 80 percent exposed. 197.9 and 13.9. Stand by. MARK. And a i00 percent. Okay, now I'm resetting to 30. Okay, tighten it up. Okay, ready to go. Stand by -

341 23 46 20

PLT

866

3hl 23 h6 3h

PLT

M_RK. Okay, it's the same field, field 830. This will be frame number - or slide number 31. Stand

by.
PLT 341 23 _70l PLT Stand by MARK. Okay, now let's get to the comet, fast. 213.9. Boy, it sure would help if you could see the numbers. Okay, 22.7. Walk that mother. Coming up on 23 - Okay, I've got a little time I want to take a little time to make sure I got this thing in here. Gosh darn. Cotton-picking thing. There we go. There it is. Son of a gun, I think you got it, _l. There's a blob in there, some place. You got it. Move it, darn it. Should he moving. 213 point - 213.9, everybody move - my correction 22.7. I got to start taking at 23:51; I've got another minute and a half to go. Ah, I'm seeing the Earth, that's what it is. I'm seeing fire in this stuff down on the Earth. There, it sort of makes a pretty good telescope. Yes, forest fires in Africa, I'll bet.
4

3hl 23 _8 3h

PLT

I saw them the other night, when I was up in the command module, and it really startled me. I was looking for the comet and I saw all these fires like sort of a dull glow over the Earth. Okay, 23:51's coming up soon. It's still 2 minutes away. Pretty weird. And I've lost it there. Boy, the position of the eye is really critical on this thing. Okay, must be nearing the horizon Now, there we go. Yes, there was the horizon; that's what was coming up in there but I couldn't see anything is all. Okay, coming up on 23:50, so I've got another minute to go. Hey, Ed. Yah-ho. Could you give me a hack on 23:h0 - 50 and 30 seconds? 23:50 and 30 seconds. Okay. I'm looking at this eyepiece. to see the comet-rise. Just second. a I'm going to try

SPT PLT

PLT SPT PLT

SPT

86T

PLT"

I

guess

Iim

not

going

-

Okay,

some

extra

stars

coming into view now. Okay, got 20 seconds to go take one more peek. Something's coming into view, anyway. Stand by. 23 :51 341 23 51 03 PLT PLT MARK. Frame number 32. That's slide 32, comet. 213.9, 22.7, and I'm timing for 6 minutes. Okay, let's see if we got it here. Well, let's see. Something looks like a tail on that one over there. I don't know if I'm fooling myself got it, Karl. 341 23 52 03 PLT or not but I think you

The tail was sticking from upper - the nucleus is upper left and the tail's going lower right. I don't know if it's my eye making the smear or what. Why do these apertures always have to have such lousy focus? You never can focus. You have to have your eyeball in such a critical position to see anything. Well, I don't know. Did I turn the recorder off?

PLT PLT

Okay, this is the FLT. When I recorded, I said I think I might have said 6 minutes. It's obviously expired for that exposure. Okay, PLT. Time is coming up at 55 on my mark or going

PLT 341 23 55 02 PLT

MARK. Then we'll be closing the shutter, to CARRIAGE RETRACTED at 56.

PLT

Let's see. There was a comment I was going to ma_e. Oh, yes. I did see the horizon in the lower part of the - of the field of view. I know we were down on the right and I don't know if that helps your left/right, so to speak. Stand by to go to CARRIAGE RETRACTED. MARK. Going to CARRIAGE RETRACVfED. There we go. Okay, two exposures complete. Ed - You were Okay. about 40 seconds from start to move back. I

341 23 56 02

PLT

SPT PLT

All exposures were executed properly. as I said

did have to make the nu z correction

868

earlier, and it was a minus - full minus i degree. So, I took i degree off all rotations. That's about it. 341 23 56 37 PLT PLT out.

###

OAY 342 (AM)
869

342 01 53 12

SPT

SPT at 01:53. Handheld photo on mag CX47; frame number 120; f/ll; i00 millimeters; 1/250. Taken at 01:40. The subject was the - a region southwest of Chungking. And the reason it was taken was really Just the beauty of the scene. There was rugged mountains with the snow cap, The Sun angle was still not yet too high, probably around 30 degrees - 20 degrees. The - All the geology of the mountain, I think, stood out very well because of the stark - or the contrast produced by the ... and the Sun angle. There was a valley on either side, and I think it was just characteristic of this area which we've seen so much of because it always shows up at this time of the evening when we're by the window. But it certainly goes on for nearly a thousand miles. We have never really thought it was worthwhile taking a picture Just because it was so common. But it's a sure beauty. That's what made me take the photo.

342 01 54 56 342 01 56 42

SPT SPT

SPT out. SPT; this is 01:57. On second photo of the sequence. Mag CX47; taken at 01:57; frame number 121; f/ll; I00 millimeter; 1/250 of a second. Skylab, Houston. Honeysuckle for 7 minutes ....

342 01 57 22

CC

TIME

SKIP

342 02 31 33

PLT

PLT debriefing the ATM run. JOP 6, step i, building block i, performed nominally. I think everything went according to the schedule there. I did forget video downlink of the XUVMON. Nu Z

was performed on time. The JOP i Bravo, step 5, building block 33 Alfa, was performed nominally, I think. The bul - first bullet to the JOP summary sheet here says ROLL, 0000 or zero or 10800, and I had to use the numbers that were recorded on a previous run. And rather than try to rely upon the instrument to resolve UP/DOWN, LEFT/RIGHT after rolling, I used a minus 7116; UP/DOWN, minus 0052; minus 0744 LEFT/RIGHT to get to my point. And then I went up 85 arc seconds from there without changing ROLL and at that point

870

executed the building block 33 Alfa. I assumed that both are wide field of view inst - instruments and there was nothing critical about the ROLL on that, and I'd get a lot better pointing if I went ahead and used the ROLL, left - UP/DOWN, LEFT/ RIGHT, FINE SUN SENSOR readout that Jer had on his previous run. 342 02 33 17 PLT So, 56 and 55 were the only ones run, and they were done properly. I did not finish in time to get an OPTICAL REFERENCE due. However, I did advance to MECHANICAL REFERENCE, 102, and shut down the panel with it on 102. I saw no evidence on the H-alpha of any particular activity, and the XUV MON even looked pretty quiet. For the film count, H-alpha 1 - excuse me H-alpha, 12203; 56, 04342; 82 Alfa, 143; Bravo, 1290; 52 is 6064; 54 was 4055. PLT out.

342 02 34 00

PLT

TIME SKIP

342 03 56 24

CDR

This is the CDR at 03:56 Zulu. I am back to debrief the 02 - correction, 22:35 ATM pass that I had. This was the pass in which we did a - a J0P 1B on network cell, and I picked a network cell at a ROLL of minus 7116, with an UP/DOWN of minus 0052 and a LEFT/RIGHT of minus 0744. I picked that particular roll because it was on the quiet band that we had been working on on the pass before. And I figured if any place was going to be a rather quiet spot for a - a cell, that was the place - the network cell. So I moved in. And approximately, oh, l-l/2 minutes or so in from the limb, I found a fairly well defined network cell. And I picked the center side - Sun-center side of the cell and set up for building block 1 Br - or JOP 1 Bravo, building block ll. Both of those building block ll's in step 1 and step 2 and also - Let's see. That's a total of three building block ll's that I did. Nothing special to report on those; they were pretty routine. I just set them up and turned the crank and did the work.

342 03 57 24

CDR

871

342 03 58 12

CDR

I did notice - was impressed by the fact that the cell shut - certainly doesn't - isn't very long lasting. I had no trouble seeing the same cell on H-AI_EA 2 ZOO __2A_ IN; so I was able - In JOP ID, step 3, I was able to - to step up the to the H-ALPHA 2 pointing and put that on the same place where I had H-ALPHA i. That was no great problem at all. However, I was - as I said before, I was impressed by the fact that the cell, in the small period of time that I was working on it, was waxing and waning. And it got a little stronger after I started working on it, and then those dark and bushy clumps began to disappear. And it was a very faint outline by the time I finished. And if I were to have had to come back at the next pass and find the same cell, I suspect I would've been hard pressed to find it, although I had sketched - sketched the cell, the shape of it and everything on the chronopaque in front of me, so that I would remember what it looked like. The building blocks ll and 33B went very quickly, and I got finishedwith about 17 minutesto spare - correction, 13 minutes to spare. And so I - Rather than take my observing time, I did my penance to the S056 people for screwing up the JOP 24, building block 28, at 33 to go on the the pass before. So I cranked in a ROLL of minus 3600 and stepped 6 arc seconds off the left limb and did another S056 SINGLE FRAME, FILTER 4, for 8-minute exposure and did it right this time. So I've done some penance, I think, to the $056 people for what I did them out of on the pass before.

342 03 59 09

CDR

342 03 59 28 _--

CDR

342 0_ 00 35

CDR

I took a few peeks, where possible, with the XUV; saw nothing of any great insignificance [sic]. We used - I used the XUV in order to verify that I was in a quiet - quiet region and that I was indeed still in that quiet baud. And I found that Just with the naked eye and integration, without the use of the persistence image scope, I was able to see the - the active and quiet bands very, very clearly, and with no trouble at all, making sure that I had chosen the network cell that was within a quiet band.

872

342 04 01 17

CDR

Other than that - Course without S052 - which I guess we will have tomorrow now - without S052 that kind of limits the different things you can look at for observation time. And I'm looking forward to getting 52 back and being able to use it to look at the corona once in a while. I had a difficult time on DETECTOR i, trying to find any kind of maximizing around the - the boundary of that network cell that I chose. I tried DETECTOR 3 and it really wasn't a whole lot - whole lot better. I guess the Stm is so quiet that it's difficult to find - in this particular area, difficult to find much of a difference, even though it was a rather dark and bushy clump. That's about all I can say about this.

342 04 02 ll

CDR

CDR out.

TIME

SKIP

342 12 20 09

SPT

SPT at 12:20. Out.

PRD readings:

42296, 23157, 38199.

-

TIME

SKIP

342 12 44 13

SPT

SPT at 12:45, coming over Brazil. The note is for the weather people and hand_held photos. I notice that over Brazil, again we've got cloud streets pretty much _,nning east-west, the same ones we were taking pictures - pictures of before. they don't extend quite as far into the - the depth of Brazil, but they certainly are well defined again and as we've always seen them before. SPT out.

342 12 44 42

SPT

TIME

SKIP

342 13 15 16

SPT

SPT at 13:15. The handheld photo. The mag ID mag CX47; frame number, 122; f/8; 100-millimeter; 1/250, taken at 13:12. Subject was the trailing

873

edge of a front down here in the ocean right below Africa. We could see the front - or the center of the low off in the distance, and the front which we were immediately upon - went spiraling in clockwise toward the front - toward the low. What was unique is that we were looking at the trailing edge of the front. It was obvious by the curvature of the front, as well as knowing where we were, and the clockwise rotation of yes, clockwise rotation of it. 342 13 16 24 SPT The trailing edge itself was very sharply defined; that is, as we looked at it, to the right it was very clear weather - roughly clear. That is scattered clouds, that's lO-percent coverage at most. And then abruptly, we came upon the front itself, which had a high cirrus layer, and it looked to be other clouds underneath it. I did not see any - I did not see any C's coming up through it, but again, what was surprising was the sharp abruptness of the front. It was relatively ... low Sun angle when we took it. So, I think, with good definition, we ought to be able to see the feature which I just described. 342 13 17 i_ SPT SPT out.

TIME 342 13 54 15 CDR

SKIP

This is the CDR at 13:54, responding to message 2361 Bravo, S183 questions. I did not save the broken glass frag - fragment of the S183. I threw that away. However, I do remember that there was a strip along the sides of the glass which was straight. Now let me again describe the shape of the piece of glass that I found. It was about 3/16 of an inch across the bottom and that was a straight edge. It was an isosceles triangle. The two long legs of the isosceles triangle were not straight. They were obviously not from the edge but from the inner - inner part of it. The - the length of the two sides of the isosceles triangle, I would estimate as about 5/8 of an inch long. As I remember, there was a strip about 3/16 of an inch wide along the straight edge - the short, straight edge. Then coming up from there on to the point of the isosceles triangle, it was covered with emulsion. The emulsion

874

was a yellowish cream color. I don't know that I would call it a thin gelatin because at that time it did not look like a gelatin. It was more like a sheet. But it was yellowish cream in color. The time the piece was discovered, it was not I don't know as it was holding the slide door open or not, because it was floating free. The problem was, the slide door was being held open bY this - the entire - Stand by. 342 13 56 07 CDR The slide door was being held open by the mechanism that holds the slide. And I pushed the slide back in, and the slide door closed. I did not fool around - As I mentioned when I reported it, I did not fool around and look and play with it to see what was holding the slide door open because I was more concerned about the other plates that were inside. So as - if you will review the other tape, you will see that I said that I quickly put - stuffed the slide back in the slot so that the door would close. And - if you'll review the tape, you will also see that I said that the slide door was closed when I put it into the stowage container. 342 13 56 51 CDR CDR out.

TIME

SKIP

342 14 51 55

PLT

PLT recording for S019. be 620; ROTATION, 039.5; widened exposure; required.

First star field will TILT, 20.8; 90-second, is

and no nu z correction

342 14 53 05 342 14 53 53 342 14 54 00

PLT PLT PLT

Okay, coming up in 1 minute, Okay, standby on my mark.

approximately.

MARK. Okay. 14:54. And that is on field 620; ROTATION, 039.5; TILT, 20.8: and this will be slide 33. And 90-second, widened. Stand by on my mark Stand by. for termination of exposure.

342 14 54 50 3h2 14 55 09

PLT PLT

875

342 14 55 13

PLT

MARK. Termination of exposure. Okay, next we want 013.6 on ROTATION. Okay. 13.6 - locked. And we want 24.3. And locked. Okay, ROTATION, 13.6. Okay, I'll take the first one. Be 90 I mean a 270-second. 14:50. Okay, time is 14:56, and I can start this one Just a bit early. No, I better not do that. Okay, 13.6, ROTATION; 24.3, TILT; star field, 854; 270, widened. No, I've already gotten one exposure out of the way. It's not on the checklist. Stand by on my m_k. MARK. field, Okay, 14:57. This will be 270, widened; 854; ROTATION, 13.6; 24.3. I

342 14 57 0h

PLT

PLT

I'm going to add that in here, Jer, because think that's probably easy to forget. Bill, can I use the recorder for a moment? Actually, sure. I'm just about to terminate

SPT PLT

an expo-

PLT 342 14 58 48 SPT

Go ahead and take it for a minute, Ed. SPT at 14:58. ATMpass beginning at 14:01. This is obviously a very straightforward pass. Building block 32 and building block l0 and 18, J0P 6 and ll, respectively, were carried out. I hope we got some good time histories on the MIRROR, LINE SCAN. I guess you're looking at some relatively low-lying lines: carbon continuum and carbon llI, oxygen VI. I got magnesium IX and then the hydrogen-Lyman continuum. So maybe with that you did find some oscillations, although I know from your previous discussions lately you have not found what you were really looking for initially. If you so find anything, I's appreciate hearing about it. During those operations, I also had 56 taking some, well, very long exposures. I gave them SINGLE FRAME l, 8 minutes; SINGLE FRAME 2 - FILTER i was 8 minutes; FILTER 2 was 7 minutes; FILTER 4 was 9 minutes; and FILTER 5 was 8 minutes and 20 seconds - Hey, Ed, may I break in Just a moment here?

342 15 00 32

PLT SPT

- - ... I can leave it go longer what the delta was ....

if I only knew

876

--_

PLT 342 15 00 41 PLT SPT

Stand by. MARK. Discontinuation of 270-second exposure.

There again, as I mentioned with Bill Lenoir this morning, if some of these estimates other than the WLC could go appreciably below the ESS as specified and be useful, then we could probably get a little more data in for them. It certainly is true with - Stand by. - - 56 and 54. 82B - MARK. - - and 55 certainly Start a 90-second, widened. - - or - correction I understand - Of course, the XUV,

PLT SPT

342 15 01 07

PLT SPT PLT

unwidened

SPT PLT

- - could not go below ESS, but maybe the XUV - Okay, and this will be plate number 035; 013.6 and 84.3. SPT out. Field 854. The SPT at 13:01 with a message to the camera people. We've had a failure of the Polaroid camera. The type of failure is that the mechanism which pushes the film out seems to malfunction. When I put in a new pack, I get the click noise, I ... the thump over on the right-hand side, but I do not get the cardboard top ejected out. I've tried it with two different magazines or three different film packs. One film pack, I actually took the cardboard off _vself, and then inserted it and tried to take it ... - Stand by for termination of 90-second exposure.

SPT PLT 342 15 01 25 SPT

PLT SPT

- - when I look at the back of the cardboard - -

877

342 15 02 20

PLT

MARK. I want

Termination 293.9.

of 90-second

on 854.

Okay,

SPT

- - over on the back side of the ... when you got the front up away from you. You notice little claw marks where the eject mechanism has tried to pick up the cardboard but has failed. ... 930.2. I took a flashlight and looked in there. I saw the little mechansim hanging down there which, apparently, has got a little hand on it that'll kick up the cardboard ... forward. Okay, this is field 803, 270 seconds - -widened on my mark. But from all purposes, I believe that that little mechanism is moving. But it's not, for some reason, board. mechanically getting ahold of the card-

PLT 342 15 02 41 SPT

PLT

SPT

F

342 15 03 03

PLT SPT

MARK.

Starting 270-second, widened on field 803. is not extending down far

So that mechanism enough ... - -

PLT SPT

ROTATION, 293.9; TILT, 30.2; field, be plate 036.

803.

This'll

- - cardboard or the film magazine, the new film slide. It happened this morning right after I changed film packs. One was working great up to now. Never had any false - any false carries on it. It all worked smoothly. So my question is, how do we fix it? It's the only one we got on board, and it's most useful for ATM; exceptionally useful. I looked at the mechanism itself, and it looks like it's made out of a relatively thin spring steel, not eas - not too easily bent. And before I start wrestling with it and - and breaking it, I feel it's best to find out from you folks what you recommend for the most expedient fix. SPT out. PLT; stand by to terminate field 803. 270-second exposure,

342 15 0h ii 342 15 06 28

SPT PLT

878

342 15 06 39

PLT

MARK. Okay, time is 15:06. 90-second next. Stand by.

I'm going

to go

342 15 06 52

PLT

MARK. Okay, and that was 15:50 [sic]. Starting 90-second on 803. This'll be plate 37; 293.R; and 30.2 on the TILT. Stand by on my mark. MARK. Termination for 30. Stand by. MARK. 30-second exposure starting on field 803. It will be plate 038; 293.9 and 30.2. Stand by on my mark for termination widened. Stand by. MARK. Termination of 30-second, widened, on field 803. Now setting up for field 281; 330 and 03.2, 03.2. 281 is the field. I want 270, widened. Yes. Avoid thrashing yourself and throwing yourself into the side of the spacecraft for the next few minutes. Stand by on my mark. MARK. 15:lO. on field 281. Okay. MARK. Termination of 270-second, widened, on field 281. Now going for a R0. Stand by. MARK. That's plate number 40; 23 - can't ever read these things - 233.0 and 003.2; 90-second, widened; field 281. Stand by. MARK. Termination of a 90-second on field 281. Now setting up for field 820. 172.5 ... 172.5 Starting the 270-second, widened, ROTATION is 233.0; TILT is 3.2. of 30-second, of 90-second. Setting up

PLT 342 15 08 06 PLT

PLT 342 15 08 16 PLT

PLT

PLT 342 15 08 43 PLT

PLT

PLT 342 15 l0 03 PLT

PLT 342 15 13 h7 PLT

342 15 13 59

PLT

PLT 342 15 15 14 PLT

879

and i0.5; i0.5. I w_nt a 270; 270. by for 16. Stand by. 342 15 16 0h PLT

Standing

MARK. Start of 270-second exposure on field 820. ROTATION, 12 - 172.5; TILT, 10.5; field is 820; the plate number is 41. Time is 15:19 on my mark. MARK. Okay, we're standing by for termination 270-second, widened exposure on field 820. Stand by. MARK. Termination, widened. Stand by. MARK. field plate 270. Setting up for 90, of

PLT 342 15 19 03 PLT

PLT 342 15 19 42 PLT

342 15 19 52

PLT

Starting 90-second, widened. That's on 820; 172.5 is the ROTATION; 10.5 is TILT; number is 042. of 90-second,

PLT

Stand by mark for termination widened, on 820. Stand by.

3h2 15 21 05

PLT

MARK. Okay, now setting up for 818; 818 is 177.0. 177.0 and ll.8; 118.8. Okay, I want a 270. Starting in 20 seconds; 15:22. Stand by. MARK. 15:22. Starting 2 - Oh, gosh, that's a 90-second. Okay, I'll go ahead and do that 90-second. Then I'll get a 270 and a 30. Forgot to change the lever on the widening knob. Okay, there'll be a 90, followed by a 270. This 90second is plate 043. ROTATION, 177.0; TILT is ll.8. Okay, stand by. It'll be termination of the 90-second exposure on field 818. Stand by. MARK. Okay, setting for 270. Stand by.

342 15 22 Ol

PLT

3h2 15 23 18 342 15 23 25

PLT PLT

MARK. Starting 270-second exposure on field 818. ROTATION is 177.0; TILT is ll.8; frame number tilt - slide number 044. Stand by for termination field 818. Stand by. MARK. Stand Termination by. of 270, widened, on

PLT

342 15 26 57

PLT

of 270.

Now going

for a 30.

880

_

342 15 27 07

PLT

MARK. 30-second exposure; field 818; ROTATION is 177.0; TILT is ll.8; and slide number is 045. Stand by for my mark, on termination of 30-second exposure. Stand by. MARK. That's And going to CARRIAGE, RETRACTED, dum-dum. good. Okay. Jer? You're clear to resume.

342 15 27 35

PLT

PLT

PLT, the only deviation was of the order on the last sequence on field 818. The 90-second was taken first, then the 270, and then the 30. Everything else was done within a second on the time and looks like a pretty good run. PLT out. Okay, now PLT debriefing from first ATM run. Ground took the recorder; didn't have a chance to do it then. Let's see, I'd better go ahead and stow this thing. I'll give that later.

342 15 28 03 342 15 28 04

PLT PLT

342 15 28 ll

PLT

TIME

SKIP

342 16 07 53

SPT

... 5, taken at 15:50, f/ll, 55 millimeters, 1/250. These were taken of B@nard cells. There was a closed one. They were the same size as - as open; that is, very large and - ... However, the ones closest to us were - were closed; they were filled in. The ones further away, toward the horizon, were open. They were all roughly of the same dimension, however; not much transition from an open to a closed. All of them seemed the same type of a - the same size, same scale for the B_nard calls with characteristic features. The transition between the two was relatively sharp. The second one was taken - which is frame number 64 - was taken of the Rio de la Plata River in South America and where it empties into the ocean The large amount of filth which the river carries downstream was evident, and the flow of this filth along the opening - either side of the openings of the mouth and a little ways up the coastline was quite clear. It's not just emptied straight into the - the open mouth of the river, but rather

881
along the - you know, at the fork and moves its way along either side of the fairly wide mouth. 342 16 09 lO SPT I think the filth defined the flow patterns exceptionally well. Again, that was the Rio de la Plata, South America, right where Montevideo is located. SPT out. This is the CDR at 16:27, debriefing the ATM pass that started at 15:51. There really wasn't much at all to be said about this one. It was pretty much of a big nothing procedurally. We did building block 18 in JOP ii; took step number 3. Did not activate 56, 54, or 52. 55A was in a MIRROR, LINE SCAN ad nauseam, and 82Awas in a 30-minute exposure rather than one exposure every so many seconds; so procedurally, it was a big nothing. During the process of the run, I took a few looks at XUV MON. I didn't see anything spectacular there. On H-alpha 2, I was kind of watching the filament out about 240.9, which is filament 49. It looked to me like it broke in two. When we started the pass, it was one long filament; but it was a little thin in the middle. And by the end of the pass, that thin area had completely disappeared, and filament 49 is now two pieces with a gap between them. 342 16 29 02 CDR I kept an eye out to see if I would see any sort of surging material moving out from the limb near the filament, and I did not see anything. And I looked at XUV at the - the channel, the area where the filament lies, and the filament channel didn't appear to me to do any changing either. It is essentially very quiet area. The - the new active region coming over the limb - which is what? I guess number 96 - is showing bright and clear in XUV. It's still not bright enough to come through ambient. It has to be integrated to be seen. Couple of other bright areas in the XUV: one near the center of the Sun, slightly to the west, and the third area is at about 060 degrees, about 70 percent of the way out. Fairly small bright area but nothing spectacular. Not too bright; just brighter than the background. CDR out.

342 16 09 23 342 16 27 39

SPT CDR

342 16 30 28 F

CDR

882

342 16 40 02

SPT

SPT at 16:40. Message for the flight planners. Well, with scheduling and constraints on the operation of the bike during experiments, it's been done to us again. The CDR got his exercise in this morning, and the SPT - I was not able to get on the bike. PLT got on the bike after the CDR, the problem being that we had two constraints. One is, we can't operate while the - we have anything in the airlock, taking exposures. That's true during S019. And also, we've got thermal constraints on the bike. We just can't hop on it and pedal that thing one right after the other. So what you're going to have to do is schedule the PT, spread throughout the day and try to avoid those times when we are supposed to be quiet - that is, JOP 13, S019, 183 and any other thing that comes up. There's Just no way to do it. So due to scheduling, I've missed out on some good PT today. SPT out.

342 16 41 09

SPT

TIME

SKIP

342 17 54 54

SPT

SPT at 17:55. ATM pass which began at 17:07 continued to go straightforward for the four building blocks 27. Gave it a 32 building block at the very beginning. The 82B was carried out using the LIMB SCAN to get 6 arc seconds off and then going to LIMB POINTING for their exposures. 55 got all the MIRROR, AUTO RASTER. 56 got their two LONG EXPOSURE of each location. The first exposure, which was carried out at LP-1, the ROLL was 1080. And at the right limb, east equator was on a prominence ... H-alpha l, and it was just south of the active region which is visible now on the limb, which I believe is - what, 97. That could be seen in - on the XUV monitor quite well. I got a question here. If we are on a prominence, like we were, and you're looking for a quiet chromospheric structure, I would think that in mini-lines, you would not be seeing what you were after because of the prominence. That being the case, would you rather that we'd change the

SPT

342 17 56 18

SPT

883

pointing a little bit to get away from the prominence, or would you rather we just hold ... In this particular type c_se, I held to the attitude given. The 82B slit was made tangent to the limb, as seen in the white light display. That gave me an UP/DOWN of plus 16 and a LEFT/RIGHT of plus 976. The second pointing, LP-2, started at the same roll, left limb. Everything carried out the same way as the first. The UP/DOWNwas minus 0035 and LEFT/ RIGHT of minus 1005. I'll wager my arithmetic is correct; gives us 32 arc minutes and 47 arc secconds - or a - 49 arc seconds. 1969 arc seconds diameter, I guess. The helium bands on the third one were not too visible. As a matter of fact, I could not distinguish them at all. The UP/DOWN was minus 0032 and LEFT/RIGHT of minus 1004. 342 17 58 54 SPT And the fourth one was - That LP-4 was carried out. Again, I could not distinguish helium bands in looking at the XUV MON, INTEGRATE, or the photo which I had taken this morning. I finished it up with a shopping list 5. I really didn't have time to maximize. The GRATING was not a ZERO as I moved the GRATINGback; so they got a GRATING,AUTO SCAN from the GRATING of - POSITION of 766. And I gave 50 - 82B exposures, NORMAL; SHORT WAVELENGTH. The slit pretty much filled or was covered by cell boundary. There was actually two cells on one side and one and something else, which was not very well defined, on the other side. But I thought the slit pretty well filled it, although as I said, I did not have time to maximize anything in either slit position or mirror position for 55. At 400 K, I cut off the 82B and 55 just got back to GRATING, REF. So I gave them a MIRROR, AUTO RASTER at that point. Even though they were looking through the atmosphere, it might help to define a little better where we actually pointed. Looking at the UP/DOWN and what I see in the limb between coalignment, between 82B and 55, I suspect that the - the bias somehow is not the - the correct bias. So whenever I get a free moment here, I'm going to try and slip in a four-limb coalignment and just see how it all works out again. 342 18 01 00 SPT SPT out.

TIME F

SKIP

884

342 18 26 57

PLT PLT

Okay, Jer, I'm hot-mike ... 27:30 MARK .... Well, there's something on my mark.

recording,

channel A.

342 18 27 29

PLT PLT PLT

inside

... too.

Looks good and steady in the viewfinder, Keep coming.

PLT

Yes. I said the rates look good and steady on the viewfinder, too. Okay. You can kill the lights up here, too, to, Ed. Okay, first MARK. We're exposure coming at 29:45. if you want

SPT 342 18 29 05 PLT

PLT 342 18 29 45 PLT PLT

Stand

by.

into a 4-minute-and-30-second

exposure.

Can't get a decent all. way there thats why. ; '

Mirror Jumped out of the

PLT SPT PLT 342 18 34 16 PLT

You see anything down there, Ed? ... Stand by on my m_k; M_IIIK. Advance film. 34 :25 • Stand by 34:15 coming up. Next exposure starts at

342 18 34 26

PLT

MARK. Okay, this is a 30-second nate at 55. Stand by -

exposure.

Termi-

342 18 34 55

PLT

MARK. Film advance. Next will be 5-second exposure starting at 35:10. Stand by on my mark. Stand by MARK. MARK. Stand by; 35:15 I'm through, Jer.

342 18 35 ll 342 18 35 16

PLT PLT CDR

Good show.

885

PLT

Man, that's a gorgeous view, isn't it? Just an incomparable panorama there. I tell you, looking out there at night is something to behold, isn't it? All those thunderbumpers flashing around, like giant fireflies. PLT out. Bill, I think you're on channel B. The PLT at 18:40, reporting iodine injection in water tank 9. I injected 75 units. The - I used both water samplers with their own reagents, respectively. Got a check or test of nil; that is, perhaps 1 but less than - It looked like less than 1 part per million; so I assumed I needed a full 9-parts-per-million equivalent injection. On a chart this peaks out at 75 or is at 75 units. I assumed that a linear extrapolation would probably be all right, but I didn't do it. I went - I injected 75 units. If you want me to inject the other 15, why you just give me a message tomorrow, and I'll do that. PLT out. SPT at 18:50. Subject is weather and Benard cells. I see a whole host of B@nard cells out in the about halfway to the horizon, over the water. And they really are a checkerboard; that is, as we swept by them, we could see them all lined up or one right after the other in rows, if you will. You can see right down the network between them as we move by them. I guess there was, oh, maybe 40 or 50 cells or so in all. They were all lined up. Did not have time to get a photo. It was kind of surprising.

3L2 i8 35 59 342 _8 39 00 B42 ]8 39 07

PLT SPT PLT

342 18 39 57 342 18 47 03

PLT SPT

342 18 47 51

CC SPT

PLT, this is Houston - There are lots of other linear cloud ridges in the area which all run in the same direction, which is roughly linear. There's slight bows and kinks in them; but in general, they are linear, running in the same direction as the network of the cells which I saw lined up. SPT out.

342 18 48 ll

SPT

886

342 18 52 03

PLT

This is the PLT, recording my recollections of the EREP checks done several days ago on S190. I voice recorded; apparently, some of it was lost. Step 1 was rotate eamara to intermediate position, remove front shield and stow on M-12_; remove rear shield and stow on M-152. No sweat. Step 2, panel 106: CAMERA CONTROL, LOCAL; SHUTTER CONTROL, OFF; cycle nine circuit breakers from CLOSEd to OPEN to CLOSEd. I did that, and they stayed CLOSEd. Step 3, panel ll0: Open C&D cover; EREP, BUS l, ON; BUS 2, ON; PANEL POWER DISPLAY, ON. I did that. Step 4, panel 202: Cycle 190 circuit breakers l, 2, and 3 from CLOSEd to OPEN to CLOSEd. I did that. 5, panel 106. Look through platten and note any CAPPING SHUTTER operation while doing the following: SHUTTER CONTROL, OPEN; SHUTTER CONTROL, OFF. As - as best I can remember, that worked all right.

342 18 54 12

PLT

And I checked - because I remembered checking six times on that. Panel 106, FMC circuit breaker, OPEN. Reach into the F_C drive area and locate FMC drive gears. Rotate FMC screw one-half turn by rotating gear - by rotating gear. FMC circuit breaker, CLOSEd. FMC screw should turn. It did not. 7, panel 106: SHUTTER CONTROL, SLOW, MEDIUM, and FAST. If rotating shutters operate at any speed, perform S190 camera check, EREP checkout, page 1-5, and then do step 8. Okay, at that time, when I turned the l0 - panel 106 SHUTTER CONTROL, SLOW, MWDIUM, and FAST, I started - I noticed that the - when I turned the SHUTTER CONTROL on or either - after I had done step 6 or after the first step of step - step 7, I noticed the FMC circuit breaker had popped. And I'm not quite sure if it popped right after I pushed it IN. I don't think it did. I think it was after I turned the SHUTTER camera. CONTROL on and got ready to operate the

342 18 55 24

PLT

Okay. The rotary shutters did operate on SLOW, MEDIUM, and FAST. And then right along in there is when I noticed that the FMC breaker was OUT. Perform S190 camera check, EREP checkout, page 1-5, and then do step 8. Okay. I did the EREP checkout. I don't have the checklist in front of me. Apparently, you all wanted this information on the for the next data dump ; so I'll go ahead and give you my best memory. I did the camera check as per

342 18 55 h3

PLT

887

the EREP checkout, page 1-5, except I did not see any FMC because the breaker was OUT. And then I did step 8, which is a SHUTTER CONTROL, OFF; CAMERA CONTROL, REMOTE; install front and rear shield, et cetera. So the only point I'm vague on is the exact place at which the FMC circuit breaker popped. It was either after I turned the SHUTTER CONTROL to first speed or when I did one of the first steps on that EREP checkout, page 1-5. And apparently that - I don't know exactly when that thing did. I - I was going through that saying everything on tape, and it's a shame it got lost because that - those were all the comments. 342 18 56 37 342 39 04 17 PLT PLT PLT out. This is the PLT, reporting on handheld 83-1 frame number 124 in the Hasselblad, Charlie Xra_ 47. That peninsula was fairly cloud covered, and I almost didn't take a picture. And I finally decided, well, what the heck; it's only one frame. So I went ahead and took a picture, but I - I think it's probably of marginal usefulness. Some of the surroundingarea in the frame, however,inMaybe that'll give you some geologic data on the surrounding region. Also, I think it probably would be of value to map makers since the outline of the map I had of that little bay is incorrect. It looks like it's had an awful lot of culturaltype work or man-made work done around the inside, the interior periphery or the border of the bay.

_-

342 19 05 02

PLT

TIME

SKIP

322 21 l0 19

PLT

PLT; the time is 91:10, debriefing some ATM passes starting at 20:15 - 20:15. The JOP 5, building block 13, _as executed nominally with the exception - I think I let - I think the timer screwed me up. I wasn't really sure on XUV SLIT. I set it all up in AUTO STEP and started it and I looked back a few seconds later and it was in STANDBY or, excuse me, in READY. So I started it again and it worked Just fine and - However, I did notice the timer; it timed down through 99 - whatever it is, and it's a possible - possibility that

888

I got part of an 82B sequence terminated early
there and - l

342 21 ii 15

CC

PLT, Houston. hill - -

Another

thing

as we go over the

342 21 13 27

PLT

PLT continuing to debrief. Okay, so with the exception of that one little glitch in 82B AUTO SEQUENCE mode, everything was executed nominally. I got the two MIRROR, 3 EASTERs in - I was using MECHANICAL REF the whole time - and the one MIRROR, AUTO RASTER. I received the teleprinter paper and you may have gotten a couple of - one part of an 89_B exposure near the end there, down below 400 K. 56 was terminated well ahead of time, so there is no problem there. Now, ground took the recorder away from me this morning and I was never able to debrief the first run. The first run was JOP 6, building block 1A and B. There - Everything was nominal there. And I did look at the white light coronagraph. I did get some downlink. It was in two parts. One, I think, when I was ROLLed at minus 5400. During the middle part was when I got part of the white light coronagraph and XUV MON. Then when I completed the JOP, I ROLLed at the 52 to give some more downlink - a very short period of time. I don't think the total was more than 3 to 4 minutes. But anyway, it was separated partly there. Looks like - like at least the one side of the corona there is a little more interesting now than it was. And let me see. That was at - I think it's up on the - the east limb. I'm sure you've seen that if you've looked at the video downlink. Now this last pass - that - the XUV MON there and XUV MON in this pass here, the Sun appears to be extremely quiet. There didn't seem to be any activity at all and - except for a little activity just along the the equator more or less. And there you can see in the XUV MON. But I didn't - I'm really not - You could see the holes at the poles - the black spots.

342 21 14 08

PLT

342 21 15 42 342 21 28 37

PLT PLT

And that's about it; it's pretty quiet.

PLT out.

PLT, the time is 21:30, and we can report on a handheld Nikon exposure at 20 :53, handheld target number ll8, southern Chile and Argentina. This was the area with more cloud cover on this pass

889
than it was on the previous; so I did not use the Hasselblad frame. However, I stuck the 300-millimeter on the Nikon and took a picture of a glacier area on the southern - southwestern coast of Chile. And - Aw, I thought I just might try to get a closeup. This was of the area I described yesterday - having a lake - what appeared to be above the glacier. And I thought about that, and maybe I had a relief inversion or something, the way my eye interpreted the relief. It may have been that the glacier was actually melting and feeding the lake. 342 21 29 34 PLT In any event, this is a picture described yesterday. of that area I

342 21 h9 05

CDR

This is the CDR at - at 21:49 Zulu with the subject M09 - 92 reporting. The subject was the SPT. The calf girths were 13-7/8 on the left calf, 13-5/8 on the right calf. The legbands were Alfa November and Alfa Quebec. And the facial photos were taken at the beginning of the run, but we goofed and forgot to take them at the end of the run. On the M093, the - the work that was accomplishedas 0304. w CDR out. SPT at 22:07. M092. Okay, no problem at all with this run. It's about the easiest run I've ever had other than the ones on the ground. One of the things I did for preparation is, I had a lot of fluids at lunch time, about 2 hours previous, about 32 ounces or so with - with the meal. And I've been working on - towards ..., doing lots of springs and toe rises. I don't think the leg volume changed as much today as I've seen it previously, and maybe that conditioning has helped a little. With the fluid at lunch I had a second tea, which I usually don't have during the day, and that probably is a slight stimulant, too ; so that may have had some effect, too - probably a small one. I think the major factor probably is the conditioning device, which we have up here. It appears to be a very good one. I think Bill probably came up with a very good idea.

342 21 49 59 3h2 22 08 55

CDR SPT

3h2 22 i0 00 /-

SPT

SPT out.

TIME

SKIP

890

342

22

33

i0

PLT

PLT at 22:33 Zulu, reporting on four over handhleld 118. First frame was ber 130 of Argentina. Charlie X-ray The next one

frames taken frame numChile I took and

h7,
was

of at

southern 22:29.

another 300-millimeter of a different glacier area, and that's frame number 62 on Charlie X-ray 36. Then I took two more Hasselblads, Charlie X-ray 47, frames 131 and 132, obliques of Chile southern Chile and Argentina, to support HHII8. 342 22 34 02 PLT Also, in passing over the east coast, the - the channel that was pre-reported is still very plainly visible. That's the turquoise or aquamarine colored - 7 to 8 on a Forrel scale - that we've 342 22 34 16 PLT So I'm rather not talked going to about comment quite on extensively. it other than to

say that 342 22 53 07 PLT

it continues

to be highly

visible. data to on were

Okay, it's the PLT with a message on EREP date; the particular, the S190. On page the EREP checkout, panel 106, the filters not installed during the checkout. photographs taken with 190 to date without the filters. There is no other than the fact that I had to checkout piecemeal because of the All have

i-7

of the been

explanation do the 190 insertion of

f_Sm threading in the EREP checkout procedures. I had to stop my normal flow because of the film problem with that - the fact that it would not it had a part set in the curvature and would not steal past the brass ruler. And that's already been recorded on tape. And I tried to pick up to check out the rest of the 190 and I flat missed a step on page i-7. So I'm photographs, 190A, taken to without filters. saying again, all date have been taken

342

22

55

37

PLT

And this is the PLT with a footnote to the previous comment on the EREP problem. We previously commented on the extensive workload durihg the early days in activation. I can't emphasize too strongly how I regret the fact that those filters were missed, and I accept i00 percent of the responsibility. However, we were working until i0 and ii o'clock at night in order to finish what was supposed to be a normal day task of duties. And this went on for about a week. And although I regret it, I apologize for it, I feel like -

891

that very poor flight planning and was a factor. 342 23 03 28 CDR

was also involved

This is the CDR at 21:04 Zulu with some _87-5 data that I should have given you 2 days ago. CDR, in the morning, 69-3/4; in the afternoon the evening, that is, 69-7/8. SPT, 70 in the morning, 70 at night. PLT, 70-3/8 in the morning and 70-1/2 in the evening. This is, I repeat, M487-5 data that should have gotten down to you 2 days ago. CDR out.

342 23 0h 01

CDR

TIME

SKIP

342 23 42 14

PLT

This is the PLT with one additional the sIg0A filter screw-up.

footnote

to

342 23 43 22

PLT

And that is that during the evening, I think the first day of activation, when I was supposed to install these, we had a malfunction on page 17, when I couldn'tget the READY light on 190. And I did interrupt the sequence and go into a hold mode waiting for procedures from the ground. And looking back over and trying to figure out how I could've been so dumb as to overlook it, I apparently just stopped the procedure then; and I did not look ahead, and I never went back to the checklist. And that's why I did not get the filters on.

342 23 43 57 342 23 50 57

PLT CDR

PLT out. Okay, this is the CDR at 23:51 Zulu. At T-2, which was - I'm trying to remember. Stand by. Okay, at T-2, which was at 23:45, I took a reading of D-6. It was reading 100 percent. Now a few minutes later, it's now down to 46 percent. This is the CDR again. My last call for T-2, I had looked 5 minutes too soon. And it was reading i00 percent at the proper T-2. It's now reading 57 percent. Okay. We're about 18 minutes from start.

342 23 54 22

CDR

342 23 56 01
f--

CDR

###

DAY 343 (AM)

893

L

343 00 00 19

PLT PLT

Come on, burn.

Where are you?

A coup.

I get - When I go up into the night sky, Jer, I get that funny-looking stuff in the optics that you named. What do you suppose that is? Let's see. of some kind.

343 00 01 58

CDR PLT

I think it's spurious reflections Could it be? Yes.... Get it in? We might make it.

CDR PLT 343 00 03 42 CDR CDR

We have 14 minutes to get there. I should have

WIll, I had it on my checklist. hollered at you.

Cdr

Okay. This is the CC operator with the monitor readings. Bravo 2 is 59; Bravo 3 is 86; Bravo 4 is 70; Bravo 5 is 67; Bravo 5 is zero; Bravo 2 is 56; Bravo 3 is 76; Bravo 4 is 71; Bravo 5 is 75; Bravo 6 is 49; Bravo 7 is 32; Bravo 8 is l; Bravo 9 is 58. Charlie 2 is 44_ Charlie 3, 88; Charlie 4 is 71; Charlie 5, 83; Charlie 6 is h7; Charlie 7 is 51. Delta 2 is 86; Delta 3 is 85; Delta 4 is 72; Delta 5 is 14; Delta 6 is 57; Delta 7 is i0. Skylab, Houston. Roger, Dick. We're AOS Vanguard for 9 minutes.

CDR

CC 343 00 05 49 CDR

TIME

SKIP

343 00 ii 17

PLT

I think we're going to be right in the ballpark. Okay, it looks right - it looks like they - they calculated it right on the money; 6 to l0 degrees, and looks like it's going to be 8, UP. And I'm waiting. It looks like you may be dead on _;_/RIGHT. Now it's 7. How much further you have to go?

894

---

SPT CDR

I.5. l Okay, got a 192 READY; MODE going to CHECK. Let's see. S190 HEATER SWITCH light is off. We'll PRESS TO TEST; DELTA T_P and 0VERT_P are okay. Here comes the preoperate configuration. TAPE RECORDER, ON; READY light on. S192, ON; READY light out; MODE, CHECK; DOOR, OPEN. 191: READY POWER, ON; READY, on; COOT._ is ON; the DOOR is OPEN. S190: POWER, ON; READY out; MODE, STANDBY; door is open - verified. 93 RADIOMETER, STANDBY; READY out; SCA'rA'_ON_;I'_ is OFF, _Y out; ALTI_i'_ is OFF, READY out. 94 is ON, READY on. Okay, about 3 minutes to go. Sounds like you're all set, Jerry. We're about 2 minutes to LOS. Canary Islands comes up at 00:25. I'll give you a calll there. 0kay, Dick. And the maneuver looks like it 's going to work out okay. 0kay. Okay, are we - are we ...? Okay. At 0.2 degrees to go, we got 7 UP and 00 T.k_T/RIGHT. And the 00 Just switched from to the RIGHT side. And we're in the box, so we're in good shape. Press on. Okay, EREP, START come at - comes at 16 minutes. Okay, I'll do my stuff at 24. 2 minutes to go. I got to tell you all that the weather for this was clear to the Moon. Yes, that 's great. That is D-day, Dick. Don't see a single cloud. Son of a gun. der how they arranged that. Flight pla=n_ug. I won-

343 O0 13 l0

CC

CDR

CC PLT PLT

343 00 13 53

CDR PLT CDR CC

PLT 343 00 15 16 CDR PLT

CC

895

PLT CDR

I see.

(Laughter) to talk to you about flight

I've been meaning planning, Dick.

CC CDR 343 00 14 59 CDR CDR 343 00 15 59 343 00 16 i0 CDR CDR

Why don't you use the EREP pad? (Laughter) 1 minute to go. On my mark, it will be 00:16:00. MARK. EREP, START. Stand by -

On my mark, it will be 16:lO. Next ma_k will be

MARK. Slgh went to MANUAL. at 17:00. That thing's Okay. steady

PLT CDR CDR 343 00 16 59 CDR PLT CDR

as a rock. required. Stand by -

No cal maneuver

On my mark, MARK. I don't

it will be 17:00. ON.

RADIOMETER, do anything

Next mark 24.

is at 19:06.

until

Yes, you really - really float. Don't even have a V - yes, there's an AUTO CAL for you at 20:12. Look at the Moon. You're Yes. Well, I wonder why you got this going to maneuver toy Oh, that's Yes. That's what he's doing, Okay, it's 1 minute i0, a 10-degree scan. right. - What are you going to maneuver again in 2 minutes?

PLT PLT SPT PLT

CDR PLT CDR CDR

You got to do the sweep.

to the second maneuver.

896

34300

18 30

CDR CDR CDR

30 seconds 15 seconds. Coming MARK. MARK. up on 19:00. 19:00. 5, h, 3, 2, 1 -

3h3 00 18 59 3)43O0 19 06

CDR CDR CDR

Start Zhe second cal maneuver.

At 06, Sl9e MODE to READY. it will be 19: 30. Stand by the S190

On my mark,

343 00 19 28

CDR

MARK. S190 MODE to AUTO. READY light will be out.

On my mark,

3h3 00 19 h5

CDR

MARK. The S190 READY light's out at hS; MODE going to STANDBY; SHUTTER SPW.WD, MEDIUM. Next mark is at 20. Stand by MARK. 20:00. POLARIZATION going to 1 on S193 Romeo; SCATTEROMETER going to STANDBY. Next mark is at 20:12; will be a VTS CAL, Bill. MARK VTS CAL.

3h3 00 19 59

CDR

343 00 20 ii

CDR PLT CDR CDR

I was 1 second late. Okay. Coming Next mark is at 20:30. up on 23 - 20:30. Stand by READY light will go

3h3 00 20 27

CDR

MARK. S190 MODE to AUTO. out on my mark.

343 00 20 h5

CDR

MARK. READY light out at 45. MODE to STANDBY; SHUTTER SPEED, SLOW. Next mark will he at 21 :06. Stand by MARK. S192 to STANDBY. take, Ed,

3h3 00 21 05

CDR PLT

How much longer does this maneuver or does it continue?

PLT

Okay, don't let me distract you, I Just The thing is I haven't even started my work yet, and I was wondering if I was going to have to do this on the fly.

897

343 00 21 31

CDR

MARK. S190 MODE to AUTO at 31. S190 READY light out. Okay, I see what's happening now.

Standing by for

PLT 343 00 21 46 CDE

MARK. It's out at 46. MODE on S190 going to STANDBY. 1 minute to S191 READY light on. Okay, we're approaching 191 READY light. 22:52. Watching for the

343 00 22 41

CDR

343 00 22 51

CDR

MARK. The READY light on at 52. going to 9Okay, we're dead on center. be my next mark.

191 REFERENCE

PLT CDR 343 00 23 03 CDR

At 23:04 will MARK. 23:30.

Stand by Next mark is at

RADIOMETER to STANDBY.

CDR 343 00 23 29 CDR PLT

Coming up on 23:30. MARK. SCATTEROMETER,

Stand by ON; RADIOMETER, ON.

There we go; steady. Around l; I want to go UP 4. Standing by for 24 for VTS. Okay, MARK. DAC's ON. Going UP to 4 degrees for a minus i. 3 seconds to go.

CDR 343 O0 23 59 CDR/PLT PLT PLT

Okay. i, 2 - 5, 5 seconds. That's 4 degrees. Back DOWN. Comes again. The limb cal, and there 's a sharp limb there. That's a radius. Okay. Start. Stop and continue tracking - 1 minute to my next mark.

CDR PLT 343 O0 25 09 CC

- - Coming back onto the limb. Skylab, Houston. Standing by. Roger, Dick. first *** AOS Canary/Madrid i0 minutes.

CDR F_ PLT

Trying anotherone....

898
CDR PLT CDR PLT CDR 343 00 26 00 CDR PLT CC PLT 343 00 27 06 PLT Next mark in 30 seconds. Okay. ST - ... there we go. it will be 26:00. Okay. And now the ...

On my ma_k,

Okay, now the - Stand by MARK. 193 POLARIZATION going to 4. Basin. I concur with that time hack.

- - Tmbrium Roger, Jer.

And the ocean is ... very ... Okay, 6 degrees DOWN. Got to push button for 5 seconds .... CAMERA, OFF. Next m,_-k in i minute. Okay, on my mark MARK. it will be 28:30. Stand by OFF.

CDR CDR 343 00 28 29 CDR CC

SCATTEROMETER,

OFF; RADIOMETER,

Roger. And, SPT, Houston. When you get a chance, we'd like S055 to MIRROR, LINE SCAN, please. Okay. Also, anytime from here on in, you cam give us ATM frame count. Probably not during this pass though, since we're listening to the EREP. On my mark, it will be 29:00. MARK. MARK. SCATYEROMETER is ON. Stand by 29:06.

SPT CC

CDR 343 00 29 00 343 00 29 06 CDR CDR CDR

S191 going to REFERENCE 2.

Okay, Bill, we're going to nother - want another AUTO CAL here in about 50 seconds. Okay. *** give you much time the first time.

PLT CDR

899

PLT

Okay. the -

I'm Just getting

two more

cheeks

on

CDR PLT PLT CDR PLT

30 seconds to go. UP 5 degrees and minus 5 degrees.

Okay, I'll be standing by. Okay. Okay. Those last two were UP 4 from minus 1 and DOWN l0 seconds. Okay° UP 4 and minus - -

CDR PLT CDR 343 00 30 05 343 O0 30 06 CDR PLT CDR CDR

5, 4, 3, 2, i MARK. MARK. Got off the count there. Next mark is 30:30. 30:30. Stand by MARK. XTNC, Sorry about that. up on

15 seconds.

Coming

343 00 30 29

CDR

SCATTEROMETER to STANDBY; L/R. POLARIZATION is 5. Stand by -

193 MODE

to

CDR 343 00 30 47 CDR CDR

Next mark 's at 48. MARK it.

SCATTEROMETER,

ON; RADIOMETER, light

ON.

Next mark will be an S191 READY l0 seconds. MA/LK. MARK. _Y light's

on, about

343 00 32 45 323 00 32 50

CDR CDR PLT

on at 46; 32:46.

At 50, MODE to MANUAL on 94.

Okay. Getting some more tracking on the Sea of Tranquility. A DATA button pushed. I'm not taking DAC film. Holding steady as a rock; I'll just click off a couple of frames. Okay, I'm releasing the pushbutton.

9O0

CDR 343 00 33 34 PLT

Next mark will be 33:48. This will be for the Sea of Serenity. ing the DATA pushbutton now. Coming up on 48. MARK. Stand by l'm push-

CDR 343 00 33 47 343 00 33 49 CDR CDR

SCATTEROMETER, OFF.

MARK. RADIOMETER, OFF. Correction: The SCATTEROMETER and RADIOMETER to STANDBY. Now the SCATTEROMETER is going to OFF. Okay, I got a few frames on the Sea of Serenity. EREP, star - STOP at 34:00. Okay. 6 minutes to the next mark. my sequence there.

PLT 343 00 34 00 CDR PLT CDR PLT 343 O0 34 41 CC

Okay, that finishes

And, PLT, Houston. Just as a r_m_nder, we need to get those S190 filters changed prior to a time of 40:50, which is the next EREP start time. Roger. Okay. Now while we got a minute here, we'd just like to pass up to Ed Gibson a real "Attaboy" on catching that mistake in the maneuver times. It's a wonder that he wasn't 5 or - you weren't 5 or 6 minutes late instead of only 2. It was a - strickly a problem in not catching a - a mistake between disciplines down here, and we'll try to do better. No problem, Dick. Most of the planning for this had been real good. It's worked out real smooth. I had a nagging feeling; and my left eyeball was looking at the maneuver pad, and the right eyeball at the ATM pad. We appreciate it. It was due to a late Flight Plan change, but we certainly should have caught it. And we thank you for catching it. PLT; copy.

PLT CC CC

343 00 35 22

SPT

CC

901

3h3 00 35 h5

SPT

When we get a break, Dick, I'ii tell you about that tropical storm - a little bit later. Okay. Go ahead now, Ed. 5 minutes. ... Oh, okay. Dick, it looks like we're all set up for unattended ops except for pointing to Sun center. We were still off at active region 96 when I went into the handhold [sic] mode. Okay, I changed it. I'm going to go ahead and we're not doing anything. I'm going to change the filters now. Excuse me. Okay,
on.

CC CDR

There's

nothing

cooking

for

SPT CDR SPT

PLT

CDR

I'll open that while

you get your

gloves

PLT 3h3 00 36 37 CDR PLT PLT CDR

Okay. Hello, Moon. Okay. Yes, thank you. what's the news there? Okay. Station 1

All right,

Let's see. It's 00:29, right? should get Charlie Charlie. Charlie Charlie. Okay.

343 00 37 i0 343 00 37 39

SPT PLT

Okay, Charlie Charlie's in and Papa Papa back. And there's the Moon. Yes.

is going

CDR 3h3 00 37 52 CC

Okay, station 2 will be Delta Delta.

Skylab, Houston. We're about 1 minute from LOS. Guam comes up at 01:05. And, SPT, we copied your comments on active region 96. And if you don't get to the pointing, we can take care of it from the ground. Thank you.

SPT

902

PLT CDR PLT CDR

You did say station 2, did you not? Yes. Okay. I think your pocket must be open, Bill. There's cloth floating all over the Joint. Delta Delta on station 2. Station 3 is Echo Echo. And that should be confirmed. It is. Okay.

3h3 00 38 47

PLT CDR

All right, station h is Foxtrot Foxtrot. That's correct. All right, 5 is Alfa Alfa. Okay, that ... caging.

343 O0 38 54

PLT CDR PLT PLT CDR PLT CDR PLT CDR PLT

Foxtrot Foxtrot - No - No. - - Alfa Alfa. Alfa Alfa. Okay." Got it.

There you go. Okay.

3h3 00 39 35

CDR

And station 6 is Bravo Bravo. on 1 minute from EREP, START. 0kay. Okay. Got it? Yes. in. Okay. Hey, heres yourpad. '

And we're coming up

PLT CDR PLT CDR

I'll *** got my umbil ***

Okay, that one's

PLT CDR

903

CDR

Made it by the skin of our teeth; by for a 40:50. MARK. 40:50, EREP, START.

5 seconds.

Stand

343 00 40 50

CDR PLT CDR

You' re fat, dumb, S190 MODE to AUTO. MARK at 41:00. out.

and happy. Stand by for a 190 READY light,

343 00 41 00

CDR

Watching

343 00 41 16

CDR

MARK. The READY light's out at 15; MODE to STANDBY; SHUTTER SPEED to MEDIUM. MY next mark will be 41:40. Stand by MARK. SI90 MODE to AUTO. READY out at 41:55. Looking for an S190

343 00 41 40

CDR

343 00 41 55

CDR

MARK. Out at 41:55; MODE to STANDBY; SH_ SPEED, FAST. Next mark will be 42:20. Stand by MARK. S190 MODE to AUTO. at 42:35. MARK. Looking for a READY out

343 00 42 20

CDR

343 00 42 35 343 00 42 41

CDR CDR

READY out at 42:4 - 35.

MODE is STANDBY.

EREP, STOP at 42:42. Coming up on 43:00 for an SI maneuver, Ed. 5 seconds, Ed. MARK. 43:00. There's nothing in my pad about ETC, either. Wonder why they took it out. Are you sure we have it for the CAL? ... Okay, then we - treat this like a back-to-back. Right? Right. Okay, Bravo number 7 is reading 32; 32 percent. S192 DOOR's going CLOSED, now. Okay, VTS operator. I'm operating the DAC camera 4, l0 seconds. DAC, OFF. Okay, angle 00. The angles are to 00 . - VTS POWER, OFF. Film transfer is not required. Okay, I record the frame counter readings .... I tell you what. Why don't

343 00 42 59

CDR

PLT 343 00 45 04 PLT

CDR

343 O0 45 30

PLT

343 00 46 04

PLT

9o4

we go off of hot mike right now? go eat now anyway, I think - CDR PLT 343 00 46 36 CDR Yes.

We're

going to

- - is what the schedule calls for. I can't get that 190 door to lock.

TIME

SKIP

343 01 23 12

SPT

SPT debriefing the pass which began at 23:20 on ATM. Okay, the first one - it all went all right except for 55 which, unfortunately, when I got to the panel, was in MECHANICAL REF rather than OPTICAL. I did not know it, and so we got a GRATING position. Rather than 1876, it was off by 102 from that. We got the VTR in; some at Sun center, some at the limb. 12E went off without any problems. And due to a problem in the pad formatting, I found myself having to make a maneuver here at the end rather than finishing up with some obsering time. I guess the message for the ATM pad writers. I hope the - ... hopes that the - the EREP people can get together so that when a maneuver is required, they can either put in the ATMpad or the ATMpad can term_inate at the right point. Okay, after the EREP maneuver, we came back and - Because we had gone into that maneuver rather hastily, we did not get the Sun center - the proper powerdown for the unattended ops. So I think go back to Sun-center and give us a building block 1 - I'm sorry - a shopping list item 1 with a little over 1 minute on the CONTINUOUS MODE. I think we got into our second sequence there. And 56 got a PATROL, SHORT. Okay, SPT out. Okay, SPT at 13 - excuse me - 01:26. And the subJect is the tropical storm which we went over at 23:41. Let me Just try to describe this storm to you briefly. First of all, it was Just, in general, a relatively small but compact, well-formed storm. The pre-storm squall lines were light and

343 01 2_ 18

SPT

343 Ol 25 26 343 01 25 50

SPT SPT

905

not very extensive activity along them. However, they certainly did define the vortex flow. Cirrus streaks were present ; they were also light and they also defined the spiral flow. I could only notice one overshooting cloud top, except for a - that is poking through some of the cirrus which was around - except which I'll talk 343 Ol 27 01 SPT for a whole band of turbulence, about in a moment.

Could see no circular exhaust clouds. The eye, however, appeared well defined. The sides were sloping gradually in and the eye was very circular. However, we had an oblique view to it and could not see all the way down to the water. I observed no feeder band; none whatsoever. There was a wide band of turbulent clouds above the cirrus, spiraling inward toward the eye and very close to the eye was a very wide band. What really caught my eye was that the turbulence properties of this area were very uniform - that is, the same size convection, roughly the same color, the same - okay, well, the same uniform degree of gray in the cloud, the same size cells - well, they were packed very much together. Just looked like a turbulent - a turbulent wall of clouds spiraling inward. It was very wide.

343 01 28 28

SPT

I guess in general, the storm was well formed except for no feeder hands and looked rather mean. The second storm, which we did see, which was not called up, but was - really caught our eye also, was 6 miles down the road. That is, we passed over at 23:h7. There was a lot of thick clouds, a fairly wide band of them, mauy cells, quite a few overshooting cloud tops, but it was not well formed into a vortex flow. There was no eye apparent and and no feeder band. It was larger than the other tropical storm we had Just passed over, but it was not well formed and maybe not even called a tropical storm. It looked like Just a crescent-shaped area of severe thunderstorms, although it was very extensive. The photos which were taken, were taken on the Hasselblad lO0-millimeters, f/ll, 1/250. And I'll be back in a few minutes and give you the frame numbers. SPT out.

343 01 28 38

SPT

343 01 29 42

SPT

906

343 01 36 hl

SPT

SPT at 01:36 reporting the frames which were taken out of the Hasselblad of the storm which I Just described. Those are m_g CX47. AMP was the 23:41 for the tropical storm and 23:46 for the thunderstorm area. Frames number 133 to 141, f/16, i00 millimeters, 1/250. SPT out.

343 01 37 lh

SPT

TIME

SKIP

343 02 02 37

SPT

SPT at 02:02. M092; on the run which past date at the day 342 - ... setting.

was made the

CDR SPT

- - for the LBNP was at six rather that seven that is, ome further out than we normally work. I neglected to mention this earlier in my debriefing.

343 02 03 14 343 02 18 49

SPT CDR

SPT out. This is the CDR at 02:19. At 02:12, which T-2, Delta 6 was reading 57 percent. was

343 02 24 18

CDR

Okay, the MONITOR switches are: Alfa 2, 60; 3, 86; 4, 70; 5, 67; 6 is zero. Bravo 2 is 57; 3 is 75; 4 is 72; 5 is 75; 6 is 54; 7 is 32; 8 is i; 9 is 57. Charlie 2 is 45; Charlie 3 is 87; Charlie h is 71; Charlie 5 is 82; Charlie 6 is 47; Charlie 7 is 60. Delta 2 is 86; Delta 3 is 85; Delta 4 is 72; Delta 5 is 14; Delta 6 is 57; Delta 7 is I0. Preoperation configuration: TAPE RECORDER, ON; READY light, on; 92 POWER is ON; READY light is out; DOOR is OPENing. The S190 HEATER SWITCH OFF light is is not shining. DELTA TI_4P and OVERTEMP are okay. ... I'll press on and come back to - Okay. 91 is ON; READY, on; COOLER, ON; 90 is ON; READY, out ; STANDBY, DOOR is OPEN. 93, STANDBY; READY, out; SCATTEROMETER' s OFF ; READY, out ; ALTIMETER' s OFF ; READY, out. 94 is ON. EREP is started at 26:14. VTS, AUTO CAL, Bill.

PLT CDR

343 02 26 14

CDR

9o7

PLT 343 02 26 18 CDH

When?

Now? Go. I've got - I got

S194 going to MODE, MANUAL. us behind. Okay, that was at 21.

PLT CDR

21. Okay. VTS, AUTO CAL at 21. behind there all of a sudden. Yes.

Man, really got

PLT CDR

I don't like working from this checklist on a backup. I wish we had a cue card for the back - back-to-back, too. 92 DOOR made it OPEN. Yes, he's right. Too easy to lose your place. CHECK; that's where it is. ... right over the Himalayas. MODE should be in

343 02 27 57

CDR PLT

343 02 28 07

CDR

PLT CDR

Man, that - -

Okay, that S191 READY CAL didn't - didn't hurt us at all. That's at 30:07.

PLT CDR

All right, looking at ***. Add ll minutes, ii seconds. It'd be 28 - no, add 9. It'd be 28:55 I expect to see a S191 READY light come on. Still over the Himalayas. *** we break down to the flatlauds, I should pick up Katmandu or whatever it is. Okay. Man, picking up a lot of cloud cover. Yes, they said it was broken. I thought that we were going to luck out there. MARK. The READY light came on at 29 even.

PLT

CDR PLT CDR PLT 343 02 29 00 CDR

908
PLT CDR PLT PLT CDR PLT CDR CDR PLT PLT/CDR CDR PLT CDR PLT CDR 3h3 02 30 03 CDR CDR PLT CDR PLT Now - Going to REF 6. No DAC for this site. Okay. country. Whoo !

Man, that 's rugged looking Yes, I'll tell you. Man, I'd hate to bail

out over that country.

*** ... Ooh! How'd you like to walk out of there? (Laughter) That 's Jagged looking. Ooh! Okay. My next mark is going to be at 30:03.

30:07 is when I go IMC. Okay. MARK. Stand by At 30:03, S190 MODE went to AUTO. That's 5 seconds.

Ed, at 30:15 the ETC goes to AUTO. Shazam. 19 , 20.

Okay, I've got what I think is Katmandu painting take. a clear area here at ***ay,

and I'm data

start

343 02 30 32

PLT

Now. And I'm coming down so I - I am painting a point which looks like it'd be about 15 miles east of Katmandu. Okay. Now I'm going to go - Well, I'll give you •.. tracking on this. I'm 21 degrees. .m. go to minus I0. I'm going to go over and paint the town

PLT

909

directly, so you'll have comparative in a real good spot here. CDR 343 02 31 05 CDR Oh, why did I do that? Okay, this is the CDR. I terminated about a minute too soon.

data.

And

I'm

S190 too soon,

PLT

Looks like that the target I picked out is actually a small agricultural area and I'd say maybe l0 - no, excuse me, on the order of 5 miles to the east of Katmandu. Okay, I'm minus l0 degrees. Now I'm going to go over - directly over the city. *** get a little painting on that. Okay, I'm tracking what I think is the city. Okay, I reselected S190 and got it going again. We need another 30 seconds of it before I shut it down and reselect it. Sorry about that. Okay, going to STANDBY Alfa going to STANDBY. on S190. Frame of 29. S193

343 02 31 37

CDR

3h3 02 32 05

CDR

PLT

Thunderstorm - I use the DAC. Here. We're coming out here. Right at the mouth of the GangesRiver is where we are now, fellows. Calcutta, Dacca. Calcutta is under cloud cover. Okay, then this is the C&D operator. Essentially you had about a 35-second dropout of Sl90 data. I reselected the sequence again and terminated the sequence midstremn, put it back in STANDBY and cycled the power to make sure that we start a new sequence next time up. Lots of rice paddies down there, man. Golly! Should be coming up on Rangoon here pretty soon. Passed it' Yes, Rangoon's Yes. I looked at that last night with the binoculars. Okay, Ed. We're coming up on 35:35 for an ETC, AUTO. l0 seconds. Stand byMARK. 35:35. ETC, AUTO. Next mark will be at 35 :53. Coming up on 35 :53. Stand by a real delta area, isn't it?

343 02 33 4h

CDR

PLT

CDR PLT CDR

343 02 35 3)4 CDR

910
--4

343 02 35 53

CDR CDR

MARK.

S190 to AUTO. yet? Looks like we're coming up

You over Rangoon

343 02 36 08

PLT

Yes. I've passed it. on Bangkok here. ... Hitting the Thailand of Thailand.

PLT CDR

plain there ; coastal plains

PLT CDR

Yes, there's the Mekong Delta. Okay, at 36:40, well, I'll give a m_k. 93 RADIOMETER, OFF. Stand by.It says

343 02 36 39

CDR

MARK. RADIOMETER, OFF. I question that one; that one's very peculiar. At 36:52, stand by MARK. The ALTIMETER is ON. and turned -

3h3 02 36 51

CDR CDR

I don't know why we took the radiometer

it OFF. It was only in STANDBY. Now we are going to have to go back to STANDBY again at 38:54. I have a hunch that was a misprint ; that should have been RADIOMETER, ON. PLT Sometimes they only turn it on to get the power on, Jer. Well, they Just had me turn it off. Well, ... turn it ... on? Maybe they want it back to STANDBY shortly. Oh, I don't know, ***area. Stand by -

CDR PLT CDR PLT CDR PLT 343 02 38 05 CDR

Okay, we're coming up on 38:06. Yes, there's that ... - MARK at 38:06. ETC to STANDBY, The S190 INTERVAL Ed.

going

up to 20.

PLT CDR

It's so bright .... What are you'looking

when I zoom in. at?

911

PLT CDE

Thunderstorms. MY next mark will be at 38:48. Stand by MARK. ALTIMETER to STANDBY. Coming up on 38:h8.

343 02 38 47

CDR PLT

On 54 stand by -

Ed, you want ... - MARK. ALTIMETER - correction, STANDBY. 39 even MARK. AUTO. MARK. RADIOMETER going to

343 02 38 53

CDR

343 02 39 00

CDR

We're going S190 INTERVAL 39:12. Stand by RADIOMETER, ON.

to i0.

ETC to

343 02 39 ii

CDR PLT CDR PLT

192 MODE to READY.

Oh, here's 39:24

a beauty. Stand by -

coming up.

It's a beauty. MARK. Okay. Stand by. Next one is hl with an ETC, STANDBY. Back in. Two. Twins are overALTIMETER to MODE, I. RANGE is 83.

3h3 02 39 23

CDR PLT CDR PLT

... on this one.

shooting cloud tops. Data now .... two beauties ... there. Okay, stopping. Going for a clear area. CDR SPT PLT CDR PLT CDR 1 more minute to EC - ETC, STANDBY, Ed. I didn't have a chance to get it. Okay, Yes. ... Borneo. On my mark, Stand by Yes, we're over Borneo. it will be 41:00 Yes - looks like we're crossing I had to -

Indonesia.

and ETC to STANDBY.

343 02 40 59

CDR

MARK. ETC to STANDBY. Stand by -

41:10's

coming

next.

912

343 02 41 i0

CDR

MARK. 192 to CHECK. SIR0 READY light is out. MODE going to STANDBY. FRAMES are going to lO, 10. 41:B4 is the next one. Stand by MARK. RADIOMETER to STANDBY. anvils.

343 02 41 34

CDR PLT

Dang. That's a shame. I had some beautiful They're Just out of the field of view. Next mark will be at 42:40.

CDR PLT

It's about 35 seconds.

Oh, blast. I got some beautiful thunderbumpers here, but they're Just out of the field of view, out of my limit of travel. Clear off of track, off the side? Yes. I've been wanting - waiting to get a good anvil at a fairly low Sun angle - I mean a low angle of view. On my mark, MARK. it'll be 42:40. OFF. Stand by at 42:5h.

CDE PLT

CDR 343 02 h2 h0 CDR PLT

RADIOMETER,

Next mark

Now painting a - what we would Ca!l a towering view. I'll Just let you get it. I want ... - Stand by 22 ... MARK. ... MARK. At h3 the ALTIMETER went on. S192 MODE to READY. Stand by -

CDR PLT 343 02 42 54 CDR PLT 343 02 h3 00 CDR PLT CDR 343 02 h3 06 CDR

That ought to - Stand by MARK. should AT 06 the S190 MODE went to AUTO be in AUTO. and ETC

PLT CDR

Clear area. Next mark is at h4 even.

913

3h3 02 h3 18

CC

Skylab, Houston. AOS Carnarvon 13 minutes. Standing by.

and Honeysuckle

CDR

Roger, Dick. Okay, Ed, on my next mark it'll be 44 with ETC to STANDBY. Coming up on hh:O0. Stand by MARK. byMARK. 192, STANDBY; ETC, STANDBY. 44:06; stand

343 02 43 59

CDR

343 02 44 06

CDR CDR PLT

INTERVAL

going

up to 20. now?

Be over at Australia

Yes, sure are. It's coming up. Wish we had a place to hold these maps. Losing the doggone things. There is it. Derby.' Okay, MARK. Okay. looking for an S190 READY light light to go out.

CDR B43 02 45 14 CDR PLT CDR 343 02 45 29 CDR PLT

190 READY

out at 13, MODE to STANDBY.

I 'm painting up the - Standby to MANUAL. Go ahead, Ed - Bill.

45: 30 coming up. MARK. S194 MODE

This is on the west side of the bay leading up to Derby. I'm getting a few seconds there. Then I shall go up and paint to the west of the city. Oops, I don't want that on. Better be it. It is it .... as if there were some red top soil or - At mY mark, it 's going to be 46 :30.

PLT

CDR PLT CDR 343 02 46 29 CDR PLT CDR

- - red ... clay it looks like. Stand by MARK. Another ALTIMETER clear to STANDBY. RANGE going to 87.

area. Stand by -

On mY mark, it'll be 46:45.

914

343 02 46 44

CDR PLT

MARK.

ALTIMETER is ON.

Okay. I'm looking straight down through some haze now. Still painting about 3 or h miles to the west of the city. Now we don't have any DAC to document it. West of the river. Okay. Let's see if we can wind this thing up. On my mark, it'll be 47:40.

CDR PLT

Okay, I'm going to go up to the south of the city, the west of the river. Stand by MARK. 191 REFERENCE to 2.
.i

CDR 343 02 47 40 CDR PLT

... run out of travel now. Red. Here's some big lake here. I'll Just get some data on it. Looks like a dried - dried lake bed. At 48:10, an angle of 30 degrees, left ... Getting good data on that lake. Okay, in - Bill, in 20 seconds a VTS, AUTO CAL. Okay. Okay. Give me a call. i0 seconds. I'm going to need

CDR

PLT CDR PLT CDR 343 02 48 40 343 02 48 41 CDR PLT CDR PLT CDR

Standing by. Okay, on my call it'll be 48:40. MARK. MARK. VTS, AUTO Okay. Okay. I've got an ALTIMETERUNLOCK light is out. Turn Yes. it off for 15 seconds? light. READY CAL. Stand by -

PLT CDR

915

PLT

Okay. I'm coming up on a lake. I've got 54 degrees, 3 degrees left; time is going to be MARK. Mark when it comes into view. up and 3 degrees left. 54 degrees

3h2 02 49 13

PLT

CDR

Okay. I got a READY light on ALTImeTER and it's cooking again. MARK. 49:23. *** starting to track. Now for comparative purposes, I'm going to go into a large what appears to be a large dried lake. Actually, it looks like there's a little bit of water in it. An awful lot of erosion streaks there. It might be ... blowing dust down there on the surface.

343 02 49 23

PLT

343 02 49 59

CDR

Okay. I got the ALTIMETER got a READY light.

UNLOCK light ; still

PLT

Okay. Data right now is at 47 degrees. is 50:10. I'll give a mark.

Our time

343 02 50 lO

PLT

50:10. *** degrees, 16 left. I'm tracking a la dried lake bed. It has an awful lot of erosion. Okay. light. Still got a READY light and ALTIMETER UNLOCK At 50:20, ALTIMETER going to STANDBY and to southwest *** Okay?

343 02 50 16

CDR

PLT 343 02 50 46 CDR

Northeast

Okay, looking for an S191 READY light at 51:20.

TIME

SKIP

343 03 01 21

CDR

This is the CDR at zero - O3:01 Zulu, reporting on handheld photography. The target was the south end of South Island, New Zealand. It was an exceptionally clear day; our trajectory just took us right over the very southernmost end of New Zealand. I got two good obliques from the west side of the south end of South Island, looking to the northeast. And I took the first one looking to the northeast, and then I delayed about a minute, and took the second one looking about the same direction and I picked up the - the eastern side of the island.

916

343 03 02 09

CDR

I got the very distinct hint that maybe the fault zone - the crossfault there - that's shown in the - in our map as a dotted line and heading off to the - to the east looked to me like maybe it was along that river, because there is a river that's extremely straight. And then it - there's a lake up in the mountain up above it that's kind of aligned along with the river. And the river Jogs off to the north a little bit, but the lake up higher looks like it's li - it's long and slender and lined up with the river. Looks like a rather straight line, so I was thinking that maybe that is where there's a crossfault.

343 03 02 47

CDR

The frames are 142 and 143 on magazine Charlie X-ray 47. The pictures were taken at 02:59 and 03:00. The f/stop was ii; 100-millimeter lens at 1/250. CDR out.

3h3 03 03 07

CDR

TIME

SKIP

343 12 16 00

SPT

SPT at 12:16. PRD readings: 164, 38 - 209. SPT out.

42 to 309, 23 to

343 12 16 17

SPT

TIME

SKIP

343 13 54 28

CDR

This is the CDR at 13:55. Terminated VTR recording, 5 minutes. Began at 17 to go and terminate - correction, began at 22 to go and terminated at 17 to go. CDR out.

343 13 54 43

CDR

TIME

SKIP

343 16 38 36

CDR

This is the CDR at 16:39 Zulu. Initiated battery 7 from M509. Initiated a charge at this time.

9_7

343 16 38 46

CDR

CDR out.

TIME

SKIP

343 17 02 07

SPT

Okay, the first one, handheld 35-4, we're unable to observe because of weather. We had a fair amount of cloud cover in the area (music), and we could not see the sea mount. Han_eld number 32, however, off the Chile coast, we were able to observe (music). First, the camera data: The photographs, three of them, were taken at 16:50, 16:51, and 16:51 on mag CX47; frames 144, 145, and 146. There were some clouds in the picture, but yet we had fairly dark water not reflecting back up, so I went and used f/ll plus a half stop and 100-millimeters, 1/250 of a second, for all three. (Music) Okay, the upwelling which I did see was fairly light-colored water, lighter than the dark blue water around it. The - The dark blue being on a Forel scale,maybe a i or a 2. And the lighter water, which I took to be the upwelling in the plankton bloom, something on the order of a 7 or an 8. Some of it was quite green. The upwelling plumes themselves - There was one major one which I captured in the first one - showed the lightercolored features to be laying off right next to coastline, maybe a small amount off. By that I mean a couple of degrees in my field of view. The - then there was a couple of eddies of this, protruding outward, sort of with random spirals, no - no one orientation of the spirals or - or rotation direction. Fairly thin, tenuous arms of this material, but it looked as though it had originated from the coastline and eddies occurring at a little bit further out. The distance off the coastline to which the two eddies which I saw traveled was about i0 to 15 degrees in my field of view. The first picture covered that. The second picture moved a little bit further down the coastline. (music).

343 17 03 28

SPT

f_

343 17 04 39

SPT

918

343 17 09 31

SPT

SPT at 17:09 reporting on some handheld photos (music). Okay, handheld photo 35-h is the sea mount we could not observe before because of clouds. However, handheld photo 32 we did get. And our three photos associated with that - let me give you those numbers first. It was on CX47, frames 144, 145, and 146, taken at 16:50, 16:51, and 16:51. The f/stops were ll plus a half, 100-millimeter lens, and shutter speed of 1/250 on all three photos (music).

3h3 17 i0 h3

SPT

We were able to see the plankton blooms resulting from the upwelling off the coast of Chile; was quite prominent. A good part of the coast north of the site that we were looking at was covered with clouds, so we could not see how far up it extended in that direction. What we saw was the plankton blooms associated with The blooms themselves were of a I would estimate a 7 or an 8 on in contrast with the dark ocean around it. the upwelling. lighter color. a Forel scale, water of 1 or 2

343 17 Ii 21

SPT

The color of the plankton blooms was light and contained a fair amount of green in contrast with the dark blue. The bloom itself extended along the coastline and had some long tenuous arms reaching out to sea - reaching out to the ocean; maybe out i0 degrees or so in our field of view. Now they appeared to be material which was swept out by eddies - material welled up - and - and the edges of the eddies where the velocity was the highest, it carried material out to sea. The first picture showed that quite well. There was two eddies in that. The second picture showed a more tenuous pattern a little further south along the coastline which extended out a little further, maybe 15 degrees. The arm or lines of plankton, which were pushed around in a random direction, were fairly well defined but fairly weak in color contrast between the dark blue ocean. It was still a light green but the contrast was not as great. It looks as though it had become diluted somewhat. Now it's estimated that the region close to the coastline was - oh, a couple of degrees or so in width of our field of view. We did take the two photographs of the material itself. A third one --_

B43 17 12 26

SPT

343 17 13 OB

SPT

919
t

was taken of the coastline with - or of the water right next to the coastline once we had passed it. And the Sun glint allowed us to pick up the wave pattern quite nicely; the waves being, in general, parallel to the coastline and of a much longer wavelength than I would suspect that we would observe from up here. So I think what we were seeing was probably the results of a gravity wave, or internal wave if you will. I think that stands - stood out quite nicely in the third photograph. 343 17 lh 03 SPT We could not observe any darkened water which might represent the upwelling itself relative to the ocean water, because the - there was quite a bit of clouds further out, and we just happened to get into an area which was open when we took these pictures. So the dark blue which we saw, we could not contrast that to the ocean water further out. And between patches we could not notice anything. It was kind of an impressive sight though. The fishing ought to be good down there. 343 17 lh 35 343 17 15 32 SPT SPT SPT out (music). SPT at 17:15 discussing the ATM pointing stability and accuracy test. Now I'll Just follow right on through the procedures as they were called out. And I'll give you a discussion of the ones that warrant them (music). Okay, there was a misinterpretation about the pad which had me call - omit the bias momentum in step 16. And in the late evening hours when this thing was gone over last night, after working the EREP cal maneuvers in EREP, it was - step 16 was omitted entirely as opposed to just the bias momentum. And I didn't realize that we were missing something until I realized we had not set our maneuver time to zero. In which case, that alerted us to the fact that we had a problem. So we went back and picked that up just about the same time the ground did. Okay, star tracker information: On step 21 we locked up on star number 1 at plus an OUTER GIMBAL of plus 1653 and an INNER GIMBAL of plus 0658. Gimbal positions on star 2, which we locked up on: On OUTER GIMBAL, minus 115; INNER GIMBAL, plus 2125. These gimbal angles

SPT

343 17 16 35

SPT

920

remained the same up to 14:53. We got locked up on those quite early, as soon as we got the attitude. 343 17 17 57 SPT Mercury did show up about 2 to 3 minutes early. We expected it at 14:h6, and it showed up at around lh:43, or so. It was quite visible. I was pleasantly surprised. I'm wondering how visible - or what the intensity of Mercury is, relative to Kohoutek. We were able to see Well, I'll discuss this in a moment, later, as we go through it. One thing that concerned me as we went through this test was that because of the degradation of the 55 - I'm sorry, 52 white light coronagraph image, I've noticed that I've had to turn the display up aSmost to full BRIGHTNESS to get the normal intensity in the coronal background, whereas we used to be able to do it with 6 or so. That's with max contrast. to 9. 343 17 18 58 SI_2 Now we have to go up

So I was a little bit concerned about being able to see the planet Mercury., but it did show up quite well. We're able to turn the intensity down to 06 or 05, somewhere in that region and still observe it. Okay, on to step 26. And I'll give you the - the information as we go through each step. Number A, step A, which was a dual-axis maneuver - Skylab, Houston .... The - -

_

343 17 19 18

SPT

343 17 19 31

CC SPT CDR PLT

We made that a dual-axis maneu - maneuver. Hey, Bill? Yes.

343 17 20 15

SPT

Okay, I had to go turn a few speakers down because Houston was calling on the m. On A, present position, X was plus 000; Y was minus 120. The desired position we picked was X, minus 100; and Y of plus 100. A maneuver which we put in with the 52021 was a 50100 and a 512200 [sic] and 50000. The position we attained was the X, minus 070; and Y, a plus ll3. We watched the display and it seemed to be holding fairly stable. We could not observe a light change at all. We used the XUV MONITOR overlay which essentially divides our grid up on the _-_

921

white finer

light coronagraph overlay into one-quarter section so that we were able to estimate

right on down to 0.01 degrees. I think we were able to do that quite accurately. We'll discuss that a little bit more at the conclusion of step 26. CC 343 17 21 48 SPT ... Okay, in B: We made a single-axis maneuver. The maneuver was made at 15:06. The present attitude was the same as quoted before for our final; that is, minus 070 and plus 113. The desired we wanted was zero in X and in Y was plus 113. The maneuvers we put in was - with the 52021 was a 51070 and a 50000 and another 5000 [sic]. The position attained was plus 006 in X and plus ii0 in Y. That held stable over the next 6 - 6-1/2 minutes or so. Made another single-axis maneuver at 15:12 and 40 seconds. Again our present position for that maneuver was plus 006 in Y - in X and plus ii0 in Y. The desired was plus 000 in X and minus 120 in Y. That wasn't quite a single-axis maneuver. We did try to get back to our original position. The maneuver which we put in with the 52021 was a 50006, 50230, and 50000. The position obtained was minus 017 in X, and Y was minus 124. Okay, we looked at the two to observe stability. And again it looked good there.

343 17 24

01

SPT

We did not see a move to even 0.i. There was some settling time allowed though. In all of these maneuvers, we did not go straight to the point, but we actually went to the - the one axis. And the X maneuvers are the fastest, of course. And then wet usually ended up with a some sort of an arc-shaped maneuver overshot the position and then came took about a minute and a half or 2 down completely. - by making and usually back and it to settle

SPT

We had some time left so we went ahead and made two more maneuvers ; call this D maneuver. The present position in X was minus 017 and the present position in Y was minus 12h. And desired - the time to go to the upper left-hand side, which was an X desired of plus i00 and Y desired of plus lO0. The maneuvers which we put in were 52021, 51117, 51224, 50000. We made the maneuver

922

at 15:25 even. 106 in Y. 343 17 25 33 SPT

We obtained

plus 114 in X and plus

Now at this point, we're going to try to fly off the display back to the original position. Thought it wss best to try. to put it at X, the test on the maneuvering system itself, than try to maneuver back exactly along the direction we came or directly to the point we came from. And that was done by Just reversing the previous commands. That is, with our - when we go back to it - to a position of X of minus 017 and Y of minus 124 from our previous position which was plus ll4 in X and plus 106 - correction, let's go back and explain that. We ended up at plus ll4 and plus 106. Rather than use those numbers to calculate a new maneuver, we just reversed the previous ones, which should have gotten us right back to minus 017 and minus 12h. That is, the commands we entered were 52021, 50117, 50224, and 50000. We did that maneuver at 15:29:45. During the maneuver, Mercury. was moved directly to center of the occulting disk, or pretty close to the center, and at about 010 on the coronagraph scale; that's in octal, equivalent to 0.08 degrees. At that distance outside of the larger dark circle on the overlay, Mercury came into view. It was fairly faint at the beginning, but rapidly came in to where we could pick it up. And I think at about 0.08 degrees outside of that larger darker line on the overlay, we can - we'll be able to pick up - were able to pick up Mercu_j. Now the values we actually attained were minus 020 in X and minus 12h in Y. So we did not end up where we started out in X; we did in Y. We were off 3 units - that's 0.03 degrees in X.

-

343 17 28 15

SPT

Now at this point, we decided we'd look at crew motions a little bit. And I'll just give you some deltas that we saw in the various crew motions. First, Jerry took a normal pushoff from the airlock, moving on down in the OWS and ended up on at the trash airlock, and with that, the X had experienced no change. And the position of Mercury in Y changed from 123 to 124 and back again. Jerry then did some T013 pushoffs quite vigorously, and in X we went from 014 to 024; oscillated back and forth there. And in Y, there was no change. During the Mark I exercise, there is a jitter of

923

about plus or minus 001, both in X and Y. The bike - And in riding the bike, there's a Jitter of plus or minus 0.005 in X and no change in Y. Now the hard pushoff from the airlock to the bottom of the OWS: In X there was no change and in Y there was movement around 124 of plus or minus O. 002. PLT 343 17 29 53 SPT ... Whole gosh darn ...

Now the things which we looked for as possible crew procedural items which we ought to be aware of were, first of all, parallax. And we would estimate that the most problems we would have with parallax was a O.OO1 and probably most likely less than that. That was probably a liberal maximum, What we did was to put our head para perpendicular to the - so that line of sight was perpendicular to the point of the tube - on the tube they're looking; that is, you do not hold their head at the center of the tube in making all the estimates but rather moved our heads so that our line of sight was perpendicular to the face of the tube where we were looking. The screen is at considerable distance in from the top surface where we had the overlay, and parallax would have been a problem, had we not done that.

3h3 17 30 56

PLT

The CROSSHAIRS we set at the very beginning at what appeared to be the center of the white light coronagraph display. That was done at - on dayside. I think we had that fairly accurately done. We used both the overlays to do that and by eyeball on the image of the occulting disk, and they both came out to be about the same. By using the display, I was able to center the display outer ring around the occulting disk, so that was uni assured was centered. You can look at the very annulus - first of all, annulus of light to get that quite accurately centered and then put the electronic CROSSHAIRs at the center of that display. That also turned out to be the point of where we would center it on the occulting disk by eye without the overlay. And then taped the monitor control to verify that we had not moved the electronic crosshairs in the taping. And also during the observations, we verified that they had not moved off center. We taped the over-

3_3 17 31 59

SPT

924

lay to the tube, and it was held down quite firmly, and it did not change its relative position with the crosshairs throu6hout the observations. The white light coronagraph display does look slightly elliptical, the long axis running left/right along the direction of the occulting disk support. 343 17 32 42 SPT I personally was not very happy with the numbers. We're going to have a tough time pointing some of the fine-pointing instruments where we'd like to see them, with those kind of accuracies, l'm hoping what we can - what the folks on the ground might be able to do is to look at these re,tubers and determine what scale factor would have to be applied to our - to our measurements off of the overlay in order to actually get to where we want to be on that overlay. Now we have an HP-B5 on board so we could certainly make some fairly straightforward calculations which involve quite a few digits very easily. The scale factor, of course, probably, is going to change as you move across the display, and I'm hoping that there's some easy way to take that into account. I'm not sure you've got all the information you really need to work that out, however. We tried to give you some fairly long maneuvers so that you could look at the largest possible errors we were encountering and give you the highest possible accuracies. The maneuver back, no problem, and the remainder of the steps were no problem at all. That's one that we - surprised by what we were able to see in the white light coronagraph, but not too happy with the numbers. SPT out.

343 17 33 59

SPT

343 17 34 13

SPT

TIME

SKIP

343 18 15 03

SPT

SPT at 18:15, M092. Leg blood pressure on the CDR, 120 over 75. Left leg girth, 13.0; right leg, 13-1/8. Left legband, Al_a November; right legband, Alfa Quebec. And for M151, the start time on this run was 17:20. SPT out.

343 18 15 36

SPT

925
343 18 33 13 FLT *** 0_3, haadheld target number 118 - -

TIME

SKIP

3h3 18 h3 31

CDR

This is the CDR at 18:h3 Zulu. Terminated the M092 at about 18: 38, and we' re beginning the M093 at this time. Comments for the medical people on the M092. We cleet - completed the the run with no problem. My pulse pressure remained about - I guess the minimum was about 30. I saw DIASTOLIC - or SYSTOLIC blood pressure drop to, let's see, 89 in - on a couple of occasions ; the DIASTOLIC stayed down around 68 to 70 all the time. The HEART RATE got up to about 80, I think. I think it helped quite a bit to move the saddle back out to number 6 position, instead of number 7. I didn't feel quite as uncomfortable, although when that thing does start sucking you at 50, it really pulls you down hard on that saddle, and it's very uncomfortable. One comment concerning facial photos. I forgot to take facial photos yesterday on Ed, and we doggonenear forgotto do it again today. And I have a question. I wonder how are - how critical are these facial photos at 50-millimeters of mercury? Because this is a time when we're really very, very interested in what's going on with the ESS and we're both watching blood pressure, heart rate, and all that. And we really shouldn't be distracted unless these facial photos are really quite necessary. We Just doggone near - for - again forgot them again today, and Ed had to really hustle to get them in time. And I would rather not have anybody fooling with photos and - and looking away from the ESS unless - unless it's really necessary.

3h3 18 h5 25 323 18 25 30

CDR CDR

CDR out. This is the CDR with a postscript to the LBNP comments I Just made. I guess I should probably tell you a little bit how I prepar - prepared myself. I did no exercise this morning. I took a water intake of about 28 ounces, and I did it all between 07:00 in the morning and 09:00, and then had no water between 09:00 and

926

ll:00 when we were scheduled to start. I had a fairly good night's sleep last night. I felt reasonably well rested this morning and went into the test with a - in a good frame of mind. I think frame of mind may have something to do with this too. If you're really worried and anxious about the test, I think maybe that might even help to make you perform a little bit less - a little worse on the LBNP. 343 18 46 23 343 18 51 18 CDR PLT This is CDR out. This is the PLT briefing for the third time on my dual passes ; I think I had trouble with the recorder before. The pass that started at 16:24, J0P 6, step 2, building block 32, was completed as printed. The corona showing fine structure from about 8 o'clock to about 9:30 on the east limb. JOP 1 Delta, step 1 was - threw me backward a little bit. I lost a little time in there because of bullet 3. I went around the thing about three times there. I saw that I needed to have the thing - I set up at 766 to start with. Thought I would be ahead of the game. Then I got to the third bullet. I see I saw I needed the ZER0-ORDER, and so I went back to 00, and then I saw the parenthetical addition, et cetera, and so I came back to 766. And then I looked and I saw that we had a MIRROR callout also, a MIRROR AUTO RASTER was specified, and I mused over that for a while and lost some time before I got started. Once I got started, everything went nominally. I - I completed the entire pass, with the exception of one 82B exposure. Okay, the second time around on - starting at 17:58 in JOP 6, step 2, building block 32, was completed on schedule, The coronagraph looked the same - the corona looked the same. 1 Delta, step i, building block 27, was completed okay this time. Started 1 Delta, step i, building block 28. I completed it all as published. I got 35 of these mini-RASTERs, or whatever they are. And I got - one - two extra 82B exposures, and one extra 56 exposure, SINGLE FRAME, 5. And also, I did the SINGLE FRAME, 5 down to the atmosphere. 343 18 53 22 PLT PLT out.

--

927

TIME

SKIP

343 20 15 08

CDR

This is the CDR at 20:15 Zulu. The subject is DAC malfunctions. I just completed a - a check run on transporter 7 and transporter number 3 in the filmthreading DAC that's mounted on the film vault and found them to be working perfectly. I then took transporter number 6, which is in the film vault with about 7 or 8 percent of film left on it, put that on DAC number 4, and ran it successfully at all speeds with no problem. So I put all equipment back into operation again. And I think that we will Just have to keep a close eye on DAC 4 and these two transporters in the future and see if we can't find some failure mode that's longer lasting. But as it stands right now, all three pieces of equipment seem to be working normally. CDR out. SPT at 25, ATM pass which began at 19:32. Okay, it all went out - went as called for, except for one point - 56 SINGLE FRAME, 2. Got really a SINGLE FRAME, LONG EXPOSURE with another one on top of that of around 4 minutes. Other than that, the exposures went as called for. The FRAME SINGLE FRAME, FILTER 5 got around ll minutes. The last two lines, as written on the schedule, confused me a little bit: Continue 55 to 400 K. Terminate 56. I assume what was wanted was to terminate both 55 and 56 at 400 K. 55 did go beyond - a little bit beyond 400 K. So it was really not too clear to me. And I think it would be easier just to say what you want terminated at a given time or what you want red to continue to. I just terminated 56 without being told. I didn't know when to terminate it. I did it at 400 K, but I also thought maybe the line above it should have been - Continue 55 to 40 K. But it was 400 K as written. I mentioned on an air-to-ground that I was able to see a marked change up there by the northpole in that a bright spot had appeared .... bright spot up around 00:20 at 0.9; quite sizeable. And I got some observing time next orbit. And I think I'll go on up and take a look at it.

343 20 16 05 343 20 25 13

CDE SPT

SPT

928

343 20 27 50 343 20 43 07

SPT PLT

SPT out. Okay, the PLT starting the recording for S063, comet observations. Time is 20:43 and I'm going to go get a time hack. Okay, time's all hacked. Coming up on 46. minutes away from first exposure. Looks like there's some clouds going by. 15

343 20 45 36

PLT

PLT CDR PLT PLT PLT 343 20 h8 45 PLT

You got 5 minutes to go, Bill. Okay. Still see a lot of clouds. Wait until you've terminated ... mountains

Looks like mountains there. Atlantic City.

- snow-covered

343 20 49 37

PLT PLT

There's your coastline Okay, we're

and inland

somewhere.

343 20 51 09

PLT

it's 51 and l0 seconds. Okay, I think going to be off ... in a few minutes.

PLT CREW PLT CREW PLT CDR PLT

Started the tape recorder way too early. ... Okay. ... Yes, Jer. Okay. Okay, if there's a comet out there, you couldn't prove it by me. It must not have been clouds I saw, because I still see whatever it is in the field of view. So I will punch off to photograph sure can't see a thing in there. per pad. I 5_:50, coming I am.

PLT

929

up on 54 now. Got i minute to go; I'ii take one last look. Hey' There's the terminator. Now that may be it. Range is coming up. CREW 343 20 54 14 PLT ... Okay, standing by. 20:54:50. TILT, 217.8; ROTATION, 24.9. That's correct. 15 - l0 seconds. 20:5h:50 on my mark. MARK. Okay, starting a 4-1/2-minute exposure. Should not be able to see through there now. And I can't, okay. Might as well kill the recorder while this takes place. Stand by on my mark. MARK. Stand by on my mark.

343 20 54 50

PLT

343 20 59 12 343 20 59 19 343 20 59 29

P_.T PLT PLT

MARK. Okay, this is 30 seconds. Okay, on my mark it will be on the hour even. Stand by MARK. MARK. MARK. ... Okay, Jer. Sunrise. Press on. right. I got them, if - if the camera worked Executed .... Stand by Stand by -

343 20 59 59 343 21 00 l0 343 21 00 15

PLT PLT PLT CDR PLT

343 21 00 27

CDR PLT

CDR PLT

See, the Sun's coming up. Okay. And this is PLT. It did not sound right. I don't know; maybe it's working Just fine. Maybe I - I couldn't hear because I had this headset on, but I could not hear the - The shutter didn't sound normal to me. I'll check the film advance here.

930

343 21 00 56

PLT

... looking at here .... taken something. I guess it Just - I'm not hearing it right. No, it checks, though. The mirror was up, because I - I checked to see if I could see through there. Okay, I - barring the fact that there was some kind of malfunction with the camera, we got everything on schedule and it should have been nominal run. PLT out.

343 21 01 21

PLT

TIME

SKIP

343 21 56 25

SPT

SPT at 22:56 [sic] on the ATM. Okay, at the conclusion of the maneuver for comet observations, we picked up on a building block 32. The course went real quick. And then I had some observing time, which I appreciate. And over in active region 96, I chose to look at a bright point up near the north pole which showed up on our XUV MONITOR picture. And just to make sure it was still there, I took a second XUV MONITOR picture, about 3 hours being the difference between the two. And it was there, although not as bright as it was previously. It's at about 00:20, 0.9 radii out. I compared it to one from about 24 hours ago. There was nothing there at all. Sometimes you just think this comet is on its wa_ out. Skylab, this is Houston through Ascension for l0 minutes. We'll have a data/voice tape recorder dump over Guam. Out. Hello, Bruce. Morning, Jer. So I went up to that region, tried to locate it in the XUV MONITOR using INTEGRATION. I tried searching around for it, using oxygen Vl. And unfortunately, the only maximum I was able to find was up around 200, 250 or so, and I knew I 'd really not found the bright spot, if if any at _I]. I kept searching around trying to use the XUV MONITOR in INTEGRATE. And for some reason, the darn thing Just didn't show up

r_

343 21 57 50

CC

CDR CC SPT

343 21 58 33

SPT

931

in the INTEGRATE. All kinds of other miscellaneous mottlings showed up, but not the bright features which I saw and had Just taken a picture of in the INTEGRATE mode in the XUV MONITOR. It took a little while to readjust the CROSSHAIRS, as I had Just used them at a different position in the pointing and stability test this morning. So rather than waste much longer looking for it, I found the best maximum I could and did a MIRROR, AUTO RASTER followed by a GRATING, AUTO SCAN in 55. 56 got a SINGLE FRAME, FILTER 2, an exposure of about 6 minutes. And 82B got a exposure NORMAL SEQUENCE; WAVELENGTH, SHORT. When I get some time again, I think I'll try to figure out Just why I was not able to see that particular bright point in the INTEGRATE mode and I saw it very clearly and very distinctively in the XUV MONITOR picture. 3h3 22 O0 39 343 22 19 25 SPT SPT SPT out. SPT at 22:19 with the rate-gyro crystal thermometer temperature. Okay, in 5, X was 96; Y is 94; Z is 94. At 6, X is 93; Y is 92; Z is 95. I began to wonder whether this is a test of the SPT's ability to read the same values time and time again or whether we're actually expecting changes in temperature. SPT out.

343 22 20 02

SPT

TIME

SKIP

3h3 23 42 32

SPT

SPT at 23:43. Results of the ATM four-limb coalignment, day 3h3, time 22 :40. The upper limb: H-ALPHA i, plus 1025; 82B, plus 1025; 55, plus 1030. THe lower limb: 82B, minus 924; 55, minus 923. At the left - at the left limb: H-ALPHA i, minus lO15; 82B, minus 1015, and the LIMB OFFSET recorded after coming out of the WHITE LIGHT MIRROR POSITION on that was zero ; LIMB OFFSET of zero. 55 was minus 1017. At the right limb: 82B - At the right limb, 82B was plus 953; 55 was plus 956. And for the 82_B, the LIMB OFFSET - the LIMB

SPT

932

OFFSET for 82B was zero. was 1032. 3h3 23 45 25 SPT

And 55 MIRROR

POSITION

Okay, as per the request on 82B align, we used a low CONTRAST and relatively low BRIGHTNESS. Okay, I've already given you the LIMB OFFSETs, which were at zero. Okay, the BRIGHTNESS - the CONTRAST and BRIGHTNESS which were used on both MONITORS turned out to be a CONTRAST of 3, a BRIGHTNESS of 7. If I decrease the BRIGHTNESS, then the limb will recede. I have to get down to around 2 or so before it starts to recede. It still is locked in good and firm at 3. If I increase the BRIGHTNESS, then the picture tends to bleach out, and it makes me eliminate the CONTRAST - eliminate the CONTRAST and it's very hard to read the - to see the display in order to determine where the - even the slit is - the traditional mark in the slit itself. Okay, if I in - decrease the CONTRAST from a setting of 3, then it becomes too dark. And it can no longer distinguish the limb. There still is a little bit of margin there.

343 23 46 34

SPT

343 23 47 46

SPT

Okay, before I give you the number of - I decreased the BRIGHTNESS below 7 - decreased it a full 3 degrees below 7. And at around 6 or so, it's 1 under or so the nominal setting, where expected. Okay, if the CONTRAST is increased, then it becomes much too green. So that in Sl,mmary, decrease the CONTRAST, it becomes too dark; increase the CONTRAST, it becomes too green; decrease the BRIGHTNESS, the limb will recede; increase the BRIGHTNESS, and it tends to bleach out. The numbers of 3 for CONTRAST and 7 for BRIGHTNESS are good, and there is - there is a margin of at least 1 on either side of those before these effects come in. In working with a - In practicing with this during all of the work we've done at the limb, I found that initially I would tend to put the slit about 1 arc second inside the limb because I would use the top of the - the top ... and bottom of the slit as on the limb. And apparently, that must be a sma]] amount of distance where the center of the slit is and where the TV LINE SCAN Judges the center of the slit to be. So I plan to move the slit out Just a little bit from that position and

343 23 48 47

SPT

933

that should not - It should be a good zero. The 55 GRATING offset went real well. The only thing I had to do there was H-ALPHA-2 RETICLE. I had to tweak it down Just a very small amount. CC 343 23 50 29 SPT ... Okay, one additional thing I - I did, just to check out whether these numbers are - are any good. Well, first of all, let's go down and - I took a look at the numbers that we had for FSS readout with the BIAS, IN and BIAS, OUT, and I find that in UP/DOWN we changed from a minus 5h to a minus 51, which is okay. Three arc seconds change is larger than I'd like, but I guess it's within its normal bounds. The T.E_T/RIGHT, however, has gone from a plus 18 to a plus 30, and that has certainly surprised me. That - Somehow we ran into a real problem on that one and I'm not sure where that LEFT/RIGHT change of 48 arc seconds ever came in - whether it was in the electronics. I doubt if it was in the - the actual misalignment change between the FINE SUN SENSOR and 82B. 343 23 53 35 SPT Okay, SPT again, picking up on the four-limb coalignment. One additional thing I did at the very conclusion was to go to the upper and lower and left and right limb and - to try to position myself exactly tangent to the limb and at the center of the limb if you will. So I was just going to the limb with the SLIT, and the H-ALPHA i RETICLE, and then to read out the values on the FINE SUN SENSOR with the BIAS, IN. results. The upper limb: And I'll give you those the UP/DOWN was 974 for

both the WHITE LIGHT slit and H-ALPHA ... coaligned, and the LEFT/RIGHT for positioning the 82B LEN_/ RIGHT at the very center of the limb and center of the fiducial mark tangent to the limb was a minus 17. Corresponding number for H-ALPHA 1 was plus 3. At the lower limb: the UP/DOWN was minus 974 and the same for - that was the same for both 82B and H-ALPHA i. So those numbers agreed very well on the UP/DOWN coalignment course, and the upper and lower limbs were both 974. The T.MF'f/RIGHT for positioning 82B SLIT perpendicular to the limb and fiducial marks just tangent and the slit right at the very center of the limb was a plus 13. And it was minus 2 for the corresponding maneuver with

93_

H-ALPHA i. At the left limb the UP/DOWN for positioning of slit Just tangent to the limb was minus 22. For H-ALPHA l, it was minus 21. 343 23 56 08 SPT For the LEFT/RIGHT - the UP/DOWN - I'm sorry. For the LEFT/RIGHT, values were - the left limb was minus 95 for both 82B and H-ALFHA 1. And again here something looks l_nny because we've got a Sun which is wider in LEFT/RIGHT than it is in UP/DOWN. It might make Dick happy, but I believe it's all in the estimate somewhere. Over on the right limb, the UP/DOWN was plus 2 for both 82B SLIT and H-ALPHA l, tangent to the limb, and the Lk_WT/RIGHT was plus 95 for both. So the two things that concern me there are, first, at the left limb, the - To put the slit tangent to the limb as I see it in WHITE LIGHT DISPLAY, I ended up with an UP/DOWN of minus 22 and that puts - and minus 21 for H-ALPHA 1 - both sets within secs of one another. And this is right after we've Just gotten done doing a four-limb coalignment. And again, the BIAS switch was IN. Also, we've got a l_rger Sun in T,F, FT/RIGHT than we do in UP/DOWN. And right now I can.'t explain it to m_self. And if you're aware of the situation which is causing this, I would appreciate understanding it. 3h3 23 58 lO SPT SPT out.

###

DAY
3_h 00 56 07 PLT Okay, this is PLT; time is 00:56. 15 seconds on my mark. MARK.

935
Coming up on

34_ 00 56 16

PLT PLT

And let's see - These government watches aren't too good. I better check that. Say, Jer, could you give me a quick time hack by looking over there? It's coming up on 56. ... This thing has lost 2 seconds since earlier this afternoon. Would you give me a time hack on even minutes? ... Thank now. you. 7, 5, 6; okay. Got a good time hack

CDR PLT

CDR PLT

PLT

Frame number 1 is indicating 48 on the countdown so it'll go 48, 47, 46, et cetera. Magazine Bravo Victor 44; infinity; 1.2. Everything is set. Time, okay. First exposure will be i0 seconds. TILT to maximum limit for frames 5 through 9.

PLT

2 or 3 seconds ... anything in here. Hey, Ed, would you look out the window there Just a second? About 2 minutes of exposure, and I got the uncomfortable feeling we're still in daylight. It's just dusk, I guess. Okay. Well, that's the whole idea of this experiment, I guess. Thank you. PLT PLT 344 01 00 00 PLT PLT 01:01. Stand by; on my mark it'll be 01:00 MARK. Okay, at 01:01. I don't know who wrote that pad, but he did us a great big favor the way he got this thing set up. Not very many people put things down on the even minute like this. It sure makes it a beck a lot easier to avoid making mistakes. And you appreciate it. 30 seconds.

f

936

PLT

i0 seconds. First exposure will be i0 seconds. Stand by on my mark for SHU'I_I'ER,PEN. O MARK. Didn't work' Thought now I'ii do it on 5. MARK. Still didn't work. stand by on 15 seconds. No. What's wrong? and see if that'll MARK. Stand by it was cocked. Okay,

344 01 01 00

PLT

344 01 01 05

PLT

Ah, come on.

Okay,

PLT

It's on time. work. Okay.

Turn it to

...

344 01 01 25 344 01 01 30

PLT PLT

MARK. It's not working. Ah, come on. Okay, there's a wasted exposure. I don't know what happened that it just won't - screw it hack in again here. Electric Nikons, I don't like them. There, that did it. I Just clicked off a frame trying to screw it in. There's two frames wasted. ... Ah, I'm fooling with the crllmmy equipment here. Okay, let's see if I can get one now. Okay, here it goes. 3, h MARK. Okay, advance. We've done this repeatedly wasted about two or three frames, you know, getting set up. Okay, at 01:02, and I'm about 30 seconds behind. I'll catch up on this one. MARK. Okay, now this is on frame 02; for your purposes, a 2-minute exposure. And it was started at 02:30; I'll conclude at 04:30. And we lost two frames there because of Mickey Mouse camera operations. Okay, now that first frame - I gave you a 5-second exposure instead of a 10-second. I'll see if I can give you a 10-second when we get through here. I don't feel badly [sic] about that at all. We've had an awful lot of trouble with the Nikon with this remote cable. That's an expensive camera. That thing really is rinky-dink in some respects. Coming up on 4 minutes. Okay, 30 seconds to go on this 2-minute exposure.

CREW PLT

344 01 02 14

PLT

344 01 02 30

PLT

344 01 03 26

PLT

PLT

Stand by.

937

344 01 04 30

PLT

MARK. Okay, that was good. That was your 2-minute exposure. Now let me give you a lO-second exposure. Make up for that 5-second one that I gave you. Stand by MARK. 5, 4, 3, 2, i by for 01:06,

344 01 04 39 344 Ol 04 49

PLT PLT

MARK. Okay. Now we're standing for a 6-minute exposure. Okay, on my mark, it'll he 01:06. 6-minute exposure. Stand by -

PLT

Start a

344 01 06 00

PLT

MARK. SHUTTER is OPEN for a 6-minute exposure, at 01:12 - I don't see any need for using this recorder all this time. l'm going to turn the recorder off temporarily.

344 01 06 15 344 01 i0 43 344 01 ii 01

PLT PLT PLT

Okay, coming up on 01:ii. MARK. 01:ii; i minute to go on this 6-minute exposure. And the ROTATION is 357.0; TILT, 000.0. This is on all four of these exposures three and one extra 5-second exposure there, by mistake. 30 seconds. Got a 176. Okay, stand by. On my mark, it'll be 01:12. Stand by MARK. Okay, now I want 176. Okay, 176.0; 00. And you want 6 minutes. Okay, we're all set to go. Okay, that's one on this one angle here - 176.0 and TILT, 00. Stand by for my mark. MARK. Didn't work. it didn't work. ( Laughter ) Okay, I'll do it l0 seconds after. MARK. 20 seconds after. at 19:20. Stand by Didn't advance it. That's why

344 01 12 00

PLT

344 01 13 01

PLT

CREW PLT 344 01 13 20 PLT

Okay, that'll be complete

344 01 18 31

PLT

Okay, coming up on 19 minutes. Since I started exposure at 13:20, I'll terminate at 19:20. Stand by. Stand by -

PLT f_ PLT

938

3hh 01 19 19

PLT

MARK. Standing still. Okay. I want 18_.6; 18h.6, got. And maximum TILT, is it? Okay, there you got it, maximum TILT. Now coming up on 01:20, 184.6. Skylab, Houston. A0S ... - Okay, coming up

CC PLT

And I've got you 32.6 on that. on 01:20 on my mark.

3h4 01 20 00

PLT

MARK. Okay, we're starting a 6-minute exposure, 184.6 on the ROTATION and 32.6; TILT to maximum for frames 5 through 9. - - also got a - In our never-ending quest to keep you guys informed; I've also got a little note here on ATM C&D loop status after that. Okay, first is the 82A door. Before I go through this mission note, Ed, let me tell you this, that we're troubleshooting the door here at this site. We believe that we are going to have a procedure available prior to the first ops in the morning, that will allow us to operate the door. However, at this moment the analysis is not complete. We're not sure what the cause is, but here's essentially what - the troubleshooting we did today to - to arrive at where we are. We did a little bit of troubleshooting that was interrupted - that was unsuccessful because that was interrupted by the stability that you did. So we took the time out, and then this afternoon, here's what we did. First, we inhibited and then enabled both door motors. We attempted 82A door open with no joy. Then we inhibited and reenabled both motors and attempted a closure, and no Joy. We inhibited and reenabled again and - and got - attempted the door open. And the door opened in about - approximately 2 seconds. This series indicated that we were stuck in a position that was very close to full open when this last command was issued. What we then did was inhibit the power on one motor, which was the secondary, so that the subsequent closure of the motor - excuse me - the subsequent closure of the door, in case it got caught up, would be soft, so to speak, that is, only a one motor. And sure enough, as you saw and reported awhile ago, it did get hung up. We're presently troubleshooting.

CC

3hh 01 21 35

CC

939

We - we're considering pinning the foor open on the next EVA. There are a couple of theories as to what's hanging it up, and I guess that debate is so - is up in the air enough now not to - so we can't really give you an idea as to the cause. However, we do think we will have a procedure in the morning that'll allow us to operate up until the EVA. Then we may very well pin it open. Over. 344.01 22 38 SPT Okay. Thank you, Dick .... it hangs very close to the open position, I would expect ... to the closed position ... EVA ... operation before we have to resort to pinning it. Well it's - One of the theories is that - that there was a - during testing, prior to launch, there was a - a configuration that - where a piece of GSE was installed behind the door, as I understand it, at approximately the position that would allow the closure of the - excuse me would allow a full opening to be about 2 seconds away. And the sequence of events during testing may have caused somethingto happen to the hardware. He ought to be pretty busy about right now. Okay, coming up on 01:26 in about 25 seconds. Terminate the exposure on 184.6 and 31 degrees - actually 32.6. Stand by MARK. Advance film; 186.1. Okay. We leave the TILT the way it is. Say again, Ed. Did INC0 get his call through? I guess I am, Ed. We're chasing down this little problem now, and we'll get back to you - Stand by for 01:27. 186.1 on the ROTATION and 31 32.6 on the TILT. This'll be for 9 minutes. 5 seconds. MARK. Standby 186.1 we have.

344 01 23 00

CC

_344 01 25 28 PLT

344 01 26 O0

PLT

CC SPT CC

PLT

PLT 3_4 01 27 00 344 01 35 05 i _ PLT PLT

Okay, I'm going to turn the recorder off.

Okay, this is PLT. Time is 01:35. Coming up on 36 for termination of 9-minute exposure; 186.1 and 31.0.

940

PLT 344 O1 36 00 PLT

Stand by MARK. Okay, advance film. Now you want 187.6 ; 187.6. Roger. You've got. 32.4, maximum TILT you say. And this is for 2 minutes starting at 01 :37. Stand by MARK. 01:37. Starting a 2-minute exposure. ROTATION is 187.6 and TILT is 31.0. Coming up on 01:39 - in 20 seconds. Stand by MARK. Advance film. Okay, waiting for 01:40; another 2-minute exposure. Stand by MARK. 01:hO for 2 minutes. oh, 32.h. 187.6 and 32.6 -

PLT 344.01 37 00 PLT

PLT PLT 344 01 39 00 PLT

PLT 344 01 40 O0 PLT

PLT

Okay, l'm going to cut this one short about 3 seconds to give me time to advance f_lm, and then I'll give you a lO-second one accurately starting at 01:42. Okay, it's coming on lO seconds. I'm releasing - advancing MARK. Starting lO seconds. on the even minute. 5, 4, 3, - Okay,

PLT

344 01 42 O0

PLT

And I got that right

CDR PLT CDR 344 O1 42 l0 PLT

Say, Ed, seen anything of that - Stand by - - ATM schedule - MARK. Okay, that's the completion of lO-second exposure. Okay. All exposures are complete, and getting ready to retract. Okay, TILT - -

941

CDR PLT

Well, I've got a pass starting at any minute now. TILT, zero; ROTATION, That's the way I like DOOR going to CLOSEd. RECORDER's going OFF. zero. Nice and smooth. it. Mirror is retracted. There we go. Okay.

344 O1 43 l0

PLT

TIME

SKIP

344 02 43 00

CDR

This is the CDR debriefing the last ATM pass for the day. That was the 01:51 ATM pass. Let's see, we started out with good old JOP 6, step number 1. Got kind of a late start with that one because it took a little while to set the GRATING in 55. I found that - well, can't remember what the large number was, but it was at a number larger than what I needed so I had to run it clear through, and that kind of put me down about 2 minutes. We then - I got the nuZ update in okay, and - took care of the

-

TV downlinkin part B of JOP 6, buildingblock i. And - everything went normally all through JOP 6. TV downlink was no big problem. I did 12C. I think I gave you about 4-1/2 minutes instead of 5 because I wanted to go up and take a peek at the new sunspot in active region 96 before I ran out of observing time. So I gave you about 4-1/2minutes of - the 82B slew calibration and building block 12 Char]ie. 344 02 44 33 CDR And went up and took a look at the sunspot. It's not a very big one but it's the only one in town right now. And, let's see, during the - Oh, yes, when I - during my observation time, I tried to do a shopping list number 2 at the sunspot. I figured as long as I was there I'd try to get it, but after I got a PATROL, SHORT going and a MIRROR, AUTO RASTER going, I realized that I really didn't have enough time. I was already headed for ESS. And so I terminated the - the - PATROL, SHORT and, at about the second frame, and the MIRROR, AUTO RASTER, I think we got down to line 12 or 13. So I think the sunspot was at least in the - in the - MIRROR, AUTO RASTER. Anyway, we got that that part of it into it anyway. And I've powered down now at precise coordinates, minus 5400 ROLL,

942

plus i0 UP/DOWN, and plus 200 RIGHT/[,EFT, and the GRATING is looking at 1042. 344 02 h5 52 CDR The frame count, I'll go ahead and put it on tape, the next time we get air-to-ground, I'll give it to them anyway. H-alpha, 11548; 4129; 138; 1209; 5784; and 3863. That's going right down the line. I took a couple of looks at XUV during this period and its bright spot around the north pole is gone. And the only thing left is the bright area that's associated with active region 96. You can see the polar coronal holes, and that 's about it. It wasn't too terribly interesting. CDR out.

344 02 46 31

CDR

TIME

SKIP

344 14 39 40

CC

I didn't tell you the truth. At 15:43 you do have a conference scheduled over Goldstone .... ... SPT at 14:40. M133, day 343: Length of sleep, 10.0; quality, good. One sleep code; that's 4. That seems to be the standard mode for me. And also, I was, l, awakened during the night, and I went right back to sleep. I - A good night's sleep. I wish I had more like them. I had no problem with the equipment. Didn't use very much electrolyte in reusing this cap. However, I did put a new cable on, which leads from the sleep monitoring box over to the cap. Last night when setting up for it, I got some erratic readings we noticed by Jiggling the cable up close to the connection. That - that would do it; so I'd Just take the cable out rather than chance losing some data during the middle of the night. I'll go ahead and use this one from now on. This one is serial number 008. Whenever I get a - Whenever you get a chance, I'd be interested in knowing Just generally what's coming out of the experiment. In other words, how many - what percentage of the time do I spend in various stages of sleep relative to the norm?

SPT 344 14 h0 ll SPT

344 14 41 36

SPT

SPT out.

_.

943

TIME SKIP

3h4 16 26 38

PLT

PLT at 16:26. been observing in the area. slider map. shots that reasonable.

For the past 6 to 7 _inutes, I've icebergs - what I think is icebergs I haven't had time to even check the I have about four Nikon 300-millimeter out of fairly an area will turn Hasselblad

-

I - which I hope I've taken one

containing probably pear as small white

up to 20 icebergs, which apdots on the surface of the

water. One of them, in particular my last Nikon frame, had a picture I hope - hopefully has a picture of an iceberg with some kind of wake-appearing trail behind it or in front of it or what. It could be small pieces that are broken off from it or - At first, when I first saw it, it looked cloud trailing the iceberg as opposed in the water, since there was no wake like clouds to a wake form present.

344 16 27 55 PLT

And when I looked at it through the binoculars, it appeared to be small ch1_ks of ice forming a sort of tail from the iceberg. I'm going to take a look at the slider map now and try to get a location to giveyou. PLT out. By the way, this observation was taken over a period of about 4 minutes; so there's a very widespread area here with icebergs, wherever I am. PLT here. course Taking to a look at the slider map, these

344 16

31 17

PLT

icebergs appear to be in the South Atlantic;
close the maximum elevation.

3h4

16

31

32

PLT

And that was about 4 - at 16:20, 21, along in there, and that's putting it near a point, oh, about 400 miles southwest of Capetown, South Africa, out there in the South Atlantic. Okay, it's the PLT at 16:40, numbers. Charlie X-ray 36: were on the icebergs. Charlie X-ray at 16:22, was reporting on the frame 49, 48, 47, and 46

344

16

40

29

PLT

344

16

40

40

PLT

47 in the Hasselblad, frame number 159 of the icebergs in the South Atlantic.

TIME

SKIP

944

344 17 05 00

PLT

Okay, time is 17:05. First exposure'll be 17:06:55. ROTATION is 222. Think that's a 2. Man' This gage is hard to read, Karl. Get my flashlight out to read it, I guess. 222.6, 25.2. Okay, got everything set here. Okay, 17:06:55; so we got about a little over a minute to go. Okay. Okay, maneuver is ramping down. And I don't see a dA._ thing in those optics - through the viewfinder. Nothing. So we'll go on faith. Okay, rates are good, Jer says. 17:06:55 will be on my mark. We start a 4-1/2-minute exposure. Stand by -

344 17 06 54

PLT

MARK. Sounds like it worked; we'll see. Something happened. Said to set on B, and I've been using T all the time. I didn't get the same click sound, but I think that it's all right. Set B, it said. I think I just screwed up the exposure by following the checklist cue cards. Focus, infinity; filter, per pad; shutter speed knob, per pad; f/stop, 1. Okay. Set shutter speed knob B; then cock shutter. The shutter was already cocked. Okay, I'm going per checklist. Sure don't like this Nikon. Okay, record's going off. Okay, time is l0 - 17:10:30. this exposure. Okay, there's Stand by. At 11:25, terminate 4 minutes.

344 17 l0 30

PLT

PLT 344 17 ii 25 PLT

On my mark, be 11:25.

MARK. Advance film. Standing by to start 30-second exposure on my mark at 35. MARK. Start a 30-second exposure. Stand by. On my mark, it'll be the end of the 30-second exposure at 12:05. Stand by MARK. 30 seconds. Advance film. And we want a 5-second one starting at 15. Stand by MARK. i, 2, 3, 4 -

344 17 ll 35

PLT

344 17 12 05

PLT

344 17 12 15 344 17 12 20

PLT PLT

MARK. 20. Advance film. And we're all ready to go. Okay, that completes -

TIME

SKIP

945

344 17 54 53

SPT

17:55. 17:55, handheld photos on mag CX47 taken at 17:49; frames 155 through 157. And second series at 17:52, one - frame number 157 They're all f/ll, lO0-millimeters, second. through 1/250 159. of a

344

17

55 19

SPT

The

first

three

were fiords,

taken and

off in

the

coast

of the

Chile.

Looking

at the

particular

Humboldt Current were able to see

where it comes into Chile, we the motion of the water; we've

-

we're able to see large waves and a particularly large fiord. The waves were, in general, perpendicular to the co - coast line, but general - but generally bowed in towards the center of the fiord. From up here they look like fairly long wavelike waves, and I was surprised I was able to see them. I got three 100-millimeters of those. be able to report pretty soon on some meter photos. And we also had camera going when we came over frames per second. I did not Jerry will 300-milli-

a data acquisition the coast at - 2 have very much time

-.

for observing but the - those waves certainly stood out in a very prominent fashion. I was not able to observe water motion as such but maybe on the 344 17 56 23 SPT next pass by we'll take another look.

The next three of the coast.

photos were taken on the east side And there I was able to see what bloom, the in contrast coloring; that to the dark

reminded me of plankton is, a very light green

ocean blue water. And it was running parallel to the coast, a very sinuous ligament, quite far up the coast towards the north. And I got a fairly oblique view of that. Sort of believe that it's a - essentially was the Fa]kand Current; whether it's the edge of it, I'm not sure. It very well could be the - the edge of the shear layer, causing some upwelling in that area. That's what immediately comes to mind when I look at it. But that may, however, not be the explanation. It was very striking in that the sinuous element Just ran all the way up the coastline and it was relatively thin, maybe 1 degree or so across in our field of view. There was some turbulence or eddies associated 344 17 57 31 SPT with it, but relatively minor.

SPT out.

TIME SKIP

946

34h 21 32 06

SPT

SPT at 23:32. we're picking

SPT at 23:32. ATM operations. And up with the orbit that began at 20:24 Okay, we did not get a nuZ up-

for the 55 CALROC.

date at the end of the orbit previous; so when one was done, we got a ROLL change of l0 arc minutes, from minus 5400 to minus 5390, which, if I'm right, is about 0.h4 arc second's change in pointing. And I'll continue to operate at this ROLL for consistency. The 82A door turned out to be a problem. We had the white talkback at slm_ise, when I went out - when I got up to the panel here. Correction: Upon trying to open the 82A door, we got the white t alkback. 344 21 33 42 SPT I decided to - to hold on that until I got the other experiments in operation - in particular, 55. And we got the MIRROR, AUTO RASTER going there and the 56 going. And I came over to run through the procedure of inhibiting both door motors and then enabling and then trying it again. And I did that once and no avail. Went through the procedure twice and on the second time through, I noticed that my 55 had turned off. And, of course, when you inhibit both of their door motors, which you do with the same command, you no longer have the conditions for experiment operation, and it just ceases. Once I enabled one of the door motors again, it picked up. So I finished up that procedure once that second time through on 82A, and to no avail. The doors did not open, and I decided I'd better just hold on, get 55 done to make sure I got in all the MIRROR, AUTO RASTERs, which we did. Along toward the end of the fourth MIRROR, AUTO RASTER, I tried it once again. Or at the end of fifth - fourth AUTO RASTER, I tried it again, and there was no success. And we finished up with the door talkback white, which is used right now at night. And we got all the exposures in for 56 and MIRROR, AUTO RASTERs for 55. And also 82B got their exposures - WAVELk_NGTH, SHORT exposure TIMES 1/4 and WAVeLeNGTH, SHORT exposure TIM_ h. The way the message was sent up or read on the operation of this 82A door was the note said, "If the door tA1kback failed to go gray, step 2, repeat steps 1 and 2, up to three times, then

344 21 34 56

SPT

344 21 35 50

SPT

947

complete steps B and 4." Well, step 3 is to inhibit both - or to inhibit the secondary door motor, which you sure want to do, and step 4 says operate 82A per pad. And I didn't think that was right with the white staring at us; so I held up and was glad I did. So, apparently, you also thought it was not best to chance wasting the film, not knowing what the situation was on the doors. So I'ii try and get that clarified once more on the airto-ground to make sure that we don't ever have that happen to us and end up taking data from a closed door or partially closed. Also, at the conclusion there, 56 got a - put a frame SINGLE FRAME, 5 exposure of Just about 7 minutes. And again, I cut that off at ESS. I know 8 is roughly the minimum useful, but I figured we were close enough to go ahead and see what we could find anyway. 344 21 37 47 344 21 39 23 SPT PLT SPT out. Okay, this is the PLT recording at i - 21:40 Zulu. Subject is M487-3 Alfa. It is subjective evaluation guide i. OWS fireman's pole is adequate to very good. It vibrates quite a lot when you use it. And one fairly importantpoint is that it has roll pins along it - little - little, tiny pins that are used to hold the - I think, the attaching bracketry into position. And those roll pins vibrate out, and they'll - you can snag your heads and cut your hand on those roll pins. And that's the fireman's pole. But as far as the utility of it is concerned, it's the - adequate to very good. 0WS dome and wall handrails: We don't work much up - up in that area, but they're good when we use them. STS handrails: Well, the STS and the MDA probably are between poor and unacceptable or unacceptable to poor as far as all restraints. They don't They don't seem very well positioned for much of anything. I know I should - Seems to me that probably for - if you're Just thinking about hands, they're not too bad. But in the STS and MDA when you're using handrails, you toss yourself around, and we are continuously bumping our feet into sophisticated equipment - namely, the rate gyros.

F

344 21 40 18

PLT

.F

948
It puts the touch those to adequate handrails. ground into a full-scale panic to even things. So I guess I'd say that poor would be the rating I would give the And as far as the MDA and STS as a

1

working area, as far as restraints are concerned, I'd say it's unacceptable. Gross shortcomings all over the place, and the MDA is Just a lousy place to work. 3h4 21 _l 22 PLT Triangular shoe cleats/grid: I would say very good to excellent. Conical shoe cleats/grid: I've not used yet. I want to get around to using those; I'm going to try to fit up my second pair of shoes _rith conical cleats and try them out. Water tank foot platform is excellent for working dome lockers. It's no - not much good for working water tanks. I'd say it's poor for working water tanks because of the crouching action that has to take place. By the way, a crouching action is very difficult in zero g; so if you design a foot restraint where there's - this posture requires a crouching action, then you're not helping us at all. In fact, it's a great hindrance to have to go into a crouch because you have to hold your abdomen very stiff and your leg muscles very stiff and you're at a constraint strain even putting on shoes. When you bend down to put on your shoes, if you bend down, it's difficult; if you pull one leg up at a time, it's not too bad to lace shoes. Portable M512/479 foot platform: Not applicable except for its EREP proposes. So - And that's very good except it's very limited. It's only good for the C&D panel, and that's about it. The rest of the thrashing about for the C&D and the VTS operator is done without foot restraints and is difficult. The ATM foot platform is good. Portable PGA foot restraints: I didn't get to use them my last time because I was - I had to use my PGA foot restraints for the EVA - foot restraints for the S193 maintenance. Portable handholds: Not used. Portable equipment restraints - tethers, bungees, universal mounts, et cetera: Tethers and bungee, in general, are - are - are very nice to use; however, the ones with the little, line wire hooks on them are really bad. They - The wire comes out from under the rivets, and you've Just lost it. And not only that, but when that happens, you've got a nice wire fishhook there thrashing

q

__

B44 21 42 22

PLT

949

about that could really snag you. That's a really bad design. I'd consider that worse than unacceptable; downright dangerous. 344 21 h3 27 PLT Also, all of our snaps - Every place that we have snaps, there ought to be stiffeners where the snap is located. I'm talking about where it's located on the strap, and a bungee falls into that category. There ought to be stiffeners, and ought to be an inch and a half or 2-inch pull tab on those. The pull tabs we have are not long enough; they're about a quarter-inch to a half-inch long in many places. And I don't know what it is, but if it's Just - it's Just enough there to tease you and not enough to help. And it needs to be stiff so you can get some levering action with it. Just a little, tiny quarter-inch picky asinine extension on there is not good enough. It does not serve the purpose for pulling that snap off. And if you have - have a stiffened portion of the fabric on which the snap is located, it also helps you when you put the snap on. And by the way, when attaching snaps to a position, it's a very difficult operationin zero g unless you have an Opposition pull point to offset the pushing force required to put a snap into position. That holds true with snaps regardless whether they're on bungees or equipment bags or these clipboards we have. It's a - There's a major effort to put one of these aluminum clipboards onto a position because of those two snaps. 344 21 h4 35 PLT You feel like you've put in 75 pounds of push force Just to put the doggone thing into position. You've got to anchor yourself, one arm and two feet, to get that clipboard attached to a surface where you have the snap arrangement that's accepted. Universal mount, I don't think is very good. Generally speaking, I'd say poor to adequate on a universal mount. I don't like the nonprivacy blocking mirror. That's the mirror with those block locks. If - If the place where you're hooking the universal restraint - on a handhold, I'm talking about now is a grand platform, it works fine except for the oscillation dynamics of the handholds using it for cameras and so forth. The DAC will - will stimulate a vibration in the universal handhold; it'll Just

344 21 43 39

PLT

_--

95O

set [sic] there and shake back and forth in resonance with the shutter motion of the DAC. But when you're trying to use the - the clamp mode of the universal restraint, I would say that there is not enough flexibility in there to allow for fine tolerances or - or to - say, to allow for - for general manufacturing tolerances of the handholds. 34h 21 h5 42 PLT The handholds - The lock is not very good. When you push it down to lock, it may or may not. Sometimes you get a nice, over-centered click about and that's about 1 out of I00 times, when you attach it to a - one of these oblong handholds. The bungees and tethers, generally speaking, are very, very nice pieces of equipment to have around, if we Just had better ways of sticking them on things attaching them. ATM seat/backrest restraint, we have not used. Fecal collection equipment: As far as the collection

3hh 21 46 ii

PLT

equipment, functionally, it is, I would say, very good. Urine collection equipment : I would say poor to adequate, maybe because of the difficulty in inserting the urine drawer and in removing it. One of the things I don't like about the urine collection equipment is the hole that was cut in through the pressure plate with this green thing with a spring leaf arrangment on - the four-leaf arrangement. The hole's in the wrong position for reaching in there and pulling the little tab. We have to do this every morning. And every morning I have to fiddle around and reach in there and Almost cut my finger trying to pull that tab out. 3_h 21 46 51 PLT The have the bag the and square hole is positioned incorrectly. Also, -Every morning I have great difficulty pushing collection - the thing that holds the urine - pushing that back into position and getting Teflon thing over the separator inlet fitting then pushing the thing on.

344 21 47 09

PLT

And then when you try to push the little nipple onto the separator outlet nozzle, that is never a positive operation. It's already - always fit and twist and fiddle and fool around there trying to get that thing on. I do not like the design of the urine collection equipment insofar as the way these things fit together. When you push the

951

urine drawer back in there, you - Every morning I've done it now almost 30 times - Every morning I feel like I'm not doing it right. It's because of poor fit. Okay, the hand washer: It's great. I think we got a long way to go. I think that there ought to be some provision for some kind of little autoclave-type thing; you stick your hands in there and give them a nice squirt without fear of water flying all over the head and out into the experiment compartment and everything. I think we need - Either we put our - both of our hands through some leaf slots or overlapping if you want to, and use it like that. 344 21 _8 03 PLT slots,

And then something that could be removed easily if - if you wish. But I think there's a lot of work that could be done in that hand washer, although I think it's really a great item. I would I would consider that very good to excellent the way it is, but I think it - there are some - some improvements. I don't - I wouldn't want to say inadequate, because I like it. But I think that with modification, it could be made even better. Okay, fecal/urine collection - collector lap strap and handhold: Well, I don't know how that was designed, but that sure wasn't - No one took a crap and noticed their posture when they designed that thing, because when I sit down to go to the toilet, I like to have a crook in my knees. And you have to straighten your legs almost straight out to use that and in order to get your bottom seated on the fecal collector properly, and that is a very awkward posture. It'd sure be nice if you could - if you had one that was more or less conventional in shape so that you could have a - a little bit of a crook at the knees when you're using it.

344 21 49 02

PLT

The lap strap and the handholds are not - They're essential. They - In fact, I would say that they are very good. But I think that the whole thing is designed for an improper posture. WMC hand washer handrail: I find that very useful. WMC foot restraints: I don't know where they are. They're - As far as I'm concerned, there aren't any WMC foot restraints. Those two straps in there are not very useful for anything. In fact, we're always ricocheting all over the place in the head. In fact, I would say that the foot restraints in the WMC are unacceptable and even

952

worse than that. That looks like very little thought was given to that problem. And you're you do an awful lot of work in the head that requires thrashing about, d1_-T_ing urine bags, putting urine bags in and doing all the - the measuring and - of the urine and sampling of the urine - and you have no foot restraints for this. The head is very, very bad as far as foot restraints are concerned. In fact, I think that they really somebody really deserves a thumbs down on the efforts in there as far as foot restraints are concerned. WMC ceiling handrail, unless l'm out of control. 3h4 21 50 13 PLT I never use

WMC light-duty foot restraint: Well, I would guess that's - Again, they sort of flatter themselves to call them foot restraints because they're they're highly unusable. There was not enough Velcro on there to - to open them up. To use the loops as large as they ought to be, you run out of your Velcro at match points. I Just think that there was very little thought given to those WMC foot restraints, if you - you want to call them that. Drying stations: I don't know what that is other - unless it's towel holders, and they're excellent. Shower, I would say, is very good to excellent. Personal hygiene kit: Well, the loops - the elastic loops in there have little tabs on them, but they are not long enough. I find that I end up Just sticking stuff in from the side in the loops. It'd be nice if the little pull tab on the elastic loop was a little longer because - and also there was Just a little bit more limit to the extent to which you could pull the elastic to put things back in. And I - I find that those loops are fairly difficult to use in the hygiene kit. Towels and wash cloths: Well, I prefer cotton, of course. These are okay the way they are. I would say they are adequate. And they're sort of like drying off with padded steel wool - not quite that bad, but they are not as absorbent as cotton. And also, they - there's a slight uncomfortable feel to them. I'm used to them now, and they are adequate. General utility wipes, wet wipes: I would say both these are great. Man, we use a lot of them, and

342 21 50 22

PLT

342 21 51 52

PLT

953

any other effort - Well, you've got to have a lot wipes around. And one of the things that's concerned me since day i is, if we ever ran out of wipes, we'd really be in trouble. We'd probably have to work some deal with wash cloths and towels. Biocide wipes: Well, of course, it's Just that they're unpleasant to use because of the color, but for the purpose they serve, I'd say they were adequate. Trash and plenum bags, we ran out of them. But it looks like we're very low on the regular urine disposal bags, which are very convenient to have around because of that spring top on them, that flap. We ran - We aon't have any regular disposal bags. I guess they were all used in - You use a lot of bags. Great consideration should be given for long-term space stations in that you've got to have either some other way of disposing the trash, like a trash masher or something like that, or you do have to have plenty of bags. 34L 21 52 48 PLT And there ought to be a little bit easier way of sealing them up for a low-bleed leak. ,It - it's not bad. I'd say they're certainly acceptable, but it is sort of a pain to wrap it around and snap it and snap around the corners and all that because we're worried about venting in the waste tank. Okay, bio - the utential wipes - the utensil wipes are also very, very useful. Went back up there, and I would say that they're excellent. Urine/fecal bags: Okay. Of course, the urine bags the UCTA are unpleasant to use. We minimize that, of course, by trying to weigh in properly. Fecal bags are unpleasant to use. They're - I'm talking about contingency fecal bags. The fecal collection bags that we use in the head are incon - are sort of diffieult to use. I wondered if there isn't a little bit easier way of fixing the seal on these, if there were some kind of very simple roll-down. You could put a little, tiny thin sheet of metal across that or have one that you could attach to it, and you roll it down like you're rolling a - a window shade over a roller. 344 21 53 58 PLT Because all that sticking and pasting to pull the little green pieces and everything seems to me to be all devoted to making sure you got a good seal up there, and I'm just not sure that you need all that origami - Let's see - WMC origami to make

-

954

sure you got a good seal at the top of the fecal collection bag. And that's sort of time consuming. That takes about 5 minutes at least, after you go to the toilet, just folding and pasting - folding the green paper and pasting the elastics together. And I think a simple, old-fashioned - what do you call it? Windowshade-type affair, if it was properly designed, would give you the same effect. 344.21 54 52 PLT This is the PLT continuing with M487-3 Alfa on page 3-4, food management equipment. Wardroom table, eating station: I would classify it as adequate. We need better ways of restraining our utensils. I - I don't like to put them up every time. There's no - there's no reason to put them up in a drawer. It's a pain to put them in that little holder. The holder is unacceptable as far as I'm concerned - the holder for the tableware. I got the eating utensils up in our private lockers. You put the stuff in there - They're hard to get in. Then they just float out. I've put rubber bands around my tray, and I hold my stuff down with rubber - with rubber bands. The magnets are let's see. I would give them a poor. The magnets just aren't strong enough. I'd say - I'd like to be able to throw a knife at this thing and have it hold onto the thing, but we've kicked By looking out - While looking out the wardroom window, we've kicked our utensils off. And I've got a spoon stuck on the collector right now upstairs, the diffuser collector. And the wardroom table as an eating station is not bad. It's I would say that it's adequate. Okay, the thigh restraints, I don't use. I - I use the foot restraints, and I use them out to the side, not on the pedestal, because you got to re-clock your triangle cleat every time you do that. We talked about that before. Wardroom light-duty foot restraints are Just like the head - they're unaccepted. The - Yes, unacceptable. They're not they don't even serve the utility function for which they were designed. Food reconstitutlon dispenser: They're a little bit stiff - getting a little bit stiff to work at times, but I really can't complain too much about that, other than the fact that in the future See, we have to reconstitute many, many, many items.

344 21 55 27

PLT

34_ 21 56 25

PLT

955

In fact, most of them, they require more than, I think, the 6-ounce max limit of these things. I think that a food reconstitution dispenser should fill to a volume equivalent to the max required for the reconstitution of an individual food item. Now if you're trying to fill a contingency water bag, okay; I mean no argument there. I'm not saying that if you don't have a quart of water in, to be able to put a quart of water in there, because that could be un - undesirable. But I think we should be able to charge that thing with enough water to fill the food items which require, say, 8 ounces of water. Water gun is good. I would say that's - in fact, wou_d be given an excellent rating. 344 21 57 23 PLT The food tray: I mentioned this a little - a little bit earlier. I don't like - The magnets aren't strong enough. The tray lid, of course, has been bad-mouthed quite justifiably. And that's a pretty lousy design, that little latch on there. Let me see if I can think of anything else on the food tray, because there were some comments I want to make on it. The timer,we don'tuse. We Just turn the thing on. It doesn't put out that much heat. You can just turn the heater on, and it's never going to burn anything, for crying out loud. It - it Just doesn't put out that much heat. Food cans: They've already been - Let's see. The food tray is adequate. Making sure of that. Water gun is excellent. Food cans are adequate. Those have the - They Some of them have collapsed. We were able to get them out of the overcans with no problem. That was a concern to me. Because of the - Apparently, they got some higher than 5 psi in there. Beverage dispenser: The beverage dispensers are - let's see - poor. You get an awful lot of air in them, which is not to say - maybe not the blame to - not the fault of the dispenser, but the valve is not reliably easy to use. And we - Sometimes is very difficult to get the thing lined up between - in there, but let's give it an adequate. Seasoning dispensers are adequate but certainly can be improved. I think we - The idea - The salt dispenser is the best step in the right direction. It's highly directional; that is, you can direct it

_

344 21 58 06

PLT

956
with a great deal of accuracy, place the salt in there, and also it's a fine spray. 344 21 59 17 PLT And it has enough velocity that it shoots in there and sticks on the item. The pepper and the hot sauce: Both of those are - We're certainly happy to have them. I - I - I don't want to bad-mouth them, but I couldn't give it better than an adequate because I think that there is a better way of getting the stuff on the food. Eating utensils: No, they're certainly - Give them a very good. Sleep restraint: I think that the sleep restraint is Let me give it an excellent with the qualification that I think that individuals may want to modify that slightly, but I've had no trouble sleeping due to the sleep restraint itself. 34_ 21 59 57 PLT Trash airlock: I've had some problems with that, but we - It's functional, and I think that the the action that pulls the lid down on the trash airlock is not - is not working properly. And we have to stand on it, of course, to get trash airlock closed again. Vacuum cleaners: They serve the purpose for the low - low vacuum requirement here, and I think the - the circuit breaker location on the vacuum cleaner - I - I find myself turning that thing upside down, sideways, and every other direction every time; I never can remember where it is. The fact that it is recessed is excellent. It keeps me from bumping the breaker, of course, but it just seems to me I don't know why it is, but I personally find myself searching for that circuit breaker every time I get ready to use the vacuum cleaner. 344 22 O0 _8 PLT It ought to be located in the same general area as the switch. I'm not saying it ought to be next to it, but that's the only thing that is bothering me about the vacuum cleaner other than that and its weird shape, which is no particular problem. And the - But the one thing about the vacuum cleaner I think was really - is unacceptable is the way that thing stows and some of the - the mounts that were designed. All of them are blind pin locations. You have to - It takes you longer to put the doggone thing into stowage, if you bother to put it into stowage, than it does to use the vacuum cleaner.

957

344 22 01 17

PLT

Wardroom table, non-eating uses: Well, we find ourselves not putting-the top on the food trays a lot. It certainly would - it - it makes a nice working surface. I would say it was adequate. Tool caddy: Oh, that's - that is unacceptable, the tool caddy is. I used it one time, lost two or three tools, and I don't know what all else, and I threw it away. I threw it back where I got it and vowed I'd never use it again. It does not hold the items, and it's got all the little pickiest pockets on it and everything and I think I could - I - I - I don't want to be unduly critical on it because I'm sure that someone had our best interests in mind when they designed it, but that thing is unacceptable for all because it doesn't serve the purpose for which it is designed. Portable fan: We have - there's - there's certainly - Let me give it a very good. They certainly move air, and they seem to be a lot bigger than they would really need to be, but from that standpoint, and from the functional standpoint, they're ex - ex - Let's see. I gave them a very good. Okay. 0DA kit: I don't know what that is.

344 "22 01 42

PLT

344 22 02 25

PLT

Garments:

Garments should not be made of the

synthetic material if you plan to wear garments for more than Just a little while. Cotton is very nice next to the skin. The - Whatever this - PBI, or whatever it is we wear, it's very odorous odoriferous. It stinks, is what it does after a couple of days' use. And if you looked at our consumables, you can - you know what we do not have a change of clothes every day. 344 22 02 56 PLT So that this - Whatever this brown - dirty brown stuff is that we wear, it certainly is not good for repeated wear. Other than that, I think we were high on the learning curve, and I Just cannot criticize people for selecting this fabric. We Just didn't know. But Just to make - make it clear, so that there won't be any failure in communication, I would say that the clothing is poor to unacceptable because of the fabric and its odor and its poor qualities. 344 22 03 31 PLT perspiration-absorbing

Also, the - Again, I don't know. I don't want to be mean about this, but the little pockets that

958
we have on here, the scissors keep coming out of mi***. They weren't quite large enough for the scissors. I don't know how. The little flaps were Just not long enough on a lot of them. If the flaps had been about an inch and a half longer, we could have used the little - tiny little pockets, and I'm talking about the one in the front. I've used - I use it for pencils now. It would sure be nice for a penlight, but it's Just no good because the little flap isn't long enough. The snaps on the clothes, that one in the center These clothes were inci - apparently were not designed by a clothes designer because - Put a snap on the back of it, it rests right on your spine when - Of course in one g, it's very bad. In zero g, it's no problem. But we use it a lot in training. In one g, that thing was really bad. 344 22 04 24 PLT So overall - let's see - overall, I give garments an - an adequate rating with the qualification the comments that I've made, again understanding that those were - those were made in the - on the basis of experience that we have gained as in actual use and not because there was - there was any failure on the part of people to anticipate, because we Just didn't know. Light baffles: Now, I don't know. At least that's in the sleep compartment. I have no question about the light baffle. I have no problem with that. 344 22 04 54 PLT Privacy curtain: I've no problem with that. That's certainly, say - Give it very adequate to very good on the light baffle and privacy curtain. Air diffusers: They're - I would say there's they're completely adequate. And I - I know we have not gone around screwing them in and out or anything like that because apparently we're getting enough flow and it - it doesn't bother us that much. Air vents in the sleep compartment: I've adjusted mine several times and they're excellent. I have no question about those. And that ends the debriefing on 3 Alfa for the PLT, pages 3-3 and 3-4 in the mal checklist. PLT out. This is the CDR at 22:15 Zulu with a 487-3 Alfa, a subjective evaluation guide, number I. And we'll Just get right - right off with the top one

34h 22 05 39 3hh 22 i_ 19

PLT CDR

959

here. OWS fireman's pole: I rate that very good. We found that it was a very, very convenient and handy thing to have in the beginning, after we got here, and we kept it up for about 2 weeks. And finally, after about 2 weeks, we felt that we could make it quite comfortably from one part of the spacecraft to the other without the need of a fireman's pole; so we've taken it down. And we have nothing installed now, not even the strap. We find that that particular piece of equipment, though, was quite useful during the, you might say, get-acquainted phase, when we were getting used to the - to the workshop and how to get around, to get myself positioned away so that I don't get that feedback. 34_ 22 16 41 CDR Okay, OWS dome and wall handrails: I would rate them very good. I think that, particularly in the area of the dome, the handrails are quite quite good. There's really not much action going on up in the dome; so there's not a whole lot of requirement for a great many handrails up there. Those handrails that are up there are quite adequate, and I don't see that there's any - any need for any great - great amount of change there. Down in the lower part, in the wall around the dome lockers and everything - I'm going to class the water ring structure as dome and wall handrails, and I found that they were very, very convenient. It was a very good idea. I would call those excellent because you got a place to lock your feet in while you're working with each of the dome lockers, and I think that's very handy. As you get down further into the - the dome compartment, the handholds become a little bit more far between; however, you've got a lot of other things to grab because there's lots of things down in this area that you work around. I think it would have been a great improvement if we had had some handrails on the side of the film vault because you get over there and start working those doors and things. And it would be good to have a handrail on the side of each film vault. STS handrails are adequate, and that's about where it ends. MDA handholds and handrails are poor to unacceptable, and I won't discuss that again because I t__!ke_ _bout that at my last debriefing,

_

31_ - 22 17 08

CDR

B4_ 22 18 26

CDR

960

_

about what I thought was necessary. Triangular shoe cleats, grid: Those are excellent. I think the big thing we need to do is not to clutter up the grid too much. The grid itself and the shoe cleats are fine and dandy, but we unfortunately have a lot of things clamped down on the grid. And makes it - It greatly limits the places we can go and place our feet. The conical shoe cleats relative to the grid: I'll have to say "No comment" on that, because I haven't had time to try out the conical shoe cleats. Water tank foot platform: I called that excellent; I lumped that in with the - the handrails. 344 22 19 35 CDR Portable M512/M479 foot platform: Those are very handy for suited work, but I think they could - could possibly be dispensed with. I would say that they're - they are excellent; they are good, you know, but I don't know that they're all that necessary. We find that getting in and out of the suit is more of a get-out-inthe-middle-of-thedome-area-and-kind-of-wr estlearound sort of a situation, although I must

admit, the guy who is helping you get into your suit is certainly well anchored in those foot platforms. That foot platform also was extremely valuable out on EVA, and I think the modification that was done to it in order to take it outside and use it for the M1 - S - or S193 antenna repair was very good. I think the rating I would have to give the platform is excellent, but it's not used as often as it - as it - as I - one would expect, I think. 3_4 22 20 _9 CDR The ATM foot platform: Both of the ATM platforms are excellent. Again, because of the grid and because you can lock in and you have a various various different ways that you can position yourself, they're very good. Portable handholds: We haven't used the portable handholds very much. We have a couple in here on the grid floor and in the forward compartment, and they're Just really not used that much. We have none in the MDA, any of the portable handholds, and really have lots of places we can use handholds as I mentioned last time in my 487-2, I believe it was, but no place these particular handholds could be fastened. Portable equipment restraints tethers, bungees, universal mounts, et cetera:

.4

961

Universal mounts, I think, are - are very good. We found them to be extremely useful and versatile. The bungees also; very useful, very versatile. 344 22 22 01 CDR It's - it's a good idea that they put the snaps as well as the hooks on them. I think the later ones with the metal, wider flat hooks are much better than the - the ones with the little round wire hooks, the earlier models. And the main reason is because they're less dangerous. There's no - little or no chance of - of Jabbing one of those flat hooks into your skin, but certainly the little sharp ones are very dangerous. Tethers, wrist tethers and waist tethers have been extremely valuable on EVA, and I've always been a very strong proponent of them. I would rate them as excellent. The long shorts and short - long straps and short straps: I don't see them listed anywhere; so I'll hit them here. I think they're very handy. The only trouble is that they're very heavy and b111ky. Seems to me there must be a lighter way of going about this. I can't think of it offhand. I think one thing that would have been very handy up here would have been more rope, more of the PBI rope. I think that would have been _very handy equipment to have. 344 22 23 22 CDR The - On a few pieces of equipment we found some straps that were almost completely Velcro, and we found it very handy for lashing small cables, like TV power cables, DAC power cables, and things like that. No snaps on these - Just wrap them around three or four times and then Velcro them to themselves, and they're quite adequate. And I think probably more of those and less of the short straps would have been probably Just as well. The ATM seat/backrest restraint: We haven't even used it yet. I think probably we'll give it a whirl one of these days, but as it stands right now, the SL-3 crew had taken it out and gotten it out of the area. And we've been plenty comfortable the way we were without it and Just haven't any real requirement to go get it, put it in, and use it. Waste _nagement/hygiene equipment. Fecal collection equipment: I would say adequate on the fecal collection equipment. I must say - I think I mentioned this in my last one, too - I was very pleasantly surprised about that. I found that it worked quite well. The

_.

962

process of collecting fecal matter and everything was not quite as - as messy and bad as I had imagined it could be. The equipment, I think, works very well. I don't know Just exactly how to tell you to improve it. 3_ 22 25 I0 CDR I just can't think of any other thing to say there. They - The - I've already mentioned foot restraints in the wardroom, and I see it's coming up again; so I'll get to that later. Urine collection equipment: I would say very good. I think that a little better system of sampling would be - would be in order here, a little bit easier system of sampling. The one we have takes just too much time, and sampling urine should be - should not be a 15- or 20-minute effort. It should be a 5-minute effort. way to do that. adequat e. 344 22 25 52 CDR We should try to find an easier The handwasher, I found to be

I think the only possible improvement - Another way to go on a handwasher would be - also, again again - I believe I mentioned this before - the idea of a see-through container or something that you could put items in to wash them, like your razor or something like that. Also your hands might possibly - Somewhat like - Oh, in many garages you have a little sandblasting rig where you put your hands in - in gloves and you put your - the item that you want to sandblast or clean inside. Then you close it up, and your hands hold it inside the box, and you - you spray it with the sandblasting equipment. Some - some Something on that order might be quite valuable for the handwasher. Fecal/urine collector lap strap and handholds, I find very good. I use them, and I find them to be very handy. WMC handwasher handrail : That 's also quite handy.

3_

22 27 03

CDR

Foot restaints: I've already discussed that. They're lousy - absolutely lousy. That's probably the most - The biggest single disappointment in the waste management compartment is the foot restraints. And I don't see any sense in going into that again. I think I waxed philosophical about that pretty much in the last one. WMC ceiling handrail: Very seldom used it. I would call it very good, but I don't really see that that was too terribly necessary. With proper

963

foot restraints, I don't think you need a handrail. The light-duty foot restraints: Really, they're no good; in other words, unacceptable. Drying stations: I'm not sure I know what a drying station is. If they're talking about the - the little cups that we stuff our towels and washcloths in to hold them, I would say those are excellent. Those are extremely handy, and those are - are very simple and unique. I think that probably they should be spread out more in future spacecraft instead of being so close together. 344 22 28 27 CDR The shower: I find the shower to be very, very satisfying, very nice. I think for a first - a first try of a shower in space, I think that I would - I would certainly rate this as - as adequate. The spray nozzle is very good. I think the scheme of charging the bottle with - with hot water and having a hot - hot spray is very good. I think the soap - the soap dispenser idea is very good, although I think the soap is lousy. There's got to be a better way to give soap than to give us that stuff that smells like dog shampoo. It's very unpleasant stuff to use. And I think that in the future, soap that we use should have some sort of a pleasant odor to it. And I think I mentioned that at the last one, too, but I'll go ahead and say it anyway. The hand soap is not as bad as the shower soap. And I Just don't understand why it had to be that, because my wife also uses Nutragena at home and her Nutragena smells quite pleasant. The Nutragena that was got for us Just smells like dog shampoo, and I Just don't think that was really necessary. Somebody could have put themselves out a little more and made it a little more pleasant, I think. The only shortcoming of the shower, I would say, is the - is the suction head. It's Just not flexible enough, and it doesn't - doesn't flow over the body well enough to remove the water. There's a redesign necessary there, and I don't think that's too difficult a thing. I think it could be very easily redesigned into something quite - quite nice and useful. I suspect that what we'll need is a selection of heads Just like we have for the vacuum cleaner because I think when you start cleaning up the

_

3h4 22 29 37

CDR

34_ 22 30 17

CDR

964

shower and - and scooping up water around the shower, that you probably need a wide head; but for the body, you certainly need a soft head that'll follow the contours of the body a little better and pull the water off of you. The personal hygiene kit, I think is - is very good. I think you could make some minor improvements, but they're not all that necessary. They're large enough to put quite a few items in them. There's quite a few items in them. The towels and washcloths were, unfortunately, saddled with a fl_mability problem; so we couldn't go for something nice and simple, like cotton or the terrycloth - cotton terryeloth that we're used to. And we find that the towels are really not quite as absorbent as we would like them to be. I think the towels 3h4 22 31 19 CDR - they should also be bigger.

They're long enough, but they're not wide enough. And I think - especially when you're taking a shower, we find that it takes a minimum of two towels and two washcloths to take a shower. So for the towels and the washcloths, I would have to - I would have to say poor. They need - they need to be bigger, they need to be more absorbent, and we've got to come to grips with this flammability problem somewhere along the line. General general utility wipes: I find them to be quite handy. We are out of tissues; so we're having to use the utility wipes in the same manner as tissues. And they're about twice as large as they should be for the tissue - type use. So we've gotten into sort of a conservative mode around here. We Customarily, when we need to use a wipe like a tissue, we tear it in half and put half of it back. And that helps a lot.

344 22 32 17

CDR

Wet wipes: And then down below it mentions utensil wipes, and I'm not sure that I know the difference between the two. All we have, as far as I know, is wet wipes. And all they are is, I think, Zeph - Zephiran chloride. They're quite - quite handy. They do a good Job on our utensils. What I do for the most part is wipe my utensils with one side - and usually you can fold it over - and on the outside, I use up the rest of the moisture on it cleaning the walls and things like that. And that helps us keep the walls fairly clean. Biocide wipes, I think,

965

are an absolute necessity up here. It would be nice if they didn't smell quite as bad and didn't stain quite as badly. But, on the other hand, maybe that color is there for a purpose and that is to make sure that after we wipe the biocide that's been on for a while, that you remember to wipe it off later. 344 22 33 18 CDR Or then again, maybe you don't need to wipe it off later. At any rate, it's kind of a messy business using a biocide wipe, and you're always quite relieved when you can go back and - and clean it up with a wet - wet towel or something. The idea of following a biocide wipe with a wet wipe, I think, is rather ridiculous because a wet wipe Just really doesn't do it. It takes about two wet wipes to follow one biocide wipe. Trash and plenum bags: Trash bags, we found to be quite handy. There are no disposal bags left up here except urine disposal bags, and they're in short supply; so we find ourselves using trash bags for everything. The trash bags are quite handy. I'm not giving any grades for these things, am I? Let's stop and go back. And based on my discussion, I'll give you some of your - some of your word grades, your evaluations. Personal hygene kit, I said was very good. Towels and washclothes, I said was poor. General utility wipes, very good. Wet wipes, very good. Biocide wipes, adequate. Utensil wipes, I call them the same as wet wipes, and they're very good. Trash bags, very good. One of the beauties of the trash bag is that when you have a small piece of paper or any small item in your hand you want to get rid of, it's easy to pop through the membrane in a trash bag and get rid of it. And it doesn't very often come out again. Plenum bags: We are finding the plenum bags to be extremely valuable. A lot of the large dry trash, like the empty washcloth dis - containers, the wipe containers, the - the herring bones out of our food cans, the towel containers Any large dry thing that is too bulky to put in a bag and stuff down the trash airlock quite handily goes into the plenum bags.

344 22 33 58 _-

CDR

344 22 34 37

CDR

966

_

344 22 35 21

CDR

So I will have to rate the plenum bags as excellent. Let's Just hope we don't run out of plenum to put them in. Urine and fecal bags: The urine bags I think are very good. I've had one failure since I've been here. That's been recorded; so I don't think I need to go into that again. The fecal bags - a lot of sticky folding and everything. I don't know how you can avoid that. If you want to contain that stuff and get it into an oven and get it baked out, it looks like we're stuck with this method. I think the method of putting it into the fecal collection equipment is - is good. It is not too terribly difficult to do, to - to take a whole lot of time, and that's probably a pretty good system. Food management equipment. Wardroom table: I pretty well hit the wardroom table on the last one. I would give it a rating of very good. The foot restraint problem down there - Let's see if there's a foot restraint Yes, there is a foot restraint. I'll get to that later. Okay, the thigh restraints: I find them to be very good. I found them to be quite helpful and useful, and I use them every meal. The lightduty foot restraints: I guess that means the straps. Those are not too good because you can't really keep your feet in them .... Put some roods on them, but that still doesn't do it. The other foot restraints, the triangle foot restraints in the wardroom table area, I've already discussed. They're unacceptable. And we have not yet got around to taking one of those platforms up in order to get access to more of the grid restraints, but we will, and we'll give you a report on that whenever we do. The water gun is handy and easy to use. It's ridiculously large, and it takes up a lot of weight. I think from a weight-saving standpoint, they should be redesigning that to change it. The rating on that would be very good. Okay, the ... ... ATM ... Okay, getting on with my report here. The food trays, I would say, are excellent. They do a very good job. I think the little time-study

i

34_ 22 36 05

CDR

--.

344 22 37 07

CDR

SPT CC CDR 344 22 38 38 CDR

967

thing is quite handy. The food cans are very good. I'm afraid - Well, let's say adequate on the ratings of the food cans. Those things are dangerous, really. Sooner or later somebody is going to cut themselves with that, and I think we need to find a different way to put our food up. But those food cans do do the Job. They are adequate. It's Just that I'm afraid they're dangerous. The beverage dispensers are good. The only problem with the food cans and the beverage dispensers or whatever the food comes in is essentially in the food itself. The food outgasses. It causes bubbles. 344 22 39 32 CDR We end up ingesting a lot of air, which causes a great deal of flatus and gastric distress, which is very bothersome. And I don't know how we're going to whip that problem. It's not the fault of the food cans or the dispensers. I would say it's the - it's the fault of the - you know, the food. And I don't know how we can pack it so that it doesn't outgas. That's - that's a ongoing problem that we're going to have to cope with and solve sometime soon. The beverage dispensers are really handy to use ... I would say probably 5 or 4 percent of valve failure in our beverage dispensers. Maybe even that's a high number. The seasoning dispensers are working quite well. The only thing that Bill and I have indicated that would probably even be nicer would be maybe an eye dropper or something like that would be ... We find that the pepper, being in an oil base, has quite a bit of surface tension. And you can squirt the pepper out of the little - the little nozzle, and it Just kind of flows back over the nozzle again and m_kes a bubble. And then it disappears down over the - the top of the nozzle. Possibly a [sic] eye dropper would give us the same problem. I'm not sure. We have found ways of getting around it, though. At the pepper dispenser, as - as well as the - the hot sauce dispenser, is - I Just - I turn my spoon over so the round side is up, so the neck side is up, and then squirt out a bubble of pepper or hot sauce and quickly get it onto the spoon so it'll adhere to the spoon before it decides to flow back over the - the nozzle. Then I can Just

_

344 22 40 25

CDR

344 22 4i 04

CDR

968

turn the spoon over and smear it over the top of my food and it seems to be - it's evening out quite nicely. The eating utensils: The big spoon is by far the most handy. The fork is used only when we have meat - frozen meat, and it doesn't get much use other than that. The small spoon, in my case, gets very little use. So let me go back. I have I've broken away from the grading system again. B44.22 42 02 CDR Food cans. I - I've - I gave them a grade of Let's see. I think I gave them a grade of adequate, and it would have been better except for the danger of it, the sharpness of the thing. The beverage dispensers also are adequate. Seasoning dispensers are adequate. We need to - need some improvements. Eating utensils, I would say, are very good. I think we could probably leave the little spoon home. I could move in - move on to miscellaneous now. We have sleep restraints. I would grade the sleep restraints as very good. At - Having had to sleep in the command module with no sleep restraint and then getting the next night down here in the workshop in the sleep restraint, I must say that the difference was quite quite - quite sharp. 344 22 4B 04 CDR It was a very strong difference; it was very it was very pleasant to get into that sleep restraint. I think the best thing we ever did was make those body straps. I think that they've been very fine. I think maybe that in the future, that we don't need to go quite to the extremes of having to get in through a neck ring. I think it would be Just as easy to have a sleeping bag sort of thing. If you could zip down and get into it and then zip up, then you wouldn't have to climb into it through a neck ring. I think the flexibility that's been designed into the restraint is very good. The fact that we can have a - either no blanket or a top blanket or a top and bottom blanket is very good. At the present, I have never used a - an overblanket, the top - the bottom blanket. The top blanket has - was on when I got here, and I've kept it on. And the only times that - When I've gotten cold, I found it to be much more convenient to put on a pair of - a half union suit than it would be to put on the lower blanket. And so when

--

344 22 43 47

CDR

969

the beta angle gets lower and we start getting cooler, I Just put on a half union suit. That I keeps my feet warm and the rest of my body stays quite warm. B4_ 22 44 38 CDR In the very hot weather, I leave the top blanket rolled up and put it under my head rest, and I sleep in the nude. And I found - find it to be quite comfortable. So I found essentially that I've had no use for the - the large overblanket, the bottom blanket I've been calling it, and that I find that by Just either rolling up or leaving the top blanket down and changing what I sleep in, the clothing I sleep in, that I'm quite - quite I comfortable in the sleep restraint. I think the head restraint has been a good idea. I've made quite a - quite a use of that, and it helps quite a bit. 344 22 45 25 CDR The trash airlock: The trash airlock has been very good. I think I would give it a rating of - I'd give it a rating of very good. Works quite well. Thank heavens we made the - the pressure relief valve, the orifices, large enough so that you don't have to wait an unncessary long period of time while that airlock either vents or pressurizes. The trash airlock is pretty straightforward, works quite well. We've not had any problem with it so far. We took the advice of the SL-B crew, and that was: "Be careful. Do not fill your bags too full so that they cause any trouble getting out. " The three little tabs on the bottom of the bags that fasten over the dogs, the ears on the trash airlock, I think were a very good idea. It gives you an opportunity to get a good thrust going with the pusher in the trash airlock and get the get the trash propelled well out into the - into the waste tank. The vacuum cleaner is quite handy. I would give it a rating of very good. The improvements I would recommend is that we Just have more vacuum; that's all. I realize the design of this and where our limitations are, and I think future designs - Somebody ought to dream up a new vacuum cleaner, design it from scratch, and do it so that it's got a good, high vacuum.

344 22 46 lb

CDR

970

i

344 22 47 03

CDR

The uses of the vacuum cleaner motors and the suit drying system and - in the shower, I think, are very good. Very good versatile use of the vacuum cleaner equipment. The wardroom table for noneating uses - non-eating uses: Found it to be very useful. I would say adequate. I'd put the top on top of my tray and pu - put a spring across it. I find it to be quite happy - quite handy as a work table. The tool caddy: I think it's useless. I have not used it. Bill used it once, and he sprayed tools from one end of the workshop to the other. It Just didn't work out. I think that we're better off - Instead of a tool caddy, I think we're better off with Just an elastic belt. Or the pockets we have work quite adequately. I find myself stuffing tools in my waistband as well. The portable fan: The portable fan is very useful. There's one in the experiment compartment now mounted on a universal mount. We use it to keep it cool while we're - while we're pedaling; we use it to keep us cool while we're pedaling the bicycle, and it does help quite a bit. And it - The - I think that with low and high blower speeds, it blows very good. The off-du_y entertainment kit: I think the thing that we're getting the most use out of is the - are the tape recordings. I - I am reading my first book and finding that very useful. None of us has had the time to play any cards. I think one of these days we'll try, just to try it out.

34h 22 47 58

CDR

344 22 49 03

CDR

But as yet we have not played any cards. The exercise equipment that's in there really hasn't been used. The exercises we're using now are more than adequate, and we Just don't need what's down there. What I'm - The ones we're using are the Mark I and the treadmill, and we find them to be extremely useful. The Mark II, the springs, are also extremely useful. Garments: I would say the rating to be given on the garments is very good. For the most part, I think the garments are reasonably well designed. Lot of pockets. The flexibility of being able to take off the legs and have shorts and have the long legs, I think, was a very good design idea. I think the crew were the ones who were all for that and got it going. Your design deficiencies are: Number l,

CDR

.-_

9Y1
the material catches sweat and then _lows the And with

the liquid to leave but the smell remains. the garment - the garments appear to react

sweat, and you end up with a scent about your your body after a while. The shirts are particularly unpleasant. The - the little pockets that were added at the end as - mainly as a result of a request by A1 Bean after consultation with all the rest of us - that's great. The pockets are deep. 344 22 50 48 CDR But the thing is, somewhere along the line somebody dropped the ball. And the pockets that are designed for the scissors are not - Well, the scissors won't stay in because the flap won't lock over the top of it. The pocket that's designed for the flashlight is too short. The flashlight comes out. It's - It's too bad because those would have been very, very handy pockets. It's just that the doggone retention straps don't hold the item in. The pockets that hold in our little trifold hooks Just barely hack it. And I don't see any reason why they couldn't have added an extra half inch onto the strap or another inch of depth onto the pocket. As it stands now, the pocket is - is not deep enough. There's about 3 inches of the hook that sticks out, and the hook is inclined to hang up on things as we sall by them. I think probably we should have made the pockets another 2 inches deeper and Just had an inch of the hook sticking out. We would have been a lot better off. Light baffle in the sleep compartment is excellent. It does its Job well. It allows the air to flow through it. And I'm quite pleased with mine. The privacy curtain is excellent. Works very nicely, and it's quite effective. The air diffusers in the - in the whole area are very good. I think it was a good idea to put the adjustment features in them. I must admit, however, that I haven't used the adjustment features because they've been adjusted very nicely now, apparently by previous crews, and we're quite satisfied with what we have. The air vents in the sleep compartment: Mine is very good. The only complaint I have is that it keeps my feet cold all the time. And that's one of the things that cause me to,

344 22 51 31

CDR

344 22 52 24

CDR

972

on cool days, to sleep in a half union suit in order to keep my feet warm. I don't think I want to try A1 Bean's trick of getting in head - head down, turning my bed upside down. If I - if I let my head get as cold as my feet get, I would probably end up with a cold. This is the CDR with termination of Mh87-3 Alfa. 344 22 53 19 CDR CDR out.

344 22 55 13

SPT

SPT at 22:55 and talking about the ATM pass which began at 21:57 for the 55 CALROC. No problem. Just carried it all out as written and also got done a little bit early; so I gave another one. I'll give you the pointing coordinates first of the first three. Buildi_ block 26 is - The first one was done UP at - UP, a plus of 2 - 128. That's a plus 1 - plus 1_8. A LEFT of minus 15. The next one was done DOWN to the lower LEFT of that at the UF or - DOWN of minus 55 and I_FT of minus 235. Third one was done to the RIGHT, which was, I think, UP of minus 55 and a T.FJ_Tof minus 55, also. Coordinates on the third point was minus 55 on both. The last one which I did was an extra, I had a little time. It was done right at the center, which were the coordinates that were UP, plus h0 and a LEFT of minus 145. 56, got the exposures called for. 82A, of course, did not because of the door problem. Hope we can pick up some of those on the next orbit. And 56 also got a SINGLE FRAME; FILTER, l; duration about 8 minutes. I spent the last h or 5 minutes looking for bright points and was able to Just about locate one when we got into ESS. And I could not confirm that I really had one using the detectors. We had a beautiful one which I previously mentioned up there in 00:20, around 0.9, which kind of came in 1 - l-l/2 to 2 days and disappeared.

3_h 22 56 27

SPT

3_h 22 58 _6

SPT

It's not there this - was not there this morning. Was there yesterday, and early yesterday it was quite bright. I'll have to keep m_ eye on the XUV monitor and continually compare it with pictures which I am taking once every morning. And also I get - the same holds true for the 52, which I am taking pictures of. I have gotten another overlay

973

made, which I have put over the occulting disk of the inner ring and also the bright points on the scope. And this allows me to get exposures which are geared for the rays of the corona outside approximately 2 solar radii and also outside that one burned in the bottom of 2. And I think it gives me a little 344 22 58 _9 SPT SPT out. better definition.

###

DAY 3h5 (AM)

973-1

345 00 02 55

CDR

This is the CDR at 00:02 Zulu. I just realized I had not debriefed my early morning ATM pass. I guess that's probably because it wasn't too terribly interesting and not really - not very much to debrief about. I did - First of all, we did the J0P 6, step i, and that was - Let's see. I think it was building block IA and B, and there were no problems in execution of that JOP. Also sent down some TV down - downlinkwhich went pretty well.

345 00 03 34

CDR

In observations, there was nothing new in XUV that I could see. I did notice in H-ALPHA 2, while doing the other work, that active region 96 had picked up a second sunspot. It was very, very faint and I never really got to go up and look at it again. And I noticed when I was up in the ATM Just a few minutes ago with Ed, looking over his shoulder, I noticed that that second sunspot has become a bit more pronounced. CDR out. This is PLT. The time is 00:07. Now debriefing on the handheld photographs taken over Fiji and the tropical storm to the southeast of FiJi. I took one photograph over FiJi as per schedule on the pad. The island - the large, more circular island was relatively clearer than the rest. It did look like they have about h/lOths cloud cover. Went ahead s_ad took one frame. I took a sequence of about - well, let's see, that was frame number 160 of FiJi; 161, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 170, 171, were taken of the tropical storm, using the instructions in the book. The tropical storm, which is centered to the southeast of FiJi, is - has a single arm to it - the pinwheel that comes off of the - the solid nucleus, and there was no eye. It was solid, built up in the - what would normally be the eye - the center of the storm. And it had one major - I guess you'd call it feeder, extending - but I don't know if you'd call it a feeder or not because it was extending to the southeast. In fact, we flew right down the main band of the arm of the tropical storm.

3h5 00 Oh 03 34_ O0 07 14

CDR FLT

PLT

345 00 08 33

FLT

973-2

There was no cloud-free moat that I could locate. The photographs are all at a very high angle in contrast to the instructions in the book, because it - there's not - there's no way of getting a good oblique angle looking forward out of the STS 190 window. The only way you can get an oblique is to look aft. And I did get some obliques of some of the clouds. As far as the frontal squall line, vertical angle. 345 00 09 19 PLT it would be at a nearly

The - There were several interesting features to the storm. It extended - This band - The arm that went into the center of the storm extended some 2400 miles to the southeast. And located about every 600 to 800 miles along that arm on the south side of it were complementary lows. They were small but very well defined low pressure areas that, to the south of that, the central band that was leading into the main storm, centered near FiJi. There were two very clearly defined small lows. One was about, I would say, 400 miles to the southeast of the center of the storm, and the other, very well defined, was about 2400 miles to the southeast of the storm. I took photographs of both of those. Complementary low is what I'm calling them. But I thought it was sort of interesting, because they were they sort of look like shed-off vortices from that main feeder, in - except they were ro - of course, rotating in the wrong direction. That's not what they were.

345 00 l0 34

PLT

Along this main feeder band, and I'm calling it that because it's the main arm of it - it was not extending toward the intertropical convergence zone. It was extremely long and it - it had although the cloud cover was solid and it looked to be about, oh, maybe 100 miles or more wide, there were intermittent positions or points of extreme high activity and cumulonimbus buildup with overshooting cloud tops.

345 00 ll 02

PLT

And I have several photographs taken and I don't I didn't record the time accurately on them. But they are taken in sequence as we went right down that main arm leading into the eye or the center of the storm near FiJi. There was also one low

_-_

973-3

pressure area located to the north of the storm, and I took one photograph of that. The relative position of the - these small complementary lows is - should be fairly easy to determine from the sequence and the fact that I should have had part of the _in arm of that storm in the frame. FLT I took one high oblique about 1000 miles southeast of FiJi; one hori - with the horizon in it of another low. So there were three lows located to the south of this main feeder arm. And I got a picture of one, what looked like another major cyclonic circulation by the Southern Hemisphere which is clockwise_ of course. And that was - As I said, it's about lO00 miles or T,-ybe 1200 miles southeast of FiJi. And that was - is the only one in which I could get the horizon. We tracked right down the middle of that main arm, and that's why I was unable to get obliques. 3h5 00 12 23 PLT I tried to get angular shots. However, some of the shots of the seething tops should - I - I stoppeddown to 16, so they should show up pretty well. Seemed like there was one other major feature that I wanted to mention. Oh, yes', I know what it was. The southern edge of that band that led into the center of the storm - that was the the single pinwheel arm - had a very clearly defined limit to it - a southern limit to it. In other words, the outer edge of that thing was very sharp, the - of the pinwheel arm. The inner edge of the pinwheel arm was very ill defined and graded off into scattered cirrus and various cloud types and forms. 345 O0 13 09 3h5 00 25 17 PLT SPT PLT out. SPT at 00:25, ATM orbit which began at 23:30. Okay, we did the operations called out for with no problem. The pointing coordinates were UP of plus 40 and a LEFT of minus 120, which was called up from the ground as a result of the actual CALROC performance. In addition to what was showing on the pad, we did a 56 exposure LONG EXPOSURE on FILTER 2. They got about 7 minutes and 50 seconds. And 82_A got one LONG EXPOSURE of 5 minutes at the ROLL of minus 5h00.

973-4

And then, because I had a little time left at the end, I ROLLed to 1080 and gave them exposure of, as called out for on the pad, 30 seconds, WAVFLk'NGTH, LONG, and a second posure of l0 seconds in WAVEJ._NGTH, SHORT. 345 0o 26 35 SPT

over an of ex-

The bright point which I picked out for unattended ops was not a real barn burner. It - it only got up to around 700 or so on the oxygen VI, the coordinates, I have gfven to the ground. The thing that did catch me, though, was that it was fairly isolated. It was not associated with any activity I could see on the disk, and it was quite sharply peaked. I would say plus or minus 2 arc seconds until it dropped the count down to 300 or so, which is surprising with a 5 by 5 slit. I was able to identify this bright point along with a couple others in the pictures from the 82B - 82B XUV monitor. MY only regret is that we had never really got a chance to study that one bright point that came and went in about a day and a half or so. That was here about one day ago.

345 00 27 14

SPT

345 00 28 ii

SPT

SPT out.

TIME

SKIP

345 01 31 55

PLT CDR PLT

... PLT reporting

... recorders

...

They went over the hill. ... the RECORD light on ... record ... record RECORD switch ... PLT reporting termination at 01:30 Zulu. of M509 battery ...

345 01 32 32

PLT

number

7

345 01 42 22

SPT

Hello. Welcome to Skylab 3. If you're wondering why I'm the only one on the screen here, it turns out I'm the only one without a beard; so I was picked. Like to tell you a little bit about where we stand here and mention one kind of a surprising thing to us and, I think, interesting to you. Since we got here, we've done an awful lot of medical experiments, and especially in the past week or two,

973-5

they've started to indicate that we're all in pretty good shape. As a matter of fact, a couple of us are probably in better shape than when we came. What we've attributed this to is Bill Thornton's Revenge, we call it. It's a device for keeping the calves of the legs with a fair amount of muscle bulk left in them, and this has enabled us to, we think, maintain r_ughly the same muscle tone in the legs as we have on the ground. 345 01 _3 21 SPT We've done an awful lot of good Earth resources recently. The first part of this week - Well, as a matter of fact, all this week we have done quite a few Earth resources passes over not only the United States, which we've looked at quite extensively, but also over Australia, Malaysia, India. And we're looking forward to _eking some contributions to knowledge of the other countries, as well as our own, in the future. We've done a fair _mount of work with the solar telescopes. And even though the Sun is quiet, we think weIre learning quite a bit. There's lots of interesting,but not very dynamic,phenomena on the Sun right now, and that's what we're studying. We hope that in another 2 weeks or so we ought to be looking at a pretty active Sun. Done a lot of corollary experiments. We've done an awful lot of visual observations, and this is something that's really been challenging and interesting to us. By that, we mean Just looking down from our vantage point back at the Earth and seeing what we can determine with our cameras and with our eyes that 'll be useful to the people when we get back. For example, Just this afternoon we were looking down in Chile, coast of - the west coast of Chile, which has a lot of fiords. And the Humboldt Current moves into the fiords and creates a - almost a continuous flow through some of those. And it's been proposed by some that it's a potential way of getting energy from the ocean. We were able to photograph this effect, observe it and photograph it, and we hope - CREW PLT ... ..., Jer. Hold on - ...

345 01 43 5_

SPT

F_

3_5 01 44 39

SPT

973-6

345 01 45 59

SPT

Now that we're getting off of TV to ATM MON i, we'll try this whole thing over again. ... No, let's go ahead and do that.

PLT CDR 345 01 48 26 SPT

Hello. Welcome to Skylab 3. You're probably wondering why I'm the only one up here. The other two did not want to get in front of the camera. I guess I'm the only one that's without a beard. What I'd like to do is to tell you a little bit about what we've done in the past week or 2 and then mention something to you which has been sort of unexpected to us and, I think, will be interesting to you. During the past 2 weeks or so, we've done an awful lot of Earth resources. We've looked back now at the United States, and we hope to learn an awful lot about our country which will be useful to us, to all of us. And secondly, we've looked at a few other countries. We've been able to gather some resource information on India, Australia, Malaysia, and we hope in the future to get quite a bit of information on other countries, which will be useful to them. During the past week or so, something that's been kind of gratifying to us Bill, would you get those guys out of the way? During the past week, something which has been rather gratifying to us is that we have been shown to be in fairly good medical shape. As a matter of fact, we're bordering on being in the same condition we were at lift-off and perhaps, in some instances, a little bit better. And we hope this trend will continue in the future. One thing we attribute it to is what we call Thornton's Revenge, this clever idea of Bill Thornton's to keep the calves of the legs in shape. And this is one thing on previous missions which they've not been able to do as well as they would have liked to. We'll show pictures of this in the future. As a matter of fact, Jerry Carr has shown one picture of it already. And we feel that's going to be the answer for us in keeping us pretty much in the same shape we were in on the ground and, if we work hard at it, maybe even a little bit better. We've done an

345 Ol 48 45

SPT

....

SPT 345 01 49 44 SPT

"-"

973-7

awful lot of solar observations during the past couple of weeks. The Sun has been quiet; not much
activity. But we've learned, we nl,*,her of things about the quiet phenomena which are not dynamic, We're done have a lot of corollary Kohoutek think, a fair Sun; studied them but which are -

going to be useful once we understand them well.
experiments. come in and start to

345 01 51 05

SPT

And

we

watched

get brighter and develop a tail. And we're looking forward to a pretty spectacular show here, comes the end - come the end of December. Now one other thing which I - I would like to mention to you now. It was rather unexpected to us, but it's - I guess it's resl]y a first. See, Skylab is a - a different type program than the others. This is the first time in space history where people have use_ the same devices, the same spacecraft, and in this case the same sps_e station. And something unexpected has arisen. We have had some visitors or, we should say, constant companions since we've been here. They've helped us - shown us the ropes when we first got here and are be - have been our companions. And we'd like to show them to you now. So looking now at the ghosts of missions past, here they are! CDR 345 Ol 52 43 SPT ... Get yours ..., and I'll start mine. me when these

.

Okay, Jer. guys are in Okay, out. ••• I'Ii

Now if you'll Just tell your field of view. try and get squared away

CDR

here;

then

get

PLT

345 01 53 58

SPT

When we arrived the ghosts from Unfortunately, Houston. And

here, we missions

found past, not one

these gentlemen, floating around.

Two of them were doing medical experiments.
they did the other send any data down to was located in such a spacecraft week, best

position that we now have a room in the called the haunted head. So until next wishes from the crew of Skylab 3. 345 3_5 01 02 5h 0_ 36 42 CDR CREW Okay, ... Bill.

9Y3-8

--_

345 02 05 19

PLT CREW PLT

Get it on? Yes. All right, one of the more interesting aspects of at least of the operation on board Skylab has Been the donning of the suit, the spaeesuit, or the pressure garment assembly, as it's called. We normally have the suit situated in a foot restraint, which you see attached to the floor here, and we've found that one of the more difficult things was to act,tAlly get in the upper part of the suit which Turns out it wasn't - it wasn't too terribly difficult on the ground, but it's difficult to lean over in zero g because normally you on the ground when you _ust try to bend over and ground, and it makes that you have one g helping lean over; that is, touch your toes on the J sort of a gesture.

345 02 06 00

PLT

Here we have Ed Gibson getting into his suit here, and Jerry is assisting him. We won't go through the full procedure for donning the suit because this is - requires very careful follo_ring of procedural cue cards. But we did - thought it may be interesting to - Just think it may be interesting to look at the operation and the dexterity involved in - or lack of it, as the case may be - in - in donning the suit. You see that we do take full advantage of zero gravity in that we try to move around so that the assistant or the individual assisting has the best possible perches.

345 02 06 41

PLT

Now this is, I think, the more difficult part of the operation - That's actually getting your head through the neck ring. And we find that we actually have to have another person in - in some cases, have another - another individual actually push our head down to get it down far enough to get through the neck ring. And now you see - Well, looks llke - There. Jerry's helping him, and, oh, he's made it very nicely. Must be adapting to zero g. Okay, now he has his head through the neck ring, and the next operation will be to line up the material, the zipper in the suit.
,.e

CREW

3h5 02 07 33

PLT

Okay. I - I'm going to cut. killthe recorder.

I'll go - I'll go _-_

p_

973-9

3h5 02 16 50

PLT

Okay, this is the PLT. We will be continuing _ne narration of the suit donning. We only have 3 minutes left on the video tape recorder; so we probably won't be able to get all this, other than the closing of the zippers. We had to interrupt this for the science conference. Okay. Now we have Ed partially donned in the pressure garment assembly or our space suit. And Jerry's going to attempt to close the two zippers. Therels one zipper on the inside which you see him reaching for now. This is actually the zipper which closes up the inner part of the suit, which is actually a pressure bladder, a large balloon which encases the upper torso and the arms and legs everything except the helmet, of course. And you you'll notice he'll be very careful to hold his fingers in the right place there and to avoid any d_m_ge to the zipper. And it - it's not considered the safest thing to do for a man to don himself;so we assisteach other. It is possible for a man to put it on by himself; fairly difficult. And Jerry's now fastening the - the zipper to the bladder - pressure bladder, and then he will get another zipper and close it. When - This completes this zipper operation, and you will be closing the zipper to - which actually completes the outer garment of the pressure garment assembly. And when he completes this zipping operation, you will have a lock, which will be pro - provided to lock the zippers so that they can't come unzipped. Okay, in spite of what Story said, I think we'll talk about visual observations here. We got the ATM this morning. We'll Just start off here talking about handheld site 33 Alfa - And you see that he'll be working working with his fingers. ... Of course, we - we certainly don't want to damage one of these zippers, and you can see - One of the difficulties we've found in donn4ng the suit this around,

345 02 17 12

FLT

345 02 17 56

PLT

345 02 18 48

CREW

PLT

MCC 345 02 19 O0 PLT

973-10

in zero gravity is, actually, we lose the effect of the weight of the individual and the weight of the suit, itself, in assisting us. Now in other things ..., some things are easier, and some things are harder, more difficult in zero gravity. AndMCC PLT ... - - he's now completing the zipping operation of the front part of the suit. ... Just wanted to pass on ...

MCC PLT

Also attaching safety clips, which take the stress off the zipper. You will notice that this is not the easiest thing in the world to do. It requires a lot of moving around, a lot of pacing and - and stretching of the outer layers of the suit. ... And we find ourselves moving all around the spacecraft as this takes place. And the - One of the things that we miss is the weight of the upper part of the suit assisting us bringing the two edges of the zipper together. You'll see Jerry now is having quite a bit of difficulty in trying to pull the two pieces of material together. Once he gets past about the middle of the back, it'll be much easier. - - get information out of your words. I presently am writing up a new topic, 34 Alfa, which will use the fact that you can detect - And of course, the - Notice how easy it is, of course, for Jerry to move around a 155-pound man plus 30 to 40 pounds of suit. ... Over. Roger, Bill. In the area of plankton growth plumes and all that, we've been particularly impressed by the Falkland - Falkland Current off the eastern coast of Argentina. and down

MCC 3_5 02 20 07 PLT

MCC

345 02 20 45

PLT

CC 345 02 21 04 CDR

MCC

Yes, so have we. Judging by that, I think the South Atlantic currents are converging in there. We've certainly found your observations there

973-11

interesting, and wetre going to begin ting more heavily on that area. CDR Yes, we've that -that got an a%rful lot of photo serpentine plume area.

concentra-

coverage

of

MCC

Good. We're hoping you'll keep an eye on it and not necessarily take more shots of it unless you begin to notice some changes in it. I concur. Okay, Okay. with a end of bust. actn_lly you don't see the ...

PLT MCC 345 02 21 55 PLT

What we - We got interruptedtwice there science conference. I think we're at the the tape. Looks like this is sort of a Oh, well, it was a good idea at the time. This Friday, - we'll be holding

B45 02 22 08

MCC

Okay, moving on here. our first team meeting Droopy-drawers Gibson.

PLT MCC , 345 02 22 17 MCC

- - visual observations team members will be coming in, going over the transcripts one at a time. Then we'll meet and discuss these from an assessment point of view to see how we're doing, whether we think that's the way we ought to be doing, and - Okay, in this ,particular operation here, where Jerry used the donning assist - Actually, he used a strap there to pull the two pieces of the garment together so he can close the zipper. And this was discovered to be a problem peculiar to zero-gravity operations ° Now he pulls the two pieces of zipper together. Actually, he pulls two zippers, they meet each other, and there's a - a lock-fastener-type device which insures, of course, that it doesn't come unzipped. There you are. yours. Scratch my back; I'll scratch

345 02 35 52

PLT

345 02 36 17

PLT

CREW

973-12

345 02 36 51

PLT

Now the zippers are fastened, and all that remains to he done is to take the zipper straps, stow them properly, remove the donning assist strap, and to Velcro down the pieces of overlapping fabric.

3h5 02 37 13

PLT

So there we have the pressure garment assembly, without the helmet, donned. Subsequent to this operation, the pilot would don a secondary oxygen pack, which would be put on his right leg. That's after, of course, putting the gloves on. And he would also put on a pressure control unit, which is a special device for metering the oxygen into the suit while we are inside the closed suit. Notice the - Jerry is fitting the wrist ring of the glove onto the suit, and then he will pull the material up over the wrist ring. And he'll do the same thing for the left arm. These are called EVA gloves because they have special layers on them to protect your hands f9om thermal heating and also to prevent scuffing and tearing of the glove while working outside the vehicle. Now you can look - recognize this, of course, as a helmet; actually a little bit more than that. You have a clear plastic helmet which is very strong plastic, and you Just sort of pull down what's called the extravehicular visor assembly, which protects your eyes from harsh rays of the Sun, un - unfiltered by the atmosphere. There comes down the Skylab extravehicular visor assembly. And in addition to the SEVA, or Skylab extravehicular visor assembly, you'll notice that they're actually, oh, garden variety wind - winwindowshade-like devices or Sun, shade devices, which can he pulled down to give you added sheeting and shielding from the Sun, if you're working in an area where you're facing, more or less, directly toward the Sun. This device separates from the helmet. And the helmet will be put on first, and then the extravehicular visor assembly will be put on second. Okay, that terminates in there. it. I hope we've got it all

345 02 38 20

PLT

345 02 39 14

PLT

345 02 39 40

PLT

TIME

SKIP

973-15

345 04 55 20

SPT

SPT at 0_:55. Handheld photos on m_g CX36, frames number 34 and 33. First one was taken at 0_:hS, and they were of closed B_nard cells out over the ocean. Exceptionally uniform properties, both in size of the network and in thickness of the clouds ; a little excellent example of those. The second one was a bit ..., off the small island south of New Zealand. That was taken at 0h:h7. There are three or four islands south of there Auckland Island, Campbell Island, although I think that's a little far south for it. Bounty Island, or the Antipodes Island. I got one of those, and I cannot tell without looking at a better diagram or a map of each one of those islands. The plankton bloom ... It's the dye of the island, and it runs about the extent of the island itself. It was - showed up in the color difference a fairly light green color, although as I looked at it from the Sun angle into the camera, I could not distinguish it. I could only distinguish it by eye. So I had to look - I have to look you Know - look very hard for it. It would be a fairly bright green,

345 oh 56 31

SPT

p

b

although it did not contrast too greatly with the water around it, which although it was dark blue, for some reason the strength of the contrast was not there, which I've seen elsewhere; I have to look Sun angle. The bloom itself was not a long sinuous element like we've seen before but more of a - It's in a large angular shape; maybe four or five sides. There's maybe a couple of sinuous elements leading off of a couple of the corners. Guess I'd say it was a lovely place. The island itself, we haven't gotten large. 345 04 58 29 SPT SPT out.

TIME

SKIP

345 13 12 19 345 13 12 29

SPT SPT

SPT at 13:12. SPT out.

PRD readings:

42334,

23178,

38330.

TIME

SKIP

973-ih

345 14 59 30

CDR

This is the CDR at 15 - 15:00 Zulu. The subject is $233 photography of the comet. The comet appeared at the leading edge - well, I shouldn't say leading edge - at the edge of the ATM solar panels, at - right on time at comet-rise of 14:53. I started the first exposure at that time. It took me about 20 seconds to change frames and - and focus, and got the second one started at about 54:20 or thereabouts. And the light level got so high by the time I was ready to take the third frame, I felt that it was senseless to waste the film; so I - I did not take the third frame. The first exposure was taken at .°.

3_5 15 O0 3o

CDR

TIME SKIP

345 15 23 47

CDR

This is the CDR at 15:19 Zulu. The subject is handheld photography, Earth observations. The site we went after was HH59, which is the Fernandino Crater in the Galapagos Islands. We missed a real golden opportunity. We were late getting to the window, and the weather over the Galapagos was essentially clear over the J-shaped island and over Fernandino _. The Fernandino Crater waswas smoking and smoked - It looked like it was not rising very much and it Was going almost due east - ... 9-1/2 minutes. And it was a very, very straight flue. Looked like it came up awaFs and then _mmediately started off to the east in a very, very straight line. CDR, ... - Stand by.

CC CDR

CC CDR

345 15 29 36

CDR

This is the CDR at 15:30 Zulu, continuing the report on HH59. I had Just - just finished describing the volcano and the - the plume from the vent. We had missed our opportunity to get an overhead shot because we were about 30 seconds late getting to the window. We did,

973-15

however, get obliques. I got one Hasselblad and one 300-millimeter niclon - Nikon oblique shot. The - the Hasselblad was Charlie X-ray 17, fra_ number i, f/S_l, 1/250. The 300 Nikon was Charlie X-ray 36, frame number 31, f/ll, 1/500. And we kind of feel very badly about this one because this is the best doggone weather we've seen over the Galapa_os so far. And had we gotten up there Just a tad earlier, weld have gotten some excellent pictures of it. SO all we can do is chalk this one up to experience, and we'll try to - we'll pray for good weather next couple of passes. And maybe we can really cover the Gslapagos. 34D 15 30 51 CDR CDR out.

TIME

SKIP

345 15 56 27 F_

SPT

SPT at 15:56, debriefing the ATM pass which began at 15:04. Building block l, JOP 6, step l, went as planned; no - no deviations. At the conclusion, I gave 82B a shopping list item 19.' The total whole boundary at the north was about plus 910, and the width was approximately 20 arc seconds, as I saw in magnesium X - 55 DETECTOR 3; GRATING, 1940 - 1941. XUV got a slew T_T/RIGHT, plus or minus 30 and an UP/DOWN of plus or minus 6. On two occasions I got outside that plus or minus 30 on the inside of the limb - that's on the negative side - but was not there - not outside that boundary very long.

345 15 57 31

SPT

SPT out.

TIME

SKIP

345 17 i0 16

CDR

- - with a postscript to the LBNP comments I just made. I guess I should probably tell you a little - ... horizontal direction. I think I was somewhat distracted from that. And I noticed that down at the lower levels, some of the first ones I got wrong. And I think one of the - the early ones

345 17 Ii 47

SPT

973-16

I got wrong. And the first one that I got, I hopped into the chair and put my head into the in the goggles, and it moved. And I think that mY - the fluid had not settled down yet in the inner ear and that caused me to have somewhat of a miscue. The remainders of the first low level I thought were very distinctly clear to me. It's unclear to me why I had problems with any of the remainders. Certainly after the second highest level, it came as a surprise to me when I saw the line not really with a depth of move - movement to it, but it would - it would oscillate in front of me, left and right, and there was a net drift to that oscillation. But apparently, that drift was misleading. However, again at the lower levels. They're the ones that should make you right. I think your second, third, and fourth periods, there is no problem in conversion activity out at the level 1. 345 17 12 27 345 17 23 14 SPT SPT SPT out. SPT at 17:23 with the completion of a S063, airglow photography. Okay, the posture is going to be at 17:30. I've set up at 30 degrees and ROTATION set setup for first exgot TILT up at 72.

3_5 17 23 47

SPT

Timer's set up for 64 seconds and filter's to 6300. And the manua_l shutter is also installed for the last photo. Okay, the first exposure on Nikon 02 will be frame number 33. That is, frame number 33 corresponds to your frame number 1 at 17:30. Okay, now we've never had any training on this next aspect and I hope I can pull it off.

345 17 24 45

SPT

At appropriate time, acquire airglow target, adJust AMS in ROTATION, observe drift. Adjust mirror in - Adjust mirror in ROTATION so that Earth limb airglow are at extreme edge of mirror, allowing extreme edge to be available for drift of airglow layer across the mirror during exposure. Now unfortunately, through this eyepiece you cannot see the whole mirror; so you don't know what you're really working with. Hey, I'm coming up on it now, Bill. Adjust ring track lock to put dashed line parallel to airglow layer. Move track carriage to put line

SPT

973-17

on airglow layer. While tracking, exposure - expose film, press timer button, and voice m_k. 345 17 26 04 SPT Get the watch out, Bill. time? Yes. Skylab, Houston. for - ... Sounds good. ... Thank you. Okay, stand by for the first mark, here. And again I'm having to change this thing in rotation all the time. By that, I mean the rotation of the - not the AMS but the ring track. Got a continuing change in rotation. Okay, standby for the first - first exposure. Standby MARK. Oh, I didn't open the shutter. Oh, dang it. A0S Tananarive; we have you Is that set for a good

PLT 345 17 26 l0 CC

PLT SPT PLT SPT SPT

3h5 17 29 59

SPT SPT SPT

Okay, I don't trust the timer. I'm going to have to go manual on these things. I can't get the timer to work. Going to have to go bulb all the way. And we've blown a few frames here fiddling around with this thing. All right_ we're now down looking at frame number 30 - 31. Frame number 31 is going to be your first exposure - or your second exposure. We missed the first one. At 17:33. No. No. That's right.

SPT 3h5 17 33 19 SPT

All right, looks like we're going to miss this one. I can't even find the horizon now. I can look out through through the mirror the sight. and see it, but I can't see it

345 17 34 19

SPT

All right, I had to change these locations in order to get some more in there.

973-18

345 17 34 23

SFT

I tell you, this is on-the-Job training. simulator, this is what you get.

With no

SPT

Okay, I've got to give you a manual exposure here. And all the time my ring track has been changing. I'm going to be upside down here in a moment. Okay, stand by MARK. Shutter's open and I'm now tracking. Okay, shutter closed. We'll call that frame number 1. Itll try and pick up for you a little bit. We are continually changing this thing in rotation now. Okay, you wanted - I'm going to skip one of them here and move you down to 5577. The first one I took was at 6300. Okay, standby. again. I have to resolve the rotation

345 17 36 15

SPT SPT SPT

SPT

SPT

345 17 39 4h

SPT

All right, at long last, l'm set up for another exposure on this thing. Okay, this is your frame number 2, a_idwe got a filter of 5577. Stand by MARK. Shutter going closed now. MARK. Okay, I'm going to alternate DAC to 6300, and I'm Just going to be alternating back and forth here trying to get in as many as I can for you. I'll tell you, there's a lot of complexity here right now. I've Just changed ROTATION. Now I'm changing the RING LOCK, advancing the film. Now okay. Now I'll give you another 5.64, as best I can time it here. The last one I know is not on. Okay, stand by MARK.

SPT 345 17 4O o6 SPT SPT 345 17 41 i0 SPT SPT

SPT

3h5 17 42 32

SPT

973-i9

SPT

Okay,

the

airglow of this

was

neatly

defined However,

here now

at the I see

beginning

exposure.

what looks like extraneous reflection inside on the left especially. I'm upside down now. The RING LOCK, I've been tracking upside down. Okay,
exposure terminated.

345 17 43 38

SPT

MARK. Okay, let me set you up for another ROTATION.
I want TILT set at 50 s.ll the way o All right.

SPT

SPT

Trying to change to another ROTATION. There's not very much left on the - visible on the mirror. Okay, the film is advanced; got to change the filter to 5577. Now trying to find the dern location of it. Now you take your way - eye away from the - for Just a second, and it goes off in the corner. And it's very tough to find
again the location of the thing.

345 1T 45 50

SPT

Could you turn out some lights down there? I think I'm getting a lot of internal reflections in here. Thank you. The ones in the wardroom
there, please, Bill.

345 17 47 00

SPT

All right, now I've got myself a nice straight white line across, with stars above and below.
Oh, for crying Very awkward. out loud. I'll tell What am you, the I looking at? numbers on

the pad sure did help. 3_5 17 48 23 SPT Boy, I'll tell you, you can't see a blooming thing as far as the locations around in here. All right, the only are I have available to me is ...; a - again, a relatively light arc which has got stars above it and below it. ... Yes, I know, but these stars are quite a bit above and below it. It's not Just - I can't believe it's the airglow. However, I will ta_e a mark - take a manual exposure on it again because of the failure of that darn timer. Okay.

SPT

CREW SPT

973-20

SPT 345 17 49 45 SPT SPT

Okay, standby MARK.

-

Give you a 64.

Certainly is a lot of slop in this whole view arrangement as well as the camera mounting, the whole thing. MARK. I have to change the filters back again. Going up to the - the lower-numbered filters - the 5. You know, now we're up to 63; and we'Ve rotated the whole camera around. It's on 6300. I'll try and give you another one. Let me look and change rotation again to ma_e sure of what I'm looking at. Oh, that wasnVt correct. Scrub that last one. Scrub that last one. You want this thing to sit outside with a boom. That's what I've been on. Jerry, could you close the wardroom window, please? Okay, wardroom window is going closed now. Maybe I won't have that boom as a distraction. That didn't seem to make much difference. Now it's the Moon which is on the darn boom; that's why. All right, we'll try this whole thing again. Okay, coming up. MARK. Shutter open. This time I am on the airglow. I started Just a little bit below the airglow, and I'm going to try to maintain this thing Just while we stick it up in the middle. What pictures you've got, you've got the discone antenna. And now we're going off the edge of the mirror. Going to terminate. We're off. Okay, we'll try and give you another one. I'm going to change the filter again; 5577 is what the filter is. I'm trying to get it set up in rotation. Okay, you Just got to change rotation, the RING track LOCK, and go back and get yourself at the right location to track it. Advance the film for manual time; get another selection of film, And all this is not expected. All right, we're tracking it good now. We're moving along to the edge of the ... al] that ... stuff. I've changed the

345 17 50 48 345 17 50 53

SPT SPT

345 17 52 13

SPT

-_

345 17 53 22 345 17 53 25

SPT SPT

SPT

345 17 54 45

SPT

973-21

rotation, the RING track LOCK, the ring location. Now I've got to change the pointing; track. Got more patience than ever. Standby 3_5 17 55 51 SPT MARK .... slight disk in the hole. Target right there at the site. Come around. I'll tell you, I wouldn't give you two cents for this. Oh, I'm ... We're tracking. We had ... track here. I know ... horizon ... No longer ... dashed line. Left-hand side going up. Going down. MARK. Okay, shutter closed. Here we go again. Let's Just go into the long exposure. It'll be 02. Then we'll wait, and then I'll give you another one. Let me reverse the filters here; put filter to 6300. Change rotation .... Prepare to lock rotation. Tracking lever down. Going back up. And whoa. Take my beautiful film down. Coming up on another exposure. Stand by -

345 17 56 46

SPT

345 17 58 01 345 17 58 lh --

SPT SPT

MARK. Shutter's open, and it's tracking. The airglow is no longer a very definite boundary. Then again, the lower left-hand side is dropping down. It's no longer tangent. I'd say you don't have enough time to adjust it. To keep up with it, I'll never get the photos done. Going open. Shutter's going closed now. And we do have time to get one more in here. Okay, going back to filter 5577. Try one more in here. I can't find the darn track for me to locate. Shutter going open now. MABK. Okay, that was for shutter closed. MARK. ... 25 ... Okay, stand by

345 17 59 16

SPT

345 18 O0 38

SPT

3h5 18 01 49 345 18 02 07

SPT SPT

Again, I keep watching my watch

...

... and we want to go to terminate at sl,n_ise. Oh ... we're in the airglow ... track. Standby MARK. Okay, that's it. I'll wait to close it until I see that there's no change. Okay, I'm also going to have to change the ring track - the ring ...

-

345 18 02 54

SPT

973-22

345 18 03 56

SPT

I think you're getting good tracking on this one. So far, no sunlight. I have to change the ring orientation and track ... Okay MARK. Might be a little sunlight reflecting in not into the field of view of the camera but Okay, that was almost a 2-minute Jobber. Okay, I would sa_ you got six to seven adequate - I wouldnlt even call them adequate. Six to seven exposures. Tracking was not too bad on them. I got better as we went on. And it sure took a lot of thrashing around at the beginning to figure out how to make all this fit.

345 18 04 27

SPT

345 18 05 ll

SPT

Okay, that was the first session I had on it, and I'll call this OJT. I think I mentioned that to Wally Teague. And without a simulator, this first one was going to be nothing but OJT. We got some exposures, but I think you'll notice that subsequent ones ought to be a little higher quality. I think we got to find out what's wrong with this darn timer right now too.

SPT

Okay, the frames remaining at the end, the last exposure taken was frame number 22. I'll advance it down to 21. SPT out. This is the CDR at 18:31 Zulu, debriefing the first ATM pass of the day. Unable to get to the tape recorder due to S063 operations. My assignment was JOP 15 Bravo. And I started out with a ... at the request of the SPT. He indicated that that would probablybe a good thing. He had noticed a ... right near there ... and with a ROLL of 400 and set up for the ... AUTO STEP and got it started at 15 - about 50 minutes from ... about what I had left. Went ahead and got S056 set up with no problems. Got it running. And S082A, I started its timed exposures. The place where I ran into problems was with S055. It Just wasn't my day with that particular experiment. I had to set the GRATING with a MECHANICAL REFERENCE, which was really no big thing, but I got her started. Got busy looking at something else. Went back and saw 105 on the counter. So that meant I had to go through one more time. I blundered on through

345 18 06 33 345 18 31 01

SPT CDR

973-23 one more time and missed again. I said a few words llke gosh darn and oh fudge and proceeded to go through and stopped it at 203 - or no, 302 it was. 345 18 32 56 CDR And got the first MIRROR, 3 RASTERs. Got the second one first. And then I got hack, got finished with that, got moved into 102, got it started. About that time, we came up with the ground, and I suggested that possibly we m/ght want to terminate - or truncate the 102, MIRROR, 3 RASTERs a little bit early in order to ensure that I got a good MAR again at 0_:28 at the end of the pass. The ground concurred and advised that I should only get one good RASTER out of 102 and that I should terminate at 05:28, which I did. Everything else went okay. I got m_ .,. S056. AUTO RASTER ... Got it started ... MIRROR,

345 18 33 38

CDR

TIME
f-

SKIP

345 18 59 59

SPT

SPT at 19:00. Picking up on the second _sequence of S063, airglow. First exposure, 19:02. We've got the rotation (music). Jerry, could you turn that me, please? Sure. No, the dome light. off for me, please? All right. Coming up on the first exposure. good tracking. Stand by MARK. Is anyone recording? Okay, we got Could you turn the dome light one dome light off for

345 19 01 25

SPT

CDR SPT

CDR 345 19 02 01 SPT

SPT 345 19 02 54 SPT PLT

973-2_

SPT

Yes, Bill, I am. Okay, I'm trying to track also by moving the ring. Okay, shutter closed; change filter. That was your frame number 1. Visible filter going off; putting UV filter on. Okay, that was frame number 19. Excuse me, that was frame number 20 which was Just taken. Frame number 21 went to verify that the timer was working. Okay, we 're coming up now on 19:06. MARK. Now we're going to get this exposure at 19 frame 2 at 19:07. And that's with the UV lev or UV filter on and at 64 seconds. Stand by MARK. Shutter open. Got good tracking. Okay, got very good tracking that time. That ... good tracking on that one. Exposure's timed out. It's frame number 2. Frame number 2. Okay, that was corresponding Nikon frame 19. Okay, next exposure coming up at ll, 19 :ll. Okay, frame number 3 in another 50 seconds. Stand by MARK. Pretty good tracking on there. Okay, timed out. Stand by MARK. Hey, we got good tracking. Oh, that looked like a shooting star or something going down through the airglow layer. Okay, we've just about run to the end of the travel here on the - on what the mirror will allow you to see. Timed out. 19:14, the next one; frame 4.

345 19 04 04

SPT

345 19 05 24

SPT

345 19 06 Ol

SPT

SPT 345 19 07 01 SPT

345 19 08 ll

SPT

345 19 l0 l0

SPT SPT

345 19 ll 03 345 19 ll 54 345 19 12 l0

SPT SPT SPT SPT

345 19 14 02

SPT

345 19 15 ll

SPT

973-25

345 19 15 59

SPT

Oh, okay. On that last one, we had pretty much gotten to the very end of travel on what - what you could make with the - with the mirror. Unfortunately, we really don't see down the axis of this with this sight we have. Okay, 19:23, the next one. ... believe on the last one, we got obscured by the skin of the vehicle itself at the very end. Could see right down the side of the OWS. Okay, now the roll - the ROTATION which was given me here is 320. And at 320, I have in the bottom. I'm looking right down the S-IVB wall of the OWS. Okay, here I am at 23, and I still have no horizon. I'm in a ROTATION of 320, and I'm looking all around. All I have is the skin of the S-IVB looking at me. No airglow, no horizon. Okay, there is the ..., and quite a bit different. A ROTATION of 320. I think I ought to try and get it. Okay, we're going to be a little late withthis one. Stand by MARK. Airglow is very difficult to see at this exposure. I think there's a top ... in the tracking of it that's more difficult than this one. And in my tracking, the whole left side of the tracking scope is obscured by something; ... the right side, which I'm using. The end of exposure. That was more like at 24 than 23. Okay, at 26 you want another one ; that 's coming up right now. Stand by MARK. about Okay, this is your a minute behind. exposure at 26. Mark's

345 19 17 51

SPT

345 19 20 38

SPT

345 19 22 48

SPT

SPT

__ 345 19 24 15 345 19 24 56 SPT SPT

345 19 25 25

SPT

345 19 26 26

SPT

345 19 27 16

SPT

Oh, boy, it's really difficult now. the airglow has Just flat disappeared on me. Oh, the tracking of this one's poor. Time exposure's out. 29, you want another one. Well, let's see if I can get some rotation set in here which might make this a little bit better.

345 19 27 33

SPT

973-26

B45 19 28 BI

_PT

Okay, coming up at 29 for Boy, I'Ii tell you, every way from this scope, you the whole picture. Stand MARK.

your frame number 7. time you take your eye Just - you really lose by -

B45 19 29 04

SPT SPT

Tracking is not too good on this one. Must have been that rotation. For sc_e reason the - it got obscured. I'm not sure whether we got into the skin of the vehicle or what on the last one, but it Just - airglow Just faded out on me. Okay, yOU want one long exposure now. At 19:35 for frame 8, the visible lens. Tell you, this ring site certainly is looking at the wrong - in the _Tong direction. The whole thing ought to be looking more towards the axis. Yes, good thing we're not looking down the axis. Half of this darn sight is obscured by the side of the - looking at - off the mirror. Okay, we've got the visible lens on. I guess I'd better track and try to line it up here. Give you one as long as possible. I guess you s_y at 19:37 is sunrise and you want to - until sunrise. I'll watch it and try to give you a long one. And I'll go with the manual timer and have the timer in ... Okay, waiting for your frame l0 at 35.

345 19 B2 07

SPT

345 19 32 47

SPT

345 19 34 39

SPT SPT

Okay, stand by MARK. Shutter in track. open; manual shutter open and we're

345 19 35 01

SPT

SPT

Good tracking on this one, both in rotation and in the section perpendicular to the airglow layer. I think this one's going to be a good one. Okay, let me get her up just long enough to see what time it is. Coming up on 37 in another 25 seconds. Okay, airglow's fading out; there we go. Okay, at frame number 8, we got a 2-1/2-minutes exposure. All right, the second sequence was a heck of a lot better than the first, and it was all observer's familiarity with the gear, with what we're going

SPT

345 19 37 29

SPT

973-27

'

to be seeing out the airlock, how many things you have to work at a given time, even the time to check out the - the equipment to make sure it worked. And I believe I mentioned this to Wally Teague and other folks who were training me on S063 at the beginning; that the first time through, especially on this one, ought to be a training session because there's no simulation on it whatsoever, and I think it is a relatively complicated task. There's a lot of things going at the same time. Well, we'll chalk that first session up. I'm sure you did get around six or seven exposures. I'll chalk it up to experience and the second one looked as though it came out a lot better. 345 19 38 37 3_5 19 42 49 SPT SPT SPT out. SPT at 19:43. Additional piece of information S063. The last frame number on the Nikon was frame 14. SPT out. Okay, SPT again with a correction to that last frame count for S063. Because we had the manual shutter release there, it didn't advance; so the last frame was really number 13. So we went 13 through 20 for the exposures, starting at 20 and working 345 19 45 31 SPT down to 13, that's your eight exposures. for

345 19 43 08 345 19 45 09

SPT SPT

SPT out.

TIME

SKIP

345 20 21 48

PLT

The PLT reporting at 20:21. Subject ... negative symptoms, and there are negative comments. PLT out. SPT at 20:24. Subject MI90 - MI31, motion sensitivity. I went up to 30 rpm and 150 head motions with negligible symptoms. The only thing I did notice is that when I - when we stopped, that I had a slight amount of dizziness for a short period of time during the slowdown procedure when I had taken off the goggles and also gotten out of the

3_5 20 21 58 345 20 24 41

PLT SPT

973-28

chair. were 325 20 25 20 345 20 25 2h SPT CDR

That lasted

for about

2 minutes

and those

the only

symptoms.

SPT out. This is the CDR at 20:26 Zulu, 19:1_3 ATM pass. Stand by. debriefing the •

345 20 26 03

CDR

Okay, pressing on. Got a late start on the ATM for many different reasons which don't really have much to do with the ATM. As a result, we're going to be truncating S056 with less than 15 minutes. It looks to me like it's going to be about a 12-minute exposure rather than a 15-minute exposure. And S055, because of a lack of time, I cut the three rasters to two rasters apiece, and that will give me a MIRROR, AUTO RASTER, at a GRATING of 1761, about one full raster and maybe a half. I figure that was about the best - the best division between the three, There was no S082A. The S082B, I wasted a lot of time trying to get that doggone SLIT [sic] OFFSET set at plus 12 - set at plus 12, and I think that cost us some time, too. I finally gave up. It was vacillating back and forth between ll and 12, and LIMB POINTING didn't seem to stop it. At any rate, the S082B finally timed out at about 9 minutes to go. It's completed now, and I'm Just standing by waiting for ESS, at which time I will truncate S056 and S055. And I'll give you readings on where they were truncated.

3h5 20 27 37 345 20 hl 47

CDR CDR

CDR out. This is the CDR at 21 - Correction. This is the CDR at 20:41 Zulu, debriefing the ATM pass which started at 19:23. I started debriefing this pass prior to the completion of it, and then we got a data/voice dump between then and now. So I figure I might Just as well start over and try to get it all in one batch. I mentioned before that I had got a late start on the ATM for various reasons not having anything to do with the ATM. And, as a result, we ended up truncating when we probably should not have had to. S056, I got sll of it done except the SINGLE FRAME 5, LONG. And I had to truncate that with 2 minutes and 13 seconds to go at -And I truncated at ESS.

973-29

3h5 20 42 39

CDR

S055, I guess I'm still snake bit. I had some problems with that son of a gun. This time, I had it set up moving in toward 130 on the GRATING. I stopped it at about 113 or 114; I didn't get the number. And as I reached up to hit the START switch and start SINGLE STEPping my way to 130, I hit the doggone ZER0-ORDER GRATING switch and hit it into refer - REFEBENCE, OPTICAL. And the son of a gun - the counter went to zero and I wasn't sure where I was. So I just had to swallow m_ pride and start it up again and run it back through zero.

345 20 43 19

CDE

345 20 44 05 CDR

So that cost us some time. And in order to recover it, I changed all the AUT - MIRROR, 3 RASTERs to MIRROR,'2 RASTERs, and managed to get two - two full AUTO RASTERs at each grating setting - two at a GRATING of 0130 and another - two more at GRATING 1144. Then I got into the MIRROR, AUTO RASTER at 1761 and I got one full GRATING. And at 400 K, we were at line 15; at 250 K, we were at line 35. These were on the second AUTO RASTER. And I figured at below 250 K, you probably weren't interested in the data; so I terminated at that time. The S082B AUTO STEP terminated with about 9 minutes to go. That cost us probably 2 minutes right there while I fiddledy-diddled around with the MPC, trying to get us set up on step - LIMB OFFSET, plus 12. I could either get ll flashing to 12 or 12 flashing to 13. And for the life of me, I couldn't get it to settle down on 12 and stay there. So I finally Just went to LIMB POINTING and - and gave up with it. It was 12 flashing back to ll and then back to 12, And I went ahead and started the AUTO STEP with that situation going on. I figured a little bit of overlap was better than a little gap. So that's the situation on S082B. Because of the lateness of the time, I had no time to really look at the Sun and fiddle around with it at all. And so I don't have any other items to debrief at this time.

345 20 45 05

CDR

CDR out.

TIME

SKIP

973-30

345 21 14 17

PLT

Now this is the PLT. The time is 21:15. And I am perf0rming the instructions contained in the general message S201 malfunctions, and that's 2637 Alfa. Okay, I removed the rear cover. To verify, connect - Step 2: To verify connectors mated, rotate the film transport box counterclockwise. Report motion. Okay, I'm pulling the handle out. I'm rotating the film transport box counterclockwise, and there is no motion. Promptly install the rear cover and evacuate. Okay, I'm doing that. Rear cover back on and going closed (grunt). And we want to do a complete evacuation; so I'm going to vent. Okay, now let's see. Continue the nominal proc - continue the nominal procedures per cue card. During $201 ops, press ear against the canister and listen for the i/4-second f_lm advance motor noise coincident with the white light flashes. Report results. Okay, now that's - that's just a little bit different. If it's a 1/_-second noise, it could have been that I was not listening for the - This is why you called it the cllmk, apparently. And I will strain my little earbone ana see if I can't hear that ellln_ this time. PLT out.

345 21 15 07

PLT

345 21 16 00

PLT

TIME

SKIP

345 21 52 34

SPT

SPT at 21:53; handheld photos 35-1. The mag ID is CXlT; frame numbers 2 through 6. And they were taken at 21:31, 21:32, 21:32, 21:33, and 21:34. The subject was sea mounts and they are located south of the Samoa Islands and east of Fiji, the Lau Group, I believe they call it, or Tonga. I believe it's the Tonga. And the weather had about 40-percent cloud cover; however, I was able to see a fair _ber of these. I would say about 800 miles or so distance over which they covered. And I would say I saw something on the order of 50 to 70 of them. Some were quite large and protruded above the surface, being an island. And there were numerous smaller ones Just polkadotted throughout the area, which were submerged. They stood out because of the relatively bright green color which they displayed .... the center of them was - looked to be deeper and the rings were

973-31

- the ring of the island - or the ring of the sea mount, if you will, stood out a little bit more and was - was more prominent and more lighter colored in green. Now if there - was only one volcano at a time, at this time it was hard to tell. I saw a large number of features which could have been vents from a volcano because of the ray structure which was present. The water color certainly was lighter colored. I did not at all notice any wakes in the o - ocean water, and I did not see any surface waves. I think the Sun angle was such that it was not possible to do that. 345 21 55 12 SPT I think we got some pretty good coverage. I used ll-1/2,'because of the partial cloud cover, for the f/stop, 100-millimeter lens, 1/250 of a second for all the photos. And, again, most of the islands or - or sea mounts were - were not long or sinuous. They were generally angular shaped, with a length-towidth ratio of not much greater than 2. I could not see any organized patterns for them. They appeared to be scattered ..., and the orientation for the larger axes appeared to be more
... -- --

345 21 55 28

SPT

345 21 55 46

SPT

345 22 09 00

CDR

This is the CDR at 22:09, debriefing the ATM pass which started at 21:21, I believe it was. The pass consisted of two JOP 6, step 2's and then a JOP 1D, step 4 - 1 Delta, step 4. Both of the J0P 6, step 2's went okay. There was no hitches and got all the data, and were truncated at roughly around 6. Got into the JOP 1 Delta; that went pretty much as planned. On one occasion, while reaching up to cycle the S055, I grabbed S054 and cycled it once. So, S054 guys, you got a freebee frame there. Don't know how much good it will do you, but I exposed a frame for you. I did not get a chance to look too much at the Sun, I did take a look at the WHITE LIGHT CORONAGRAPH, and - while I was doing the VTR work - and was impressed by the fact that it looks like the - Let's see. Let's get our north and everything set up here. There were a - a pair of - of streamers coming off the northeast limb,

345 22 l0 08

CDR

973-32

and this pair of streamers has very much diminished - become really - become less diffuse, I should say, and more two separate streamers. The streamer that Ed mentioned this morning at 8 o'clock is gone. Did not see that. The - You know, the 8 o'clock position on the Sun. He said that's - He mentioned that streamer this morning early, and that streamer is gone during this last pass. 345 22 ll 24 CDR And you - I got TV of that; you'll see it on your - your TV data. I got the VTR data that you needed. I got WHITE LIGHT CORONAG_RAPH about a minute before time to make a ROLL from 10800 to minus 5400. The WLC was ON during the roll. After the roll, I had to leave it ON for a while, while I set up the next part of the building block and then shifted over and gave you about 3 minutes of XUV MON. So that about covers that situation. The building block 28 in J0P 1 Delta went very smoothly this time. I got the S056 exposures done pretty well, and we managed to finish the run with the aperture closed. 345 22 12 23 345 22 28 08 CDR SPT CDR out. SPT at 22:28. Information for the M071 people Jerry Hordinsky, Mike Whittle in the medical directorate. The subject is weight before and after exercise. Weight before is 6.368, 6.370, 6.371; after, 6.327, 6.331, 6.324. Just a normal amount of exercise, a little over 8000 wattminutes on the bike; the usual work with the Mark I we report every night and for Thornton, Thornton's Revenge (music). Looks to be 2 or 3 pounds or so of weight loss, and I figure that's where most of m_ salt goes. Most of it comes out in the bicycle ergometer work. That's the only time I really give out - internal heat up. SPT out. This is the CDR at 22:35 Zulu. M092 began at 22:20 Zulu. The subject is the SP - the PLT. The calf measurements are left calf, 13-3/8; the right calf, 13-1/4. The legbands are Alfa November on the left and Alfa Quebec on the right. CDR out.

345 22 29 29 345 22 34 55

SPT CDR

345 22 35 22

CDR

973-33

345 22 39 53

CDR

This is the CDR at 22:40 with a note on M092 HIGH CAL. With a HIGH CAL, we get a SYSTOLIC and DIASTOLIC of 125, which is outside the range of 127, 133. CDR out.

345 22 40 07

CDR

TIME

SKIP

345 23 13 18

SPT

SPT at 22:13 [sic], debriefing the ATM pass now in progress, which is the one that began at 22:52. Okay, to start it off with, of course, I had noticed a sma11, subtle change in the corona. Earlier'today I went and did a shopping list item i at the very beginning of the orbit. That is, a CONTINUOUS MODE for 1 minute and three exposures for 52. And 56 got a PATROL, SHORT. Our ROLL was minus 5400. And in looking at the corona on the TV and also with a picture which I took, I can see that the very prominent streamerwhich is located at about 8 o'clock, which I mentioned this morning, appears to be a little narrower at the base but still very strong and exceptionally well defined - a very symmetrical helmet streamer. It looks very much elongated though. It looks like the classical picture of a helmet streamer which has got a base-to-height ratio of the cusp portion or the helmet portion of approximately 1. In this case it looks like that ratio is more like 2. Just ... look like you took a helmet streamer and stretched it out. The second greatest streamer was the - this morning was the one over at 2 o'clock and it still is; however, that has changed slightly. The portion up towards - well, it really runs from 2 to - It's centered at maybe 02:30, and then it runs almost down to 3 between 02:00 and 02:45, if you will. Get - getting picky here. The portion which is at the northernmost part, at around 2 o'clock, has weakened considerably, and so it looks almost uniform across it in brightness - uniform in - in clock rotation, if you will, or uniform from north to south.

345 23 14 00 J_

SPT

973-34

--_

345 23 15 55

SPT

The other two very fine streamers which I mentioned this morning are - well, the one at lO o'clock is still there, although not anywhere near as bright. And the one at 08:30, superimposed on the larger one centered at 8, is really not visible. There's a very hint of it on the base of it, but it does not appear to be anywhere near as visible as it was this morning. So again, the major change in the corona looks to be a - The m_Jor change here in the corona looks to be a stretching out of that helmet streamer at 8 o'clock. After the shopping list item i, then building block l0 was carried out; no problem. 55 received - Rather than one complete MIRROR, AUTO RASTER, which was taken at - essentially 4 arc minutes off the Sun, they got two of them down to around line 30, whereupon I then started the succession of MIRROR, AUTO RASTERs going down to line 13, or in some cases beyond that if - if my attention got distracted. I think you'll probably receive a good number of MIRROR, AUTO RASTERs; probably up to around 20. The building block 28 which followed the building block 10, there was no problem; was straightforward. And all of the exposures requested are being received. So what's been called off for on the pad has been run off nominally. The pointing for this was not quite as easy as the last time in that the spicules did not stand out quite as well. Today there does not appear to be anywhere near as much activity at this limb in the'way of spicule and chromospheric - intensity variations as I've seen before. I think center of the ... one very prominent - fairly prominent spicule which had a good base to it. However, as I watch it, it kind of waxes and wanes, decreases in the intensity, and then slowly comes back. During most of the exposures, however, it has been fairly prominent so I feel we're looking at a peak and not a valley - sort of representative material of the corona - of the chromosphere. The coordinates I've used are plus 10797 for ROLL, a DOWN of minus 1007, and a LEFT/RIGHT of plus 0000. That count of four zeros was fortuitous.

345 23 17 05

SPT

SPT

345 23 19 45

SPT

345 23 21 38

SPT

973-35
I did not try to get it. I'ii debrief anything which may be carried out after the completion of this last building block 28, at that time. 345 23 22 18 345 23 28 08 SPT CDR SPT out. This is the CDR at 23:30 Zulu. M092 terminated at 23:.05 Zulu, and we moved right into MITI-I. The GAS PRESSURE of CAL N2, 02, CO 2 was 1184. was 1266. CABIN AIR

The CAL N2, H20 PRESSURE PRESSURE PERCENT

was 5.023; PERCENT WATER, 3.29; PERCENT

OXYGEN was 76.22; CO 2 , 2.03. VITAL 5.721,

CAPACITIES: then 5.914. 345 23 28 54 CDR

The first

one was 5.634,

then

CDR out. This was the - This is the CDR again. This is - The subject was the SPT on the MI9 171-1. CDR out. SPT at 22:42 - Make that 23:42. I believe we completed up the orbit which began at 22:52 which I've already given you a brief snmma_y Of. At the end, we ended up with 23 truncated MIRROR, AUTO RASTERs, all of the exposures asked for in 56 and 82B. And also, in the 82B, we had a little time lest ; so I gave them a - the NORMAL ... exposure in the LONG WAV_Lk_NGTH. I know it's not called out for in the 82B exposure guide which was sent up. Normally, we just work in the SHORT WAVELENGTH. However, you had already gotten two sets of long in the SHORT WAV_T,k_NGTH - or two sets of the type 4 in the SHORT WAVE.L_GTH; so that, I think, handled that one real well. And knowing you're a lit - tend to be a little bit overexposed in the LONG WAV_.Lk_NGTH, I made this one only a NORMAL. There again, the pointing was unchanged from all of the building blocks carried out, and that's how we've done the two 28's and the 10. At the very conclusion, I went back to Sun center and again looked at the streamer at 8 o'clock, and now it actually looked like it had narrowed down at the base; that is, actually had necked in. It was no longer than it was nearly before, perfectly straight on the sides going in the disk. It

345 23 29 03 345 23 42 2_

CDR SPT

345 23 43 46

SPT

973-36

actually necked in a little bit. And I'ii be up next orbit, and I'ii take a look at it first thing. I did a shopping list item l in on it, CONTINUOUS for 1 minute, and a 56 PATROL, SHORT; however, I think we got down a little bit below 250 K on that. TIME R_4AINING was - Well, maybe not too bad, about 01:25 or so when we completed it. 345 23 44 46 345 23 47 ii SPT SPT SPT out. SPT at 23:47. Message to FAO and the schedulers. In looking at the layout we have today for ATM activities, it looks like Jerry ended up with ATM, a overabundance of it. The discussion we had yesterday said that - that there should be three passes a day devoted to the PLT and CDR - with one day, one taking two and the other one taking one. Now Jerry ended up with three passes today which may or may not be more than he would desire. He certainly says he's got a fair amount of it. And at the sam_ time, I come out with three. If I was to receive the remainder of those three passes, it sure hasn't worked out that way. And I'm looking now at the ATM pass which goes from a little after zero - from 02:15 or so on that general schedule, on down. It comes right after the first 201 maneuver. There's no reason why I could not pick up that ATM pass and eat subsequent to that and then pick up the 201 maneuver. 345 23 49 03 SPT I'm wondering what the holdup is or what the reason for the scheduling after our discussion. Maybe there's something I don't understand in the way of constraints, but it looks fairly straightforward. SPT out.

345 23 49 19

SPT

TIME

SKIP

345 23 53 I0

CDR

This is the CDR at 23:53 terminating the subject the PLT. CDR out.

M171-1

with

345 23 53 19

CDR

###

DAY 3h6

(AM)

975

326 00 51 42

CDR

This is the CDR at 00:51 Zulu, reporting on handheld photography. The sites are HH153 and HH126-1. As we came in over the northern coast of Australia, I noticed, first of all, a patch of ground that looked like it was raised somewhat above the surrounding ground - rather large patch of ground. And it was in the area of - according to my aviation maps here, there's an airfield called Evelyn and there's a little town south of this area called Katherine. And it appeared to me that this ground was raised somewhat. And it had very, very linear crosshatch patterns on it. Looked very much like a fault zone or something like that. Very, very straight lines and - and crosshatch. (Music) I entitled that HH153 because I don't think that is the rangeland they're looking for in lh6-1.

346 O0 52 53

CDR

A

That particular frame that I took was taken at 00:37; it was frame number 7 on magazine Charlie X-ray 17. I took it at a setting of f/ll, 100-millimeter Hasselblad, and a speed of 1/250. Then as we proceeded on into the rangeland area, around HHI46-1, I noticed that the - the land was flatter and there were some areas of green along the river. It had a look of - of cultivation or or human, you know, human interference, in that although not all of the hunks of land were very rectangular. There was some regularity to them, some of that, you know, you could see sense lines, essentially. The land in general - the rangeland is - There are some very light greens that I could see. But the land for the most part was tam to to red. But there was scsne - some light green areas there. Then as we proceeded on to the southeast, we got back into the HHI53 area, the drought area in general. There's some - some dry lakes. There were a few lakes with _ater in them. The water was rather greenish yellow, looked very alkaline.

346 O0 54 09

CDR

346 OO 54 31

CDR

The ground itself was very red or yellow or tan in large blotches of red; but there were some tans and some yellows. There was indications of wind erosion. There was lots of - of linear striations over the land that looked very much like the wind had blown and had Just kind of - It looks llke the the perennial wind here - the prevailing winds

L

976

are all from about the same direction. My impression was that the winds are from the southeast to the northwest, or from the east-southeast to the west-southwest. All of the lines that I saw are lined up in that direction and they overlap the red and the yellow and the tan, so - And it looked like possibly the red _as on top because the - the red streaks lay - looked to me like they lay over the yellow and tan. Then as I moved on down further, I took one picture which I think is outside of the area of HH15B. 346 00 55 36 CDR In fact I think it's more down in the cultivated area around - approaching HH140-5. That area down there is - got a whole lot more water, obviously; it's moire cultivated. I - I would suspect that maybe it's wheatfields because the - the land patterns are much more rectilinear, much more regular, and there's quite a bit more green in the area. Deeper green along the - the rivers indicating heavy forest. And the - The green of the or the coloring of the rectangular areas themselves were either light green or tending toward a - a brown, darker a brown. 346 00 56 24 346 O0 56 B1 CDR CDR This is the CDR out. Okay, this is the CDR continuing the HH146/15B observations. I did not give you the frames and all that. The pictures I took of HH146-1, the rangeland area, were frames number 8 and number 9 of Charlie X-ray 17 magazine. I took them right after I took the first one of the crisscross area that I mentioned. The f/stop was the same, f/ll at 100 - 100-millimeter lens, I should say, at 1/250. B46 00 57 07 CDR And then frame number l0 was taken in HH15B, more in the area, I would say, of Brunette Downs or Alroy Downs or Alexandria. These are airfields in the southwest corner of HH153 square on my map. The last frame which was number ll - I kind of lost track of where I was but I think it was probably down around the area of Windorah, somewhere between Windorah and the HH140-5 area that's laid out. Let's see, a town in that area would be Bourke, B-o-u-r-k-e. That's probably about the best area. Okay. so that covers it.

--

t

i

J

977

Frame number 7 was taken up in the northwest corner of HH153, Frames 8 and 9 were taken at HH146-1, of rangeland. Frame number lO was in the southwest - correction, the southeast corner of HH153, and frame number ll is down in the more cultivated area, toward the southwest of Australia. 346 00 58 41 CDR CDR out.

TIME SKIP

346 01 21 i0

SPT

SPT debriefing the ATM _ass which began at 00:21. Okay, at the beginning we got a shopping list item 1 in, to look at the corona. And we also got one in at the end, although we could not fit a PATROL, SHORT, in as we were - would not be above 250 K when it concluded, The streamer at 8 o'clock again appeared very prominent and appeared to vent down quite a bit towards its base, especially on the northern side of it - more so at the end of the orbit than at the beginning. We're now on that Kohoutek maneuver for $201and whenwe get back from that m_neuver and into the day sid2 we'll take a look at it once again and try to give you another shopping list item 1. The coronal hole work would not - did not come off as well as I would have liked. The coronal hole at the north pole is not very sharply defined and is fairly Jagged. By that I mean, there's lots of - of points where the boundary is composed of a series of points and ragged structures as opposed to a nice, clean, smooth boundary. This made it very hard to find a place in which the slit would be parallel to anything resembling a boundary and also to find a reasonable half width. I got a bad start in that I was once lined up on what looked like a good area and then in concentrating only on the 55A readout, I got to where I thought I had a reasonable point halfway and I had to be rolled considerably from the slit tangent to the limb. Started the experiments only to find out that I had been working on the limb brightening. I aborted that and got myself back on a more reaaonable location. Although still I would not call too optimum.

346 01 22 28

SPT

978

SPT

And was able to get through the - the first three building block ll's ; however, the building block i0 at the end we did not have time for. Guess that would have been 400 K and running 55 and 82A - 82B which this was designed for. I think if I had had a choice and knew what was on your mind, I would have used the south pole as there the boundary is fairly linear and appears to be a little bit easier to work with and more representative of a coronal hole boundary or an idealized coronal hole boundary.

SPT

The following orbit we have a little observing time, which l've arm wrestled Jerry for, and I think I'ii work. I gave a - a shopping list item 19 .this morning - the coronal - coronal hole boundary at the north. I think I'ii go take a look at one at the south and see if I can't get you a - a better - see if I can't give you some better obeservations. SPT out. What? ... Yes. ... Oh, yes. Whenever you're ready. Got a handheld coming up_ No, I Just had a snack.

346 01 25 ll 346 Ol 30 32

SPT FLT CDR FLT CDR PLT CDR PLT

I'm ready anytime ... Yes. Jerry, could you give me a time hack Just to make sure I'm not off too far_ Should be coming up on 31:lO in about 5 seconds. ... 15 MARK. 0kay, could you give me a hack on 3 - 32? Okay....

346 01 31 03

PLT

CDR 346 01 31 15 CDR PLT CDR

979
346 01 33 04 PLT Okay, we Just came passed 33; coming up on about 2 minutes. The ROTATION is 154.9; the TILT is 16.8. Start exposure. POWER switch ON, 01:35:00; RESET switch to START, 01:35:01; terminating at 01:44:26. Put the RESET switch to START again and 01:44:27 POWER switch OFF, Okay; 45 seconds to START. clonk. 15 seconds. mark. MARK. Stand by. I'ii try to hear the

346 01 34 15

FLT

PLT

POWER

switch ON, on my

346 Ol 34 59

PLT PLT

RESET, START now.

Sorry, Just can't hear a clonk. Skylab, Houston. 30 seconds to hand over to Madrid .... Out. I hear a little bloop, not a clan_. So you may be getting it all right. 0kay, better watch what I'm doing here. It's not a clonk. Secure the slash again. You might hear one of them on occasion. All I can hear is a little bloop, which may be what you're talking about. Okay, PLT picking up at 41:30. Ground took the recorder there; I'm not sure you heard my comments. First off, I did the - performed the operation specified in the general message as of day 345. And I think it worked out probably to your satisfaction. When I reached in to turn it, it didn't even budge ° Okay, 42 on my mark. MARK. Okay. And continuing, I had my ear right up against the case here when I actuated the thing initially. And I can hear the motor noise - the rotary noise, but I - all I could - I did hear a sort of very faint "bleep" or "splonk" or something like that - that - I think that may be what - the noise that you were looking for there. And there is a very faint noise associated with it. But the reason I didn't hear it before is because I had this headset on that I was using for the voice recording. And I think we are getting the noise

346 01 35 38

CC

PLT

-

3h6 01 36 16

FLT

346 01 41

27 PLT

346 01 4I 59

PLT

980
that - that you had anticipated. But it certainly isn't - isn't as loud as I expected that it might be. 346 01 42 42 CC ... i minute to LOS. tion, which 346 01 43 25 PLT PLT 346 Ol 44 00 PLT Okay. Okay MARK. 01:44. And at 26 we want RESET switch to START and at 27 we want POWER switch OFF. Stand by. On my mark it'll be 15 - MARK. MARK. Z0; stand by, 26 - START; OFF. 26 minutes to the next staat 02:08. Out.

is Carnarvon,

Coming up on 01:44 in about 30 seconds.

346 01 44 14 346 01 44 25

PLT PLT PLT

Okay, let me set the new ROTATION and TILT. We want 205.9, 20 - oh, darn! Doggone! Numbers all the stuff's come out of them; you can't read them, unless you get your flashlight out. Well, I'm Just going to blow your exposure because of those nnmhers. Drifted way out into the middle of the workshop here. 205.9 and TILT 24.1. Okay, now at 01:45:30, which is coming up in i0 seconds, POWER sw_itch ON followed by START. Stand by. On my mark POWER switch ON. MARK. START. Okay, had it on time. Waiting for 49 :56. Man, those numbers. Oh, what 's happened is that the numbers in the ROTATION and TILT are black on black, some of them. And you have to have your flashlight out to read them, and I didn't have m_ flashlight out when I tried to change. Some of the numbers are missing the little - the filled-in recess for - supposedly to help you see it. Of course that stuff has all come out and it flicks around. When you rotate the thing, it turns around in there and looks like talcum powder rotating around the dials ; and I'm afraid it doesn't help to read the numbers. That was why I was expressing some consternation there. I'm going to turn the recorder off in between this.

--

346 01 45 29

PLT

346 O1 48 41

PLT

Coming worked

up on 49, 15 seconds. nominally as described

The lights before.

have all

I was Just

981

trying

to hear that noise

and I couldn't

find it.

I think I may have convinced myself that I heard
it. But I think the fact that that magazine was clocked in properly pretty well clinches it, and it's Just a - a problem of hearing. Okay, h9.

And we're standingby for h9:56, RESET switchto START, followedby an OFF 1 second later.
PLT Stand by. On my mark it'll be 50, 49:50, Stand by - or 56. MARK. START; OFF. Okay. That completes the operation of 01:25 ops and I think everything worked out there very satisfactorily. And I still can't give you a complete, lO0-percent confident report on the clunk, but I did hear a very faint noise in there that, I think, may be your clunk. PLT out. And this is PLT setting TILT to zero zero, ROTATION to zero zero, in that order, and retracting the AMSmirror. This is the CDR at 01:55 Zulu. The subject is transporter malfunction correction. Transporter 05 was Jammed. The takeup reel had approximately 20 percent of good film on it covering some S183 and some M092. So that particular cassette has been placed in - in storage to be returned, and I - I got takeup cassette number Mike Tango 06. We've cleared the DAC - We've cleared the Jam, I should say, and transporter 05 is back in position A-2 with sup - supply reel Charlie India 93 and takeup reel Mike Tango 06. A/id we're starting off with 74 percent.

346 01 49 55

PLT

346 O1 50 22 346 01 51 34 346 Ol 55 O0

PLT PLT

CDR

346 01 56 03 CDR

CDR out.

TIME

SKIP

3h6 02 _9 17

SPT

Hello, this is the friendly SPT at lh:h9 [sic] debriefing the ATM pass which began at 02:23 after the maneuver back from the Kohoutek observations.

982

SPT

Okay, I had some interest in going and looking at the corona again, particularly the filament - I'm sorry, the streamer which had changed shape and necked in quite a bit. So I gave us a building block 2. 52 had a STANDARD; 56 a PATROL, LONG I'm sorry, a PATROL, NOI_W_ALand a PATROL, SHORT. And 55 got a MIRROR, AUTO RASTER at a GRATING of zero. DETECTORS, all Then looking at the time remaining, I had not realized I would not have a full orbit. I didn't realize how long the maneuver would take. I figured I really didn't have any adequate - time to do an adequate Job on exploring the coronal hole bound_ at the south. I think that takes at least, a good full orbit of the types of observations which have been spelled out for the one at the north. So I went over to try to look for whether there was anything on the limb which could be causing the changes in the streamer which we've seen. And the only thing I could determine - Well, first of all, on the XUV MONITOR, we do have some brightening in that region, and it could be 88/90 coming over the southeast limb again. However, the location where the ,streamer appeared to be changing was a little further south of that. I did move south and saw some low-lying prominent structure on the limb. And had I had time, I would have liked to have done a couple of MIRROR, AUTO RASTERs, stepped out towards the lowlying changes in the corona; that is, a maxiRASTER. However, I only had time to do a MIRROR, AUTO RASTER at that point. Actually, I went through l-l/2 MIRROR, AUTO RASTERs, then a GRATING, AUTO SCAN at slit center - a little over one GRATING, AUTO SCAN at slit center. What I did was to roll the slit tangent to the limb, and then try to find some maximum in ROLL on the oxygen VI.

346 02 50 B0

SPT

346 02 52 05

SPT

346 02 52 45

SPT

I got a peak of around 600, and it was sensitive in ROLL. About plus or minus 5 arc minutes would change the roll - would change the oxygen VI readout to about half of that - of what it was; that is, from 600 down to 4[00] to 300. 82B received a WAVET.k_NGTH, SHORT exposure TIMES 4. And the last exposure had to be truncated, although

346 02 53 13

SPT

983

most of it did get in. I truncated exactly at 400 K. 56 received a FILTER 4 for 8 minutes, and a FILTER 5 for 5 minutes. And again I had to truncate that. SPT In H-alpha, I did see a low-lying prominent structure, and l'm Just not sure what's coming around the limb. Again, the only thing that really prompted me to do this was to try to explore what could be - the causal factor behind changing the streamer structure seen at roughly that same location. Okay, next orbit we have a JOP 6, step i, so that'll continue to - to look at the corona. And from there on, it's unattended. SPT out.

346 02 54 25

SPT

TIME

SKIP

346 03 20 22

CDR

This is the CDR at 03:20 Zulu. The subject is DAC movie camera maintenance. DAC number 09 checks out properlywith - We're using the cassettethat was recommended by the ground with the fog film on it. DAC 09 works very well. DAC 08 still does not grab the film. It looks like the hook or the pawls whatever you call them - are not reaching forward far enough. And in this particular one it looked like they Jabbed into the film a little bit short of the hole and Just made a groove in the hole. So if there's any adjustment that can be made, you Just send up - send up word. Otherwise, DAC 8 is still red taped. CDR out.

346 03 21 14

CDR

TIME

SKIP

B46 04 2h 28

PLT

PLT debriefing the ATM pass at 03:29. Started out with JOP 6, step i, building block i. Completed as per JOP S,imm_ry Sheets. It was in this the start of this JOP that I noticed the activity at the 7 o'clock region with solar noises at the top of the screen. It appeared to be a bomb on its way out from the disk. Called Ed up. He came up to take - took a look at it and indicatedthat

i _-_

he thought there was something interesting. We went ahead and did the building block i and tasked to the ground. Continued with the JOP 24 to step l, building block 28. Two errors on the operation there. One was I did the SINGLE FRAME, 2 in SHORT instead of LONG; and the other was when I slew to the right limb, I went to LIMB SCAN and pointed to plus 6 with the LIMB POINTING which I thought would hold it at plus 6 off the right limb. And went ahead and when I looked back about 3 or 4 minutes later, it was in plus i. So the 82 I don't know how that happened because I thought I'd put - had an attitude-hold capability there when I went to LIMB POINTING. It - it kept the slit in the right position, but anyway, I'll check that ou_ with Ed. And that slit drifted back plus 6 or 7 arc seconds off the right limb back to plus 1. So there was some integrated spatial emission there in that slit. 346 04 26 07 FLT I truncated at 6 and was able to do that in about 3 minutes and 3 seconds to go; I went ahead and threw in the JOP 20, even though building block 32 - Even though we were down in atmosphere, I figured that the corona would give some good data. And 56 indicated a high degree of flexibility. When in doubt, they said go ahead and use it, so I did, even though I was in the atmosphere. And I completed the building block 32 just at the end of the orbit. 346 04 26 46 PLT 55 was executed properly. I didn't do a real professional Job, but I got quite a few 13 line scans in there. I - occasionally, I let it go over. Should be quite a bit - quite a few scans. And I think I got four to five in each limb. The major config - the - the point of most significance, I guess, is the - what appears to be the development of the slow-moving transient at the 7 to 8 o'clock position with solar noises at the top. Appears to be out about 2-1/2 radii now and a definite widening - whitening in the - coronal texture and structure as opposed to Just some brightening in that area. You can actually see more or less the linear features or fiber-like quality of the structure. And other than that everything went fairly well. I 'm sorry about the 56 on the - on the SHORT. I've done that a couple of times, and I Just have to watch that

_-_

985

more closely. And the film count is H-ALPHA, 10, 915, that's 10,915; 56 is 3733; 82 Alfa, 127; 82 Bravo, 1075; 52 is 5514; and 54 is 3680. 346 04 28 22 PLT PLT out.

TIME

SKIP

346 Oh h9 Oh

CDR

This is the CDR at 04:h9 Zuluwith a message for the medical folks and for the evening status report world. And that is, we're going to standardize our exercise routines in order to minimize the amount of reading down that goes on at the evening etatus report. And henceforth, beginning tomorrow, which is actually today, mission day B46, we're going to refer to our standard exercise routine and we will give you only the deltas from the standard exercise routine. The C - The standard exercise routine follows. CDR, method Alfa, which is the ergometer: leg, 30 minutes, 5000 watt-minutes. The next method is Bravo, the Mark I: and the positions are Alfa, Delta, Echo, and Foxtrot; the time is l0 minutes, and 20 repetitions for each one of those. Method Charlie, which are the springs or the Mark II: the positions are Charlie, Delta, and Foxtrot, 06 minutes and 20 repetitions each. The next method is Echo, which is isometrics: the positions are Alfa and Bravo. These are what we Jokingly refer to as a Hordinsky Special. These are opening and closing the legs isometrically. The time is 03minutes and lO repetitions each. Method Foxtrot, which is the treaam_ll - I'll be walking for l0 minutes, running for 1 minute, I'll do - I'll pick up in a few minutes. We're starting our medical briefing. This is the CDR again at 04:58 Zulu continuing with the standard exercise routine that I was calling out. I'll pick up again with the CDR's exercise. I've given you Alfa through Echo. I'll pick up with Foxtrot and go from there. Foxtrot, which is the treaam_ll: I'll be walking for l0 minutes, run for O1 minute and there's an NA over in the repetitions side of the columm. Under springs, Foxtrot I'll be doing springs for 2 minutes and

346 04 49 44

CDR

3_6 04 50 54 B46 04 58 51

CDR CDR

986

that'll be 200 springs andcorrection, 300 springs, 300 springs, and for toe rise, 03 minutes for 200 toe rises. 3h6 04 59 34 CDR That - That's the CDR's standard exer - exercise routine. Now the aPT. Method Alfa: leg, 40 minutes ; 8337 will be his standard. Method Bravo: he's going to do position Bravo and curls. It'll take 20 minutes, i00 repetitions each. The method third method, Foxtort, which is the treadm_ll: He's going to do springs for I0 minutes for i000 of those and toe rises for i0 minutes for 200 of those. And that's the SPT's exercise routine. The PLT. Method Alfa: leg, 35 minutes, 600 wattminutes. Method Bravo: he'll be using positions A, B, - I should say, Alfa, Bravo, Delta, and Echo for 8 minutes, 50 repetitions each. He'll use for method Charlie, which are the springs: He'll be going for positions Bravo, Charlie, Delta, Echo, Foxtrot, and Golf for i0 minutes, 20 repetitions each. Method Echo, which is isometrics: Alfa and Bravo, the Hordinsky Special for 2 minutes, i0 repetitions each. Method Foxtrot, the treadm_ ii: wa]_ for i0 minutes; springs for 1 minuSe or i00 repetitions; toe rises for 1 minute, 75 repetitions ; and that concludes the standard exercise routine. CDR out. aPT at 05:03 with a quick look at the WHITE LIGHT CORONAGRAPH TV display. Shows that the streamer which was at 8 o'clock has pretty much straightened out and very necked down and close to the disk, and looks like the trio which once was down at the base of the helmet streamer has Just lifted off and moved away from the Sun. We have stretched out the field lines underneath it; they're now pretty much straight and most of the material has moved off. I've been giving you another quickie with a CONTINUOUS MODE for 1 minute. And I hope you folks are going to get some observations on it tonight because I imagine it's still going to be changing. 346 05 03 34 SPT SPT out.

3h6 05 00 12

CDR

,

3h6 05 01 03 3h6 05 02 37

CDR SPT

987

346 05 04 47 p

FLT

FLT at 05:05 Zulu, reporting on the completion of S23B scheduled for approximately 04:51. That first exposure was started promptly at Oh:S1, 60 seconds, 15-foot focus and I could not see the comet. I do not have binoculars. 30 seconds for setup for the second, 120 seconds in infinity, 30 seconds for setup for the last 60-second exposure at 15-foot focus, and at that point, about 15 seconds into the last exposure, the horizon w_ perceptibly brightening due to sunrise and by the end of the exposure was fairly bright. So I don't know how good the last one was, but I - I got them in as rapidly as you could possibly expect, so whatever data was available we got.

346 05 05 hl 346 05 17 ll

PLT CDR

PLT out: This is the CDR at 05:17 with the rate gyro sixpack temperatures, housekeeping 2 Charlie. Zulu 6 is 95 degrees, X-ray 6 is 93 degrees, Yankee 6 is 93 degrees, Yankee 5 is Oh, Zulu 5 is 95, X-ray 5 is 95. CDR out. SPT at 05:25, ATM. For 52, you've got another CONTINUOUS MODE for 1 minute - about 3 minutes go. SPT out,

-

346 05 17 33 346 05 25 42

CDR SPT

to

346 05 25 56

SPT

TIME

SKIP

346 05 57 02

PLT

PLT. The time is coming up on 5 - Just past How far? 2 degrees? ...

57.

SPT PLT

Thank you. Okay, that 's it. Okay, we want to talk to - I'm - I'm on this thing here, Jer; so I can go ahead and record. And we can talk to Ed on this. We're going to start a sequence at coming up on 58. We're going to start it 3 minutes late, and I'll truncate on time at 06:03:26. And we're still in settling the maneuver and at field T-12, we'll probably not be exposed with a

346 05 57 50

PLT

988
good stable spacecraft. Okay now we are in an I

exposure sequence starting at 58. I will terminate at 06:03 - let's see - 26. The thing is that we could, if we wanted to gamble a little bit but I don't want to. I want to go ahead and use that full minute of time there to reset. So what I - I have arbitrarily decided to start this, even though we are not stable on rates and we will not get the full sequence for which we were scheduled. That 's on field Tango 12. Okay, everything seems to be working properly. 346 05 59 06 PLT And I think I will do this step in here, because I'm not quite sure under what circ_m_tances you're clear to turn the POWER switch OFF. I agree 'with you. That 's what I 'd do.

CDR PLT

May only get a partial exposure on that one, but I don' t know. Coming up on 06:00. Onmymark MARK. 06:00 even. late. -_

CDR PLT 346 06 00 00 PLT PLT

Okay, we started at 58; we started 3 minutes Hey, we'll get all of this sequence in here. You can get all that in the first minute.

SPT PLT

Uh-huh. What we are going to - we're going to get this 200. What is it? 2046 is the one we're on. Okay, it's in 601.

SPT 346 06 01 08 PLT

Two 107-second exposures at the end. So there you - you're 3 - little over 3 minutes right there. That's what we're going to lose, those last two 107-second exposures. There 's only one. It's Just beginning, You' re right. Okay, we're coming up on 06:02. Ed.

SPT CDR PLT PLT

3h6 06 02 53

PLT

Coming on 06:03. At 16:03:26, I'll go RESET; 27, I go POWER switch, OFF. Soon as I can do that, you can start changing your ROTATION. Okay. Okay, MARK. 25, 26, 27. Okay, and we want and 31.7 over here. Got it. Okay, _],i right, to recheck: 312.5 and 3 - 31.7. 312.5 over there coming in, almost 15 seconds -

SPT PLT 346 06 03 15 PLT PLT SPT PLT SPT PLT

Verified. 06:04:30. We're coming up on 06:0h. We're in good shape. POWER switch, ON, at 30. RESET switch START, at 31. 15. Okay. On my mark, POWER switch, ON -

_

PLT PLT 3h6 06 04 31 PLT

MARK. RESET, START, now. Okay, we're in - we're running. There we go. We're advancing film. Got to be the most seen. ridiculous thing I have ever

CDR

PLT

(Laughter) They want the - there's a clunk, apparently, when that white light flashes. It's when the film is changing and I never could hear it because I always had this thing on, too, I guess. Okay, now we have we're waiting for - as we've done that one. It dries out. Did you hear a little bloop? That's what I hear. I never did hear a good clunk! ... Okay, we've got a second party that's heard the bloop instead of a clmmk. So maybe you're in business on the frame advancement and the slide advancement.

PLT

CREW 346 06 05 35 PLT

990

CDR PLT CDR PLT

... Yes. 06:08 even?

08 even, you've got a few minutes left. l'm Just going to leave that RECORD, ON, to get plenty of time to dump it tonight. Skylab, this is Houston through Goldstone, Corpus Christi, Merritt Island, and Bermuda. Break break; the launch has been scrubbed. Over. Roger, Bruce. We're continuing with the exposures.

346 06 06 04

CC

346 06 06 12

PLT CC

Roger. And you'll skip the part that's entitled launch and take up again with the T-20. Roger. Oh, too bad.

PLT CDR PLT SPT 3h6 06 06 42 PLT CDR

That's worse... Yes. Does this much work We truncated - - - started when you got within 2 degrees, we started it - we truncated it. We only missed about I think, the last exposure. Maybe the last two. But - ...

PLT CDR 346 06 06 57 PLT

... exposures for that

No, it's - I don't think there's any - We had to let it go through the whole sequence. And I don't know how they - where that star field is, and how it is - movement and all that. The time is critical on this. Let's watch it. That's 07. Okay. Okay. We got a lots of time after this next one.

CDR PLT 346 06 07 20 PLT

991

CDR

When this is over, then I think you should tell Bruce - Yes. - - ... T-12. I will. The next exposure is at 06:13:30. You can go ahead and set ROTATION as soon as this is over. Yes. Okay, stand by. On my mark, it'll be 06:08, even. POWER sw_tch will be going OFF MARK. POWER switch is OFF.

PLT CDR 346 06 07 28 3_6 06 07 38 PLT PLT

CDR PLT

346 06 08 O0

PLT PLT CC

Houston, Skylab ; PLT. Go ahead, Bill. Roger. On Tango 12 field,we were Just a bit late getting to attitude. We started - We w_ited until we were reasonably stable within the degree and a half. I started the sequence, and I terminated it on the pad time. So probably lost the maybe the last two exposures in the sequence. The rest of them we should have with no problem. Okay, we copy that, Bill. Okay. 15 .i - - 15.1. Okay. Okay. rotation has 08.2 - Now I've got tilt of 1 - -

f-

FLT

346

06 08 39

CC PLT CDR

346 06 08 46

PLT CDR PLT CDR PLT CDR

So reverifying,

082.0 [sic]. 15. - i 15 • 1. - - and we're just waiting for - -

992

346 06 09 14

PLT

13. You can't do these early because I'm certain that the - these star fields are rising and moving, see. This is another reason that I didn't really worry too much about starting this, you see, with a 2-degree attitude error. Because during the time of these exposures - of course during the sequence, they're separate exposures and they're - they're moving across the field. Yes. But during each one of these exposures, there is considerable star motion due to our rotation and

SPT 3h6 06 09 34 PLT

our orbit.
346 06 09 h4 SPT I imagiue this did. Yes. ... sent to them. In fact, he's probably sitting down there kicking me because he'd like for me to go on and start on it even though we weren't in attitude. But anyway, I - I think that was a reasonable approach to take. You had two other choices. One was to start on data is much like the other one I

PLT SPT 346 06 09 55 PLT

-4

346 06 l0 09

SPT

time and let it all - No matter what happened. And the other one was to not do anything at all on these particular PLT Yes, I think it is a ... These people irrevocably gone, a lot of that data. these star fields don't come into view Yes. - - except for the of - every so often, and then they don't have the AMS in the window, and a bunch of other things. Okay. It's coming up on ll. - that's Some of for - -

SPT 346 06 l0 25 PLT

PLT SPT 346 06 l0 50 PLT

... 0.1. 82050. A shame about all that filler - filler material coming out of those numerals.

993

346 06 i0 53

CDR

Yes, I was turning the crank and I could see the
., . _ I

PLT CDR PLT CDR PLT

Little stuff - - - filler move by. Yes. ... - Wonder why that is. It ro - This must ro - this must do more rotating than the rest of them. NO, I think basically - Actually, the - the decimal would, wouldn't it?

CDR PLT CDR

No, I think this - this wheel probably Just didn't get cleaned properly before they put the paint on it. Putting it - putting it - .°. Okay. When you stow this thing, it's quite an operation. You've got to pressurize it with nitrogen. Yes. They don't want any air getting in there at all. Apparently oxygen, or I don't know what it is, I guess - whether it's Just contamination, or if it's the oxygen. Okay, 12 it is. All right, at 03 No, at - at 1 - 1B - at 13:30, POWER switch, ON. .•• Okay. Mark in 30 seconds. 13:30, POWER switch, ON. l0 seconds. Stand by 31, RESET switch to START.

3_6 06 ll 52

PLT CDR PLT

CDR PLT

CDR PLT CDR PLT PLT PLT

99h

346 06 13 31 PLT
346 06 13 32 PLT CDR

MARK. POWER switch,ON.
MARK. Yes, owl. RESET switch to START. definitely And we're ... sounds running. like an

it is a bloop,

PLT

Yes, that's right. That's exactly like. Sounds like an owl hooting.

what it sounds Hoot.'

346 06 lh 01

PLT

Okay, we're rnnning for quite a long time here. Okay, PI, I think we're in business here. I've got eonfermer - confirmation from second party, and we're both positive we're hearing what you're calling a clunk, only it sounds like a - Jerry's described it as the hoot of am owl - the little hoot! At a - at the - when the light flashes. So I'm pretty sure we're getting the plate advancement. Yes, you can - Now you can hear it, once you become accustomed to the sound.

CDR 3h6 06 14 30 PLT

Yes.

There went

another

one. --

Yes, it does that. The first time I thought it was re - I though the thing was all screwed up because it kept flashing, and hit sort of irregular intervals. But that's all these - you see that's all these peculiar exposures here. It has a i, 2.5 and a 6. I don't see 40 seconds. ... Yes. 20h seconds, that's 3 minutes .... There's something doesn't Jibe there. No, more than that.

CDR PLT CDR PLT 3h6 06 15 35 CDR PLT CDR

No, it sure doesn't. The whole thing's only 20h seconds long, but now this thing's set for 7 minutes. Okay. Then apparently what's happened, Jerry, is _nere's another plate moves into view, and they get a long time exposure.

PLT

995

CDR B46 06 16 ll PLT

That's supposed to be all of it right there. Well, this, I think, is the reason for this other RESET switch to START Just before you go switch OFF again, is to start that thing off again. And I think they go to a - they probably lose this 1-second lithium flouride here. Or they - they wait - they - they put it into that mode, and then - Then why do they allow 6 minutes and 30 seconds - Gosh, I don't know. That's - -

CDR PLT CDR PLT CDR 346 06 16 42 PLT

- - for a sequence that only takes - I don't know. - - 3 minutes and 24 seconds? As I say, I think that what is happening is there's another plate advances in position after this. And it's sitting there soaking all this up, see. Has to be the lithium flouride ...

CDR PLT CDR

Well, as I say, I don't know how this thing works. This was supposed to be the ... sequence right here. I gave it to them. It was supposed to ... This was the right place down here. If we had a frame counter of sort it out - Yes - - - but without the - I - I - ... television. (Laughter) Channel 2. Speaking of ... I'd sure like to go camping up there in Arkansas, nice and restful. on that, we could sort

CDR PLT

CDR PLT CDR PLT CDR PLT

996
CDR We ought to have time when we get home and get debriefed, get through with all that nickel and dime stuff; by late spring, be ready to go up there a couple of weeks. Coming up on 19. May - let me reach in there and check that thing real real quickly. However, if I have to change that, we have to bleed - put nitrogen bleed in it. You want ... ? That or - I'm wondering - I guess for the new film container - the reason that we do have spare film containers. I think they probably Just let us reach in there and change it. Yes, that logic sequence is ... Okay, coming up on 20 now. Those lights ... conditions ... ridiculous. they ever let themselves get taken - How'd

_-.

346 06 18 22

PLT PLT

CDR PLT

346 06 19 26

CDR

PLT

I don't know. They - they're not bright enough to use on EVA at all. We'll Just have to go on faith. ... really had on that one. (Whistling ) You really have to watch that teleprinter, too. Boy, some of those 3's and 8's Just look alike, you know it? Smartest thing they ever did was put the slash through the zero. Yes. Okay, coming up on 06:21. out of these watches,

--

CDR CDR PLT

CDR PLT PlaT

Boy, I've really beat the heck thrashing around here. 16:21 - rather 06 :21 :56 - 56. RESET switch to START, POWER switch to OFF. 06:21.

346 06 20 54

PLT CDR PLT

and 1 second later,

997

CDR PLT PLT 346 06 21 57 PLT CC PLT CC PLT CC

(Whistling) Okay, Stand by, 5 seconds.

On my mark MARK. Skylab, Start Next And - SEQUENCER, Houston. POWER, station going for OFF OFF; POWER, to OFF. LOS.

346 06

21

58

i minute rather. in

contact 00.5.

6 minutes

through

Madrid

- -

... the

launch the for No

got

scrubbed, 3 hours

we to

all

appreciate it the

your staying up old college try PLT CC f PLT CC CDR PLT Roger, Bruce.

extra $201.

give

sweat.

Glad

to

do

it.

And the old We're going Roger. ... Zero Good

silver team here says good night. to hand over to our buddies. night. silver Okay team - ...

tarnished zero ...

Okay, coming up on 06:23:00. POWER switch, ON, and then 1 second later, RESET switch to STAI_T. Okay. Okay. MARK. MARK. action. I'm reverifying. Standing POWER by. ON. to START. And we are getting

CDR PLT 3h6 06 2B 00 346 06 23 02 PLT PLT

switch,

SEQUENCE

switch

PLT CDR PLT

I'm thinking 0.5 ••• Okay.

more

- you know,

I guess

that

was not

- -

998
CDR CDR 346 06 23 46 PLT ... Right on time. You know, I couldn't - I wa - I - I was just listening for another sound. It's - it's amazing. I Just was not programmed to hear that sound. It wasn't until today, I took this comm carrier off, stuck my ear on the metal case, that I was able to hear that hoot. And I still wasn't convinced that that was what he was after. Yes.... It's got to be, because the schedule. Well, we got the lion's the - the launch. Just first. 346 06 26 01 PLT it times out perfectly on

CDR PLT

PLT

share of that, other than a little bit of data at (yawn).

All right, the pad

They got Ed scheduled to stow this. It's a - it's a really wormy operation. No, tomorrow - I'm just looking at tomorrow's schedule. I think I'll - If we take about now, I can save 30 tomorrow. l0 minutes right

PLT

346 06 28 00

CC PLT PLT

Skylab, Houston through Madrid for 9 minutes. Roger. Okay, coming up on 06:29. And at 06:29:26, RESET switch to START, and at 27, POWER switch, OFF. 15 seconds. Stand by. On my mark -

346 06 29 ll

PLT PLT

346 06 29 27

PLT

MARK. START; POWER, OFF. Okay, we are through. Okay, note for - that's right. Completetion of last sequence, set AMS ROTATION to zero zero, retract mirror and tilt first. Okay. We were Just about there, weren't we? Okay, and LOCKED. Okay, LOC_.

346 06 29 50

PLT CDR

_'_ 346 06 30 09 PLT
PLT 346 06 30 33 PLT

999 Okay, you retract the mirror?
Still working hard? Okay, termNo. termination of sequence.

PLT reporting

TIME

SKIP

346 07 00 03

SPT

SPT at 07:00; handheld photos on mag CXlT. First one was taken at 05:47, frame number 14, f/5.6 over 100-millimeter, 1/250 of a second. Taken of some towering cu[mulus] which were seen at sunset and the Sun angle plus they're very - ... very prominent above the lower lying clouds, gave a really - a good three-dimensional picture of a series of towering cumulus. At 06:55, frame number 12 was taken at f/ll, 1/250, 100-millimeter. This was taken of ocean interfaces. By that I mean m_ right side, as I'm looking out the S190 window, I saw a metallic gray ocean, and on the left side was a bright blue. And I believe it's the - the surface effect, Just the wave phenomenon - at the surface. And I saw this interface for a couple hundred miles, or I should say for about 1000 miles, as I watched it for quite a few minutes. The interface, at times, tended to have clouds running parallel to them. I'll say that was, general - generally true. And at more times than not, the clouds were running right over the interface. I have yet to figure out in my own mind exactly what I'm seeing, why the two different types of reflections, and what causes it. But I'll be continuing to look. SPT out.

346 07 00 42

SPT

346 07 01 33

SPT

346 07 02 03

SPT

TIME

SKIP

346 15 33 07

SPT

SPT at 15:32.

PRD readings:

42350,

23188,

38243.

i000

346 15 33 15

SPT

SPT out.

TIME

SKIP

346 18 04 I0

CDR

This is the CDR at 18:04 Zulu. The subject is M131-1. I had no sensations of motion until I got to the higher rpm's. And at the low rl_n's, I did have sensations, or I did have - find that I picked out motion that was opposite to what I expected on a couple of occasions, One funny little thing that I noticed this time was that I rather got the impression today that my gyros are caged - or whatever you want to call it, when I close my eyes, down and to the left. And as soon as I open my eyes, the - and - and look at the - at the line, the vertical line, it comes from - up from lower left, up to the center, and then stops. And then - then I look for the - the rotation that I expect. But more than Just a few times, I noticed that as soon as I opened my eyes, I would see the line move up and to the right slightly and then stop and then take oD a motion relative to what I was really doing. So it kind of made me feel like - when I closed my eyes I caged my gyros, and they caged slightly down and slightly to the left.

346 18 05 31 346 18 07 25

CDR PLT

CDR out. PLT. The conclusion of the 0GI run. Nitrogen pressure of the chair is about llS0 psi. SPT at 18:22. ATM, pass beginning at 17:30. Okay, we had a couple extra things thrown in on this pass. It started out with the building block 2, Sun center, one nominal. The corona at 8 o'clock or so shows what's left of a streamer which - from which a fair amount of material has been ejected, I would say.

346 18 22 19

SPT

346 18 23 32

SPT

And apparently, the material in its path outward stretched out the field lines; so they're pretty straight now. They were slightly curved yesterday during the ejection itself. Okay, then we - there we had abetter reconfiguration to do

1OOl

at the beginning of the orbit, involved in getting the rate gyro squared away and then, also, before we did the four-limb coalignment, switching over to the SECONDARY FINE SUN SENSORS. Okay, 55 offset was done first, before we went over to the SECONDARY FINE SUN SENSORS. I did that using MONITOR l, and I did not have to change anything. The alignment looked good for H-ALPHA 2. 346 18 24 44 SPT Caged four-limb coalignment. Started off a little late in that. And I checked the numbers in UP/ DOWN, and they looked good at the beginning. They were moving in the right direction; so I assumed I didn't have to zero the wedges in UP/DOWN. In LEFT/RIGHT, it turned out that I did. And as I was doing the UP/DOWN work, Houston called; so I went ahead and did both UP/DOWN and LEFT/RIGHT. And for some reason, it made a difference of 1 arc second in UP/DOWN. Of course, the LEFT - the La_'l'/ RIGHT, we were on the back side of the wedge; so that certainly had to be done there, and I would have caught that doing the LEFT/RIGHT work. So even though we started a little behind, we got - got the the four-limb coalignment in. However, we did not complete all of the 82B exposures. I got the one WAVET._NGTH, LONG, 2 seconds at minus 2, and I did not get the other two. I think I'll - I can pick those up very easily on the next orbit or one of those following orbits ; so I'll keep that in mind and make sure it gets done. Okay, the numbers follow: Day 346; time we started was about 17:55. And again, I'm giving you tha data on page 1-1 for the four-limb coaligument, ATM log. The upper limb, H-ALPHA 1 was a plus 1006; 82B, plus 1006. No drift between them. 45 was plus 1010. The lower limb, 82B was minus 944, and 55 was minus 943. And apparently, looking at the deltas between the upper and lower, there is a 5 and a l; so it was probably a 1-arc-second deviation in there, though delta should add up to 5. The left limb, H-ALPHA 1 was minus 924; 82B was minus 923. And the offset, as I mentioned - In your LIMB OFFSET the limb SCAN mode was zero - 55 was minus 923. 346 18 27 h8 SPT The right limb, 82B was plus 1045; 55 was plus 1046. MIRROR POSITION, still 1032.

346 18 25 37

SPT

1002

346 18 30 13

SPT

Okay, again looking at the results, I find something a little confusing. And that is, the solar diameter in two directions again is off. In the UPDOWN we get a diameter of 1950 ; and 1968 in the LEFT/RIGHT. I'll look these things over and probably be talking more with you at the ground. SPT out. This is the CDR at 18:35 Zulu, reporting on MI31-1, MS. The - There were no symptoms. The time required for the sensation of motion to subside was about 30 seconds. One interesting little thing that happened between head movement number 25 and number 26. During the rest period, I apparently went into a vertical nystagmus or something like that, because I got the distinct impression that I had a wobble going that was a frequency of about 1 cycle per second. It was a very low-amplltude wobble and lasted - It was very lightly damped. It was still going on when I started the 26 head movement. And when I finished number 30 and went back to a rest period again, the sensation had completely disappeared. CDR out.

346 18 30 50 346 18 34 37

SPT CDR

346 18 35 36

CDR

TIME

SKIP

346 19 29 58

SPT

SPT at 19:30 with observations on weather phenomena. We have been coming over a lot of ocean water which has got a very thin low-lying cloud layer. By low-lying, I mean structure which is below cirrus and has a fair amount of detail to it. I've been noticing the B4nard cells over the past couple of weeks, and one figure stands out very clearly. That is that most of them, there is always one side I was interrupted there. One thing which I have noticed was the Bgnard cells - that one side is always much more prominent. That is, over a whole field of cells, there is only one preferred direction for each cell, whivh has got a boundary much better defined. In a series which I Just went

346 19 30 23

SPT

3_6 19 31 07

SPT

1003

over, the effect made the cells look very much like fish scales. That is, the contour of one Just overlapping onto another, so that the ..., without the well-defined contour, just sort of faded away or was not even - did not diminish at all in the adJoining cell with that abruptly brought up against it and its curved interface, which shows up clearly, Just like fish scales. 346 19 32 09 SPT I would say I've noticed this quite frequently. unfortunately, I did not have a camera with me, because it was an excellent example of the one I Just passed over. I will try to get a picture of this when I see another good field of these. I guess I have a question to the weather people. Is - is this indicative of the general flow that corresponds to the convection and associating sheer layer? Or what really is the cause of it? I think if I could understand that a little bit better, I might be able to make some more observations to give us a little better insight into the total convection picture. SPT out.

346 19 32 16

SPT

346 19 32 45

SPT

TIME

SKIP

346 19 54 4h

CDR

This is the CDR at 19:55 Zulu debriefing the ATM pass. The second one of the day started at 19:01 Zulu. Made up of a JOP 9, step 1 and 3, JOP 26, step 2's. All four of those exercises went as planned. The JOP 9 started off on time; got a little bit delayed because I wanted to show some white light coronagraph on the downlink. And I got some XUV MON in on the downlink and then got the first JOP 26 started at about 41 rather than 44, which meant that the last one ate into my observing time a little bit. All of the JOPs went okay. All the data was gathered as - as scheduled. During the observing time or actually during the JOP 26, as I took a few peeks at XUV MON, got the distinct impression that the - there was new bright area coming up over the west limb. And since we Just had - had a quiet area go over

ioo 4

there, I was rather surprised by it. I compared this with the picture that was taken this morning, and this bright area was kind of surDrising. So as soon as we finished building block - correction JoP 26, I went Sun centered. 346 19 56 21 CDR That seemed to tone down that bright area on that east limb. Then we took a picture of it and compared it with the original picture, and it didn't even show; so I guess that points out aan area we should be careful in. And that is comparing what we see with what's on the photograph, because I guess the old eye is better integrater than the - than the camera. And I was able to see bright areas that the camera did not. After that I only had about 4 minutes left ; so I fooled around looking at the various active regions. 346 19 57 04 CDR And active region 96 is _]most completely indiscernible. It's got small filament nearby and one rather weak sunspot that hardly shows up in H-alpha at all. 97 is the only bright area on the whole disk, and it doesn't even show in H-alpha 2, zoomed out. It has to be zoomed in and up close looking at it before you can see it. 98, I couldn't even find; so I can't say much for that at all. AR 96, I see the - the pad here says it's - it's stable. It's ver_ stable. It's so stable, it's almost nonexistent. Okay, that's about all really. There wasn't anything too spectacular happening in this pass. CDR out.

-

346 19 57 56

CDR

TIME

SKIP

346 21 00 04

SPT

SPT at 21:00; ATMpass which began at 20:35. Building block 2, Sun center, was straightforward; building block i0 in JOP 27 in straightforward. What was done for the pointing, I ROLLed, 0000, although I performed the subsequent nu Z update

and the current turned out to be plus 0009. Went down to line 25; looked for the brightest spot in the active region, which is not a terribly active region. It's Just a plage. Found one

lOO5

which was roughly - actually the brightest one in H-alpha, which was about halfway between the upper and lower limits of the active region. I went over to that bright spot and m_ximized the oxygen VI on it, and it got up to a reading of around 6 or 700. And then I Just slewed directly to the right so that I would be UP/DOWN - would remain the same and I would be centered on the active region. This way, the mirror line scan, which we'd be performing in doing the line profile work, would also pick up that bright point. 3_6 21 02 _6 SPT And the remainder of building block 19 is - Assuming straightforward, we'll get in Just about 27 grating steps before ESS, ..,26. The active region itself looks like it has been eroded quite a bit. You can see the super granulation boundaries leading right up to - within about an arc minute or so of the center. And I do not see any plage brightening in the network. It appears very much like quiet Sun network cells all the way. So apparently, this active region has been aroundfor a long time and is slowlybeing eroded. The one bright point I did find was located in H-alpha, and sure enough, when I went over and put the crosshairs for H-alpha 2 on top of that bright point, I found the maximum in oxygen VI, which was a fairly sharp peak - sharp in spatial terms. 2 or 3 arc seconds either way will make an appreciable difference, maybe dropping down to 3 to 400. So the pointing I - I ended up with then was an UP/DOWN, plus 0157; and L_'I'/RIGHT OF MINUS 0187. The technique for doing the line profile work at 19, which we also have in our shopping list item, was very straightforward. I was thinking of doing this the other day when I had a little bit of time in line profiles. However, there really was nothing on the disk at the time. And looking at the line list, I noted that it's been chosen so that we're working with fairly bright lines so we've got something to work with in studying the line profile. I have thought of doing something like that on a prominence, but I could not find a line in here which was very strong in the prominence.

SPT

346 21 05 06

SPT

1006

3h6 21 05 56

SPT

For example, the Lyman-beta line is not included in that list, and I'm wondering whether that was an oversight or an omission because it was relatively of small intensity. As was already pointed out, the Lyman-beta can get up to a maximum of around 200 or so in the one prominence we did look at about a week ago; so in the future, that may be something we would want to look at for line profile. H-alpha 1 certainly is superior to H-alpha 2 in its ability to resolve all the fine features ventilating off the limb features which we've mentioned, but also the details of the active region and including the details of the network. But comparing the two here and trying to study the chromospheric nextwork and the way it fits in with the active region, and it's nearly impossible to do with any kind of assurance in H-alpha 2, but H-alpha 1 certainly does give you a good picture. Certainly the folks who worked on that one deserve a lot of credit. It's a very good image. In working with a CONTRAST of about 8, BRIGHTNESS of 3 on MONITOR i, chromospheric network stands out beautifully. Again, as I said, it just moved all the way up to around 1 arc minute of the center of the active region. SPT out. This is the CDR at 21:16. The subject is Earth observations through the area of HHll8. No photography taken. The pass this time, we came in right over Peninsula de Taitao and a very large lake with a small town on the south side of the lake. The lake straddles Chile and Argentina border. The - The city - The town of Los Antigos [?] is on the south shore of the lake. We notice on the north shore of the lake, there is lighter colored lake, very greenish in - in color, that appears to be draining into the larger lake, which is a very deep blue.

3h6 21 07 lh

SPT

3h6 21 08 50 3h6 21 16 18

SPT CDR

3h6 21 17 01

CDR

That seems very strange to see these two lakes with a rather large opening between the two. But yet the smaller lake is very green; looks like it's sedlmented. And the larger lake is - is very deep blue. As we moved over across Argentina, past Puerto Moreno [? ] and the Lago Musters and Lago can't hardly read it - anyway, the large lake next

1007

to that one near Pampa del Castillo, it's a it was rather striking to us to see that so mRny lakes up here had such different colors. Some lakes are blue; some are green; some are Just tan, like they're Just covered full of silt and very shallow; and other lakes are sort of a dusty green. And it's a very striking thing. As we went out over the Gulfo de [sic]San Jorge, we looked to the to the south and to the east, and we could see the Falkland Current coming up along the coast. And we could see a large swirl Just north of the Falkland Islands. And it looks like maybe there's a portion of them - Possibly all of the FaSkland Current comes in from the east over the north of the Falkland Islands and then turns north, and you hava sort of a eddy area right there at the turn. 346 21 18 31 346 21 23 50 CDR CDR CDR out. This is the CDR. The time is 21:24 Zulu, and we're in preparations for S019. We have sunset on this side of the house - I should say it's dark on this sideof thehouse. I have opened the SAL and extended the mirror. The ROTATION is set at 27.7, and TILT at 23.9. The prism is in and cassette number 02 is on. And I verify that I have set the FOCUS at 2 - number 2. The film hatch is coming - I'll wait another minute for the film hatch Just to make sure it's plenty dark. This is a no-crew-disturbance Jobber; so let's be careful. Ed, this S019 coming up in about 3 minutes is a no-crew-disturbance. Okay, ... Skylab, Houston. We're back with you through Ascension for 9-1/2 minutes ... - Okay, the nuz that's called out on the pad is minus 2.3. The nuz that's in the ATMDC at the moment is minus 1.8; so we're at 1/2 degree, and therefore no correction required. CC -...

-

CDR

SPT 346 21 25 12 CC

346 21 25 21

CDR

1008

346 21 25 51 346 21 26 01

CDR CDR

Okay.

All right,

the time is now 21:26;

stand by -

MARK. I'm going to open the FILM HATCH at this time. FILM HATCH is opened. All right, our first exposure is 270; so I'm setting it right now. Reverifying: ROTATION, 27.7 and a TILT of 23.9. _ This first field is number 620. Okay, verifying the filter is open. Hey, we have a RETICLE light now. Okay, with about 30 seconds to go, I'm going to film lever to SLIDE RETRACTED, setting the spectral widening at 270, and going to 100 percent. All right, we're coming up on 28; so I'm releasing it. Stand

346 21 27 25

CDR

by346 21 28 09 CDR MARK. SHUTTER is OPFIN, and it was OPENED at 06 21:28:06. This is, again, field number 620 with a 270-second, widened exposure. And somehow, miraculously, we have a RETICLE. Bill, did you change the battery in this thing or anything? PLT CDR No. Okay, it must be the other one that the RETICLE doesn't work in. ... Yes. time. The frame counter is reading 001 at this

PLT CDR

CDR CDR CDR

We're passing 70 percent.

50 percent.

95 percent. Stand by for termination posure. Stand by -

of the ex-

346 21 31 46

CDR

MARK. Going to CARRIAGE RETRACTED. Setting the exposure for 90. Winding it up. This is the same field, number 620. Stand by MARK it. Starting the 90-minute exposure at this time. Time is now 21:23 [sic]. ex - 90-second

346 21 32 04

CDR

346 21 32 59

CDR CDR

Stand by -

1009

346 21 33 17

CDR

MARK. Termination of this exposure. CARRIAGE RETRACTED. New ROTATION is 002.3. Next, the TILT is 28.4. All right, verifying the ROTATION is 02.3; the TILT is 28.4. This is field 854.
Winding up to 270. Stand by. Going into SLIDE

RETRACTED. 346 21 34 21 CDR MARK. Starting this - OPEN the SHUTTER. Starting the exposure of field number 854 with a ROTATION
verified at 002.3, the We tre looking at frame TILT verified at 28.4. counter number 3 - frame

count number
346 21 36 O0 CDR 50 percent.

3.

CDR

Karl, it 'looks llke you tried to pack too much into this pad. Your last - last field is 21:5R, and you want a 90, a 30, and a 30, and sunrise is
22:02. chance It looks of making like it. there's Passing Just a Chinaman's 80 percent.

346 21 37 19

CDR

I think I'm now rnnning about 15 seconds behind. The 21:34 start time was 21:34 about 16 or so.
We're past 90 percent, coming up on lO0. Stand by for termination of field 854 at lO0 percent.

Stand by 346 21 37 50 CDR MARK. Termination. Going to CARRIAGE RETRACT.

Changing the TILT to 227.8. One of the problems is, you can't read the dials too well. CC CDR CDR ... Okay, 227.8 and the TILT is 01.9. All right, they're set. The first one is a 270, widened. All right, going to SLIDE RETRACTED. Stand by for the initiation. MARK. SHUTTER is OPEN. Verifying ROTAT_0N of 227.8, a TILT of 001.9. This is field 276, and we're on a 270, widened. What ' that, Bill? s ... Oh, beautiful. loss? He said there'd be little or no

346 21 38 50

CDR

CDR PLT CDR p-

lOlO

FLT CDR PLT CDR PLT CDR CDR

... Beg your pardon? ... What you say about, ... Oh, gre_t. Okay. again7

Karl, I wish you'd put a T-handle on top of this winding valve instead of a - instead of Just this knob. The knob, when your hands are moist, is very slippery. A T-handle would have been a whole lot better for winding this rascal up. Passing 60 percent. The next exposure is a 270, but it's unwidened. By the way, we're looking at a frame count of 004, a little past 70 percent. Passing 90 percent. Stand by for termination. 1 minute from LOS. Next

346 21 h0 55

CDR

B46 21 42 09" CDR 346 21 42 23 CC

Skylab, Houston. site is GuamMARK. Termination.

We're

346 21 42 26

CDR

CARRIAGE

is RETRACTED,

The

TILT and ROTATION RETRACTED. 346 21 42 36 CDR CC 346 21 43 42 346 21 44 4_ CDR CDR OPENING

stay the same.

The SLIDE is

the SHUTTER

now and starting

my watch.

That's why I'm crimson. 60 seconds have gone by. on this frame is 005. 2 minutes

The frame count are gone.

346 21 45 39

CDR

180 seconds gone by on this exposure. field number 276; 270, unwidened. ... (Recorded laughter) Okay, we have Stand by 250 seconds in now.

This is

CREW 346 21 46 49 CDR

l0 seconds.

1011

346 21 h7 i0

CDR

MARK. Termination of the 270, unwidened. Now changing the ROTATION to 22h.2. That's set. And a TILT of 00.9. That's set. Winding up for a 270, widened. Okay, SLIDE RETRACTED now. Stand by for SHUTTER OPENING. MARK. SHUTTER OPENED. We're looking at frame count number 6. This is field number 281 with ROTATION of 224.2 and a TILT of 00.9.

346 21 h7 56

CDR

a

346 21 48 28

CDR

Oka_f_ the time is now 48:30 - 22:48:30. We're about on schedule, but I don't think we're going to get it all in by sunrise. Fassing 50 percent. Okay, we're looking at frame number 6, and we're 90 percent of the way through the exposure. All right, stand by for termination. Going to CARRIAGE RETRACTED. Stand by MARK. Termination. CARRIAGE RETRACT. Going to a ROTATION of 166.5. All right. And we're going to a TILT of 14.5. All right, that's set. The first exposure is a 270, widened. Okay, SLIDE RETRACTED. Stand by for the exposure. Stand by -

346 21 49 44 346 21 51 06

CDR CDR

346 21

51

35

CDR

346 21 52 22

CDR

MARK, SHUTTER's OPEN. We're looking at frame number 7. I'll go back, verify TILT and ROTATION here. TILT is 166.5; ROTATION is 114.5. This is field number 821, and the first exposure is a 270, widened. 60 percent. 80 percent. guys. That doesn't Try not to clank things around, you

346 21 54 27 346 21 55 12

CDR CDR

SPT 3h6 21 55 31 CDR

..., Jet.

Okay, I Just thought I felt a - a clnnk when the LBNP opened. Passing 90 percent. Coming up on lO0 percent, termination of the first exposure of field number 821. Stand by MARK. Termination of the exposure. Going to CARRIAGE RETRACTED. Setting up for a widening of 90. No change in TILT and ROTATION. Stand by -

346 21 56 01

CDR

1012

346 21 56 15 346 21 56 50 346 21 57 14

CDR CDR CDR

MARK. Passing

Frame

number

8 has started

now.

50 percent.

80 percent. Stand by for termination of this frame. It's 008, field number 821. Stand by M_RK. Termination. CARRIAGE RETRACT. Going to a new ROTATION of 166.4; that's set. New TILT of 7.5; that's set. First exposure is a 90. Winding it up now. Going to SLIDE RETRACTED. Stand by MARK. Frs/ne number 9. Verifying ROTATION of 166.4, a TILT of 7.5. This is field 818, and we're in'a 90-second exposure. The time right now is 58 and 40 seconds - 45 seconds. It's going to be nip and tuck. We're going to have two 30's of this same one - same field 818. Passing 90 percent. Stand by Setting for 30. Winding

346 21 57 33

CDR

346 21 58 i0

CDR

346 21 59 20 346 21 59 29

CDR CDR

MARK. That's termination. it up. Stand by MARK. We're

346 21 59 40

CDE

This is frame number i0 of 8 - field going to do this one more time. Stand by for termination. Winding

818.

346 21 59 56 346 22 00 08

CDR CDR

60 percent.

Stand by it up.

MARK. Going up to 30 again. Stand by MARK. About 1/2 second

346 22 00 15 346 22 00 22

CDR CDR

late there. has

We're coming up on 28 - 22:01. 50 percent gone by. We're going to ms_ke, by golly. 80 percent. Stand by for termination -

346 22 O0 43

CDR

MARK. CARRIAGE RETRACTED. All right, going to set the TILT and ROTATION to zero. And setting the TILT to zero. Retracting the mirror now. Closing 22:02. the door. Complete. And coming up on

3_6 22 Ol 28 CDR

346 22 Ol 52

CDR

Now coming up on 22:03; barely got it done.

so it looks like I Just

i013

346 22 Ol 59 346 22 02 Oh 346 22 19 28

CDR CDR PLT

MARK.

22:03,

and - and the door is closed.

This is the CDR out. PLT reporting M092/171 run on the SPT. It started at 20:50 getting the LBNP (music). The measurements on the left calf are 13-3/4; right, 13-1/2. Left legband, Alfa November; right leghand, Alfa Quebec. PLT out. PLT recording the end time on M092 at 22:40 and correcting the start time. Make that 21:50; 21:50 instead of 20:50, as reported earlier. PLT; GAS PRESSURE, CAL N2, 02, CO 2 is 1183.

346 22 19 50 346 22 38 39

PLT PLT

346 22 42 00

PLT

346 22 49 00

PLT

PLT; CAL N2, H20 is reading

1263.

346 22 56 35

PLT

PLT; percent C02 are 764h,

- CABIN

AIR, PERCENT

02, H20 , and

3h3, and 1.98 respectively.

346 23 01 09

CDR

This is the CDR at 23:00 Zulu, debriefing the ATM run that started at 22:12 Zulu. It was made up this time of a JOF 6 followed by three block JOP 26's; pretty much the same as the last pass I did, except the last one started with block JOP 9. _ the JOP 6 went uneventfully. The first J0P 26, I was well into it when I discovered a spray beginning to come out what looked like, oh, 40 or so arc minutes of roll above where I was. And it's too bad I wasn't a little bit later. I think I might have been tempted - If I hadn't started J0P or - yes, J0P 26 yet, I would have been sorely tempted to modify the ROLL from minus 0720 to something like minus, oh, 0800 or whatever it was and lay it right on that little spray. As I proceeded on through the first JOP 26, I had no problems with it ; got it off in good shape. But Just as that J0P was finished, another - that was building block i0 - another spray occurred, oh, probably 60 arc minutes of roll on up above the first one I saw.

346 23 02 38

CDR

And the first one was beginning to wane; so I stayed where I was and pressed on with the second JOP 26. And while being distracted and watching

i014

the other one, I managed to bungle on 82B experiment NORMAL; I forgot to STEP the LIMB OFFSET from minus 2 to zero, I think I got two frames done on 82B with the 82B exposure NORMAL. I terminated it offset to - from minus 2 to zero - and then started it over again. I apologize. 346 23 03 21 CDR So I wasted two of your frames, and

Other than that, that building block i0 went well. The third building block l0 went without a hitch. Went right on through it with an offset of plus 2. And then I checked my sprays again. The first spray was gone, but the second spray was still well defined and did not appear to be on the wane as yet. So I ROLT.W._on up to that point, and that gave me'a ROLL of minus 1094. I - On the XUV SLIT

I reset to LIMB SCAN. Actually, I went back to
LIMB SCAN, then WHITE LIGHT DISPLAY. Made sure I was right on the limb. Went back to LIMB SCAN, noticed that my limb offset had reset back to zero; SO I went to LIMB POINTING and did a shopping list number 3, interesting events. And I called it a spray; it might have been a minisurge. I don't know Just which you would want to call that. 346 23 04 25 CDR At any rate, I did one PATROL, SHORT for S056. For S082B I did one timed WAVE T_GTH, SHORT, exposure 240 at a zero offset - that's offset out 2 and did another. And then offset out to 6 and did another and got 1 minute and 40 seconds of that done before we hit ESS. Now S055A, I should have stopped every time I got to line 13, but I Just completely forgot that. I went ahead and Just did a full MIRROR AUTO RASTER on the area and - Actually, we did about a mini auto - a MIRROR AUTO RASTER and 3/4. I forgot to note which line we were on when I terminated, but it was about 1-3/4 or possibly 2 complete. Well my counter says 2; so that's what we did. We did two MIRROR AUTO RASTERS. Now for about 2/3 of the first MIRROR AUTO RASTER, I, unfortunately, had DETECTOR nnmber 1 inadvertently turr, ed off, and I got that on at the suggestion of the ground. And I'm sure you got at least one full MAR with DETECTOR 1 in. And that's the time we hit ESS. I terminated S082B promptly at ESS. I terminated S055 at about - oh, I would suspect about 300 K rather than 400 K. And that's about

346 23 05 22

CDR

-4

lO15

it. I took a look at XUV MON; didn't see anything particularly interesting there. And the white light coronagraph was devoid of any indications of - of anything new. And this little spray, I'm quite sure, was not big enough to cause any sort of thing that you might see on the coronagraph.
346 23 06 18 CDR CDR out. the

346 2B 07 ii

PLT

PLT with the VITAL CAPACITY on the subject, SPT, for M092/171-I: 5.483, 5.363, 5.h56.

###

DAY 347 (AM)

i017

347 00 i0 48

SPT

SPT at 00:i0; M092/MIT1. M092 run was kind of a disappointment. I made it through but it got a little ... there at the end .... a little faint, but otherwise, no objective symptoms .... the old ... along the back of the neck. Pulse pressure dropped down there a little bit. The only thing I can attribute it to was probably I must be dehydrated. I didn't prepare for this in any special way at all like I have the other ones ; that is, I did not ingest a large amount of water either yesterday or today and did feel even a little - a little dry in the mouth when I started, but I didn't feel it was bad enough to warrant taking in a lot of water. Not especially rested nor not especially tired either. So I don't know. It's Just another dip of the curve. MI71 - Didn't have no problem with that. Did a little exercise afterward. One thing I did notice about that is that every time the blood pressure cuff swings while you're riding the bike, you have to hang the one arm loose; so you've got to really hang on with the other one. And I think it's correlating the heart-rate rise with the blood-pressurecuff inflate period. You'll see a definite correlation. I noticed it go up two or three beats each time that occurs. And then as soon as the whistle'd go off, I could relax and hold on with both hands ; and the heart rate would level off and go down a little. I'd be interested in knowing what kind of a factor you have to apply to the flight readouts here in order to get the actual oxygen consumption rate. Today it got up to be 2.h, 2.5, or so, and I'm wondering what that really corresponds to. SPT out.

347 00 Ii 48

SPT

347 O0 12 49

SPT

TIME

SKIP

347 00 36 13

PLT

The PLT debriefing the ATM pass that started approximately at 23:45 and included a JOP 9, building block i, which was truncated at 6 minutes, omitting 82 Alfa. That was completed as published.

r_

1018

347 00 36 h3

PLT

I did notice what I consider to be a sort of a brightening at the base of coronal streamer located at approximately 8 o'clock when solar north is at the top. Made a mental note to look at it later. I checked it later; I checked XUVMON, went Sun centered and the - there was - on INTEGRATE there was an area of brightening on the limb, much brighter than the rest of the limb brightening at approximately 08:30 position. In other words, not - not precisely but grossly correlated with the streamer which appeared to have some brightening at the base. Then I went to JOP 26, building block 10. Did three of those in a row, and those were all performed nominally with the exception of the last one. I hit 82B exposure NORMAL; let's see, and I got the first exposure at the previous LIMB OFFSET of zero. So when it - when I saw the READY light come on, I hit the 82B STOP to stop the sequence, stepped up to plus 2 and restarted the - the NORMAL SEQUENCE. And when I completed the sequence NORMAL SEQUENCE at LIMB OFFSRT plus 2, I went back and got the 10-second exposure; so there's one extra 10-second exposure at the zero LIMB. OFFSET. Everything else was performed nominally except when I - I completed a little bit early, I went back went over to the limb and looked at the area at 8 o'clock, and there is - nothing spectacular. But there is definitely a sma]1 prominence over in that area. Checked XUV M0N again, and there's brightening in that area. Had Ed come up and look at it. He wasn't too impressed but said it - it could be growing in that area. Other than that one extra frame of 82]3, I think everything was performed nominally.

347 00 37 45

PLT

-

347 00 39 18 347 00 42 30

PLT SPT

PLT out. SPT at 00:42. MITI, conclusion of run. 02 PERCENT

is 75.04; WATER, 347 00 42 51 SPT SPT out.

4.66; co2, 2.21.

TIME

SKIP

1019

347 01 15 08

CDR

This is the CDR at 01:15 Zulu, reporting completion of housekeeping 70 X-ray, 3 and 4. M0L SIEVE PP correction PPC02 - MOL SIEVE A, PPCO 2 IN indicator B, PPC02 is 5.5;

OUT is 2.5;

for MOL SIEVE New subject:

IN is 1.8;

PPCO 2 OUT is 0.h.

This is oxygen

•.. partial-pressure sensors. I think on about day 3 or day 2 in the activation sequence, there was one sequence where I was to change out the the sensors - partial pressure oxygen sensors. And I made the note that in sensor number 2, I found a deposit of crystalline structure that was salty to the taste. It was a white crystalline structure. The ground said - I asked them what they wanted me to do with it, and I kind of inferred that I'd be willing to put it away and save it, bring it home so they could analyze it and see what it was. PPO 2 number properly, 347 01 16 35 CDR 2 sensor is the one that's not working seat properly.

and it's the one that won't

After a little bit of experience, it's become apparent to me that that white crystalline structure that tastes salty is indeed salt. We've had a couple of small spills from our salt slcfinges at the eating table, and the crystalline structure that that remains when the salt evaporates is exactly the same. It's Just plain old garden variety household salt• So I would suggest that we forget about going to the trouble of bringing this - this particular sensor back with its _sterious crystalline structure attached to it, because I think all it is is plain old salt. It probably happened when a previous crew had one of their salt packets break and go squirting off in the wrong direction. CDR out.

347 01 17 22

CDR

TIME

SKIP

347 01 56 01

SPT

SPT and 19. The the held

at 01:56. Handheld photos. First one was HH55, the mag ID is CX17; frame numbers 17, 18, and This was of Merapi Volcano in Java, Indonesia. location of the volcano was wide open and clouds, good Sun angle. So we got three hand100-millimeter shots of it; f/ll, 1/250.

1020

3h7 0156

h3

SPT

Bill Pogue, Jerry Carr, and I were up there looking at it. I took thephotos. Jerry said - he thinks he was able to identify it by eye. There was no smoke or no vent visible to us. And Bill Pogue
looked to see at it it through binoculars and also and believes that - He says he was did able see

the crater but could not see any - any venting or any smoke coming from it. However, we have gotten three good photos of that area; so I believe we
do have it recorded.

ShY 01 57 17

SPT

Following that, we got a series of photos, and they fall into the land use category. They were all along the coast of Australia. First of all, before I give you the particulars, mag ID numbers ... add Cxo7 to them; frame number 20 to 32. The GM_was 01:35 to Ol:hO. Okay, going back to HH55, that was - those frames were taken at 01:2h.

347 01 58 04
347 01 58 30

SPT
SPT

Okay, back to the land use photos, 20 to 32.
The southern part of Australia, which is wide opening now, has been cloud covered, and that ... what we came over. And by that, I mean the area from Port Lincoln, Adelaide - that's A-d-e-l_a-i-d-e the Kangaroo Island, Fort Firie, Feterhorough, Mount Gambler, Hamilton, Geelong, down to Melbourne, especially that whole area which was nothing but a continuous quiltwork of either urban development or rural farming. I think the geometry in the area was most interesting from the way in which the quiltwork pattern was laid out. The cities themselves were very visible, and you

SPT

could see the major directions of streets, and they all showed - Not that each individually showed up, but the - Just the directions were readily apparent by eye.

347 01 59 45

SPT

The rural Each area

development all showed seemed to have its own

a quiltwork which direction for

-

each - for the boundary for everybody's land. That is, you had nothing but a series of rectangles all lined up against one smother, and the sides of the rectangles all had a different orientation in a given locale. And then it would gradually transform into another major sages [sic] or major rotation or clocking of these axes.

__

1021

347 02 00 24

SPT

The area was wide open and it reminded me very much of what you see in flying over, say, some of the parts of southern California, although this was rural development, not - not urban as most of southern California is. It was just a continuous quiltwork of - of farm and land division. The coloring showed up quite well. There was a a lot of vegetation, and the land was bright red. The color of the - some of the ground underneath, some was dark. It was a dark - very green or almost black. So we had the geometry, the color, and a good Sun angle in a wide open day; so I shot a bundle of film, giving you a pretty thorough coverage of that whole area, which I hope will be useful fbr - for those who are interested in land
use -

SPT

347 02 01 34

PLT SPT PLT

Hey,

Ed. for the people down in Australia.

- - and especially Ed - SPT out.

f

347 02 01 39

SPT

TIME

SKIP

347 03 27 04

PLT

Okay, time is 15:30. Debriefing the ATMpass that started at 02:48. Building block 1 - or - that's right - J0P 6, step i, building block IA, was performed nominally. Building block 6, J0P 1 Bravo, was performed nominally except when I started to do the CONTINUOUS on the 52, I forgot to change into STANDARD. That's the second one - the second sequence of 52 after ROLLing to minus 5400. And then, I was going to throw in the first three exposures of a CONTINUOUS after that to get a total of 15. I got distracted from ground and forgot my time and got a couple of extra frames in there and probahlyused up one exposure.

347 03 27 58

PLT

82A exposures

timed

out properly. Nu Z update

The video went

tape 2.5 -

was - was performed.

from minus

to minus 2.3. The activity seemed pretty well nil. The one streamer

to be pretty I've been

1022

watching, over about the 8 o'clock position when the solar north is at the top, still has about the same character it did earlier this afternoon. Doesn't seem to be growing any. I was watching it fairly closely. A lot of fine structure on the east limb in the corona. And there's streamer still active on the west limb. B47 03 28 42 PLT onebig

Did a scan around in H-alpha for the east limb, trying to pick up the prominence I saw earlier this afternoon; could not find it. That's at the 8 o'clock position, where the - the streamer over there seems to be - seemed to be developing then, the point at which I reported earlier in the day there was more XUV activity than in the rest of the lim_ in the area. There did not seem to be much change in that - in the status as far as XUV associated with the streamer at 8 o'clock. Still a little bit more there, but nothing spectacular. Looked around in H-alpha at the sunspots and the filaments. There were sunspots as right near almost near dead-center of the Sun. And that was about it. PLT out on ATM. I'ii give the frame count here in Just a second and - in case somebody wants to give it to ground. Stand by H-ALPHA, 10623; 56, 3577; 82 Alfa, 12B; Bravo, 1014; 52, 5269; 54, 3504. PLT out on XU - on ATM debriefing. And PLT; I'd like to debrief the S183 procedure I did. I've already indicated, I think, the area - given the information of the area you were interested in. And I ha - I want to go over it step by step in detail. This is in reference to the general message S - S183, 1-1 checkout.

347 03 29 i0

PLT

PLT

347 03 29 34

PLT

B47 03 29 47

PLT

347 03 30 03

PLT

PLT

"Following procedure is to be - is to insure carrousel 1-1 is synced and film gate is operable. We hope loose glass encountered previously will not Jeopardize future operations."

PLT

"Step l:

Pressurize

and remove carrousel

1-1 from

stowage container in subdued light."

I did that.

1023

"Vacuum

exterior

of carrousel

and interior

of con-

tainer." I did that. I saw only one small fragment about the size of a grain of rice, except it was flat. 3h7 03 30 59 PLT "2. Verify f_]m gate closed. Check action of gate by opening and letting it snap closed with spring action." I did that, and it appeared to work properly. In other words, it opened; it sprung back closed, and didn't seem to be binding on anything, and that's what I was looking for. "Step 3. Verify alignment mark (drill mark on center hub face of carrousel) is aligned with film gate." It was not. In fact, if you visualize the film gate slot as 12 o'clock position on the clock, then the drill alignment hole or mark was just about dead on 45 degrees counterclockwise. In other words, the 10:30 o'clock position on the clock. I checked it with the preference that was suggested, and it came out Just right on the 45-degrees marker. "If al - if aligned, go to step 5." And it wasn't; so - "If not, voice record angle offset and align." I did. I - I'm doing that now. I did align. The ATM point - Align. "The ATM point overlay may be used to estimate the angle offset." I did. I used that. Okay, now. "To align, depress center of carrousel hub - recessed - center it, and rotate the minimum angle of travel to align drill mark to film gate. Release hub to film gate. Release hub center and rotate slightly to insure carrousel is in a detented position." Okay, now I tried to do this one the same way I did on that 2-2, and I - I Just about ruined the end of my fingers trying to - to rotate the hub. I could not put enough pressure to get enough friction between the end of my finger and the hub to rotate it. So what I did was, I went down and got some tin-straightener pliers and carefully reached in there and grabbed that thing and turned it. Now it turned fairly easily with the pliers, which - you know - I mean I don't know how much force is sup - supposed to be required to turn that thing. So you - we may have a problem; we

347 03 31 15

PLT

_-

PLT

347 03 32 09

PLT

3h7 03 32 33

PLT

f_

1024

may not. In other words, what I'm saying is, I may have been overcoming interference which the carrousel advance mechanism may not be able to. That is, when I was using the pliers, I had enough force to overcome some friction or internal resistance that the carrousel may not. We ought to be able to find that out tomorrow. So I cannot give you definite assurance that we've corrected that problem.

347 03 33 34

PLT

"5 - Step 5. Install carrousel in stowage container and evacuate." That was accomplished, and it was stowed. "Note for subsequent 193 ops: If plat if plate found protruding from carrousel, remove plate, report number, and save. Insure film gate always closed." I've never seen it open. "If glass encountered again, terminate ops; notify STDN. " Okay, now - Leo's see. There was another question I wanted to ask on that. Okay. I guess I already asked it. We are going to use 2-2 tomorrow. And we ought to be able to tell by plate advance indications whether or not we're actually getting operation. Okay. There was one other question I wanted to ask. Oh, yes. Where - Is the number on the plate? "Report number." Yes, "Report number and save." Where is the number on the plate? Is it - if if - if it's obvious, don't bother to answer. If it requires some looking around, how about giving me a clue as to where to look? I got a little, tiny sort of magnifying glass that I could use that's a part of my eyeglass kit - that I could use to look for it. So that ought to take care of the 183. I hope it works, and I hope that we've been able to salvage this operation. PLT out.

347 03 34 O0

PLT

PLT

347 03 34 23

PLT

PLT

3h7 03 35 03

PLT

TIME

SKIP

1025

347 04 57 51

CDR

This is the CDR at 04:55 Zulu. The first subject is handheld photography. The first subject is the mountain areas north and northeast of Rangoon. During the pass Just prior to coming up on volc_mo HH55, Merapi, and trying to get some shots of Malaysia, we came down on a descending pass past Rangoon. And as we were pulling off to the south of Rangoon, the topography of the mountains north of Rangoon became very striking with their snow cover, and I thought that it was - it deserved a good picture, an oblique, if for no other reason but for topographical significance. The entire mountain range the snow. shows - is beautifully outlined by

347 04 58 57

CDR

The magazine ID is Charlie X-ray 17. It was taken at Ol:2C on day 346. The frame number is 16 and the settings were f/8 on the Hasselblad lO0 with a 1/250 of a second. The next items I have to report are - were later on at 04:25 Zulu. We got three obliques of the Afar Triangle, taken from the southeast looking northwest. The Afar Triangle was particularly cloud free and we thought that the obliques with the low Sun angle were probably pretty interesting pictures and valuable to have. The three pictures are on magazine ID number Charlie X-ray 17, taken on 34 - day 347 at 04:25 and 04:27 Zulu. The Afar Triangle obliques, HHll0, frame numbers are 32, 33, and 34. They were all taken with a Hasselblad 100 at an f/8 and 1/250.

347 04 59 16

CDR

347 05 00 01

CDR

Okay. I have a new subject. This message is to be delivered to Dr. Hordinsky as soon as you can. It's a special open letter to Dee O'Hara from the crew of Skylab 3. Jerry, I'd appreciate it if you would hand-deliver this to Dee Just as soon as you can. Dear Dee, it's with mixed emotions that we bid you a very fond farewell. Your leaving is an acute loss to all of us, but at the same time we share with you the excitement that the promise of a new Job brings. You've been a great friend to all of us and to our fam_ lies over the years. Our kids love you and our wives love you and so do we. And we're all going to miss you terribly. Our hearts are with you, Dee, but not our livers, our kidneys,

347 05 O0 35

CDR

1026

our stomachs, our gall bladders, our lungs, our
spleens, our appendix, our pancreas.

347 05 01 12

CDR

Signed, Jerry, Bill, and Ed.

TIME

SKIP

347 12 09 01
347 12 09 13

SPT
SPT

SPT; PRD readings:
SPT out.

42359, 33193, 38350.

TIME SKIP

347 12 32 38

CDR

This is the CDR at 12:33 Zulu, reporting on Earth observation handheld camera work. The first site was HH101-15, the city of Brazilia; a metropolitan study. We didn't really locate Brazilia until we were past it somewhat; so this picture is slightly oblique. However, it should probably serve the
purpose. The weather was good. The next site,

which was, I believe, dash 9, Rio de Ja_eiro, had cloud cover over it, so all you could see was the
harbor; so we didn't - didn't bother to take that

picture. 3_7 12 33 28 CDR The frame numbers for the first picture are number 35 and 36. They were taken at 13 - correction, 12:22 Zulu. The magazine is Charlie X-ray 17; the f-stop was f/ll; and 1/250. We're just not positive we did get Brazilia. We felt we ... what looked like a populated area, and it looked like at the branch of two rivers. We were looking for the Pan American Highway as a possible landmark; however, that was not evident. And if we get another opportunity, we'll try to do a little visual and oral work, rather than the photographic work. CDR out.

347 12 3_ 21

CDR

TIME SKIP

1027

347 13 27 58

SPT

SPT at 13:28 reporting on the photos taken of triangle shoes. They were taken on mag CIIIO, f/8, 1/60 with a flash attachment ; frame number 52 No, make that frame numbers 52, 53, and 54. Correction, that was frames number 51, 52, 53, and 54. The first three were taken of all three triangle shoes - all three sets - on the grid, all from the same angle, all - each one with three different angles: left-side front, right-side front, and back. And the last one was taken of the SPT's left heel, which has become fairly unglued. Let me describe the conditions of the shoes in general, that is, what seems to be characteristic of all the shoes and of the SPT's heel. Okay, the toe guards which were set up have done a good Job. I wore - did not have the toe guards on for about the first 3 weeks, and I could certainly see the wear of the toes. Wherever there's a hard surface underneath, it tends to help wear through quickest at that location. With the toe guards on, however, it seems that they can be quite adequate. As you'll see, there's a lot of scuffing and discoloration of the toe guards, but they're holding up real well. We don't expect to have any problem with them. The only problem encountered in the toe guards is that they're very hard to install. And in my set in particular, there was one screw, the one at the very tip on the left shoe, which I could not get in. And I have worked with the - for the past several weeks without that screw in there, and it seems to be in no way a detriment to the shoe or to myself.

3h7 13 29 3h

SPT

347 13 30 37

SPT

There is not much wear on the side of the shoes Just an occasional amount of abrasion. I think you can see that's very minimal at the largest width of your foot, say right below the small toe, if you will, on the outside. But that's minimal and is more of a discoloration or dirtying of the canvas from wearing. The other real wear points come in the back and - that is, with everybody's shoes, there is a ridge which runs vertically down the back on the inside, a stiff - very stiff one, maybe 2 inches across at l-l/2 inches across. At the border to these ridges, the canvas is stretched and encounters a fair amount of wear and stress where they have started everybody 's shoes. to come through on aSmost

lo28

347 13 31 49

SPT

The CDR and SPT have - the CDR and PLT have put tape over those locations and I'm about to do the same. Now one part of the SPT's shoes, on the back on the left, have undergone a pretty healthy tear. And that is the - right along the bottom edge of the very back, parallel to the ground. The bottom has been ripped straight across. And that occurred one day on the bicycle ergometer, which if you put your heel back down at the bottom stroke, rubbing your toe down - if you put your heel down, which I just happened to be doing because of the way I was pedaling oz_ day, you can catch it on the triangular grid. And with the force of your other leg coming down and the inertia of the system, you just flat rip the - the back. It has not slowed me up at all and has not gotten appreciably larger, and I expect that if this'll hold up at least until halfway through the mission, we should have no problem. In general, the shoes are wearing, but the thing is, we've got another set of canvas on board that we'll put in about halfway through. Seeing as we're about a third of the way through now, it looks as though we're pret .... ty much -got it made. We - we expect no problem with them. SPT out.

347 13 32 40

SPT

347 13 33 33

SPT

TIME

SKIP

347 14 51 26

CDR

This is the CDR at 14:52 [sic] and 30 seconds. We're beginning the S019 operation. The SAL DOOR is OPEN. The mirror is EXTENDED and set at a ROTATION of 31.0 and a TILT of 6.2. The first field is number 213, and exposure will start at

14:54.
PLT CDR 3h7 lh 53 l0 CDR ... Okay. The nuZ correction is zero. is minus 2.h, and on the pad, The nuz in the ATMDC it's minus 2.5.

1029

347 14 53 32

CDE

Okay, the first exposure is 270, widened. Okay, I'm going to start. Going to SLIDE RETRACTED.
All right, coming up on the first exposure.

Standby 347 lh 54 08 CDR

-

MARK. The SHUTTER is OPEN. And I verified that the FILM HATCH is OPEN. This is star field 213. The first exposure is 270 seconds, widened, and we're verifying a ROTATION of 31 and a TILT of 6.2, The frame count is 012.

3h7 14 54 55

CDR CDR

That exposure was started at lh:54 and 7 seconds. 50 percent. The next. exposure will be on the same field. It will be widened and 90 seconds. Passing 90 percent. Stand by for termination MARK. Termination. Going to CARRIAGE RETRACTED. Setting it for 90 widened. Winding up. Okay, standby for exposure start MARK. Exposure 20 percent. 50 percent. Okay, stand by for termination. frame count is 013. By the way, the started at 57:40 - 57:35.

347 14 56 27

CDR

347 lh 57 16

CDR

_

347 lh 57 32

CDR

CDR 347 14 58 39 CDR

347 14 58 49

CDR

MARK. Termination. CARRIAGE R_'I'_ACT. Changing the ROTATION to 35.7, and the TILT is being changed to 15.3. All right, it's a widened, 90. I'm winding it up now. I'm going to SLIDE RETRACTED. Standby MARK. SHUTTER is OPEN, and the time is 15:02 15:00 and 2 seconds [sic]. I'm verifying the ROTATION,is 35.7, the TILT is 15.3. This is field number 128, 90-second widened exposure. My next exposure will be Kohoutek at 15:03:40. 50 percent. 90 percent. Stand by - This is frame 01_.

347 14 59 36

CDR

347 15 00 43 347 15 00 53

CDR CDR

MARK. The CARRIAGE is RETRACTED. Changing the ROTATION to 195.5. And locked. The TILT is 22.1 and locked. This is a 240-second, unwidened. Standby. Going to SLIDE RETRACTED.

1030

347 15 01 30

CDR

MARK. S_ER It was started

is OPEN, at 15:02

and the watch was started. [sic] and 30 seconds.

3h7 15 02 22

CDR

Okay, I'm reverifying the ROTATION is 195.5, the TILT is 22.1. We're looking at frame count number 15. i minute has gone by. I'm looking at the viewfinder, and I think I'm looking at the ground. But I think I see the horizon moving past now. We're at a minute and a half into the exposure. I see the horizon going by. Should see Kohoutek-rise. Okay, we see the airglow horizon going by. I see Kohoutek loud and clear. 2 minutes and 30 seconds have gone by or will go by in about 4 seconds. So the first minute and a half of the exposure, Karl, was clodds, or I should say the Earth. And then up until about 2 minutes and 15 seconds, you were looking at the airglow between the horizon and the top of the airglow. And finally, just about, I would say 2:30 - Well, no, 2:15 is when the comet finally cleared. And we are now completing our 3rd minute. We have the comet and a tail. It's really not as clear in your optics as it is with a pair of binoculars out the STS window. I think I did you a disservice, Karl, in that I started the exposure on Kohoutek too early. I'm finally looking over the remarks in my pad, and I should have waited until exactly 03:h0. Okay MARK. h sec - 4 minutes have gone by. CARRIAGE is in RETRACT. And let's see. It's now 06, and I'll go ahead and get the mirror retracted and the door closed. Setting ROTATION and TILT to zero. I'm so used to being so far behind on th s S019, that I - I should not have gone ahead and started the exposure early because - I hope I didn't overexpose the film and degrade your Kohoutek information by showing you some air low first. All right, ROTATION and TILT are both zeros. I'm going to retract the mirror; retracted and locked. I'm going to CLOSE the wind - or the SAL DOOR. It's CLOSEd and LOCKed. Okay, this is the CDR terminating S019 operations.

347 15 03 46

CDR

3h7 15 15 13

CDR

347 15 05 43

CDR

347 15 07 30 347 15 12 36

CDR PLT

Comes PLT - a GMT of 15:15 - with the M487-2 Bravo. Number 1 - this is on page 2-3 of the Eval. Checklist - How adaptable are the various compartments

_-_

1031

to multi-uses beyond their prime design function? Example: Does each sleep compartment double for off-duty reading, et cetera? I find that in the case of the sleep compartment - Of course, we don't have time to do much reading. The flight planners see to that. But in any event, the sleep compartment does afford a lot of stowage during the day. I find the straps across the sleep restraint very useful for ... if l'm handling bi,1_¥ items, such as urine bags .... supply modules, that sort of thing. The towel holders, I use every one of them for holding clothes, socks, watches, et cetera. 347 15 17 50 PLT As far as the wardroom doubling beyond their prime design function - Of course, the wardroom is our prime viewing area because we're getting ... and it's very convenient to look over and see where you are. And I think that we're probably getting an awful lot of good handheld photos and visual observations by virtue of the fact the ward - the window is located in the wardroom; so I think that probably the wardroom is making a prime contribution to the visual-observation sciences, which, of course,it wasn't its design function. We also find the wardroom walls very convenient for posting items for general crew reference. Wall space is at a premium, and we find - In fact, I find myself using the doors of all the lockers for stowage also, which makes it inconvenient to get into the lockers, and in one case, the tableware - the eating utensils stowage, I find undesirable in their design; so I Just line utensils out on my tray, using the magnets, which are only marginal in their effectiveness but at least they still work. The wardroom table is not very convenient to use because of the fact that a lot of times we have food heating in the area. And the trays - When you take the trays out, the puddings all come out, and so you're - and also, it Just - it doesn't seem to be convenient to put the tops on the trays a lot because of .the latches, because of the fact that if you take the bottom tray out, the puddings come out of their drawer. Experiment compartment : It 's sort of useful. It's got such a fairly good volume, and you're able to move around it quite well; so I do a lot of - Just sort of ... experimentation with small objects, such as balls and that sort of thing.

347 15 19 07

PLT

1032

347 15 19 52

PLT

And I use it in zero g for play and the elementary experimentation because it does have a close ceiling and you can move around and catch thlngs, whereas the forward compartment has such a large volume, it's fairly difficult to do anything. When you .... it drifts away. The head is not Useful for about anything else because of the floor is there. And also, it's not intended for anything else, and it's not used for anything else. Very difficult to restrain yourself in the head because of things we've already mentioned. Forward compartment: I don't - I can't think of anything other than the prime design function; that is, it's got large volume and housing stowage and supplies, and providing the scientific airlocks for the corollary experiments. Also, there's volume for the corollary experiments. I can't think of anything else. Airlock's not useful for anything other than going through. MDA is use - It's worse than useless because of the lack of restraints in it. And how good has the sleep restraint been for sleeping? It's excellent. Anything useful for anything other than sleeping? I've already mentioned the fact that it's a good interim stowage place ; very good.

3h7 15 20 28

PLT

3h7 15 21 15

PLT

3: What noneating uses have been found for the wardroom table? Okay. Agiin, I think the eating utensils should have a good stowage position_ the location, on the tray itself or in it. I find the stowage in the locker is very inconvenient to use and unsatisfactory from my standpoint. It takes a lot of - It's a lot of trouble to get them in there and ... the restraint is unsatisfactory. It doesn't hold up too well. Would a design modification of the table and its associated restraints be desirable for any and all uses? Well, I wouldn't want the people that designed this table doing anything else. I think that it's such a lousy Job of design and the foot restraints are so poorly designed that I wouldn't want to have - have those same people work on that thing, because all they'd do is Just make a bigger and better white elephant. Although the idea is sound, I'm afraid the implementation would be very bad if the same people were permitted to work on it.

3_7 15 21 hh

PLT

1033

347 15 22 14

PLT

What sanitation problems have developed, and how have you dealt with them? Urine spills, I guess. I have been - l've had about two urine spills, and both of them were my fault, mainly because of the peculiar way we're ... processing our urine bags. Now ... you leave them out, we get to to evacuate them, ... chloride, and so forth. And l've saved up old clothes for that purpose; mopped up with the old clothes. Defecation for me has not been a problem. It could be. Again, you - The probThe ws.v you deal with them is give us time, and that time is at a premium. I think that anything can be cleaned up if you're given enough time. Of course, it's unpleasant and - It hasn't been that big of a problem for us. Food spill in the - in the wardroom has been a problem in that the bags have been -l've had a lot of trouble with spilling the drink bags Or flatus bags is probably a better name for them, because that's where I think all the flatus is generated - in drinking our drink with drink bags.

347 15 23 24 z-_

PLT

I think that that's another problem, too. We generate so much flatus, we have to pass so much gas, that you're laundry marking your shorts all the time. And that, I think, probably sounds a bit flippant, but I think it's an - it is a problem. And I don't want to pass over the flatus problem lightly because I think passing gas about 500 times a day is not a good way to go. What is the most disconcerting personal hygiene problem you have encountered? I think I Just mentioned it - Passing gas about every 5 minutes. And I don't mean Just a nice little pooh; I mean really passing a big blast of gas (laughter). It's Just not a nice thing. It - it offends people around you, and the only rede_,_ng feature is that everybody else _s passing the same amount of gas. It's a good thing we got some charcoal canisters taking the stuff out. How effective and efficient are the cleanup procedures and hardware? The - We don't have very good way of cleaning up. It's Just swab mop, and we use our own personal towels. The the tissues are at a premium, and I don't want to - I find m_self very reluctant to. use gobs

347 15 23 48

PLT

3h7 15 24 16

PLT

a and of

tissues to clean up. i made one obser - observation at least in the aft compartment, and that is we have grid structure about 6 to 8 inches above the plen_wall, the bottom of the workshop, which is a closed b,_1_head. Now this biJ1khead is about 6 to 8 inches below the grid, and it gets an awful lot of food spills. And yet there's not a good way to reach through there and clean it up. You can reach your hand through there, but you're - you're Just very confined. And you can scratch - cut your wrist fairly easily if you try to do any vigorous scrubbing. So I think in the future we should have removable grids if we have the same arrangement we have, with an area below which can be conta_minated by food and drink particles drifting around ... and splashing around. 3_7 15 25 26 PLT How much of a time-line imposition are cleanup chores? I'd say anything that you do is a timeline imposition, because cleanup obviously - What I do is, I try to use my utensil wipes on my utensils. And then I try to use the utensil wipe to clean up a small area every day befo - after I get through eating, before I throw the utensil wipe away. That way, I get a little bit cleaned every day, but the grid avove the food preparation table is pretty soiled - pretty well soiled with small drops of food. By the way, the bags - the - the - the food hags that had to be cut across the top, they're in - some of them are in cans. The - These are very poor hags, and the Apollo bags are very, very bad for flipping the particles of liquid out. And I think that we're maybe directing ourselves at the wrong problem here; and rather than cleanup, to prevention. Now of course there are always going to be spills, hut rather than, say, focusing your attention on giving us more cleanup time, a better designed bag is probably - It would go a long way toward minimizing a lot of those food spills. I can't overemphasize the poor properties of those cut-across bags. They call them pull-open bags That - I - the ones that you have to use the big spoon in - and they have caused an awful lot of food spills. 347 15 26 53 PLT HOW adequate is the ATM chair? I have not used it, and I won't - I won't cogent on it. Do you use the shoes/gridwith it? Is the toe bar useful? Oh - Okay, no comment on that.

_

1035

347 15 27 13

PLT

How comfortable are your garments in terms of fit, warmth, and don/doff ease? Fit: I lost a lot of weight. I can't complain about the fit because they fit me when I was about 15 pounds heavier. Warmth: No problem. Don and doffing : Well, that's a good question. The Jacket has the sweatshirt-type insert at the sleeve. I find it difficult to get the Jacket on and off with a wristwatch on, particularly if you have to use the the passive radiation dosimeter on your watchband. I finally took the PRD and - the passive radiation dosimeter off the watchband because it - it was so cumbersome. So one of the things I think we need is the ability to put trousers on and off without taking your shoes off, because that causes a lot of trouble. And also, the sleeve opening needs to be Just a little bit more flexible. I - I like the idea of this sweatshirt-type sleeve, but - Also, the sleeves are too long. Now all of my sleeves are about an inch and a half too long; I've rolled the cuffs up to a sort of Jacket. And I think that's a fit problem. It was just not quite tailored properly. The - They just hang down too long on the arms.

347 15 28 31

PLT

What recnmmendations do you have for improving IVA garments? Do they tend - Well, that's first. Do they tend to snag as you move about in the 0A? Yes, they do. The pocket that holds the little Flight Plan book and also the scissors pocket tends to snag, but you could - I finally took the cord off my scissors because I figure it was a safety hazard. The pockets are also inadequate. We've already commented on those before, but they Just _lmost made them good enough. You know, it was Just like if they'd have Just used 5 more minutes of time and thought, they could have made them real nice, because the way they are now is Just sort of m_ginal, useless, although we - Of course, we do use the Flight Plan pocket ... the little straps aren't long eno,_h. I - The little pocket in front, I think, was supposed to be used for pencils; however, it Just - Just accommodates a flashlight. But this - this flap isn't long enough to really hold it in. I keep losing it. So I finally stopped using it and went back to using it for pencils. The scissors pocket: Again again, the flap is not quite long enough to really give you good positive retention of the scissors

1036

and you can knock the scissors out of your - flip them out real easy if you hit something. 3h7 15 29 41 PLT What recommendations do you have for improving IVA garments? Well, any place there's a zipper, there ought to be a zipper-pull tab on the zipper, if it's nothing more than a little inch and a half lace or cord or - with a knot on it or something like that. But I find myself irritated by having to dig and hunt and probe for the little zipper-pull and - in order to get at a flashlight in a hurry. Also, any place there's a zipper, there ought to be an opposition pull-tab. In all, I don't think that's so critical on the clothing here. But they - they Just left these off every place. And I don't think the people really knew what they were doing. I mean I - I've seen an awful lot of things designed with zippers that have pull-tabs on the zippers and opposition pull - ... Anyway, that's my comment on zipper pull-tabs. And what have you detected in environmental elements discussed as the last question in the first debriefing? Have you used any of the M487 to document these changes? I'ii have to answer pass now. that later. I have an ATM

CREW 347 15 30 37 PLT

347 15 30 47

PLT

TIME

SKIP

347 15 55 23

SPT

SPT at 13:55 [sic] for M151. M092 run now. SPT, observer; SPT out.

Just starting the CDR, subject.

3h7 15 55 35 347 15 59 33

SPT PLT

PLT, debriefing the ATM pass started at 15:14 actually 15:32. JOP 9, step l, building block 2, performed per pad. I left DETECTORS 6 and 7 on there when I first started the set at 2500 - and first started the MIRROR, AUTO RASTER. Ground call, I got that off. Other than that - that was performed update. nominally - truncated at 6; got the nu Z

i037
347 16 08 92 PLT And the 15 Bravo, step 2, building block 36-A, coronal hole, was pretty well fouled up. I tried to give them - I wasn't quite sure what they wanted to do on that. I asked Ed. He helped - he tried to help me out. And I left 59 on STOP. I saw him put it to AUTO SCAN. Then he put it to STOP apparently and set there. He turned to hit the START switch and didn't notice it didn't have a READY light; set there for about out any - taking any data. 347 16 09 27 PLT 5 minutes with-

So I lost a lot of 55 data there. I - I did not get the last prescribed observering from 56, but that was mainly due to the fact that I was slow getting everything set up there; so that wasn't too good. 15 Bravo, I got - I let 55 run down past 400 K, so I don't know - the data may be atmospherically degraded on the GRATING, AUTO SCAN. And - sort of a case of too many cooks can spoil the broth, there, although I asked for help. So that data was not - was not the best data I've ever got or ever given you. I didn't have a chance to monitor anything. Ed's given us a pretty good brief on the coronal structure.

347 16 l0 01

PLT

347 16 lO 25

PLT

I did notice that - that - as I've noticed before that the hole - south pole coronal hole is quite distinct. And on the - a few things, with solar north at the top, the - It moved in a clockwise direction from the south pole, and it moved slightly to the left and up. When you come to the edge of that coronal hole, there's a fairly bright border there. In other words, it seems like there's a - there's a high degree of activity and then all of a sudden it'd stop. And this was one of the things, I think, that led Ed initially to want to point over there and get that border. And finally we decided to go above the limb as per the JOP Snmma_y Sheet, which we did. But that is an interesting feature which bears watching. PLT out. SPT at 14 -Make that 16:20. M092; CDR is subject.

PLT

347 16 ll 20 347 16 20 h0

PLT SPT

1038

On the left leg, 13.0; the right bands: The left, Alfa November; Quebec. 347 16 21 00 SPT SPT out.

leg, 13-1/8. Legthe right, Alfa

TIME

SKIP

347 16 56 01 347 16 56 08 347 16 57 ii 347 17 08 31 347 17 08 40 347 17 ll h8 347 17 12 58 347 17 23 21

SPT SPT SPT SPT SPT SPT SPT SPT SPT

SPT at 16:55. SPT out. SPT at 16:58. SPT at 15:08 SPT out. SPT; 171. M171. This

M171.

We Just concluded the M092.

M171. [sic].

CAL N2, 02, CO 2. ll80. M171. CAL N2, H20 , 1257.

M171 CABIN PRESSURE,

5.019.
f_

First ... is your friendly SPT at 17:22. MI71.

Looking at the PERCENT 02, 76.12; PERCENT WATER, 3.48; and CARBON monoxi - DIOXIDE, 2.09. VITAL CAPACITIES of the CDR: 5.229, 5.090, 5.205. SPT out. PLT, debriefing the ATMpass which started at 16:47. JOP 9, step i, building block 2, performed as per pad. The repetitive JOP 26, building blocks 10's, were performed all nominal, except on the last one. When I was changing DETECTOR, I left 3, 4, 7, and 6 on and didn't notice it. And I saw the GRATING moving. I turned it off. I don't know how far it went. But I think it went up past 4000. Then I got 102, got a MIRROR, AUTO RASTER in at the GRATING, 102. The XUVMON, as far as observing time is concerned - XUV MON on this ROLL, minus 3800, it looks like there's a loop reaching across - let me see if I can look at my sketches on --minus 3h - Okay, that puts it about the l0 o'clock position.

347 17 24 15 347 17 32 28

SPT PLT

1039

347 17 34 03 '

PLT

Minus 3h puts about 7 to 8_00 on - arc minute position on the - the limb_ yes. And_be a 9600 3600 - 8h00 position on the limb - roughly along in there. And there seemed to he a loop reaching across, angling in, going down to the right, an arc-like structure in the XUV. Now I can't positively say that that's there or not. I was - I was in it using the repeated IBTEGRATION. But it looked like you had a very good location, minus 3800, for the last two building block lO's. That was about the only thing I noticed other than I took a quick look at the corona. And the fine structure et cetera that Ed briefed on earlier today is still there. PLT out. SPT at 17:50. 75.59; PERC_T MI71 first: PERCENT PERCENT H - PERCENT 2.05. 02,

347 17 35 02 347 17 51 01

PLT SPT

H20 , 4.12;

C02:

3h7 17 51 28 347 18 07 58

SPT SPT

SPT out. SPT at 18:07. Housekeeping 7 Delta. ATM C&D water reservoir check shows it to be full, with no bubbles. Good looking reservoir - no sediment, nothing visible. SUS water reservoir quantities: T-23, quantity there looks about like 30 percent remaining, approximately. There are about equivalent of six five, six bubbles, maybe 2 centimeters or so in diameter. On T-24, about 95 percent remaining and approximately l0 to 12 bubbles in the reservoir, approximately 2 centimeters diameter. SPT out.

347 18 08 52

SPT

TIME

SKIP

347 18 43 42

SPT

SPT at 18:45. M487-2B - 2 Bravo, which was about 2_ hours behind the scheduled time before its coming: I didn't have a time ye - long enough for a period yesterday where I could do an adequate Job.

SPT

Number l: How adaptable are the various compartments to multi-uses beyond their prime function? Okay, let's take one at a time. Sleep compartment: The only thing the others do in there besides sleep

i04o

and dress is read a book occasionally. Not too often; we usually don't have too much time for it. 347 18 _4 25 SPT Wardroom: Sometimes I use the wardroom table as a desk for writing or working on graphs that we have for medical - keep track of medical status. Can't think of wardroom in anything else. I guess Well, there we also have the - the window, and we do a lot of photography work out there_ so that's that is another function of the room, although the wardroom window itself multiplies it as a design function of the room to do photography there. Okay, the experiment compartment: No, I wouldn't say there's a heck of a lot to do there except the experiments. There's not much - much room, and there's nothing else to really attract you to go in there. So other than the experiments for which they're designed, I've not found much use for it. The upper dome - The dome area of the OWS: Well, occasionally, I go up there and Just do some gymnastics or acrobatics, if you will - body acrobatics. I also have been working on some science demonstrations up there. It's a wide open room; allows you to do a - a lot more, and I would recommend that in future spacecrafts, that at least a room of that type be available and one fairly large which - The only problem I find with that for your acrobatics, for other things, is that there is a lot of appendages, a lot of things sticking out of the floor and also not that many footholds around. I'd like to see that whole area up there with more triangular grid around the walls and a little plainer - or if anything, just have things built close to the wall. M509's sticking up with arms out, fans sticking out of the floor, T020 sticking up - I think this kind of ruins the the whole working area in there for anything else, although you can still use it for some of the other things I mentioned. The way in which those things are situated - not off in a corner but Just kind of sticking bare naked right out in the center of everything - makes it a little bit hard to use that area as you would like. The MDA: We use the 190 window for the photography again. But other than that, it's primarily the design functions of that. One of the whole problems of the MDA is, there's no footholds or handholds. Shouldn't say none, but next to none.

j

347 18 45 19

SPT

lOhl

3_7 18 _7 3_

SPT

Other than the EREP foot - triangular shoe platform and the one for the ATM, you've got very little to grab onto in there. Airlock: No, that's Just a place to go through. How adequate has the - the sleep restraint been for sleeping? Has it been useful for anything other than sleeping? Well, I just hang in there and read sometimes. I think it's perfectly adequate for sleeping. The one thing that I find gets in my way is that top cover which comes down, which is - Who knows what you're supposed to do with it. It's always either in my face, or I tuck it in, and I can't get my arms out if I want something. The thing is just a general nuisance. I think they should have made that thing so you could zip it on or off or at least so you could have arm armholes through it if you wanted to use them. I don't use the upper blanket, the top blanket. We don't have it on there. Just the netting, and that seems perfectly sufficient. I think one of these nights l'm going to try sleeping without it - that is, withoutthe outsideof that, just floating free. I think that _can be done, and maybe there'll be an advantage to it. So far, I've not been able to afford the - the chance of losing a good night's sleep for the experiment.

3_7 18 h7 49

SPT

347 18 48 40

SPT

347 18 49 06

$PT

What non-eating uses have been found for the wardroom table? Would a design modification of the table and its associated restraints be desirable for any or all uses? Well, as I mentioned, I use it as a desk sometimes, with the cover on the top.

347 18 49 37

SPT

The other day I had to take plants - elodiza p_an_ elodea plants out of the agar, and I used the table Actually, used the food tray itself with a couple of cans in there .... it's an inconvenient place ... table. The restraints for that table are awful primarily the foot restraints. I think the best thing they could have done was to yank them - never put those foot restraints in there; strictly stick with the triangular grid. If - if anything, people may want to use soft shoes in there, which is a good idea. We should have had foot restraints - light lightweight foot restraints which are portable. You can move those around and put them down there if you want them. Right now you've got ... triang_alar foot

1042

restraints down in there that do nothing but move your triangle so that it locks. But your foot is out, and you have to ... chasing around. The net result means that you'll very rarely ever put your foot in it. The rest of the blooming thing just keeps you from putting your feet in the triangle grid. It's a lousy design and a lousy idea. Thigh restraints seem to work all right. You've got your option whether you want to use them or not. Sometimes I do; sometimes I don't. 347 18 51 i0 SPT What sanifra - sanitation problems have developed, and how often have you dealt with them? No real major problems. No major problems. Probably the place which you got to keep after - Seems like there's one in the wardroom, and there you can do it piecemeal. Anytime something flies out, you clean it up. Or if something looks - looks as though it's building up a little - little layer of crust, then you clean it off. You do all this piecemeal. The other location where we have our problem is the head. But everybody's pretty conscientious there and cleans up after themselves quite well, although potentially it could - could be quite a problem. Okay, that was number 4. I'll pick up on this in Just a moment. SPT out on 487-2B. Let me pick up a moment here on handheld CXIT, day 347, frame number 37 and 38. photos -

SPT

3h7 18 53 05

SPT

3h7 18 53 45 347 18 53 h9

SPT SPT

347 18 54 ii

SPT

Okay, I'm looking at what appears to be a pretty good pattern of - of plankton. Whether it's from an upwelling, I am not sure. Let me take a look at our location. What I've seen is a very bright green contrast to the _]most royal blue ocean water and, again, a very sinuous element - a long sinuous element and some fairly subtle, and some subtle ones seem relatively larger. The not-sosubtle ones, the ones which have a higher contrast, if you will - so that would be non-subtle, with a higher contrast - are thinner, more compact, better defined ones. I can see circulation in some of them. One in particular looks very much like a low-pressure center, although it's relatively small. I would guess maybe 20 miles across. Clockwise

__.

lO43

rotation. A couple of the long sinuous elements have pink in them, indicating - or which looks something like there have been a - a vortices [sic] created along part of it. I wouldn't quite call it a Von Karmon Vortice, but there's two or three three kinks in one sinuous element which I could not identify the sense of rotation in two of them. One of them is clockwise. 347 18 56 28 SPT The colors again: One is a light blue contrasted with a deep - aSmost - kind of a cross between a navy blue and a dark blue. I don't have the book out; otherwise, I'd give you the Forel scale. I'll try to do that in a minute. One element is a light blue; one is a light green; and one's a relatively darker blue which shows up with - not with much of a high contrast - color contrast to the other ocean. Okay, as I Just thought, we have just come across the tip of South America by Argentina. And we're looking at the Falkland Current, which we saw a little bit of the other day, before we went across at - a little higher up. And I have looked - gotten a couple more photos down here on the effects of that Falkland Current, and we have some oceanupwelling associated with it and accompanying plankton growth. In - in the brightening, that - there was, I would say, three different types of colors and and general patterns. One was a very tight pattern. By that, I mean small, fairly sharp pink involved in sinuous elements, and I would say there the color of that was, oh, about a 9 or so on the Forel scale - 8 or R. These are relatively small, sharp pink. Second one was one which was maybe a 7 on the scale, not quite as small, spread out, more diffuse, contrasting with the ocean water behind it, which was more llke a 4. And then - Well, actually, it wasn't; it was almost, say, like a 5. I would say just one step up on the Forel scale because you plainly see this covered a much larger area. And the two previous ones will be superimposed on the larger one - not necessarily, but it was observed to be that. So it looks to me like upwelling or plankton blooms, if you will, will come up; the picture is depicted in m_ mind anyway. Looks as though the pla_ton bloom will come up and spread

347 18 58 17

SPT

347 18 59 53

SPT

1044
out on the surface of the water. It'll first appear as a very tight packet stretched out by the current or the motion of water - eddies, ... ; a very sharp, sinuous element. Then it spreads out a little bit and becomes spread over a much larger area. The currents which carried it slowly dissipate and die away, and another one can move up through it. And it actually was visible, three stages ; very much in the same way new cells in the atmosphere will grow up from the remains of an old one or a new chromospheric network will grow in the remains of the network around it, although here the packet, if you will, looks more densely packed, smaller than usual at that time. Okay, SPT out on - Well, hold on. Let me give you the camera data on that: CX17; frames 36, 37, 38; f/ll; 100-millimeter; and 1/250. 347 19 02 01 347 19 02 25 SPT SPT SPT out. SPT back in again. Let me give you those frame numbers once again. They are 37, 38, and 39. Wanted to make sure I gave them to you correctly. Out. SPT at 19:06 - 19:04, picking up again on M487-2B. Okay, we're up to number 5. What is the most disconcerting personal hygiene problem I've encountered? Probably one is, you Just don't have time to take a shower every day. It takes a good 45 minutes to an hour. I do enJoy that, but we don't have time for it. The other sponge bath works, but it's not anywhere near as efficient. And you just not end up being in the clean and healthy-feeling state that you can on the ground, especially after vigorous exercise. Usually exercise - after exercise, taking a cold shower will stop the sweating. Then you need a good soap bath. But here it's not possible. Now another way I can interpret that question, and that is the head itself. Even though it's very efficient and I think well designed, the process still Just takes too blooming long. Correct bowel movement takes a good, oh, half an hour or so. Sometimes in a day you Just don't have a half an

347 19 02 38 347 19 04 02

SPT SPT SPT

347 19 05 00

SPT

hour. The net result is, you end up being uncomfortable for a good part of the day. I think a lot of this is a requirement put out by the experiment itself. And the time can certainly be cut down to far less than that if the experiment did not exist. But the way things are right now, the process just takes too long. J47 19 05 5J SPT How effective and efficient are the cleanup procedures and hardware? How much of a timing imposition are the cleanup chores? I don't find that to be a problem at all. Pretty much shay on top of it as they said it would happen. So it's no real problem. How adequate is the ATM chair? Haven't used it yet. It is readjusted for each crewman? No, we don't use it. Do you use the shoes or grid with it? No. The toe bar useful? No. Do you use the chair anywhere other than the ATM? We've got it stashed up there in the top of the OWS. What design improvements do you recommend? Eliminate it. The reason I gave all these negative comments on it is that when you're operating in the ATM, I personally have to reach all aroundfrom one side to another. One, I use the timer over on the STS for some function, As I use the - as I look at the time, I have to turn the VTS ON or OFF - the VTR ON and OFF. Information - Experiment information is stowed off on a panel right behind me, which I use to get over to - to open the container for the book. I use that quite often. I generally Just have to reach all around, and also, I don't llke to be confined. Many times, when I don't have my hands on a switch on the panel, I lean back and move all around. I find it much more enjoyable to work when I'm not confined. We will be giving that thing a try, though, future, Just to fill the square. B_7 19 07 29 SPT in the

347 19 07 i0

SPT

How comfortable are your garments in terms of fit and warmth and don/doff ease? All of those are not too bad. Were they sufficiently resistant to tearing and abrasion? Yes, they're sufficiently, although I have imagined the value of the next question. I went into the airlock one day, and I had the bottom of my pocket - the zipper in my pocket on the bottom left leg open. And it caught on somethingand Just rippedthe pocket halfway

1046

down. I was really whistling along, though. What recommendations do you have for improving IVA garments? Well, one is, even though I like these pockets, I'd like to have a couple garments around here which don't have these blooming pockets, that I could use Just for comfortable, casual wear. I'd also like to get some different colors. I feel like I've been drafted in the Army with this darn brown; it gets pretty obnoxious after a little while. 347 19 08 30 SPT I'd like to get some different colored T-shirts. Sweat shirts might not be a bad idea, but probably T-shirts are better to go with for right now either that or Just pullover cardigan type. I think they're plenty warm. Might think a little too warm. The pockets on the gear, though, is not for the flashlight, is not too sterling. The pocket is either too small or too big for whatever you want to use it for. This pocket, I just don't use. I put the pencil over on the inside pocket on the top left thigh. I use the one pocket in the back to hold the - my schedule book, although I think that the flap on that is too weak - the Velcro is too weak. The po - or the flap itself is too short; Just barely makes it. The pockets on the back right-hand side, which I guess one is a pencil pocket and one's a flashlight, are next to useless because they're too small for a flashlight or too big for a flashlight. The flashlight gets lost in the center pocket and comes out of the other one. I have not found them very useful at all. One thing I would like is to have a couple of plain old handkerchiefs around here. Not quite too sure why we have to go around plucking tissues out of every ... all the time. I would much rather have the two handkerchiefs, and we are _,n_ing short on tissues and wipes. What changes have you detected in the environmental elements discussed in the last question in the first debriefing? Have you used any of the M487 instruments to document these changes? Environmental elements: Can't say - environmental element. Okay. No, I have not done light surveys. Spot meters, I've only used for photography. No, I have flat

--

347 19 09 30

SPT

347 19 l0 16

SPT

3_7 19 i0 _7

SPT

10h7 made - made the situation work whenever I've been
handed ... Haven'thad time to Jury-rig the lighting or worry about sound levels - try to measure them and so forth. The press of getting the job here Just doesn't allow that kind of activity. 3h7 19 ll 20 3h7 19 18 h8 SPT PLT SPT out. PLT debriefing the ATM run that Just started at 19 - at 18:20. J0F 9, building block 1 - or steD l, building block 2, was done at about minus 3600 arc minutes and a ROLL of - to a minus 5400. Everything else is nominal. Started too soon. JOP 26, all those steps were completed correctly, I believe. The only thing I did wrong was, at the end I didn't go back to WHITE LIGHT DISPLAY when I maneuvered toward the center of the Sun by the 52 standard sequence. In fact, I had forgotten that. And I understand why, I think, you've got that limb tracking mechanism in there, but it had slipped m_mind actually. It wasn't Just an oversight; I Just flat wasn't aware or even - It's been a long time since I've done that. I looked at the corona versus the XUV MON , and I think they're looking in the right area. There definitely - As Ed reported, there is sort of a secondary-type detail of structure developing in that region you've been looking at there, and in about the 8 o'clock position on the Sun. It appears in the XUV MON there is a bright spot on the disk - not - not Just in the limb but down onto the disk now. And it appears as a continuation of the highly amplified limb-brightened area with the streamers coming out, and a little, oh, about 1/16-inch-diameter circle-sized spot has now moved onto the disk at that point at the lower part of the brightened area at the limb, on the XUVMON, which very closely correlates, of course, with the ac - activity or whatever that - whatever is taking place out there in - in that - It looks like an active region coming on the disk. I don't know that, but that's what I would guess. If - if I were a betting man, I'd say that that's - that's what is happening - that it's just moving onto the disk. That's about all the viewing I got other than Just watching that limb activity on the H-ALPHA i, which - and H-ALPHA 2, which didn't
/

347 19 20 04

PLT

3h7 19 21 15

PLT

io48

tell a whole lot. You can't - Sometimes you can't see that stuff out in the corona; sometimes you can on this MON 1. Let's see. That actually is about it. I'm set up for the next orbit. I think that everything's in good shape here. I'll clean up the panel. 347 19 21 50 PLT PLT out.

TIME

SKIP

347 20 20 40

PLT

PLT at 20:20 reporting MI31, OGI MODE. At level - Just above level 4 - about level 4, I started getting no response at _11 and - However, I did get considerable motion up and down of the - the visible bar in the OGI goggles. So I got an awful lot of negative responses. However, I was getting motion up and down, and I don't know which way I was going; so there was no way for me to correlate if upward motion was perhaps correlated with right and down with left or what. In any event, I just saw - I got no illusion at all, I guess, above level 4, as far as right and left. Occasionally, I got very minimal sensation and gave a response, but, by and large, the - the illusion was not present. PLT out.

347 20 21 26

PLT

347 20 21 43

PLT

347 20 23 24 347 20 23 29

SPT SPT

SPT at 20:23. SPT out.

MI31

N2 pressure,

1250.

TIME

SKIP

347 20 44 05

SPT

SPT at 20:44 reporting to you the two handheld photos - mag CXl7; frames number 40 and 41 taken at 18:13 and 18:15, respectively; f-stop of ll plus l; and lO0-millimeter lens; 1/250 of a second. First one was of a crosscurrent in clouds. That is, at a higher level I saw a linear lightcloud structure, a lot of - lot of elements very wispy in appearance, all lined up parallel to one another, fairly close together. Compact was not

.-_

lob9

their nature, though; they were wispy, high clouds. Underneath, a current structure or flow structure perpendicular to that; a low-lying cloud which was - Linear features were all perpendicular to the ones above. This was ver - very representative of the area over which we had been flying for the past 1000 miles or so. There was a large current - flow structure along our route, and this was adjacent to it, although not particularly involved in it. This type structure was fairly evident all the way along - especially the higher clouds, which were all lined up. Looked very much like the - the linear lines you can see along a specific type ... which - which ... or a cloud field. The - the second one of these pictures was - sort of a transition between Bgnard cells and large flow structure. This spilled over about 1000miles. 347 20 46 O1 SPT large flow was

I could see the B_nard Cells fairly well deformed on the - like a V on my right-hand side - transitions become slightly elongated and finally disappear, moving to a random area - and then the flow structureon the left. It was an interesting study in undisturbed convection and transitioning into a flow. SPT out. SPT at 20:46. Handheldphotos. These were on mag CX36, frame number 30 and 29. They were taken at 20:35. First one: f/ll, 35-millimeter lens. Second one: f/8, 35-millimeter lens, 1/500 of a second. They showed at sunset an arc of cumulus clouds, essentially _hat - an arc formed by a - Looks like a low-pressure center at the right. We're in the south, and it was a clockwise structure. The center was relatively clear, and then all of a sudden appeared this very long, pronounced arc of cumulus buildup. Overshooting cloud tops, fairly well defined cumulus clouds, seemed to be looking at - oh, maybe extending over 500miles or so. What was surprising is that these clouds were not on the front side of a front, the moving side of a front, but actually on the backside. And then _mmediately behind them, it was perfectly clear. It was not a representative type of thing, which I have seen a number of times now. And with the 35-millimeter

347 20 46 26 347 20 46 55

SPT SPT

IQSQ

lens, I was able to get in Just about structure. 347 20 48 29 347 02 59 04 347 20 59 19 SPT PLT PLT SPT out. One, huh? Okay.

all of that

The PLT. The time is coming up 1 minute from 19:00, and I'm going to initiate the first minute's exposure. Oh, okay. All right, we have field 97 Alfa; ROTATION again is 40.9; TILT is 23.7; PLATE is 21; and let's see. Okay, I'm starting exposure now. SEQUENCE START's on my mark. MARK. It would take a minute and 50 seconds for the •camera to ... film in the cassette. They were supposed to have figured that in for you. - Okay, now I've

347 21 00 12

PLT CDR

347 21 00 2h

PLT

It says available at 20:46; 21:20 started on the hour roughly.

347 21 02 06

PLT

Okay, this is the PLT with a message to the PI on 183. I was scheduled for another experiment, which was scheduled to be completed at 20:45, and we completed it right on time. Your window opened at 20:46. I had to debrief from the other experiment, and you might - you've lost an exposure because of poor flight planning. And you might ask them how they expect me to - and in 1 minute, ass,-,_ng that I could set your experiment up in zero seconds, which of eourse is impossible, how I could get out of the other experiment and debrief it and get up here and then push the switch? 60 seconds isn't even enough time to do that. Now I'm only going to be able to get your 1260-second exposure because I've already taken it, but I don't want to be put in this position anymore. Now this is Just undesirable flight planning. Now Bob Parker mentioned the other day about us cutting down on prep time, and I think that 60 seconds to debrief one experiment and set up another one isn't quite enough prep time. And that - You might pass that on there because someone is getting the short end of the stick, and I don't want to be held to blame for it. I think your

347 21 03 04

PLT

_-_

IQSI

experiment is important, and I wanted to do a good Job in setting it up. But this is exactly how we fouled up SO19 and S183 - is when we're thrust bodily from one point of the spacecraft to another with no time for - not even enough time for mental preparation, let alone getting the experiment ready. 3h7 21 04 O1 PLT There's no way we can do a professional Job or to take scientific data working under those circumstances. I feel very strongly about it; I think there is no - not enough attention being given. It has been mentioned repeatedly, and I don't mean one or two times; I mean like a dozen, 25, or 30 times. Now I - I don't like being put in an untenable position, where I'm taking somebody's expensive equipment and thrashing about wildly with it and trying to act like a one-armed paper hanger trying to get it started in a insufficient time. Now I think that this is - You're going to get a good exposure out of this, but you're only going to get field 97 Alfa. And this is going to happen again, and it's going to happen again, and it's going to happen again until the word gets through to the Flight Activities Officers that they're going to have to give us time to get from one point of the spacecraft to another. And when an experimenter tells them that it only takes 15 minutes to perform his experiment and then asks for a debriefing after that - and not only that, but you've got to put up his equipment - then say they are being - the FAOs are being misled by the time deltas that have been given to them to perform that experiment. Performance of the experiment is not the only time delta involved. You have to put up equipment, you have to debrief, and then you have to move from one position in the spacecraft to another. And you have to look and see what's coming up, and it - and we're Just being driven to the wall. And I'm sure that repeated errors have been made in cases - in what I consider to be very important scientific data simply because there's noZ enough consideration given for moving from one point in the spacecraft to another and allowing for a transition from one experiment to the other.

347 21 04 34

PLT

1052 347 21 05 44 PLT I don't kn,ow how we're going to get this across to the people n_less you people put your foot down and stomp it hard. So I guess that's - that's all I wanted to tell you. And I have done the best I could. I was given 60 seconds to get from one point in the spacecraft to another to take advantage of your window. Now let's check your times. You were not aware of this problem because your times at - a 1260-second exposure and a 620-second exposure occupies all the ava - Just about all the available time between 20:h6 and 21:20. It was 59 before I was in position, had your experiment clicked in position and ready to actually push the SEQUENCE START switch. And so, theoretically, I did m_f - completed the other experiment at about h5 - let's say h6. So there's Just - there is no way that we can operate under those circnm_tances and get all of - of the task done that is scheduled. 347 21 06 46 PLT PLT out. I'll give you tion of the exposure on you'd pass this message I - I - I feel like Bob a time hack at the complefield 97 Alfa. I wish on to Bob Parker because has been beat about the

_.

head and shoulders by the Flight Activities 0fficers, and I think this will give him the ammunition he needs to insist upon more setup time for experiments like the 183 and the SO19 and whatever else is involved. Let's see. That T025 also falls in that category, as does the S063. 347 21 07 20 PLT And we Just cannot set this thing or 60 seconds, as in this case. up in 2 minutes

3h7 21 07 41

CDR

This is the CDR at 21:08 debriefing the ATM pass that started at 19:53. The pass consisted of a JOP 6, building block 2, which was executed with no problem. I also did video tape - VTR down downlink and - for 5 minutes. About the first minutes was XUV MON, and I did the INTEGRATION cycle as frequently as I could during that period of time. The last minute of it, I was able to get the white light coronagraph fired up and - and on it. So that's going to just about - what filled the VTR for that 5 minutes.

347 21 08 31

CDR

Then we went into building - JOP 26, building block I0, with a ROLL of minus 6500 and a LIMB OFFSET of minus 2. I had to do some finagling because when I put it into LIMB SCAN, I came up

1053

with a LIMB OFFSET of zero. Had to get it back down to minus 2; so I had to do some manipulation work.

347 21 08 58

CDR

Of course, this is all time c°nsuming" Finally got it running at about - I think about 38, a_d the exposures went real well. And Just as we finished the 82B second exposure, the mirror went unstable. I reported this on the air-to-ground loop; so I won't dwell on it. Went ahead and did building block - or J0P 26, building block 10, again with a LIMB OFFSET of plus 2 after we got things settled down. That went without problem. And then we went to a ROLL of minus 7400 and did another JOP 26, building block l0 ; no problem there. And then on - at an OFFSET of plus 2, we did another JOP 26, building block 10, and at that time, I set up 82B, I thought, for an experiment NORMAL with a - a SHORT WAVI_.k"NGTH and a START. At the end of the experiment I looked down and I saw the flag said LONG; so I tried to shift it over to SHORT. I was going to re - But it - it would not shift to SHORT. So what I did is, I went ahead and set up for the TIMES 1/4 and did a TIM]_q i/4 with a SHORT WAVELENGTH. And when that was completed, I shifted back to a LONG and did a TIMES Well, I did a NORMAL with a - a SHORT WAVELENGTH. I finally got it to shift back to SHORT.

347 21 l0 35

CDR

Let's see, did I say that right? I did the time one - TIMES 1/4 with a SHORT WAVE T._GTH - No, it was a LONG WAV_L_GTH. I beg your pardon. I did it with a LONG WAVeLeNGTH, the correct way. And after that was over, then I went back and tried to shift to SHORT, and it worked. So then I repeated the NORMAL with a SHORT WAVELENGTH, and it worked out okay. So as best as I can remember, I apparently hit the WAVELENGTH switch on 82B to go to SHORT in order to get the NORMAL exposure. Apparently it did not go to SHORT, and I didn't verify that it had gone to SHORT and didn't notice that the WAVELENGTH was LONG until that was completed. At that time, I tried to shift to SHORT. It did not work; so I stayed LONG, did a TIMES 1/4, and then was able to go to SHORT and did a NORMAL.

347 21 l0 5h

CDR

f

105h

_

347 21 ii 28

CDR

And that Just about covers it on this JOP 26, as I got all of your data. But I apparently used some extra film with that one NORMAL pass. And I did not get a chance to get any observation time because of the hangups in getting the mirror offset set up properly. And so we Just barely got the JOP 26's done before we got to 40OK. And this is the CDR out. Okay, Let's PLATE by. this is the PLT. The time is 21:24, and see. I'm in STANDBY. I'll be going to 22 - experiment when RECORDER is OFF. Stand Okay, I'm ... to zero.

347 21 12 02 347 21 23 40

CDR PLT

3h7 21 24 17

PLT

Okay, the POWER is going OFF now. And TILT and ROTATION were set to zero, and the mirror was retracted. A little late getting on - what's on the tape and late CLOSING the SAL DOOR. PLT out.

347 21 24 34

PLT

TIME SKIP

347 22 16 26

CDR

This is the CDR at 22:16 Zulu. The first subject is housekeeping 2 Charlie which is rate gyro sixpack temperatures. X-ray 6, 94 degrees; Zulu 6, 95 degrees; Yankee 6, 93 degrees; Yankee 5, 95 degrees; Zulu 5, 95 degrees; X-ray 5, 96 degrees. New subject. New subject for the CDR is M487-2, crew briefing. Question number l: How compatible are the various compartments for multi-uses beyond their prime design function? Let's see; the sleep compartments - Yes, that's given as a possibility, used as a kicker. Sleep compartments, as far as I can see, double for nothing else other than sleeping. There's not enough room in there to do much of anything else. And if you want to do your off-duty reading in bed, it would be okay for that. But essentia]ly, I think the - the sleep compartments are pretty much of a single-use compartment. There's not a whole lot more you can do in the sleep compartment other than - than Just crawl in your sack because there really isn't any more room. If you went in there something like that, to do - to - say, to read or you'd have - you'd probably

347 22 16 56

CDR

347 22 18 03

CDR

1055 want to anchor yourself on the floor somewhere,
and you'd have a blower blowing air right in your face the whole time. So I think - I th_nk you'd Just have to say that's a single function compartment. I guess if you wanted a quiet place to go read, the best place to do it would be in the command module. That's a good, quiet place to go; nobody spends much time up there. You could turn off the speaker. And if you wanted to be by yourself and be quiet, that would probably be about the best place. CDR The - the MDA is fairly adaptable to other uses, but it's kind of crowded there. There's a guy there working all the time. If you wanted to go in there and do something else besides what's being done at the - at the ATM, I think you'd be hard pressed because if you wanted to spend any time at the other end you would find yourself suddenly out of foot restraints with the exception of the EREP C&D panel foot restraints. Of course, then you get into the forward compartment in the workshop, and this is a multi-use design compartment so I would say that's - not much ; you can say about there. You use it for just about everything where you need room. The wardroom could be considered adaptable to paperwork, like checklist changes or something like that, but I don't I think we have to bring up a few more things. We did bring up some springs ; we brought up some magnets. The central cover that covers the - the water dispensers could be used. You could put that cover down, and it would make a fairly nice place to put out papers and - and work, since it's also adaptable to a magnet. 347 22 20 27 CDR The - That's about the only other use I can think of offhand for the wardroom, and even that's not all that great. Bill, do you want to debrief the ATM now? Well, I'm going to be a while_ I'm Just getting started. If you want to debrief your ATM, I'll terminate for now and pick up as soon as you're through. Okay. This is CDR. ATM debriefing I'm going into a stand by until the 's complete.

B_7 22 19 21

CDE

CDE

B47 22 20 _6

CDR

laS6
347 22 21 14 PLT The PLT, 21:43. debriefing Nu z update on ATM pass which was performed started at

on schedule.

J0P 9, building block 2, step l, was performed nominally, truncated at 56. And I may have put in - let me - that's all right; it doesn't make any difference. I may have put in an extra PATROL, SHORT in there. May have put it in the building block. But everything else is okay. J0P 26, step 2, building block 10, at minus 2 was okay, plus 2 was okay. 347 22 22 13 PLT And I started maneuvering again with the thing still in LIMB POINTING and caught it _ went back and looked at the coronagraph. And the corona structure seems to be developing a little bit over there on the east limb. As best I can describe it, there are four distinct streamers. The one at 8 o'clock is fairly dominant on the east limb. This is the one that looks like it Almost has a three-dimensional aspect and is sort of extending coming from stuff that goes behind the limb, then in front of it, on the disk. And it is the most prominent, and it has a sort of a - what may be an associated - or may not be - streamer, which is slightly clockwise from it. Then the two others I think Ed has described as very fine streamers at around the 9:30 to lO o'clock or lO:O0 to 10:30 positions - are two distinct ones. The one closest to the 9 o'clock position seems to be thickening a little bit, developing. The XUV activity associated with the limb activity on the east limb is about the same as it was previously. I saw no other items significant - of significance, and that's about it. 347 22 23 45 347 22 25 52 PLT CDR PLT out. This is the CDR again picking up at 22:26 again with the Mh87-2B crew debriefing. Question number 2; How adequate was the sleep restraint - has the sleep restraint been for sleeping? Has it been useful for anything other than sleeping? If so, what? Yes, it's been quite adequate for sleeping and I've gotten some good rest. It's, as I mentioned in my last debriefing, it - After having spent one night in the command module with no sleep restraints, it was an extremely welcome change. And I found it to be quite comfortable and got quite used to it. I can't imagine it being useful for much of anything other than sleeping, and I haven't tried anything else. Question 3: What noneating uses have been

3-057 found for the wardroom table? Well, that up in 1. The fact that - 347 22 26 52 347 22 26 58 CC CDR ... - - as I mentioned before, it - it could be used for paperwork and things like that, if you want to put down the center cover and cover your tray and put springs on and magnets and get on with - with that. It's - Would a design modification of the table and its associated restraints be desirable for any or all uses? To that, the answer is yes. First modification I would make would be to change the water dispensers and design them so they'd deliver more than Just 6 ounces of water. I think probably the largest water requirement we have is 8 ounces for some of the drinks, and I think that that's probably what the water dispenser ought to - ought to dispense, about 8 ounces. In fact, it seemed to me it might be Just kind of handy to have it dispense l0 ounces. The - The floor, the restraint floor. We still haven't gotten around to raising - removing part of the floor there. But on m7 very first debriefing, which was, I believe, 487-1B, I pretty well told you how I feel about the foot restraints that are in there now. They should very - would very definitely - if I had - You know, if I was designing a new table, I would certainly modify the foot restraint design greatly. I think that there are probably some pretty snappy ways you could redesign the table for paperwork for the - the things like checklist changes and the like. We have never tried playing cards yet, which might be interesting. We keep thinking about - well, one of these days we ought to give it a whirl. But our problem is, we don't seem to be able to fink enough leisure time where we can Just maybe want to sit down and play a little cards. Okay. Question number _ : What sanitation problems have developed, and how have you dealt with them? No serious sanitation problems have developed at all. The only area that could be a problem, if - if you don't keep up with your housekeeping and everything, could be the - the trash locker in the waste management compartment general. in I mentioned

347 22 28 01 _"

CDR

CDR

347 22 29 2_

CDR

1058

_

CDR

But I think that our housekeeping tasks that we have which have us water washing and biocide washing the - the head and the wardroom area on on a frequent basis pretty well takes care of that problem for us. Around the food area, sanitation is not much of a problem, again, if you Just stay with it. I think probably the - the biggest problemwe have is - has been a rash of - of faulty valves particularly in the drinks. It seems to be pretty much concentrated in the drinks that we brought up. It appears that - that those drinks were not - not too well evacuated, and it looks like some of the crystals or something got into the valves. But anyway, we - Bill has particularly hadtroublewith those - those valves. There's been a lot of spillage. And that sPillage, when it gets up into the grating area, is - is _most impossible to get out because none of us have small enough hands to get in between the - in the grating and work very easily. I can get in there but I can't do much, once I get m_ hand in there. Waste management has been no great problem. I'm beginning to get into question 5, so let's go to that. What's the most disconcerting personal hygiene problem you've encountered? Well, I had a urine bag break on me. It wasn't so terribly disconcerting as it was Just a great big pain in the neck. I had to pull the drawer out and - and go in with rags and things and - and clean out the drawer. Luckily, we had the foresight to begin saving soft cloths like towels and T-shirts that weren't too dirty, and we put them in a rag bag that we have got established outside the 131 area, MiB1. And when this spill occurred, we had some nice absorbent rags to soak it up with, and then we Just threw them away. The fecal containment system has been no problem at all for me. I think I mentioned before that I was very pleasantly surprised with how well it worked. And so I've had no hygiene problem there at all. It takes a long time to wash yourself. I've found that it takes about 20 minutes for an entire body wash, and you kind of hate to spend that kind of

347 22 30 20

CDR

347 22 B1 lO

CDR

B47 22 32 16

CDR

iQ59 time. But after a heavy workout, you Just need it ;

it ; so if you have an hour and a h_lf exercise, PT period, you're going to spend 20 or so minutes of that cleaning yourself up, getting yourself squared away again. 347 22 32 h2 CDR Question number 6. How effective and efficient are the cleanup procedures and the hardware? How much of a time-line imposition are cleanup chores? When programmed, they are no time-line imposition; and I'm assnm_ng that's what you mean. I think the procedures we've got for cleanup are - are pretty good. I think we could use some better some sort of a better system than running around dabbing with - with biocide wipes. I never have understood why we have shied away from aerosol things; maybe it's flammRbility. I'm not sure Just exactly what it is, but it seems to me that there are some aerosol products that are nonflammable that would be excellent for cleaning the place down, some disinfectants - Lysol, Mr. Clean, Pinesol. You know, some of those things where I think you could probably clean a lot better if you could squirtit with a spray of some kind; let it sit and bubble for a minute, and then wipe it off. It would be a whole lot better than going after it with a biocide wipe and then following that up l0 minutes later with a wet, sloppy cloth of some kind. We've definitely found that following a biocide wipe with a wet wipe is ridiculous. What you got to follow it with is a wash - wet wash cloth or a towel. It's not so much in the area of procedures, but scraping the re - the freezer is - is no easy chore because we don't have any of the right kind of tools for scraping. What we're using is a - a T-bar to which are - are fastened our extra snap to the tool - tool box, and that's really not a very efficient way. I think a regular oldfashioned ice scraper or putty knife would have been a whole lot better, and we could have - we could scrape the ice from the freezer in a lot less time than we are doing it in right now. Cleanup of the - of the food disposal area, the place where the six can - over cans can be placed, and we put our - our dirty cans and things in there, That place does not lend itself too well

_

347 22 34 00

CDR

CDR

1060

for cleaning, because there's too many nooks and crannies around the cover. I think next time we design something like that we ought to design the tops sO that they're nice and flat and easy to clean and there aren't too many hooks and nooks and things like that to - to tear up your wipes and everything and make it difficult for you to clean. B47 22 B5 BI CDR Let's go on now to question number 7. How adequate is the ATM chair? We have not used the ATM chair, and none of us is of a mind to try to use it. I think, Just in deference to - to you folks, we probably ought to get up there and stick it in and - and run one ATM pass with it, but quite frankly, I like the freedom that you get by standing up. I like the - the more reach that you get, and I don't think I'm going to like the chair. I'm sorry that I'm prejudiced already, but we'll we'll give it a try one of these days. CDR Do you use the chair anywhere other than at the ATM? No, we haven't used it for anything. And what design improvements do you recommend? I guess I recommend that we don't have a chair next time. It's really - I don't think it's needed. How comfortable are your garments in terms of fit, warmth, don/doff ease? Were they sufficiently resistant to tearing and abrasion, et cetera, et cetera? B47 22 B6 36 CDR Okay, I found that in terms of fit and warmth that m_ garments are quite comfortable. I quite frankly, as I mentioned earlier in an earlier debriefing, do not wear the brown shirt because they get to smelling so bad after you've got them damp. So quite quite frankly, I pretty much stick with the short trousers and a T-shirt, and I'm quite comfortable that way. And in the event that I have a - a tour of duty at the ATM or in the co_nand module and I'm going to be there for a while, I zip the legs in, and I even bring a coat if I feel it's necessary. But I find the ad - the garments are adequate in terms of fit and warmth and don and doff ease, and that they are flexible enough so that they can be adapted to the environment that they're going to be in. They are sufficiently resistant to tearing and abrasion. I have not yet torn or snagged one at all. Do they tend to snag as you moved about the orbitalassembly?

._

IQ61

327 22 37 39

CDR

One thing I mentioned last time a - about them snagging, and that is the - the book pocket. There's one on _y left hip. The book - The pocket's not long enough for the book, and the book's inclined to snag on things. Other than that, it's okay. I've already discussed m_ dislike for the other small pockets that are on here - because the - the ones that are designed for scissors don't have a flap long enough to cover the scissors_ the one designed for the flashlight, the same. And so you end up having - you put things in those pockets, and you put the scissors and the flashlight in other pockets. The fact is, I think the way it stands now, I have my flashlight in my scissors pocket; I have pencils in my flashlight pocket, and I have my scissors in the upper right leg pocket. And every time I raise my right foot to tie my shoelace, I Jab myself in the groin with the scissors. The - the most important recommendation I would have for the IVA garments is, for crying out loud, let's be more careful about how we design all these little special-purpose pockets and make sure they fit, with a little bit of leeway, the things that you intend to put in them. And I don't know what to tell you about the shirts. They catch the - the sweat, and they allow the water to - to evaporate; and the rest stays, and they smell. They react with the sweat and pick up a real smell. Okay, so much for that one. Question number 9. What changes have you detected in the environmental elements discussed as the last question in the first debriefing? All right. The last question is lighting, noise, temperature, _,m_dity, airflow, and all that sort of thing. What changes have I detected? Well, temperature, of course, I've noticed was hot when we got here. It cooled off and was quite comfortable, and now we're back up into a hot cycle again. It's starting to get warm; OWS temperature is about 75 to 77 degrees now. And the system can't keep up with it and it's Just getting warmer and warmer, but, thanks heavens, we can doff clothing and stay reasonably comfortable. The _Im_dity in this - As the temperature goes up,

3_7 22 B8 16

CDR

327 22 39 17

CDR

CDR

CDR

1(]62

the h11m_dity seems to - to bother us more. My my hands are very dry and peeling, and so I'm using a lot of the lotion to keep them from cracking and getting painful. 347 22 40 17 CDR Noise: Nothing - No change from the noise patterns that I mentioned before, being surprisingly quieter than I expected. Lighting, I consider is adequate in the - in the dome area and the experiment area. Airflow: I think airflow is adequate. If there was any - any more airflow it would be bothersome. And again I don't - don't really note any changes in these environmental elements. I have not used any of the 40 - 487 instruments to document any changes, mainly because I haven't really noticed any changes other than temperature. And we have a - we have a temperature gage right down on the OWS instrument panel that tells us quite nicely what it is. 347 22 41 06 CDR This is the CDR; termination of M487-2B.

TIME SKIP

-_

347 23 24 51

CDR

This is the CDR at 23:25 Zulu with a message for data priority, Phil Shaffer. Phil, we have been doing a little thinking up here about the possibility of another lost CMG and recognize that what we in data priority have given a lot of thought and study to, is the wide deadband mode of operation. I guess that would be after we reach a point where we don't want to get into the TACS any deeper. As I understand it, we would go from - Where we are now, if we lose one CMG, we'd go to TACS ONLY and then try to set up for wide deadband and go with that, conserving TACS and RCS the best way we can and getting as much out of the mission as possible. One other thing comes to mind; that's the possibility of setting up some rates in the spacecraft and stabilizing ourselves with rates. Now, of course, that means we'd have to give up - Well, we're going to have to give up ATM and EREP anyway in the wide deadband mode, as far as I can see. But I think maybe on - for 1 or 2 days or so, that would be a very interesting thing to try. I don't - don't know offhand - I

IQ63

can't think of any reason to be dangerous. I don't fect the communication. 347 23 26 18 CDR

why it would be considered know how that would af-

But I think it would be an interesting thing for people to start thinking about and doing a little planning, to see what the feasibility would be of spinning the workshop up to some reasonably low rate. And - and use that to stabilize for a while and Just see what happens. It doesn't sound to me, right offhand, as being a particularly dangerous thing to do. It's something that's never been done before. I think we would probably, undoubtedly, set up a - a gravity of our own, an artifical gravity. I think that would be an interesting thing to look at too. Why don't you take a look at that, Phil, and maybe just teleprinter me up a little note and tell me what you think of it, even as a as an idea, whether we - it's feasible to go ahead and look at it or whether it's just completely unfeasible altogether, and give me a couple of ideas as to what the reasoning might be.

347 23 27 18

CDR

This is CDR; termination of message to data priority, Phil Shaffer. The next message from the CDR; the time now is 23:28 Zulu. This message is to the $233 people, the Kohoutek observation folks. Bill and I have said on several occasions that we very much doubt the validity or the usefulness of the third exposure that we're taking because we're getting s_Inrise or extreme brightening in the film - or on the camera before the third exposure is up. So far, we've heard nothing from you folks about that. We would very strongly urge that you stop wasting film on the third exposure of Kohoutek the third - you know, the last 60-second exposure. We're convinced it's an absolute waste of time because there you are sitting there with the shutter wide open; then you're going to get 15 minutes or 15 seconds or so or even more of scattered light. And this last exposure I took, I got about probably 2 seconds of nlmost direct sunlight right into the camera because sunrise was there.

347 23 27 27

CDR

347 23 28 43

CDR

I need to admit to you that I did not get the Kohoutek exposure done at the - the time that was scheduled, which was 21:16 Zulu, but I waited until

1064

the next pass. And at about 22:55 Zulu I started the first exposure precisely at the moment that Kohoutek rose above the - the airglow, the second horizon I should say, or the airglow, whichever you want to call it. At precisely that instant, I started the first exposure. The first exposure was 15 seconds - correction, 15 minutes at a focus of 15 feet. Let me start over again. It was 60 seconds at a focus of 15 feet. The next exposure was after a delay of 20 seconds; I started the second exposure of 120 seconds at infinity. And after another 15-second delay, I got the third exposure started at a focus of 15 feet for 60 seconds. And as I said before, we must have got 15 to 20 seconds of scattered light into it, and the last 1 or 2 seconds was direct sunlight. 347 23 30 03 347 23 47 52 CDR SPT CDR out. SPT at 23:47. ATMpass began at 23:00. Sun-center operations went fine. I took a look at the corona. The streamer structure is still evolving on the east limb. What used to be two sharply, narrowly - narrow streamers - sharply defined and narrow streamers at 08:00 and 10:00 yesterday are now into four different streamers. The one at 10:00 split yesterday. We should have mentioned that the two -And that gap is widening at maybe around lO degrees now between the two. The one being - brightest is the one closest to the south. The - the one at 8 o'clock is still very sharply defined, but it appears that superimposed on that is a very broad, 111m_uous one which does not reach out anywhere near as far, maybe only out to 3 solar radii. The other one goes out to the edge of the picture, about 4-1/2. However - it does look like a new emergence of material into the corona, as this was not anywhere near as visible yesterday. 347 23 51 04 SPT The preparation for building block 37 went pretty well. We **_ seven for the bright - What I did was put the slit tangent to the limb and I had a bright point maybe - oh, close to 0.9 - a little less than 0.9 out. The UP/DOWN was minus 0007; LEWT/RIGHTwas minus 804. I maxim ed in oxygen VI and found a very - I'm sorry, ox - DETECTOR 1 at GRATING of ZERO, which was a carbon III, 1336 line. We found a very sharply - bright point which

io65
was about 200 or so maximum. Fall - Fell off to

100 in plus or minus 2 to 3 arc seconds, looking inside of that location UP and DOWN, LEFt/RIGHT. And then I went over to look at oxygen VI and found it to be the more broadly peaked one. But essentially the peak was at the same locationwhich surprised me a little bit, but that's the way it came out. B_7 23 52 22 SPT Although the peak being so relatively broad - that is , maybe 4 or 5 arc seconds - there could be the actual peak could be misplaced - displaced a little bit, which I expect they are, especially that close to the limb. So we had good pointing for that and, I believe, good roll. In H-alpha, there was nothing visible except a chromospheric network structure. It was one of the brighter points outside of the active regions, I tried to stay away from anything which had any plage around it at all. There was one other bright point which was almost the same radius out, located further to the south. This one was around, say, 070, and the other one was about 095 or 100. And I suspected that becauseof its - how broad it was, that it was perhaps associated with activity, and I did stay away from it. Also the oxygen VI line did come out to be ... fairly close to what we would expect for a bright point ; so I assumed we had a good one to study, A] 1 the operations on building block 37 were carried out. Our only problems encountered were there's a lot of movement of the grating, and as often happens in that case, you end up with a an extra lap or two around the grating that you don't need and it slows you down. But we got all the operation - observations in that were called for. And pointing for building block l0 was done by going Just UP exactly 85 arc seconds to 78 UP. So eventually, that same spot should show up .,. line 25 in region 32, the same bright point. And we did not completely finish the MIRROR, AUTO RASTER before we got down to 400 K. We got down to some line 40, _4, 45 - somewhere around in there before we hit 400 K.

347 23 53 35

SPT

347 23 54 24

SPT ,

1066

347 23 55 09

SPT

And 82B got their exposure in well before 400, as did 56. It looked like a useful thing to be doing. And I guess what 55 was studying is, as you move 7-1/2 arc seconds away from the center of the bright point, notice how the - the spectra change with each step of 7-1/2 arc seconds. Oh, I guess it's closer to 7 arc seconds. I guess something else we could do to explore that further would be to look at a 3-by-3 grid that is centered on 1032. For example, sometimes I had have observations coin - coinciding with 82B. You go to get your 1032 in; then go to 931, 932, and 933, 1031, 1033, 1131, 1132, and 1133. Do a GRATING ... and scan in each one of those. I suspect that except in exceptionally high lines like magnesium X, that a step of 7 arc seconds is going to pretty much put me out of the bright point location or the influence of the bright point. At least that's what I would get from looking at the pointing, at the changes that I see with the pointing. I'd be interested to know how the spectra does change and how far the influence of the bright point doescarry out. SPT out.

347 23 56 14

SPT

3h7 23 58 02

SPT

###

DAY
,_

(AM
1067

348 O0 19 00

CDR

This is the CDR at 00:19 Zulu. The subject is S183. Beginning S183 operations at this time. The SAL is open, the mirror is extended, the ROTATION is 195.8, the TILT is 25.0. We're doing PLATE 22, rather than PLATE 05 ; that's on the p&d per ground instructions. The EXPOSURES are set up at 0, 300, and 00. Available time is 00:22 and at that time I'll be going to SEQUENCE, START. MARK. MARK. The time The time is 00:20. is 21. is minus 2.4, the pad is

348 00 20 00 348 00 21 00

CDR CDR CDR

The nu Z on the ATMDC

2.5, so there's no ROTATION correction. The star field is Kohoutek. I'm looking through the eyepiece at this time, and I see the ground. 30 seconds to go to available time. Stand by for 00:22. Stand by 348 00 22 00 CDR CDR MARK. SEQUENCE, START at 00:22.

Okay, this is a 300-second exposure; that's 5 minutes. Going to take this machine a minute and l0 - 5 to 15 seconds to get going and sunrise is at 27. It looks like you're only going to get about 242 of that 300 seconds. Okay, the Earth's horizon is now going through the field of view. I see Kohoutek. MARK. At 06. It's still in the airglow.

CDR 348 00 23 06 CDR CDR

At 23:06, Kohoutek cleared the airglow and it's in the night sky now. We're not too well pointed, Houston. Kohoutek is down in the lower right-hand side of the field of view. Okay, we still have Kohoutek in the field of view and it's coming up on 00:24. 00:24 and 30 seconds. Kohoutek's still in view.

348 00 23 54

CDR

CDR

Well, looks pretty good. I think it's - it's not well pointed, and I don't think we have all the tail in the field of view. We have Just the the nucleus. We're coming up on 00:25. Stand by -

1068

_.

348 00 25 00

CDR CDR

MARK. It's 2 minutes posure here. now until termination of the ex-

in my field of view in the optics eyepiece Kohoutek is down at 4 o'clock and it's out

at a radius of about 0.7 or point - yes, 0.6 to 0.7. The tail is radiating down toward about 5 o'clock. And I think if we were better pointed, you would get all the tail in this picture. Right now I think the tail is - is outside - at least • outside of the field of view of this eyepiece. Okay, we're - we've passed 26 minutes; we're now 50 seconds from term_ination of the exposure. Okay, we still have Kohoutek; it's still with us. 30 seconds to go. Have a nice, long, straight tail on Kohoutek; quite clear. Can be seen with the uaaided eye now out STS window number 3. We're 5 seconds from termination, still looking good. Stand by 348 00 27 02 CDR M_. Terminating at 27. Okay. As I look, I'm going to close the SAL window immediately. All right, setting the ROTATION to zero. And as I was looking at the star field, looking at Kohoutek, I think I saw the upper three stars, the - of the head of Scorpio up at about 10:30 to ll o'clock at a radius of about 0.9. One question I would like t6 have answered is I'd like to know what star it is that - it's a fairly bright star. I don't know what magnitude; it can be seen with the naked eye and it's on the order of, I guess, Menkent, Menkar, Acamar, some of those. And the tail of Kohoutek is extending clear back to that particular star. All right, I'm retracting the mirror at this time. 348 00 28 57 CDR The mirror is retracted. Closing the SAL door. The SAL door is closed. All right, now in accordante with instructions from the ground, I am to after the taking of this exposure, I am to advance the SA to 09. I'm to remove the carrousel, and then advance to 01. So the PLATE ADVANCE switch is going to RESET now. The three EXPOSURE switches are all reading zero. The little green exposure light for the three - in the number 2 position for 300 is - has not gone out. Okay, I'm going to run a little bit of DAC film in order to preserve the picture. That's complete; we're back intime.

--_

1069

3h8 00 30 30

CDR CDR

Can you see it out the wardroom

window,

Ed?

Oh, that's right, that's right, l've got TILT and ROTATION. We had a ROTATION of 195 degrees which meant Ye're Iook_ng dovn 5 degrees . Or no, we were looking to the right _ degrees; and a TILT of 25, which is down 25. Okay, we're looking at PLATE number i. I'm going to put the RESET switch back to OFF and then back to RESET. We're 9 now, I hope. going to RESET ADVANCE on up to

CDR

3h8 00 32 h5

CDR

Okay, we're now advanced to PLATE number 9. I'm removing the carrousel at this time. I'm going to turn off EXPERIMENT RECORDER nnmher l; I don't think we _need to be rlmning that any more. But I'ii keep channel A voice recorder going so that you car. hear every move I make. ... Say again? I alreadyturned it off. Ed, would you close the wardroom window and turn off the the lights for me? I don't want to be surprised if I open this thing up and find a film plate hanging out.

348 00 33 17

CDR

SPT CDR

SPT Bh8 00 34 13 CDR

... Just the lights in the forward compartment here would be fine, I th_n_. ThatVs great. Than_ you. Let's not have any surprises, please. Okay, I'm unlocking the carrousel at this time and retracting it. As I said before, weWre now looking at PLATE number going to pressurize moval. 9 in the counter. Okay, I'm the SAL now for this film re-

CDR

348 00 36 40 CDR

Okay, it's going to take a little time for this SAL to pressurize, so I'm going to go off the air. The procedures that are going to be followed from here on after the SAL is pressurized - I'm going to remove the carrousel while we're sitting here looking at PLATE 09 and I'll pressur - I'll

io7o
depressurize the carrousel and stow it. And with the pl - _im..y plate on we will go ahead and advance. We will advance the car - the logic assembly onto position number l, at which time then I'll carry out the rest of m_ SP procedures. 348 00 37 29 CDR This is CDR leaving the line at this time.

_

TIME

SKIP

3h8 02 40 18

PLT

This is the PLT reporting on handheld photographs Charlie X-ray 17 magazine, exposures h6, 47, h8, 49. I had an excellent oblique view of tropical storm, which was the subject of handheld photographs a couple of days ago. I took a picture of the center of the circulation and along what appeared to be the main feeder band, focusing then on the areas of intense thunderstorm activity, which were more or less unevenly distributed along the feeder band, and which were co_nented on in the previous - during the previous photograph. I took a sequence of about 10. And again this is an extremely long arm which reaches into the center of the pinwheel. And some of these - these thunderstorm photographs - a lot of overshooting tops, et cetera. Okay, that is the report on the Hasselbald. Now a general report on handheld 149, I think it is. Stand by. Handheld 149. Perth, Australia, and that will be frames 27 and 26, and Charlie X-ray 36 Nikon, 300-millimeter. The - the view of the city of Perth was excellent overhead. I took two frames, and that's about the size of it. PLT out.

348 02 41 34

PLT

348 02 _l 54

PLT

TIME SKIP

348 03 03 20

SPT

SPT at 03:02. ATMpass which began at 02:06. J0P 9, step i, building block 2 went off; no problem, straightforward. And I got a little observing time, so I was - went over to look at the site with all the bright point which I said was the brightest point before. And I discovered that it really was a remnant of old active region 98.

_-_

1071

CC

°..

CDR 348 03 05 08 SPT

... Now, Bruce. Okay the TV downlink which came up when we put that in there before. There, we had 5 minutes, and it doesn't take you very long to give you an XUV MONITOR integrate. And I'm wondering, what do you want for the remainder of that time? I'll be glad to leave the - the tubes sitting on any given position. Does looking at XUV MON without the integrations help you? Or are you really only concerned about the ... Okay, excuse me for the interruption. The question is: For the remainder of the time when I 'm doing integrations, what would you like to see on the TV tube? Okay, over to the operations. Afterwards, I went over to look at the active region, for I originally thought that perhaps that was the bright point because it was very locally defined,and it turned out to be Just a remnant of active region 98. Went over and looked at the second bright point, the one which I had looked at earlier today. That was out 070 at 0.8 - 0.85, and that one - I tried to look for it in a relatively high light in the atmosphere with magnesium X. And as I suspected - although I hoped it might, but it, as I suspected, it did not show up. So rather than pursue amy more, I went over to the limb and started to look for activity on the limb. Found a good prominence.

CC 3h8 03 05 59 SPT

f_

CC 348 03 07 _6 SPT

... Excuse me for another interruption, finish as soon as he gets through. I'ii - I'ii

348 03 16 18

SPT

Okay, your friendly SPT back again at 03:16, ATM. Picking up on the observing part of the orbit. We did the - again the quick look at 98. Went over to look at the other bright point. Couldn't find it in magnesium X. Went over to the prominence and prominence was located ...

CC

1072

348 03 18 17

SPT

This prominence is located at around 5 o'clock, and it was a relatively low-lying one, that is, in alpha - H-alpha. I could not see it off the disk at more than about 30 arc seconds. It was fairly well defined, however. And I had essentially good pointing at that. The first one I used, I put the slit adjacent to the limb 9 arc seconds offset and maximized Lymph continuum. I was at 1032 on the MIRROR and then I gave 82B an exposure SHORT, TIMES 1/4 - I'm sorry, TIMES 4. I had to truncate the - the last exposure, however. 55 got a GRATING, AUTO SCAN and two MIRROR, AUTO RASTEHs down to the line 30. And S056 received a SINGLE FILTER - SINGLE FRAME and FILTER 4 for 8 minutes. The 82B exposures are all taken with 9 arc seconds, LIMB OFFSET and LIMB POINTING, and tangent to the limb on the prominence. And in order to get some background spectra for 82]3, I rolled about Sun center and moved the MIRROR down to line 35 and maximized in Lyman beta this time. That is, all I did was maximized in, roll about Sun center. Then gave 55 another GRATING, AUTO SCAN and the better part of a MIRROR, AUTO RASTER. 82B got another exposure SHORT, TIMES 4. The last exposure being truncated; it stopped at 400 K. And 56 received about a 6-minute exposure in SINGLE FRAME, FILTER 5. It looked like a relatively good observation program. And then I gave 82B some good film usage, some spectra of a prominence and the background spectra. 55 got, fairly, two good GRATING, AUT0 SCANs, three MIRROR, AUTO RASTERs over the prominence, although the first two MIRROR, AUTO RASTERs were done at MECHANICAL REFERENCE 102, and the second one was also done at MECHANICAL REFERENCE 102, although I neglected to turn on DETECTORS 3, 4, 6, and 7. 56 got two good, LONG EXPOSURES and their preferred filters. And it was kind of a fun thing to do; I'm glad I had this much observing time. I don't think that as long as we still have the capabilities that we do in MONITOR i to find interesting events on the limb, and the XUV MONITORs to find bright points on the disk, that we'll be ___

SPT

348 03 20 15

SPT

348 03 21 l0

SPT

3_8 03 23 28

SPT

._.

1073

lacking for anything to do in our observing Even if the Sun stays as quiet as it is. 348 03 23 54 SPT CC 348 03 27 ll SPT SPT out. ... SPT at 03:27, ATM. on the observations

time.

I neglected in the debriefing carried out after the Sun

centered work to give you the shopping list numbers. And in scanning through, I guess, the one that comes the closest to it is building block 28 and shopping list item ii. Although clearly there were a few deviations. 348 03 28 00 SPT SPT out.

TIME

SKIP

348 12 19 28

SPT

SPT at 12:19.

PRD readings:

42374, 23202,

3...54.
348 12 19 29 SPT Out.

TIME SKIP

348 13 12 18

SPT

SPT at 13:12. VTR information. VTR of white light coronagraph and XUV monitor were given from 13:08 to 13:12, mission day 3h8. PLT. The time is 13:21 Zulu; reporting on handheld 12h and i01-i, frames 50 through and including 54, Hasselblad and one -that is, the i00. The city - The area around Lake Titicaca and La Paz was clear. I got two very good pictures of La Paz and also some - We were almost nearly vertical right over La Paz, Bolivia. And there I took three or four pictures - to three more, ranging from near-vertical to oblique, of the other area or handheld 12h.

3h8 13 21 15

PLT

348 13 22 00

PLT

PLT out.

TIME SKIP

i07_

348 14 15 27

SPT

SPT at 14:15, debriefing the ATM at - Well, it has 13:02 here. I 12:45 or so. There's nothing in except video tape recorder should utes, and the Nu Z update.

pass which began began at around - written in here take you 5 minover and

Okay, went

first of all, looked at the limb to see if I could - the east limb to see if I could see any of the act - re_mants of the activity which occurred last night. I could not, and in H-alpha I could see some streamer structure change. I gave some of these details during the science conference; I won't bother going through them now. 348 14 16 15 SPT What I did - did do, though, was to use a shopping list item l, a ROLL of a minus 6400. Then I went over to the limb and did something like a shopping list item 2, I guess - Well, not really. Shopping list item 3 probably is more like it - combination of both experiment modes. Then went, first of all, to survey the limb, put the 55 MIRROR, LINE SCAN parallel to the limb. Then did some MIRROR, AUTO RASTERs. Essentially put H-ALPHA l, HORIZONTAL CROSS HAIR on - just a little bit below the limb and tangent, to get MIRROR, AUTO RASTERs pointing at three different positions, covering the area from 240 degrees to 270 degrees, and in each one getting 56 PATROL, SHORT. Then I ROLLED for the 82B slit, just tangent to the limb and gave some exposures there. I was 2 arc seconds off it and a LIMB POINTING, exposure, SHORT, NORMAL - sequence 3 in the NORMAL. And this was when I rolled to the oxygen VI with maximized on DETECTOR 3; gave around 10,000, and that was at a ROLL of 2029. Then I rolled further so the slit was further north, and the LIMB OFFSET was the same. The oxygen VI dropped down to around 600 to 700 at a ROLL of 1728. So, in Sllmmary for 82B, there were two sets of exposure NORMAL 2 arc seconds off the limb: one at 2029, oxygen VI maximum; one at 1728, oxygen VI pretty much at a background level. And I could also see in H-alpha 1 that we had a - a prominence on the slit at that given location for the oxygen VI maximum and it was well off the slit for the for the second pointing. The prominence itself had - At least, there was two parts of either the same prominences or two different ones.

348 14 17 33

SPT

348 14 19 33 SPT

___

1075

348

14 20

20

SPT

The

first

one,

which

was

a -

about

236

degrees

off

the - from solar north, with the largest segments; and then further south, there was another smaller
segment. Could not see whether the two were inter-

connected. looked at. 348 14 20 54 SPT

Okay, then just recapping what I'd

And also, to mention one other feature.
the corona. The bright narrow streamers

First,
at the

edge of - of streamer activity and those that ... seemed to have faded away and nearly disappeared
from what they were yesterday - they've decreased

in intensity. Two in the XUV monitor; the limb is appearing very bright, between 247 and 270 degrees, even though we do have limb brightening, of course, using this effective double limb. It still appears exceptionally bright. 348 14 21 26 SPT So I think there's something coming around the
corner, and all of the activity in the corona would

signify that also. Looks like the emerging region is - might provide us with something. And thirdly, a bright point. This one I did not mentionon the air-to-ground, yet, I will in the science conference. The bright point is located at around 241 degrees at 0.39 radii, l've got coordinates of a ROLL of minus 1728, UP/DOWN of plus 2, and a L_FT/RIGHT of minus 378. It appears in H-alpha as a hingement in the chromospheric network. A quick look says it's at the vertice [sicS of a couple of cells. East - It's at a location where yesterday was an east-west filament channel. There was a prominent north-south, one running up from the coronal hole at the south pole, and then branching off of that, there was one which ran east-west, turning east off of that primary filament channel. The bright point is
located where the east-west one was located.

3h8 14 22 49

SPT

So if I were drawing up the plans for today, looking at the Sun as it is now, I would want to include a J0P 17A, step l, building block ll, and a step 4, building block 36-A, to take a look at that bright spot. And I wouldn't do the J0P 26 location, I think, in order to study that limb activity. Ought to do them at the left limb at ROLLs of 0000, 06000 or 1200, and 1800. SPT out.

348 14 23 32 SPT

1076

348 14 30 04

CDR

This is the CDR at lh:30 Zulu, reporting completion of the first $233 exercise of the day. It started at 14:21. I got the exposure started at precisely 14:21 with the c_net still down in the airglow. You could see the star which we never have gotten the name of; I asked for it yesterday. There's a bright star and it was being somewhat occulted by the tail yesterday. The comet has now moved far enough along so that the bright star is no longer in the tail of the comet. That star had Just risen when I started the first exposure. The second eXposure I started at 40 - 14:22:39, which is about 2 seconds after the comet itself had risen. The third exposure was started at 14:22 - correction, 14:24:59, and that _ne was completed before sunrise. The comet - i just got finished sort of debriefing on the air-to-ground - the comet is becoming, as far as we can see, longer and stronger. I could see the comet last night and this morning with the unaided eye. And that is sssentially it. We have another cc_et, I believe, observation later on - late this afternoon or evening. And window 3 is beginning to work out very nicely now.

348 lh 30 39

CDR

348 14 31 18

CDR

348 14 31 h8 348 14 39 56

CDR CDR

CDR out. %his is the CDR-at 14:40 Zulu. on battery number 7 for M509. CDR out. Initiated charge

348 14 h0 03

CDR

TIME

SKIP

348 15 22 12

PLT

The PLT, debriefing the ATM pass starting 14:30. JOP 6, step l: 1 Alfa was not completed as per pad. I did not finish the raster at 162; I overshot. Got it back and got about half of the MAR, and then I didn't want to - Took a lot of time. I didn't want to get behind, so I went ahead to 1 Bravo. That was okay. JOP 29's step 1 was done twice starting about 28 as per pad except I was not quite as swift in getting the 13 line RESET at all - in all cases. I think I got a total of six -

_-_

1077

five to six MARs in the most of the - maybe probably six building - six scans in most of the building blocks. I finished - There was enough time, so I went back Sun center. I picked up the 162 green MAR and at a ROLL of zero approximately. Then I went to 5400 and set up the WHITE LIGHT CORONAGRAPH on CONTINUOUS. Took i minute - a little over i minute, so I got three exposures there Just before sunset. And all of the timed exposures, 56 and 82B, were correct. The two time exposures in 82 Alfa were good. And the only - the only shortcoming was in some discipline on getting the RESET on line 13 and in getting only half of a raster 162 at - up at the J0P 6 point. And I did go back and pick up a full raster at the completion of the three building blocks. 348 15 24 21 B48 15 25 18 PLT PLT PLT out. The PLT with a co_nent on solar activity. The a active region in the center - near the center of the Sun at 070, 0.2 looked a little brighter today than it did yesterday; that's96. That was my general impression. I can't - Of course, when you're trying to INTEGRATE - use the INTEGRATE switch on the XUV MON, it's sort of hard to tell whether you're - lets you see things into it that aren't really there. The activity on the east limb, I couldn't tell much difference other than the fact that it looks like it's still there and changing form. In other words, it's developing, or at least it's undergoing changes. Let's put it that way. And that was about - the - The corona structure on the east limb is quite different than it was yesterday, which indicates to me that something - at least some action has taken place, or it's Just a consequence of the fact that we could see more of the stuff as the thing 3_8 15 26 17 348 15 43 56 PLT CDR rolled on - onto the disk.

PLT out. This is CDR at 15:44 Zulu. The subject is S019 operations. We're Just beginning to get started here. The SAL is open; the mirror is extended; the ROTATION is set at 034.5; a TILT of 7.1; the first field is number 209. It'll be widened, 90-second exposure. And I am at

1078

the moment looking at frame 15, and I 'm setting the operate handle to the CARRIAGE RETRACTED position. And we're coming up on 15:45. No reference stars, so no problems there. On the nu z given about or delt_

by the ATMDC

is the same as that given on the pad;

so we have no nu z update to worry rotations. SPT 348 15 45 22 CDR CDR Hey, Jer. Okay, the FILM HATCH is open.

Roger, Ed; thanks.

Okay, we're standing by for the first exposure. We're looking at frame number 15 at the moment. It'll probably change to 16 when I do my thing here. Going to the SLIDE RETRACTED position. All right, winding up the timer for a 90-second, widened. Stand by MARK. No, hold the mark.

348 15 46 02 348 15 46 05

CDR CDR

MARK now. SHUTTER is OPEN. And I opened the shutter at 46:04. The first mark I gave you is when I released the knob, and I wasn't An zero yet. Repeating: This is ROTATION of 34.5, the TILT is 07.1, field 209. I'm now looking at frame number 16. As I remember, frame number 14 was the last one we did last time; so it looks like we in the maneuvering here of the machinery in and out - we've lost one frame. My memory may not be correct, though. Passing 60 percent. The next exposure is going to be field number 129. Okay, we're passing 90 percent. On my mark, we'll be de - we'll be terminating this frame. Stand byMARK it. We're in the CARRIAGE RETRACT position. Changing the ROTATION to 45.3; set and locked. The TILT is going to 32.4; set and locked. The exposure's a 270, widened. Stand by for my mark. SLIDE is RETRACTED. MARK. SHUTTER is OPEN. All right, this is 270, widened. The ROTATION is 45.3; the TILT is 32.4; field 127. We're now looking at a frame count of 017.

_

CDR

348 15 47 18

CDR

348 15 47 58

CDR

CDR

1079

348 15 49 16

CDR

We have one very bright star in the field of view at lO o'clock, right at the edge; a radius of 1.O. In the upper right, extending from 2 o'clock down to 3:30, is a string of stars. The 2 o'clock star is in --at about 0.8 radius, and the last star down at 3:30 is at - about right at the edge of the field of view. Passing 60 percemt. Passing 90 percent. Okay, on my mark we'll be terminating a 270-second, widened exposure on field 127. Stand by MARK. Going to CARRIAGE RETRACTED. New ROTATION is going to 188.5 - and locked. The new TILT is 21.3 - and locked. The exposure is a 90, widened. Going to SLIDE RETRACTED. Stand by MARK. SHUTTER is OPEN. We're looking at frame number 18. Reverifying: 188.5 on ROTATION, 21.3 on TILT. We're looking at field h08 on frame 18, and it's a 90, widened. Okay. And thank heavens I'm about 30 seconds ahead of schedule now. I have plenty of time to get Kohoutek set up properly. Passing 60 percent. 90 percent. Stand by -

348 15 50 01 348 15 51 05

CDR CDR

348 15 51 30CDR

348

15

52

lJ

CDR

CDR

CDR 348 15 53 27 CDR

MARK. Going to CARRIAGE RETRACTED, termination of that one. Going to a new ROTATION of 201.6 and locked. Going to a TILT of 18.8 - and locked. All right, reverifying: a ROTATION of 201.6; it's a TILT of 18.8. My first exposure is going to be of 180 seconds, unwidened. We're coming up on 15:55 now. MARK at 15:55. RETRACTED. 49 seconds to go. Going to SLIDE

CDR 348 15 54 59 CDR

348 15 55 33 348 15 55 49

CDR CDR

Okay, standing by for Kohoutek-rise.

Stand by -

MARK. We're looking at frame number 19. We're looking at Kohoutek. The TILT is 2 - correction ROTATION is 201.6; the TILT is 18.8. The first one is 180 seconds, unwidened.

io8o

CDR

Okay, it looks like we're pretty well pointed. I have Kohoutek at 5:B0 o'clock at about 0.4 radius out from the center of the viewfinder, and the - the tail is pointing downward at the 5:BO direction. Looks like it's kind of radially outward from the center of the - center of the viewfinder. 1 minute's gone by - 60 seconds.

CDR

So if there's a spike, you're going to have it right in the middle of the viewfinder. Unfortunately, you probably don't have all the tail. 2 minutes have gone by. 15 seconds to go. This was frame number 19. Stand by -

B48 15 57 49

CDR CDR CDR

348 15 58 51

CDR

MARK. Terminated. Going to SLIDE RETRACTED. Stand by; I'm going to OPEN MARK. SHUTTER is OPEN. We're looking at frame n_Jmber 20. This is a 30-second, unwidened, l0 seconds gone. 20 seconds gone. Frame number 20. Stand by -

348 15 59 01

CDR

_

CDR CDR B48 15 59 31 CDR

MARK. CARRIAGE is in the RETRACT position. And that should terminate the Kohoutek observations. The time is now - It's coming up on 16:00 Zulu in about l0 seconds.

B48 15 59 58

CDR

Okay, it's 16:00 Zulu. I'm going to set the ROTATION to zero. Set the TILT at zero - Better do that first. Stop the ROTATION at 60. All right, the TILT is set at zero. The ROTATION is zero. This rotation dial is ridiculous with all the paint missing out of the - the unit's digit. Little pieces of white paint floating around inside there. I'm now retracting the mirror.

348 16 00 _B

CDR

Retracted and locked. The Sun is Just beginning to rise through the wardroom window. Closing the SAL air - SAL door. Okay. All right, I'm supposed to do an ST-1 i_nediately; so I'm going to leave the film hatch open while I pressurize the canister.

1081

CDR

This is CDR terminating operations. CDR out.

the recordings

on S019

348 16 01 27

CDR

TIME

SKIP

348 17 01 41

SPT

_

SPT at 17:02. ATM ops; debriefing the pass which occurred after the SO19 maneuver. Okay, there was nothing strenuous in this pass; so I took a little observing time. I went over and looked at these bright points which I had seen previously. Essentially less than 24 hours old, and it begins at - the one at 241 degrees, about 0.39 solar radii. Now let me drop back one. First thing I did was give a shopping list item 1 at the beginning of the orbit to get a look at the corona, and it's pretty much as I have reported it previously on air-to-ground. Then I went over and looked at the emerging flux region, and I got a m_x on the oxygen VI of around 2200 with a ROLL of minus 5393, UP/DOWN of zero plus - 0311, and a LEB?f/RIGHT of minus 0182. At that location I gave 55 almost two MIRROR, AUTO RASTERs, 1-2/3. Then 15 lines of - 15 minutes of MIRROR, LINE SCAN to see if they could pick up any prime rates of change. I had the MIRROR, LINE SCAN covering not only the brightest point but also pretty close to running along one of the brighter linear elements on the chromospheric network, which was brightening. 82B: At that point, I gave two sets of WAVELk_GTH, SHORT; exposure, NORMAL sequences separated by around i0 minutes. 56 received a PATROL, SHORT and a SINGLE FRAME, FILTER h for about 7 minutes. I then repointed in order to give 82B some comparative spectra. UP/DOWN and ROLL remained the same. LEFT/RIGHT, I moved to the left about 40 arc seconds, that's to minus 222, and expecting I would step the mirror then to the right nine - or eight steps.

348 17 03 30

SPT

348 17 04 48

SPT

And I did that, seen previously more and got up nine steps even of eight,which

and it was not the value I had in oxygen VI. I stepped it one to 2200 again; so it really took though I only moved the equivalent is stillkind of a mystery to me,

1082

but that's the way it worked out. 55 then at that GRATING position where it went back some, received a GRATING, AUTO SCAN - about l-l/2 before we got to 400 K. I had hoped that I'd been able to fit into a - a partial MIRROR, AUTO RASTER to show them where that GRATING, AUTO SCAN was done, but we got to the 400 K before that. 348 17 05 26 SPT 82B received a SHORT WAVELENGTH exposure, NORMAL sequence for comparative spectra. I might mention before I changed the mirror that we were down to a - an intensity of around 200 or so in oxygen VI; so we truly were right off - far off the bright point. And 82B looked fairly uniform. I did not see any bright elements in there. It looked as though we were Just crossing quiet-Sun network. And at that location, 56 received a SINGLE FRAME, FILTER 5 for 7 minutes. They were - both 4 and 5 7 minutes because that's the best I could work in, as opposed to their minimal of 8. However, if we're looking for something relatively bright here, like an emerging flux region, then it probably doesn't hurt to go a little bit on the short side. Let me bring up something here. As I see something occur and I know what observations each instrument would like to have on it, I go ahead and start those observations; and then I look around for a shopping list item which will fit it. Whether this is ethical or not, I'm not sure. However, in my hurry to get the event covered before we ran out of viewing time, I've took - taken that tack. Now I can - I can look back through and come up with a shopping list item which just about approximates it. I'm not sure whether that's useful to you. For example, I guess I could call it a shopping list item 7 with a few modifications or a building block 28 with a few modifications or a I guess shopping list item 5 comes the closest to it. I was looking at chromospheric network, although it was enhanced chromospheric network. So I guess I'd like a word - without making a large thing about it - I'd like a word from you folks as to whether you'd like me to Just stick strictly to the as-published shopping list items, or whether I can go ahead and put the instruments in the modes which I know - which I best believe they

348 17 06 15

SPT

3h8 17 06 59

SPT

1083

would like to be in for a given observation and which I believe are supportative [sic] of one another. 348 17 08 18 SPT SPT out.

TIME

SKIP

348 18 12 39

PLT

This is the PLT - the time is 18:12 - reporting on two handheld photographs for 30 Alfa, ocean currents - particularly the F_]kland Current. Location of interest was Just where we crossed the southern coast or the southern part of Chile and Argentina, just about Santa Cruz, which is just to the west-northwest of the Falkland Islands. And as I was watching for the current, the gen - my general impression was that it was a southwardflowing current. And this is the reason that I said that. The appearance is like this: There are isolated pools of light color, Forel scale 7 to 8, and some of these are sort cf - just like shed-offmeanders - that is, part of the current that just sort of separates from the main channel. And sc_e of these are just sort of nondescript, no particular form, you kn_, Just loops and arcs and PoOls and - Actually, I saw one to the northwest of the Falkland Islands that was actually sort of a donut shape, rough - It was roughly donut-shaped, with a sort of strung-off blob off of one side.

_

348 18 l_ 05

PLT

But about Puerto Deseado, or whatever it is - It Just takes off in a straight llne up northeast. And that was the reason that I was saying that it was - the reason I thought that it was a southwardflowing current, because here it came by its -My impression was, it came zigging almost straight as an arrow, roughly southwest direction, and then about Puerto Deseado, it started sort of going to pot, going all serpentine and creating oxbows and these other isolated, separated pools of color that I've been ta]_king about. And then about, oh, Strait of Magellan over to the Falkland Islands, it just sort of loses all form and shape. Now that was my impression. I see by looking on the map that that thing actually flows to the north throughthe Strait,which will not -

348 18 14 40

PLT

1084

I guess you wouldn't really call it Strait, the space between the Falkland Islands and Santa Cruz close to Argentina there, Tierra del Fuego. But that is shallow, apparently, along in there, and you do not get to see as definite a color on that 7-day Forel scale as you do up further to the north. And then the thing is fairly narrow at the point, Puerto Deseado, where it takes off - shooting off in a straight line up toward Montevideo - the point off of Montevideo. And it's highly linear and narrow, about - oh, I'd say probably on the order of 15 miles wide. 348 18 15 37 PLT And we have two photographs to document part of that at least. I couldn't get that - I tried to get that narrow straight-line portion in the photograph, but it was much to oblique. And those were frames - frames number 56 - 55 and 56 on the Hasselblad, Charlie X-ray 17. This is the CDR at 18:17 Zulu with a handheld camera report, Earth observations. The site I picked was an ice island which was about 200 miles southwest of the Falkland Islands, maybe westsouthwest - correction, southeast or east-southeast of the Falkland Islands. The striking thing about this ice island was the fact that it had stratus clouds all over the water, and the stratus clouds came right up to the island but would not cover it. Apparently, it's sort of the inverse of the effect you get Of cumulus clouds building up due to convection over a - an island. The magazine ID was Charlie X-ray 36. The times the pictures were taken were 18:13and 18:15; frame numbers 25 and 2_. The first frame was taken at f/ll at 35-millimeter lens, 1/500. And the next one was taken f/ll, 35-millimeter lens at 1/250. CDR out.

348 18 16 39

CDR

348 18 17 _l

CDR

TIME

SKIP

348 18 37 09

SPT

Hello. This is the friendly SPT at 18:38; ATM pass, which began at 17:39. The pointings at LB-3 went with no problems. I stepped through it pretty quickly; finished up at around 30 minutes remaining, without having to do any repointing.

i085
Only moved the 82B mirror. It moved along quite quickly. 'I 4Li_ go to an exact ROLL of minus 1080, did - and I did move the slit exactly tangent to the limb; I find myself with a DOWN of minus 20. 3h8 18 38 13 SPT Those three performances of building block lO, J0P 26, step 2 - no problem. After that, I went on over and looked at the emerging flux region again and did sc_ething similar to what I did in the previous orbit. I tried to get 82B some good data and at the same time get the other experiments going and learn scmething about the emerging flux region, if that's really what it is. It's appearing more and more like - like - like it. I have not seen any spots, as yet, I would not expect to in the white light display. However, the chromospheric network now has - I'd say five different elements of the network are bright to very bright, and three further south of the two bright ones are just beginning to come up. 348 18 39 15 SPT Really it's kind of fun to watch s_nething like that grow. It's - from orbit you can see the changes in that brightening and network. First, I was at a GRATINGPOSITION of 1941; so I looked at magnesium X and maximized there and tried to ROLL so that the slit was looking primarily at Jim's (?)network. I ma_mized and got a GRATING of about 300, which is not too strong for magnesium X with an active region, but I guess this is Just an emerging one; so we'll - so I overlooked that. It still had plenty of contrast in the background. And the coordinates where I found was maximum was a ROLL of minus 6552, an UP/DOWN of plus 345, and a LEFT/RIGHT of minus 69. " 82B got a 2-1/2 second exposure in WAVET.F_NGTH, SHORT followed by a NORMAL SEQUENCE. 55 got a GRATING AUTO SCAN going from 1941 up to REFERENCE. And then received a MIRROR, AUTO RASTER in REFERENCE with all detectors down to around line 40. 56 received a SINGLE FRAME, 4 for 8 minutes FILTER 4 for 8 minutes. I then shifted 30 arc seconds to the left, which brought the - Well, let me say, first of all, I - before I shifted, I put the GRATING back at zero, and I looked for the maximum in now - oxygen VI.

_-_

348 18 40 42

SPT

1086

_-_

348 18 hl 20

SPT

The UP/DOWN had not changed - I'm sorry; the UP/ DOWN had changed, and it was now 337 rather than 3h5. The LEFT/RIGHT of 69 remained the same. I think part of the problem is that in magnesium X it's very tough to determine the peak. That's because it is relatively broad. Shifted to the left; then 30 arc seconds to a LEFT/RIGHT of minus 99. Stepped 55 MIRROR, six steps to the right, expecting to see my peak of a 1000 or so in oxygen VI, which I had just seen previously, and could only get around 500 - around 5 or 600, stepping it LEFT/RIGHT over several steps around the location where I'd expect the peak and could not find it. I expect there is a - especially if they're sharply peaked - that there's a problem here in the Marshall arc seconds versus the 55 arc seconds, which they have on their step. So I - Since I could not really get on the peak, I did not try the GRATING, AUTO SCAN. And time was running out; so I gave 55 another MIRROR, AUTO RASTER, and it got down to a line 40 again or so before we hit 400 K. And from there, I gave it a MIRROR, LINE SCAN for JOP 7. 82B received exactly the same as it had before for comparative spectra - that is, a WAVELENGTH, SHORT. 2-1/2-second exposure. And a NORMAL SEQUENCE. 56, because time was short, I did not get any - any - a LONG EXPOSURE at 6 get a LONG EXPOSURE in before 400 K or even 250 K. So they received a PATROL, SHORT. SPT out. PLT; the time is 19:00 Zulu. I've discon - discontinued charging BAT 7, and I've started charging BAT 6 in the ASMU. And that's at 19:00 Zulu.

348 18 42 18

SPT

-

348 18 43 35 348 19 O0 34

SPT PLT

348 19 00 45

PLT

TIME

SKIP

3h8 20 Oh 00

SPT

SPT at 20:0h.

1087

348 20 04 05

CC

One other -Additional information is that we have developed what we call a quasiinertial patch to be loaded in the ATMDC, which reduces the cost per rev around - or about 100 to 150 pound-seconds each rev. Also, we're working on something similar to that for the command module, which would reduce the RCS cost down to about a third of what it is now. Crip, what's remaining? our useful number of pound-seconds

Skylab, Houston.

SPT

348 20 04 56

CC

We have 26,000 pound-seconds total. We've saved 6000 pound-seconds for - as a rescue dead - a red_line, and that leaves us 20,000 pound-seconds available. Thank you. Okay. And as I said, we're going to be uplinking a message to you, hopefully, maybe by tomorrow. It'll probably be about the same time we would be loading this APCS quasi-inertial patch, and that will go into a lot more detailas, you know, fuel usage in both - with RCS or with a A***CSC. Okay, that sounds like a little over a week, Crip. I hope we can come up with some other method. Okay, once again the SPT, at 20:07. ATM pass, which began at 19:12. Building block 2 went off fine. Building block l0 at the ROLL of minus 9900 want off fine ; no problem. At the conclusion of that, I gave the TV downlink and then went over to look at the emerging flux region again. And it certainly is changing day by - or orbit by orbit. The - in H-alpha I see more chromospheric network, which is enhanced now, moving into the the brightest part into the southern end of it. The northern part of the chromospheric network is brightening, but the brightest still remaining at the southern. I think it - I pointed at the maximum intensity as seen in - In this case, it was neon IIISkylab, Houston. We're i minute from LOS. We'll see you again over Guam in 35 minutes. That's 20:42.

SPY J CC

SPT

348 20 06 27

SPT

348 20 07 4I

CC

zo88

_,

SPT

- - 991 wavelength, 1640, D_ECTOR i.

maximized

at a position

of

3h8 20 07 56

PLT CC

Okay, Crip, we'll see you there. Roger. At that point which I _imized, we then did a 55 GRATING, AUTO SCAN from the GRATING of 1940 on around to REFERENCE and then a MIRROR, AUTO RASTER. So we got pretty much finished, I think, down to, I believe, somewhere around line h0 or 50 before we hit 400 K. 55 - Oh, well, that takes care of 55. 56 got a PATROL - 56 got a SINGLE FRAME, FILTER 2 for about 5 minutes, and 82B got a WAVELENGTH, SHORT, an exposure of 2-1/2 seconds, and then the SEQUENCE of NORMAL. SPT out.

3h8 20 08 50 8PT

348 20 09 48

SPT

TIME

SKIP

3_8 20 29 19

CDR

This is the CDR at 20:30 Zulu. The subject is M092; the subject, PLT. TheM092 exercise was begun at 20:00 Zulu. The calves girth: Left calf was 13-3/8; the right calf, 13-1/4. The legbands attached: On the left is Charlie Juliett; on the right is Alfa Quebec. CDR out.

348 20 29 46

CDR

TIME

SKIP

348 21 09 12

CDR

This is the CDR at Rl:10. is complete at this time.

The }4092/93 sequence

348 21 35 33

SPT

SPT at 21:36, debriefing the pass which began at 20:46. Okay, pointing at LB-5 and LB-6, straightforward; no problems. Only one problem encountered. We've taken an extra lap around S055 grating and not having the grating conducive to the pad; so I - I think I got a little behind there. However, we got the observations done well in time, ahead of schedule. I also put a shopping list item 1 at the beginning of the orbit. And at the end, Just

1o89

as I was getting off the last _IRROR_ AUTO EASTER for S055, I got a call about a surge over the limb at 250. And even though the pad said continue this to 400 K, which I'm not sure what that really meant, whether it was to give me leeway - or past 400 K, it s_s. I'm not quite too sure of the intent of that. 348 21 37 09 SPT And so I asked for clarification while we were taTklng with ground. And whistled on - then whistled on over to the surge and gave 82A something less than an 80-second exposure, which they wanted, because we were coming up on 400 K. And I terminated Just a couple of seconds after 400 K time. I think we got more like a hO-second exposure on that one. 55 was running in MIRROR, AUTO RASTER, and I truncated that three times, although the second two were below 400 K, in an effort to get a look at the surge. And 56 received a PATROL, SHORT. Surge showed up quite well in H-alphawith a - a spike extending almost an arc minute above the surface. It was very identifiable as a surge. I regret that I had not ... on that particular location with H-alpha 1 at the time. And I certainlywould have been able to pick it up earlier. But down there at LB-6, and it did not show up in H-alpha 2; so there was really no way of getting to it other than the call from the ground. SPT out. This is PLT. The time is 21:40. Reporting on two handheld photographs over Brazil. Actually, one of them was taken over a small inlet Taitao, T-a-i-t-a-u [sic], in southern Chile. I know you didn't want any more pictures down there, but this looks like a - an unusually good shot from the water side of some of those fiords; so that took it anyway. It's number 57 on Charlie X-ray 17. _,mher 58 is a frame over Brazil, an ag - It has It's an agricultural area, and there are banded patterns which appear to be of regional interest in the - in that they appear to be revealing some sort of geologic feature. 348 21 42 12 PLT And that was taken at 21:26, that's frame n_ber 58 and Charlie X-ray 17. Also, we took a good look

348 21 38 i0

SPT

r-

348 21 38 55 348 21 41 16 ! i

Sl_r PLT

1090

at the Falkland

Current

off of Montevideo

and this

time I saw a difinite fork out about - oh, I'd say maybe 100, 150 miles to sea from Buo - Buenos Aires and Montevideo. And again, the - the - the single stem extending to the north-northeast - or the northeast and the Y forming Just out, oh, as I say, 100 to 150 miles out to sea from Buenos Aires and Montevideo - one fork running straight, almost due south and the other one parallel with the coast to the southwest. 348 21 42 59 PLT Again, I don't know if this is part of the Falkland Current or part of another cu_rrent. But smyway, it - it appears the s_ne, and it be - it was serpentine and meandering to north. And the the Y stem appeared to be more nearly disciplined and straight and linear. PLT out.

B48 21 4B 18

PLT

TIME

SKIP

348 22 B9 09

SPT

SPT at 22:39. Debriefing some ATM work put in before the maneuver to Z-LV. Upon coming into sunlight, we immediately returned to looking at the position where the surge was on the limb, and could no longer readily identify it, although I believe I could see a remnant of it. It's no longer the spike which struck - stuck atout 1 arc minute above the limb. But now something - maybe a third of an arc minute. Relatively wider at the base and not looking too much different than some of the chromosphere around it, especially along that area of the limb which has got so much activity associated with it.

SPT

348 22 40 16

SPT

We gave 52 a quickie at Sun center, ROLL 5400 minus 5400, and 56 PATROL, SHORT; so we had a shopping list item 1 there. Then went back out to that position. Stayed at the roll of 5400 and did five truncated MIRROR, AUTO RASTERs, shopping list with the H-alpha 1 horizontal reticle Just a little bit below the limb. And did five MIRROR, AUTO RASTERs down to line 14 at a GRATING POSITION of 102 MECHANICAL, DETECTORS, all. 56 received

io91

a - a SINGLE FRAME, FILTER h, again for on/_ 6 minutes because I had to get going on EREP. And with that much activity over there on the limb, I thought we'd still benefit by that 6-minute exposure. 348 22 hl 38 SPT Just before we went into the powerdown for EREP, I went back to Sun center and gave another 1-minute's worth of CONTINTOUS MODE, three exposures to 52. SPT out. Oh, a - addition to that - the last comments on ATM. In looking at the ..., I could not identify any S-transient, although I perhaps have talked myself into thinking that the material at the base of the streamers over around 8 o'clock to 9 o'clock were a little bit more dense, but there were no other suggestions of activity which made me think of that. 348 22 h2 33 SPT SPT out.

348 22 41 50 348 22 42 05

SFT SPT

TIME

SKIP

348 23 14 01

PLT

PLT and time is 23:15, voice recording Delta 6. Delta 6 is reading 56. PLT out.

348 23 lh 15

PLT

I

TIME SKIP

348 23 41 41

PLT

Okay, PLT with the T minus i0 readings, monitor readings. Alfa 2 is reading 92; Alfa 3 is reading 86; Alfa h is reading 70; Alfa 5 is reading 67; Alfa 6 is reading 0. Bravo 2 is reading 61; Bravo 3 is reading 76; Bravo h is reading 71; Bravo 5 is reading 75; Bravo 6 is reading 50; Bravo 7 is reading 31; Bravo 8 is reading 81. Charlie 2 is reading 5 - Charlie 2 is reading 45; Charlie 3 is reading 88; Charlie 4 is reading 98; Charlie 5 is reading 82; Charlie 6 is reading 47; Charlie 7 is reading 57. Delta 2

1092

is reading 86; Delta 3 is reading 85; Delta 4 is reading 72; Delta 5 is reading 14; Delta 6 is reading 57; Delta 7 is reading lO, 10. 348 23 44 09 PLT Okay, the PL2 [sic]. Alfa 2 is still reading about 92 percent. And I'm - it is a little bit out of tolerance for the number 1 detector. It was even for the high range. And Charlie 4 is still reading about 98 percent.

348 23 45 Ii 348 23 47 22

PLT PLT

Okay, coming up on T minus 5. S192 MODE to READY now. DOOR, OPEN, now in 30 Seconds. Okay, there's to CHECK. the READY light for 192. MODE going

348 23 48 27

PLT

CDR

Oh, good. It's light outside, but it ain't through the VTS. S190, HEATER SWITCH OFF light, off. DELTA TEMP, PRESS TO TEST, both check okay. 0VERTEMP okay. Here I am worrying again. *** I see light coming in around S190 and I don't see any on the VTS, and it bugs me. Yes. (Laughter) Okay, coming up on T minus 3, preoperate configuration. TAPE RECORDER, ON; READY, on. 92, ON; the READY, out; CHECK. DOOR, OPEN. 91, ON; READY, on; C00T.k_/_, ON; door is fixed open. 90, ON; READY, out; STANDBY; door has been checked open. 93, RADIOMETER, STANDBY; READY, out; SCATTEROMETER, OFF; READY, out; ALTIMETER, OFF; READY, out. 9h, ON; READY, on. And I've got an extra line in here which says 93 - okay, that's Just a repeat. Oh! Got a sunrise.

PLT

348 23 h8 hh

CDR

PLT CDR 348 23 49 14 PLT

348 23 50 00

CDR PLT

Should be sunrise Just over the Himalayas if it was the same as - Yes.

CDR

1093

PLT CDR 348 23 50 09 PLT CDR PLT CDR 348 23 50 38 PLT

- - it was last time. Yes, it is. sort of orange fire looking - -

It's really Certainly

is.

- - down there on all that. I thought those were clouds, and it's snow.

Okay, I guess Ed is down at the panel there, ETCing it. Okay, 2 minutes to EREP start and a little over 2 minutes for an AUTO CAL; I'll give you a call. Okay. We whistled down over - well, be about Phnom Penh and right over - right near 1 minute to start. Thailand over Saigon.

CDR CDR

348 23 51 48

PLT CDR

Okay, we're just ccming across northern now, according to my map. Okay, Jer. All right. l'm going to need a EREP - -

PLT CDR PLT

- - AUTO CAL in about - VTS, AUTO CAL in about 30 seconds. I'ii give you a call. All right. Very cloudy. Stand by. On my mark

3h8 23 52 35

CDR PLT

l0 seconds to EREP, START. 23:52:50.

348 23 52 50

PLT

MARK. EREP, START. l0 seconds I'll give you a mark. Okay. Stand by. MARK. 2, i -

to VTS, AUTO

CAL.

CDR PLT 348 23 52 59 PLT CDR

VTS, AUTO CAL.

On time.

1094

___

PLT

*** Ok%V, stand by for 53:12 Stand by MARK.

for 194 MODE,

MANUAL.

348 23 53 12

PLT PLT SPT

And 194 MODE to MANUAL.

4 minutes for ETC, AUTO, Ed. Okay. Okay, the clouds are beginning to build up now.

348 23 54 26

CDR PLT

Okay, standing by for 55:40. 191.

We have a READY on

CDR

Looks like we're out over the water now between Vietnam and Borneo - Viet - Vietnam and Ma Malaysia. There we go. Right on time. REFERENCE 6 on 191. Standing by for 56 even. On my mark MARK. ON. it'll be 56 even. to STANDBY; RADIOMETER is going to

348 23 55 39

PLT

348 22 55 52 348 23 55 59

PLT PLT

Okay, ALTIMETER

348 23 56 30

CDR

Okay, starting tops.

to look for some under

- overshooting

PLT

Okay, Ed, in Just about 1 minute on my mark, mark the - for ETC, AUTO. I'll give you a call. Okay, 56:51 the CAMERA is ON. And I'm not seeing very good thunderstorm clouds as yet. Oh, there's a good one. *** my mark it'll be 57:33. And on 7 seconds later I'll give you a - ETC, AUTO. MARK. mark, MARK. Okay, 190, MODE, Ed. 2, 1ETC to AUTO. ON. AUTO. And stand by for a

348 23 56 54

CDR

CDR PLT PLT 348 23 57 32 PLT

348 23 57 39 348 23 57 42

PLT CDR

Okay, DATA pushbutton's

1095
,,_ 34_ 23 57 _Q CDR Okay, thereWs 5-seconds worth. I'll see if I can

find an anvil top.
CDR Thunderstorm has played out on us.

PLT
CDR 348 23 58 24 PLT

Standing by for 58:24.
Okay, MARK. the best to I can RE_dDY. give you is now sc_e I've cirrus. got a green

MODE

Okay,

TAPE MOTION 348 23 58 30 PLT CDR 3h8 23 58 57 CDR MARK.

light after ETC change -

SHUTTER SPEED to FAST.

Okay, I may look further ahead again here. I'm afraid it's the wrong time of day for thunderstorms around here. Rather clear. Yes, it's just after sunrise, isn't it? Yes. I found one, and that's about it.

PLT CDR 348 23 59 26 _ PLT

Okay, Ed, stand by for about - I guess it's about 40 seconds.At - on thehour plusi0 seconds, ETC
will be going to STANDBY ; I'll give a call.

CDR

Okay, it looks like we've overflown Borneo; now
maybe I'll find something on this side.

PLT

Okay, on my mark it'll be 24:00 hours even.

Stand

by.
3h8 23 59 59 CDR Nothing at all.

###

DAY 349 (AM)

1097

349 OO O000 349 00 00 09

PLT PLT

MARK.

Stand by for ETC to STANDBY, Ed.

3, 2, 1 -

MARK. ETC, STANDBY. And my 190 READY light did go out. 190MODE to STANDBY; SHUTTER SImm_D to MEDUIM; and 08; and IBT_VAL to lO. There's one isolated cell I might be able to get for you. Two isolated cells side by side. Okay, I made a - Okay, 190 MODE to STANDBY, MEDIUM I_'I'EHVALis - FRAME 08, I_'r_VAL 20. RADIOMETER 93ALTIMETER to STANDBY. is ON. even has an overshooting top.

CDR

PLT

349 00 00 47

PLT PLT CDR PLT

One of the cells

90 MODE to AUTO. Slow on the 193 ALTIMETER, ON; and ... - on the MODE to AUTO. 2 seconds slow on the MODE to AUTO on the 190. Oh here's a - Just a couple of real classic cells just all out by themselvesfor the world to see. I thought I'd missed my chance to get a good thunderstorm. Skylab, this is Houston with you through Carnarvon and Honeysuckle Creek for 13-1/2 minutes. Out. Roger, Bruce. Okay, we've got a good thunderstorm here with a nice little overshooting top in it. Taking data. Right now, going for the anvil. Taking data. A dual cell. All right, going for clear water and data. Termination. Is it very clear down there? It is now. And set that Set. north Got to go for Alice camera to 1 - 1/25. Springs now. 44.9.

349 00 01 12

CDR

349 00 01 27

CC

CDR 349 00 01 50 CDR

349 00 02 19

CDR PLT CDR CDR CDR

LEFT 6 for Alice. Starting over the Australian coast, I believe; got clouds.

1098

349 00 03 13

PLT

Standing by for 03:20. Man, that's unusual there in that area too.

right

CDR

Well, maybe l'm a little bit too quick to call that Australia. Stand by MARK. Stand by -

PLT 349 00 03 20 349 00 03 21 349 00 03 55 PLT PLT PLT CDR

FAST; 08; and INTERVAL to i0. ALTIMETER UNLOCK light, turn it off for 15 seconds. and rock

Okay, we're interested out croppings.

in rangeland

PLT 349 O0 Oh 12 CDR PLT

Ought to be a lot of them. Unfortunately all there is now is a lot of clouds.

Okay, 193 is back ON and I do have a READY light. Standing by for 04:30. Then *** going to turn it back to STANDBY. And got the ALTIMETER UNLOCK blinking now. On my mark, Oh :30 MARK. And the ALTIMETER to STANDBY. *** not either.

349 O0 04 30 349 00 04 45

PLT PLT

Be soaking up the 192 data here. We' re in CHECK.

349 00 04 55

CDR

Okay, the clouds are beginning break up. Scattered cirrus, scattered it looks like.

to breaking up -

CDR

to broken

cirrus now

CDR

All right, from northern Australia

down to about

central Australia, Just north of Alice Springs, it was broken to overcast ; it's now broken to scattered cirrus and breaking up now where it looks like we 're headed for - that 's broken, below deck, broken stratocu. Okay, CAMERAS's going ON at 45-degree time. Alice Springs, where are you? PLT Stand by for 06:13.

1099
f--_

3h9 00 06 13 : PLT CDR 349 00 06 17 349 00 06 20 PLT PLT CDR

MARK. Okay.

190 MODE to AUTO.

06:20, stand by MARK. 192 MODE to READY. ETC to AUTO, Ed.

Looking for some rangeland; I'm not finding any. All right, this looks like it's probably rangeland. *** buy that either. No, it's all wind streaked. I don't see how you could grow anything there. Back out and take another look. Now, we're taking 192 data, over this area. Standingby for 07:20, and at 07:20, Ed, ETC to STANDBY. And 07:20 on my mark MARK. CHECK; ETC tO STANDBY. some good outcroppings, right

349 00 06 55

CDR PLT

349 00 07 20

PLT CDR

All right, there's there. Roger; got it. Data.

SPT CDR 349 00 07 31 PLT

And I've got a READY light out at 31. MODE is going to STANDBY_ SHUTTER SPEED, MEDIUM; FRAMES l0 - Okay, little or no outcroppings - - INTERVAL 20. there.

CDR PLT 349 O0 07 56 CDR

Waiting for 09:53.

10.7 RIGHT. Okay, the clouds over the Alice Springs area were clear to - oh, scattered to broken, I would Say; most of it was low cumulus. At this momentI'm looking 45 degrees ahead and we're coming into overcast conditions now. And I must be looking very close to the Woomera Test Site area. And we have scattered - or broken to overcast clouds; very little ground visible.

CDR

Looking

for vegetation.

No, that's rock.

ii00

PLT

Looking up ahead there, to thin out? Negative.

do you see clouds starting

349 00 09 01

CDR PLT CDR

Solid overcast. AUTO again.

Yes, 09:53 we go 190 MODE,

Now there is little or no ground available to be seen. Okay. All right, I'm now 15 degrees to the left of track and I've got a littl@ patch of ground, However, it is not vegetated; it is dry and sandy looking. Standing by for 09:53.

PLT CDR

PLT 349 00 09 41 CC

Skylab, this is Houston, With the overcast, you can scrub the S190 ETC and the DAC operations on 191 for the balance of the pass. Over. Thank you, Bruce, That's a very good call.

PLT CDR

Okay, Bruce. I'm going to take - I'm going to look for Canberra. If I don't have any luck there, we'll give her up. Roger. That's a good plan. the alternate site; sounds like

CC

CDR

Okay, the clouds break - they're broken up until about 15 or 20 miles from the coast and then over the coastline they're scattered cu. Okay. Which side of that break is Canberra on? Can you see it? I haven't located Canberra yet, but I've got a good vegetation area, which is what I'm supposed to be going for. Might be the eucalyptus groves they're interested in, HH146, I think it is. Okay. I didn't undergtand you, Ed, but at 11:45, and that's coming up in about 30 seconds, the ETC is no - we've - we've scrubbed that, though. We scrubbed it.

349 00 i0 32

CC

CDR

CC 349 O0 ii 09 PLT

_-_

ii01

CDR CDE PLT CDR PLT

Hey,

Canberra,

where

are you? very dark vegetation - -

Some more

dark vegetation,

And I'm going to go ahead with ... - f

- - which I'm going to go for. - " and ll:h5 callout to NO GO; no - no ETC. Negative on the ETC, Ed. I'm sure you heard that call. All right. Got data on light vegetation and data on dark vegetation area. Standing by for 12 minutes. MARK. 191 REFERENCE to 2. area

CDR

PLT 3h9 O0 12 00 PLT CDR 349 00 12 Oh PLT CDR PLT

Got a farmland

area now.

And 19h MODE to MANUAL. Data on farmland. What are you doing; just going in the breaks in the clouds there? Yes. Okay, we've about run out of opportunities.

CDR PLT

Okay, the SOLAR INERTIAL m_neuver is supposed to start here at - in about 30 seconds. Okay. And, Bill, we do want to get the SHUTTER SPEED on S190 to the SLOW position before you do the Earth limb stuff. Okay, it's going to SLOW now. And 191 AUTO CAL, of course. Yes, and stand by at - in about 5 seconds l0 seconds. Okay, I'm ready. Stand by on my mark MARK. VTS, AUTO CAL.

CC

349 00 12 39

PLT CC PLT

CDR PLT 349 00 13 00 PLT

ll02

CDR PLT PLT

Okay, you got it. Thank you. STANDBY and SLOW. 190 all right. Okay, we're configured for

349 00 14 05

PLT

And the S190 INTERVAL is i0. So I think l'm up to date on my 190 configuration. SLOW; i, O, and i0. And you verify S190 is in MODE, STANDBY, Bill? That is affirmative. Okay, 46 seconds until LOS. Next station contact in 37 minutes through Bermuda at 00:52. Out. Thanks for the help, Bruce. Roger. Sounds like a good Job there.

CC PLT CC

PLT CC PLT

Okay. Coming up 15:40, I should get the READY on the VTS, 191. Must be headed over New Zealand. Yes, sir; passing over the southern island.

349 O0 15 19

CDR CC CDR

Hey, how about that. I got a good - a good picture of it. I'm going to take a couple of pictures. Okay, standing by for 15:40. Okay, I'm taking pictures of the - Okay. READY light on.

PLT CDR 3h9 00 15 39 PLT CDR

- - the Alpine Faults area on South Island. I'm going to sweep up the Alpine Faults Just as far as I can go. Turned out to be about - oh, halfway up the island. All right, I am now looking at an area where I have a very straight river, which I suspect is a crossfault. And very straight looking lake. Okay, the CAMERA's OFF. I won't use any more of your film. And, let's see, Jer, I do have to change apertures.

PLT

1103

349 00 16 15

CDR CDR PLT

Okay. Okay. Okay. thing Okay. That 's good, I'll get that pins out? Not yet. I'll take this near one here. Here we go. Okay. Set 190 aperture, six of them, to 2.8. Okay. out of your way. Got your - your Let's see, I'm going to open this top first, pull that FMC circuit breaker.

CDR PLT CDR

PLT CDR PLT PLT CDR PLT 349 00 17 04 CDR CDR PLT 349 O0 17 15 CDR

All of them to 2.8? 2.8. All right, They're I'll take care of these lower ones. -

very hard to find little

aperture

... it is. But once you're in it, you're there; you're solid. Okay, these three down are all 2.8. Okay, thanW you. Earth limb, setup follows: Open S190 FMC 's circuit breakers ; set 190 apertures, six of them, 2.8. We did it. Okay, six pack. Okay. There we go and locked. There they are. Thank you. Okay, we're waiting for 32 - excuse me, 23.

PLT

CDR PLT PLT CDR i-349 00 17 45 PLT

I'm waiting for 23:11. 23.

I104

CDR CDR

Got myself

an Earth

horizon

out here.

Ed, would you tilt the horizon a little bit? The - the world is not straight in my VTS. And EREP was turned to STOP. speed is 1/60.

349 00 18 14

PLT CDR CDR

Okay, the DAC shutter

You don't need any DAC for this, right? I don't see any on my pad. I'll Just - oh, yes, here's DAC, ON at 23:11. Yes, Yes. Now do they want us to scan crosstrack to make this horizon symmetrical about ... axis? I used - I used their settings there, and I just got the - the gross picture, you know, sort of integrated to - Yes. - - what would the way up. Well, there's Oh, they're be halfway up or three-qlmrters of I think the DAC's on for all those sequneces.

PLT CDR 349 00 18 57 CDR

349 00 18 58

PLT

CDR PLT

CDR PLT CDR

no settings

there.

not.

It Just says, "Set the VTS such that the Earth appears like figure A." Now see, they gave me a zero, whatever Lk"_T - let's see. it was,

PLT

CDR

Well, I had to go LEFT 23 to get the Earth s_-,,,,etricalwith the horizontal axis. And I'll do it, if that's what they want. It should work all right because what they're doing is - you know, Just letting that thing sweep up through the atmosphere. Uh-huh.

349 O0 19 34

PLT

CDR

ii0 5

CDR

I take

it what

this laser

dots

are, is the airglow,

not the atmosphere. PLT Look at that one on the right, half of them in like that. Yes. Doesn't make much sense, though. It's got

CDR PLT

does

it? at - no, that

Maybe you're supposed to be looking wouldn't be the terminator.

PLT

Not going that way. That's what I'm doing here. 23minutes will be EREP, START.

over

349 O0 21 40

CDR

Okay, for the record. Because the horizon is skewed, I have trained off to the left 22 degrees, 22 degrees. And I still have a skewed horizon, but it's not as bad as the other. So I'm going to go back to zero again and see if it's any worse. Yes, and it's - skewed considerably worse over there. So I'm going to set it at 22 degrees LEFT, which is not agains_ the stop. Give you about Okay, you going 30 seconds. to give me a mark at 23:117

PLT CDR PLT

I'll give you a mark at 23:11. Now is that My first mark will be for me, Jer - All right. - - and I'll give - I'll later. I can give my own really, say a mark for 23:11

CDR PLT

CDR CDR

I guess. in garbaging

I can say my own, Bill. No sense up your time line with mine. Okay. START. MARK. MOTION Stand by for my mark And -

PLT

on 23 even.

EREP,

3_9 00 22 59

PLT

And I got a re - Okay, light. Doesn't show.

got a green TAPE

CDR

Coming up on 23:11. At 23:09, the DAC. It's started.

I'm going

to start

ll06

3h9 O0 23 ii

CDR PLT

23:11, Okay. it.

data hold,

40 degrees. About

Getting 191 data; 194 it looks like.

CDR 349 00 23 45 CDR CDR

Coming up on 23:45. MARK. 23:55. looking Coming MARK. Pushbutton release. Repointing. We're still

The PITCH is 38 degrees. at LEFT, 22. up on 24:29. Pushbutton release.

CDR 359 00 24 28 349 O0 24 39 CDR CDR

Repointing. Looking at

MARK. 24:38, pushbutton's in. 35 degrees, ANGLE of PITCH. MARK. 25:12. Repolnting.

349 O0 25 ll 349 O0 25 20

CDR CDR

MARK. 25:21, we're looking 32 degrees of PITCH. MARK. Still MARK. 25:57, repointing. 22, LEgT. 26:09,

at 30 new -

349 O0 25 56

CDR

The ANGLE's

29.

349 00 26 08

CDR CDR

I was a little

late with

that one. LEFT.

29 degrees MARK.

on the PITCH, the DAC's

and 22 degrees OFF.

3h9 00 26 41 349 00 28 17

CDR CDR

26:42,

I've got one more shot at 32:09, here. Oh, another shot after that, at 32:59. Oh, boy! Okay, ground, I messed up. I've given you all that first data with a - with a MAGNIFICATION in MINIMUM. Doggone it. It shouldn't make it much a It shouldn't, but as long as they know they can figure what the - you know, what the difference is from MAX to MINIMUM. Diffenence is angle is - Angle will be a little different.

PLT CDR

PLT

IIQ7

CDR

All right. We're Doggone it.

at MAXIMUM

MAGNIFICATION

now.

PLT

Jer, I should have got the hint there when you said that thing was slanted so much. Because mine - you know, it's - when you - when you go in MAX, it doesn't - it reduces that effect a little bit. Well, I'll leave it at a pointing LEFT of 22, so that we don't change that bit of data anyway. I'm still standing by for 32:04.

CDR

349 O0 29 39

PLT PLT

Hey, you know what we ought to do is Just to get this - all this stuff out of the way we can - No, I guess we won't be coming over that same part of Europe though. No, that' s right. Those - those orbits, though, right along there are fairly adjacent. I'll take a look at it in a minute. whatI'mdoing here. Better watch

CDR PLT

PLT

CDR

About 2 minutes to go. I p,1] ed that - that I back to look at New Zealand. Yes. And then I didn't zoom it back in again. Like we're coming up on South America now. Okay. Got about 1 minute to go. up for me. 32:04 32 - I will go SINGLE.

PLT CDR 349 00 30 54 CDR CDR PLT PLT 349 O0 32 03 PLT

32:04 coming

Stand by on my ms,k,

MARK. 192 MODE to READY. Stand by 32 :09. MARK. 190 MODE, SINGLE.

CDR 349 00 32 09 PLT

1108

CDR PLT PLT PLT 349 00 32 42 PLT CDR PLT CDR PLT 349 00 32 49 PLT CDR 349 00 32 59 349 00 33 02 CDR PLT CDR PLT

The ANGLE is 5 degrees. 32:43. 32:43, 192 will be going Stand by on my m_k, MAHK. MODE to READY. off. ***

32:43 -

Pushbutton's ... CHECK. Repointing.

Stand by, in 49 MARK. MODE, SINGLE.

32:59 is my next one. MARK. MARK. 32:59 MODE, is 1 degree SINGLE. - plus 1 degree, it was. PITCH.

3_:02

That's 33:02. It sure was. I got you an extra frame there. 34 - 33:02, I hit the 190 MODE to SINGLE. Okay, we're still looking at 1 degree 22 degrees LEFT; waiting for 34:02. Stand by for my mark, MARK. SINGLE. off; DAC's coming OFF. 34:02 PITCH, at

CDH

PLT 349 00 34 02 PLT CDR PLT CDR CDR PLT

Pushbutton,

Standing by for 36:05 now. Again setting the VTS at 3 degrees UP. And it says "Zero, LEFT/RIGHT" so we'll do that.

I just still can't get over that view of Western Europe.

llO9

CDR PLT

That was beautiful.

Boy.

Such a sparkling irridescence, you know, I mean, it just - everything just seemed like it was laid out there in a cut and fine crystal. Yes. I was amazed at the diffused light over - over England, though, and the fact that their country is so well lit up - Yes. - - compared to France. You could almost make the whole shape of the British Isles. Yes, that's a pretty heavily populated course, I know France is, too, but Okay. 36:05 and this data is DAC only. is pointing 3 UP, and zero RIGHT/LEFT. Standing Standby MARK. by for 36:05 for another MODE, on my mark area. out

CDR CDR

PLT CDR

3h9 O0 35 26

PLT

Of

CDR

The VTS

PLT PLT 349 00 36 04 PLT CDR 3h9 00 36 lh CDR PLT

SINGLE.

MODE to SINGLE.

DAC, OFF. DAC, OFF at 15. Let's see. They don't have - we'll do that in the post; the cal. Well, Alice could these Yes, But I Just couldn't find any - any rangeland. I wasted too much time looking for rangeland and didn'h really get the rock outcroppings. I had a picture of the Alice, Tex - the Springs area right in front of me and I see some of these - these mountain lines, ridge structures.

CDR

PLT CDR

lll0

349 00 38 12

PLT

Standing by for 39:17, about i minute. other frame and then we'll go STOP. Okay, I got a thing to do at 39:07. 39:00. DAC's ON at 39:07. Standing by on my mark for 39:17 MARK. DAC's OFF. 191 MODE, SINGLE; EREP's going to STOP. That does it.

No ***

CDR PLT 349 O0 39 07 CDR PLT 349 00 39 16 3h9 00 39 17 PLT CDR PLT CDR 349 00 39 25 PLT

Tape measurement. Turn EREP COOLANT valve to BYPASS at end of post. Close 190 FMC circuit breakers. I'm going to leave those out so I don't fail to do that. Okay, get the post card out. expression. Ed, would have liked that one. Yes. (Laughter) Is he holding his nose? No, he's - I think he's doing something else. He's making an obscene gesture at me, that's what he's doing. (Laughter) Okay, voice record Bravo 7. Bravo 7 is reading 32. S192 DOOR is going to CLOSE. Okay, I'm running the camera for its l0 seconds. Okay, DOOR CLOSED light on, 60 seconds. Appears a little less there, I think. Close and latch 191 to cover. I'll close it. And what a - what a beautiful view. If you'll pardon the

PLT

PLT CDR PLT CDR PLT

349 00 40 45

CDR PLT

PLT

llll

349 00 41 19 349 00 53 16

PLT PLT

RECORD switch going OFF. PLT. The TAPE RECORDER reading is 1.8 centimeters at end of the EREP pass.

TIME

SKIP

349 01 39 20

SPT

SPT at 10:40. corded between day 349. SPT out.

VTR information for ATM was re01:35 and 013 - Ol:h0, mission

349 Ol 40 Ol

SPT

TIME

SKIP

349 02 29 20

SPT

SPT at 02:30. This is the last ATM pass of the day. Building block IA and IB went as specified, no problem. At the conclusion of that I went over to take a look at the east limb, and sure enoughthere waswhat appeared to be a surge. I had no past history on it, so I did not know how long it had been surging, whether it was on the decline or- or rise. I rolled tangent. As I rolled, 55 scanned parallel to the limb with the H-alpha 1 crosshair Just slightly below the limb. Did two MIRROR, AUTO RASTERS; truncated at 13 lines - line 13 there, GRATING of 0000.

349 02 30 25

CC SPT CC

Roger.

And for you

and Bill

...

56 proceeded

to PATROL,

SHORT.

... sunrise problems S233 ... Then rolled

that you've been having with

SPT CC

about the line of sight

- in the

... been having you take the first photo direction of the comet ...

SPT CC

- - with 5 m with 82B tangent to the limb - ... the anticipated time of comet rise ...

1112

SPT

- - 6 arc seconds out in limb pointing, WAVELENGTH, SHORT and gave them a SEQUENCE in NORMAL. ... one of the purposes of the third frame is to ... Unfortunately, I ran out of time at about then ran out of viewing time and could not pursue it any further. It was kind of - See if you can give us a mark over the intercom system or on tape when the sky does . .. - - frustrating in that I wanted to get good coverage of that and also go on back and take a look at our emerging flux region. But time did not allow it. And in the light of that, did today's pass give you any problem with the sunrise? Over. Okay, this morning ... _

CC

349 02 30 55

SPT

CC

SPT

CC

CDR 349 02 31 28 SPT

Now in the XUV monitor, I now see that the brightening on the limb has boeken into two distinct sections. One is still the limb brightening and the other is an active region which is down at about 240, 250 at 0.9. Then there's one slightly a bit above that msybe two very, very - relatively small though - getting a 280 at 0.8. And the ESR which I mentioned. And lastly active region 96.

349 02 32 21

CC

... your detailed Flight Plan for tomorrow, that's message 3002 Alfa, we need to change the time for the S063 Kohoutek maneuver from - from 14:56 to 14:48. This is necessitated by a tangent maneuvering position. Okay, Bruce, that' s noted. And one more question dealing with ...

CDR CC 349 02 32 59 SPT

I see we're calling that one at 250, 0.9 - I think it is 90 - active region 97, although I don't believe it was - is really that far - close to the center of the disk. It looks more like 0.8 and this is towards end of the day also, 0.8, 0.85, possible 0.9.

1113

349 02 33 h2 349 02 33 44 349 02 50 00

SPT CC CDR

SPT out. Houston, Skylab, Do you read me?

This is the CDR at 02:50 Zulu answering a question that was raised 2 days ago concerning mission day ii, wanting to know if we would please retransmit the limb volume and measurements that were schedu_led for that day. I have in my hand the teleprinter pad that was sent up for that day, and in the details - in the details under the general subject of limb volume, it says, "CG measurements only on the CDR, girth and CD - CG measurement on the PLT left arm and leg." And then at 18:45 it says, "limb volume general," and then it says, "CG measurements only on the SPT," and so I'm going to give you that information.

349 02 51 00

CDR

_-

Okay, CG measurements: The SPT was 25.5 centimeters ; the CDR was 24.2 centimeters; and the PLT was 24.2 centimeters. The PLT's left calf girth was 13-1/2, and his right calf girth was 13-3/8. We could not believe that anybody wanted his left arm maximum girth measurement, so we didn't take it. I think we still need to clarify what you mean when you send up a message that says limb volume and then dash and then something else. Under our - our understanding the term limb volume dash something else means that - the generic term limb volume tells us what checklist to look in but the dash thing tells us what particular thing you want in the checklist. And that is why you got the measurements you did. CDR out.

349 02 51 57

CDR

TIME

SKIP

349 03 27 17

SPT

The colors again were pretty much as we've seen them before. The uniform across the ocean wherein we see plankton bloom is a light green, somewhere around 8 or 9. And I don_t recall the exact geometry. Stand by.

349 03 28 ll

SPT

I'm being jerked enough now, Bruce.

1114

349 03 28 35

SPT

Was a - it was a fairly extensive bloom from what I could see. It seemed to be alternate, due to clouds. There was a fair massive portion to it and some tentacles coming off of it. All pretty much of this light green. I had a - pretty much of a quick look at it and then took the photo. Next photo to report is CXl7. Taken at day 349, 00:09 GMT, frames 60, f/ll plus a stop, 100-millimeter, 1/250 of a second. Taken over Australia and'I just happened to notice when we were looking down doing the EREP run, when the ETC was not running, a very small body of water which was both - which was red and white. One side of it was white and the other side was red. At least from the outline and the shape of it, it appeared to me that it was a very small lake, but what it was I'm not sure. It may be something very well known, however, I thought it would be interesting because of the color and the - and that location, so I took it. Best I can tell that it - puts it out in the south central Australia over a test site somewhere around in that area. Next handheld photos were also CXl7, taken 349, 00:15 GMT to 00:17. Frame numbers 61, 62, and 63, f/ll, 100-millimeters, 1/250 of a second. The remainder of the photos were taken on CXl7, day 349, 01:43 to 01:46, frames 64 to 77, f/ll, 100-millimeters, 1/250 of a second. The handheld photos 140-6. Rangelands in Australia, around Perth, Albany, et cetera in that area. The rangelands - I've taken to be rangelands, those which were close to the coastline, makes you see a whole quilt-work, whole pattern of what appeared to be either farm or and/or grazing land divided up all along the coastline. It didn't appear that there was a real systematic organization to them. Not quite the same organization which I saw the other day around Melbourne and that area, or at least that side of Australia. Here the pattern was - many of the fields were not even rectangular. Many of the lines did not seem parallel to one another in - over one given area. In some cases they were and in some cases they weren't. It was

349 03 28 47

SPT

340 03 29 31

SPT

349 03 30 54

SPT

349 03 34 15

SPT

1115

not - not - not as well organized. Colors range from green, showing a lot of chlorophyll, to red, and dark in a couple of places. Most of it was a fairly light color, however, it reminded me of straw. But the pattern outlining the rangeland was certainly - or whatever they actually were, was certainly very evident. 349 03 36 ll SPT Now I'm taking easy rangelands; further briefing. we don't have any

349 03 36 lh

SPT

When I looked further to the - further inland I could see red land which was blocked off, very large segments, very rectangular fashion. I'm not sure what these were. I don't believe these were the rangelands. Certainly the other plots which I saw down below me were plenty large for that - that function. The other areas, I'm not sure what I saw. They weremaybe a factor of 5 to l0 larger in - in linear dimension than the others I've seen and also were Just very rectilinear, laid off in precise fashion. It was almost all red soil but there was this very light colored division separating large plots of the soil. SPT again completing the information on the New Zealand/South Island coverage that I just reported on the previous CXll7 [sic] mAg. Also, I had one photo of it on CX36. Information there is day 349, 00:15 GMT, frame number 23, f/ll, 35-millimeter, 1/250 of a second. Coming in over New - New Zealand, the whole southern half of South Island. SPT out.

349 03 38 48

SPT

349 03 39 21

SPT

TIME

SKIP

349 12 58 ii

SPT

SPT at 13:58, M133. In the log, on day 349, 7 hours; quality, fair; and remarks i, 3, and 4. It wasn't a good night for sleeping. No particular reason; every once in a while I get a night like that. No reason that I know of. [ SPT out.

lll6

349 13 06 49

SPT

SPT at the 13:07. 38275. SPT out.

PRD readings:

42389, 23211,

349 13 06 59

SPT

TIME SKIP

349 14 44 54

CDR

This is the CDR at 14:45 Zulu, debriefing the 13:48 - 13:49 ATM pass. Scheduled was TV downlink, JOP 6, and JOP 4 Alfa. The TV downlink came with no problem. The 52 - the J0P 6 was carried off; we got all of the required data on the J0P 6. I'm trying to remember now how I got behind. Oh, I know how it was; did not get J0P 6 going until about 54 or so. We get - when we get the Kohoutek photography, $233, here at the MDA, there Just can't be any lights in here at all, which means you essentially have to turn off the ATM panel and close the hatch - the forward airlock hatch. And the guy in here doing 233 just has to have it absolutely dark, which means the guy that's got the ATM the next pass is hard pressed for time. And so for that reason, I got to the ATM panel a little late, got started a little late. Gave serious consideration to truncating JOP 6, building block l, at the truncation point. But decided I had enough time because at the end of this pass, we were going to cancel the powerdown for unattended ops and leave it up. So I figured, well, I've gained a few more seconds there. And I Just did not account for any time required, any extra time required, to locate this prominence for J0P 4 Alfa. Just took a little bit of extra time to go up and locate it, mske sure I was in the right prominence, to get some maximizing of DETECTOR 3 for the Lyman beta. And I Just ended up using a lot more time getting pointed than I really had calculated. So, as it stands on building block 37 for JOP hA, I got all of 56 done; 82B, I got the first one started and running. And I have the distinct impression that it ra - that it did not terminate on time. I had to truncate it. I had to turn it off myself. The TIMES 4 mode is a 14-minute and 7-second total. It seemed to me I started that

349 14 46 41

CDR

349 14 47 12

CDR

1117

at about 19 or so - or 18 - to go. The thing should have timed out itself, but it didn't. I had to truncate it. Now unfortunately, I didn't write down the time when I started that doggone thing, so I'm not positive whether it failed to shut down itself, or whether it still had a little time to go and I truncated it. But at any rate, I do know that I was the one that stopped 82B in the WAVELENGTH, SHORT, exper - exposure TIMES h. 349 14 48 18 CDR The S055 data. What I did there to truncate was the first GRATING, AUTO SCAN, DETECTOR 1/2, w_s at a MIRROR POSITION of 1032. So rather than repeat it, I just dropped the second one and did a 1031 and a 1030. So you got one of each, and that takes care of it. So it looks like the only people who got shortchanged were the S082 people, S082B. I wish I could've gotten started and got your data. It only would have taken an extra - probably h minutes. But I Just didn't get pointed quick enough. The prominence in H-alpha that - that I pointed at was at a ROLL of minus 6362, which is nearly i00 arc minutesroll from the 5h00 that I had, but that's about 260 at the limb. The prominence looked much like the Rock of Gibraltar. The height of the prominence was - By the Rock of Gibraltar, I mean it had one of what looked like a rather straight side and the other side tapered off at sort of an angle. The apex of the prominence looked like - compared with what I call - I'll call spicule height. That is the - the term spicu/e height, for me anyway, is the difference between the inner and the outer limbs in H-alpha 1. And I would say this prominence was about 2-1/2 times spicule height. 349 14 50 07 CDR And that was about the size of that. The XUV M0N I did not get much chance to look at that. I was busy doing other things and trying to do the TV downlink and all that, and missed it. We seem to be having trouble _rith this particular roll of Polaroid film. I tried four times to get a good white light coronograph picture. And the film has got a - a one - about a one-third of it in each frame is - is brown, unexposed, and the other twothirds is the white light coronagraph. So maybe

349 14 49 01

CDR

i118

the next guy will have a little bit better luck. We may have to go to a new package of film. 349 14 50 52 CDR The - let's see, I took a quick look at active regions 96, 7, and 8. The only one that even looks remotely like an active region is 96; 97 and 98 are rather devoid of activity, although I did not get to look at them in the XUV and see what they looked like there. But in white light I mean, not white light, but in H-alpha. And 96 was the only one that looked like much of anything. Most of the filaments that you called out are there and - and easily discernible. That's Just about all I can say. CDR out. This is the CDR with an addendum to the ATM debriefing that I was giving just a few seconds ago. And that is, in J0P 4 Alfa, step _, where I was maximizing DETECTOR 3 with Lyman beta, the maximum count I got was about 730, 730. CDRout. SPT at 14:56. An observation, Falkland Current. This is handheld 30-12. And I got a look at it one orbit earlier than scheduled. I'ii take a look again as scheduled. The upwelling along the coastline was very prominent. And what got me this time was it extended all the way along the coastline as far as I could see. I'ii try to give you some parameters here, before I describe the details of the upwelling. CDR SPT ... current? Uh-huh. Got some good ones of the Falkland here. Okay - ... take pictures. Okay. Get all my mass of papers organized here. Current -_

3h9 14 51 33 349 14 51 51

CDR CDR

3_9i_ 5213 CDR 349 14 56 03 SPT

CDR SPT 349 l_ 58 01 SPT

Okay. The time at which the observations were made, in around 14:13. And I figure we came across the coastline somewhere around Bahia Blanca - B-a-h-i-a B-l-a-n-c-a - and we are looking

1119

south. And the upwelling which was a - a linear element, I'll describe in more detail in a moment, ran parallel to the coastline as far down to the southas I could see, although there were clouds about two-thirds of the way to the horizon. So just a rough eyeball estimate then says that we were looking at maybe - oh, 500 miles or so down the coastline and I could see that extending into the clouds ... the coastline. The length or distance off the coastline which it was, is essentially the distance from San Antonio Oeste, which I am probably mispronouncing, but it's San Antonio O-e-s-t-e, down to Puerto Madryn or Madryn, M-ad-r-y-n. And I guess that's a distance of somewhere about 150 miles. 349 14 59 37 SPT The width of this was about the - half the width of Peninsula Valdes, or Valdes, V-a-l-d-e-s, and that puts it at around, oh, 30 miles. Now the current itself, or the plankton bloom, the upwelling - First of all, the - the general appearance was of a long sinu - sinuous element extending all the way along the coastline. However, what what was much more pronouncedvisually today than I have noticed before is that this was all one element; that is, one - one single element with a few appendages coming off of it, which came off in a slight angle between a major one running along the coastline. They tended to extend off on either side, maybe at an angle of 20 to 40 degrees and running further to the south as they went off. These maybe a factor of 2 or 3 sm_ller in width and gradually faded off. It was a width or a length-diameter ratio, then again, I'm just guessing from memory, of around l0 to 20. Now these appeared every once in a while along the along the major structure of the bloom. 3_9 15 01

17 SPT

Now the colors, on a Forel scale - And first of all, let me say one thing about the Forel scale we have in our book. The blues at the very top one come out well, but the bottom one, I think the lighting was wrong for the photograph which was taken. There's an awful lot of reflection on those, especially 8 and 9, which are the colors I'm thinking of and I can't get a real true assessment of those colors, so I'm really guessing to a degree. The color was more like a tan in

1120

the center

of the bloom

itself.

Some of the other

appendages went off and were a little bit darker, say between a 7 and an 8. Actually some of that bloom was quite bright green, not - not a yellow, but it was a bright green, almost a lime green which I don't think shows up on this Forel scale and I would say it was brighter green than what we have in 9 or 10. The ocean water behind appeared to be something like a 4 or a 5 on the scale and I'll take another look and try to compare it real time next - next time. We do not have a camera handy, so I did not get any photos, although I guess you would like some emphasis on the observation; so that's what I'll try to do again the next time around. 349 15 03 08 SPT Again what impressed me the most was the fact that this extended all the way along the coastline. It did not look like a random occurrence at all. It certainly - the Falkland Current tended to cause this up_-elling at a uniform distance along the coastline. An attempt to follow some larger - some of the larger structures in the coastline; for example going farther south, we have Golfo San Jorge, G-o-l-f-o S-a-n G-o-r-g-e [sic], and it tended to bow in there a bit. And then it went underneath clouds from there on. And let me think, my distance of 500 miles that I quoted previously, whether that's right, that's - 8 degrees times 6 - yes, sure, that's - about 500 miles. ... We'll get another look at it the next time around. Okay, let me move on to another observation which was made immediately after that. And let me quote a photograph number for it first. This was CX17, day 349, taken at 14:23, l0 minutes after this previous one. Frame numbers 78, 79, and 80; f/16, 100-millimeter, and 1/250 of a second. These were taken of a island wake in - which showed up in the stratus clouds, not cumulus, but primarily stratus-type clouds in that area. What was most impressive about this was the large extent of a wake in the clouds, exceptionally large extent. The location of the island, which I did not specifically see, I figured to be at 4 west and

_

349 15 Oh i0

SPT

PLT 349 15 Oh 30 SPT

i121

48 south, which there is two small isla_Ids on the map at that location. The wake extended off in the east direction, in our direction of travel, and it reminded me very much of a - of a Christmas tree, if you will, with a star at the top of the Christmas tree being the island, and the wake extending out as branches extend out. Very simular in several characteristics in that respect. 349 15 06 27 SPT First being that closest to the center of the wake, the wave or trough and a crest were relatively close together and especially at the head of the - wake or closer to the island, they were very close together. And then the wave tended to fan out and bow slightly outward. By that, I mean that the angle relative to the axis of the wake was a little bit smaller, the acute angle, was a little bit smaller close to the axis and then it tended to increase so that we got a slight arcing effect. And also on one side, that is on the outside that angle - acute angle - tended to be larger. The waves extended out - Well, first of all, by timing the distance by using a spot on the window and as far back as I could see in the wake, it came out with 33 seconds which is about 4 miles a second, is 120 miles long. Yes, I estimate it was a little bit beyond that I actually saw it. So it was more like a 150. We're talking about for the distance of the wake and the distance across was roughly comparable to that at the tail end of it. The wake itself was not a vertex, not a co_on vortices [sic], but strictly waves which you might expect in - Well, similar to supersonic flow, for example, you put an object in there and you get a shock diamond coming off. This was just a series of these, although not as linear and straight as a - as a shock wave would be. But you can see the hills and the crest in the succession of waves in the wake itself. 349 15 08 23 SPT The - I estimated that I saw somewhere around 20 to 30 crests and valleys in the distance of going back from the head, back down to, say 150 miles or so. So maybe we're looking at 5 miles or so of crests over there towards the end, maybe a little larger. What was very impressive was that the wave stood out exceptionally well, far from the island and far from the axis. The shadowing

1122

was such that the crest, or the trough of the wave - although the angle was not proper for it they appeared slightly shadowed, a little bit darker. And it was a - just a most pronounced effect. And I think the analogy to a Christmas tree in the general appearance was good. I think that those three Hasselblad photos, which I hope will show it up - took them in f/60 and the Sun angle was relatively high over clouds. We'll get another go at this one next time around and I'll see if I can take a look at it then. 349 15 09 33 SPT SPT out.

TIME SKIP

349 16 ii 52

SPT

SPT at 16:12, reporting and photos.

on handheld

observations

349 16 12 52

SPT

These observations were of handheld 30-12, Falkland Current. This time we went a little further south than our previous course. This time we went over the Golfo San Jorge, which is again, G-o-l-f-o S-a-n J-o-r-g-e. We were able to look north and see the very strongly defined, relatively narrow linear element of plankton bloom. Again this was a very sharp contrast the the numbers which I've given before are approximately the same; it's a bright green against a relativelymediumblue - dark to medium blue. The numbers I gave on the Forel scale still hold. As I recall, the green was a 8 or a 9. I though it was again, a lime green which I don't really see on that scale. Skylab, Houston. at 52 ... About 1 minute from LOS. Hawaii

349 16 13 27

SPT

CC

349 16 14 44

SPT

It came down the coastline toward the gulf, and was very well defined. This time I saw the streamers which were coming off of it, if you will, protruding to the south. And in most all of them, I'd say 90 percent of them or so - which were numerous - were streaming off to the west - I'm sorry, to the east, that is to the - further away

i123

from the coastline. My estimate of the distance off the coastline I still think is accurate, which I gave last orbit. At about the gulf, it started to become diffused and then it ran not into the gulf, but rather out away from it - out toward the islands which are a little bit further south. 3h9 16 15 4h SPT And by these I mean the Falkland Islands. The cloud cover was down at the tip of South America, so I could not see how far it went really beyond the gulf. Essentially it's going between the gulf and Fa]kland Island, their south - southwest was covered with clouds. But I did see a turn for the very sharply, narrowly defined pl_ton bloom into a more diffused hidden-type bloom as it moved towards the Fa]kland Islands. It went out further. I was able to observe - By further, I mean maybe 2, 3 minutes past the point of being right over the main plankton bloom off the coastline. I was able to observe just a very diffused random edgetype plankton blooming, which again reminded me of plankton blooms which had seen its better day and become spread out and diffused by ocean currents. Apparently the current turns and goes out to sea there and this could possibly be the cause - sweeping it out. The colors were such that the contrast was very much lower; that is, I could see a deep ocean blue with a - with a relatively lighter color ocean water has a bright green to it. Hold on, let me get the Forel scale and I'll try to give you some numbers. I'd say the ocean water we were looking at was somewhere around a 3 and and then I can see a 5 and a 6. Maybe - maybe/more of a 5 and occasionally a 6 in the very diffused blooming further out. SPT out. One addendum to that last report on the Falkland Current. We did get a couple photographs; they're easy to click off. Those were CXl7, time of 15:49, frame number 81 to 84, f/ll, 100-millimeter, 1/250 of a second. Okay, another subject was a handheld photo, CX17, taken at 15:54, frames number 85. It was just taken of weather phenomena; relatively

349 16 16 57

SPT

SPT

349 16 18 27 349 16 18 43

SPT SPT

112h

low-lying stratus, few if any patterns in it, no real - no cumulus buildup. And over in one location which I photographed with the 100-millimeter, there was an overlying patch of exceptionally bright cloud. I'm not sure what would cause it, it really caught my eye because it was such an exceptionally bright patch relative to the background of sort of an off-white to almost gray in color for the - stratus which was slightly underneath it. What lighting effect would do this, I'm not sure. I don't think it was the differences in the densities of the two, although it may could possibly be - or the Sun _gle was relatively high. Right now, I'm - I don't have an answer. It must lie in the reflective in the density properties of the various clouds but I have not - It was not obvious to me at the time when I looked at it though what it could be. 349 16 20 41 SPT Again, what prompted me to take it was exceptionally bright characteristic of this one patch of clouds relative to all the others. SPT out. Oh, in addition to that last - the patch of clouds was probably 5, i0 miles or so across. SPT out.

SPT

349 16 21 03

SPT

TIME

SKIP

349 17 52 17

SPT

SPT and at 17:52. ATM ops. Well, it began at 16:57. Started off with the building block 32 Sun center. Looked at the corona and did not see any real appreciable change from yesterday, except that the streamers which were prominent at 8 and i0 on the outside of all the streamer activities have become, again, a little bit more prominent than they were yesterday. They w - were prominent, they faded into the background again and now, to me, appear a little bit more prominent again. No other real changes that I could note. Although certainly we do have an awful lot of fairly dense streamer structure there at - between 8 o'clock and i0 o'clock. It's impossible to see all the rest of the details from the TV display.

1125

It all appears - not too much of a uniform brightness. But I'm sure he's got a lot of activity coming around the corner. Okay, then I went over and looked at our emerging flux region and was kind of disappointed. First the brightness in the XUV had decreased. In oxygen VI, the brightest point only yielded something on the order of h00 300 actually, occasionally at 3 or h. Chromospheric network brightening was not as pronounced and not as extensive as I thought it would be, only two or three cells were involved. And not really a a real brightening there. 3h9 17 5h 02 SPT And there was no arch filaments that I could detect. And no spots evident in the white light display. So I did a shopping list item 2 there, just for more of a synoptic observation. Then moved on to prominence 55 and I'm motivated by going over there to try to catch some surges. And also it Just seems to be where most of the activity was occurring which was well worth watching. Went over to P55. Rolled 82B SLIT tangent to the limb. Did essentially a shopping list ll, except for a small modification which I'll mentionhere. I maximized - Well, first of all, I was _around 7 arc seconds off the limb, then rolled about Sun center to maximize Lyman beta. And it was not a very pronounced maximum. 82B had received a - was at LIMB POINTING 7 arc seconds off the limb, got a long exposure - LONG WAVELENGTH exposure for 40 seconds and then a sequence of SHORT WAVELENGTIIS, TIMES 4. 55 received two GRATING, AUTO SCANs in that position and then two MIRROR, AUTO RASTERs, truncated down around 40 or the first one all the way down, the second one truncated around 50. And these MIRROR, AUTO RASTERs were on a GRATING POSITION of 595 - 594, excuse me. Got a look at a lot of - of free hydrogen - Lyman alpha on the wing - hydrogen continuum. Two locations, neon VIII line and the helium continu_n of magnesium VIII. I decided hydrogen would be more useful there. And 56 received a SINGLE FRAME, FILTER 2, 5 minutes_ SINGLE FRAME, _, for 8 minutes. I then rolled 82B away from the prominence hoping to get some background spectra. Rolled 1 arc minute to the south - ap proximately 1 arc minute to the south_ 7 arc seconds OFFSET. Then I went to WAVELENGTH, SHORT,

349 17 54 59

SPT

1126

TIMES 4. And while that was in progress, I noticed the surge right in front of me, right on the SLIT about one-third of an arc minute _ay from SLIT center, so I let the auxiliary timer time the 82B out to the conclusion of the 2:40 - 2-minutes40-second exposure and then reinitiated that sequence. 349 17 57 26 SPT So we really got two sequences at WAVELENGTH, SHORT of 20 seconds and 2:h0 seconds. Just hoping to catch some time - time rate of change in that. That same surge which I saw also was - I thought I saw a hint of it while we were up doing the observations above. I chose to roll in this direction, however, because the XUV MONITOR showed that we were relatively clear in that area, much more so that had I rolled north. And it looked clear in H-alpha at the time I started the observations. However, I did notice that that surge in the first set of observations, on P55 and I think 55 should have seen something down around line 27. Okay now, the second set here where I was rolled 1 arc minute south again, picking up there. 82B, I've just described, with the h exposures. And - 55 received three MIRROR, AUTO RASTERs, truncated in order to give you some time resolution. They were done at llne 772, GRATING 772. And that again gave me some hydrogen continuum, carbon III, and the neon VII which is apparently an interesting line for looking at liTm_n activity. 349 17 59 34 SPT 56 received SINGLE FRAME, FILTER 5 for 8 minutes at that location. The surge was located at an UP/DOWN of zero, and a ROLL of minus 1200, which would put it down at 250 degrees at 1 solar radius. And again I appreciate the observing time. It's an interesting way for me to operate. I find it challenging and stimulating. Kind of brightens up the whole day. And I hope you're getting some good data in the process. Feel free to critique what I'm doing. I'm sure each one of you has thought in much more detail about the observations which you would like to have and could get with your instruments. And the more I learn from you on - on that, I think, the better data I can get for you. SPT out.

349 18 01 02

SPT

,_ TIME SKIP

i127

349 19 26 25

SPT

SPT at 19:26. ATM pass which began at 18:31. They're all carried out with no problem, that is the 26, building block i0 - second building block i0 and building block 28. A couple of well there was two - two difficulties. One is the EXTENDED STANDARD. When that timed out, it was inadvertently reinitiated again. And, after the first frame was taken, as evidenced by the frames decrementing off switch, the stop switch was hit. However, I saw it decrement a second time so I don't think I was able to catch it before we lost one more. And in 56, we got the 8-minute in FILTER 4, but then only a LONG EXPOSURE in FILTER 1. At the conclusion of the planned observations, I moved off to the limb on the east side and rolled so that 82 - I rolled so that 55 MIRROR, LINE SCAN was tangent to the limb. Actually it was H-ALPHA l; HORIZONTAL CROSSHAIR was slightly below the limb. And Just started the - a MIRROR, AUTO RAS'I'EMat a GRATING of zero, and was part way throughthe first one when I noticed a transient, that is, a surge in H-alpha. We did not have much time left and rather than repoint, I gave it - I let the MIRROR, AUTO RASTER continue on down to around line 13 and then reinitiated.

349 19 28 41

SPT

By the time we got scan the second time, we were below 400 K. The interesting surges - There are two large masses of material eJected with no material reaching up from below that was evident. And it appeared to be moving at a fairly high rate of around 1 arc minute - or a half an arc minute per minute. Which I guess would be llke 350 kilometers a second or so. It sure was impressive to watch it move in H-alpha. The size in H-alpha was about minute for each one of them. the second one caught up with it got off toward the edge of could follow it out to around, 2 arc minutes. It's actually a third of an are Appears as though the first one as the screen. And I oh, not quite out to the edge of

349 19 30 l0

SPT

349 19 30 30

SPT

1128

_

the field of view of the scope. esting to follow it. 349 19 31 01 349 19 hO 38 SPT PLT SPT out.

Sure was inter-

**_ PLT. Time is 19:40. Reporting the rate gyro package temperature: X-5 is 108 degrees ; X-6 is 105 degrees; Y-5 is 105 degrees; Y-6 is 96 degrees, that's 96; Zulu 5 is 108; Zulu 6 is 105. PLT out.

349 19 hl i0

OLT

TIME

SKIP

349 20 25 33

PLT

PLT. Time is 20:21 Zulu. Calf measurements on SPT, MO92 run. Left leg, 13-5/8; right leg, 13-3/8. The legbands are Charlie Juliett and Alfa Quebec, left and right respectively.

349 20 25 50

PLT

TIME

SKIP

349 21 00 51

CDR

This is the CDR at 21:00 Zulu, debriefing the 20:0h Zulu ATM pass. The - because of the surge that Ed Gibson saw on a previous pass, we elected to do the building block 32 prior to starting this ATM pass. So we did it, and we also took a look at the WHITE LIGHT CORONAGRAPH and saw no transients or any signs of any. Went ahead and did the building block 32, watched for a little while, and then finally decided we'd better get with it on the JOP 25A, building block 10. Jumped into those and really whistled through there's - those rather rapidly. At 26, I noticed that it - it was Just a repeat of 35 to go, down 26 to go, so I just left the MAR going.

349 21 01 56

CDR

I let it go for two - two started the PATROL, SHORT SCAN there. I guess it's same thing at 08 to go as

RASTER counts and reafter the first RASTER raster JOP. And did the well.

349 21 02 18

CDR

Finished up about lO or something like that, and went back and did another building block 32 Just

1129 to follow up. Looked at the WHITE LIGHT CORONA-

GRAPH for a while and saw nothing. Decided to go on up and take a look at that limb which I had up at 12 o'clock on m_ scope with a ROLL of minus 5bOO. Went up and looked it over. The particular surge that we had seen at the beginning of the period was gone. There was another one to the right of it. And over considerably to the right, another - oh, lO0 arc minutes - was another surge coming up off the llmb. 349 21 03 ll CDR During this period, I took a couple of looks at the XUV MONITOR, and this particular limb is now getting so bright with activity that it does not need INTEGRATION. So it looks like we got a boomer coming around the horn and we're looking forward to seeing it. All of the JOP 25, building block 10's were done. There were no problems. Everything went as scheduled, in fact, a little bit early and so I ended up with a little bit of observing time at the end of the period. So that's it for the ATM debriefing. 3h9 21 03 43 349 21 0h 05 CDR CDR The CDR out. This is the CDR at 21:04 with a message for the food people and the FAO. Has to do with providing time for the food and the inventory. First of all, we have so far completed one locker, front and rear, which is 61 - 561 I believe it is - yes. And we have Just about completed the front - the front pallet in locker 562. I think that we're wasting a lot of time messing around with the food canisters in these pallets because we know that the SL-3 crew, or at least we have their assurance, that they did not get any of the food; they were only into the beverages. Most of the beverage cans that have been gotten into by the previous crew were either marked or it was obvious from the way the tape or lack of tape was arranged can that it had been gotten into. 349 21 05 l0 CDR on the

I would suggest that we could cut down our workload by about half, by not inventorying any further any of the food cans in lockers 562 and 563. Further, all - I wanted to point out to the food people that all of the overage food has now been gathered by food type and put into our pantry, which consists of locker 550, 51, 52, and 53, I believe it is.

1130

_-_

We have

all of our food - all _he same kind of food

in one can, and that work has been completed, so that when we get to the inventory of the overage it should be fairly easy. This inventory of the food particles - food p_]]ets - is extremely time consuming and I think, for the most part, taking twice as much time as it should. 3h9 21 06 13 CDR Ed and I have devoted all the time assigned today to that Job and only gotten through one locker and a half, which I think is a rather unproductive way to spend our time. I've already mentioned how I think we can cut that time down - by skipping the food cans. That Just about covers the - the food thing. I think we're going to need some more time for that. The checklist changes, I got about half of them done. I think you're going to have to schedule - this is for the FAO - you're going to have to schedule me another period of time, I should think that at least a half hour to threequarters 3h9 21 06 53 CDR of an hour, for more checklist changes.

You folks seem to send those doggone things up in in spurts, and I get snowed under, and there doesn't seem to be any way I can catch up. And I think you just - when you start sending up a spurt of checklist changes, you better just go ahead and arbitrarily assign me a period of time to make the changes because it does take time. Particularly the ones that we got this time that had to do with RCS reconfiguration and things like that. There was about four checklists I had to go to and about five entries in each checklist. So one little piece of paper, 3 or h inches long, about 30 minutes of work. represented

349 21 07 32 349 21 19 03

CDR PLT

This is the CDR, out. PLT reporting completion now of M092 run on the SPT, the subject, at 21:00 hours even. And complete with the M093 at 21:20 hours. I took a look at the right legband when I took it off the subject at the completion of MO - M092 and I could not tell or detect anything amiss with the legband. PLT out. SPT at 21:20; total work on M093, 292, that's 292.

349 21 19 30 3h9 21 19 59

PLT SPT

1131

349 21 20 i0 349 21 31 01

SPT PLT

SPT out. PLT debriefing ATM pass which was executed earlier today, I forget the exact time. I want to make a few con_nents on the way that the shopping list itemitems ii and 12 were completed because I didn't get around to finishing 13. The shopping list item 1 was completed - constructed early, so what I - I did a second PATROL, SHORT. Item ll shopping list item ll was done as had requested. Let's see; I used SHORT on 82B; the GRATING, AUTO SCAN was done on line 20. I was getting counts in the 100 units for in - in the - the hundredths place, so I used line 20 and position 30. And now on the second SCAN I got my maximum reading at 21. And - let's see, instead of doing another PATROL, NORMAL - PATROL, SHORT, I did a SINGLE FRAME, 2, LONG, and a SINGLE FRAME, 4 LONG; SINGLE FRAME, 2, 5 minutes; SINGLE FRAME, 4, 3-1/2 minutes. Then on the third slit position, on the OFFSET position, the GRATING, AUTO SCAN was done on line 23, which was a much weaker indication on GRATING - or on DETECTOR 3.

349 21 31 50

PLT

349 21 32 53

PLT

I did an 82B SHORT, 2 minutes and h0 seconds. Did not have enough time between then and 400 K to do another SHORT, 5, so - 520, so I did a LONG, 2 minutes. And I did a 56 NORMAL and SHORT again on that third SCAN position. The little prominence that I was looking at, it appeared as though I put the first OFFSET position - slit position - in the hottest part of it. And I got a position to the left of it, 2 arc seconds to the left, 2 arc seconds to the right, with the 55 GRATING POSITION in what was the hottest position for that slit - was line - for position 30. And that's about the size of it; it didn't do anything while I was watching it. Didn't do - see any unusual activity there, but it was obviously a definite structure of the limb, and I think that that ought to be pretty good. PLT out.

349 21 33 25

PLT

349 21 33 54

PLT

TIME

SKIP

i132

3h9 22 i0 25

SPT

SPT at 22, handheld photos. H-30 plankton off the coast of New Zealand.

blooms

3h9 22 13 37

SPT

Okay, SPT again on H-30, plankton blooms off the coast of New Zealand. First of all, let me say, there was a small amount of evidence of plankton blooms fairly close to the coastline. I could see on the east side of North Island what appeared to be very small blooms, although they pretty much ran along the shoreline. I suspect that the discoloration there was due to something else. However, I will describe it. It's - was just a very thin line, maybe 1/20 or so of the width of the island. It ran along the coastline. The Forel scale again was around 8 or so on that. It was not very - very bright green. But it certainly was detectable. There was one other prominent location where I saw a little ebbage [sic] coming off, and that was over on the opposite side of North Island. Somewhere around New Plymouth. Time's ... one and ...

349 22 lh 27

SPT

CDR SPT

On the opposite side, maybe far - further out on the east side of the island is where I saw the most extensive blooming. It was not a - The color was not a very sharp contrast to the waters around it. The water basically was about a 2 or - about roughly a 2 or so, although it didn't have the bright blue that the Forel color - color shows in the book here.

349 22 15 42

SPT

It was Just a - a darker - it was obviously a blue, but not as - not with a bright - rich blue in it that this nt_nber 8 shows - sorry, number 2. The Forel scale for the - for the upwelling was about a 7 or an 8. Again, it was a dark, dirty green, as opposed to a light lime green. This contrast was not very great. Both the blue and the green were both dark dirty colors, if you will, as opposed to the bright contrast we've seen off the coastline in South America with the Falkland Current. Here the blooming - the color anyway, was very much more subdued; contrast much lower.

SPT

i133

349 22 16 48

SPT

The current lines themselves have given a very strong impression that there was a - a flow llne or stream lines of water which ran between the North and the South Island, and went out east. The blooming seemed to reflect the - the lines which lay - ran out, I would say, about the length of the North Island, and then there was some eddies, and pretty much of a random motion. And then I could see, coming in - evidence coming in from - especially from the north, and a little bit from the south, a flow line, which was Joining that major flow. It looked like we had a - a stagnation point, if you will, where two flows came in from the north and the south - Skylab, this is Houston through the Vanguard for 6-1/2 minutes. Out. - - although not directly opposed to one another.

3h9 22 17 2h

SPT

3_9 22 17 31

CC

SPT SPT _-_

And then bulged out further out. So we had lines moving away from the coastlinebetween the North and the South Island to the east. A period of or location of stagnation with lines coming in from either side, and then stream lines moving further out again to the east, a distance which I could see it further south with, especially out to the cloud line, which was out to about the distance of the length of South Island. I could actually see it out to the island out there, which is Chatham Island. And then the cloud line picked up. I think it began to clear over seas. There was no - no clouds that might be a much larger overall pattern to it all. I was very impressed by how extensive it was. When I looked back into the map showing the major currents of the world, I see that there is some flow going through between the north and the south, which does fit. What happened to that? However, my description was ready-made and drawn up before I seen that, so I don't think there's

349 22 18 22

SPT

349 22 18 52

SPT

CDR SPT

i134

any subconscious imagination there. I'll give you handheld photos n11m_ers on those. 349 22 19 35 SPT CDR SPT PLT SPT CXl7, day 349, taken at approximately - Bill, it's just ... - - 21:58 to 21 - Ahh ... - - 21:58 to around 22:05, frame n1_m1_ers,86 to 99. Buried in there, also, are some pictures which I thought show the fault llne in the - Here it comes. - - South Island very well. I looked for them in the North Island; I think I was able to see them also, but I was more looking for plankton blooms at the time, and I really didn't have time to focus on that. I'll give you a little more description on that - those photos in a moment. But there're all blended in there together. Up to photo n_ber 90 was taken at X-16, as there was some cloud cover. But then I realized we were looking at pretty much of a cloudfree area, then I went down to f/ll. 349 22 21 38 SPT One thing I had not had the chance to do is to look at it through a haze filter or Polaroid filter, and I do intend to do that when I - the next opport1_nity. Now as far as finding the whole upwelling area, looking for darker ocean, that's a very difficult thing to do unless the sky is wide open because when you see little bits of it - when you've only got a piecemeal view of it, it's kind of tough to tell which is the - the matrix, and which is upwelling material. We'll try to see that _n the future and keep that in mind. Bill, ... I think, obviously though, we have a very prominent upwelling area there. Not for the color contrast the points of blue that we've seen off the Falkland Current, but certainly very extensive.

PLT 349 22 20 20 SPT

CC SPT

1135

349 22 24 00

SPT

Okay, again now, buried in those photos are some photos of North Island, which I have found from Jerry have been extensively covered already. Unfortunately, I did not know that, and I buried quite a few photographs in there of the North Island. I also had some of the - one fairly oblique of the South Island, but it was looking straight down the Alpine Fault, that's A-l-p-i-n-e. And I thought it was a very good picture showing that fault. I did not have time to notice the slippage of - of one side relative to another, and try to determine exactly what type of fault it was or - or fault coming in from the side.

349 22 2h 55

SPT

_-

I was pretty busy looking at plankton blooms at the time. However, I think we're getting better, not that we know what we're looking for up here in a couple of shots at it. I think we'll Just continue to improve. I'm very encouraged by this visual observation. Rather than saying we've filled so many squares, once you've done it a few times, I think you actually get better at it, and you learn what subtle features you're looking for. And I'm not at all concernedabouthaving particular features called out over again to observe. It's left over here and that's right.

CDR 349 22 25 37 SPT

I think the more you expose us to the whole multitude of things that you're looking for, and we get a chance to use the book and look at the Earth below and try to become competent observers, the better we're going to get at it; the better the data's going to become. So, Just because we've done something early in the mission - no reason we sh - we shouldn't continue because the da - data certainly should be getting better all the time. It's something we certainly enjoy doing, Phil. Keep the information coming.

349 22 26 06

SPT

SPT out.

TIME

SKIP

349 23 29 45

PLT

Okay, undocking checkout has been completed. Yawing left 180 degrees; very smooth.

1136

349 23 30 39 349 23 31 48

PLT PLT

Pitch up 90 degrees. DATA MARK. Rolling left - 90 degrees, left. Okay, a lot of the data here of my voice comment was lost because of coordination with the ground and also a little bit of a problem catching up with the TP. If I can just - fin - he finish single axis cal, CMG. Okay, that was the completion of single axis cal, CMG. Now I'll try to give you a little better voice. Now coming up with single axis eal in RATE GYRO MODE. Okay, he's getting a little minus Z translation with the - the roll. Also he's translating lot of dust in here. plus Y. Really raising a

349 23 33 20

PLT

DATA MARK. Yawing left 180. Very little coupling. Here, he's stopping the roll left. Got just a little - yaw left - got Just a little roll left when he started to kill the yaw. Pitching up 90. Okay, he's getting ... stopping the pitch. Developed just a little left yaw. Yaw right 90 coming up. He's getting ready to kill it now. There he goes. He had to put on a little minus Z there. Okay, he had to put in some minus Z to move himself out. He was drifting slowly over toward higher sensor control panel. Roll left 90. DATA MARK. Okay, he's still on the roll. fairly clean maneuver. Okay, this is a

349 23 3h 5h

PLT PLT

349 23 35 13

PLT

DATA MARK. He's got a little translation but it's left over from what he put in prior to this maneuver to keep him away from the dome lockers. Okay, DIRECT coming up now. Okay, he picked up 90 degrees ... Maneuvers all seemed pretty clean. No coup - very little coupling. There appears to be a little at first, but it didn't seem to affect it. Got a little bit of left yaw in that one. It was a pitch ... pitch of 90 degrees. Yaw left 180. Okay, yaw left 180. DATA MARK. And that was pretty clean maneuvering. He's ended up with a slight plus X translation.

034 23 36 44

PLT

349 23 37 42

PLT

1137

Y_ing

right

180

degrees.

He

developed

a

little

left roll when he yaw. 349 23 38 18 PLT

started

yswing

off on his right

DATA MARK. And he had - also put in a little plus X at the end there. Translation. Roll right
90 degrees .... up. Moving out to the center of

the workshop. 349 23 39 06 PLT PLT DATA MARK.

Rolling Rolling

right

90.

left. it. Okay.

*** ... minus X translation. He's stopping Got a little left roll when he stopped it. Stable now. Plus X coming ...

349 23 40 23

PLT

DATA MARK. And he's killing off that plus X; looks pretty clean. Minus Y coming up. Minus Y. Okay, when he killed off that minus Y he got a - a little roll in the ... Okay, he got a little plus roll when he started killing off the plus Y. Plus Z now. Got a little left roll there when he killed off the plus Z. I toldyou it was plus;it's minus Z. Minus Z nc_. Good, it was a pretty clean maneuver killing off the minus Z. The completion of single axis
cal.

349 23 41 17

PLT

349 23 42 58

PLT

Okay he's now at the banjo. He's yawing back around. He'll be flying to the donning station shortly. And that was in the RATE GYRO MODE. Now he's getting ready to fly to the donning station. No, he's going to MODE, DIRECT now. There's a good one - thruster toward the donning station. He forgot to give a data mark before he thrusted. He'll be giving a data mark midway here. DATA MARK, midway. Make it from midcourse correction. Okay, he was pitched down a little bit too much when he initial - originally translated there, and I think that's his comment on midcourse correction. It looks pretty good there. Okay, we're trin_ning ID 2 now. Get ready for the *** MODE, CMG. 800. Got about 900 pounds. DATA MABK now. Return to baseline.

349 23 44 07

PLT

PLT

349 23 45 53

PLT

1138

349 23 47 04

PLT

DATA MARK. Okay. To the banjo, that's point i. Looks like he - pretty good accuracy on that. He made several midcourse corrections there on the way. Didn't look like he put in initially enough thrust to get back. So when he was yawing around about 90 degrees, he put some plus Y in. He was already on his way *** Seemed to have worked out pretty well. Now on his way to position 4.

PLT

Now he's made it position 2. Correct that, he's trying ... position 2. And S063 looks reasonably safe. Okay DATA MARK. At position 2. Okay, his X axis is not quite paralleled to grid floor, but he's not not far off in his eye - he's got correct eye eye position. On his way to position - to position 3 now. DATA MARK. He's at position 3. Now he's started around the dome lockers. Armrest about I0 inches
out rest from the dome lockers, starting the left arm-

349 23 48 40

PLT

349 23 h9 h9

PLT

okay, ... left - left armrest. It went in to about 4 inches. Now he's holding it out. I think he's doing a pretty good job maneuvering it around there. The knees are about even with the center of the water tank. The fire hose is coming up. Looks like it may snag his feet. Now, he's going to clear it. He just barely cleared the water tank - condensate storage tank. Coming up on one of the DAC mounts. And it's 4 - He's at position 4 now of the data mark. like he's stabilized fairly well. to come back to donning station. PLT 349 23 52 20 PLT Okay DATA MARK. He's back at the donning station. Looks like a pretty clean run. Okay, I'm going to have to change a bottle out. Stand by. And looks Getting ready

--

1139

DAY

350 (AM)

350 00 00 04

PLT

He's got a little roll left, coupled with a right yaw. Starting second baseline in DIRECT. Okay, he's up to banjo. It sounds llke he's doing a little more thrusting this time, and I'm sure it's because he's using added thruster gas for attitude as opposed to CMG on the last one. DATA MARK at the banjo. Doesn't seem to have any trouble at all going where he wants to. He got over a little bit close - too close to the minus - minus Z SAL, coming down, but it's ... He's going to kill that translation out, too. I'm not noticing a lot of coupling on this one because he's not using a very long duration. He's - again he's ended up with his head a little high relative to the grid floor. Maybe that's the position he likes. Head and eye positions there turn out good. Getting considerable coupling now as he tries to stabilize his translation. DATA MARK .... Now headed for position 3. a lot of aerosol. Coming up on position. Really

350 00 01 21

PLT

350 O0 03 06

PLT

350 O0 04 Ol

PLT PLT

Okay, he's using quite a bit of attitude and translational thrust there to get him, you know, started. And it'll settle down as soon as he starts around the dome ring lockers.

350 O0 04 25

PLT

DATA MARK. About a foot out. Got to start a right yaw here very shortly. There it comes. A little bit close now; a little bit close to the lockers. He's in minus X now. The bottom of the rotational hand controller is just about even with the bottom of the dome ring lockers. Sync [?] hoses are just below the blue rail and about h to 5 inches out. I might as well get a cord out of the way.

350 00 05 56

PLT

DATA MARK. Okay, it was smooth. He gained a little height as he went around and took it out near the end. That wasn't over about 2 or 3 inches. Okay, he's moving back starts to the donning station. around and

i140

PLT

Okay, as he 's showing minus X. pitch.

He 's getting minus

350 O0 07 09

PLT

DATA MARK at the donning station. repeat thebaseline. DATA MARK. Going to be RATE GYRO.

He's going to

350 00 07 21 350 00 21 59

PLT PLT

The time is 00:21. The ASMU is docked. The POWER is down and I'm getting ready - I just turned the TELI_I_RY POWER, OFF. We have completed the first run, and we did not get HHMU fam in complying with your instructions to make sure we're - started the button-up by 00:15. PLT out. This is the CDR at 00:35 Zulu, debriefing the M509 run. First of all, let me give you a - a quick agenda or scenario of what went on to give you an idea of what happened to the time line. The preps all went without incident; a little slow, but they all went well. We were moving along very nicely and had the ASMU running and in good shape. And it got time to do the undocking and checkout - correction, let me locate the first one here. Okay, we were on page 7-10, MODE HHMU. We Just transferred to INTERNAL POWER. And Bill said, "Check your bus ; buses are greater than 26 volts." Well, I misread the meter, and we decided we had a low battery; I read it at 22. What I was doing really was reading the nitrogen pressure. So we quickly change - changed batteries. We went to the battery change procedures and changed batteries to see if that would help us. And I hadn't gotten smart yet. I still looked at the wrong needle and said, "No, we're still only at 22." And by that time, the CMGs had run down some. By the time we figured out what was going on and that I was really reading the wrong and th - wrong meter and that everything was okay, we went back to EXTERNAL POWER and had to wait until the CMGs wound up again. Okay, once we got the CMGs wound up again, we went back on the battery. And then we went through the rest of the procedure without too much problem. We undocked, did the checkout, single-axis cals, transfers, baselines ; and by that time, we were running out of time.

350 00 22 24 350 00 35 25

PLT CDR

350 00 36 42

CDR

ll_l

350 O0 37 h0

CDR

We - we changed the PSS. After the transfer maneuver and after the CMG maneuver, we were supposed to have changed the battery out. But we still had ample voltage left, and so I elected not to have that done• Went ahead and flew a DIRECT baseline and then planned on changing both the PSS and the battery at that time• Correction, we changed the PSS after the DIRECT. And the battery, we decided to hold off until after the RATE GYR0. And after the RATE GYR0 baseline is when we would have changed out the battery; however, it became time - it came time to quit at that time, so we stopped. So let me get into the meat of the maneuver here•

350 00 38 h6

CDR

At any rate, we changed the PSS at the time specified. We ju - elected to let the battery go one more time. We shut down on the battery Just slightly above 26 volts, so it was in good shape. All right, now let me find the debriefing pages. Okay, run-number-i debriefing guide. Could you fly the baseline maneuver satisfactorily in all modes? Yes. Any modes deficient? No, the Of course, the DIRECT MODE requires quite a bit more attention, but I wouldn't say it was any more deficient. It's Just a different way of flying the machine. I was real pleased and surprised to find out that the - that the actual ASMU flies very much like the simulator that we worked at in Denver, except that you're zero g all the time. And - and without having that old g vector pulling you around, particularly when you're upside down or on your head, I - I found - or on your side - I found that when I was moving from position 1 to position 2 in the baseline maneuver, that it didn't bother me as much as it did in Denver when the g factor came into play. Was precision - precision stationkeeping easier in some modes? Which ones and why? Well, of course, in the CMG and in the RATE GYRO MODE, it was much easier because it doesn't require as much attention. I - I found in the DIRECT MODE, particularly in roll, that small corrections were difficult to get. Maybe I'll try banging the hand controller next time. I tried using the hand controller in •.. with strictly wrist motion and not any banging

350 00 39 40

CDR

350 00 40 45

CDR

1142

to get very small attitude corrections or very small thrust. I did not at this time try squeezing squeezing off any thrust, either, to see if that was possible in the DIRECT MODE. 350 O0 41 hh CDR

-

Question 3. Did some modes take more attention to flying than others? Yes. In order of - of increasing attention to flying, CMG was the least, RATE GYRO was the next, and then, of course, DIRECT would - took - required the most attention. Were you able to satisfactory [sic] aim at the target for the transfer maneuver and the baseline maneuver? Yes, once you get the hang of it. The first transfer maneuver I did, I was essentially pitched down too much, and I really didn't point my X vector at the target. I kind of pointed my X vector at the floor in front of it, and that's exactly where I went. But I would say, yes, I was able to satisfactorily aim at the target. You have to try it a couple of times and once you get the picture, it's very easy to do. Should any maneuver be changed for the next M509 run? Negative. I don't think so. I think all the maneuvers we have scheduled are good maneuvers, the waterfront real well. and they cover ....

350 O0 42 48

CDR

Number 6. During the single-axis cal, did you notice any attitude disturbances when commanding translation? Yes. Not so much in the single axis as when I was starting one of the baseline maneuvers from down at the docking station. I - I start - I - I did a minus-X translation and a minus-Z translation, and I got in a little hit of roll along with some yaw. Now I don't think that I don't think that roll got in as a result of the translation. I think it came in as a result of the yaw. That's - anyway, that's when I first noticed it. I called it out for Bill, and Bill noted it on the other tape. For the most part though, I think in the translations, the cross-coupling or attitude disturbances caused by translation were minimal. I did not - did not feel like they were very much. On my next - my next one, I'll give it a lot more attention in the DIRECT MODE.

350 00 44 09

CDR

In the single axis cal, DIRECT MODE, did you notice attitude rates increase or attitude change about an axis other than the axis commanded? Well, I'll

i143

Just refer back to the last question. They were minimal. However, this was the first time out of the bag. I suspect I'll be much more sensitive to that next time. CDR Were attitude disturbances due to normal limb

motions in the DIRECT MODE bothersome? They were not bothersome, but I did notice them because I made a few limb motions. CDR And - and question 9: Did you notice any leg lag? That is affirmative. I did notice leg lag during rotation and translation cnmmand. I kind of wished I'd had a - a thing to put my feet in, because I felt like the leg lag was causing, or had the potential anyway of causing problems with the purity of translation command. 350 00 45 01 CDR Did you inadvertently contact the 0WS? If so, how often? Yes, I did once while coming down from from the D-432 area - that's position number 4 going to position 5 - correction, going to po Let me think about this. I did it - yes, going from position4 to position5. I tappedthe food locker 550 with m_ toe, but it was a very gentle taD, and it wasn't too - too much. It was in the DIRECT MODE that I hit it. Did you sometimes use your legs or hands to stop or push off? No, I did not. Did the ASMU tend to slip during roll commands? I didn't notice that. We had the straps pretty tight. And I really didn't - I really felt like I was part of the ASMU or it was part of me or vise versa, and I did not feel any of the slop that - that Bean and his - and his crew noticed. And I'll keep an eye out for that next time, too. But the slop was not such that I really noticed it. 350 00 46 19 CDR Did shadows provide useful motion cues? Oh, I forgot number 13. Did you notice the OWS air velocity perturbating your translation? No, I did not ; nor did I feel it on stationkeeping. Did the shadows provide useful motion cues? Not not so I could notice. I found most of my motion cues by Just moving my head and looking where I was going and taking a couple of cross-checks.

CDR

CDR

ll4h

350 O0 46 h9

CDR

Did the high-intensity photo lights bother you? No, they did not, other than that they make things pretty hot in here, and both Bill and I were complaining of the heat by the end of the - the mission. If M509 had flown on the first day of the mission, do you think you would have had a greater tendency to become disoriented? If so, why? Well, I don't know if I could tell you why other than the fact that I could get disoriented without the ASMU on the first day; that was no problem. The ASMU would have just made it all that worse because I had a - what would he sort of an abnormal control situation. On day i, I was using my arms and legs and pushoffs and all that for control, and then that, when you're flying something And yes, I do. I feel I would have had a little tendency to become disoriented. And I think it was best that we did not rush into M509.

350 00 47 43

CDR

HHMU. I'll have to skip that because I didn't get to do any in the HHMU, because we were so doggone late getting going because of that boo-boo. But in general, I found the HHMthe ASMU a very pleasant piece of machinery to fly. I found that DIRECT was controllable. I deliberately took it fairly slow today. I used about the rates I use in the six-degree-of-freedom simulator. They felt comfortable today. I'm not sure if I'll be tempted to speed them up or not. I think probably I will. And if I do decide to speed them up, I will so debrief, so that your data will - will reflect it. The DIRECT MODE is a little snappier than I expected. I think it might be a little bit snappier than the six-degree-of-freedom simulator. And I said before, I'm going to try slapping the hand controller next time and see if I can get smaller impulses in DIRECT and see what that does in the way of control and - and the conservation of gases. The only other comnent I had is the one I gave Bruce at the last minute on the air-to-ground, and that is that we have not been able to fine the bracelet for the - the wrist checklist - the Cuff Checklist. We looked in the protection kit, in the protection helmet, in the white bag up there. We looked - we pawed through all of the data card kits down in the wardroom and could not

350 00 48 32

CDR

1145

find the bracelet and have really run out of ideas as to where that thing might be so. If anybody down there might possibly know we'd appreciate finding out. 350 00 49 35 CDR CDR out.

TIME

SKIP

350 01 28 h8

SPT

SPT. It is 01:29. Information on the handheld photos. Mag CXI7; frame number i00, i01, and 102. First one, i00, was taken at 01:ii; next one, 01:12; and the next one at 01:13. They're all 16 on the f/stop ; lO0-millimeter lens ; 1/250. Okay, the first one was of phenomena I've seen quite often over the ocean where you have stable air. It looks very much like cloud rows, if you will. Just - It almost looks like cloud streets, except these are much more closely packed together. They go in very narrow - a line between them just to show that there actually is some - some division. They remindme very much just of an open plowed field. The distance between the lines separating each cloud is about - oh, I'd estimate on the order of a half mile. So that you can - over a large field, you could see very easily 100 to 200 wavelengths. I've noticed that over the ocean they fade quite a bit and they - wherever their stratus were, that you Just seem to find them embedded in there somewhere. This particular field was very uniform on both 101 and 100 and 102. There is one other particular feature on lO0 which put - prompted me to take it, but the subsequent photo which came up, I have - caused me to forget that particular feature. And I'm sure when I look at that picture again, I'll be able to recall it. 101 was taken of the same type of cloud only with a much larger wave pattern superimposed on it. The wave pattern here was maybe a factor of l0 to 20 larger than the sub - than the other one; that is, of the plowed clouds, I'll call them. The wave pattern was just a series of crest crests of troughs in the plowed clouds which in

350 Ol 30 31

SPT

350 01 31 30

SPT

llh6

_-_

some locations were perpendicular to the linear elements, and in some cases, at an angle to them. ... types of ... 350 01 32 02 SPT *** the same location I though was interesting, one superimposed on top of the other. The last photo I took was CX17, taken at Ol:13, frame n_,mher 103. It was f/ll, 100, 1/250. They were taken of an island wake to an island just to the south of New Zealand. I'm not sure exactly which one it was. But in the water there was a very pronounced bow wave, if you will. You could certainly see the direction of the water flow and the effect that the island had on it. It looked pretty much Just like a ship moving through water with sev - several bow waves moving off of it. I'm sure you could calculate the speed of the water flow very easily knowing the size of the wave and the velocity and the angle which we can get from the picture. 350 O1 33 08 CDR The angle was essentially - oh, maybe 6 degrees from the - a line running straight back or 30 from a line perpendicular to the flow. There was a couple of bow waves or wakes, if you will, pretty much emanating from the front part of the island and tending to run out and spread out slightly from one another as they moved further away from the island. Very small angle in between the two. There were no clouds in that particular area_ just a break in the clouds from the other I happened to be looking at. And there it was. I think it was an excellent illustration of a bow wave. I did see any vortices at all. 350 O1 3_ 03 SPT SPT out.

T llvL_SKIP

350 03 27 h8

SPT

SPT at 03:28 with the results of the four-limb coalignment. Day 350. Initiated at 02:55. Upper: H-ALPHA i, plus 1006; 82B, plus 1006; 55, plus i010. Lower limb: 82B, minus 94h; 55, minus 94_. The left limb: H-ALPHA i, minus 915; 82B, minus 917; 55, minus 922. The right limb:

___

ii47
82B, minus 1052; 55, minus 1051. The MIRROR POSITION: 1033. That's a change in the LEFT/ RIGHT - 1033. 350 03 29 03 SPT SPT out.

TIME

SKIP

350 04 30 41

CDR

This is the CDR at 04:30 Zulu, reporting Earth observations. The target was New Zealand, South Island. This particular pass we flew right up the west coast of New Zealand. The Sun angle was fairly high. I would estimate it was probably around 60 to 70 degrees. And the island itself, with the exception of a few scattered clouds at the southernmost end, was clear all the way. I'll be darned if I could see the fault lines that are - are shown on the map. I just - I Just can't see them. I see about one-third of the way north from the south end of the island. I see - I've mentioned this before - a very straight river that plunges right down out of the mountains and right down to the sea. And when it gets part way up the slope of the mountains, it makes a sharp turn to the north and then kind of meanders off. But on above the river is a long lake that's aligned with the river. And the straightness of the river and the fact that the lake is in the same direction makes me very suspicious of crossfaulting. I don't see any of the dunite that is mentioned in the - in the text. I did, however, finally see some evidence of a fault line once we got to North Island.

350 Oh 32 21

CDR

And it was right at the southern end of North Island. There's a little hook and a little bay, and coming up from that hook and bay is quite obviously a fault line. This is the westernmost of the two fault lines that are drawn in our our chart. I don't feel I can give you much more of an intelligent comment about it. The mountains are dark and there is lots of vegetation all over the island. The low - the lowland is well cultivated. From a geologic standpoint, it's very difficultfor me to pick out anythingthat really really grabs you. That's Just about all I can say.

350 0_ 32 39

CDR

llh8

350 Oh 33 09 350 Oh 3h 07

CDR CDR

CDR out. This is the CDR again, continuing on with the New Zealand discussion. The target is HHI07. I guess the reason why I couldn't see the dunite zones or anything like that is the fact that they're looking for the low Sun angle for the fault lines and the high Stun angle for the dunite zones. And I'm afraid I Just couldn't see the dunite zones at all. I took three photos with a Hasselblad i00. I couldn't resist that because this is probably the most cloud-free that I've ever seen New Zealand. The exposures I took are nnmher 10h through 106 on Charlie X-ray 17. And the f/stop was ii, and shutter speed was 1/250. CDR out.

350 Oh 3h 56

CDR

TIME SKIP

350 12 02 03

SPT

SPT at 12:02.

PRD readings:

42402, 23219,

38386.

--_

TIME

SKIP

350 12 59 09

SPT

SPT at 12:59. Subject: light flashes. These should go to Bob Parker in the Astronaut Office. Last night I was sleeping rather lightly and woke up around 08:_5. I was observing a whole chain of light flashes for around 2 or 3 minutes. They all appeared to be coming from the right-hand side as I lay on the bnnk, which, close as I can figure, is the plus-Z direction. Most all of them were long with two segments to them and ... appeared high energy. Skylab, Houston. We're A0S stateside for 13 minutes. And, Ed, if you ... - I'll pick this up later. SPT out.

350 12 59 56

CC

350 13 O0 01

SPT

TIME

SKIP

1149

350 13 37 15

CDR

This is the CDB at 13:37 Zulu with observations of the Falkland Current. This is for the Earth observations people. About l0 minutes ago, we had a pass which crossed the southern part of Argentina/Chile and paralleled the coast of South America in a northeasterly direction. Bill and I got a good look at the Falkland Current and the green, the light-green upwelling, the blooming that's associated with that. We again verified that the current is extremely straight along the coast along the eastern coast of Argentina. And today we noticed that the fork or the - the blending of of currents appears to be off - Let's see now, if I can give you the name of the inlet here - off the Golfo San Matias.

350 13 38 32

CDR

Stand by just a second; I'm going to get out that current chart and try to be a little more specific. Okay, this is the CDR again. Discussion again on the FAlkland Current. Bill and I have, I think, both been thinking that the current was stronger, was not Just a west-wind drift that we see here in our little chart of currents. But at any rate, this - this Falkland Current that is traveling from the south up to the north, it appears to me now - what I described yesterday Just north and west of the Falkland Islands must be sort of an eddy pattern in the lee, if you can call the downstream side of a water situation the lee side. The lee side of the island, from a current standpoint, must have caused the eddies there. Now as I stand here looking at the chart, example 4-1, we see that the Brazil Current and the Falkland Current come together off of Montevideo and head southeasterly. Today, it looks like that Joining of the currents has shifted south from Montevideo and the R_o de la Plata mouth - harbor there. It's shifted south to where it's more opposite the Golfo de San Matias. From the Golfo de San Matias on down to Golfo - Golfo San Jorge, the - the current is very, very straight as we have indicated before.

350 13 39 I0

CDR

350 13 40 53

CDR

We were sorely tempted today to take another picture of it, but we decided that - Well, for one thing it went by too fast, and then the other

i150

thing was that we decided we'd pretty well documented this current and the straightness photographically, already. But, again, at the point where these two currents Join together', and again this morning, it was off of Golfo de San Matias there is considerable mixing going on. And again I got the distinct impression that I saw the - the reddish, the bluish hint that you get when you see petroleum on the water. Now, I don't know whether this might be oil spills or something that are being caught by these currents and - and carried and the mixing of these currents has caused this - this slick or so, but I very definitely get the very faint pink red - you know, the - the iridescent look that you see when you see gasoline floating on water. 350 13 42 00 CDR But at any rate, the main point here is that the that the joining of these two currents apparently has shifted south from Montevideo several hundred miles. And it's - I'm wondering just how rapidly this shifting can occur, or whether that - we're all we're seeing is Just a manifestation of some some eddies that - that occur because of this the drifting of these two - the merging of these two currents and if these eddies could pop up plus or minus a couple of hundred miles from the - the area that's sketched in our current drawing here. 350 13 42 39 CDR At any rate, the - the blooming and the upwelling in the currents are extremly easy to see. This appears to be the easiest place that we have seen anywhere in the world to see where upwelling and or upblooming [sic] of - of the chlorophyll and all that and the pl_nkton and the green - the light green - this is the most prominent area right here. CDR out. Okay, this is the PLT. mark. Time is 14:02:30 on my

350 13 43 08 350 14 02 21

CDR PLT

350 14 02 30

PLT

MARK. Stand by. I have ROTATION, 215.0; I have TILT, 30; I have the timer set. I still do not have a reticle. I will do the best I can. I checked the timer yesterday battery and apparently that after changing the was the problem.

1151

Let's

see.

I wasted

one frame

of IR checking

it -

that is, mistakenly installed the film first.

I

figured I'd better go ahead and make sure the thing was working. And I hope it works today. Okay, I'm looking - I do have somewhat of a horizon. By the the way, a note for future design: This - Operation of this equipment is difficult because of the hardware - I guess just the design of it. It's all a bunch of little bits and pieces put together and it doesn't fit too well and the track drive is rough won't 350 lh 03 37 PLT and Jittery and a lot of other things go into right now. that I

But one of the things that really bothers you is that you have to remain in a crouch position in order to take these observations. This requires continual muscle tension in the abdomen. So what we've got here is a problem that not only is the hardware not - not optimally designed or - Actually, it's sort of poorly designed. I don't mean to be critical; I'm Just saying it doesn't work right. It doesn't work smoothly, it's not easy to see what's going on, this ring track is lousy But that'sbeside the point. It does requirean awful lot of muscle tension to hold yourself in position. We're coming up on time. Okay, you got 1 minute to go. Let me make sure I've got everything working here. Here's the ring. Tighten that just a little bit. There, that's good. All of a sudden I've lost everything. Okay, 15 seconds. Okay, there's the horizon. Stand by. Okay, 64.

350 lh 05 05

PLT

M_A/K<. There's the start of the first exposure. Also, because of the conditions you give us to work, I have to use a flashlight and there may be spurious light off of the window. Okay, I do not have a reticle, so it's difficult for me to track the horizon. Okay, completion of that one, except - Okay, I'm sorry. That was on 64 - 32, and you got a 32-second exposure. Okay, starting up at - second exposure at lh:07. They have to leave that off. This is their problem. You have to leave the timer off so you don't run the battery down. I had to select this in semidarkness, so I went to 32 instead of 6h. I have 6h set now and it'll give you a good one next time. Okay, I will do that at lh:07 right on the money. And that's 1 - h0 seconds from now. Let's see if I can do

1152

any better on your horizon. Also, I have to lose my eye - night adaption, you see, in order to make these changes. Everything is against the operator in this experiment. It's Just not optimally designed for a h_an to operate. Okay, coming up on 14:07. We'll Just - I'll try to get myself organized here and give you the best Job. Stand by 350 14 07 00 PLT MARK. Starting a 64-second in there that star exposure. Once again,

I got the horizon starting to lose

the best I can. Okay, on the view track [?].

Well, I just don't know how to get this thing in the right position. Ring track's on zero. Of course, the ring track is designed - It looks great when it's out laying flat on the table all by itself _,but when you put the hardware together, you conceal everything. Also, the marks are very poorly laid out. Just no intelligence at all given to the scheme of putting the marks on the ring. Okay, here we go. All right. Just a sorry Job all the way around as far as I can see as far as - if you wanted an operator to work it right. If you wanted him to screw it up, then it's great. Okay, 14:09 coming up in about 35 seconds. And let me check my horizon. And I'm just having an awful lot of trouble of it. 350 14 09 01 PLT getting the horizon in here. Stand by. 14:09 coming up. Here is part

MARK. I can't even find the dang button to start the timer. It' s black on black. There' s nothing here to help the operator. And, in fact, it looks like there's somebody who went out of their way to make it hard. And really can't be too critical of hardware like this, because if you really want good data, you ought to make it so an idiot could work it and then maybe we could do it. But I think I'm getting the data you want. There's the old horizon in there. That should be closing. Come on there. There we go. Okay, we got about a minute; let me check the focus here. There we go, looks good. Okay, we're standing by now for 14:11. Ah, I seem to be losing my night adaptation to - in order to get the ... Okay. Okay, let's see if we can't fire at ii, 13, 15. Okay, here we go.

350

14

ii

00

PLT

MABK; 14:11. Okay, 14:11, 32 seconds.

Starting another 64-second 13, 15, and then we change

one. to

1153

PLT

Okay, coming up. There we go. Okay. Fits right in there. 13 is next. I got about h5 seconds ; let me check. And I think that's the airglow. Well, I hope that's right. 13. Stand by MARK. Okay, starting another 6h. One more 64-second exposure. Stand by - Come on - there we go. Okay, now it's coming up on 15. We want one more 64-second exposure. Okay, I hope your angles are right. The trouble is that part of the view has blocked our sight. That's what's confusing me here, and I - I think I'm getting what you want. MARK. I was 5 seconds late on that one. Trying to make sure I had a view - the correct view there. Okay, now at 15 - 16 - at 18 you want a 30-second. 32. It looks to me like I'm getting - that's a very beautiful star field up there. Okay, now we're changing to 32, 32-second exposure starting at 18; 14:18. Okay, I've got a few minutes here. Let's see. 14:18. It's coming up on 14:17; let me check to make sure - the view in here. Nmmm, it changed. Oh, I'm off in my night adaptation. That' what it was. Okay, ROTATIONs changed. s ' Stand by -

350 14 13 00

PLT

350 14 15 07

PLT

350 lh 18 00

PLT

MARK. Starting a 32-second exposure. There's a city on the horizon. I can see it going over the horizon. Okay, there we go. Okay, that was one at 18. Now we want one at 20. Coming up at 20. 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30, 32. Okay, even minutes. Okay, I can get along without the flashlight now. Stand by -

350 14 20 00 350 lh 20 33

PLT PLT

MARK.

Okay,

the track

is ...

The only way I can keep this thing ... - Here we go. All right, I'm going to fiddle with ROTATION and see if I can get a little bit better picture here. Well, that's at the different part of the horizon; so I'll leave that and try the TILT. Okay, there was our problem. Our TILT was way off. Okay, maybe this will be all right, too. Okay, at 21, I got 1 more minute. Seems to me we're 90 degrees out of phase for using the tracking mechanism. And I've been trying my best to keep this thing on the horizon, and it looks like to me that the horizon

llS_

is oriented 90 degrees to the cr_%k track. Maybe I understand - incorrectly understand the operation of this. Stand by e

350 14 22 01

PLT

MARK. Oh, thunderstorm. Okay, stand by for 24. Okay, I guess we can add another comment that's sort of significant. good here, but - Probably too late to do any

CDR PLT

... manual. Yes, I do. And - However, I don't need it. I was

just looking at the pad here. Let me just make a - make sure here. When do you need it, Jer? CDR PLT In a while. Okay. Well, I - I looked at the pad here. I don't see any - 36 - 32-seconds. No, I don't see that I need it. Stand by just a second; let me get this one started. Okay. I'll tell you. Wait until this exposure is over and I won't touch the camera. Okay, I think that we're finally getting some decentpictures here .... The timer 's not working ...

CDR 350 l_ 24 13 PLT CDR PLT

The ti - the timer's working now. Oh, it is? Yes. It was the battery. I think these batteries are going down just setting in there in the case because we - the thing's switch was off. So I'm going to take the batteries out and tape them on the side of the timer. Okay. How's the reticle ...?

SPT PLT

Oh, the reticle is out to lunch. It's just not there. I changed the battery, too. ... Uh-huh. Okay, let's see if we can get a better Okay, there we go. Beautiful, right in the middle of the picture. Right across the middle. Okay, next one's at 26. It is now 25. i0 seconds. _-_

CDR PLT

PLT

1155

350 14 26 O0

PLT

MARK. 26; starting the 32-second exposure. Okay. These are much better than the first ones. Get the thing right across the middle of the frame, or at least the sight's there. The first ones there, I wasn't sure if I was on the edge or what - the horizon, that is. Okay. Next one is at 28. Check my ROTATION again. Hey, very good. We're doing we're doing great, just great. Beautiful. Okay, now it just takes training. If you don't have a simulator on something that requires this kind of action, it's Just - first couple of times it's a training session. That's just what it amounts to. I feel a lot better about these exposures. Those yesterday were terrible. But these in the first of this sequence aren't too good. 28's coming up here shortly. Yes. I guess we're getting them better. This last part - The last half of these ought to be excellent pictures. First half are terrible. Standby. MARK. 32-second one. Great, beautiful. Star right to the airglow and everything. Come on there. 1 - 2, 1 MARK. There it goes. Okay.

350 14 28 00

PLT

350 14 28 31 350 lh 28 42

PLT PLT

Okay, that was 28. Now you need another one at 30. Okay, I think that - probably could still get reasonable photographs. I'm going to try something else here. Okay. There we go. I - I Just noticed that I - I wasn't horizontal across the frame. It still had good - good airglow, but it's going to be - it was diagonal. And now I've got it rotated around. It's just not obvious, you know, when you're looking in here, because I don't have a reticle. The thing was changing. Now I'm Just line - just lining it up while I'm looking at the camera case.

350 l_ 29 39

PLT

Better watch my time here. Okay, coming upon 30. I guess in a couple more times, I ought to be pretty good at it. Standby MARK. Well, sorry about that, but, boy, I tell you. When you Just don't train on something like this - all you do is go and look at the hardware on a bench - why, first time through, it's just different - Or not different; it's Just foreign. Never done it before. Stand by -

350 14 30 00

PLT

i156

350 14 30 34

PLT

MARK. Okay. Everything's working great now. 32; I need two more exposures. Terminate at sunrise, i_:38. Okay. Get the window in, Karl's mirror stowed. Coming up on 32. I feel a lot better about these latter exposures than the earlier ones. Okay. Standby about i0 seconds. Standby. MARK. Okay. Termination. to go.

350 14 32 01 350 14 32 35

PLT PLT PLT

One more exposure

350 14 33 27

PLT

I'Ii tell you one thing that you did here that really helps. And that's to put everything on an even minute and space it like you did. Boy, I tell you, you can't - you can't overemphasize how much help that is. Like you started there, you would go on odd minutes there for a while; and then at the exposure-duration change - Make sure I don't screw everything up. Okay, got another I'm coming to in lO seconds here. I'll make my comment then. Stand by MARK. Starting last exposure. Anyway, it sure does help. Every little crutch like that helps because this is a fairly easy sequence to do here, because I don't have to change filters. But hav having the major events, the exposures, start occurring on an even minute like that, boy, I'm telling you, it really - it really makes it easy for you to catch everything and do everything properly. Okay. That's the end of the last exposure. I'm getting ready to secure. Okay. TILT, zero .... That's okay. Okay, locked. Air coming in. Come on .... Okay. Come on there. Locked. RECORD switch, OFF. Okay, this is the PLT; completion of S063. Camera used was Nikon 02, magazine IR14. The last exposure was number 26. The indicator - Perhaps it's 25 - the thing is not quite right; 25 or 26.

350 14 33 59

PLT

350 14 35 48 350 14 39 04

PLT PLT

I157

350

14

39

28

PLT

PLT

out.

Difficult

to

read

the

little

indicator.

350 14 hl 28

CDR

This is the CDR at 14:40 Zulu, debriefing the $233
camera operations this morning. The first frame

that was taken was snapped on time; however, the shutter closed again _mediately. I suspect that maybe I did not push the button hard enough on the remote cable. I verified the setting was bulb, and recocked the camera and started another exposure at 17:40 - 14:32:17. Got that exposure
complete and refocused and cocked the camera and

got the flare - correction, the comet-rise at 14:33:56. 350 lh 42 17 CDR And the third exposure was started at - let's see, it'd be 14 - 14:36:15, terminated at 14:37:15. And sunrise came 45 seconds later; that is, the Sun edge peeked over the horizon, the inner horizon, at that instant. For 30 seconds before the Sun
peeked over the horizon, the light coming through

the STS window number 3 was bright enough to read a wristwatch without any aid from the flo - phosphorescence of the dial or anything like that. So it lookslikeour exposures ow are finishing n well enough before sunrise. And your fi,rst exposure, of course, is getting the comet completely in - in the airglow. 350 14 43 21 CDR The comet today is very easily seen with the naked eye, and the tail itself can be seen with the
naked eye. Looking through the binoculars, the

comet from head to tail takes up three-quarters of the field of view of the binoculars. See, these binoculars are - I don't know if you heard all that ; the mike was kind of away from my mouth. I said the - the comet takes up the full - threequarters of the full field of view of the binoculars.
That is, I put the head of the comet on one edge

of the field of view, and the end of the tail, as far as I could see, was about three-quarters of the way across the diameter of the binoculars. I'm not sure that any other method of - of measuring the distance is valuable at all. I'm looking here to see if I can't figure out what the power is of these binoculars. I guess the best thing to do would be to get a set down there and Just check them out and see what the field of view is.

1158

350 lh 4h 38

CDR

At any rate, the comet is definitely getting brighter. I'm afraid that in another couple or 3 days, the comet is going to be hidden from view by a strut. We have a strut that is just parallel to the tail of the comet, and the comet gets closer to that strut every day. And I'm afraid in another 2 or 3 days that we're going to find that the comet rises and sets - essentially, rises and is lost in sunlight -while it's entirely behind that strut. And we'll Just keep you posted as we get closer and closer to the strut. CDR out. This is the PLT with further comment on S063 ops, AO - Alfa Oscar Papa. In reflection back over that, I think I really came up on a training curve on the experiment on this part - particular observational sequence. However, I still have _ couple of questions. First, to reassure anyone that's wondering, I did remove the battery from the timer and taped it to the cable. And I told Ed about it. So we will be removing the batteries from the timer each - at the end of each sequence to preserve the timer batteries. A question_ for the FIs, and that is this. The field of view we have through the sight is truncated by, I think, the SAL case, or the configuration of the S019 mirror. In other words, I assumed, perhaps improperly, that my field of view was truncated, but that the camera's was not. In other words, the camera was looking straight on to Karl's mirror, but I was not seeing all - I was not looking down the optical axis of the mirror, so I was seeing a truncated view.

350 14 45 19 350 14 46 _0

CDR PLT

350 14 47 52

PLT

What I tried to do - I assumed that my sight was getting a truncated view but the camera was getting the full view. So when I centered the airglow in my field of view - in the sight's field of view, I centered it in the circle, not the truncated portion of the field of view. So, in other words, the - I - part of the field of view was cut out because it wasn't seen - it was not looking at the mirror - it was looking on the edge of the mirror. And I would - I want to know if this is right, because if not, then I'm - I'm not centering the airglow in the camera's field of view.

ii 59

350 14 48 27

PLT

So, the question is this. Do I extrap - do I use what would be the full field of view in the sight? That is, if it were getting the - to look at the mirror fully, do I use that full circle for centering the airglow band, or do I use my truncated field of view, neglecting what would be the completion of the circle of the field of view of the sight? And I - I realize that I had not worded that quite well, but I think you understand the problem well enough, having used the - looked through the equipment, to understand what the question is. And do we - do we center the airglow in what would be the entire circle field of view of the sight if it were seeing a full field of view of the airglow horizon in the night sky?

350 14 49 17

PLT

PLT out.

TIME

SKIP

350 15 20 59

PLT

PL - PLT reporting on M092/93 run. CDR: Left calf is 13 inches even; right calf, 13-3/16. The - startat 15:05,and the legbandnumb IDs are Charlie Juliett and Alfa Quebec,'left and right, respectively.

TIME

SKIP

350 15 56 56

SPT

SPT at 15:28. Subject: light flashes. And this should go to Bob Parker over in the Astronaut Office. Okay, Bob, I got sidetracked in giving you the details on this last one. We had the ATM conference come up Just at that moment. I can go through it rather quickly again and finish it off. Okay, Last night, I was sleeping rather lightly - especially around 3:45 - and I saw a fair number of light flashes. These all came in from - well, in my eyes. I was Just laying there in the rack on my right side, which turns out to be the plus-Z direction; that is, they were all aligned in that direction along the Z axis, maybe plus or minus 20 degrees. And I thought I could detect that they were Just

i160

going in one direction. Certainly I could not see the speed at which particles move, but the illusion was that they were moving from right to left. Maybe it was the shape of the trajectory itself which gave that illusion. 350 15 58 20 SPT There were usually two parts to the trajectory, major parts, of a relatively thin line which branched out into a - a width of maybe 4 or 5 times the original line and then abruptly stopped; picked up with another thin trace and essentially did the same thing. That's Just a general impression; they're not all that way. This occurred at 3:h5. And I looked at the map when we got up, and it turns out that's exactly when We were in the South Atlantic anomaly, pretty much right in the heart of it. At 10:45, I saw - Excuse me. At 10:15, which is exactly 1 hour later, again in the South Atlantic anomaly, I did not see the same type of light flashes,• but I saw many more of them, at much lower energy in apperance; Just a lot of what looked like polliwog-shaped light flashes going off in random directions - large number of them lower intensity, smaller in scalel At one point at the earlier occurrence, I saw what appeared to be a green flash - which is the first time I have ever heard of it - a green light flash which was just as green as the RECORD light on one of these SIAs. The first and last one I've ever seen, but it was very definitely green. I've looked up the times at which flares have occurred this past night, and we've had a fair number of them in that time frame. The largest one did not occur until quite a hit later than that. According to NOAA Active region 00 produced energetic flares at 0h:25 Z of the one at C-3, 05:h6 Z of the subnormal C-7, 07:47 Zulu of the one normal M-l, and a large one at 11:08 Z - a surge, and it was an M-3. Whether there's any cause-and-effect relation or it's strictly fortuitous, I'm not about to guess. We did have the three flares - a C-3, a C-7, and an M-I - before those flashes were visible. I've not seen flashes for a long time now, and they all of a sudden appeared quite - quite vividly,

350 15 59 08

SPT

SPT 350 16 01 23 SPT

1161

so maybe there is some cause and effect there. But until we - until I understand that mechanism better, 350 16 02 35 350 16 19 23 SPT CDR SPT out. This is the CDR at 16:19. The subject is M093_ subject, CDR. Total work was 300 watt-minutes. CDR out. I'm not about to guess.

350 16 19 32

CDR

TIME

SKIP

350 16 49 12

PLT

And I also see a very small, what I think is an iceberg, directly below me. I'm trying to locate my position. Okay, PLT. I see numerous icebergs -sma]l icebergs. There must be, oh goodness, 50 to 100 of them. And the time is 16:49. Okay, it's the PLT. I Just took a Hasselblad frame of those icebergs. I've never seen that many together before in such a small space. And it was frame number 108 - Make that 107. PLT out. Okay, PLT. I've checked my map, and that position was approximately 40 degrees west longitude and about 48 degrees south latitude. And it's, oh, about several hundred miles to the east of Falkland Islands. PLT, reporting on frames 108, 109 - Hasselblad Charlie X-ray 17 - taken over Angola and southwest Africa, approaching the coast. There were three items of interest. First, there was - g - there was low Sun angle. There was some very interesting geology in Angola, and down north or - correction part of southwest Africa, there were some sand dunes. And there were also several massive thunderstorms. I took a - the pictures - well, because it seemed to be a reasonable combination of three items of interest.

PLT

PLT

350 16 50 27 350 16 53 18

PLT PLT

350 17 04 16

PLT

1162

350 17 04 53

PLT

PLT out.

TIME

SKIP

350 17 33 56 350 17 3h 00

PLT PLT

PLT, time is, on my mark

-

MARK. Time is 17:34. ROTATION is 136.8, TILT is 11.3. There is extended doors open. Waiting for 17:37:00 for POWER switch, ON. ... Okay, Ed. Thank you. Just thought of a design change for future pieces of equipment like this. It could avoid a little problem. And that would be a power-test light or switch - or switch and light. What we are doing, we had to change cables all around and so forth. When we get to the shuttle there's going to be a real shuffle if you change pieces of equipment around. And it's very easy to get a piece, to do all the hard work - like putting a piece of equipment into position and everything - and forgetting to hook up a power cable ... which is what happened a moment ago here. I Just happened to notice that the power cable had been left off. And which would be real nice on this - on these pieces of equipment in the future when we have big double shuffles taking place because of limited viewing time. It will be nice to have a switch and a power-test switch a light and a power-test light. Yes, go ahead, Ed.

SPT PLT

SPT 350 17 36 07 PLT

... Thank you. Say that again. A power-test switch and indicator, like a light or a talkback or something like that, so that in - early in the procedures you could have them hit that switch and see if the light lights or if the talkback goes gray or something like that. You know you'd had everything hooked up. Might incorporate it in your logic somehow, too, to know that - made sure that the equipment is operating properly, which is apparently a question that you had - It was a question that you had earlier. But that's Just

1163

a note for future design. Coming up on 37. Stand by; i0 seconds. Stand by - POWER switch, ON 350 17 37 00 350 17 37 02 PLT PLT MARK. RESET, START.

MAEK. And we got the flashing, and everything - yes. Okay, the stuff's moving in there. I hear the bloop or that hoot. Okay, waiting for 17:39:10.

PLT

And the - Going back to that suggestion on the the power-test switch, that could be a pushbutton a place that you have the indicator aud the switch located on just one element. You'd push the button to make sure that you had everything hooked up right in there - maybe an end-to-end check on your - on power and logic. Okay, coming up on 39 shortly. And now 38:30 on my mark. MARK. Coming MARK. Okay, 39:10, electrical POWER switch, OFF.

350 17 38 30

PLT PLT

up on 39. 39.

Stand by on my mark. for 39:10,. 39:10

Okay on my mark.

350 17 39 00 340 17 39 i0

PLT PLT

Waiting

MARK. POWER switch, OFF. Now, let's go for ROTATION 203.1. They're not doing . .. Can't see those numbers. 203.1 is locked. TILT of 24.9 and locked. And I'm looking for 17:h0 - excuse me, for h0:30. Coming up on h0 now. Check it once more with the flashlight. Man, it's hard to see that one digit. Yes, 203.1, 24.9. We Just passed 40. Waiting for h0.30. 40.30, POWER switch, ON; - 340 31, RESET switch to START. Stand by on m_ mark; 4 - h0:30. POWER SWITCH on the mark. MARK. moving START. film. Okay. Here we go. Okay, we're Okay, we're waiting for 46:56. the RECORDER, OFF.

350 17 40 30

PLT

350 17 hl 41 350 17 42 04

PLT SPT

I'm going

to turn

SPT at 16:42 - 17:42, ATM pass which began at 16:15. JOP 50, step 4, building block 39, went off as scheduled. The only thing I did not do is truncate exactly at i0 MINUTES REMAINING because I wanted to make sure we got enough of our GRATING, AUTO SCANs in for 55 and as long

1164

as possible on that exposure for 82B, on their last exposure, got 14 minutes and 30 seconds. And 55 got over three GRATING, AUTO SCANs. That last part, I'm not sure exactly how much or - STARTED off the orbit with a shopping list item 1 at Sun center to get a look at the corona. Then I've gone to the active region. I rolled so that the slit was tangent to the limb and looked at oxygen Vl on the detector, mode UP and DOWN, until I got a maximum, LEFT/RIGHT, and that was about the 20,000 on the INTENSITY COUNT. The slit there was still tangent to the limb. I had moved out to the limb and performed the building block as specified; so we were right above the hottest part in the active region. PLT SPT PLT Say, Ed? Ed, do you read?

Yes, what ? Hey, I got to have the recorder at about 46; so if you could open - or discontinue for Just a moment there, I can get the last exposure's con_nent s on. Okay. before Great. If you want it at 46, I can finish up then. That ' be fine. d

SPT

PLT 350 16 44 h5 SPT

Okay, during the first 82B exposures, we had a surge on the limb which was right at the location of the slit; so I suspect that you were looking at surge at that moment. It was not a very large surge but certainly effectual, maybe, oh a quarter of an arc minute or so to a third of an arc minute off the limb. It lasted for about 5 minutes and then died away. The active region brightened up at that time, also, however, we did not get an increase. We couldn't get an increase in PMEC or APERTURE - or no aperture ch - position changes on

56.
350 17 45 30 350 17 h5 38 SPT PLT SPT out. Okay; PLT. Completion of S201, ... comet. up on 17:46 now. Stand by on my mark. MARK. 17:46. Okay, waiting for 17:46:56. Coming

350 17 h6 O0

PLT

i16}

FLT

Okay, stand by on my mark, to START, followed by POW_

17:46:36, RESET switch switch, OFF. Stand

by350 17 46 56 PLT MARK. And OFF. Okay, let's see. We want TILT to zero first. And ROTATION to zero. And both of them are locked. Okay, here we are now. Retract .... before I close the door. Okay, terminating recording of S201. PLT out.

350 17 47 54

PLT

TIME

SKIP

350 20 18 01

CDR

_

This is the CDR at 20:18 Zulu, debriefing the ATM pass that started at 19:24 Zulu. It started out with a J0P 26, building block 10, at LIMB OFFSETs of minus 2, 02, and 4 and ended up with a J0P 6, step 2. On the building block 10's, I had no great problem with that. I started up I found the - the GRATING RE_a_ENCE switch in OPTICS and the GRATING sitting at zero. And I looked back, and - and Ed had been doin_ some limb work. And so I took the 000 that I had. I put the GRATING in MECHANICAL and figured that what I would do would be subtract 102 from every reading and that would be the right GRATING POSITION. And let's see. Did I do that right? Yes. So the first grating - the first MIRROR, AUTO RASTER, at the step of - off - LIMB OFFSET of minus 2, was done with a GRATING reading zero. But I had it in MECHANICAL, and I knew it was supposed to be reading 102.

350 20 19 31

CDR

And then the next - the next one, at an OFFSET of zero, I had at a GRATING of 10h2. And then I got ahead of schedule. I also got to feeling uneasy about the grating, and I said, "Well, I've got the time; so I'm going to resync the GRATING around the MECHANICAL REFERENCE and make sure I'm not messing things up." So for the third building block 10, at an OFFSET of plus 2, I had gone ahead and synced it - run it clear to the end in MECHANICAL REF and then up to 1761. I'm pretty sure the data's good. But I Just had that uneasy feeling, and I had a little time to spare; so I decided to go ahead and do it.

i166

350 20 20 l0

CDR

The last building block l0 was no problem. That was a LIMB OFFSET of 4. All the time I was doing these, I was carrying the XUV in the other monitor and watching region O0 for brightening. We went into the South Atlantic anomaly at - Oh, golly, I think it was about 50 or thereabouts. Good old PMEC went galloping up. Master flare alarm went off; so I turned it OFF. But I continued monitoring XUV because I figured that was my best possible hint between that brightening and H-alpha 1. I started JOP number 6, step 2, building block 2 and about 4 minutes into the JOP I noticed a bright spot appear on XUV very suddenly. I looked at H-alpha, ahd H-alpha was brightening very suddenly right in the middle of - of active region 00. And I looked up just in time to see the BERYLLIUM APERTURE POSITION drop from 4 to 3. The PHOTOMULTIPLIER, PMEC, has been clanking around between 500 and 700 all through the South Atlantic anomaly. And I did not have the master flode MASTER FLARE MODE on; so I just can't tell you at all what the EXPOSURE COUNT was. I don't know how much of the PMEC was South Atlantic anomaly and how much of it was the flare. I looked at the flare cue card. We were set up for a slew to flare; so I hightailed it off in that direction. I bungled in that I did not get 54 going, nor 82A. And the reason why is 54 was running in 256. Now it says at the beginning of this activity period to configure 54 for SL-31. But down here in JOP 6, step 2, there is no mention of omitting 54, so I had the doggone thing set up in SINGLE, 256 instead of HIGH, 64. So I figured, at that time, I'd already had it anyway; so I might as well slew to the flare. Stand by. Okay, I'll continue on. Air-to-ground started talking and then quit. I went ahead and slewed to the flare, and I m_naged to bungle that too be slewing to in in H-alpha 2 instead of H-alpha 1. And the MAR was in the line 25 when I got there, and I had already started - switched over 56 - correction - 54 to HIGH, 64 and started 82A. And I decided - Well, the worst - best thing I can do now is leave it where it is, and luckily, we're in line 25 for the flare for S055. So all

350 20 21 ll

CDR

CDR

350 20 22 43

CDR

1167

in

all_

I kind

of

bungled

it.

On

the

other

hand

-

Stand 350 20 25 05 CDR

by.

Okay, this is the CDR again, getting back to my debriefing on the flare. Essentially what happened and I'll review it very briefly - and that is that I did not fire up 54 and 82. And the reason I didn't fire those - fire 54 was a good reason, because it wasn't set up properly. And I thought - since I only had 8 minutes left - the best thing I could do would be to slew to the flare quickly, and I bungled that by slewing to it with H-alpha 2. Partially recovered because $055 was on line 25. I got 82A going, 56 going, and 54 late. And it had already - the flare had already started pooping out by then. We got out of the South Atlantic anomaly, and the PMEC was starting to fall fast. And we were down below the flare threshold in no time at all. The whole thing was very quick.

350 20 26 13

CDR

It might have been a - sort of a preflare sort of thing; I don't know. About l0 minutes before the flare went off, I noticed around O0 a brightening in H-alpha i. This - this occurred during the last building block 10, up from the sunspot that's there in 00 at the - about the 2 o'clock position from the sunspot. And I think it was probably about l0 arc seconds - l0 or 12 arc seconds long and about 4 arc seconds wide. A - The area brightened up and became the same - same brightness as the plage that's to the south and east of the sunspot - the bright plage that really makes up active region 00.

350 20 27 ll

CDR

That, mainly, was what prompted me to continue watching kq/V while I was trying to do JOP 6, because I saw that bright area increase in brightness in H-alpha 1 but saw nothing in XUV. So that's a little bit of preamble information that got me looking at the XUV. I was awfully surprised to see how fast the flare went up and how fast it died out. And, of course, the whole thing was was fogged by the PMEC. We were still in the South Atlantic anomaly. I'm trying to think. I guess probably what I should have done was gone ahead and stayed Sun center and fired up all of the - the experiment

350 20 27 55

CDR

1168

first, before I moved. Even though 54 was - was configured wrong, I should of Just stayed there and configured it and then moved off to locate the flare. I think if I'd taken it a little more slowly, I would have gone with the right H-alpha, too. But things were happening so fast that I and there was so little time left, I felt obligated to slew and ended up pointing the wrong doggone H-alpha at the flare. 350 20 28 37 This is CDR out.

TIME

SKIP

350 22 ii 28

CDR

This is the CDR at 22:11 Zulu with S019 operations. The first exposure will start at 22.160 The SAL
is OPEN. The mirror is EXTENDED. I have a

ROTATION set in of 44.6, a TILT of 10.2, for star field number 004, and this exposure will be 180-degree, widened. 350 22 12 52 CDE All right, the nu Z is - I don't see a nu z called there is no nu Z

out in the pad.

Okay, apparently

update desired. Okay, the brightest star in the field - All right, I'm reverifying a TILT of 44,6 - a ROTATION of 4h,6, a TILT of 10.0, and there is no single star that stands out as being considerably brighter than all the rest. And I would have expected Betelgeuse to be considerably brighter, I had one star at the edge of the field of view at 3 o'clock, and it Just rotated Just passed from view. The maneuver is still going on; that's our problem. 350 22 14 30 CDR SPT How much ... longer on the maneuver, Ed?

CDR

Okay, and say again the nu Z . it down. Minus 3.8. Okay, thanks.

I forgot to _-rite

SPT CDR

CDR CDR

The nu z from _he ATNIDC is minus Okay, yet. here we are. We're

3.8. at the attitude

not even

350 22 15 20

CDR

And we're up on - we're coming up on 16. We're • 30 seconds away. I Just don't have time to make a - a TILT and ROTATION correction. I'm in the SLIDE RETRACT position now. I'm going to start this exposure on time, with no correction in TILT and ROTATION. Coming up on 22:16. Stand by MARK it. The first exposure is number 21, frame number 21.

350 22 16 00

CDR CDR CDR SPT CDR CDR

Are we damped out, Ed? ... Okay. They sure cut it close this time. I'm afraid we

Okay, the rates are damped out.

Just cut that maneuvermuch too close. Now this exposure is 180 seconds, unwidened. We have about - almost 40 seconds complete on it so far. 1 second gone - correction, 1 minute gone. I Just don't recognize Betelgeuse in the - in the stars here. There is one fairly bright star down at It's about 7 o'clock, looking at the clock, and it's out - Okay, it's in the - it's in the corner, is where it is, of your reticle - the lower left corner of the square. 350 22 18 07 CDR 2 minutes and 5 seconds are gone. But I'll tell you, I'm just not positive that's Betelgeuse because my impression of Betelgeuse is it's much brighter than that. And I don't see enough of the other stars here to be able to recognize Betelgeuse. I know Betelgeuse is in - right near Orion, but I don't see enough of the star field to positively identify Betelgeuse. We have 2 minutes and 38 seconds now. Okay, coming up on a 18 - 180 seconds. MARK. Stand by -

CDR

CDR 350 22 19 00 CDR

1170

CDR

The exposure is completed. Going to a ROTATION of 204.2. That's set. Going to a TILT of 22.8. 204.2, ROTATION. 22.8. All right, the exposure start time is 22:20:09. It is now 22:20 even, at my mark.

350 22 20 O0

CDR

MARK. 9 seconds to go. up through the airglow.

Looks like we're Stand by -

coming

350 22 20 l0

CDR

MARK. The SHUTTER is OPEN. We're looking at frame 22. Reverifying 20h.2 and 22.8. Okay, I have the comet in sight and it looks like it's placed properly. Negative. It' s placed halfway between the center vertical reticle and the left-hand vertical reticle. And I can't quite read the hatch marks. There's l, 2, 3-1/2 hatch marks out. Almost in the exact center between the two verticals on the left. 1 minute has gone by. Oh, Lord. This is supposed to be widened. Okay, I can't do anything now but leave it unwidened and give you a 270, unwidened. We're coming up on 22:23. ... Okay, I'll be finished. Okay, we're coming up on 22:2h. The sky is beginning to lighten up. I'm going to terminate it 5 seconds early.

350 22 22 53

CDR SPT CDR

350 22 23 52 350 22 23 55

CDR CDR

MARK. Am closing the FILM HATCH, and the FILM HATCH was closed 2 seconds before sunrise. We're now in STOWAGE. Frame 22 was Kohoutek. And I'm sorry about that - not widening that doggone thing. I Just got too busy looking, to check the crosshairs for you. Okay, I'm going to set the ROTATION and TILT to zero and get the mirror in. Through with the recorder, yet? Yes, I 'm through. Okay, this is the CDR terminating on SO19. CDR out. the recordings

SPT CDR 350 22 25 l0 CDR

TIME

SKIP

i171

350 23 02 15

SPT

SPT ... pass which began at 20:57....
of solar winds. straightforward.

operations

It all went - all went fairly I got about seven sequences

of SINGLE FRAME, FILTER 2 or FILTER h for 56, and the other exposures as called out for. Right at the very tail end of 54 and as I was powering down to do the maneuver away from solar inertial, we got ourselves that M-flare, and I had no alternative because we were running out of daytime. We had about 5 minutes left in day, and we had the maneuver coming up. I had about 2 or 3 minutes for the maneuver. If I had known it was the M-flare, I might have dallied a little bit longer and tried to get something. But then I couldn't get anywhere near complete data on it; so I did not pursue it. Fortunately, that whole orbit for flares, around hO minutes too late. this about spend flare block _350 23 04 25 SPT state, then I think I was spring loaded but it just came When the Sun is in really are serious

if we

getting a rise a considerable rise or 24 with

from a flare, we ought to amount of time either in a

a building block 24 or a building a couple of other experiment in there. If 82A

operations

thrown

Certainly know the name of the game, though. you get the X-ray instrument going and the -

going as fast as we possibly can - and I think that, we can - can do rather quickly if we're spring loaded for doing it - I think we could be running

some operations centered on the flare, reeentered on active region 00, with - certainly S054 in the
FLARE it's turn MODE very them ready to go. 56 can be running, but easy to switch then to PARTOL, SHORT; around. Have 82A set up the way I had

this past orbit - that's PARTOL, SHORT. Have 15 seconds set up on the EVENT TIMER; then ENABLE. And 55, set up with a - in some sort of a mirror mode - MIRROR, AUTO RASTER/MIRROR, LINE SCAN so that they're in reasonable GRATING POSITION. 350 23 05 43 SPT And maybe XUV SLIT doing something of sort of a patrol - or nothing at all, desire - on the flare. The time we'd stand a very that was the SPT But I think alert - And good chance of getting announced intent. a - some if you have, we'd if

a rise,

as soon as we got ourselves a - a flare I've been tolerating the PMEC moving

1172

the tolerances of the anomaly

up and down as it goes in and out and watching a brilliant APERTURE.

It was pumped up 3 on that last run at the very start. We watched that in H-alpha, which, surprisingly enough, it showed up quite well. And also, the XUV MON, which - This last one I pushed was - had Just taken and put the XUV MON away the - not the monitor but the persistent image scope; so I could not verify that we really did get point brightening immediately. 350 23 06 53 SPT But I think if we - ... all those displays - we have the experiments in the modes which are going to _ke them amenable to a rapid turn - on in the FLARE MODE, I think we got a good chance for it. SPT out. This is now PLT, debriefing the ATM pass started at 22:_3, approximately. Nu Z update performed as

350 23 07 09 350 23 20 02

SPT PLT

scheduled. Did J0P 19, step l, building block 35 substituting for 3_. Everything went reasonably well. I misunderstood one line - Truncate at 2-TR at the bottom. I thought it meant two rasters. I only give 55 two RASTERs and two GRATING POSITIONs. I don't know what that means, but I'm pretty sure did not apply to 55. Next time I wonlt do that. Everything else was performed. I got the 1-minute exposure - WAVE, LONG, 82A; 52, NODE,CONTINUOUS. No problem. I did - I think - three sequences of 54, and I got a total of 20 exposures, 56 - 5 through 6 in - No, not 20; ll - six SINGLE FRAME 2, LONG and five SINGLE _ 4, LONG. I watched the 99, the active region that popped on the last orbit, and in - in fact, it sort of died down. The activity is less now than it was when I first came on console, and it is just not as near as bright in XUV. In fact, it's disappeared from the persistence image scope now, though it still shows up in H-alpha 2. 350 23 21 25 PLT PLT out.

-.

###

DAY

351

(AM)

1173

351

O0

23

53

SPT

SPT at O0:e3. drought area Carpentaria.

Handheld photos 153 and 146-13 in Australia, a ... at Gulf of

the

351

00 2h

48

SPT

The one thing I certainly was looking for is this in the ob - these observations was any water or any vegetation. And was fairly open sky, maybe lO to 20 percent cloud cover. There was only one location where I saw any vegetation and that was right by the mouth of the river by Darwin. ran up the - up back past the mouth of the up the - on either side of the river bank. would that, estimate I could up to, say, see no signs It river I

Pine Creek. Other than of vegetation. The land -

looked pretty barren. In some spots, it was Just plain open rock. Looked as though it had been wind wind eroded a fair amount. I could see no - no small lakes. It was certainly a rather sight, knowing how much they are really of water in that location. 351 00 26 21 SPT depressing in need

I did get a photograph of the - one particular area where the - where I did mention previously - where I did see some vegetation and also a couple of shots a little further inland as we passed over. Numbers on those are CXl7, frame nl,mbers llO to ll2. Okay, moving on to another area of weather, open cells, closed cells, the B4nard type, and waves. I saw a good illustration of these all in one location around over the ocean. These frame numbers ll3 to ll5. were taken on CXl7,

351

00

27

19

SPT

The B4nard cells, well, were on my right; open, fairly classical pattern of them. And they - as I scanned further to the left, they tended to be more lined up in a linear fashion so that their their sides all tend to come together in a wave moving east/west - white line east/west. That is, they were not hexagonally shaped, if you will, or or fitted among one another, but gack - stacked up right beside one another so that they're - the further - furthermost end, closest side to me, formed a linear line of clouds. As we moved further to the left, we gradually moved into an area of closed B4nard cells, very classical again. I thought that the combination of the two in what appeared was kind to be essentially of interesting. a uniform weather system

1174

351 00 28 37

SPT

The waves which cells also were mucher

existed evident

over the open B6nard to a small - to a

[sic] degree

over in the closed.

351 00 28 46 351 00 29 01

SPT SPT

SPT out. Oh, SPT back in again. I should add to thatthis last observation of the weather that for, I'd say, a period of 500 miles or so - that these types of clouds existed open, closed, and to some degree, some stacking up of them in the manner I just described. Oh, I think what I - photo I got was probably - The photos I got were probably the best illustrations in the area. SPT out.

351 00 29 28

SPT

TIME

SKIP

351 02 55 39

CC

For the SPT or the PLT, I've got a question like to ask you about ILCA. Go ahead, Crip. Go, Crip.

I'd

PLT SPT 351 02 56 01 CC

Okay, one of the things that we've been pondering is on day 347, about h days ago, we noticed - Okay, this is the CDR on SO19. It's 03:56 [sic] right now. We're in our positions. I believe I have Aldebaran in sight. It's very close to being in the proper position. It is, at the moment - - - about 39 degrees. possibly ... - And we were wondering if

351 02 56 03

CDR

CC

CDR

On the reticle it is about two marks up, and about five marks to the left. I'm now going to put it, I hope, on the left margin. Okay, Ed, that makes - eases the EGIL's mind to know why his temperatures weren't what he anticipated. And did - did it - they cleared

CC

1175 up last night when you cycled that circuit breaker and that you did not have to turn off switches. SPT 351 02 57 lh CDR CC ... Okay, the corrected angles are 27.7 ROTATION -

you did not have to turn the power switches off to do that. - - and 22.8, TILT. ... Now I'm going to the TILT and ROTATION for Spica.

CDR CC CDR CC

Okay, very good. We're i minute from LOS. We'll see you again at Tananarive in about 17 minutes and - 164.1 and 20.4. - - ... And for - just as a reminder, for the CDR, we've got the VfR to dump it, so it's not available to you. All right. Spica's way over to the right. That's ab - RIGHT, 6; and DOWN, i. I'll try to work it back over to where it belongs. All right. There's Spica. And Spica's at 166.9 and 18.4. A]] right, I'm now going to the ROTATION and TILT values for Kohoutek, which are 202.5 in ROTATION - and in TILT, 22.8. All right, let's verify that again. It's 204.5 and 22.8. Watching for Kohoutek. Got 20 seconds until rise. We're coming through the airglow nov, I believe. This one will be a 270, widened, if I can ever find Kohoutek. As yet, I do not have it in sight. There it is. It's - it's on the left line, but it's - it was out'about 6 points. Okay, it's where it belongs now. start the exposure. Stand by I'm going to

CDR CC

351 02 58 04

CDR

351 02 58 28

CDR

CDR

CDR

1176

351 03 00 35

CDR

MARK. Starting a 270, widened, and I started it about 30 seconds late. We're looking at counter frame number 23. I Just checked and the FILM HATCH is indeed OPEN. The corrected values for ROTATION and TILT are 204.8 and 21.8. Okay, and I'm prepared to stop this rascal early.

CDR 351 03 01 5h 351 03 02 00 351 03 02 50 CDR CDR CDR SPT CDR 351 03 03 00 CDR CDR

hO percent has gone by and it's now 04:02 [sic]. MARK. Coming up on 03 now - 03:03. ..., Jer. Okay MARK. At 03:03 we had 72 percent. Stand by -

Okay, Kohoutek is about 1/2 mark up from the 9 o'clock position, and it's on the left-hand ..., Jer. Okay, we have - we have at mark, 20 seconds to go. It's 90 percent now. I'm going to close the shutterat - with about 2 secondsto go. Well, the sky is starting to light up already. I'm going to CLOSE the SUTTER now. Okay. And the FILM HATCH is closed. 03:04. Okay, Bill, no sweat.

- -

SPT CDR

351 03 Oh O0

CDR

It is now

CDR

' 351 03 04 42 351 03 05 09 CDR CDR

Okay, we had about 97 or 98 percent of the widened exposure completed then. The FILM HATCH is closed. We're in the CARRIAGE RETRACT position. I'll put it in STOWAGE. We're looking, right now, at frame number 23; that was the Kohoutek frame. Ed, you can turn on the lights down there if you want to, if you need them. Here comes the Sun. I'd better get the mirror in. TILT coming out, and ROTATION coming out. Okay, TILT and ROTATION are out. retract the mirror now. I'm going to CLOSE the SAL door. I'm going to

351 03 05 26

CDR

1177 F351 03 05 43 CDR Okay, this is the CDR recapping again. For Kohoutek, the pointing I found to be 20h.8 and 21.8, that 's ROTATION and TILT. For Aldebaran, I found the ROTATION to be 277.7 and 22.8. And for Spica, 351 03 06 15 CDR I found 166.9 and 18.h.

Okay. This is the CDR terminating data on the S019. SPT at 03:10. Handheld photo CXlT, frame number 116 was of an island wake taken at 00:30. Again, I saw a bow wave as though from a ship, although it was not the same as previously. The the wave pattern itself was not anywhere near as extensive, and it was repeated along the axis several times back with the waves being parallel to one another, and as though there was a second and third and fourth and fifth sources back there; although I know that not to be true. One side was more pronounced than the other. And in general, the - it looked as though the clouds - air mass was a little more unstable than the last one which I discussed, which I believe that it was yesterday. I found no evidence of yon Karmon vortices in thewave effect. SPT out.

351 03 I0 28

SPT

351 03 ii 45
J

SPT

TIME

SKIP

351 Oh 47 hO

CDR

This is the CDR at 0h:h7 Zulu reporting on $233. Missed the 01:25 observation because of the medical conference and we did not get an opportunity to take our 233 pictures during the S019 maneuver or during the time S019 was going on. So I elected to wait until the next normal comet-rise on the night cycle. I took the first frame, 60-second frame, focused at 15 feet at 0h:32:50. At 0h:3h:08, I started the 2-minute frame, focused at infinity. I would estimate that it was probably 20 seconds after comet-rise - 20 to 30 seconds. The first frame I initiated at 32:50 and at - I initiated it the instant I could recognize the - the comet in the Earth atmosphere. As soon as I recognized it, I hit that frame and then, as I said before, the 2-minute frame was activated at 34:08. And I decided not to do the third frame because it was

1178

obvious there was not 60 seconds of darkness left ; was already getting quite light at that time. So I terminated with two frames, and the total frames taken for the day were six. Four this morning - the first frame, I think I explained before, the shutter closed as soon as it opened, and I think it was because I did not press the mechanism hard enough. Frames 2, 3, and 4 Actually, the first frame was frame number zero in the camera. Frames l, 2, and 3, were this morning's 233. Frames 4 and 5 were tonight's exercise. So we start tomorrow - tomorrow morning with frame number 6. 351 04 49 52 351 04 53 09 CDR CDR CDR out. This is the CDR at 04:53 Zulu. Subject is handheld photography or Earth observations. The site requested was the Gal_pagos Islands. The time was 00:58 Zulu. Unfortunately, Earth observations was upstaged by solar observations. That was about the time we were getting our first good look at a solar flare. And so we did not get a chance to take a look at the Gal_pagos Islands at night to see if any of the volcanic activity could be seen. 351 04 53 48 351 Oh 54 13 CDR PLT CDR out.
l

PLT at 04:54 Zulu, reporting the initiation of squeezer bag dump back at 04:45. This is the CDR at 05:03 Zulu with the results of limb volume measurements and body measurements. PLT - this is mission day 31, day of the year 350: Limb volume - left arm, 17.2, 16.7, 17.8, 18.8,

351 05 03 53

CDR

20.7, 22.8, 24.5, 25.5, 26.2, 26.3, 25.8, 24.5,
24.7, 26.0, 26.4, 26.9, 27.7, 28.1, 29.6; right arm, 17.6, 16.6, 16.8, 18.0, i -20.1, 22.9, 25.5, 26.6, 27.8, 28.0, 27.5, 26.8, 26.0, 26.8, 26.9, 27.4, 28.26, 29.0, 29.5. That's 19 positions on each arm. Left leg, 25 positions: 20.2, 20.2, 21.2, 23.3, 25.5, 27.9, 29.9, 32.6, 34.0, 33.1, 31.0, 31.3, 32.6, 35.0, 34.6, 34.3, 37.5, 38.6, 42.2, 45.7, 46.8, 48.5, 49.8, 4 - 5o.7, 5o.4; right leg, 21.6, 20.2, 20.4, 22.5, 24.6, 27.6, 29.4, 31.1, 35 - correction, 33.5, that was number 9; number l0 is 33.5, 33.0 31.2, 32.5 34.5, 34.2, 33.7, 36.2, 38.1, 42.8, 45.1, 47.1,

47.9, chest hips, 351 05 06 36 CDR

48.6, 49.9, 50.0. Neck measurements, 35.3; inspired, 97.0; expired, 92.5; waist, 71.0; 81.9 ; center of mass, 22.9 centimeters.

Next subject is the CDR, mission day 31: Limb volume - left arm, 16.1, 15.7, 17.1, 18.5, 20.7, 22.4, 24.3, 25.4, 25.6, 25.6, 25.6, 24.0, 24.3,

25.8, 26.0, 26.6, 27.0, 27.0, 28.5.

That's

19 positions. Now the right arm, 17.8, 16.6, 17.0, 18.4, 21.5, 22.6, 24.5, 25.5, 26.4, 26.8, 26.5, 25.0, 24.5, 25.8, 26.9, 27.5, 27.7, 27.3, 29.4. That's 19 positions. Now we go to the legs with 25 positions each. Left leg, 20.4, 19.8, 20.5, 22.3, 24.1, 26.3, 28.2, 31.8, 32.4, 31.7, 30.2, 30.6, 31.6, 33.4, 34.1, 33.8, 34.8, 36.8, 40.2, 42.0, 44.8, 47.2, 48.9, 50.6, 51.0; right leg, 21.2, 20.0, 20.4, 21.8, 23.9, 25.7, 29.5, 32.0, 33.8, 32.5, 31.4, 30.7, 32.0, 34.2, 34.8, 34.6, 35.0, 36.2, 39.4, 41.2, 44.3, 47.5, 50.0, 51.2, 52.0. Neck, 37.5 - correct that, 37.5; chest inspired, 101.2; expired, 94.0; waist, 79.6; hips, 87.5; center of mass, 22.9. 351 05 08 42 CDR The SPT, there were no measurements taken on him today. There was not enough time allowed in the schedule. And we suggest that it be rescheduled. CDR out. This is the CDR with an addendum to the previous report on leg volumes. The IR photos were taken. The e.g. mass - or the center masses were taken. And the SPT will report that with his measurements of limb volume. And the stereophotos were taken. CDR out.

351 05 08 58

CDR

351 05 09 18

CDR

TIME

SKIP

351 14 29 56

SPT

This is the SPT at 14:30. 23227, 38298. Out.

PRD readings:

42411,

351 14 30 06

SPT

TIME

SKIP

II8G

351 15 05 14

SPT

SPT at 15:06. M071. The blue dyemarkers were taken on mission day 32, rather than day 31. SPT out.

351 15 05 26

SPT

TIME

SKIP

351 15 32 51

CDR

Okay, this is the CDR at 15:33 Zulu debriefing the $233 pass this morning. The first exposure was taken at 15:25 on time, for 60 seconds and 15-foot focus. The second exposure was taken at 26:19 with a 120-second exposure, with an infinite focus. And the third one was taken immediately after that. These were frames 7, 8, 9, and lO - I guess they would be. We've shot six frames yesterday and three frames this morning. Looks to me like maybe the next day or so the comet is going to be occulted by the strut that's out in the area there, and after about tomorrow we'll be unable to take any pictures. It'sgetting veryclose. CDR out.

351 15 33 31

CDR

351 15 33 _7

CDR

TIME

SKIP

351 16 55 30

PLT

Okay, this is the PLT. mark.

Time is 16:55:40 on my

351 16 55 41

PLT

MARK. And I'm waiting for 16:59:10. I have ROTATION, 201.5 and TILT of 23.1. I have filter A-1 in position now. I'm trying to see the comet. We're there now. Okay. Okay, we're in position and I don't see a darn thing in here. I never have seen anything in here. All I can see is a fuzzy white blob. Maybe that's it. Take the filter all the way on. See if that fixes it. Okay now, this did not have focus. So that's not the problem. I've got the mirror down, I checked that. Flat no way you can tell it until you get there. Well, really kidding yourself, I guess. I'm Just going to take them on time.Okay.

SPT PLT

_-_

1181

SPT PLT

... No. No, that's okay. Coming up on 58. I can't figure this out. When I first looked in there, it seemed all right. Okay there's nothing - no circle to use. Well, it looks hopeless as far as trying to center the nucleus. Next 58. Well, I'm going to - too late now. Screw up m_ exposures trying to diddle with the ROTATION and TILT. Okay, ROTATION is 201.5 TILT is 23.1. 30 seconds starting at 16:59:10. Well, now, I don't have much confidence this camera is going to work right, but we'll give it a go. Okay, ... filter and standing by. Gosh darn. Okay, there we go. Standing by for 59:40. Have MARK. Okay on filter A-1. at zero, 3 seconds starting Okay and filter A-l's at 17:00. Stand by -

351 16 58 h0

PLT

PLT

351 16 59 42

PLT

351 17 O0 02

PLT

MARK. l, 2, 3. Okay .... zero. Change filters. ... Charlie 3. Charlie 3 is in position. Now standing by for 170h5. Stand by. 15 secondsto go. This w-ill be 90 seconds. Stand by MARK. Okay, I'll put the A filter up. mark.

351 17 00 48

PLT PLT

Coming up on 45 seconds on _ MARK. Okay, 45 to go. 30 seconds to go. Okay, stand by.

351 17 01 33

PLT

Now filter B-1 next.

PLT 351 17 02 18 PLT

l0 seconds

to go mark.

3, 2, 1 -

MARK. That's .... And stuff a little filter. ... Bravo 1. Okay and at 17:02:55, coming up shortly, 60 seconds on B-1. Yes. MA/IK. 17:02:55. Bravo 1. ... Okay. Okay. You gave me 5 seconds to center the nucleus, kud I don't think I can quite do it. I'll try. That is if one exposure's on time and Starting a 60-seond exposure on

351 17 02 56

PLT

SPT PLT

1182

the maneuver pad executed as per pad. Looks like I have about 5 seconds of pad. Stand by. 351 17 03 57 PLT MARK. Take the filter out and see if I can see it. I can't see a doggone thing. It's light. Okay, I finished them on time. All through? Yes. Okay, frame count at start was 18. Frame count at end is 22. And I never did - I never was confident I saw the comet. I did have a fuzzy white blob in the field of view. Very indistince, and I don't know if it was the comet or not. And only, as I say, executing my exposures per pad and with SPT executing the maneuver per pad, there was only 5 seconds time remaining to perform the required centering of the nucleus and from - Even though I looked in there, it was too light. There was light already 351 17 05 l0 CC Skylab, Houston. We're through Hawaii for 6 minutes.

SPT PLT

PLT

Okay, I'm going ROTATION - TILT, zero and ROTATION, zero.
¢

CC CREW CC

... ..., Hank. ... involved in your of questions? No, go ahead. ... you can't answer a couple

CREW PLT

There's no way I can ...

Yes, well actually I can't find my - my little camera mount, so it will probably take a 1/2 hour to get it all rigged up. It'll probably take a 1/2 hour to get the - to get it all rigged. And then after that ... it'll only take about l0 or 15 minutes. Okay, PLT out from S019 - correction, S063. ... allow you about 30 minutes for the new setup, is that -

CREW

351 17 06 39

PLT CC

1183

CC

We'll be getting you a new pad up, Jerry, to give you the exact figures to support that time. Okay, good enough. And, Jer, I don't know whether you've been advised or not, but we would like to give you a brief rundown on what tomorrow looks like and - and see how it suits you. What we have scheduled tomorrow morning is a geothermal EREP with an early getup. In fact, it starts at - 10:00 will be the wakeup time in order to do it. And we Just sort of got ourselves in a box. We have to wait until it gets dark over the CONUS and then we have two opportunities, one for tomorrow and one for 2 - 2 days later. And it's an even earlier wakeup, and we're trying to keep it within 2 hours of your normal getup. And in this same day, tomorrow evening, we got 201 ops scheduled. And because of that we can't get you to bed before your regular time, which makes it a pretty long day. However, the following day we've scheduled you to sleep later, to try to make some of this up.

CDR CC

F_

351 17 09 34

CDR

Okay, let me get this straight. That means tomorrow morning we will be getting up 2 hours earlier and staying up until normal bedtime. Next day, we'll be able to sleep in? Roger. The next morning we'll give you one extra hour of sleep which will mean that would be a 9-hour sleep period. And we think - we did t_lk DOD into moving the rocket launch up for the 201 tomorrow night. We're goin_ to try that again and and we're again _,D_ing out of windows on that thing. We're sort of caught in the - We're losing our opportunities now, Jerry. And it kind of hampers the schedule a little bit, and we were wondering if it was okay with you to go ahead and do this? Okay, and we'll just have you owe us one.

CC

351 17 10 15

CDR CC

All righty. And we're about 30 seconds from LOS. Coming up on Vanguard at 35 and I believe we've got an ATM conference there for Ed. Roger.

CDR

1184

PLT

And just a quick note, Hank. The - if what I saw in the field of view was the comet, it's relatively centered for this S063 I Just performed. Also, I only had 5 seconds between the time I finished my nominal exposure and the time the maneuver started back. And on top of that there was light on the mirror when I looked in there so I wasn't able to perform that last action. prescribed. I did use the film you

CC 351 17 12 17 PLT

Roger; we copy, Bill. Ed, are you recording, or did I leave the recorder on? SPT at 17:12. Debriefing the ATMpass which began at 15:29. Everything went as planned for the building block 1. I was a little late in getting the whole production started because of the conflict of the 8233 up in the MDA. Looking at the corona, I saw at the area above l0 o'clock a helmet streamer which was there yesterday. Now it's very much more pronounced relative to what it was yesterday and also relative to the surrounding corona. The region above 00 is now full with corona again, although I do not see - There's a couple of small streamers imbedded in there, but no real major features, other than Just a general enhancement of the corona in the picture I have out to around 2-1/2 solar radii, contrasting yesterday where that area of the region appeared to be depleted. That area of the corona over on the west limb, in the area between 3 and 3:30, it looks now like essentially, just a band running with the same ... but about lO degrees wider. So just running straight out. It's not a helmet-type streamer, but Just a band of corona which has straight sides running straight out. I imagined this is due to 98 being rotated over - active region 98 being rotated over to the edge of the disk, and a little behind now. At the end of the building block l, I went gave a setup on building block 2h with the rolled tangent to the limb. 55 at line l0 ing right at the brightest point, which in - I slit lookoxygen

SPT

351 17 13 07

SPT

SPT

ii85

VI came up to around 30,000. I setup for the flare wait for 54. 56, I gave a PATROL, SHORT, and 55 received about lO minutes worth of MIRROR, LINE SCAN, then a MIRROR, AUTO RASTER, truncated at 40, and then picked up on the MIRROR, LINE SCAN again. 351 17 14 54 SPT And 56 did receive two PATROL, SHORTs, and that's essentially a shopping list item 2 with a MIRROR, LINE SCAN thrown in. Well it's kind of combined, if you will, with a building block 24. The end of the orbit showed that Mother Nature managed to do it to us again. And with approximately 4 minutes remaining, - I say approximate because I had the maneuver keyed into the DAS and I had the last maneuver keyed up with no ENTER and I could not see the time, although I could keep reasonable good track of when ESS was. That was about 4 minutes remaining. Sure enough, along comes a flare again, and right where we were looking. And I got to a_m_t that I did not get - I was not looking at the scope at that moment. But the - the image persistent scope because we had the maneuver coming up and I was starting to power down for the for the dark side. However, I had 55 running in MIRROR, LINE SCAN, looking exactly where the flare was. 56, I gave them another PATROL, SHORT .... could use some good data on it. The PMEC got up close to 600. I don't recall the exact value. And then we got into the atmosphere to fade out. 351 17 16 43 SPT SPT out. and it started

P

TIME

SKIP

351 18 03 02

CDR

This is the CDR at 18:03 Zulu with a message for the M509 consllm_les people. PSS number 2 and n_imber 3 after cooldown, have got 2200 pounds pressure in them. PSS number 4 is holding 2500 after topoff. CDR out. ST - PT debriefing the pass which began at 07:22. Had observing time and looked for a flare;

351 18 03 20 351 18 05 25

CDR SPT

1186

unsuccessful.

We did not have

one scheduled

this orbit. However, in monitoring oxygen Vl, I was able to find the hottest spot. I used the MIRROR, AUTO RASTER to find the line it was on and then searched around in that area and finally found a intensity of up around 30,000. And it was in a - H-alpha. A - plage which went between two loops or went between - excuse me, it went between two - two spots which I - I have to I did not really have time to look into it in detail, but there were two of these spots in H-alpha and I did not get the white light display on it to verify that, however. During the course of monitoring it, I got some counts up as high as 57,000. So there was some transient going on in there. Unfortunately, we were in the South Atlantic anomaly; I could not see what was happening to the PMEC. BERYLLIUM APERTURE did not step up and I could not noticeably - I could not see a great enhancement in H-alpha. IMAGE INTENSITY COUNT remained low, below 10. 351 18 07 06 351 18 08 32 SPT SPT SPT out. SPT at 18:09, handheld operations. Checking now on the Falkland Current and the associated plankton blooms. And just going by the wardroom window, I noticed the - the Falkland Current again right off the coast of South America. And was able, for the first time, clearly be able to distinguish the eddy which is Just north of the Falkland Islands. I could see the plankton blooms which we've all discussed very thoroughly, narrow and well-defined plankton bloom coming down from the north and just north of the island, turning out to - to the east. And some plankton blooming south of the island, although it was scattered clouds, and I could not see too well down there. The eddy just to the north of that island - that is, I could not see any direction - rotation direction. But there was just a thick aggregate of plankton blooms with some random spirals coming off of it in various directions. Two or three about three or four elements and then some plankton again turning 351 18 l0 06 SPT SPT out. and going to the east.

351 18 09 30

SPT

1187

TIME

SKIP

351 18 51 39

PLT

PLT, the time is 18:51. Recording the six-pack temperatures. X-ray 5, 82 degrees; X-ray 6, 8 81 degrees; Yankee 5, 82 degrees; Yankee 6, 81 degrees; Zulu 5, 82 degrees; Zulu 6, 82 degrees. PLT out.

351 18 51 59

PLT

TIME

SKIP

351 19 47 04

SPT

SPT again, at 19:47. ATM, picking up again on the debriefing of the pass which began at 15:29 I'm sorry, 15 - 18:42, the flare wait. Okay, as I was saying, I went out to the limb and was going to try to roll so that I could put the bottom on the MIRROR, AUTO RASTER below the limb. The active region at the top of the MIRROR, AUTO RASTER has the slit on it, the - slightly beneath the flares. However, the roll constraints did not allow me to do that. So I went back to putting the slit tangent to the limb, which would give the best 82A exposure, and also if we did get a flare and monitored it at the same place I did the previous orbit. Unfortunately, the PMEC remained down very low - below 300 a good part of the time except when we had already started getting into the South Atlantic anomaly. I saw no significant changes in - the XUV or H-ALPHA. I got a call then towards the end of the orbit to go over to perform a shopping list item l, and let me mention that I did shopping list item at the beginning of the orbit, and then I did one at the end. Followed it up with a STANDARD MODE; at least we did go below 400 K and perhaps a little bit below 250 K in order to complete it. About one frame or so, perhaps, one or two frames, I thought it was best to go ahead - If we can get anything and - be careful in looking at the data. I then looked at it with the TV, and I'm unable to notice anything resembling a transient. And not knowing exactly what the - what's been blowing off because it's something I could not see clearly. I was looking at the whole corona trying to detect

351 19 _8 52

SPT

i188

changes, and I will say I just didn't see anything. I did not have time to get out the photograph and compare. So I'm - I did not see anything over there where - where ... to 49 at llO - or lll blew off. Well, now he just gave me solar 49 again which is at 0.1 - no, 1.0, out, and I did not see that go off. I was assigned to corona; I'll take a good, hard look at it next time we come around and compare it with the photograph. I'll start out in Sun center. 351 19 50 19 SPT Okay, let me go on now with the S054 CHT mal which just came up. And I'll go through the steps pretty much as written here. Okay, I'm to - ... the THRESHOLD is set to l; I'm going to COUNTER TEST and hold. And the array of dots up in the 4 by 4 up there - shows up at the top. And it is - Well, let me take - there's two circles - three circles, acutally; a very small one in the center, one medium way out, and one, I believe, which was a 48 arc minute one. And there are lines in between those circles, and at the top the four - or the squate 8mray is centered in UP/DOWN on the horizontal line between the outer circle and the middle circle. A LEFT/RIGHT - it is about two elements to the left - that's two elements to the right, one to two. If we move the array to the right one to two elements, I think it would be centered in LEFT/RIGHT also, on that horizontal tic mark. 351 19 52 i0 SPT Okay, now going to 16. Now need to make threshold. Okay, and I'll give you a location now of the three sides which I can see of the RASTER. The left-hand side is exactly tangent to the circle, the outer circle, the 48 arc-minute circle. The right one is - falls a little bit short. And I would say that it - Just the distance between the intermediate circle and the outer circle is about 80 to 85 percent from that distance out. So it's not far from the outer circle but maybe 80 percent, and I guess a few - few scan widths. Now in UP/DOWN there's a problem, and there it starts at the very top all the way, and only comes down to the horizontal tic mark between the bottom of the square box and the intermediate circle. That is, in moving out from the center downward, we have a small circle, a box, and a tic mark. It makes it down to the tic mark.

-

i189
351 19 53 52 SPT I should report that I did notice this once, oh,

about a week ing properly, ported then,

ago or so. And it was in - was workand - and I guess I should have realthough through an oversight, being

I was working and concentrating on the observations, I did not. And then we Just noticed, when I called down the other da_, that it had gone back into %his mode of operation. It is degraded, but I do not think that it is that serious a degradation, unless we start having two or three active regions on the disk at opposite sides which are about - which very potentially could flare. And we use this as the - as the breakpoint for determining which one is really going. Right now we use the XUV monitor with the specific image scope and H-alpha. Granted, this is a larger field of view; it would help a little in that sense, but I don't feel that we're that greatly handicapped by this malfunction or anything else .... to restore it, I'd be most happy. 351 19 55 02 SPT SPT out.

TIME SKIP

351 21 07 29

SPT

SPT at 23 - correction, 21:07. ATM, flare wait which began at 20:15. Short, no luck. At the beginning of the orbit I went over to Sun center. Took a look at the corona and also gave a STANDARD.

351

21

08

22

SPT

Excuse me, gave them a CONTINUOUS for 1 minute, and 56 a PATROL, SHORT, shopping list i. Then went over to the active region, rolled - active region 00, rolled to plus 9568 - must have been 180 from where I was before. to the limb. Did this set at MIRROR, AUTO RASTER with the other activity, active region course, it couldn't cover all It's a little the bottom of - looking toward tangent the the

99.
of

I know, of it, but it would

certainly see if there were any loops anyway; hopefully see some loops going in that direction. I gave them two MIRROR, AUTO RASTERs at a GRATING of 772 which is optimal for putting neon VII in DETECTOR 6 which may show up in the loop.

i190

351 21 09 37

SPT

Then did a GRATING, AUTO SCAN at that position. Now let me first say that I chose that position by maximizing in carbon III which is the intermediate line and should be a little bit further down than oxygen VI. I'm going to repeat that. I believe this block should be - should be a little bit further down in the atmosphere than oxygen VI.

351 21 i0 25

SPT

I gave 55 nearly two MIRROR AUTO - two GRATING, AUTO SCANs. And then at detectors - at position at GRATING POSITION of 0000 started them - gave a MIRROR, AUTO RASTER in that position, flJ]] MIRROR, AUTO RASTER. And then went to the STOP MODE and remaximized using oxygen VI and found the maximum was different. But I think the appearance in H-ALPHA though was somewhat different too. So rather than having an UP of plus 3 and LEFT sorry, RIGHT of plus 880, what I found maximizing in carbon III, the oxygen VI gave a UP of plus ll and a right of 883. And the active region had certainly changed in that period of time, so we'll know about that from the difference in the lines. Towards the end of the orbit, I found that the oxygen VI was fluctuating very - fairly greatly. I was at about 20,000 and I went up to 20 - or 30,000, 35,000. Then I had to do a little reposition to make sure I was on the maximum. This led me to think there might be something coming up in central - or in the South Atlantic anomaly. I couldn't really see. So rather than going back to Sun center again and picking up that last shopping list item l, I stayed where I was, hoping that I'd be able to catch a - a flare rise, but unfortunately nothing developed.

351 21 ii 51

SPT

351 21 12 44

SPT

56 operation. Oh, correction, let me go back. For 52, they did receive a STANDARD at the beginning of the orbit. 56 ... received a SINGLE FRAME, FILTER 2 for 5 minutes, and unfortunately at the end I moved before I had closed their shutter or cycled on to another frsme, so I'm afraid that particular exposure is not the usual term. I then had 56 in AUTO, SHORT for the duration, except for one time when I stopped it when I had to switch position to maximize in oxygen VI. I guess old Sol is just perverse and isn't going to show us her stuff when someone's looking.

i191 351 21 14 i0 SPT SPY out.

TIME

SKIP

351 21 49 14

CDR

This is the CDR at 21:49 Zulu with a report on $233. The exposures were taken on time. The first exposure was taken at 21:38; the second exposure, at 21:39:17; and the third exposure was taken at 41 - be 21:41 :34. Exposures were completed before sunrise, and the situation on exposures now is that we are sitting on frame 12. I'll recap it. I think I was a little bit vague this morning when I did it. The exposures are as follows: last night I took only exposures 4 and 5 - frames 4 and 5; this morning was frame 6, 7, and 8; and this aft this afternoon the frames were 9, 10, and ll. Just visually observing the comet, there is definitely a brightening around the nucleus and streaming back from the nucleus. I would estimate l0 percent of the tail is much as - the front i0 percentis much brighternow. The comet no longer looks like a - oh, a point with a long tail diminishing in - in brightness all the way out. It now shows the nucleus rather brightly, and then extending back from the nucleus is a - a wedge of light that's, you know, included in the tail that is almost as bright as the nucleus itself. And then extending on back beyond that wedge, the tail begins to look more normal; that is, it - as you get away from the comet, the tail becomes less bright. I didn't notice that last night. I think it took the remarks by Bill Snoddy this afternoon at the science conference to make me - to cue me to be more conscious of that.

351 21 50 17

CDR

351 21 51 24

CDR

But now that I look at it and think about it a little bit, it most definitely is brighter today than it was, say last week. When - As I said, last week it was sort of a bright dot with a uniformly diminishing brightness in the tail all the way to the end. And now we see the - the wedge of brightness extending back from the point, I would estimate about l0 percent of the length of the tail. CDR out.

351 21 51 52

CDR

1192

TIME

SKIP

351 22 17 45

CDR

This is the CDR at 22:15 Zulu, reporting on handheld photography. The assigned sites were - were scheduled for 23:03 and 23:07 Zulu - correction, 22:03 and 22:07 Zulu. The sites were HH33 Alfa-5 and HH30-21. HH33 Alfa-5, was impossible to - to see Just as soon as we crossed correction, immediately tion the Coral Sea area, because of cloud cover. the - the southwest -

the southeast coast of Australia, we went into a broken-to-overcast situaand could not see _y of the ocean

on clouds

at all. And it pretty much stayed that way until we got over New Zealand, over the northern part of North Island, at which time we found a break in the clouds and a large open area that extended New Zealand to the Chatham Islands, and it was clear to scattered. 351 22 19 01 CDR I did not get a chance to see anything Tasman Sea, but I was rather interested that off the east coast of New Zealand, mately - oh, rough line which crossed of the to see approxifrom

guess, 200 miles, I found a the path of our orbit almost

90 degrees. And on the landward side of this line, the water color was the normal blue that we're used to seeing. And there were not much in the way CDR of signs of current or anything like that.

Now the important thing is that when I got to the ... side of this line, the water abruptly changed color from a dark blue - a deep blue to a, oh, let me call it a smoky blue or - in other words, it's the dark blue but it had a pastel smoky - little white added to it. So it became a lighter blue. And there were many, many white dots all over it. Now I don't think it's far enough south for that to be ice. And I'd be surprised if I could see whitecaps through through the binoculars, but it gave me the impression that we the definite

351 22 20 27

CDR

It gave me the definite impression that I was looking at whitecaps and that it was a very windy situation down there. The clouds were aligned parallel to the line, much like clouds streets. And, you know, what few clouds there were, it was a scattered situation by the time we got there.

1193

The water looked very much like - like roiled water; that is, you know, water that's been buffed up essentially by the wind_ and turns a little lighter color. And I think what I was seeing was a wind situation and not a current situation, although I may be wrong on that. At any rate, this situation lasted - this coloring lasted all the way to the, oh, about i00 miles or so west of the Chatham Islands. And then by the time I got to the Chatham Islands and watched them very closely, there were no signs of any island wakes like we had seen before on previous days. I think Ed Gibson saw water and reported it to you. 351 22 21 26 CDR And the water around the Chatham Islands looked pretty much normal for that area. I did not see any blooming or anything like that anywhere in the area indicating current or upwelling or anything like that. But I did think that this particular straight line of demarcation was rather peculiar. I probably should have taken a picture of it, but i didn't. I - I spent more time looking at the patterns rather than taking a picture. CDR out.

351 22 21 56

CDR

###

f_

DAY 352 (AM)

1195

352

OO

29

06

SPT

SPT

at

00:29;

ATM

pass

which

began

at

23:16.

Went

through building block 28, J0P 6 ; no problem. TV downlink. We went over and looked at the prominence, A-69, and it certainly is a goodie. Very entensive; it covers a - Well, I'm sure you folks on the ground know. I think you can see that Halpha by now, I imagine. But it certainly is very extensive, extending at the top, perhaps, maybe 3 arc minutes out. I cannot see the top on H-alpha, though I can certainly see the seat of it, and I would say up to essentially an entire third is missing. the most We chose dense, to to work at the try to get you slit which is spectra there. to the ii. 5 for film worked the -

And we figured that ought to be rotated out limb first. Did essentially shopping list 56 received FILTER 4 for 8 minutes, FILTER about 6 minutes. 82B: With your sensitive in there, I had the exposure NORMAL; and I at 3 arc seconds off the limb, parallel to tangent 352 352 00 O0 31 31 ii 17 CC SPT Skylab, to the limb. We're A0S Madrid for

Houston.

7-1/2

minutes.

They received in LIMB POINTING, exposure NORMAL there, at 7 arc seconds off the limb; exposure NORMAL at ii arc seconds off the limb. And I had to truncate the last exposure because of 400 K.

352

00

31

31

SPT

55: The pointing was done for 82B - that is, parallel to the limb - and also to get maximum amount of prominence on the slit. I would say the slit was filled by 80 percent or so with visible prominence in H-alpha. So what I did there was give 55 some MIRROR AUTO RASTERs at 0028 and then came back and spread the 55 mirror UP and DOWN and found that line 7 gave me the maximum, which was around - oh, must be 100 or so, in alignment data. the limb, just And then I moved it right out from to get away from any limb effects.

So we ended up doing a GRATING AUTO SCAN at 0724. And it certainly is the key to the - I think, one of those things we ought to be doing the next few days. I wish I had looked at this this morning. 352 00 33 00 SPT I think I got a little fixated flare out of region zero zero. on getting a good And - and m_ first

attack probably would have been to study this film and to set as many experiments up as I could for -

1196

for the flare mode. And so when it went off, treat it as a slow flare. Many of the - Much of the work on the prominence requires long time exposures, and that would allow a fair amount of attention to be devoted to watching for a flare. Toward the end of ... longitude, this has come around; I wish we had more like them. 352 00 33 46 SPT SPT out.

TIME

SKIP

352 01 30 55

CDR

This is the CDR at 01:30 Zulu. I'm on the EREP C&D panel. S192 has gone to CHECK, and MONITOR Delta 6 reads 68 percent. CDR out. Okay, this is the CDR on the ready verification check. S192_ POWER's ON; HIGH, LOW, HIGH. S191: CALIBRATION, 9; REFERENCE, 2. S190 is an NA. XTC is 193; ANGLE is zero; POLARIZATION, i. 93 Alfa: Continuing a MODE 5; RANGE, 61. And AUTO, B on 194. Okay, at the T minus i0 point, we'll go ahead and get - get going on some MONITOR readings. Alfa 2 is 60; Alfa 3 is 86; Alfa 4 is 71; Alfa 5 is 67; Alfa 6 is 0. Bravo 2 is 56; Bravo 3 is 76; Bravo 4 is 71; Bravo 5 is 75; Bravo 6 is 50; Bravo 7 is 32; Bravo 8 is i; Bravo 9 is 58. Charlie 2, 44; Charlie 3, 88; Charlie 4, 71; Charlie 5, 83; Charlie 6, 47; Charlie 7 is 52 - Make that 51. And Delta 2 is reading 86; Delta 3 is 84; Delta 4 is 80 - is 72; Delta 5 is ***teen; Delta 6 is down to 57 now; and Delta 7 is i0. I'ii monitor Delta 6. Skylab, Houston. Copying you on VOX through Texas for about 16-1/2 - 15-1/2 minutes. Okay. Just finished the monitoring I got two questions check.

352 Ol 31 ii 352 01 46 00

CDR CDR

CDR

352 01 48 25

CC

CDR 352 O1 48 57 SPT CC

Well, Crip, Go, Ed.

for you.

1197

SPT
b

Okay, in the first maneuver that have been a plus - ... right here. I think the entry •.. - the degrees And secondly - Acapulco's

in the Y, shouldn't

PLT 352 01 49 08 SPT

is the same, but I think the should have been plus 4.36.

352 01 49 17

PLT SPT

over to the left.

- - what we're going to do after this one coming up. That's the last fine m_neuver before the SI. Is that one for - Kill the lights, please. - - or for experiment alignment? That's for going back to the offset attitude, to get the principal axis tangent to the gravity metric. Okay. Thank you.

PLT SPT CC

SPT PLT 352 01 50 04 PLT

Ed, do you mind if we kill the lights? Well, there's Acapulco at night. Come here and take a look at this. See that area down there? Oh, yes. Uh-huh.

CDR FLT CDR PLT

Beautiful Mexico City coming up next. Mexico City. great, huh? Holy cow' Look at the visibility. Most of Mexico star. There's Yes. City looks like a big five-pointed There it is. Golly, it's really

CDR PLT 352 O1 50 19 CDR

PLT CDR

Guadalajara;

something

to the left.

1198

352 01 50 27

CC CDR PLT

Sounds like you guys are getting a pretty view. Yes. Oh, gosh; terrific! You know, Mexico City's lights are laid out in such a way - or t_ne city's laid out in such a say that it looks like a five-pointed star. So we can even see some beacon flashing down there. Maybe it's a searchlight. For the SPT: Ed, did I understand your question on the first Y fine maneuver, the 50644? That is supposed to be plus 4.20 degrees. ..., Houston. Say again. No, noth - nothing. I'll tell you later. See that bright spot down there at Acapulco? That very bright spot. Yes. *** eliminated Huh' Take a look and see where we're coming here. Okay, S192 DOOR is OPEN. The READY light is out or the DOOR CLOSED light is out. Waiting for a READY light. READY light's on. MODE's going to CHECK. S190 HEATER SWITCH OFF light is off. ***17 window, push *** and the 0VERT_IP; both PUSH-TO-TEST okay. Okay, let's do the preoperation configuration. TAPE RECORDER is ON; READY light is on. 92: POWER is ON; READY's out; MODE, CHECK; DOOR, OPEN. 91 is ON; READY light is on; the COOLER is ON; and the DOOR is OPEN. 90 is OFF; the READY is out; in STANDBY; and the door is - is open, because we're rubber-necking through it. ... people.

352 01 50 30

CDR

352 01 50 36

PLT

CC

SPT CDR PLT

CDR PLT CDR PLT 352 01 51 37 CDR

352 01 52 01

CDR

CDR

1199

352 01 52 45 352 01 52 49

CDR CDR

93 R:

STANDBY;

READY,

out.

SCATTEROM_"±'ER, OFF; READY, out. ALTIMETER, OFF; READY, out. 94, ON - excuse me - 0N; READY, off. Okay, come quick. You can see the whole Texas coast from Brownsville to Houston, Beaumont, Port Arthur - Oh' Oh, beck. Look at that.

PLT

CDR 352 01 53 04 PLT

There's Brownsville and then the big one on the coast. You can see Galveston Bay outlined by the darkne s s. Yes. San Antonio, Austin. Fort Worth. Okay. I can't quite crane my neck far enough. I told you it was pretty weather out there. Sure is. Sure is. CAVU! Trying to see the dome. Okay, I'm 45 seconds from my first action here. ... EREP, START. It'll be 58:15. Let's see if we can see

CDR PLT

CDR PLT CC CDR PLT CDR PLT 352 01 53 31 CDR PLT CDR 352 Ol 53 37 352 01 53 40 PLT PLT

See New Orleans down there? Gosh, what a tremendous view' This is just like the one over Europe, only better. The whole Gulf coast looks clear as a bell. Yes.

PLT

12OO

CDR PLT

See any of the wells out in the water? Yes. That's what he was just talking about. There's quite a few of them over there. I don't see any on fire, though. Okay, on my mark it will be 54:15. Stand by MARK. The ALTIMETER's going to STANDBY. The RADIOMETER's going OFF. Next mark will be at 58:15 with an EREP, START. Think you're Pensacola. going to pass Just about over

352 Ol 54 04

CDR CDR

352 01 54 15

CDR CDR

352 Ol 54 31

CC

PLT

Yes, we have the whole Florida peninsula in sight, all the way down to the Keys. Miami's lit up. Look at - You can see Miami Beach. Tampa, St. Pete - Oh, boy. You can see the whole thing. Gosh, just down there around the Everglades only place that there's no light. Tallahassee. Pensacola! That's right. Where I first learned to fly. Look. is the

CDR PLT CDR

PLT CDR 352 01 54 58 PLT CDR

And we've got the whole eastern seaboard, too. Well, they've got snow in Washington; to be cloudy up there. Going up - Atlanta. Say, you can sure make out the major highways, can't you? Yes. Well, that main route there goes all the way up to Atlanta, see.

so it's got

PLT SPT

PLT

1201

CDE PLT 352 01 55 22 CDR

From Tallahassee Yes.

to Atlanta?

Ho*** cow. Look at that. You can see the - you can see the interstate highway all the way down the center of Florida. That's right. Right down the middle of it like a backbone. There's the Cape ; see the Cape plain. Yes. Orlando -

352 01 55 28

PLT CDR SPT PLT

352 01 55 41

SPT PLT

Merritt Island - the whole schmear. Cocoa Beach doesn't seemfairly well. Yes, it's lit up

CDR

Sounds like you guys are getting all the good looking, and I've got to watch this darn C&D panel. Look. Yes. The east coast now is still clear. Look -

PLT SPT PLT SPT 352 01 56 04 CDR PLT CDR PLT CDR

Jacksonville. (Laughter) Beautiful! straight down.

That's got to be Savannah; Yes. That's right. coming up.

Charleston

Cape Hatteras

can't be far behind.

That's got to be Colllm]lusin there, and Augusta *** on. Man, it's too bad you can't take a picture of this.

PLT 352 01 56 32 PLT

This is very good demographic data. It's Just too bad you can't record it. What we - what we need is an IR cine camera.

1202

PLT

Just look at the exquisite detail down there. The right - With the right camera, you could really do a proper job. You can see Lake - Golly, you can see all the way to Lake Michigan. Chicago. Starting to pick up a few clouds now. Oh, yes. Wait a minute. I - Is Washington It looks to me like Let's see. Wilmington? There's clouded over?

352 01 57 01

PLT

352 01 57 12

CDR PLT

CDR

We're just going over - Is that

PLT CDR

New Jersey,

and that

city's over to the left. down there.

That's New Bern, North Cherry Point.

Carolina,

PLT

If you come ever here a minute, you can see all the way over to Lake Michigan. Come over where I am. You can see Chicago. ... Oh, yes.

SPT PLT

Okay, now we're starting to pick up cloud cover. Okay, I -Washington's got to be right down there. Yes. There's Norfolk down there. Langley, Norfolk, the whole area. Now this is Washington Yes. Washington right. What is that thing down below? Look at that -

352 01 57 52

CDR

PLT CDR PLT SPT CDR

right over here, isn't it?

- Baltimore.

Baltimore;

Look at that.

Hey, tell your Baltimore folks they can - or your Washington folks they can go home. The clouds have cleared. Looks pretty clear. I see some clouds, but - -

PLT

1203

CDR

Okay, I got an EEEF, START to do here. to need some light, guys. Yes. I don't know.

I'm going

PLT CDR

I'ii see if I can do it without light. for EREP, START. MARK. EREP, START at 58:21.

Stand by

352 01 58 21

CDR PLT CDR

... Delaware peninsula. The ALTIMETER is ON. I got behind. ON at 31; the EREP, START at 21. We're screwing up, Jer. light 's coming on. Let's ALTIM_I'ER went

PLT

stop it.

Okay,

352 01 58 46

CC

Can you guys verify for us that we did get the FLOW - the valve - the EREP valve to the FLOW, please. Verify that, Ed. Okay, it's gone to FLOW now. Put it there for us. It 's there now. Okay. This mark will be 02:01 and 45. UNLOCK light, but I've still It did not get there.

352 01 58 54

CDR SPT CC SPT CDE CDR

We'd appreciate it.

I've got an ALTIMETER got a READY light.

352 02 00 13

CDR

Okay, it just blinked and went out. back on. Now it's out.

Now it's

CC

Jerry, you can delay your 183 [sic] Alfa STANDBY to 02:01:55. Okay. I will pick up that l0 seconds I lost at the beginning. Okay, we're passing 01:45. 01:55. Stand by. On my mark it will be

CDR

CDR

1204

352 02 01 55

CDR

MARK. ALTIMETER to STANDBY. EREP, STOP. Changing the ALTIMETER RANGE to 63. MODE to 2. RADIOMETER is going to STANDBY. We enjoyed the - the ride over the clear coast there with you guys. Well, I'll tell you. We did, too. I'm sorry I let it get to the C&D panel - I was late - but it was worth it. No sweat. No problem at all.

I

CC

CDR

CC CDR

I don't believe I have ever seen it that clear before and to - the opportunity here is just fantastic. to see it from up

PLT

It is, and it's - it is so seldom, of course, you're in Z-LV; only in the EREP pass that you can look out the big picture window. Boy, that was tremendous. I think the whole southeast quarter and a little bit more of it was clear. Yes. It looked like a spider web with water droplets on it, didn't it? Yes. Hey, Crip. You could see every major artery running all over the whole eastern side of the country. Yes, it must have cleared up considerable up there from where they were having that snow. And - and consider you guys filled a visual ops DT0. Very good. Yes. It looked like the clouds started just to the south of the D.C. area. And right over D.C. it looked like - there may have been a solid over if you were looking from the city. But from up here, it looked like they had about 6/10, you know, integrated over a i00- to 200-mile area.

CDR 352 02 02 49 CDR

PLT 352 02 02 54 SPT

CC

CDR PLT

1205

352 O_ 03 26

CC

Roger. We're about 30 seconds from LOS. We'll pick you up again at Madrid in about 5 minutes, 02:08, and we'll be doing a data/voice recorder dump there. I tell you, Crip, it really was a shame that we did not have a camera out with some high-speed film, because those demographic studies could really benefit by a pass like that one. Roger. This would have been a - a good camera with that super-sensitive Yes. - - some of that for taking pictures at night. opportunity for a film - that - -

SPT

CC CDR

PLT CDR PLT

It's just a rare opportunity when you get clear area like this - get the country clear. Yes. Don't you think the people, people - the population-study

CDR CDR

352 02 04 05

PLT

Yes, the demographers would go right out of their gourd, looking at that. And those Yes. All of the HHI01 sites. It was an oblique, Miami is one of the sites. - folks studying the metropolitan areas.

CDR 352 02 04 i0 352 02 04 13 PLT CDR PLT CDR

but it was still much better

Mexico City's one of the sites, and we were looking right down at that. I couldn't get over how much Mexico City looked like a star. Did you see that? Yes. Yes. Man,

PLT PLT

I didn't realize that Atlanta was that large. that's Just a big city.

1206

CDR 352 02 05 05 PLT CDR PLT

It is. Could sure see Galveston Bay outlined, Sure could. Okay, I've got everything set here. Let's see. I've got nothing to do except l0 seconds - or, excuse me, l0 degrees of tracking. Okay, 1440 to 17. I just keep going 5 degrees up and let it track 5 degrees out. What you need is a dark shroud to put over this. Yes. You know, a pass like that, seems to me like, would have been worth shooting up some - Well of course, we don't - I don't guess we had any sensitive blackand-white movie film - 16-millimeter. No, I don't think so. I'm just wondering how much you could get. What kind of BV film do we have? Well, I think that is black-and-white sensitive film, but I don't think we have much of it. I think it's just for 183 and All the stuff we have to burn is - is all fogged up. Yes. It's already - ... But I was wondering about just - regular color interior on something like that. No? Could be. Open it wide open and use 1/60 of a second, That's as - That's as slow as you can go. - - slow as you can go. I guess. i

PLT

PLT CDR 352 02 06 51 PLT

CDR PLT CDR 352 02 07 09 PLT

CDR

PLT

CDR 352 02 07 35 PLT

CDR PLT

1207

352 02 07 44 j

PLT

If you took a roll of that and they specially processed it - you know they'd get all they could out of the emulsion- yes, I think they couldprobably get some data out of that. They probably could. I don't think you'd want to spend the whole roll for something like that, though, is the trouble. No, you wouldn't have to. .Two frames a second would be fine for where we've been. I mean if we could get it at all, it would be just as good as that - -

CDR

PLT

CDR

No, what I'm talking about is, you have to develop the whole roll that way or it won't cut it. Oh, yes, that's true. Okay, coming up on 9 minutes. On second thought, I think it would be worth a whole roll of film, but I imagine it's all allocated. Guys, we're back with you through Madrid for 7 minutes, doing a data/voice recorder dump. Roger, Crip. Stand by. 0n my mark it will be 09:00.

PLT 352 02 08 22 CDR PLT

CC

CDR

352 02 09 01

CDR

MARK. SCATTEROMETER's START in 55 seconds. Calibrating

going to STANDBY.

EREP,

352 02 09 14 352 02 09 20 352 02 16 04

CDR CREW PLT

a VTS AUTO CAL at 10:06.

Okay; give it to you. That's off. *** on high _, 3, *** 1. On high, 5, 4 _** off. Okay, on my mark it'll be 16:44. MARK. l, 2 *** by for my mark S191 REFERENCE to 2. 5, off.

CDR 352 02 16 44 CDR PLT CDR

Stand by -

1208

352 02 16 50

CDR

MARK.

16:50; 192, MODE to STANDBY. I

352 02 16 54 CDR 352 02 16 55 CDR PLT

SCATTEROMETER, STANDBY. RADIOMETER, STANDBY.

One more swath. A little bit past 17 minutes, but I'll go ahead and let it finish. On my mark, it will be 17:08. Stand by 0ff. MARK. The ALTIMETER is ON.

CDR CDR/PLT PLT 352 02 17 08 352 02 17 i0 352 02 17 Ii CDR CDR CDR

194 MODE to MANUAL. RADIOMETER is going OFF now. And, Bill, I want a VTS AUTO CAL at 4_. I'ii give you a countdown. Okay, at the 20 - 17:44 or - Right. - - or 23? 17 : 44. Standing by. Okay, i0 seconds. MARK. AUTO CAL. Okay. ... *** ... Nothing. You'd think we'd be able to see something over to the left. I guess we're looking right in the middle of Med right now. Stand by -

PLT CDR PLT CDR PLT CDR 352 02 17 43 352 02 17 45 PLT/CDR PLT CDR PLT CDR PLT

1209

CDR

We should see Africa off to the left, if we haven't already passed it. Athens and Cyprus. Let me have that map for - Nicosia. Oh, yes. There's Athens down there right below us, I'll bet you. Let's see. I don't really know. Time is right. That's probably it. That's the only big city. Oh, yes, probably. Or Constantinople now. I stanbul ? I stanbul. That shouldbe well off to the left of Athens. Yes. I could see something down there, but it didn't look as if it's big enough to be Istanbul. Okay. Next big city we'll Alexandria and then Cairo. Cloud cover over Ned [sic]. About 2-1/2 minutes, we'll and 3 minutes to Cairo. be over Alexandria, go right over will be or *** name of the place is

PLT CDR PLT

CDR PLT

352 02 18 34

CDR PLT

CDR PLT CDR PLT

CDR

PLT CDR 352 02 19 03 PLT

I think that's Malta we're looking at straight down there. *** like a harbor. Mala -Malta - Let's see. Crete. Crete? Okay. Crete, the island of

PLT CDR

PLT CDR

Directly under us.

1210

PLT CDR PLT 352 02 19 27 CDR

Well, maybe it's too big to be - No, Malta's clear over by Italy.

That' s right. Okay, Ed, you got about 30 seconds to maneuver time. Okay, here we go. You can see ... over to the left. Get down here, Jer, and take a look. Let me turn the lights - Do you need the lights over there, Ed? See, you can see the curve. Yes. Going up around to the Holy Land. Couple of big islands there. Alexandria on the

PLT

PLT CDR PLT 352 02 20 03 CDR PLT

I see Cairo; where's Athens? coast, Jer, right under us. That 's right.

CDR PLT CDR PLT

And that's Cairo right up ahead. The big island was Cyprus, Nicosia. That's right. Okay, now look over to the left. There's Haifa. And one of those - And inland from Haifa there, the lightest point, that should be Jerusalem. Beirut. Where is that? Well,

352 02 20 39

CDR PLT

It should be on up a little bit farther. I'm not real sure about this, but Beirut - Damascus is inland from Beirut. Jerusalem. And then inland is Amman. That's it. I think I had it.

CDR

Yes,

PLT 352 02 21 O0 CDR

Okay, the S191 READY light came on all right.

1211

352 02 21 06 352 02 21 i0

CDR CDR CDR

EREP,

STOP. to STANDBY. the termination of the - of the pass.

ALTImeTER Okay_

that's

352 02 21 28 352 02 24 02

PLT CDR

Hey, I can see the Sinai Penin *** Okay, Bravo CLOSED now. 7 is reading 32 percent. S192 DOOR,

CDR PLT 352 02 24 41 CDR PLT CDR PLT

Wonder why we didn't run out of tape recorder. You didn't have 192 running, did you? Yes. You did_ Son of a gun! Very long?

Well, let's see. I - I was expecting a tape change - since you were at the last pass. It ran for nearly 3 minutes .... Is it C-8 that's the tape recorder? Oh, yes, tape remaining. Let's see what C-8 is. That thing's not too *** not supposed to be too accurate. Yes. Okay, VTS gimbal angle is zero zero. VTS POWER, let's see if I got it there. There we go. VTS POWER *** Okay, the DOOR CLOSED light is on. out the window? Yes. Get that door closed. VTS POWER, OFF. Stow lightweight camera. Discontinue hot mike. headset, cable, Through loo_ing

CDR

PLT

CDR PLT

CDE

PLT CDR PLT

1212

352 02 26 00 352 02 26 02

CDE CREW

I'm through ...

recording,

too.

J

TIME

SKIP

352 03 08 _0

PLT

Okay, it's the PLT. The time is 19:09 [sic] Zulu. Reporting on upwelling or at least coloration to the northeast of Chatham Islands. Estimating the distance between 50 to i00 miles. Looking at the ocean-current map and also looking at the surface coloration on the water that we saw, the following sounds like a reasonable explanation of what we're seeing. In this area, there west-southeast flow indicated map. And northeast is a general northon the ocean-current to the north or and - this cur-

if there is a landrise of the Chatham Islands

rent would - depending on the depth of it - this would indicate bringing lower-depth water up to the surface in this area. And because of the interference or resistance or friction, the viscosity with the landrise, or perhaps just a - a backwater eddy on the back side Chatham Islands we're 352 03 09 53 PLT of this landrise, in the seeing an awful lot of mixing.

There does not seem to be much order to the pattern, although there seems to be a sort of a general serpentine path to the south and southeast. This is what you have to report on. This is the first time, I think, that we were able to sort of discern a directional pattern to this. Before, it's Just been sort of a general area of coloration, the water with no directionality more or less nondescript or progression - direction -

progression implied by the pattern that we saw. Again, this looks to be a pretty slow flow, almost stagnant, with a lot spinoff eddies. We saw one rather large clockwise eddy which apparently is was generated off of the main stream of the flow. But all of it's very - very nondescript and with very little discipline or order to the pattern of flow. 352 03 i0 43 PLT PLT out.

1213

352 03 18 47

CDR

SPT at 1 - 03:17.

ATM operations

after the Z-LV

pass. I decided to get a little better pointing, as we had a misunderstanding where the pointing should be at the conclusion of the last ATM pass; so we now got the good - relatively good pointing. The MIRROR, AUTO RASTER will cover just about all of the prominence, although it's pretty tough to squeeze that in there. It's really a large prominence. And we are in ROLL of minus 5400 right after 352 03 19 33 SPT a nu z update.

While we were Sun centered - Well, I did go back to Sun center first and gave 52 a STANDARD MODE and 56 a PATROL, SHORT and some - 55 also received a MIRROR, AUTO RASTER at a GRATING of MECHANICAL REF 102. Then I went out and did some repointing, and they received a partial MIBBOR, AUTO RASTER, although not anywhere near like what I think they ought to cover for - for that prominence. I did some moving around and alternately stopped the MIRROR, AUTO RASTER and moved and then started it again, to get a little better repointing for the unattended. SPT out.

352 03 20 15

SPT

TIME

SKIP

352 i0 09 12

SPT

SPT at 10:19 [sic]. 38305. SPT out.

PRD readings:

42425, 23232,

TIME

SKIP

352 ii 09 48 352 ll 17 53

PLT PLT

PLT at ii:09 Zulu.

Delta 6 is reading 56 percent.

Okay, and we're going to RECORD. T minus lO. Okay, I'm reading MONITOR. Alfa 2 is reading 59; Alfa 3 is reading 86; Alfa 4 is reading 70; Alfa 5 is reading 68; Alfa 6 is reading zero. Bravo 2 is reading 56; Bravo 3 is reading 76; Bravo 4 is reading 70; Bravo 5 is reading 75; Bravo 6 is reading 50; Bravo 7 is reading 32; Bravo 8 is reading l; and Bravo 9 is reading 48 - Bravo 9. Charlie 2 is

1214

reading 45; Charlie 3 is reading 88, and it's a little high. No, it's okay. We got the attenuator installed. Charlie 4 is reading 71; Charlie 5 is reading 83; Charlie 6 is reading 47; Charlie 7 is reading 51. Delta 2 is reading 86; Delta 3 is reading 85; Delta 4 is reading 72; Delta 5 is reading 13. That's good. Delta 6 is reading 57. Go back to Charlie - Well, it was Charlie 3 - All right; that's right. 352 ll 19 48 PLT Okay. 91 *** 7; that's if the ALIGNMENT switch okay. Okay, is OFF. I'll go check

352 ll 21 30

PLT

The - Yes. See, that's much better. Now it's okay. Want me to check it? No. T minus 5. 192 MODE to READY. DOOR, OPEN. DOOR CLOSED light's out.
on.

We may be -

CDR PLT 352 ll 22 35 352 ll 22 40 352 Ii 22 45 352 ii 22 49 PLT PLT PLT PLT

Waiting for READY light,

CDR 352 ll 23 56 PLT

Okay, thank you. Okay, there's the READY light; MODE's going to CHECK. Now you want the HEATER SWITCH OFF light off. It is. PRESS TO TEST. Both of them, good. Waiting for T minus 3. Let's see. My nadir step starts over San Francisco.

352 ll 24 00

PLT

CDR CDR

Yes. Looks like I won't get to do much rubbernecking. Say again? When's your ...?

CDR CREW

1215

CDR
PLT 352 ll 25 19 PLT

36, which is right at San Francisco - ... Verifying Preoperate voice/record preoperate RECORDER, config ON; pad. READY,

config:

The TAPE

on. 192, ON; READY, out; CHECK; DOOR, OPEN. 91, ON; READY, on; COOLER, ON; DOOR, stuck OPEN. 90,
OFF; READY, out; STANDBY; door, closed. 93 RAD to STANDBY ; READY, out. SCAT, OFF ; READY, out. ALTI_I'ER, OFF ; READY, out. 94, ON ; READY, on. TV-INPUT-STATION-133 POWER, ON; VIDEO SELECT, TV. Ed, would you verify that TV-INPUT-STATION-133 POWER is ON, the VIDEO SELECT is to TV, over there on that other switch, 132?

SPT
PLT 352 ll 27 07 PLT PLT

Got it.
Thank you. Okay, we're all ready. will

Okay, on my mark, it will be ll :28 ; ALTIMETER be going to STANDBY. Stand by -

352 ll 28 00

PLT

MARK.
you

STANDBY.

Hey, Jer.
AUTO CAL.

At 31:06, I'll give

a call;

I need

CDR PLT CDR CDR PLT

Okay. Good. Okay. What was the time on that VTS? 31:06.

CDR
PLT PLT 352 ll 31 00 PLT

Okay.
On my mark, Stand by MARK. Jer. EREP, START. Stand by for VTS AUTO CAL, it'll be 31 minutes *** EREP to START.

CDR

Stand by.

1216

PLT 352 ii 31 06 PLT CDR PLT 352 ii 31 14 PKT PLT

On my mark. MARK. Okay, you got it. VTS AUTO CAL. MARK. Stand by for 31:14; a MODE, MANUAL.

194, MODE to MANUAL. Stand

Stand by for 31:40 for a RADIOMETER, OFF.

hy352 ii 31 40 PLT MARK. RADIOMETER, OFF. And I want switch position 6 on the down. Switch position 6 is on the downlimk, and l'm standing by for 33 minutes. Kill those lights for a while, if you want to, Jer. There's nothing to see. We're out over the water.

PLT CDR PLT

Stand by on my mark. It'll be 33 minutes; 193 ALTIMETER goingON. Standby MARK. ALTIMETER, ON. I have an ALTIMETER UNLOCK light. Stand by; I'll watch it. ALTIMETER UNLOCK light is out. Staying out. Good. Just blinking now.

352 ll 33 01

PLT

352 ll 33 lO

PLT

352 ii 33 21

CC

Bill, we're reading you loud and clear and got you stateside, 14 minutes. Good, Story. Standing by for 33:46. 6.

PLT 352 ll 33 47 PLT

Okay, READY light came on at 45; REFERENCE, Standing by for 34 minutes even. MARK. SCAT to STANDBY.

352 ll 34 00 352 ll 34 06

PLT CC PLT CDR

And your vehicle's looking good from down here. Thank you, Story. Story, would you clarify that that f-setting was 1.27 I believe you said wide open this morning, and I copied 2.0.

1217

CC
P

That's

f/2, and shutter

speed

now 1/125.

CDR CDR PLT 352 ll 35 19 352 ll 35 25 352 ll 35 31 PLT PLT PLT

Okay, thank you. Okay, 1 minute to go on the nadir step. Standing by for 35:18. MARK. MARK. ALTIMETER to STANDBY. Stand by At 35:30 -

35:24; RADIOMETER to STANDBY.

MARK. RADIOM_±'ER, ON. *** 192 MODE to READY. MARK. 192 MODE to READY.

And standing by for 35:39. Stand by -

352 ll 35 40 352 ll 35 43 352 ll 35 58 352 ll 36 00

PLT PLT PLT CDR

TAPE MOTION green light ; good. ALTIMETER UNLOCKMARK. Okay, that's *** Track-

At 36, we've started the nadir step.

ingthrough zero. Okay352 ll 36 12 352 ll 36 14 352 ll 36 21 352 ll 36 32 CDR CDR CDR CDR MARK; it's minus 5. Going to plus 5. MARK; plus 5. MARK; minus 5. Okay, Story, it looks wide open again, and we're getting some good data. Okay. MARK; plus 5. NADIR. MARK; minus 5-

CC 352 ii 36 h2 352 ii 36 47 352 ii 36 52 CDR CDR CDR PLT 352 ii 37 00 352 ii 37 06 CDR CDR

Standing by for 37:10. MARK; NADIR. plus 5.

1218

PLT 352 ii 37 i0 352 ii 37 ii 352 Ii 37 16 352 ii 37 19 352 ii 37 2h 352 ii 37 28 352 ii 37 37 352 ii 37 h3 352 ii 37 48 352 ii 37 55 PLT CDR PLT CDR CDR CDR CDR CDR CDR CDR SPT 352 ii 38 02 CDR PLT SPT 352 Ii 38 05 CDR SPT

Stand by. MARK. RAD to STANDBY.

MARK; minus 5. Okay, 16. SCAT, OFF; RAD_ ON.

MARK; plus 5. NADIR. MARK; minus 5.

MARK; plus 5. NADIR. MARK; minus 5. MARK; plus 5. ... NADIR. Taking some good pictures?

Sure am-MARK; minus 5.

- - I hope we got some good coverage for them. Got every major artery and every small town along it. Great. ni ght. Too bad we didn't have that camera last

PLT

352 ii 38 17

CDR PLT

MARK; plus 5. Man, that's view. NADIR. MARK; minus 5.

Yes, boy, I'll say. - that was just a tremendous

tremend

352 Ii 38 23 352 ii 38 28

CDR CDR

1219

PLT 352 ii 38 36 352 ii 38 46 352 ii 38 51 352 ii 38 56 352 ii 39 02 352 ii 39 i0 352 ii 39 21 CDR CDR CDR CDR CDR CDR CDR PLT 352 II 39 33 352 ii 39 39 352 II 39 43 352 ii 39 45 CDR CDR PLT CDR PLT 352 ii 39 53 CDR PLT 352 ii 39 59 352 Ii 40 00 352 II 40 04 352 ii 40 12 352 ii 40 16 352 ii 40 22 352 ii 40 30 352 ii 40 35 CDR PLT CDR CDR CDR CDR CDR CDR

Yes, everything's MARK; plus 5. MARK; minus 5.

looking

good here.

Yes, lots of lights down there.

MARK; plus 5. NADIR. MARK; minus 5. MARK; plus 5. MARK; minus 5. for 39:4h.

Standing by

MARK; plus 5. NADIR. MARK. 192 MODE to CHECK.

MARK; minus 5. Check the TAPE MOTION. MARK; plus 5. Okay.

Stand by on my mark NADIR. MARK.

40; downlink to OFF.

MARK; minus 5. MARK; plus 5. NADIR. MARK; minus 5.

MARK; plus 5. NADIR.

1220

PLT 352Ii 40 40 CDR PLT

And, Story, I'd like to confirm one thing. MARK; minus 5. I turned the ALTIMETER to STANDBY at 35:18, and l'm not turning it ON again until 44:32. MARK; plus 5. NADIR. ... MARK. Minus 5. i

352 ii 40 50 352 ii 40 55

CDR CDR CC

352 ii 41 01

CDR PLT

Makes me suspicious because of the change in selection at 42:12. It's probably right, but I just wanted you to check. MARK; plus 5. 44:32 is verified, Bill. Thankou. y NADIR. MARK; minus 5. MARK; plus 5. NADIR. MARK; minus 5. MARK; plus 5. light. Must have picked up a little sun-

B52 ll 41 lO

CDR CC PLT

352 ii 41 16 352 Ii 41 21 352 ii 41 33 352 ll 41 39 352 ii 41 43 352 ii 41 52

CDR CDR CDR CDR CDR CDR

PLT 352 ii 42 04 352 ii 42 I0 CDR CDR PLT 352 ii 42 12 PLT

Standing by for 42:12. MARK; minus 5. MARK; plus 5. Standing by MARK. 192 MODE to READY.

1221

352 ii 42 15 ' 352 Ii 42 17

PLT CDR PLT

ALTIMETER, MODE 5. NADIR. RANGE, 65. MARK; minus 5. 44:32 is verified on the ALTIMETER, Plus 5. Roger. NADIR. Thank you, Story. MARK; minus 5. MARK; plus 5. Everything NADIR. TAPE RECORDER is *** MARK; minus 5. MARK; plus 5. NADIR. MARK; minus 5. Sunrise, Story. MARK; plus 5. Say again? NADIR. Sunrise. Completion of photos. looking good. Bill.

352 ll 42 21

CDR CC

352 ii h2 29

CDR PLT

352 iI 42 3h

CDR PLT

352 ii 42 38 352 ii 42 42

CDR CDR PLT

352 ii 42 48

CDR PLT

352 ii 42 53 352 ii h30l 352 Ii h3 07 352 ii hB 12

CDR CDR CDR CDR SPT

352 ii 43 21

CDR CC

352 ii 43 27

CDR SPT CC

Thank you.

1222

352 ii 43 32 352 ii 43 42

CDR CDR PLT

MARK; minus 5. _4ARK; plus 5. Coming up on 44. NADIR. MARK; minns 5. Stand by MARK. 192 MODE to STANDBY; TAPE MOTION MARK; plus NADIR. MARK; minus 5. Stand by. MARK. 44:18 on my mark 5. ...

352 ii 43 47 352 Ii 43 52

CDR CDR PLT

352 ii 44 O0 352 ii 44 Ol 352 ii 44 07 352 ii 44 I0

PLT CDR CDR CDR PLT

352 Ii 44 18 352 ii 44 19 352 ii 44 20

PLT CDR PLT PLT

SCAT to STANDBY; at 20 5.

MAEK_ plus MARK. 26 NADIR. MARK.

RAD to STANDBY.

352 ii 44 25 352 ii 44 26 352 ii 44 30

CDR PLT CDR PLT

RAD, OFF.

MARK; minus 5. Stand by MARK. ALTIMETER, ON.

352 ii 44 52 352 ii 44 34 352 ii 44 40 352 ii 44 42

PLT PLT CDR PLT

READY light on; green. MARK; plus 5. ALTIMETER light. NADIR. UNLOCK light at 41. Still have a READY

352 ii h4 46

CDR

1223

352 ll h4 _9
p

PLT

ALTIMETER UNLOCK light is blinking Good. MARK; minus 5.

and going out.

352 !i L4 51

CDR PLT

We still have a READY light. MARK; plus 5.

352 ii 45 Ol B52 Ii h50g 352 ii 45 12

CDR CDR CDR PLT

NADIR. MARK; minus 5. The oi' ALTIM_'I'ER's hanging MARK; plus 5. NADIR. MARK; minus 5. MARK; plus 5. NADIR. MARK; minus 5. That's the end of the swath. Stand in there, looks like.

352 ii h5 22 352 ii 45 27 352 ll _5 31 352 Ii 45 41 f 352 ii 45 48 352 II 45 52 352 ii 45 59

CDR CDR CDR CDR CDR CDR CDR PLT

On my mark, 46:10; it'll be REF 2 on 191.

by352 ii 46 i0 PLT MARK. REF 2. A_d, Jer, in about 1 minute I'll need a VTS AUTO CAL. I'll give a call. All right. Skylab, we're a minute from LOS. About lO minutes to Vanguard. Be dumping the data/voice there. We'd like verification that you did go to EREP COOLANT VALVE to FLOW. That's affirm. We did, Story.

CDR 352 ll 46 21 CC

PLT CC

Okay, and we'd like you to go ahead and ENTER the maneuver time back to SI, so we can take a look at it over this station.

1224

SPT 352 ii 46 51 PLT

Okay. I got an ALTIMETER UNLOCK now, but I still have a READY light. Okay, Jer, I need a - I'ii get it. All right, I'ii get it. Stand by. 27:20. It's 15 seconds yet. Stand by -

PLT CDR PLT PLT 352 ll 27 20 PLT CDR PLT

Okay, 5 seconds. MARK.

VTS AUTO CAL.

You have it. Thank you. Okay, I still have - Oops' Now it just went out. This READY light went out at 26 on ALTIMETER; I'm turning it OFF. And I go to STANDBY at 50 seconds ar4vway. Well, I'll go ahead and get a little bit more. Got a good maneuver time, Skylab; see you in about i0minutes. Okay, Story. And ALTIMETER's back ON and then I get an ALTIMETER UNLOCK light. And about time to go to ALTIMETER, STANDBY. MARK. Range, 68. mark; 48:06. MARK. And at 48:06. Stand by on my

CC

PLT 352 ll 47 46 PLT

352 ll 47 50

PLT

352 ll 48 05 352 ll 48 ll

PLT PLT

193 ALTIMETER, ON. at ll seconds -

ALTIMETER UNLOCK light blinking 48:11. It's out now. And it's staying out. Good.

PLT PLT

ALTIMETER UNLOCK light is staying out. This really looks like a very good pass. The UNLOCK - ALTIMETER UNLOCK - lock light came on late in the previous ALTIMETER swath. Stand by 50. I do not have a 191 READY. At 06, I go MODE, MANUAL. There's the 191; right on time. Stand by -

1225

352 ii 50 05 , 352 ii 50 35

PLT

MARK. 50:06; 194 MODE to MANUAL. Now the ALTIMETER UNLOCK light came on at 50:10, but the READY light is still on. Just got a 194 M3KLF light blinking. 50:38 [sic]. Nothing but clouds. We were - going to ST_qDThat was at

PLT

CDR PLT

Okay, I just lost my READY BY - -

light;

CDR

- - we were so busy we didn't get to look down at the lights. What's happening? This thing is going - l'm - l'm finally losing my READY light just about, oh, 40 seconds before the end of the swath. MARK. Back on. METER. And-I got a READY light on the ALTI-

PLT

352 ii 51 04

PLT

CDR -PLT

See South America, Peru. I do not have an UNLOCK light; it's hanging in there, and I got about 15 seconds to go in the ALTIMETER swath. Lima, Peru. Peru. Stand by to STANDBY.

CDR PLT 352 ii 51 35 352 ii 51 38 PLT PLT

On my mark, it'll be 51:35. MARK. And EREP to - ALTIMETER

EREP to START - STOP. And at 11:54, which is about 3 - 2 minutes from now, we'll go to - start fine maneuver. Okay. Fine maneuver first. No - Okay. Okay, RECORD switch is going OFF. PLT; time is 12:11. 32-1/2 percent. PLT Bravo 7 is reading

PLT 352 ii 52 24 352 12 ii 28 PLT PLT

352 12 19 23

PLT

1226

352

12 19 51

PLT

PLT;

recording

EREF

tape

at

5.8

centimeters.
I

TIME

SKIP

352 12

46 i0

SPT

SPT at 12:46. ATM op after a EREP pass; only around l0 minutes left of day. We got to the center of the item 1. Took The was one over yesterday Sun and gave it a shopping list a look at the streamer structure. T-59 and is as larger strong at in the base emission

had

than it further

out as it was yesterday; just grown a little bit a little more further south 352 12 47 07 SPT

so it has essentially at the base. I also see to the base, of that streamer.

structure to - close than the center line

Another good streamer is - although not anywhere near as intense - is located over around 2 o'clock on the east limb - correction - the west limb. The XUVmonitor we have on the shows the disk quite active well. regions which

SPT

96 shows up; 97 - both of which weak. O0 shows up exceptionally

are relatively well; and 01.

And I believe there is another one right at the limb. So looks like we've got a real complex system coming around, right next to 00. 352 12 48 00 SPT Went over then and looked at the prominence, and again, that centainly has extensified [sic]. Love to see that one blow off. We rolled so the MIRROR, LINE SCAN was tangent to the limb and gave it a MIRROR, AUTO RASTER and got to 400 K just as we were going through, oh, line 15, 16 - somewhere in there. So we got one good MIRROR, AUTO RASTER GRATING of ZERO, DETECTORs all - looking at the prominence. It's probably not in order to get a good look at we could squeeze in. 352 352 12 12 48 42 49 22 SPT SPT SPT out. anywhere it, but near enough that's all

SPT at 12:49, reporting some observations - visual observations of plankton bloom and current structure in the South Atlantic. Okay, at the conclusion of the EREP pass, we came across the east

1227

coast of South America; came out right over Montevideo. Due to clouds, I was not able to see

the plankton bloomvery close to the coast; how,
ever, as we moved further out, let me describe to you what we saw. We were heading essentially southeast to east, Maybe at a angle of 120 or so,

relative to solar nor - relative to Earth north.
352 12 50 53 SPT Okay, at 12:06:30 we to our path - that's saw, running perpendicular roughly northeast - a very

faint but discernible plankton bloom; very low contrast in intensity and a color fairly discernible green. And it seemed to - okay, and I can
picture these as streamlines streamline to the northeast. we saw a fair amount - okay, running as a At 12:07 to 12:09, blooming. Al-

of plankton

though extensive in area, it was again very low contrast, low color difference. I don't have the Forrel scale here, but I would - as best I can remember - that we were looking at the 4 or 5 contrasted with a 2 or a 3. 352 12 52 13 SPT We saw several things, mostly eddies. I noticed at around 12:08 which again was; it was counterclockwise. pretty much random. I could cific direction. One eddy was slightly

to the north of our path, as most of the material The others were not notice any spe-

352 12 52 51

SPT

The clouds which were further north, at the very
base of the clouds, there appeared to be a little brighter plank - plankton blooming - by base, I mean just leading into the clouds from our vantage point - and it leads me to wonder whether the clouds are associated with the blooms themselves - blooms representing the the normal ocean colder water and thereby cooling air blowing across it, with a -

then bringing the dewpoint down to where we form clouds or bringing the temperature down close to the temperature where water will condense. 352 12 53 31 SPT I've seen this on a number of occasions, where I've been frustrated because all of the plankton bloom appears to be just starting where the clouds start, and usually there is a relation. Okay, 12:12 and as we looked further out, at around, say, to 12:14 - and at this point, we are moving

352 12

53 48

SPT

1228

pretty much directly east - we saw two things. One is a wave pattern in the water. Showed up quite well in the contrast or the Sun angle we had. The waves themselves to our path at east-west. 352 12 5_ 24 SPT were running parallel

Now over a very extensive distance, over hundreds of miles, both along the waves and perpendicular to them. And then also, a little bit to the say around 12:14, a little bit further east of the major portion where we could see the waves real well, we saw cloud streets. These clouds streets were in the same direction; that's east-west, as the waves. So apparently, the wind and the waves were parallel at that point. Whether there is a relationship there, I'm not sure, because I'm not sure what - what caused the waves at that point .... to a very small angle of our estimation, the cloud streets, which were fairly long and linear, were parallel with the waves, which were very long and linear. So coincidence or cause and effect, I'm not sure or both effectsof the same thing. SPT out. PLT at 12:50 - 12:56; subject is S183 carrousel. I have the 2-2 out, and I found the two alignment marks perpendicular to the line of the f_]m slide opening. And I have rotated it counterclockwise, which was the easiest way that it went. It's very difficult to rotate the other way. And I moved it to line up with the film-hatch-opening slot.

352 12 54 45

SPT

_

352 12 55 29 352 12 56 02

SPT PLT

352 12 56 31

PLT

TIME

SKIP

352 14 19 47

SPT

SPT at 14:20; building block ing blocks ll but I found I

the ll and was

ATM pass which began at 13:50, Bravo. The J0P 4, step 4, build28, really went with no problem, a little rushed in getting the

pointing in - that is, to try to find the maximum as well as to get the slit off the thread. Took a little care and patience, and I find I got a

1229

,

little rushed. I think we got good data and I got in what we wanted, but it put it pretty close. These threadsare very visible- in the H-alpha monitor. One thing that will show them up better is not just to use the low contrast brighten and then relatively high brightness - that is, a CONTRAST of 3 and a BRIGHTNESS of 7 - but if we also move most of the solar image off the edge of the tube, then the gain in the TV will compensate and bring out the structure even more. And that's worked to real good advantage to get visibility. With that, I am able to see the whole beautiful prominence structure, which really has, as I look at it, a whole complex array of arches and feet. Let me Just start at the very north part. I'll not try to give you dimensions of them; but big and small. The northernmost part has got a relatively small arch; fairly bright at the first foot of the small arch that's coming from the north. And then we have the most - brightest point in the cromin - prominence, which guess people are referring the prominence. 352 l_ 22 21 SPT is the feet, which I to as the north foot of

"

And that's fairly intense as well as dense, and I do not see very much thread structure there. Then I see the prominence, as it goes south, looping out in perhaps the largest arch of all, which is part of what's been called the major portion of the prominence. And I can see that - at least, a lowlying thread of that going from one foot all the way across to the other; just as I reported that was open or I could not see that. Today we're trying new techniques and also making some changes in the prominence. I haven't been able to detect that. I can see it quite well. There'll be, of course, arches above that, which I cannot see. And stretching my memory, I would say that's only about an arc minute or so off the disk. Okay, so now we come to the end of that long arch, and there is a foot there, which may be called the southern foot, which is attached to the disk - except, well, maybe a very small fraction of an arc minute. I cannot see it on the disk. I'm not sure what the - the cause there is - the reason is. But it comes pretty close to being right down there at the very bottom; so I do believe that one is, in the normal sense of the word, attached to the disk. There is

1230

where all of the beautiful, vertical thread structure is. The structure itself - or that is, the nttmerousthreads encompass the fairly wide area, maybe an arc minute or so across, in multivertical structures. This is where I did the pointing for building block ll and building block 28. I'd show it's one nearly vertical structure for building block ll, at about l-l/2 arc minutes off the disk. I did not measure it, but that's an eyeball estimate. 352 14 24 33 SPT And then I chose one which was - where the top was inclined slightly to the north, maybe 20 degrees or so, for the building block 28. That's right adjacent to it, the first one. I think I'd have lined it up a little bit better had I taken a little bit more time. But in looking at the intensities in Lyman beta, I found that within that range they did tend to change a little bit but not as much as I might think from looking at the Halpha display. Maybe it was the width of the 5-arc-second aperture, although I - I doubt that. That's still relatively small for what I was seeing in H-alpha. They look as though there's more in the Lyman beta - and I suspect it's most of the higher temperature lines - than anything we're seeing in the visible. I suspect that's quite a bit broader than the thread structure we see in H-alpha. The Lyman-beta count we are getting in that structure was 300 - 350, which is quite quite high, as - as I understand it. I looked for the one we looked at a couple of weeks - a week and a half ago or so - that's prominence 39 or 37 when it was on the east limb - sorry - the west limb. That was only 200, and that was considered relatively dense. 352 14 26 18 SPT Okay. Continuing further south in this description of the prominence, there is another small arch, which I see quite well, and it's at the southern foot. Then comes into a series of relatively lowlying filament structure which is - I'm sorry prominence structure which is fairly dense but low lying, and there's one or two arches in it; it seems like all of them are relatively small, one system.

1231

352 14 26 54 , '

SPT

So in general then, I see four feet. If I broke the one up that l'm just mentioning to the south, I can probablyfind more of them. I thinkwe have an excellenttool here for doing pointingat the 0nly wish I could stop it - the Sun from turning for a little while. Building blocks themselves mechanically were carried out with no real problem, except for at the very end - 55. I was at MECHANICAL REF and wanted to maximize Lyman beta again and went to 130, and for some reason I could just not get anything out of the detector; it was just laying down there around 20 or so. And I suspect for some reason that I had a GRATING POSITION that was off. This was coupled with the fact that when I gave a GRATING, AUTO SCAN in building block ll, I put it to GRATING, 3 SCAN. And for some reason, it stopped before GRATING, 3 SCAN. I had a MECHANICAL REF, and was indicating all zeroes. I don't believe I was really at MECHANICAL REF. I'm just not sure what the problem was here. Most likely it was procedural, but I cannot unravel it. And then before we did building block 28, I had to take another lap around the GRATING to get MECHANICAL REF of zero, stepping up to 102. And I did get a MIRROR,AUTO RASTER,down to around line 16, which did encompass the filament before we got to

4oo K.
352 14 29 03 SPT Descriptions of XUV monitor and white light coronagraph - that's given on air-to-ground. I won't repeat. SPT out.

352 14 29 14

SPT

TIME

SKIP

352 15 48 50

CDR

This is the CDR at 15:49 Zulu. The subject is Earth observations. The first target suggested today was HHI06 at 11:57:24. We just flat missed that one. We got busy cleaning up after the EREP and Just missed our opportunity to look out and see that one in the window. It looks like it was probably pretty good for that, too. The next two opportunities, for me anyway, were at 15:28 Zulu, and that was HH77 and 78.

352 15 49 17

CDR

/r

1232

Again, all three of us were busy with other jobs and didn't get a chance to look at it. And I did, however, get a look - a short look out the window at about 15:33, and I noticed that it was awfully cloudy in that area anyway. So it may be, because of clouds, we didn't lose much anyway. 352 15 49 59 CDR We did, however, get some good Earth observations in. And stand by a second; let me get a map to refer to. Are you still on, Jer? Yes, I'll be done in a minute. Okay. Okay. The observations I'm referring to were w@re done this morning at approximately 12:00 Zulu as we were on the Earth resources pass and coming out over Montevideo and the Rio de la Plata harbor there, the area where it - where it comes into the - the ocean. We got out over the ocean and remembering that this is the point where the Falkland Current and the South Equatorial Current come together and head out in a southeasterly or eastsoutheasterly direction. It just happened at that time we had very good sunglint conditions. And so we, Bill and I, started looking at the water - I with binoculars and Bill unaided - and noticed nothing particular in the - in the wave forms that would indicate any current. However, we did notice, after we got a good 200 miles offshore, that we picked up some very faint plankton bloomings, the - the - the light green. It was nowhere near as pronounced as what we've seen in the Falkland Current and certain other areas, but there were definitely hints of it out as far as 200, 200 miles southeast and east-southeast of Montevideo. We looked at it and took several Hasselblad pictures, and Bill will report those at another time - the frame numbers and all. There were no intersecting wave patterns or anything like that, indicating where the edge of the current was; so that was not - not too easy for

PLT CDR PLT 352 15 50 26 CDR

352 15 51 17

CDR

352 15 51 47

CDR

352 15 52 16

CDR

1233

us to find. However, we were surprised to see so far out at sea, away from landfall - the again, the indications of plankton bloom. And this, as far as we were concerned, indicated that the the currents were - were coming together in - in that area. 352 15 52 45 352 15 59 59 CDH PLT CDR 352 16 01 54 PLT CDR out. Yes, this is the PLT. Think it's dead now. Okay. this is PLT. The time is 16:01 - 2, coming up on 16:02, and the reason that I did not do a voice record was because of a couple of interruptions, one of which was a master alarm. It was a problem with the rate gyros. However, the exposure was started on time at 15:48. ROTATION, and I'll check it on the gage, 016.2; TILT, 09.6; and everything was started on time so - except - with one exception, and that is that - It was when I s started the exposure; it went to PLATE 13, and I had - I set 12 in when I set up the experiment. So I'm not quite sure what's going on or if it's just an indicator problem. In any event just about the time the - all the clicking stopped and the exposure started, I assume, on - this is field Charlie 99 Alfa Alfa - that the PLATE indicator advanced to 13. I'm going to check it in the next exposure here. We'll see how it works out. About 5 minutes to go in this exposure. This is the CDR at 16:05 Zulu with ambient food inventory data so far. Step number 1 was frozen food locker F-553, canister number i0. The contents are two prime rib, two filet mignon, two por - pork loin, and five vanilla ice creama. ii total, one missing. Okay. Step number 2 was inventory of lockers 561, 2, and 3. Locker 561, front: number 31/number i0; number 26/ - Now let me give you the code here first. Number 31 means canister number and the slash and then the i0 means the tenth item is missing, or the number l0 item is missing. (High-pitched tone)

_,-352 16 02 36 PLT

352 16 03 05 352 16 05 08

PLT CDR

1234

352 16 06 05

CDR

So we'll start over again now. This is locker F-561, front: number 31/10; 26/9; 25/9 20/8; 17/i0; 15/9. F-561, rear: number ll/9; 16/9 and 10; 21/9; 27/10; 25/9. Locker F-562, front: 16/2; 17/4; 21/6; 26/9 and 10; 27/10. F-562, rear: 21/10; 18/9; 16/9; 15/9 and i0; and ll/10. In some cases the slash 9's were the bottom ones, and in some cases the slash l0 was the bottom one. I don't see - I think your records probably tells you how many are in there; so I think just the number should be adequate. Now we have F-563 to go, and we have the overage ambient inventory to go; and you're going to have to schedule us with extra time for that. CDR out. Okay. This is the PLT; 16:ll. It did advance to PLATE 14, and I'm setting up for field Charlie 38 Alfa. And that'd be ROTATION, 2119; 2119, and TILT is 05.7. Okay, TILT, o5.7; it's PLATE 14. EXPOSURE 0, 300, and 0 ; okay. Okay. START. And that's about 12. And we're in work.

352 16 07 17

CDR

352 16 07 43 352 16 ll 03

CDR PLT

352 16 12 19 352 16 18 39

PLT PLT

Okay. This is the PLT at 16:19. completion of the 300-second exposure on field Charlie 38 Alfa. And I say again, that was plate 14; 13 and 14 were exposed on these two, not 12 and 13. I don't know what happened. I set up 12 Just like it said in the procedure. Anyway, "If time available after S183 exposure complete, would like you to point at two reference stars with no photos, to calibrate the AMS. Point at the following stars and center them in the reticle; center crosshairs." Canopus, 225.4 - and TILT, 16.6. Skylab, Houston. 10-1/2 minutes. Hello, Houston. We're through Hawaii for

352 16 20 09

CC

SPT 352 16 21 07 PLT

At 16:00 even, we got a ...

Okay. My Canopus is centered; I've got 225.3 and 16.9. Okay, Regulus, 139.8. 139.8, 01.2. (Whispering) Okay, there they go. Okay. Right in the center.

352 16 22 02

PLT

1235

CC

o..

PLT

Okay. Regulus, 0140.2 and 001.8; and I will now call that down to ground. And PLT out. I'ii be shutting down your experiment as soon as I call this to ground, real time. It's the first and last one I've ever seen, but it was very definitely green.

352 16 22 39

PLT

352 16 24 34

SPT

352 16 27 57

CDR

This is the CDR at 16:28 Zulu, reporting on $233. The first exposure was to have been at 16:17. Started having camera problems again. I pushed the remote control shutter release, and the shutter opened and then promptly closed again. So I checked - checked the shutter speed, and it was at B. And so I tried it again about 12 seconds later and this time pressed firmly on the button because I figured the last time it happened to me was because I didn't press hard enough on the button. And that didn't help either.

352 16 28 40

CDR

So 13 was wasted. So I went to timed, T, tried it again and got nothing. That is, by nothing I mean the shutter opened and closed again immediately. So I went back to B, and by that time I was approaching 16:18:52; so at 16:18:52 I went ahead and took the 120-second, focus-infinity exposure, and luckily that one worked okay.

352 16 29 13

CDR

Then frame number 16 came at 21:04, I believe it was, and that was no problem either. It was well before sunrise. So essentially what we have then is five frames used, and the last two were successful, the last two normal frames of $233. CDR out.

352 16 29 37

CDR

TIME

SKIP

352 18 51 52

PLT

PLT at 18:52, debriefing an ATM pass that started at 17 - Skylab, Houston; we are 1 minute - -

CC

1236

PLT CC

- - or 18:03. - - Guam at 26, and we're scheduled to dump the data recorder there. Roger, Hank. Okay, the solar wind - excuse me - lunar libration clouds was run with the exc - the - Okay, except for the fact that I had the - S054 - the S054 experiment was in HIGH, 64 and I ran it through several sequences and - before I noticed it. We had ENTERed the lighting all turned down onthe panel, and I just flat screwed up. Okay, and your next one was the ma - maxi-rasters. That - All one, two, three, four of those were completed as per pad, except I had to use a ROLL of plus 1992; I couldn't get 2000. JOP 10, building block 2, step l, at the end was completed per pad and truncated at 6. Looked at the white light coronagraph before and after; looks like a very nice corona. I'm sure it's been described to you already, but north, at the top, we got a good helmet streamer at about 9:30 - i0 o'clock; two very faint streamers - one at about 8:30, one at about 7 o'clock, maybe 7:30. And over on the west limb at about, oh, 2:45, almost 3 o'clock, a nice - a very nice helmet streamer and a very faint one down at about 4:00 or 4:30.

CDR 352 18 52 l0 PLT

352 18 53 45

PLT

I did not notice any change. I looked at the WLC during the first J0P l0 and the last JOP 10, and I could not tell any difference. The activities on PMEC and IMAGE INTENSITY averaged around 250 on the PMEC and noise level l, 2, maybe 3 or 4 on the IMAGE INTENSITY COUNT. The - I never got an aperture triggers XUVMON see any up. At TEGRATE I think change in beryllium. I got several X-ray - false triggers on the flare. Used the and the image intensifier scope. Did not brightening. It looked like one spot came least it was a little brighter on the INat times, but no particular activity on, it's 00.

352 18 54 36 352 19 04 05

PLT SPT

PLT out. Hold on ... more back over this way ... okay. Okay. Let me get this pocket here.

1237

352 19 04 39

SPT

Hello. Welcome to Skylab 3 and the land of the moths. I have right here in these two vials essentially a growing number of companions. These are two vials containing eggs of - gypsy moths. One is tame, and one is _rild; that means laboratory produced and one from the wild. The objective of having these along with us is to see if we can prematurely induce, by having them in zero g, a production of a moth or diapause hatching of the egg. The normal hatching for these fellows that I'm holding right here, on the ground come about February or March. We've been up here a relatively short time r and they have not expected to see anything - I don't think - quite this es.rly. We have in these vials essentially five to six moths which are visible and perhaps an equal number of partially hatched or partial emergents from the eggs. Now if we can find a way, such as use of zero g, for prematurely inducing their hatching, then this opens up a way of producing them in large numbers axld understsxlding just what some of the mechanisms n _y be. It will greatly aid the laboratory rearing of these animals or moths, if you will, and enable people to then produce large quantities of sterile moths which can be used to decrease the moth population where they trun out to be a - a great nuisance. What I'd like to do now is move in a little closer and give you a closeup view, as close as we can, of the eggs and some of the moths. These eggs turn out to be about the size of poppy seeds, and even %_ith your eye right next to the vial, they're pretty hard to see.

352 19 06 12

SPT

_

352 19 07 04

SPT

But we'll put a closeup lens on the TV and give it a try. SPT at 19:14 for RLITI. Start of the run of M092, with the PLT as subject. It started at 19:10. SPT out. This is - this is the CDR at 19:15 Zulu with a note to the food people. Yesterday, in my evening status report, I forgot that there was a little bit of variation in my water usage. It was occasioned by

352 19 13 oo

SPT

352 19 13 13 352 19 15 h0

SPT CDR

1238

one of those blankety-blank food - Apollo spoon packages splitting. The - What it - Actually, it didn't split. It wa - it was mainly caused by the little check valve that's where the nozzle goes into the bag - you know, on the side of the bag. There's a little hole with a flapper on it, and apparently, that flapper stuck closed and would not allow the water to go in with the food. And the pressure from the dispenser finally split the side of the tube going to the bag, and we lost that water. And I ended up having to open the bag and put the water in with my water gun. 352 19 16 46 CDR I've already repressed what the food was; so I can't think of that. But anyway, I do remember that it was 3-1/2 ounces of water. So if you really want to get - get the details correct, subtract 3-1/2 ounces from _ water gun reading and apply that toward food reconstitution. And the 3-1/2 that the table tried to put in the bag just kind of went all over the workshop. So chalk up 3-1/2 ounces for the workshop. CDR out.

352 19 17 14

CDR

TIME

SKIP

352 19 39 29

SPT

M092; subject, PLT. Left legband, right legband, Alfa Quebec. Out.

Charlie Juliett;

352 19 39 39

SPT

TIME

SKIP

352 20 32 02

CDR

This is the CDR at 20:30 [sic], debriefing the 19 - debriefing the 19:35 ATM pass. The first was a JOP lO, building block 2. No problems with that. Wasted about a minute and a half or so trying to get the VTR work done. I elected to wait in order to give you about 30 to 40 seconds of white light coronagraph. Okay, then we got to JOP 25A, building block 10. You specify a ROLL of plus 2000, and the best I could get was 1915. And I didn't want to leave the canister in a roll

1239

stop - up bard against it ; so I backed off to 1900, and your data then was taken - for JOP 25A - was taken at a ROLL of plus 1900 and then at the UP and DOWN and LEFT and RIGHT coordinates that you specify on the pad. 352 20 33 06 CDR On the third one, I seriously considered going UP 250, instead of DOWN 250 arc seconds. But I looked at where that would take me, and I decided that really wouldn't be in your best interest ; so I went ahead and - and did the lesser of the two evils and kept the ROLL where it was and followed the other pointing coordinates precisely. We got down to JOP l0 with l0 minutes to go and actually only had 8 minutes to go. And by the time I got 55 to the right GRATING POSITION, we did not have enough time for a full MAR; so we had to truncate at line number 45 in a MIRROR, AUTO RASTER DETECTORs, all; GRATING, zero. 352 20 33 51 CDR The other two experiments - 56 and the WHITE LIGHT CORONAGRAFH - yes, both got their exposures complete before we hit the 400 K line. And looking at the Stand by - -

352 20 34 14

CDR

TIME

SKIP

352 21 03 05

SPT

SPT at 21:02 PLT.

[sic].

M092/171

run.

MI71

data on

CAL N2, 02, C02, 1177. is 5.145. H20, the PERCENT

CAL N2, H20 , 1256. CABIN 3.27; AIR, PERCENT C02, and PERCENT

CABIN AIR PRESSURE 02, 74.33; 1.96. third, 352 21 03 47 352 21 03 54 SPT SPT

VITAL CAPACITIES: 6.083.

6.197;

6.19 - 6.159;

SPT out. SPT back in again with MI71 information to finish the MI71. For the M151 people, the run on 171 which was concluded at 21:02. SPT out. Jer, just go ahead and turn it on. Okay.

352 21 04 12 352 21 i0 19

SPT PLT CDR

1240

_-

352 21 ii 16

SPT

Okay, let's ta - have our closeup look at a few of these moths that have emerged. I'll vary the distance back and forth here so you can come up with the best focus. On the bottom of your screen are the ones that are wild. And those are the ones - I wish we had some hatching. And the ones on the top are tame, and from which we have not seen anything as yet. And I think that - I think it's probably good right about _here. Now let me point to an area; right at the very top here in the cotton there are a few clinging. There's a couple who are there who that can cling no more. And there are a few which There's also a big ball, of these. Let me see if the cotton here. have once clinged [sic] They had a short life. have emerged recently. a cluster, if you will, I can move it away from

352

21

13

02

SPT

There it is, down there. Now the only way we can see these is to hold them up to the light and get rather close, right as - far as - close as your eye can until it goes out of focus. Then you can see some of the little fellows crawling around in there. Okay, maybe I had that off the screen at that moment. Let me point again.

352 2]

13

38

SPT

The whole cluster where they all are is right here. There's a few up at the top, a couple alive and a couple who have b_tten the dust - or in this case the cotton. That big cluster is a cluster of some who have partially emerged, or partially hatched, if you will, from the - from the egg and some which have emerged all the way. Very minute. Look about the size of a pencil lead, very thin pencil lead_ maybe even smaller than that. Hairy. And they don't do much except roll up into a ball occasionally or crawl around. Life is hard enough when you're first born, but to find yourself in zero g, think you'd be doubly confused.

352

21

14

51

SPT

Now let me try one other thing here, and that is to change the zoom, which I have set on 35 right now. And I'll slowly increase it here. And as you can see, I can focus on the main type very well. But the depth of field is so shallow that and the object that I'm looking at on the monitor is so small, it's kind of hard to tell when we have it in focus for you.

1241

352 21 16 i0

SPT

Let's go over to the wild. Okay, you can see that little cluster of them. Let me take a look a minute, and I'ii try to identify some for you.

352 21 17 42

SPT

Okay, right
one.

right in about the center of your screen, at the very top in the cotton, the center

of the tube which I've rotated now, you may see

352 21 18 29

SPT

There's

a large

aggregate

- aggregate.

And a

good focus. I'm sure the people who are familiar with the nature of these things can see, because
of the nature of the aggregate, that we've some hatching, even if you can't determine exact number or see the specific ones that got the have

hatched.
352 21 19 19 SPT Okay. Well, that's it. We'll try to keep the people that are interested in moths informed as we go on here. Between all the good Earth resources

and solar observations and medical work, the comet viewing, and looking at auroras, we also keep an
eye 352 21 19 39 SPT And on our moth eggs if we for you. with the tame

especially

see anything

ones coming out, we'll certainly let you know.
SI°T CDR 352 21 27 l0 SPT Gosh Sorry darn! Son of a gun' Ed ....

about that,

Okay, SPT here again at 21:27, and we'll try this whole moth egg spiel again. Last time we managed to get a switch into ATM BUS 1 rather than TV.

So all - we got all the good words but no pictures. So I now hope we will get both of them at the same
time. ready 352 21 28 14 SPT CDR SPT Okay, Trying to go. Jet, to get set up here, and we'll be

you ready?

Yes, I'm ready. Okay, flip her on.

CDR
352 21 28 29 CDR

Okay.
You got it.

1242

352 21 28 35

SPT

Here we are looking at a - at a eloseup view, at our companions on our 85-day flight. It's not much, but it's all we got. On the top of the screen is the vial containing the tame moths or larva, those which were bred in the laboratory. And on the right are ones which are wild. The ones on the right are the - excuse me, it's on your bottom. The one on the top is the tame, and the one on the bottom is wild. The ones on the bottom are the ones which have hatched. A relatively small percentage of them have hatched, still a significant quantity. but

352 21 29 31

SPT

There's about five or six which have fully hatched and have been out crawling around or have ceased to crawl. And the other five or six are partial emergents; that is, they got part way out, and that's as far as they got. Now first of all, on the ones on the bottom, you can see the large aggregate as I shake these