Você está na página 1de 54

Sharing our Guidance

HEATING, VENTILATING, & 
AIR CONDITIONING FUNDAMENTALS
HVAC FUNDAMENTALS

INTRODUCTION 

•HVAC = Heating , Ventilating and Air Conditioning
•Heating and cooling load calculations
• Energy and Heat Transfer
• Material Properties
• Climate/location
• Building Construction & Envelope
•Ventilation requirements
• Natural vs Mechanical
•System and Equipment types

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
THERMAL PROCESSES

DEFINITIONS
• Temperature – measurement of heat
• Specific Heat – storage capacity of a material
• Latent – change of state energy; related to moisture
X
• Sensible – “what you feel”; temperature changes
• Conduction – heat transfer through contact
• Convection – warmer air rises, cooler air falls
• Radiation – heat transfer without a medium 

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
R & U VALUES

DEFINITIONS
• R = thermal resistance (of a material and specified thickness)

• K = conductivity (material property)

• U‐value = reciprocal of R

• X
x/k = R (where x is thickness of material)

• R = 1/U

• U = 1/ (R1 + R2 + R3 + R4)

• Where each R is different section of material in any given 
construction assembly

• Ex:  Chart of building materials in construction

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HEATING LOAD CALCULATIONS

FORMULA
• Q = UA (T2‐T1)
• (heat transfer coefficient) x (area) x (temperature difference)
• Degree Days = mean temperature of a day is 1 degree different 
from 65oF. (i.e. mean temp of 63oXF is two heating degree days)
• Infiltration
• Air changes
• Crack method

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC FUNDAMENTALS

ELECTRIC HEAT GAS HEAT
• More efficient • Perception ‐ warmer
• More flexible sizing choices • Direct and indirect
• One power (utility) source • Less flexible for unit 
X selection and staging
• No flues / piping on room
• Duct furnaces

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC FUNDAMENTALS

VENTILATION
‐ Design requirements and focus:
• Code requirements
• Odor control
X
• Smoke control
• Energy recovery

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
COOLING LOAD CALCULATIONS

FACTORS
• Exterior elements (envelope loads)
• Roof (actual temp over 120oF)
• Walls (heavy walls, heat moves slower)
• Windows (warm surface)
X
• Windows (solar)
• Outdoor air for ventilation (people)
• Outdoor air due to infiltration (leaks)

• Interior elements
• People
• Lights (100% conversion to heat)
• Equipment

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
COOLING LOAD CALCULATIONS

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
COOLING LOAD CALCULATIONS

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
PSYCHOMETRICS
• Dry Bulb
• Wet Bulb
• State Point
• Relative Humidity
• Dewpoint X

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
PSYCHOMETRICS

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
PSYCHOMETRICS

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
PSYCHOMETRICS

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
PSYCHOMETRICS

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
PSYCHOMETRICS

DEFINITIONS
• Absolute Humidity ‐ actual mass of water vapor present in the air water vapor 
mixture. The absolute humidity may be expressed in pounds of water vapor 
(lb).
• Specific Humidity Ratio or Humidity Ratio ‐ ratio between the actual mass of 
water vapor present in moist air ‐ to the mass of the dry air.
X
• Humidity Ratio ‐ normally expressed in pounds of water vapor per pound of dry 
air or in grains of moisture per pound of dry air. There are approximately 7,000 
grains in a pound.
• Relative Humidity ‐ The ratio of the amount of water vapor in the air at a 
specific temperature to the maximum amount that the air could hold at that 
temperature, expressed as a percentage.
• Dewpoint temperature ‐ temperature below which moisture will condense out 
of air.  Air at a given humidity ratio has a constant dewpoint. If air is cooled 
below this point, moisture condenses out, thus changing its humidity ratio.

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
PSYCHOMETRICS

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
PSYCHOMETRICS

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
PSYCHOMETRICS

COMMON FORMULAS
• Sensible Btuh = Cfm * ΔT * 1.08
• Derive the 1.08 factor as follows:
• 1 CFM x 60 = 60 CFH
X
• 60 CFH x .075 lbs of air/cu ft = 4.5 lbs of air/hr
• 4.5 x 0.24 Btu/lb ‐°F (specific heat of air) = 1.08 Btu/hr °F ‐ CFM
• Total heat = Cfm * ΔH * 4.5
• Derive this one on your own?
• Mixed Air ºF = (Cfm RA * ºF) + (Cfm OA* ºF)
Cfm SA (Total Cfm)

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HUMAN COMFORT

BASICS
• Human Body generates 450 – 2500 BTU/Hr
• Psychometric Chart
• Sling Psychometer ‐ measures wet bulb temperature (grains of 
X
moisture per pound of air or pounds of moisture per pound of air)
• Ranges for comfort:
• 65 – 78 deg F (dry bulb)
• 20% ‐ 50% RH

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC SYSTEMS

HYDRONIC SYSTEMS
• Steam, Heating Hot water, Chilled Water, etc.

• Often Radiant Design (radiators)

• Single Pipe

• Typically Boiler system (heating)X

• Common supply/return pipe

• Two Pipe

• Either Boiler or Chiller (heating or cooling)

• Dedicated supply and dedicated return pipes

• Three Pipe and Four Pipe Systems

• Heating and Cooling systems

• Separate coils or mixing valves and single coils
Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC SYSTEMS

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC SYSTEMS

FORCED AIR SYSTEMS
• Single Duct vs Dual Duct Supply
• Constant Volume vs Variable Volume

BUILDING PRESSURE
X
• Positively Pressurize Building
• Limits infiltration

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC SYSTEMS

FORCED AIR SYSTEMS

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC SYSTEMS

FORCED AIR SYSTEMS

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC SYSTEMS

FORCED AIR SYSTEMS

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC SYSTEMS

FORCED AIR SYSTEMS

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC SYSTEMS

FORCED AIR SYSTEMS

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC SYSTEMS

FORCED AIR SYSTEMS

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC SYSTEMS

FORCED AIR SYSTEMS

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC SYSTEMS

FORCED AIR SYSTEMS

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC SYSTEMS

What is a “ton” of AC?

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC SYSTEMS

PLANT SIZING
• Capacity of all loads on a ‘design day’ based on the system 
(peak vs. block load)
• Heating: MBH or kBTU’s (1,000 BTU/HR)
• X
Cooling: Ton of cooling (12,000 BTU/HR)
• 1 ton of ice – change of state/melting into water in 24 
hours

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC SYSTEMS

SYSTEM SIZING
• Air systems

• CFM = Q(BTU)/1.08 * (T2‐T1)
• CFM = Cubic Feet of air per minute (Airflow)

• Ductwork X
• A = 144 * CFM / V 
• V = velocity in feet per minute
• Common: 300 to 2,000 fpm
• A = duct area in square inches

• Fans 

• Static Pressure: created by fan on duct system to overcome 
friction loss and throw at diffuser or grille.
• Friction loss as H2O = Inches of water column

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC SYSTEMS

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC SYSTEMS

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC FUNDAMENTALS

BASICS SUMMARY
• Heat flows from object at higher temp to object at 
lower temp
• Air Conditioning (AC) does not add cool, it extracts 
heat
X
• Refrigerant (aka “Freon”)
• Common characteristics
• Changes states
• Transfers energy
• Highly efficient

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC FUNDAMENTALS

REFRIGERATION CYCLE (VAPOR COMPRESSION)
Hot, high pressure gas is  Refrigerant 
circulated through a heat  expands into 
rejection coil outside and  cold, low 
changing refrigerant  pressure liquid.
state to liquid.
X

Cold liquid/gas 
runs through a 
coil while air 
passes over. 
The cold gas 
absorbs heat 
from the air.
Compressor squeezes 
low pressure refrigerant 
gas into hot high 
pressure refrigerant gas.
Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC FUNDAMENTALS

REFRIGERATION CYCLE FOR HEAT PUMPS

Reverses on a 
Heat Pump
X

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC FUNDAMENTALS

EQUIPMENT PROS AND CONS
• Package
• Splits
• Rooftop Units
X
• Central Water Source Heat Pumps
• Central Rooftop VAV
• Central Chilled Water
• Distributed Air Handlers
• Central Large Air Handlers
• Central… District Chilled Water?

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC FUNDAMENTALS

WINDOW UNIT

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC FUNDAMENTALS

WINDOW AC OR PTAC UNIT
• Pros • Cons
• Low first cost • Low efficiency
• Easy to install • Appearance
X
• Easy to replace / maintain • Requires outside 
• Short life cycle
• Noise

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC FUNDAMENTALS

SPLIT SYSTEM

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC FUNDAMENTALS

SPLIT SYSTEMS – FURNACES OR AHU’s & CU’s


• Pros • Cons
• More options for location • Efficiency
• Larger capacity • O.A. needs to be ducted
X
• Condenser locations • Equipment access –
usually located in ceilings
• Sound
• Condensate piping
• Replacement costs
• Zone control challenges

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC FUNDAMENTALS

ROOFTOP UNIT

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC FUNDAMENTALS

ROOFTOP UNITS
• Pros • Cons
• Higher efficiencies • Zoning issues for larger 
systems
• Larger capacity
X • Need to be concealed
• Ease of installation
• Zone Control (non‐VAV)
• Ease of service and 
maintenance • Structural requirements
• No internal O.A. ductwork • Limit to number of floors
• Shaft requirements

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC FUNDAMENTALS

ROOFTOP VAV
VAV boxes vary the amount 
of air to meet cooling needs 
in individual spaces.

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC FUNDAMENTALS

ROOFTOP VAV
• Pros • Cons
• Higher efficiencies • Structural requirements
• Larger capacity • Replacement costs
X
• Zone control • Initial equipment costs
• No internal O.A. ductwork • Concealment
• Limit to number of floors
• Shaft requirements

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC FUNDAMENTALS

CHILLED WATER

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC FUNDAMENTALS

CENTRAL CHILLED WATER AIR HANDLERS
• Pros • Cons
• More options for locations • O.A. needs to be ducted
• Maintenance is centralized • Condensate piping
X
• Sound • Experienced HVAC on‐
site staff
• Zone control
• First cost of equipment 
• Opportunities for LEED  and distribution
points
• No limit to number of 
stories

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC FUNDAMENTALS

• Water Source Heat Pumps
• Closed Loop Cooling Towers
• Evaporative
• Fluid Coolers
X

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC FUNDAMENTALS

WATER SOURCE HEAT PUMPS
• Pros • Cons
• High efficiencies / energy  • O.A. needs to be ducted
savings
• Condensate piping
• Zone control X
• Equipment access –
• Location options usually located in ceilings
• Replacement costs
• Sound

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC FUNDAMENTALS

RULES OF THUMB
• 1 kilowatt = 3.413 btu (British thermal units)
• 1 btu = heat needed to raise 1lb water 1°F
• One ton = 12,000 btu/hour
X
• Air leaves AC unit at 55°F
• Airflow required to space is approx 1 cfm/ft2
• AC units has nominal capacity of 400 cfm/ton

Use of the information and data contained within tesengineering.com and/or these pages is at your sole risk. 
For full Terms of Use see www.tesengineering.com/termsofuse.html
©2008 TES Engineering
HVAC FUNDAMENTALS

QUESTIONS / DISCUSSION ?

THANK YOU