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EY / sp 10 / wk 1

IE 244
COMPUTER INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING
SYSTEMS
Introduction

Lecture Notes – week 1


Introduction

 Definition of CIM
– Computer Integrated Manufacturing
– CIM is a management and manufacturing strategy
– Use of computer technology to tie together the design,
production, marketing and delivery of a product into a totally
integrated system
– It is a strategy for organizing and controlling a factory rather than
a specific technology
– It enables linkages between, people, machines, databases and
decisions
– It is made possible by the development of shared databases,
standards and networking within manufacturing.

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Introduction

 Definition of CIM
– by CASA/SME (“Computer and Automation Systems
Association” division of the “Society of Manufacturing
Engineers”)

“CIM is the integration of the total manufacturing enterprise


through the use of integrated systems and data
communications coupled with new managerial philosophies
that improve organizational and personnel efficiency.”

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Introduction

 Definition of CIM
– by CASA/SME (“Computer and Automation Systems
Association” division of the “Society of Manufacturing
Engineers”)

“CIM is the integration of the total manufacturing enterprise


through the use of integrated systems and data
communications coupled with new managerial philosophies
that improve organizational and personnel efficiency.”

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Introduction

 Definition of CIM
– Other attempts to define CIM:
• One needs to think of CIM as a computer system in which the
peripherals, instead of being printers, plotters, terminals, and memory
disks, are robots, machine tools, and other processing equipment. It
is a little noisier and a little messier, but it’s basically a computer
system. Joel Goldhar, Dean, Illinois Institute of Technology
• CIM is a management philosophy, not a turnkey computer product. It
is a philosophy crucial to the survival of most manufacturers because
it provides the levels of product design and production control and
shopfloor flexibility to compete in future domestic and international
markets. Dan Appleton, President, DACOM, Inc.
• CIM is nothing but a data management and networking problem.
Jack Conaway, CIM Marketing Manager, DEC

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Introduction

 Definition of CIM
– According to Venkateshwaran and Alavudeen (2008) those
attempts to define CIM
“reminds us about the story of group of blind persons trying to
describe an elephant by touching it. Each has a different
description depending upon which part of the elephant’s body
was touched.”

Which part of the elephant? Manufacturing, management, or


networking?

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Introduction
 CIM Wheel – A systematic approach
– Originally developed by CASA/SME in 1985 as CIM Enterprise
Wheel.

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Introduction
 CIM Wheel – A systematic approach
– Updated in 1992 as New Manufacturing Enterprise Wheel by
CASA/SME

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Introduction
 CIM Wheel – A systematic approach
• The old version focused in • New version also focuses in
automation and integration the outside of the enterprise.
inside the enterprise.

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Introduction
 CIM Wheel

1. The central role of


the customer and
evolving customer
needs.  Strives for
continous improvement

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Introduction
 CIM Wheel

2. The role of people


and teamwork in the
organization.

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Introduction

 CIM Wheel

3. The revolutionary
impact of shared
knowledge and
systems to support
people and processes.

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Introduction

 CIM Wheel

4. Key processes from


product definition
through
manufacturing and
customer support.

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Introduction

 CIM Wheel

5. Enterprise resources
(inputs) and
responsibilities
(outputs).

This infrastructure can


only be implemented by
computer integration.

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Introduction

 How to implement it in a production environment?


– Aim to
• Simplify production processes, product designs, and factory
organization as a vital foundation to automation and integration
• Automate production processes and the business functions that
support them with computers, machines, and robots
• Integrate all production and support processes using computer
networks, cross-functional business software, and other information
technologies

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Introduction

 Production System
– Collection of
• people,
• equipment, and
• procedures
organized to accomplish
the manufacturing operations
of a company.

Aim: identify and locate the most efficient method to produce a


product.

Objective: reduce time to market, increase quality, reduce cost


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Introduction

 Production System
– consists of
• facilities and
• manufacturing support systems

Set of procedures to
- manage production
- solve technical and logistic problems
Manufacturing - ensure quality standards
Production

support systems - design product


system

and certain bussiness functions

Facilities
- The factory
- The equipment
- The way the equipment is organized
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