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A STUDY ON EMPLOYEE WELFARE MEASURES IN

ROYAL CLASSIC MILLS PRIVATE LIMITED

Project report submitted to

ANNA UNIVERSITY COIMBATORE

For the award of the degree of

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Submitted by

M.DHANA LAKSHMI

Reg. No. 098001117013

Under the Supervision and Guidance of

Dr. M. PRINCE MANICKAM, B.Sc (Agri)., CAIIB., MBA., M.Phil., Ph.D.,

Head of the MBA department

DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES

PARK COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TEKHNOLOGY

COIMBATORE – 641659

MARCH-MAY 2011

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BONAFIDE CERTIFICATE

This is to certify that the Project report, entitled “A Study On Employee Welfare
Measures In Royal Classic Mills Private Limited” submitted to the Anna University
Coimbatore in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the award of the Degree of Master
Of Business Administration is a record of original work done by M. Dhana Lakshmi,
during the period March 2011 to May 2011 of his/her study in the Department Of
Management Studies, Park College Of Engineering & Tekhnology, Coimbatore, under
the supervision and guidance of Dr. M. Prince Manickam, B.Sc (Agri)., CAIIB., MBA.,
M.Phil., Ph.D., Head of the MBA department and the project report has not formed the
basis for the award of any Degree / Diploma / Associate ship / Fellowship or other similar
title to any candidate of any University.

Faculty Guide Director / HOD

Viva voce examination held on: __________________________.

Internal Examiner External Examiner

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DECLARATION

I, M. Dhana Lakshmi , hereby declare that the Project report, entitled “A Study On
Employee Welfare Measures In Royal Classic Mills Private Limited”, submitted to
Anna University Coimbatore in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the award of the
Degree of Master Of Business Administration is a record of original and independent
work done by me during March 2011 to May 2011 under the supervision and guidance of
Dr. M. Prince Manickam, B.Sc (Agri)., CAIIB., MBA., M.Phil., Ph.D., Head of the
MBA department, Park College Of Engineering And Tekhnology, Coimbatore and it
has not formed the basis for the award of any Degree / Diploma / Associate ship /
Fellowship or other similar title to any candidate of any University.

Date: Signature of the Student

Place: (M.DHANA LAKSHMI)


Reg.no:098001117013

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

There are lots of people to whom I owe debts of gratitude. This project study would never
have seen the light of the day without conscious help of all of them.

I would like to express my deep sense of gratitude to Dr.P.V.RAVI, B.Sc., M.A (Lit).,
B.Ed., Ph.D., MISTE., Chairman PARK COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND
TEKHNOLOGY for having given me the opportunity to undertake this degree program.

My sincere thanks to Dr.G.MOHAN KUMAR, ME., MBA., Ph.D., PGDMRM., MIE.,


MISTE., Principal PARK COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TEKHNOLOGY,
providing me all necessary facilities in carrying out my course.

I extend my heartfelt thanks to Dr.V.GOVINDARAJU, M.A., MBA., M.Phil., M.Com.,


M.M.M., BGL., DLL,. Ph.D., Director of the MBA department, for his zeal and
enthusiasm in the project.

I must be grateful and owe a debt of gratitude to Dr. M. PRINCE MANICKAM, B.Sc
(Agri)., CAIIB., MBA., M.Phil., Ph.D., Head of the MBA department who guided me to
complete the Project report successfully.

I am grateful to thank Mr. N ARUN KARTHIC Factory manager in the “ROYAL


CLASSIC MILLS PRIVATE LIMITED” who offered his helping hands by conducting
this training programme successfully in their esteemed organization.

I would like to express my sincere gratitude to all the staffs in the “ROYAL CLASSIC
MILLS PRIVATE LIMITED” who shared all their enormous knowledge with me for the
completion of this project.

M.DHANA LAKSHMI

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LIST OF TABLES

S.no TABLE NAME Page No


1 Table showing age of respondents 37
2 Table showing gender of respondents 38
3 Table showing income of the respondent 39
4 Table showing medical benefit to individual and family 40
5 Table showing maternity benefit to women employee 41
6 Table showing disablements benefits to individual 42
7 Table showing dependence benefit 43
8 Table showing old age benefit 44
9 Table showing employee injury benefits 45
10 Table showing environment protection effort 46
11 Table showing hosing facility and road facility 47
12 Table showing canteen facilities 48
13 Table showing transport facilities 49
14 Table showing provision for safety equipment 50
15 Table showing drinking water facility 51
16 Table showing education facility 52
17 Table showing conducive work environment 53
18 Table showing workers education 54
19 Table showing workers recreation ,child ,and park 55
20 Table showing crèches benefit to children 56
21 Table showing uniforms in organization 57
22 Table showing distribution of work 58
23 Table showing market cooperative credit society 59
Table showing maximum level for satisfaction towards employee welfare
24 60
facilities offered in the organization
Table showing minimum levels of satisfaction towards employee welfare
25 60
facilities offered in the organization
26 Table showing the correlation of age vs weak environment factor 61
27 Table showing the correlation of age vs convenience factor 62
28 Table showing the correlation of age vs work health factor 63
29 Table showing the correlation of age vs women and child welfare factor 64
30 Table showing the correlation of age vs workers education facilities 65
31 Table showing the correlation of age vs outside welfare facilities factor 66

LIST OF CHARTS

S.no CHART NAME Page No


1 chart showing age of respondents 37
2 chart showing gender of respondents 38
3 Chart showing income of the respondent 39
4 Chart showing medical benefit to individual and family 40
5 Chart showing maternity benefit to women employee 41
6 Chart showing disablements benefits to individual 42
7 Chart showing dependence benefit 43
8 Chart showing old age benefit 44
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9 Chart showing employee injury benefits 45
10 Chart showing environment protection effort 46
11 Chart showing hosing facility and road facility 47
12 chart showing canteen facilities 48
13 Chart showing transport facilities 49
14 Chart showing provision for safety equipment 50
15 Chart showing drinking water facility 51
16 Chart showing education facility 52
17 Chart showing conducive work environment 53
18 Chart showing workers education 54
19 Chart showing workers recreation ,child ,and park 55
20 Chart showing crèches benefit to children 56
21 Chart showing uniforms in organization 57
22 Chart showing distribution of work 58
23 Chart showing market cooperative credit society 59

INDEX

LIST OF TABLES
LIST OF CHARTS

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CHAPTER CONTENTS PAGE.NO

1. INTRODUCTION 1

2. REVIEW OF LITERATURE 26

3. OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY 31

4. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY 33

5. DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION 36

6. FINDINGS OF THE STUDY 67

7. SUGGESTIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 69

8. CONCLUSION 70

ANNEXURES 71

BIBLIOGRAPHY
QUESTIONNAIRE

CHAPTER I
INTRODUCTION

Employee or labour welfare is comprehensive term including various services, benefits and
facilities offered to employee by the employer. Through such generous fringe benefits the
employer makes life worth living for employees. The welfare amenities are extended in
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addition to normal wages and other economic rewards available to employees as per the legal
provisions. Welfare includes anything that is done for the comfort and improvement of
employees and is provided over and above the wages.

Welfare helps in keeping the morale and motivation of the employees high so as to retain the
employees for longer duration. The welfare measures need not be in monetary terms only but
in any kind/forms. Employee welfare includes monitoring of working conditions, creation of
industrial harmony through infrastructure for health, industrial relations, insurance against
disease, accident and unemployment for workers. Employee welfare in India has a special
significance as the constitution provides for the promotion of welfare of the employee for
human conditions of work.The various welfare measures provided by the employee will have
immediate impact on the health, physical and mental efficiency, alertness, Morale and overall
efficiency of the workers and thereby contributing to the highest productivity. Social security
measure provided by employer will act as a protection to the workers.

Employee welfare means activities designed for the promotion of the economic, social and
cultural well-being of the employees includes both statutory as well as non-statutory activities
undertaken by the Employers, trade unions and both the central and state governments for the
Physical and mental development of the workers. Employee welfare enables workers to have
richer and more satisfying life. It raises the standard of living of workers by indirectly
reducing the burden on their pocket. Welfare measures improve the physical and
physiological health of the employees, which in turn enhance their efficiency and
productivity. Employee welfare promotes a sense of belongings among the workers,
preventing them from resorting to unhealthy practices like absenteeism, Employee unrest
strike, etc. welfare work improves the relations between Employees and employers.

IMPORTANCE:

 Enables workers to have a richer and more satisfying life.


 Raises the standard of living of the workers by indirectly reducing the burden on their
pocket.
 Absorb the shocks injected by industrialization and urbanization on workers.

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 Promotes a sense of belonging among workers, preventing them for resorting to
unhealthy practices like absenteeism, labour turnover, strikes, etc.

TYPES OF WELFARE FACILITIES:

Drinking water
Washing and bathing facilities
Rest shelters
Uniform and protective
Canteens
Medical aid
Housing
Education facilities
Transportation
Sports facilities
Leave travel
Vocational training
Holiday homes
Maternity benefits
Social insurance

CONCEPT OF LABOUR WELFARE:

The National Commission on Labour has observed that the concept of “welfare” is necessary
dynamic bearing a different interpretation from country to country and from time to time and
even in the same country according to the value system, social Institution, degree of

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industrialization and general level of social and economic development. Even with one
country its context may be different from region to region.

AIM OF LABOUR WELFARE WORK:

C.B.Memoria (1966) points out the following aims of Labour Welfare Work.

1. It is partly humanistic to enable the workers to enjoy a fuller and richer life.

2. It is partly economic to improve the efficiency of the workers, to increase its availability
where it is scarce and keep him contended so as to minimize the inducement to form or join
unions and to resort to strikes.

3. The aim of partly civic develop a sense of responsibility and dignity among the workers
and thus to make them worthy citizen of the nation.

THE HISTORY OF EMPLOYEE WELFARE:

The history of Labour Welfare in India started with the abolition of slavery system in 1833.
Based on the recommendation of the International Labour Conference in 1870 held in Berlin,
the Government of India modified the factories act in 1881.Considering the suggestions given
by the International Labour Organization, which set up in the year 1919, the Government of
india enacted the factories act in 1922, the Government of India launched scheme of Labour
Welfare in their ordnance ammunition and other factories in war production, to keep up the
moral of workers and also to increase their productivity.

After the Independence the amendment of factories act in 1948, the Labour Welfare
movement acquired new dimension, for one thing, the massive investments in industry during
various plans increased in number of workmen. It was realized from the beginning that
Labour Welfare had a positive role in increasing productivity and reducing industrial
tensions.
The State Government enacted various legislations, regarding the welfare of the workers
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1. Workmen compensation Act, 1923.
2. Factories Act, 1948.
3. Employees State Insurance Act, 1948.
4. Coal Mines Labour Welfare Fund Act, 1947.
5. Employee’s Provident Fund and Miscellineous Provision Act, 1952.
6. Plantation Labour Act, 1957.
7. Mines Act, 1952.
8. Maternity benefits Act, 1962.
9. Payment of Bonus Act, 1965.
10. Payment of Gratuity Act, 1972.

The study team study appointment by the Government of India in 1959 to examine Labour
Welfare activities then existing divided the entire of these activities in to THREE groups viz.,

1. Welfare measure inside the work place: Condition of the Work Environment,
Conveniences, Work Health Services, Women and Child Welfare, Worker’s Recreation,
Employment Follow-up Economic Services.
2. Welfare measure outside the work place: Housing, Water, Sanitation, Waste
Disposal, Road, Recreation, Play Grounds, Schools, Markets, Bank, Transport,
Communication, Health and Medical Services, Security, Community Leadership
Development.
3. Social security measures: Welfare Services are “render to workers and their families
by an individual enterprise with the proposes of raising their morale, material, social and
cultural levels to adjust to better life”.

1.2 INDUSTRY PROFILE

The Global Textile Industry, particularly the Apparel Industry has seen remarkable changes
in the past few years. The Garment Manufacturing Industry and the Garment Companies in
developed countries are now always on a lookout for cheap source of garment production.

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The days are gone when textile garment industry was concentrated in the consumption hubs
of US, EU and other developed countries of the world. Textiles have played a major role in
fashion. Textile consists of the whole garment production including weaves, prints for clothes
and furnishes. Textile consists of two main parts, i.e. weaving and knitting whereas weaving
is the interlacing of warp and weft yarns.

Many designs can be applied while weaving which in order gives back a rich look. Textiles
use knitting equipment to produce knitted fabric. Many types of knitted fabrics are produced
in which viscose knit is lustrous and economical. The human race universally wears articles
of clothing also known as dress, garments or attire on the body in order to protect it against
the adverse climate condition. In particular the circulation of air around the skin and thus
avoid existence of the air reheated by the skin, which makes people feel uncomfortable and
cold. Additionally, the clear weaves of clothing avoid the ultra violet radiation of the sun and
it burns in the skin protecting it from heat.

“Fashion, which is as old as time and as now as tomorrow, is one of the most powerful forces
in our lives. It influences what we wear, the way we live, how and where we travel, what we
look at, and what we listen to fashion is what leads us to discard a product that is still useful
but is no longer in “Many definition of fashion have been given by wise and witty or learned
men and women.

The garments industry in India is one of the best in the world. An extremely well organized
sector, garment manufacturers, exporters, suppliers, stockiest and wholesalers are the
gateway to an extremely enterprising clothing and apparel industry in India. There are
numerous garments exporters, garments manufacturers; readymade garments exporters etc.
both in the small scale as well as large scale.

One of the reasons for the economical pricing of India's readymade garments and apparels is
the availability of highly skilled, cheap labor in the country. The superiority of India's
Garment Industry has been acknowledged in the National Textile Policy (NTP) of India 2000.
Having realized the tremendous growth potential of this sector there is a proposal in the NTP
for taking the Indian Garment Industry. Fashion is an expression shown through appearance,
often influenced by the taste of an era in the given region. Fashion is a growth towards self-
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awareness that leads the world beyond. Fashion is not something that exists in garments but
in the sky, street and in nature.

Fashion changes depending on the way of life changes, Fashion at first starts with design.
Designing is one of the most important aspect of the fashion psychology. Mechanical
production methods influenced both design aesthetics and styles. The clothing wholesale
supply is increasing worldwide in all the sectors of the industry, whether it is men’s clothing,
women’s clothing, kids wear or infant wear. The elimination of global export quotas has led
to a shift towards low cost countries having strong and established Clothing Industry
especially the Asian countries.

Major Trends in Apparel and Clothing

Global garment exports are valued at more than US$310 billion a year, of which the world's
top 15 clothing exporters account for more than 80%.China continues to develop its textile
and clothing exports despite the reposition of quotas by the United States, Europe and some
other developing countries till December 2008 as a temporary safeguard measure on exports
from China. The gain is due to the strategy of China to divert its clothing wholesale
destinations from US and EU to other Asian countries
Developing countries in Asia continue expanding their Textile Garment Industry due to their
very-low-cost production. Apart from China, the true gainers of the post-quota period are
India, Bangladesh, Cambodia and Vietnam India is the second most preferred country after
China for textile and apparel sourcing. Its Apparel industry is likely to achieve an export
target of US$ 25 billion by 2011.

The rise of exports in India is due to several factors like vast sources of raw materials, low
labor costs, entrepreneurship and design skills of Indian traders, changes in the policies to
open up Indian economy to the outside world etc. Bangladesh has emerged as a key player in
RMG sector (Ready Made Garment Industry). 76% of its total textile and clothing export
earnings comes from the apparel industry. The chief factor behind this is abundant and cheap
labor force available here.

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Turkey and Brazil are the emerging markets for investment by apparel manufacturers and
traders. One of the main beneficiaries of the textile and clothing exports drop in US imports
from China is Vietnam. In the first quarter of 2008, sales of Vietnamese apparel and dresses
in the US market were up by over 30%. Cambodia's garment industry is continuing to attract
new investors and increase its garment exports. This is due to EU and US restraints on China
and also because of its positive 'sweat-shop free' reputation on labor standards. It is the ninth
largest supplier to the American market. Its garments exports to the EU are also rising.

Current Scenario:

Developing countries with both textile and clothing capacity may be able to prosper in the
new competitive environment after the textile quota regime of quantitative import restrictions
under the multi-fiber arrangement (MFA) came in to an end on 1st January 2005 under the
world trade organization (WTO) agreement on textiles and clothing.As a result, the garment
industry in developed countries will face huge competition in both their exports and domestic
markets. The elimination of quota restriction will open the way for the most competitive
developing countries to develop stronger clusters of the garment industry which enable them
to handle all stages of the production chain from growing natural fibers to producing finished
clothing.

The garment industry is undergoing a major reorientation towards non-clothing applications


of textiles known as technical textiles which are growing roughly at twice rate textiles for
clothing applications and now account for more than half of total textile production. The
processes involved in producing technical textile require expensive equipments and skilled
workers.

As a result of various initiatives taken by the government, there has been new investment of
50000 crore in the garment industry in the last five years. Nine garment majors invested 2600
crores and plan to invest another 6400 crores. India’s cotton production has increased by 57%
over the last five years and three million additional spindles. The industry expects investment
of 1,40,000 crores in this sector in the post MFA phase. A vision 2010 for garments
formulated by the government after interaction with the industry and exports promotion
councils aims to increase India’s share in the worlds garment from the current 4% to 8% by

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2010 vision and plan to increase Indian garment economy from the current US $ 37 billion to
$ 85 billion by 2010 and creation of 12 million new jobs in the garment sector.

There will be opportunities as well as challenges for the Indian garment industry in the post
MFA era. But India has natural advantages, which can be capitalized on strong raw-material
base cotton, manmade fabrics, jute silk. Further, for the benefit of exporters, there should be a
state owned cargo-shipping mechanism. Several initiatives have already been taken by the
government to overcome some of these concerns including rationalization.

Shri Kamal Nath, union minister of commerce and industry has said that India will take up
the issue of non-tariff barriers (NTBs) in the world trade organization (WTO) Doha round of
multi-lateral trade negotiations, which are expected to gather steam from march 2005
onwards. On the eve of republic day, president DR.ABDUL KALAM said that, “India is
presently exporting six billion US dollars’ worth of garments, whereas with the WTO regime
in place, we can increase the production and export of garments to 18 to 20 billion US dollars
within the next five years.

This will enable generation of employment in general and in rural areas in particular with the
help of export of garments. We can add more than 5 million direct jobs and 7 million indirect
jobs in the garment sector. Primarily in the cultivation of cotton, efforts are needed in cotton
research, technology, generation, transfer of technology, modernization and upgrading of
ginning and pressing factories and growth in marketing strategy”.

INDIAN GARMENTS EXPORT INDUSTRY:

India is a major exporter of garments, fabrics and accessories for the global fashion industry.
Indian ethnic designs and materials are an important factor in the plans of fashion houses and
garment manufacturers all over the world. Those buttons on the Levis you are wearing could
well have been made in India. The welcome decision of phasing out Multi Fiber Agreement
(MFA) will end the regime of quotas and other rules and regulations made by the Indian

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governments helps us to create a competitive export garment industry all over the world. For
India, the clothing industry has performed quite well in exports. It has been facing most of the
quotas every year. As compared to 12 crores in 1970-71, exports have reached 18000 crores
by 1998. The major competitors in this segment of the market are developed countries, Asian
tigers like Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Singapore. Developing countries like Bangladesh
and Mayan mar of china, of course.

In order to ensure quality of garment exports, the SSI restriction of the garment exports, the
SSI restriction of the garment industry should be removed. Present equity participation of
24% by the foreign partners need to be enhanced and joint ventures with majority
shareholdings as well as technical collaborations should be allowed. Labor laws need to be
reorganized and the export procedures should be liberalized.

LATEST TRENDS (NEWS) IN GARMENT AND TEXTILE SECTOR:

India recorded exports of $ 461 million in March 2005, against $ 351 million in March 2004.
The increase has continued from February, when textile exports stood at $ 410 million. India
has shown a 28% growth for the period January to march 2005 as compared to the same
period last year. While china remains the lead country in terms of textile imports to the US.
Countries like Mexico and Canada continue to loose out to India and china. Imports were
threatening thousands of US jobs. The us has the power to impose caps of 7.5% growth in
textile and clothing categories on china under an agreement that the way for Chinas
membership in WTO in 2001.

Ministry of finance has added 165 new textile products under Duty Drawback Schedule. The
new products included wool tops. Cotton yarn, acrylic yarn, various blended fabrics, fishing
nets etc. further, the existing entries in the drawback schedule relating to garments have been
expanded to create separate entries of garments made up of,

(a) Cotton
(b) Man-made fiber blend
(c) MMF
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After the phasing out of quota regime under the Multi Fiber Act (MFA), India can
increase its textile sector becoming $ 100 billion industry by 2010. This will include exports
of $ 50 billion. The proposed target would be achieved provided reforms are initiated in
textile sector and local manufacturers adopt measures to improve their competition.
Replacements of existing indirect taxes with a single nationwide VAT. The union minister
shankar sinh vaghela said that the board for Industrial and Financial Reconstruction (BIFR)
had approved rehabilitation schemes for sick NTC mills at the cost of 3900 crores. Of the 66
mills, 65 mills have been closed after implementing voluntary retirement scheme (VRS) to all
employees. The government has already constituted assets, sale committees comprising
representatives of central and state governments, operative agency, BIFR, NTC and the
concerned NTC subsidiary to affect sale of assets through open tender system. Proposals for
modernization of NTC mills have been made to the consultative committee members
including formation of a committee of experts to improve management of these mills. Even
the present status of jute industry was under the scanner of the consultative committee.

The government had announced change from the value-based drawback rate followed to a
weight-based structure for textile exports that will discourage raw material exports and also
there is a scope for misusing the drawback claims by boosting invoice value of exports.
NCDEX launched its silk contract (raw silk and cotton) on Thursday, January 20, 2005. With
this launch, the total number of products offered by NCDEX goes up to 27. The launch of
silk contract will offer the entire suite of fibers to the entire value chain ranging from farmers
to textile mills.

Government of India jointly with NCDEX has adopted a policy of encouraging future
contracts of silk. The ministry of textiles and the central silk board (CSB) had decided to
introduce Futures trading in mulberry cocoons and raw silk on NCDEX. Futures trading on
the NCDEX will provide an alternative trading avenue for farmers, weavers and traders and
help them to make a better price for their product and it will also helps them to reduce risks
associated with natural calamities.

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Internationally speaking, the Textile Garment Industry is concentrated in the hands of large
retail firms who look for few vendors with bulk orders and thus opt for vertically integrated
companies hence, there is a need for integrating the operations from spinning to apparel
making by the sourcing countries in order to gain advantage from the changed scenario
Both, the trade skills and soft skills, viz., design capabilities, textile technology, management
and negotiating skills will also be significant determinants.

In future, the factors that will affect the rise or fall of the Clothing Industry of sourcing
countries include labor standards, tariff preferences, access to materials and supplies, political
and economic stability among others. With the increase in demand for performance apparel,
the sectors like Industrial Clothing and Sports Wear will experience growth and due to the
increased fashion consciousness globally, fashion clothing will also see an upward trend.

From this, we can conclude that garment industry is still in developing stage in India. The
government is taking a lot of efforts to upgrade the garment industry in India. Rules and
regulations on small scale units should be liberalized and export procedures on exports of
garments is to be simplified and some grants to be given to those farmers who are dependent
on cotton and jute corps.

1.3 COMPANY PROFILE

ROYAL CLASSIC, vertically integrated textile major, has been the forefront of quality and
innovation since its inception in 1991, having a fantastic clientele across the Indian market
and in many countries across the globe. RCG’s infrastructure comprises of complete
facilities required for knitwear manufacturing, right from Knitting, Wet processing (dyeing),
Finishing, Garmenting and Retailing. The ultra-modern facilities ensure maximum
productivity, with minimum work force required at every stage of production.
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The periodical modernization at every factory ensures the updates best quality standards
available in the Industry. All factories are well planned and spaced to take care of future
expansion plans too, with all statutory compliances made up to date. All factories are
environment friendly models, with minimum carbon emission and maximum utilization of
solar & wind power.

Water wastage both industrial & domestic effluent are treated well, and re-used in-house for
factory as well as gardening. As performance bars got raised to new heights and requirements
started becoming more demanding in nature, RCG realized that operational efficiencies are
the key to acquire the competitive edge, and hence the factories are strategically spread over
various places, according to the worker availability and their skill sets present. The Royal
Classic Groups (RCG) began as an exporter and gradually expanded its wings in the national
boundary as a textile giant with two brands under it. Various products are manufactured like,
shirts, t-shirts, trousers, denims, sportswear, loungewear, kids wear, and supplied across the
globe. All our garments are made in house and we have one of the best facilities available to
world standards.

VISION:

RCG's core values are centred on maintaining the highest standards of ethics and business
practices in order to achieve the overall objective of being a global player through the
relentless pursuit of perfection

DIRECTORS PROFILE:

Royal Classic Groups is based in Tiruppur, India. The group is privately owned by two
eminent business tycoons who believe in transforming their thoughts into action. These
legends are an encouragement to the first generation entrepreneurs.

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Mr. R. GOPALAKRISHNAN, Chairman, 51 Diploma Holder In Textile Technology, with
30 years’ experience in the Industry, he spearheads on strategy of Company, with hands-on
control over manufacturing and export business.

Mr. R. SIVARAM, Managing Director, 41 Diploma Holder In Civil Engineering, with 20


years’ experience in the Industry, he heads all manufacturing and Retailing of Domestic
brands. They both lead a team of Dedicated, Energetic and Enthusiastic professionals devoted
to realize RCG’s vision.

BUSINESS FORMAT:

The Royal Classic Groups (RCG) began as an exporter and gradually expanded its wings in
the national boundary as a textile giant with two brands under it. Various products are
manufactured like, shirts, t-shirts, trousers, denims, sportswear, loungewear, kids wear, and
supplied across the globe. All our garments are made in house and we have one of the best
facilities available to world standards. Designing concepts keeps on transforming from season
to season and as per the latest trends

Royal Classic Groups is structured into two main formats:

EXPORTDIVISION:

Working across cultural boundaries requires a strong expertise on how cultural variables
affect outcomes. We leverage our expertise for achieving our clients' goals with our
professionals' knowledge, experience, diversity and passion. Our clients consistently say that
collaboration with our resourceful team is a key reason why they choose to work with us.

In Knits, RCG specializes in 100% Cotton and Blended fabrics with Polyester / Modal /
Spandex. We specialize in Yarn dyed stripes, Mercerized fabrics, Bio wash fabrics, and
Rotary prints etc. in all Jersey / Pique, Interlock and Rib constructions. Having huge in-house
fabric Knitting and Wet processing and latest finishing range, we excel the International
standards of fabrics with our Ultra-modern plants.

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DOMESTICDIVISION:

Over the past 11 years, Royal Classic Groups has been continually improvising, building new
brands. RCG has now taken its brands Classic Polo and Smash to worldwide, building a
powerful franchise of thousands of loyal customers under its tree. Investments in brand
building have enabled the brands to occupy the top positions in their respective categories, all
the while allowing the brands to be continually developed.

At Royal Classic Groups, we are constantly innovating to make your shopping experience
pleasant. Trust, Excellence, Quality, these are some of the abiding values that have been
allied with us. We produce 540+ designs per season that have found their way across the
globe with others. Our consistent focus on cutting-edge research and technology has resulted
in pioneering new products which have set new benchmarks in the textile industry.

Having a thorough grasp of the domestic market, this is a major advantage for Indian retail
businesses. It is impossible for every locality to develop a common model; therefore, retail
businesses should use their accumulated experiences to come up with appropriate solutions.
And so, our brands have carved a niche in the mid-premium segment by showing a
continuous growth in its business graph and therefore we are unconditionally accepted by our
customers.

INFRASTRUCTURE:

Royal Classic Groups core values are centered on maintaining the highest standards of ethics
and business practices in order to achieve the overall objective of being a global player
through the relentless pursuit of perfection. Innovations in manufacturing of garments occur

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in our production facilities very often. Our specialization reflects in the quality of the goods
delivered, as the workers, executives and machinery are trained and tuned for that purpose.

 Dyeing
 Knitting Division
 Wet process
 Garmenting Division
 Value Addition on garments

DYE HOUSE:

1) Processing Unit

The Dyeing Division Is Equipped with Soft-flow And Ht-hp Vessels from Fong's And Tong
Geng Dyeing Machines, Finished with Santex Squeezer and Ruckh Calator Drier from
Germany. Bruckner Stentering with 8 C.

2) Stentering machine

3) Water treatment plant

To Retain an Eco Friendly Nature, Installation of Reverse Osmosis Plant for water treatment
have been undertaken with a capacity Of 10 Lakh Liters/day, by which the status of "Zero"
effluent discharge unit have been achieved.

KNITTING DIVISION:

Knitting machines: The Knitting Division Has 84 Circular Knitting Machines of Mayer &
CIE from Germany, and Orizio from Italy and Pailung from Taiwan. It also has flat Knitting
Machines of Kauo Heng-Taiwan, with a capacity to produce 10 Tons of fabric per day.

WET PROCESS:

1) Compacting (Pre-Shrinking Process)

It consists of Tube-tex, USA Tubular and Open Width Compacting Machines -4 Nos. and
Monti Of Italy, Felt Compacting Machines For Mercerized Fabrics. Also Tong Geng
22
Chamber Heat Setting Machines for Lycra and Polyester Fabrics which can handle fabrics up
to a width of 48 Inches. The capacity of the Compacting Department is 15 Tons of fabric per
day. The Unit has 20 Tons Capacity of Fabric Dyeing per day.For Fabric Stretching (Balloon
Padding), RCG is using a special machine from Santex Santa Stretch Plus of Switzerland
with Squeezing and Wet Stretching. The Dryer Division is equipped with the latest Relax
Dryer from Calator Ruchk of Germany with 3 Chambers and a Wet Stretching Facility.

GARMENTING DIVISION

1) Knits Factory Building:

Cutting:
The completely integrated facilities is topped by our garmenting division with skilled pattern
masters, cutting masters, tailors and supporting workmen who are well trained. The product
specialization gives an excellent finish to the garments we make. The entire production wing
is housed under one roof with scientific work systems and quality control systems.

Punch cutting:

Besides, our Cutting Division is also been equipped with the Bierbi Cutting Machine from
Italy, especially For Tubular and Infant products also equipped with Band Knife Cutting
Machine.

2) Woven Factory:

Classic Polo’s woven division has high-end machines which are all imported from Durkopp
Adler, Germany and Pfaff, Germany. They are fully computerized and all lock stitch
machines have automatic under-bed thread trimmers. Classic Polo’s unit which can produce
2000 trousers per day and 1000 shirts per day has been set with the training of German
consultants.

Wing Pocket Attaching machine

Wing pocket Attaching machine attaches the pocketing cloth to the front panel of trousers -
be it a front opening pocket or side opening pocket. It also makes the notches at the correct
place of the front panel which ensures correct size of pocket opening and also helps to avoid

23
an up and down position between the right side pocket and the left side pocket - a chronic
problem that usually happened when done manually.
The front or side pockets, being present in the “A-Zone” of the garment can make or mark the
aesthetic look of the trouser and hence the wing pocket attaching machine is of paramount
importance in the connection of a good quality trouser.

Automatic Side Surging Machine

Automatic Side Surging Machine stitches the sides of the trouser with ease and perfection the
seams are need and the dimensions are uniform, maintaining a perfect fit enhancing the
productivity and thus bringing down the cost.

Automatic Pleat and Dart Making machine


Automatic Pleat & Dart Making machine creates the front pleat and back dart automatically.
It ensures precision of placements and dimensions and perfect uniformity will be maintain in
the entire lot of production.

Computerized Eyelet Hole Machine


Computerized Eyelet Hole machine makes eye let holes with different combinations of size,
design and shape.

Computerized Bar Tracking Machine


Computerized Bar tracking machine is available in our factory are fully programmable and
help determine the size, width, shape and density of the bar track stitches. Apart from this,
these machines also have the sequential operation feature that helps the operator to make
different size/shape stitches in the same machine in one stitching. Thus material handling is
made easier and saves a lot of time and also provides possible staining of the garment due to
multiple handling of the garment and movement between work stations during manufacture.

Leggers and Toppers


The trousers, especially the 100% cotton trousers and more particularly the washed pieces
will have inherent dead creases that are formed during the manufacturing process & drying
process. It becomes difficult to remove all these creases and wrinkles in the conventional

24
method of manual iron processing. These creases and the wrinkles need forced streaming and
suction coupled with pneumatically controlled pressing.

It is difficult and impossible to reach certain areas of the top side of the trousers like the front
fly zone, just below the waist band and hip are with the manually handled ironed boxes and
sometimes, if attempted with yield adverse results like creation of new creases and puckering
or sometimes reshapes the garments as well. Therefore leggers and toppers give good ironing
results by removing all the dead creases and wrinkles and also eliminate the puckering.

Permanent Crease Lines


The latest technology from Clantex, U.K., that gives permanent crease lines to the trousers
enhances its aesthetic appearance and also enables easy care of the garments.

Washing
There are different types of garment washers done in our factory- silicon wash, softener
wash, enzyme wash, acid wash, golf ball wash, etc. their washing capacity is 2,000 pieces of
trousers and 1,500 pieces of shirts per day.

Wrinkle Free Finish


We have adopted German Technology and the washing and finishing are done in
collaboration with M/s Weishi, China. Our employees have been well-trained by the chief
technicians of Weishi and the technical knowledge is being constantly upgraded by their
training.

Oven

The trousers washed with wrinkle-free chemicals are taken to the hydro extractor machines
and the hydro extracted trousers, with about 20 % moisture content is pressed in leggers and
toppers to remove the creases and wrinkles formed during confectioning /washing and then
25
are baked in the Oven at the required temperature and time. The baking is a curing process
and the bone dried trousers are taken out of the oven and cooled at the room temperature for a
while.

Cooling Chamber

The bone dried stick cooling which allows the trousers to regain the moisture quickly and
more importantly are weathered well to gain a superb hand feel !

WIND MILLS

RCG has installed 5 Windmills of total 3.75 MW capacities taking care of the entire power
requirements of the group at cost of Rs. 150 million. These 5 machines are the latest from
Neg-Micon of Denmark. By generating this green power, RCG is saving gallons of fuel and
metric tons of coal for the nation, with equivalent avoidance of harmful carbon emission into
the biosphere.

1.4 PRODUCT PROFILE:

T-Shirts: Royal Classic Groups offers a wide range of T-Shirts with unique color
combination. It is extremely comfortable and easy to maintain. Every design is an outcome of

26
R & D which is in-house and is supervised by a team of international technicians. RCG now
deals with all kinds of textile such as 100% Cotton, 100% Mercerized, Poly Cotton Blended,
Cotton/Rayon Blended, Linen/Cotton Blended, Spandex, Hydrotec, Polyester, Micro Fabric
and premium knits such as Micro cross, waffles, Square structures, Interlock knit,etc

Casual Shirts, is made out of 100% cotton fabrics, and given an enzyme wash for better
hand feel. The fabric options will be Plain, Striped, Checks, Jacquards and Prints in half as
well as full sleeves. Each season will have a theme and accordingly a collection is created.
Design elements are explored with innovative placement of detailing elements at different
locations.

Executive Wear will be 100% cotton and Cotton Polyester blends. All the shirts are
unwashed. The fabrics will be Plain, Striped, checks, Jacquards and prints. Design will
change from season to season and is available in authentic, slim & muscle fits. The fabrics
used may vary according to the season.

Trousers: Royal Classic Groups offers structured, formals, core trousers. The trousers fabric
selected will be super combed cotton. These fabrics are sourced from the reputed mills in
India, and certain fabrics are imported from Italy. These trousers will have rich look, better
hand feel and good fall (drape of the trouser).More over the garment is given extra treatment
–like given Wrinkle free finishing on the garment.

Denims: The denims are hand crafted with brand pneumonic & logo being crafted in
embroidery. Each & every denim is processed through multiple finish of dry & wet finishes.

Sportswear: Royal Classic Groups established itself early on as a high-end, high-quality


sportswear maker and grew into a very successful global brand.

27
Vest & Briefs: RCG offers a variety of options in fashion and cut in intimate wears with a
standard quality & comfort.

Jackets: RCG offers a variety of options keeping in mind the fit, fabric, insulation,
reinforcements, bells & whistles as per the vogue and desired by our clients, partners and
customers.

Sweaters: Our sweater pattern highlights various kinds of stitches, creating simple overall
texture with unique quality & comfort.

Baby wear: We manufacture baby wears which includes high-performance soft and natural
fabrics, cozy and comfortable fits ensure that each product matches international standards of
quality.

CLIENT PROFILE:

Royal Classic Groups, a 100 percent vertically integrated company offers brands of
international quality standards. Through a wide product portfolio, the brand caters to the
broad segment of its customers and business partners across the globe. With the best of
technology and complete infrastructure support at its disposal, RCG caters to a clientele
which includes the elite of the Fashion world. From garmenting to posh retail outlets, RCG
has a presence across the entire textile value chain — something that very few mid-sized
textile companies have managed to achieve. Despite being among the first from the south to
have an entire range of menswear products, Royal Classic Group has made a unique identity
of its own. The company has an organized branded segment which differentiates it from other
brands. Our services are customized for our clients and our solutions are focus on their
specific needs. That is why it is so important to learn more about our clients.

A ‘need-based’ assessment is always conducted in advance, but there is an effort to maintain


maximum flexibility throughout the process as cultural variables are extremely complex.
With a strong base of industry experts & by applying upgraded technology we ensure that
28
outcomes and objectives are sustainable and have a lasting impact. Sustainability lies at the
core of all our services. It is the foundation of everything we do as we believe that learning is
most effective when people become integral and interactive parts of the process.
The quality and success of our solutions is ultimately reflected by clients’ impact. This is why
we constantly assess the impact of our work, beginning with the planning stage, to
continuously increase the value we create for our clients. Our quality management system
provides feedback about the effectiveness and efficiency of all we do.

We employ self-assessment, monitoring, survey, benchmarking, evaluation and verification


procedures as effective tools to ensure the quality of our services. We have Export
Clients and Domestic business partners across the globe. We provide the best of our services
to our clients. We nurture and retain those, the company already has, entice former clients
back into the fold by fulfilling their demands.

ACCOLADES:

Best Brand
Classic Polo awarded the best brand of the year - men's casual wear category '05-'06 (small
and medium sector), instituted by CMAI.

Images BOF Study report


Very recent research by AC neilson conducted research with all the leading Multi-brand
retailers across the country to name the top three T-shirt brands,reveals that "an aggregation
of responses show that classicpolo stands clear No.2 in the men's category" (source: images,
business of fashion sept, 2009).

Partners Choice Award


Prestigious LFS CENTRAL (Future group) has awarded classic polo the "Partners Choice
Award" 2009-10 for being the No.1 brand in terms of value and volume business in category
knits.

KSA Technopak

29
According to the research conducted by Images magazine & KSA Technopak, revealed that
"Classic Polo" is most popular brand in south and west and the NO.1 preferred brand of T-
Shirt segment for the future purchases of the consumers.

Emerging India Awards


Another feather on the hat, RCG was identified in top 3 companies in textiles and Apparel
category for the emerging India Awards '05 (the first ever awards created for the India's
small and medium enterprises) among the 35,000 entries organized by the ICICI bank and
powered by CRISIL.

CSR:

After abiding all the statuary laws of country, Still RCG strives hard to deliver its best
capable solution for the needy General Public. Few of them are:

 Plantation of 15000 trees.


 Construction of school class rooms for Village Panchayat school in year 2003.
 The Canal on the Andipalayam Village Panchayat has been re-constructed.
 Rejuvenation of a lake near Andipalayam.
 Establishment of factory in most backward / deprived village whereby creating job
opportunity of about 500 women folks.
 Construction of School Class rooms for the Iduvampalayam Village Panchayat school
in the year 2008.
 Installation of Solar Panel for the Dyeing Plant.
 "Flying on the Wings of Fire" Documentary Film Released about our Former
President Dr. A.P.J Abdul Kalam.
 RCG has combined with Minvelli Media Works and released the documentary film
about our Former President Dr. A.P.J. Abdul Kalam.

CLUB EARTH
30
It is an initiative for a greener world and an initiative to preserve Mother Nature, club earth
an endeavor from Royal Classic Groups to spearhead a green revolution in association with
by the Department of Forestry Tamil Nadu, SFSC (State Forest Service College) and Tamil
Nadu Agricultural University, SACON Salim Ali Institute, IFGTB (Institute of Forest
Genetics and Tree Breeding), The Hindu business line, Dinamalar.
Global warming could do more than just melt ice and cause sea levels to rise. It could
displace people, submerge tropical islands and change the very maps as we know them.

The good news is that we can do little things that make a big difference. Planting a tree, for
instance and preserving the ones already there. “Club Earth" as an endeavor will create
awareness on the ill effects of global warming and encourage preservation and development
of our environment.

The Club Earth movement will take shape by the distribution of free seeds/saplings at the
Classic Polo stores, a move to encourage planting of trees and give the environment the
healing touch of greenery. This task, which is soon going to be a national movement in itself,
is initially being planned for our Tamil Nadu outlets and Bangalore outlets in phase-I. Later,
this will be extended to all other Classic Polo showrooms across the country.

WORK CULTURE AT RCG:


31
Personalities and experiences of employees create the culture of an organization and so is the
work culture of Classic polo. It offers a well-defined career path enumerating the different
ways in which an employee could choose to reach his destination. Rewards, promotions and
growth opportunities here are based on performance. Appreciating an employee and
acknowledging his/her efforts can go a long way towards employee motivation. Employee
roles are clearly defined and are spread across the value chain at Classic Polo. It encourages
individual initiative; mistakes and failures that occur in the process of taking initiatives are
viewed as progress in the personal and organizational quest for excellence.

Despite of busy schedules & work pressures, employees actively participate in various events
conducted by the company, which makes them feel motivated by realizing his/her importance
towards the company. Equal opportunity is given to demonstrate his/her sporting and out-of-
the-box thinking ability. Each year, standards are set higher than it was.
Experience of working with this framework over the last few years consistently points to the
reality that the 'Inspiration and Values' cluster matters most and 'Quality of leadership' is a
must-have for a high performance workplace.

Interest in career opportunities has clearly been fed by a combination of well-established


training & development centres, thereby raising employee awareness of the possibilities and
encouragement from many sources to look beyond the immediate job and its earning
potential. A transparent performance management system ensures that individuals set the
performance bar higher for themselves and exceed expectations every time.

32
CHAPTER II
REVIEW OF LITERATURE

Human Resource Management is the process of procuring, developing, maintaining, and


controlling human resources for effective achievement of organizational goals. This project is
focused on employee welfare measure and employee morale.

EMPLOYEE WELFARE – DEFINITION

Employee welfare means “the effort to make life worth living for workmen”. When all basic
facilities are provided and employees obtain satisfaction then the productivity can be
increased and development of the organization will be possible.

CONDITIONS OF WORK ENVIRONMENT

1) Working conditions
 Temperature
 Ventilation
 Lighting
 Dust
 Smoke
 Fumes and gases
 Noise
 Humidity
 Hazard and safety complex devices

2) Factory Sanitation and Cleanliness:

 Provision of urinals in factories


 Provision for the disposal of waste and rubbish
 Provision for water disposal (drainage)
 Provision of proper bathing and washing facilities
 Cleanliness, white- washing and repair of buildings and workshops

33
 Care and maintenance of open spaces, gardens, roads, etc.
3) Welfare Amenities

 Provision and care of drinking water


 Canteen services
 Lunch
 Rest room
 Crèches
 Cloak rooms
 Other amenities

EMPLOYEES’ HEALTH SERVICES:

1) Factory health services

 Medical examination of employees


 Factory dispensary and clinic treatment
 First aid and ambulance room
 Treatment of accidents and
 Health education and research

2) Recreation

 Playgrounds for physical recreation (athletics, games, gymnastics, etc)


 Social and cultural recreation (music, singing, dancing, drama, etc)

3) Workers education

 Education to improve skills and earning capacity


 Literacy
 Library, audio visual education, lecture programmes and
 Workers educational scheme and its working

4) Economic Services

 Employees co-operative societies


34
 Grain shops and fair price shops and
 Housing co-operatives
REVIEW OF LITERATURE FROM JOURNALS AND ARTICLES:

Karen E. Mishra, Gretchen M. Spreitzer and Aneil K. Mishra


Topic: Human Resource Management and Industrial Relations
Reprint 3927; winter 1998, Vol. 39, No. 2, pp. 83–95

Preserving Employee Morale during Downsizing:

Mishra proposed a four-stage approach to downsizing, gleaned from interviews and surveys
that will retain workers' trust and sense of empowerment. The company should consider all
stakeholders' needs — survivors, laid-off employees, the community, local and national
press, and any affected government agencies. The implementation of all the above, is the
most important. Management should communicate frequently and be open and honest.

How to Boost Employee Morale

By Betsy Gallup
April 9, 2006

The following are the ways to boost the employee morale.

 Treat employees with respect


 Show interest in your employees' personal lives
 Allow your employees to gain ownership of their jobs by being part of the decision-
making process.
 Create a pleasant work environment
 Establish an employee recognition program
 Give clear direction and set priorities.
 Stand behind your employees. Be their greatest advocate.

35
Boost Employee Morale with an Employee Incentive Program

By: Trevor Marshall

Good managers know from their own observations that employee attitude affects their work
and eventually the company’s output. It is essential that your incentive program will actually
inspire and motivate them to work efficiently and not just be competitive with each other.
Healthy competition among the company’s employees is good but too much of it may also
cause the company to disintegrate.
The company should still be very much hands-on with the whole employee incentive
program to ensure that the outcome of the employee incentive program will be good.

Employee Welfare

By Regina Barr

Employee Welfare program is based on the management policy which is aimed shaping
perfect employees. Therefore the concept of employee welfare includes to aspects namely
physical and mental welfares

1. Applications of merit system or work performance system as the basis for employee
rewarding.
2. Providing the retired employees with the old age allowance.
3. Employee insurance program to provide the employee with better security.
4. Improvement in health security for the employees and their families so that they can work
confidently and productively.
5. Increase in basic salaries and pension as adjustment to the needs providing all work units
and their officials with vehicles to help support smooth mobility.

36
EMPLOYEE WELFARE IN INDIA:

The chapter on the directive principles of state policy first our constitution expresses the need
for labour welfare thus:

Article 38: The state shall strive to promote the welfare of the people by securing and
protecting as effectively as it may a social order in which, Justice, social, economic and
political shall inform all the institution of the national life.

Article 39: The state shall, in particular, direct its policy towards security.

 That the citizen, men and women equally, have the rights to an adequate means of
livelihood.
 That the ownership and control of the material resource are so distributed so as to sub
serve the common good.
 That the operation of the economic system does not result in the concentration of
wealth and means of protection to the common determine.
 That there is equal work for both men and women, and Article 42. The State shall
make provision for securing just and human condition for work and for maternity
relief.

37
CHAPTER III
OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY:

 To study the level of satisfaction of various employee welfare measure.


 To study the employee welfare measure with respect to work environment factor,
convince factor, work health factor, women and child welfare factor worker’s
education factor and outside welfare factor.
 To suggest suitable recommendations to improve employee welfare measures in the
company
 To win over employees loyalty and increase their morale.

38
3.1 SCOPE OF THE STUDY:

The scope of the study is to find out how for the existing welfare schemes cater to the
requirement of the employees in Royal classic mills private limited. The study will be able to
throw light on the dark spots where it need some sort of improvement in the welfare scheme
that has been implemented. The purpose of the study is to measure the employee’s attitude
regarding the welfare measures provided in the company.

3.2 LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY:

 The time period of the study is very short, so elaborate study was not made.
 The conclusions and suggestions were formed based on employee’s spot response.
 Some false information may be given by the employee.
 The result depends on the answers received from respondent which may be biased.
 Some of the workers were reluctant to respond to the questionnaires due to fear.

39
CHAPTER IV
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

RESEARCH – MEANING

Research is an art of scientific investigation. According to Redmen and Mary research is a


“systematic effort to gain knowledge”.
Research methodology is way to systematically solve the research problem. It is a plan of
action for a research project and explains in detail how data are collected and analyzed. This
research study is a descriptive research study.

RESEARCH DESIGN

A research design is a plan that specifies the objectives of the study, method to be adopted in
the data collection, tools in data analysis and hypothesis to be framed.
“A research design is an arrangement of condition for collection and analysis of data in a
manner that aims to combine relevance to research purpose with economy in procedure”.

NATURE OF DATA

Primary data:

The primary data has been collected from the employees of RCG through a direct structured
questionnaire.

Secondary data:

The secondary data has been collected from various public sources, Company profiles,
websites, magazines, articles, books, journals and various website.

40
SAMPLING:

Sampling is the process of selecting a sufficient number of elements from the population, so
that a study of the sample and an understanding of its properties or characteristics would
make it possible for us to generalize such properties or characteristics to the population
elements.

SAMPLING DESIGN:

20 employees have been taken from 5 departments Manufacturing & Research and
Development Department, Finance Department, Marketing Department, Material
management department, HRD/personnel which makes 100 as sample and it is a stratified
random sampling method.

Stratified Random Sampling, also sometimes called proportional or quota random


sampling, involves dividing your population into homogeneous subgroups and then taking a
simple random sample in each subgroup.

HYPOTHESIS:

Employees of RCG’s are found to be satisfied with the welfare facilities provided by their
organization.

STASTICAL TOOL USED:

 Percentage Analysis and


 Correlation

41
PERCENTAGE ANALYSIS METHOD

The percentage analysis method is used for making comparison between two or more series
of data. It is used to classify the opinion of the respondent for different factors.

No. of respondents favorable


Percentage of respondent = X 100
Total no of respondents

CORRELATION

The correlation analysis deals with association between two or more variables. The
correlation does not necessary imply causation or functional relationship though the existence
of causation always implies correlation. By itself it establishes only co- variance. It is used to
find the degree of relationship between motivation and work satisfaction.

Cov (x, y) = 1/n ∑ x y – x y


σ x = √1/n Σ x2 – x 2

σ y = √1/n Σ y2 – y 2
Cov (x, y)
r= σ xX σ y

Here, r = co-efficient of correlation

42
CHAPTER – V

DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPETATION

The data has been collected from 100 employees of Royal classic mills private limited.
Regarding Employee welfare measure with special reference to social security has been
analyzed and interpreted in the following table and charts.

43
Table 5.1 Ages of the Respondents

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent

Less than 25 32 32.0 32.0 32.0

25-35 40 40.0 40.0 72.0

Valid 35-45 22 22.0 22.0 94.0

45 and above 6 6.0 6.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:
From the above table it is clear that40% of the employee belongs to 25-35 age.

44
Age of the Respodents

40

30

20
n
u
q
y
cF
re

10

0
Less than 25 25-35 35-45 45 and above
Age of the Respodents

Table 5.2 Gender of the Respondents

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent
Male 85 85.0 85.0 85.0

Female 15 15.0 15.0 100.0


Valid
Total 100 100.0 100.0

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:
From the above table it is clear that 85% of the employees are male and 15 of them are
female.

45
Gender of the Respondents

100

80

60
n
u
q
y
cF
re

40

20

0
Male Female
Gender of the Respondents

Table 5.3 Income of the respondent

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent
<Rs. 5000 9 9.0 9.0 9.0
Rs.5000-10,000 29 29.0 29.0 38.0
Rs.10,000- 37 37.0 37.0 75.0
15,000
Valid Rs.15,000- 16 16.0 16.0 91.0
20,000
>20,000 9 9.0 9.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:
From the above table it is clear that 37% of the respondent are earning10, 000-15000.
46
Income of the respondent

40

30

20
n
u
q
y
cF
re

10

0
<Rs. 5000 Rs.5000-10,000 Rs.10,000- Rs.15,000- >20,000
15,000 20,000
Income of the respondent

Table 5.4 Medical benefit to individual and family

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent
Highly 42 42.0 42.0 42.0
Satisfied
Satisfied 41 41.0 41.0 83.0

Valid Neutral 15 15.0 15.0 98.0

Dissatisfied 2 2.0 2.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:
From the above table it is clear that 42 percent of the people are highly satisfied and 41
percent of the people satisfied towards medical benefit to individual and family.
47
Medical benefit to individual and family

50

40

30
n
u
q
y
cF
re

20

10

0
highly Satisfied Satisified Netural Dis-Satisified
Medical benefit to individual and family

Table 5.5 Maternity benefit to women employee

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent
Highly satisfied 7 7.0 7.0 7.0
Satisfied 50 50.0 50.0 57.0

Neutral 42 42.0 42.0 99.0


Valid
Dis-Satisfied 1 1.0 1.0 100.0

Total 100 100.0 100.0

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:
From the above table it is clear that 50 percent of the people are satisfied and 7 percent of the
people highly satisfied towards to maternity benefit to women employee.

48
Maternity benefit to women employee

50

40

30
n
u
q
y
cF
re

20

10

0
Highly satisified Satisified Netural Dis-Satisfied
Maternity benefit to women employee

Table 5.6 Disablement benefits to individual

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent
Highly Satisfied 21 21.0 21.0 21.0
Satisfied 52 52.0 52.0 73.0
Neutral 25 25.0 25.0 98.0
Valid Dis-satisfied 1 1.0 1.0 99.0
Highly 1 1.0 1.0 100.0
Dis-satisfied
Total 100 100.0 100.0

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:
From the above table it is clear that 52 percent of the people are satisfied and 21 percent of
the people highly satisfied towards disablement benefits to individual.

49
Disablement to individual

60

50

40

30
n
u
q
y
cF
re

20

10

0
Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dis-satisfied Highly dis-
satisfied
Disablement to individual

Table 5.7 Dependence Benefit

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent
Highly satisfied 7 7.0 7.0 7.0
Satisfied 58 58.0 58.0 65.0
Neutral 30 30.0 30.0 95.0
Valid Dis-satisfied 3 3.0 3.0 98.0
Highly dis- 2 2.0 2.0 100.0
satisfied
Total 100 100.0 100.0

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:
From the above table it is clear that 58 percent of the people are satisfied and 7 percent of the
people highly satisfied towards dependence benefit.

50
Dependence Benefit

60

50

40

30
n
u
q
y
cF
re

20

10

0
Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dis-satisfied Highly dis-
satisfied
Dependence Benefit

.Table 5.8 Old age Benefit

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent
Highly 15 15.0 15.0 15.0
satisfied
Satisfied 52 52.0 52.0 67.0
Neutral 29 29.0 29.0 96.0
Valid
Dis-satisfied 4 4.0 4.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:
From the above table it is clear that 52 percent of the people are satisfied and 15 percent of
the people highly satisfied towards the old age benefit.

51
Old age Benefit

60

50

40

30
n
u
q
y
cF
re

20

10

0
Highly satified Satisfied Neutral Dis-satisfied
Old age Benefit

Table 5.9 Employee injury benefit

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent
Highly satisfied 20 20.0 20.0 20.0
Satisfied 52 52.0 52.0 72.0
Neutral 23 23.0 23.0 95.0
Valid Dis-satisfied 3 3.0 3.0 98.0
Highly dis- 2 2.0 2.0 100.0
satisfied
Total 100 100.0 100.0

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:
From the above table it is clear that 52 percent of the people are satisfied and 20 percent of
the people highly satisfied towards employee injury benefit.

52
Employee injury benefit

60

50

40

30
n
u
q
y
cF
re

20

10

0
Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dis-satisfied Highly dis-
satisfied
Employee injury benefit

Table 5.10 Environmental Protection effort

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent
Highly 19 19.0 19.0 19.0
satisfied
Satisfied 47 47.0 47.0 66.0
Neutral 25 25.0 25.0 91.0
Valid
Dis-satisfied 5 5.0 5.0 96.0
Highly dis- 4 4.0 4.0 100.0
satisfied
Total 100 100.0 100.0

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:
From the above table it is clear that 47 percent of the people are satisfied and 19 percent of
people highly satisfied towards environmental protection effort offered in the organization.

53
Environmental Protection

50

40

30
n
u
q
y
cF
re

20

10

0
Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dis-satisfied Highly dis-
satisfied
Environmental Protection

Table 5.11 Housing facility/Road Lighting

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent
Highly satisfied 16 16.0 16.0 16.0
Satisfied 47 47.0 47.0 63.0
Neutral 28 28.0 28.0 91.0
Valid Dis-satisfied 7 7.0 7.0 98.0
Highly dis- 2 2.0 2.0 100.0
satisfied
Total 100 100.0 100.0

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:
From the above table it is clear that 47% of the people are satisfied and 16 % of the people
highly satisfied towards the housing facility, road, and lighting offered in the organization.

54
Housing facility/Road Lighting

50

40

30
n
u
q
y
cF
re

20

10

0
Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dis-satisfied Highly dis-
satisfied
Housing facility/Road Lighting

Table 5.12 Canteen Facilities

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent
Valid Highly 27 27.0 27.0 27.0
satisfied
Satisfied 38 38.0 38.0 65.0
Neutral 27 27.0 27.0 92.0
Dis-satisfied 5 5.0 5.0 97.0
Highly 3 3.0 3.0 100.0
dis-satisfied
Total 100 100.0 100.0

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:

55
From the above table it is clear that 38 percent of the people are satisfied and 27 percent of
the people highly satisfied towards canteen facility offered in the organization.

Canteen Facilities

40

30

20
n
u
q
y
cF
re

10

0
Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dis-satisfied Highly dis-
satisfied
Canteen Facilities

Table 5.13 Transport Facilities

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent
Highly satisfied 16 16.0 16.0 16.0
Satisfied 48 48.0 48.0 64.0
Neutral 23 23.0 23.0 87.0
Valid Dis-satisfied 7 7.0 7.0 94.0
Highly dis- 6 6.0 6.0 100.0
satisfied
Total 100 100.0 100.0

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:
56
From the above table it is clear that 48 percent of the people are satisfied and 16 percent of
the people highly satisfied towards the transport facility offered in the organization.

Transport Facilities

50

40

30
n
u
q
y
cF
re

20

10

0
Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dis-satisfied Highly dis-
satisfied
Transport Facilities

Table 5.14 Provision for Safety equipment

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent
Highly 15 15.0 15.0 15.0
satisfied
Satisfied 43 43.0 43.0 58.0
Neutral 39 39.0 39.0 97.0
Valid
Dis-satisfied 1 1.0 1.0 98.0
Highly dis- 2 2.0 2.0 100.0
satisfied
Total 100 100.0 100.0

Source: Primary data


Interpretation:

57
From the above table it shows 43 percent of the people are satisfied and 15 percent of the
people highly satisfied towards provision of safety equipment offered in the organization.

Provision for Safety equipment

50

40

30
n
u
q
y
cF
re

20

10

0
Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dis-satisfied Highly dis-
satisfied
Provision for Safety equipment

.Table 5.15 Drinking water facility and sanitation

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent

Valid Highly 15 15.0 15.0 15.0


satisfied
Satisfied 60 60.0 60.0 75.0
Neutral 23 23.0 23.0 98.0
Dis-satisfied 2 2.0 2.0 100.0
Total 100 100.0 100.0

Source: Primary data


Interpretation:

58
From the above table it shows 60 % of the people are satisfied and 15 percent of the people
highly satisfied towards the drinking water facility and sanitation offered in the organization.

Drinking water facility and sanitation

60

50

40

30
n
u
q
y
cF
re

20

10

0
Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dis-satisfied
Drinking water facility and sanitation

Table 5.16 Education facility

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent
Highly satisfied 15 15.0 15.0 15.0
Satisfied 48 48.0 48.0 63.0
Netural 27 27.0 27.0 90.0
Valid Dis-satisfied 6 6.0 6.0 96.0
Highly dis- 4 4.0 4.0 100.0
satisfied
Total 100 100.0 100.0

Source: Primary data


Interpretation:

59
From the above table it shows 48 percent of the people are satisfied and 15 percent of the
people highly satisfied towards the educational facility offered in the organization.

Education facility

50

40

30
n
u
q
y
cF
re

20

10

0
Highly satisfied Satisfied Netural Dis-satisfied Highly dis-
satisfied
Education facility

Table 5.17 Conducive work environment

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent
Highly 13 13.0 13.0 13.0
satisfied
Satisfied 50 50.0 50.0 63.0
Neutral 31 31.0 31.0 94.0
Valid
Dis-satisfied 4 4.0 4.0 98.0
Highly dis- 2 2.0 2.0 100.0
satisfied
Total 100 100.0 100.0

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:
60
From the above table it shows 50 percent of the people are satisfied and 13 percent of the
people highly satisfied towards the conducive work environment offered in the organization.

Conducive work envrionment

50

40

30
n
u
q
y
cF
re

20

10

0
Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dis-satisfied Highly dis-
satisfied
Conducive work envrionment

.
Table 5.18 Worker's education

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent
Highly 14 14.0 14.0 14.0
satisfied
Satisfied 57 57.0 57.0 71.0
Neutral 21 21.0 21.0 92.0
Valid
Dis-satisfied 7 7.0 7.0 99.0
Highly dis- 1 1.0 1.0 100.0
satisfied
Total 100 100.0 100.0

Source: Primary data


Interpretation:

61
From the above table it shows 57 percent of the people are satisfied and 14 percent of the
people highly satisfied towards the worker’s education benefits given in the organization.

Worker's education

60

50

40

30
n
u
q
y
cF
re

20

10

0
Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dis-satisfied Highly dis-
satisfied
Worker's education

Table 5.19 Worker recreation/child/youth/women's club/playground, park

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent
Highly 14 14.0 14.0 14.0
satisfied
Satisfied 45 45.0 45.0 59.0
Neutral 31 31.0 31.0 90.0
Valid Dis-satisfied 6 6.0 6.0 96.0
Highly dis- 4 4.0 4.0 100.0
satisfied
Total 100 100.0 100.0

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:
62
From the above table it shows 45 % of the people are satisfied and 14 percent of the people
highly satisfied towards the worker recreation, child, youth, women’s club, playground, park.

Worker recreation/child/youth/women's club/play ground, park

50

40

30
n
u
q
y
cF
re

20

10

0
Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dis-satisfied Highly dis-
satisfied
Worker recreation/child/youth/women's club/play ground, park

Table 5.20 Crèches benefit to children

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent
Highly satisfied 18 18.0 18.0 18.0
Satisfied 34 34.0 34.0 52.0
Neutral 33 33.0 33.0 85.0
Valid Dis-satisfied 7 7.0 7.0 92.0
Highly dis- 8 8.0 8.0 100.0
satisfied
Total 100 100.0 100.0

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:

63
From the above table it shows 34 percent of the people are satisfied and 18 percent of the
people highly satisfied.

Creches benefit

40

30

20
n
u
q
y
cF
re

10

0
Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dis-satisfied Highly dis-
satisfied
Creches benefit

Table 5.21 Uniforms given in the organization

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent
Highly satisfied 12 12.0 12.0 12.0
Satisfied 58 58.0 58.0 70.0
Neutral 27 27.0 27.0 97.0
Valid Dis-satisfied 2 2.0 2.0 99.0
Highly dis- 1 1.0 1.0 100.0
satisfied
Total 100 100.0 100.0

Source: Primary data


Interpretation:

64
From the above table it shows 58 percent of the people are satisfied and 12 percent of the
people highly satisfied towards the uniform given by the organization.

Uniforms

60

50

40

30
rF
q
n
u
y
e
c

20

10

0
Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dis-satisfied Highly dis-
satisfied
Uniforms

Table 5.22 Distribution of work/provision of rest hours

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent
Highly satisfied 12 12.0 12.0 12.0
Satisfied 47 47.0 47.0 59.0
Neutral 36 36.0 36.0 95.0
Valid Dis-satisfied 4 4.0 4.0 99.0
Highly Dis- 1 1.0 1.0 100.0
satisfied
Total 100 100.0 100.0

Source: Primary data


Interpretation:

65
From the above table it shows 47 percent of the people are satisfied and 12 percent of the
people highly satisfied towards the provision of rest hours offered in the organization.

Distribution of work/provision of rest hours

50

40

30
n
u
q
y
cF
re

20

10

0
Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dis-satisfied Highly Dis-
satisfied
Distribution of work/provision of rest hours

Table 5.23 Market co-operative/credit society

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent
Highly satisfied 8 8.0 8.0 8.0
Satisfied 31 31.0 31.0 39.0
Neutral 20 20.0 20.0 59.0
Valid Dis-satisfied 30 30.0 30.0 89.0
Highly 11 11.0 11.0 100.0
dis-satisfied
Total 100 100.0 100.0

Source: Primary data

66
Interpretation:
From the above table it shows 31 percent of the people are satisfied and 18 percent of the
people highly satisfied towards existence of marketing co-operative credit society offered in
the organization.

Market co-operative/credit society

30

20
n
u
q
y
cF
re

10

0
Highly satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dis-satisfied Highly dis-
satisfied
Market co-operative/credit society

Table 5.24 Maximum level of satisfaction towards Employee welfare


facilities offered in the organization

S.no Particular Percentage Rank


1 Drinking water facility 60% 1
2 Dependence benefit 58% 2
3 Uniform’s to employee 58% 2
4 Worker’s education 57% 3

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:

67
From the above table maximum level of satisfaction towards employee welfare facilities
offered in the organization are ranked below:
Rank 1 - Drinking water facility
Rank 2 - Dependence benefit
Rank 2 - Uniform’s to employee
Rank 3 - Worker’s education

Table 5.25 Minimum level of satisfaction towards Employee welfare


facilities offered in the organization

S.no Particular Percentage Rank


1 Marketing co-operative credit society 31% 1
2 Crèches benefit to children 34% 2
3 Canteen facility 38% 3

Source: Primary data

Interpretation:
From the above table Minimum level of satisfaction towards employee welfare facilities
offered in the organization are ranked below:
Rank 1 - Marketing co-operative credit society
Rank 2 - Crèches benefit to children
Rank 3 - Canteen facility

Table 5.26 Showing the Correlation of age vs work environment factor

Work
Age of the environment
Respondents factor
Age of the Respondents Pearson Correlation 1 .097
Sig. (2-tailed) .339
N 100 100
Work environment factor Pearson Correlation .097 1
Sig. (2-tailed) .339
N 100 100

68
Source: Primary data

Work environment factor = Environmental Protection+ Provision for safety equipment+


Uniform.

Interpretation:

From the above table it is clear that age of the employees and employee welfare factors with
respect to work environment is positively correlated. There is a relationship between age and
employee welfare factors with respect to work environment .The relation between two
variable in such that as one variable values tend to increase the other variable value tend to
increase.

Table 5.27 Table showing the Correlation of age vs Convenience factor

Age of the Convenience


Respondents factor
Age of the Respondents Pearson Correlation 1 .208(*)
Sig. (2-tailed) .038
N 100 100
Convenience factor Pearson Correlation .208(*) 1
Sig. (2-tailed) .038
N 100 100

Source: Primary data


69
Convenience factor =canteen facilities+ Drinking water facility+ Conducive work
environment.

Interpretation:

From the above table it is clear that age of the employees and employee welfare factors with
respect to convenience factor is positively correlated. There is a relationship between age and
employee welfare factors with respect to convenience factor The relation between two
variable in such that as one variable values tend to increase the other variable value tend to
increase.

Table 5.28 Table showing the Correlation of age vs Work health factor

Work
Age of the health
Respondents factor
Age of the Respondents Pearson Correlation 1 .100
Sig. (2-tailed) .325
N 100 100
Work health factor Pearson Correlation .100 1
Sig. (2-tailed) .325
N 100 100

70
Source: Primary data

Work health factor = Medical benefit to individual and family + Disablement to individual+
Dependence benefit+ Old age benefit +Employee injury benefit.

Interpretation:

From the above table it is clear that age of the employees and employee welfare factors with
respect to work health factor is positively correlated. There is a relationship between age
and employee welfare factors with respect to work health factor The relation between two
variable in such that as one variable values tend to increase the other variable value tend to
increase.

Table 5.29 Table showing the Correlation of age vs Women and child
welfare factor

Women and
Age of the child welfare
Respondents factor
Age of the Respondents Pearson Correlation 1 .112
Sig. (2-tailed) .266
N 100 100
Women and child Pearson Correlation
.112 1
welfare factor
Sig. (2-tailed) .266
N 100 100

71
Source: Primary data

Women and child welfare factor = Maternity benefit for women employee+ crèches benefit.

Interpretation:

From the above table it is clear that age of the employees and employee welfare factors with
respect to women and child welfare factor is positively correlated. There is a relationship
between age and employee welfare factors with respect to women and child welfare factor
The relation between two variable in such that as one variable values tend to increase the
other variable value tend to increase.

Table 5.30 Showing the Correlation of age vs Worker’s education factor

Worker
Age of the education
Respondents factor
Age of the Respondents Pearson Correlation 1 .116
Sig. (2-tailed) .251
N 100 100
Worker’s education Pearson Correlation .116 1
factor Sig. (2-tailed) .251
N 100 100

72
Source: Primary data

Worker’s education factor = Educational facility + Worker’s education.

Interpretation:
From the above table it is clear that age of the employees and employee welfare factors with
respect to worker’s education factor is positively correlated. There is a relationship between
age and employee welfare factors with respect to worker’s education factor The relation
between two variable in such that as one variable values tend to increase the other variable
value tend to increase.

Table 5.31 Showing the Correlation of age vs Outside welfare facilities

Outside
Age of the welfare
Respondents factor
Age of the Respondents Pearson Correlation 1 -.060
Sig. (2-tailed) .555
N 100 100
outside welfare factor Pearson Correlation -.060 1
Sig. (2-tailed) .555
N 100 100

73
Source: Primary data

Outside welfare factor =Housing facilities and road lighting+ Transport facility+ Market
Co-operative and credit facility

Interpretation:

From the above table it is clear that age and outside welfare factors with employee welfare
is negatively correlated. There is a negative relationship between age and job related to
employee welfare outside. The relation between two variable in such that as one variable
values tend to increase the other variable value tend to decrease

CHAPTER – VI
FINIDINGS

1. 40% of the employee in the organization belongs to 25-35 age which means large
people are young.
2. 85% of the employees are male.
3. 37% of the employees are earning 10,000-15000 per month.
4. 42% of the employees are highly satisfied towards medical benefit to individual and
family offered in the organization.

74
5. 50% of the employees are satisfied towards the maternity benefit to women employee
offered in the organization.
6. 52% of the employee are satisfied towards disablement benefits to individual offered in
the organization
7. 58% of the employees are satisfied towards the dependence benefit provided in the
organization.
8. 52% of the employees are satisfied towards old age benefit provided in the organization.
9. 52% of the employees are satisfied towards employee injury benefit offered in the
organization.
10. 47% of the employees are satisfied towards environmental protection offered in the
organization.
11. 47% of the employee are satisfied towards housing facility and road lighting offered in
the organization.
12. 38% of the people satisfied towards the canteen facility offered in the organization
13. 48% of the people are satisfied towards the transport facility offered in the organization.
14. 43% of the people are satisfied towards provision for safety equipment provided in the
organization.
15. 60% of the people are satisfied towards drinking water facility and sanitation provided
in the organization.
16. 48% of the people are satisfied towards educational facility provided in the
organization.
17. 50% of the employees are satisfied towards conducive work environment offered in the
organization.

18. 57% of the employee are satisfied towards worker’s education offered in the
organization
19. 45% of the employees are satisfied towards worker recreation, child, youth, women’s
club, playground and park.
20. 34% of the employees are satisfied towards crèches benefit offered in the organization.
21. 58% of the employees are satisfied towards the uniforms offered in the organization.
22. 47% of the employees are satisfied towards distribution of work/provision of rest hours.

75
23. 31% of the employee are satisfied towards marketing co-operative credit society
offered in the organization
24. Drinking Water facility Ranked as no.1, Dependence benefit and Uniform’s to
employee are ranked no.2 and worker’s education are ranked at no.3, towards Maximum
level of satisfaction welfare facility offered in the organization.
25. Marketing co-operative credit societies are ranked at no.1, Crèches benefits to children
are ranked at no.2 and canteen facilities are ranked at no.3. Towards Minimum level of
satisfaction welfare facility offered in the organization.
26. Correlation of Age vs. Worker Environment factor is positively correlated.
27. Correlation of Age vs. Convenience factor is positively correlated.
28. Correlation of Age vs. Work Health factor is positively correlated.
29. Correlation of Age vs. Women and Child Welfare factor are positively correlated.
30. Correlation of Age vs. Worker’s Education factor is positively correlated.
31. Correlation of Age vs. Outside Welfare factor is negatively correlated.

CHAPTER-VII
SUGGESTIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

 Medical benefit should be provided inside the industry by providing small


dispensary/hospital.
 Quality of food in the canteen should be improved.
 Schools with good standard providing Quality education should establish.
 The employee should be made members in welfare club like (Red Cross& lions club)
76
 Marketing Co-operative societies should be formed and the company can also have tie
up with co-operative bank for granting loans.

CHAPTER VIII
CONCLUSION

The welfare measures are more important for every employee, without welfare measure
employee cannot work effectively in the organization. Social security measures like workmen
compensation, maternity benefit, old age benefit, medical benefit and family welfare benefit
are very important. The organization by providing better social securities to employee the

77
satisfaction towards job can be improved. But they are lacking in canteen facilities, worker’s
education facilities, marketing co-operative credit societies. The organization should take
necessary steps to improve in those measures.

ANNEXURES

BIBLIOGRAPHY

1. Aswathappa.k, Human Resource and Personnel Management Text and cases, Tata Mc
Graw Hill, 2002, New Delhi.

78
2. Aswathappa.k, Human Resource and Personnel Management, Tata Mc Graw Hill,
1999, New Delhi.
3. Bernardin H..Jonn Human Resource Management, on Experimental Approach, Tata
Mc Graw Hill, 2002, New Delhi.
4. Gary Dessler, Human Resource Management, Prentice Hall, Tenth Edition 2004, New
Delhi.
5. Gary Dessler, Framework for Human Resource Management, Prentice Hall, Tenth
Edition 2005 New Delhi.
6. Jerald R.Smith Peggy A. Golden, Human Resource Simulation, Prentice Hall, Second
Edition 2005, New Delhi.

WEBSITES:

1. http://www.managementparadise.com/forums/garment-industry.html

2. http://www.rdplapps.com/(specialized garment s/w)

QUESTIONNAIRE

A) PERSONAL DATA

79
Name : ______________________________

Age :
□ Less Than 25
□ 25-35
□ 35-45
□ 45 & Above.
Sex :
□ Male
□ Female

Education Qualification : SSLC/UG/PG/Professional

Income :
□ Less Than 5000
□ 5000-10,000
□ 10,000-15,000
□ 15,000-20,000
□ 20,000 & Above

Department : ______________________________

Designation : ______________________________

Years Of Experience : ______________________________

B) EMPLOYEE WELFARE:

1. Are you satisfied with the medical benefits provided to individual and family?
80
Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]
Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

2. Are you satisfied with the Maternity benefit provided to women employees?

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]


Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

3. Disablement to individual.

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]

Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

4. Are you satisfied with the Dependence benefits provided by the company?

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]


Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

5. Are you satisfied with the Old age benefits (Gratuity, PF, Group insurance, Loan
benefits) provided by the company?

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]


Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

6. Are you satisfied with Employee injury benefits provided by the company?

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]

81
Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

7. Environmental protection

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]


Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

8. Are you satisfied with the housing facilities/road lighting?

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]

Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

9. Are you satisfied with the canteen facilities provided by the organization?

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]


Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

10. Are you satisfied with the transport facilities provided by the organization?

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]


Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

11. Are you satisfied with the safety equipment’s?

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]


82
Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

12. Are you satisfied with the Drinking water facility and sanitation?

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]

Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

13. Educational facility:

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]

Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

14. Are you satisfied with the conducive work environment?

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]

Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

15. Are you satisfied with the Worker’s education facility?

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]

Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

16. Are you satisfied with the Worker recreation/ child/ youth/ women’s club/
playground, park?

83
Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]

Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

17. Are you satisfied with the Crèches benefits?

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]

Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

18. Are you satisfied with the Uniforms provided by the company?

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]

Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

19. Are you satisfied with the Fair distribution of work/ provision for rest hours/ breaks.?

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]

Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

20. Market co-operative society/credit society:

Highly satisfied [ ] Satisfied [ ] Neutral [ ]

Dissatisfied [ ] Highly Dissatisfied [ ]

84