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ENVIRONMENTAL

MANAGEMENT
SYSTEM

SUBMITTED BY:
JACINTO, JILLIAN G.
SUBMITTED TO:
DR. RUBY HENSON
ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGY
Nokia is a market leader in mobile devices and with leadership comes great
responsibility. Nokia aims to be a leading company in environmental
performance. Our vision is a world where everyone being connected can
contribute to sustainable development. We want to shape our industry and
drive best practices.

Achieving environmental leadership means minimising our own


environmental footprint. With the expansion of mobile communications, this
is all the more important. We strive to reduce the environmental impact of
our products, solutions, and operations. We also collaborate with our
suppliers to improve the environmental performance of our supply chain.

We have a user base of more than one billion people which means that we
have a unique opportunity to make an impact that goes beyond our own
activities. That’s why we aim to offer people products and solutions that help
them make sustainable choices. Together, we can achieve more.

Minimising our environmental footprint

Nokia’s environmental work is based on life cycle thinking. This means that
we aim to minimise the environmental impact of our products throughout our
operations, beginning with the extraction of raw materials and ending with
recycling, treatment of waste, and recovery of used materials. We achieve
this by better product design, close control of the production processes, and
greater material reuse and recycling.
Our environmental efforts focus on four issues:

• Substance management. We work closely with our suppliers and


require full declaration of the substances we use in our devices. Our
work is based on the precautionary principle and we aim at
continuously reducing the amount of substances of concern. In
addition, we explore the opportunities for using new, more
environmentally friendly materials, such as bio plastics or recycled
metals and plastics.

• Energy efficiency. We make sure our devices use as little energy as


possible. We also work to reduce the energy consumption of our
operations, and agree on energy efficiency targets with our key
suppliers.

• Take back and recycling. We want to increase consumer awareness


of recycling, offer superior recycling in all markets and promote the
recycling of used devices through specific initiatives and campaigns.
The backbone of Nokia’s take-back program are the collection points of
used devices in 5000 Nokia care centres in 85 countries.

• Promoting sustainability through services and software. We


have developed eco services for our phones to help people to make
sustainable choices and consider the environment in their everyday
lives. A variety of eco services are freely downloadable to Nokia
devices via Ovi store.

Basic principles

Our environmental work is based on global principles and standards. Our


targets are not driven by regulatory compliance but go way beyond legal
requirements. Environmental issues are fully integrated in our business
activities and are everyone’s responsibility in Nokia. It is a part of everything
we do.
CLIMATE STRATEGY
Nokia aims to be a leading company in environmental performance. The way
we address the global challenge of climate change through energy efficiency
in our products and operations is an integral part of our overall
environmental strategy.

Although Nokia is not an energy intensive company and most of the CO2
emissions take place either in component manufacturing by our suppliers or
in the use phase of our products, we want to show leadership. We do this by
reducing our own CO2 footprint, raising consumer awareness on measures
they can take to reduce their own footprint, driving best practices in our
industry and influencing other industries to make full use of the potential of
ICT and mobility in reducing emission.

Nokia's climate strategy includes specfic targets covering areas that


contribute to our direct and indirect CO2 emissions. The four main areas are:

• Nokia products and services


• Nokia operations
• Nokia facilities
• Leveraging mobile and virtual tools in the way of working and
management practices.

We provide Independent Assurance for some key targets. The assurance can
also be found in our Sustainability Report 2009.

Nokia Siemens Network is part of Nokia Group. Nokia Siemens Networks


offers the industry’s most comprehensive approach to efficient and
sustainable telecoms growth for Communications Service Providers of new
and legacy telecommunications networks. Nokia Siemens Networks Energy
Solutions are designed to reduce network operating costs and lower the
power consumption of telecoms networks by exploiting more efficient
technology and renewable energy. Here are couple of examples of the
achievements so far:

• http://www.nokiasiemensnetworks.com/press/press-
releases/renewable-energy-and-efficiency-targeted-lower-telecoms-
costs
• http://www.nokiasiemensnetworks.com/press/press-releases/nokia-
siemens-networks-pursues-applications-partnerships-energy-sector
• http://www.nokiasiemensnetworks.com/insight/environment/renewable
-energy
• http://www.nokiasiemensnetworks.com/portfolio/services/energysolutio
ns
• http://www.nokiasiemensnetworks.com/press/press-releases/exploit-
ict-reduce-global-warming-nokia-siemens-networks-cop15

We also provide comprehensive digital map information from NAVTEQ.


According to their research, NAVTEQ Navigation Benefits Study, drivers using
navigation on a regular basis not only drive shorter distances and spend less
time driving, but also consume less fuel which decreases their CO2
emissions.

To participate raising public awareness Nokia signed an international


communiqué, along with over 150 other global organizations, ahead of the
December 2007 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Bali,
Indonesia. It urged world leaders to develop policies and measures for the
business sector to contribute to building a low carbon economy to help
tackle climate change. Nokia's participation demonstrates our support for the
belief that the benefits of strong, early action on climate change outweigh
the costs of doing nothing.

There is good evidence that information and communications technology


(ICT) makes a major contribution to GDP growth but at the same time can
help to reduce the use of energy, thus slowing down global warming.
Technology enables higher energy efficiency by making homes, offices,
transportation, and operations more efficient. ICT-based services and
working methods such as remote work and videoconferencing can result in
lower overall CO2 emissions.

The environmental gains of dematerialization can also be significant.


Convergence, or incorporating the functionalities of several products into one
product, can further contribute to dematerialization and energy efficiency.
ENERGY SAVING TARGETS
Nokia created a climate strategy in 2006. It looks at the energy consumption
and CO2 emissions of our products and operations and sets energy and CO2
emission reduction targets for our most important activities. We updated this
strategy in 2008 and have set ourselves the following targets.

Those marked [V] have external verification of performance in place. The


statement of the latest verification round (June 2009) can be found from
here.

Products and services

• Reduce the average charger's no-load power consumption from 2006


level by 50 percent by the end of 2010 (V)
• Continue to study new technologies which will use renewable energy
resources, such as solar panels and kinetic energy
• Continue to look ways to reduce data centers energy consumption

Operations (including suppliers and service providers)

• Ensure that improvement in energy efficiency meet and exceed the


general efficiency targets per units manufactured
• Ensure that all our key suppliers set energy efficiency and CO2
reduction targets
• Set CO2 reduction targets for logistics service providers

Facilities

• Create 6% of new energy savings in technical building maintenance


systems between 2007 and 2012 compared to the baseline year 2006,
in addition to the savings of 3.5% achieved already in 2003–2006.(V)
• In 2009–2010, begin deploying green electricity purchases to those
countries where Nokia operates and where buying green electricity
makes the most impacts on CO2 savings. This will depend on how
carbon intensive the local power generation industry is and where
green electricity purchaces are available.
• Reduce CO2 emissions through these measures by a minimum of 10%
in 2009 and by a minimum of 18% in 2010, compared to the base year
2006.

Work and management practices

• educe work related travel and commuting by increasing remote work


and remote working possibilites and reduce office space to gain
savings in energy consumption and CO2 emissions.
• Offer employees the possibility to offset their air travel carbon dioxide
emission
• Utilise energy saving technologies in offices and in office
equipment/hardware.

Participation in external initiatives

• Continue to investigate opportunities to join further voluntary


initiatives promoting energy efficiency across the industry
• Provide solutions and influence policy makers to realise the role and
potential of ICT in reducing economies overall energy consumption
when addressing climate change policies.
ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
We believe that environmental management has to be fully incorporated in
our business processes. Environmental issues are everyone’s responsibility
at Nokia and an integral part of managing our business because they are
related to all we do. Our environmental work is based on global policies and
standards.

The Nokia wide Environmental Management System (EMS) according to the


ISO 14001 standard covers our production sites and large offices. All Nokia
production sites are included in the company wide ISO 14001 single
certificate. The first manufacturing sites have completed the certification end
of 2000. Certification is an ongoing process, with all new production sites
being covered by the certificate.The EMS in our large offices and R&D sites is
verified internally. We also require a certified EMS of our contract
manufacturers and EMS is one of our supplier requirements.

Our Environmental Management System consists of:

• Nokia's Environmental Policy


• Identification of environmental aspects, and evaluation of their
significance
• Objectives and programs for achieving environmental targets
• Compliance with legal and other regulatory requirements
• Audits, management reviews, and continuous improvement
• Operational management (data and processes) for energy and water
consumption, waste etc.

The goal of the Nokia EMS is to improve our environmental performance,


focusing on:

• Energy consumption
• Water consumption
• Air emissions
• Ozone-depleting substances
• Waste management
• Packaging
ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY
Nokia’s Environmental Policy
Basic Principles
1. A successful business requires a solid, product life cycle based
environmental
performance.
2. The Nokia Way means an active, open and ethically sound approach to
environmental
protection.
3. The objective of Nokia's environmental policy is sustainable development
in accordance
with the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) business charter.
Implementation
1. The environmental policy is an integral part of general management
process.
2. Line organizations plan and implement the action programs by using
environmental
specialists and the best available technology.
3. The action programs are based on a thorough understanding of the
environmental impacts of a product throughout its life cycle.
4. Minimizing the environmental impacts requires continuous efforts and
follow-up of the
results; it is thereby a part of the total improvement activities.
Originally published in 1994 and revised in 2002.
SUBSTANCE AND MATERIAL MANAGEMENT
Nokia is an industry leader in substance management. Our main objective is
that we know all the substances in our products, not just those that raise
concerns, and that they are safe for people and the environment when used
in the proper way.

Nokia is the first mobile phone manufacturer which, in close cooperation with
its suppliers, has full material declaration for our mobile devices. This means
we can respond swiftly if new concerns arise about substances we use.

Meeting health and environmental regulatory requirements is a basic


requirement. It is our practice to use legal compliance not as a mere baseline
but as a starting point from which to grow.

We follow the precautionary principle. Where we have reasonable grounds


for concern over the possibility of severe or irreversible damage to health or
the environment, we believe that lack of full scientific certainty should not be
an obstacle to triggering actions to gather and assess additional data. That
may lead us to voluntarily take steps, e.g. to substitute substances of
concern with safer alternatives, where feasible alternatives are available.

We aspire to go beyond legislation and compliance, and proactively drive the


development and efficient use of more sustainable materials. We promote
innovative and sustainable material choices, and work on this in close
collaboration with our suppliers.

We are actively researching the development and deployment of


biomaterials. Biomaterials that are made of renewable natural resources can
potentially reduce dependence on fossil fuel based raw materials and thus
help minimize global warming, by decreasing CO2 and other greenhouse gas
emissions. Our focus is on the development of bio-based materials which do
not compete with food industry. We've introduced fully renewable materials
in the Nokia 3110 Evolve. 50 percent of the plastics in its cover were
bioplastics, made from renewable sources. Since Nokia 3110 Evolve, we
have continued to research and implement bio-plastics when those are a
viable and optimal solution for a given part and product. Nokia C7 is the
industry first device to use bio paints.

Nokia C6-01 is the first device in the industry to use recycled metals, in the
internal parts of the product. Metals are recycled to some extent today, so
some of the components used in this industry may contain a portion of
recycled metal in addition to the primary metal. What makes our approach
different is that we have introduced a process and clear requirements for the
use of recycled metals, increasing the ratio of recycled content significantly.
For example, for stainless steel we require 75% recycled content and for
nickel silver alloy a whole 97%. Nokia C6-01 uses both recycled stainless
steel and recycled nickel silver in some of its internal parts.

We are actively researching the use of recycled plastics. We are working on


to find ways to overcome durability issues that currently result from the
lower quality of available recycled plastics. Through extensive R&D, testing
and concepting, we make sure that all our devices - regardless of the
materials used - meet the same standards and have the highest quality,
reliability and longevity. This ensures a maximum lifetime for your Nokia
device and thus reduces waste.

Nokia Substance List (NSL)


The Nokia Substance List identifies substances that we have banned,
restricted, or targeted for reduction with the aim of phasing out their use in
our products. The list is divided into two sections, Restriction in Force and
Monitored Substances. We work together with our suppliers in investigating
alternative materials and solutions that will help us fully eliminate restricted
or monitored substances from our total product line. The Nokia Substance
List will be updated annually. In addition, we will give interim updates on
individual substance phase outs as needed in these pages.

See the Nokia Substance list (NSL) in full. (XLS file, 785 KB)

All new Nokia devices are RoHS compliant and free of PVC. Starting from
2010 all our products will also be free of brominated and chlorinated
compounds and antimony trioxide as defined in Nokia Substance List.

About brominated and chlorinated compounds and antimony trioxide


(restricted flame retardants) phase out

A couple of years back, Nokia made an ambitious voluntary commitment to


phase out not only brominated flame retardants (BFR), but also other
compounds of bromine, chlorine and antimony trioxide, as defined in Nokia
Substance List (NSL), from all our new mobile devices and accessories.
Considering the breadth of the substances to be phased out as well as our
scale of operations, this project has demanded extensive R&D, actions and
cooperation with our suppliers.

By driving this phase-out project, we have been doing pioneering work, and
in collaboration with our suppliers helped clean out the industry from these
substances, also for others who use same sources of components. Despite
the economic downturn, we have maintained and remain committed to our
original aim. On November 2008, we launched our first device free of
brominated compounds, chlorinated flame retardants and antimony trioxide,
ahead of schedule. Today, a total of 46 new Nokia models are free of these
substances, based on NSL definitions.

Looking ahead, we are proud to say that our new mobile phones and
accessories to be launched during 2010 are on track to become fully free of
bromine, chlorine and antimony trioxide as defined in the Nokia Substance
List.

About other materials & substances phase out


Nokia has banned the use of Beryllium Oxide since 2004 in all new products.
The restriction for use of all other Beryllium compounds has been in force
since 2010 for all new products. Use of Phtalates in our products has been
restricted since 2005. The ban includes 8 different Phtalates of which 6 are
restricted based on EU regulation.

Working with suppliers on substance management


Our substance management requirements include the need to know, control
and manage the material content of the components and parts supplied. We
expect our suppliers to integrate environmental considerations in their
design procedures and supply chain management.

Our suppliers must record the material content of products supplied to Nokia
and make these records available to us on request. We check that they are
complying with these requirements and other social and ethical standards
through audits and inspections.

If we find a supplier is not complying, we ask them to take corrective action


and check this has been done. We work with suppliers to help them make
improvements, offering examples of best practice, training and other
support. If a supplier were to refuse to address any of these issues we would
be prepared to reconsider our business relationship.

We work together with selected suppliers to develop indicators of


environmental performance for the components and materials in our
devices. Involving suppliers in substance management means we can
introduce new environmental requirements quickly.

Nokia Substance management timeline:


From time to time we get questions about certain substances or general
principles in our substance management. We are addressing the frequently
asked questions here.

About Nickel
All Nokia devices comply with strict global safety and quality standards. We
use nickel at levels well within current legal and safety limits. Our policy is
that all our new devices are free of nickel on the product surfaces.

Since as early as 2001, we have voluntarily complied with restrictions on the


use of nickel as defined in the EU Directives 94/27/EC and 2004/96/EC
amending the Directive 76/769/EEC. This directive was originally targeted for
products where the materials often are in direct skin contact for longer
periods of time, such as jewellery. In December 2008 EU Commission
decided that this directive is applied for mobile phones as well. We have
addressed this requirement in advance.

The directive 76/769/EEC has been repealed by the EU regulation (EC) No


1907/2006 concerning the Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and
Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) in June 2009.

Over 40 of our recent devices, such as the popular Nokia 5800 XpressMusic
and the Supernova series, come without nickel on the surface coatings or
any underlayer, giving people with allergies lots of choice. The information
about whether a product includes nickel or not can be found in the eco
declaration of each individual product.

Some metal alloys used on product surfaces, such as stainless steel,


inherently contain nickel, but standardized testing has shown that these do
not cause nickel sensitivity in the general population. However, Nokia offers
a wide range of models without stainless steel on their surfaces as well.

About RoHS Directive


RoHS stands for “the restriction of the use of certain hazardous substances
in electrical and electronic equipment”. The European Union’s new legislation
restricts the use of lead, mercury, cadmium, hexavalent chromium and two
flame retardants in all electric and electronics equipment. Although this
regulation came into effect on 1 July 2006, Nokia introduced the first RoHS
compliant product already in April 2005, over a year before the legislation
came into force. Currently all Nokia products are RoHS compliant not only in
Europe, but globally.

RoHS legislation in the future


Nokia’s follows the precautionary principle in its material management. The
Nokia Substance List (NSL) expresses our view on the need for and
application of the precautionary principle for the specific substances relevant
to our business/industry.

We are continuously and proactively phasing out substances according to


these principles and welcome further research of the environmental risks
related to substances used in the ICT industry. The criteria and processes for
new restrictions need to be clear and transparent for the industry to be
prepared and to be able to act proactively. It is important to work together
across our whole industry and suppliers to make this happen and gradually
replace these materials with environmentally more friendly alternatives or
new technologies. In line with the precautionary principle, Nokia favors
voluntary initiatives by the industry, which is reflected in our publically
available Nokia Substance List.

In addition, the following principles should be taken into consideration:

• Restriction criteria to be based on potential risk in the full product life


cycle – focus should be on substances that are relevant for our industry
• Evaluation process well aligned with existing legislation
• Industry to be involved in the discussion about the processes and the
practical implications
• For receiving CE marking on products, full material declaration should
be driven forward as an alternative for compulsory testing. In any case,
compliance with legislation should be easily verified.

It is important that the enforcement of the legislation is uniform throughout


the EU. Market surveillance needs to be transparent and effective and it
should be carried out together with industry parties.

To accelerate the implementation of key changes globally, further regulatory


requirements may be needed. Nokia is actively contributing to the
development of systematic criteria and processes for improved RoHS
legislation. Nokia continues to support effective RoHS legislation to
complement but not contradict with other legal requirements. Nokia also
supports further restrictions for chlorinated and brominated compounds, as
already committed to in our ambitious targets.

About REACH regulation


The EU regulation concerning the Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and
Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) has been in force since June 1st, 2007.
Nokia's basic principle is that the use of chemicals in Nokia products and
processes shall be safe to humans and the environment. Within REACH,
Nokia has the role and responsibilities of a downstream user. We
continuously assess the substances and their uses in Nokia products and
production operations, and we are in active communications with our supply
chain also regarding REACH and its implementation. Nokia devices and
accessories do not contain substances included in the current EU REACH
candidate list of “Substances of Very High Concern”, which REACH would
require to be reported. However, we voluntarily give information on our
substance management, including REACH-related requirements, in the Nokia
Substance List which can be found from this page.

About Tantalum / Coltan


Nokia became aware of the potential link between mining of Tantalum and
financing of the conflict in the DRC in 2001 and took action immediately.

Tantalum is a material used in many consumer electronics products. The


mobile phone industry uses a very small amount of the world’s total supply
of Tantalum. DRC is one of the places where Tantalum, or rather Coltan, one
of the ores that it comes from is naturally found and mined. The country only
accounts for a very small amount of the world’s supply of this material, but it
can be found in the east of the country where there is conflict, leading to
concerns that this Tantalum may be mined under conditions breaching
human rights or sold to fund war and illegal activity.

As soon as we became aware of this issue we began requiring suppliers of


capacitors used in our mobile phones to confirm they do not source this
material from the conflict areas of DRC. This is checked on an ongoing basis,
and also monitored via the Nokia Substance List requirements. The DRC
provides a tiny amount of the world’s source of Tantalum. The vast majority
of it is mined in other places around the world including Brazil, Canada,
Russia, China and a number of other countries in Central Africa.
ENVIRONMENTAL MILESTONES
All new Nokia devices are free of brominated and chlorinated compounds
and antimony trioxide (BFR, RFR).

Eco Profiles for all new Nokia devices made available on our website
presenting not only the environmental features in our phones but also the
environmental impact and CO2-eg. footprint throughout their lifecycle.

Nokia introduces new eco lead devices such as the Nokia C7, the first device
in the industry to use bio paints, and the Nokia C6-01, the first device in the
industry to use recycled metals.

The Nokia 6700 slide starts selling also without a charger in an ultrathin flat
pack in UK and Portugal.

Dow Jones Indexes names Nokia as the world’s most sustainable technology
company for the second year running.

2009

Nokia introduces several devices free of brominated and chlorinated


compounds and antimony trioxide (BFR, RFR).

Nokia supports the GSMA industry-wide initiative to create a common


charger for mobile devices.

The prestigious Dow Jones Indexes ranks Nokia as the world’s most
sustainable technology company.

Nokia’s Jucu Factory in Romania achieves Gold Rating for Leadership in


Energyand Environment Design (LEED).

Nokia’s most energy efficient charger for micro-USB charging, Nokia Fast
Micro-USB Charger AC-10, was introduced.

2008

Nokia Beijing campus in China achieves Leadership in Energy and


Environmental Design (LEED) Gold Level certification.

Nokia and four other mobile manufacturers launch an energy rating system
for mobile chargers.
Launch of the Nokia 7100 Supernova: our first device to be free of
brominated compoundsantimony trioxide and chlorinated flame retardants
(BFR and RFR).

2007

Nokia’s most energy efficient charger so far, the Nokia Fast Charger AC-8,
was introduced.

The first device using bio plastic in covers, the Nokia 3110 Evolve, was
launched. It also came with the energy efficient Nokia High Efficiency
Charger AC-8 and compact packaging using 60 percent recycled materials.

Nokia becomes the first manufacturer to introduce unplug charger reminders


to mobile devices.

We achieve our target of using 25% renewable electricity in our own


premises.

The Eco catalogue for S60 devices was introduced.

The world’s first mobile offsetting application, we:offset, was launched. The
application helps people offset CO2 emissions caused by flying, directly from
their mobile device.

2006

All Nokia devices are EU RoHS compliant – everywhere in the world.

All new Nokia devices, headsets and chargers are PVC-free.

New compact packaging introduced, reducing the amount of materials used


by over 50% in just two years.

2005

The first EU RoHS compliant mobile device is released to market - the Nokia
5140i - over a year before the legislation comes into force.

2003

Global partnership with WWF was signed to find new ways of enhancing
environmental performance and increasing employee environmental
awareness.

1997
Nokia’s first recycling pilot schemes take place in Sweden and the UK.

CASE STUDIES
On November 2009, Nokia conducted a case study about a design for the
environment.

Nokia’s approach on phasing out brominated and chlorinated


compounds and antimony trioxide

Scope

Nokia’s scope includes phasing out all brominated and chlorinated


compounds and antimony trioxide as specified in the Nokia Substance List
requirements and definitions.

Background and rationale

The EU RoHS directive 2002/95/EC prohibited the use of brominated flame


retardants PBB and PBDE in electronics after 1.7.2006. PBB or PBDE are not
used in Nokia products. Prior to any legal requirements Nokia started
voluntary activities phasing out chlorine, bromine or antimony trioxide with
good progress to date.

Requirements and implementation

Nokia follows the precautionary principle. Where we have reasonable


grounds for concern over the possibility of severe or irreversible damage to
health or the environment, we believe that lack of full scientific certainty
should not be an obstacle to triggering actions to gather and assess
additional data. This may lead us to take voluntarily steps, e.g. to substitute
substances of concern with safer alternatives, where feasible alternatives are
available.

We aspire to go beyond legislation and compliance, and proactively drive the


development and efficient use of more sustainable materials. We promote
innovative and sustainable material choices, and work on this in close
collaboration with our suppliers.

The Nokia Substance List identifies substances that we have banned,


restricted, or targeted for reduction with the aim of phasing out their use in
our products. Nokia Substance List contains also up-to-date definition on
restriction for brominated and chlorinated compounds and antimony trioxide.
NSL is divided into two sections, Restriction in Force and Monitored
Substances. We work together with our suppliers in investigating alternative
materials and solutions that will help us fully eliminate restricted or
monitored substances from our total product line. The Nokia Substance List
is updated annually. In addition, we give interim updates on individual
substance phase outs as needed in our web pages.

Nokia is the first mobile phone manufacturer which, in close cooperation with
its suppliers, has full material declaration for mobile devices. This means we
can respond swiftly if new concerns arise about substances we use. Full
material declaration should also be driven forward as an alternative for
compulsory testing, in any case, compliance should be easily verified.

Our substance management requirements include the need to know, control


and manage the material content of the components and parts supplied. We
expect our suppliers to integrate environmental considerations in their
design procedures and supply chain management. Our suppliers must record
the material content of products supplied to Nokia and make these records
available to us on request. We check that they are complying with these
requirements and other social and ethical standards through audits and
inspections.

History and case examples

At Nokia the substance management has long history. Already at late 1970’s
Nokia issued internal instructions on Chemicals Control. The Nokia Substance
list (NSL) introduction dates back to year 2000, and on 2001 the first public
version of NLS was introduced. The assessment of the elimination of
halogenated flame retardants started already in the last century and the
phase out plan of brominated flame retardants was introduced publicly in
Nokia Substance List in 2001.

Restriction of brominated and chlorinated flame retardants came into force


for Printed Wiring Boards in Nokia Substance List in 2004. In addition to
PWBs, the elimination of brominated and chlorinated compounds and
antimony trioxide continued for other components and parts. On 4th
November 2008 we introduced our first device, Nokia 7100 Supernova that is
free of brominated compounds, antimony trioxide and even free of
chlorinated flame retardants.

Since the introduction of Nokia 7100 Supernova, we’ve launched in total 16


new models that are free of these substances. The status of a product’s
compliance can always be found in the respective eco declaration. A list of
the models is also available on request.

Our commitment is not, however, just about a few devices but we are
phasing out the use of all brominated and chlorinated compounds and
antimony trioxide across our whole global product range. From the beginning
of 2009 we have been introducing products free of these substances to all
regions, steadily increasing the amount of products available throughout
2009. Our aim is to have all new products launched after end of 2009 free of
these substances.