W

ILKES-BARRE –
Help for the
homeless may
soon be out of REACH.
On July 1, the REACH
program – which began in
Wilkes-Barre in1984 by the
late Stan Hamilton as
Shepherds of the Streets –
will stop providing servic-
es to an average of 40
homeless men and women
a day in downtown Wilkes-
Barre.
The cul-
prit: The
pending
loss of an
$18,500
state grant.
No more
showers to
clean them-
selves up.
No more
mail to
open. No
more break-
fast in the
morning. No telephone to
use to make appointments
or to seek services. No
more counseling, camara-
derie or friendly chats.
No more day care for the
homeless.
“As of July 1, that stuff
stops,” said Stefanie Wo-
lownik, executive director.
REACHing for help
CLARK VAN ORDEN PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Stefanie Wolownik, executive director of REACH, talks with Kathy Boston in the dayroom on South Franklin Street in Wilkes-Barre. The
program has drawn a great deal of praise from the people who rely on it.
Program
needs
funding
By BILL O’BOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
See HOMELESS, Page 11A
The Times Leader
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INSIDE
A NEWS
Local 3A
Nation & World 5A
Obituaries 10A
B PEOPLE
Birthdays 5B
C SPORTS
Outdoors 12C
D BUSINESS
Mutuals 6D
E VIEWS
Editorial 2E
F ETC.
Puzzles 2F
Travel 8F
G CLASSIFIED
Baseball
Yankees fall
to Mud Hens
Sports, 1C
Middle school students recent-
ly flocked to the former St. Chris-
topher’s Roman Catholic Church
in Bear Creek Township for their
end-of-the-year dance.
The pews are gone, leaving
plenty of open space for the stu-
dents to strut their stuff on fresh
carpeting.
A disc jockey pumped out mu-
sic from a stage where the altar
once stood.
Images of students flashed on
flat-panel televisions flanking the
stage, keeping with the red car-
pet Oscar night theme.
“The place was transformedin-
to a mini Kodak Theatre for the
night,” said Bear Creek Commu-
nity Charter School CEO Jim
Smith.
St. Christopher’s is among sev-
eral Diocese of Scranton church-
es, rectories and ancillary build-
ings that have been sold in the
last year to buyers for a mix of re-
uses, according to interviews and
county records.
The diocese started imple-
menting a cost-cutting consolida-
tion plan to close some schools
and half of the 90 churches in Lu-
zerne County in 2009, raising
questions about what would hap-
pen to the religious structures
listed for sale.
The Bear Creek Foundation,
Inc., which is linked to the char-
ter school, purchased the church
for $148,000 in December.
Hazle Township residents Gio-
vanni and Paula Ann DiBlasi
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
The Rev. Patrick
McDowell, pastor
of Sacred Heart
and St. Joseph
Parish in Nurem-
berg, stands
outside the for-
mer St. Joseph
Catholic Church
at the southern
end of Luzerne
County. He is
pleased that the
vacant church
will be purchased
by a nonprofit
theater group.
Theater, fitness center and private home are among uses
New chapter and verse for old churches
By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
jandes@timesleader.com
“We’re hoping to do ‘Godspell’ as our first per-
formance in the new building. We thought that
would be a great way to start.”
Anne Bonacci
Nuremberg Players
INSIDE: Some church properties
face taxation, Page 14A
See CHURCHES, Page 14A
To prepare for the Scripps Na-
tional Spelling Bee, champion
Sukanya Roy spent years study-
ing the etymology of English,
dabbling in foreign languages to
learn foreign word roots and
simply reading the dictionary
cover-to-cover.
Despite all of that study, Suka-
nya’s father Ab-
hi Roy said the
greatest lesson
his daughter
learned at the
2011 spelling
bee was not
academic.
“It taught
her the value of
hard work, setting goals and
meeting challenges,” he said.
“It’s not just about words. Those
are the values that we’re trying
to teach her, and they’re going to
serve her later in life.”
On Thursday, 14-year-old Su-
kanya, an eighth-grader at
Abington Heights Middle
School, took home the top prize
in the National Spelling Bee. It
was the third time Sukanya
made it to single-elimination
rounds of the national competi-
tion; she finished in 20th place
last year and tied for 12th in
2009.
Abhi Roy said he and his wife
Mousumi helped their daughter
devise a study plan and would
quiz Sukanya on words.
Both of Sukanya’s parents are
scholars – Abhi Roy teaches mar-
keting at The University of
Scranton and Mousumi Roy is
an independent mathematics
scholar who formerly taught at
Johns Hopkins University and
the Penn State Worthington
Scranton campus.
“We encourage her to enjoy
learning,” Abhi Roy said. “That’s
HOMEL ESS SI TUATI ON
Mike Smith talks about how REACH has helped him
with food and a job search.
Skip Constable says what REACH means to him and
how he will miss it when funding is cut.
Bryan Hogan explains what the program did to help
him.
WILKES-BARRE – Mike
Smith, Skip Constable, Bryan
Hogan, Kathy Boston and a
man named Jeb have all been
helped by REACH to the
point where they are living
on their own and getting
their lives back together.
Each has a story of how
they have coped with life and
its ups and downs. They are
regulars at REACH, the home-
less day center on South
Franklin Street in Wilkes-
Barre. None of them want to
see the center close.
On a recent visit to the
center, the five offered their
thoughts on homelessness and
the need for help.
On most days more than 40
homeless enter the basement
of St. Stephen’s Episcopal
Church to get a shower,
check their mail, grab a little
breakfast or use a telephone.
But on July 1, the homeless
services at REACH go away
due to budgetary constraints.
The clients will then filter
into the streets to find a
place to hang out, keep warm
or have a conversation.
There are other agencies
that offer assistance to home-
less men and women – Moth-
REACH helps the homeless get back on their feet
By BILL O’BOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
See REACH, Page 12A
Editor’s
note: This
is the first
of a two-
part series
exploring
the ram-
ifications of
closing a
downtown
service that
assists the
homeless.
SPEL L I NG BEE
Learning
was the
real prize
for champ
Sukanya Roy’s parents, both
scholars, wanted to teach her
the value of hard work.
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
Roy
See PRIZE, Page 14A
K

PAGE 2A SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Amendola,
Marguerite
Aquilina, Mary
Findora, Elizabeth
Heffernan, Alice
Keats, William
Klein, Robert
Moore, James Jr.
Perrins, Louise
Piatt, Thomas
Piskorik, Helen
Rembish, Henry Jr.
Sakowski, Mitzie
Schmidt, Josephine
Stratton, Allen
Toole, Helena
OBITUARIES
Page 10A
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Issue No. 2011-156
HAZLE TWP. – State
police reported the follow-
ing:
• A warrant has been
issued for Matthew Werth-
wine who was allegedly
involved in a physical alter-
cation and made threats to
a woman on May 29 at Four
Seasons Court. Anyone with
information on the where-
abouts of Werthwine is
asked to contact state police
at Hazleton at 570 459-3890.
• The windshield and
passenger side window of a
1995 Peterbilt truck were
damaged while it was
parked in the rear of the
Hazle Park Cold Storage
building between 11 p.m.
Thursday and 7 a.m. Friday.
Anyone with information
about the reported damage
is asked to contact state
police at Hazleton at 570
459-3890.
• Two female students,
ages 14 and 15, will be is-
sued summonses for dis-
orderly conduct after they
were involved in a fight in
the hallway of the Hazleton
Area Ninth Grade Center on
Friday morning.
HOLLENBACK TWP. -
Richard M. McSurdy, 51, of
Shamokin was arrested on
suspicion of drunken driv-
ing after he committed traf-
fic violations on St. John’s
Road on the morning of
May 22, state police at Ha-
zleton said. McSurdy dis-
played signs of intoxication
and was taken into custody,
state police said. Charges
will be filed pending the
results of blood alcohol
tests, state police said.
HANOVER TWP. – Police
arrested Colton Lee Howell-
Hadley, 21, of Blackman
Street, Wilkes-Barre, and
Joshua John Krzywicki, 21,
of South Market Street,
Glen Lyon, Saturday on
charges they stole stereo
equipment from vehicles.
At 1:15 a.m. a witness
reported seeing the two
men attempting to break
into vehicles on South Main
Street, police said. Police
said they located Howell-
Hadley and Krzywicki, who
fit the description provided
by the witness, and found
they had smashed the win-
dows of two vehicles in the
area and removed stereo
equipment. Krzywicki at-
tempted to flee but was
stopped and arrested after a
foot chase, police said.
Howell-Hadley and Krzyw-
icki were arraigned Sat-
urday morning at Luzerne
County Correctional Facility
on charges of theft from a
motor vehicle, receiving
stolen property, criminal
conspiracy, criminal mis-
chief, and public drunk-
enness. Krzywicki faces an
additional charge of resist-
ing arrest.
FAIRMOUNT TWP. – Two
persons were taken to a
hospital for treatment of
minor injuries following a
two-car crash Thursday.
State police said John
Remphrey of Wilkes-Barre
in his vehicle struck the
rear of a Chevrolet Impala
driven by Eugenia Valente
as she attempted to pull
into a driveway on State
Route 4015. Valente and her
passenger were taken to
Geisinger Wyoming Valley
Hospital, Plains Township,
for treatment of minor in-
juries. Remphrey was not
injured.
WILKES-BARRE – City
police reported the follow-
ing:
• Police are investigating
a reported slashing outside
Escape after-hours nightclub
early Saturday morning.
• Police cited Steven
Tagnani, 21, of Nanticoke,
on public drunkenness
charges at 6:30 a.m. Sat-
urday at 41 N. Hancock St.
• Police arrested Patrick
Lee Staley on assault and
possession of marijuana
charges Friday at 8:53 p.m.
Police said they were
called to 846 S. Franklin St.
for a report of domestic
violence.
Laura Ruby said she came
to the residence to remove
property and was punched
in the face by Staley.
Police said they were ar-
resting Staley and found
him in possession of a bag-
gy containing a green leafy
substance believed to be
marijuana.
Staley was charged with
simple assault and posses-
sion of marijuana.
• Jim Post of North
Welles Street said Saturday
morning that eggs were
thrown at his residence.
•Jamal McElligot, 19, of
Midland Court will be
charged with criminal mis-
chief after Brianne Reddick
of South Welles Street said
he smashed a window at a
residence on South Welles
Street on Thursday.
• Jennifer Kintz, 24, of
Barney Street said Saturday
that her ATM card was sto-
len and then used.
• Thomas Major, 57, of
Barney Street said Saturday
that a GPS unit was taken
from his vehicle.
• A representative of La
Esperanza on Old River
Road said a male customer
left the store on Tuesday
afternoon without paying
for several food items.
POLICE BLOTTER
WILKES-BARRE – A growing
citizens group is seeking to con-
nect citizens and train “resident
reporters” to effect change in
Northeastern Pennsylvania.
The NEPA Organizing Center,
founded in 2008, hosted an ori-
entation for its recently
launched media program at the
Arts YOUniverse building on
North Franklin Street Saturday.
The volunteer group, which in
January moved to a new office in
the Luzerne Bank Building on
Public Square, aims to provide
the area community the means
to develop long-term solutions
to human rights issues. It is
wholly staffed by volunteers and
is funded solely by private do-
nors.
Founder Frank Sindaco, 38,
said the group is initially focus-
ing its efforts on housing by reac-
hing out to homeowners facing
foreclosure and residents of pub-
lic housing communities. Volun-
teers contact owners of homes
slated for sheriff’s mortgage fore-
closure sales to provide referrals
to agencies that can help, and or-
ganize meetings with public
housing residents about the diffi-
culties and problems they face.
“While we’re referring people
to services, we also identify what
services there are and where
there’s a gap,” Sindaco said.
“We see this as a widespread
problem,” he continued. “If it’s
not affecting everyone in our
community, everyone knows
someone that it’s affected… The
economy is causing massive dis-
placement and we as a communi-
ty need to figure out what we
need to do to stop it.”
Organizers said the resident
reporters program ties into its
holistic goal of connecting citi-
zens to create change.
“Media can be about more
than just getting the word out,”
said media coordinator Mitch
Troutman, 25, of Wilkes-Barre.
“It’s also really good for building
relationships; going to talk to
someone who’s in the same sit-
uation as you.”
Steve Simko, an amateur polit-
ical cartoonist and member of a
group opposed to Marcellus
Shale gas drilling in and around
Harding, said he attended the
meeting Saturday because the
stories of citizens whose lives
have been negatively impacted
by gas drilling do not receive ad-
equate attention in the media.
“I came to see what was in-
volved; how we can promote bet-
ter communication to the people
of the actual facts,” Simko said.
Sindaco started the Organiz-
ing Center three years ago after
working in human-rights orga-
nizing for 15 years, mostly in Phi-
ladelphia. He said he came to
Wilkes-Barre because he saw a
need for community organizers
in the area.
“I recognized that after the de-
cline of unions, there wasn’t
much ability to organize in small
and medium-size towns, at a
time when we need it most,” Sin-
daco said.
He hopes that bringing orga-
nizers together around issues
like housing and natural gas
drilling will foster long-term col-
laboration, eventually leading
them to take on higher goals.
“All of these issues are inter-
woven, based on issues like eco-
nomic change; what do we want
to do about where we’re going in
the future,” he said.
Later this summer, the center
hopes to bring together about
100 community leaders fromthis
area and others for a conference
to further that collaboration.
New group eyes change
Volunteers organize to help
people deal with human rights
issues, such as loss of home.
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
To learn more about the NEPA
Organizing Center, visit www.ne-
paorganizingcenter.org.
C E N T E R AT A G L A N C E
WILKES-BARRE–Thelawnat
Kirby Park turned purple on Sat-
urday as hundreds gathered to
participateinthe3rdAnnual Pow-
ering Past Pancreatic Cancer 5K
Run/1Mile Walk.
“I started the event three years
ago because my grandfather died
two weeks after being diagnosed
with pancreatic cancer,” said
event founder Erin Ryan. “We av-
eraged around 100 people in the
past, but the event has gathered
steamover the past three years.”
Ryan said that pancreatic can-
cerisgenerallyundiagnoseduntil
it is in terminal stage. And more
research is needed to detect the
diseaseat anearlier, morerespon-
sive stage.
“My father was diagnosedwith
pancreatic cancer a year agoandI
wanted to do something to raise
awareness, so I decided to take
over the event this year,” ex-
plained event coordinator Jackie
Degnan as she stood beneath an
elaborate archof purple balloons.
“Next year wehopetomakethe
run a national Purple Stride
Event,” added Degnan, referring
to the Pancreatic Cancer Action
Network, which sponsors the
events internationally.
The National Cancer Institute
states that more than 43,000 new
cases of pancreatic cancer are di-
agnosed each year, with 38,000
being terminal. Research has
showngenetics as alikelyriskfac-
tor incontracting the disease.
“We really have a beautiful day
for the run,” said volunteer Jason
Jolleyof Dallas. “Iwantedtocome
out and help in any way I could.
I’m looking forward to a great
event.”
The organizers thanked the
many volunteers and sponsors
who worked to make the event a
success. Proceeds will gothePan-
creatic Cancer ActionNetwork.
CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
More than 200 runners and walkers came out on Saturday for the third annual walk-run for pan-
creatic cancer at Kirby Park in Wilkes-Barre. For Click photos, see Page 13A.
Cancer fighters get the power
By STEVEN FONDO
Times Leader Correspondent
Lottery summary
Daily Number, Midday
Sunday: 1-1-9
Monday: 0-7-1
Tuesday: 7-5-2
Wednesday: 4-2-7
Thursday: 2-5-7
Friday: 8-3-0
Saturday: 7-0-3
Big Four, Midday
Sunday: 1-7-2-2
Monday: 4-1-2-8
Tuesday: 1-5-2-5
Wednesday: 3-3-1-0
Thursday: 4-7-1-0
Friday: 5-9-8-9
Saturday: 9-7-5-2
Quinto, Midday
Sunday: 8-9-2-4-9
Monday: 4-2-9-7-5
Tuesday: 0-5-4-3-5
Wednesday: 7-7-4-1-2
Thursday: 2-9-1-7-8
Friday: 4-3-0-4-3
Saturday: 9-3-3-3-9
Treasure Hunt
Sunday: 02-06-08-17-28
Monday: 02-10-17-28-30
Tuesday: 03-09-13-15-26
Wednesday: 06-11-12-21-27
Thursday: 02-06-09-14-26
Friday: 01-09-19-21-30
Saturday: 17-22-26-27-28
Daily Number, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 5-8-0
Monday: 5-7-0
Tuesday: 5-8-4
Wednesday: 9-7-5
Thursday: 7-7-8
Friday: 8-7-5
Saturday: 0-9-4
Big Four, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 5-5-0-2
Monday: 5-2-9-7
Tuesday: 2-6-0-0
Wednesday: 4-3-5-4
Thursday: 4-5-1-1
Friday: 4-7-2-2
Saturday: 9-7-6-7
Quinto, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 6-5-9-7-7
Monday: 6-0-9-1-9
Tuesday: 2-7-2-4-6
Wednesday: 9-1-6-1-7
Thursday: 9-5-0-8-3
Friday: 1-5-9-2-3
Saturday: 3-8-5-8-5
Cash 5
Sunday: 04-21-28-30-38
Monday: 05-09-10-18-24
Tuesday: 12-20-25-31-37
Wednesday: 08-19-30-31-43
Thursday: 07-11-25-29-40
Friday: 02-04-10-29-39
Saturday: 02-15-18-23-26
Match 6 Lotto
Monday: 03-09-24-27-33-38
Thursday: 13-15-18-26-35-46
Powerball
Wednesday: 08-18-38-46-56
powerball: 31
powerplay: 04
Saturday: 17-19-39-41-58
powerball: 21
powerplay: 05
Mega Millions
Tuesday: 28-30-31-37-55
Megaball: 13
Megaplier: 03
Friday: 20-23-41-49-53
Megaball: 31
Megaplier: 03
KINGSTON – The Wyom-
ing Valley West School
Board will hold its June
meeting for general purpos-
es on Wednesday. The work
session will be held at 7
p.m. followed by the board
meeting.
The meeting is open to
the public and will be held
at the middle school, Ches-
ter Street, which is hand-
icapped-accessible from the
side of the building.
LOCAL BRIEF
MOOSIC–Tothetuneof “IWill
Survive,” hundreds of cancer sur-
vivors, family members and care-
givers streamed onto PNC field
before the Yankees’ game on Sat-
urday night.
Wearing yellow T-shirts and
waving yellow bandanas, partici-
pants celebrated their win over
one of the most feareddiseases in
theU.S. TheYankees warmingup
on the field got yellow bandanas
too and joined in, finding a place
in a pocket or waistband for the
bright yellowsymbols of victory.
The participants thenformeda
circle on the field as part of the
Northeast Pennsylvania Cancer
Institute’s 19th annual Cancer
Survivors Celebration, held for
the first time at PNCField.
Before their entry onto the
field, several participants ex-
plainedwhy they hadcome.
Faith Patrillo of Nicholson was
there with her husband, Michael.
An 11-year cancer survivor, she
said, “I’mheretogivehopetooth-
erpeoplesothattheycandoitjust
like I did.”
Mother and son, Linda Anche-
rani of ScrantonandMike Anche-
rani of Scott Township were both
wearingsurvivor badges. Lindais
a 16-year survivor of breast can-
cer. She said, “When I got sick,
Mike and my other son took care
of me.” ThenMikewasdiagnosed
withcancer almost twoyears ago.
“Whenhegot sick, wetookcareof
him. We’re happy to be here.”
Jill Kryston of Shavertown is a
cancer survivor and co-chairwo-
manof theSurvivors Celebration.
She said, “It gives you momen-
tum when you walk around and
see badges that show 25 years or
45 years of survival. It gives you a
burst of energy andhope.”
Onthefield, aftertheformation
of the circle, Kryston explained
the purposes of the Cancer Insti-
tute to the crowd. She said, “One
hundredpercent of the donations
to the institute stay inour area.”
Curt Stevens, a resident of Ni-
cholson, anda 25-year cancer sur-
vivor, told the crowd of his battle
withnon-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.
The first ceremonial pitch was
by 10--year-old Mollie Ward, a
fourth-grader and cancer re-
search advocate. A resident of
Cherry Hill, New Jersey, she was
diagnosed with cancer at age 15
months and is an eight-year can-
cer survivor. Her mother, Megan,
is a native of Clarks Summit.
Bob Durkin, president of the
Cancer Institute, estimated that
therewouldbe700participantsat
the game. He said, “These people
have a very unique shared experi-
ence. It’s like a fraternity or soror-
ity, a sisterhood and a brother-
hood. My ideal is for people to
meet somebody, share experienc-
es, andmake a friendfor life.”
Christine Zavaskas, Communi-
ty Outreach Coordinator for the
Northeast Regional Cancer Insti-
tute, said the event was intended
to“honor survivorsinacelebrato-
ry atmosphere.” She explained,
“It is important because there are
over 30,000 cancer survivors in
Northeast Pennsylvania.”
Cancer survivors celebrate victory over disease at PNC celebration
By SUSAN DENNEY
Times Leader Correspondent
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Jack Wall a two-time survivor of lymphoma, swings a bandana
with his wife Lois as they forma circle in the outfield at PNC
Field.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 PAGE 3A
LOCAL
➛ timesleader.com
SUGARLOAF TWP.
Gangs program planned
U.S. Rep. Lou Barletta, R-Hazleton,
and state Sen. John Yudichak, D-Ply-
mouth Twp., will hold a Gang Aware-
ness and Action Panel Discussion on
Wednesday at 6 p.m. on the Penn State
Hazleton campus, University Drive,
Sugarloaf Township.
The event, in Room K1 of the Kostos
Building, is open to the public free of
charge.
"As a former mayor, I’ve seen first-
hand the problems that gangs cause
here in Northeastern Pennsylvania,”
Barletta said. “One of the best weapons
we have in the fight against the spread
of gangs is education.”
Yudichak added, “Our purpose is to
better inform law enforcement, school
officials and members of the public to
further the discussion and come up
with a plan on how we can effectively
combat this growing threat to all of us,"
The evening will feature a presenta-
tion from D. Darell Dones, supervisory
special agent of the
Behavioral Science
Unit of the FBI, a
nationally renowned
gang expert. The
presentation will be
followed by a dis-
cussion with panelists
Kent Lane of the
Pennsylvania State
Police; Detective
Chris Orozco of the
Hazleton Police De-
partment, who started
the city’s Gang Task
Force; Chief Larry
Semenza of the Old
Forge Police Depart-
ment, a nationally
recognized expert on outlaw motorcy-
cle gangs; Luzerne County District
Attorney Jackie Musto Carroll, and
Lackawanna County District Attorney
Andrew Jarbola. .The experts will share
what has worked in other areas of coun-
try. There will be time for audience
members to ask questions and hear
suggestions on what steps they can
take in their community to help law
enforcement reduce gang activity. This
event follows the release of a major
study from the U.S. Department of
Justice on the growing problem of
gangs in Northeastern Pennsylvania.
COURTDALE
Two new officers hired
Courtdale Borough Council agreed
to hire two additional part-time police
officers at a special session Thursday
evening.
Borough officials said the new hir-
ings were planned to coordinate with
the upcoming summer work schedule
and to provide coverage for scheduled
vacations.
The two officers, Gina Kotowski and
Matthew Stitzer, are state-certified and
will work weekend and evening shifts
at a pay rate of $11.30 per hour.
Wednesday’s appointments bring the
total number of officers in the borough
police department pool to six. The
council said the officers will be eligible
for uniform reimbursement after one
year of service to the borough.
WILKES-BARRE
Crime Watches will meet
The Wilkes-Barre Crime Watch an-
nounced the following meetings:
• South Wilkes-Barre - Monday at 7
p.m., St. John’s Lutheran Church, 410 S.
River St.
• Park Avenue Towers - Tuesday at 2
p.m.
• Rolling Mills Hill/Mayflower/Iron
Triangle - Tuesday at 7 p.m. St. An-
drew’s, 316 Parrish St.
• Wilkes-Barre Crime Watch Coali-
tion meeting - Wednesday at 7 p.m.,
EMA Building, Water Street.
• Valley View High Rise - Thursday
at 2 p.m., Valley View Terrace, 215 High
St.
WILKES-BARRE
Stabbing is investigated
Police responded to a report of a
stabbing victim at Wilkes-Barre Gener-
al Hospital at 2:15 a.m. Saturday.
The victim, Lateesha Luady of
Wilkes-Barre, said she had an alterca-
tion with a black female she did not
know inside Escape, an after-hours.
The argument continued outside the
club in the area of East Northampton
Street and South Washington Street,
where the unknown female slashed
Luady’s arm with an unknown bladed
object, Luady said.
Police have no suspects at this time.
I N B R I E F
Barletta
Yudichak
After the death of Joshua Miller, a
Pittston Township native killed in the
line of duty on June 7, 2009, Luzerne
County Detective Chris Lynch had an
idea as a way to remember the fallen
Pennsylvania state trooper.
Lynch and state police Sgt. Charles
Sands, members of the Wyoming Valley
Pipe and Drum Band, co-wrote “The
Hero Miller,” which made its debut dur-
ing the state police memorial service
outside the Wyoming barracks on May
7, 2010.
Theidea continuedtogrowintoa stu-
diorecordingthat resultedina compact
disc of 11 songs paying tribute not only
to Miller but to all first-responders and
U.S. military service members killed in
action.
‘ T H E H E R O ’ S C A L L’ CD honors Joshua Miller and others killed in the line of duty
Musical tribute for fallen trooper
SUBMITTED PHOTO
A compact disc of 11 songs pays tribute to Joshua Miller and all first-respon-
ders and U.S. military service members killed in action.
By EDWARD LEWIS
elewis@timesleader.com
See MUSICAL, Page 6A
The CD is available for sale beginning
Wednesday at the Luzerne, Wyoming or
Lackawanna County district attorney’s
offices. Only 1,000 CDs have been pro-
duced. They sell for $10. Area merchants
interested in displaying CDs for sale can
email heroscall@gmail.com.
M U S I C F O R S A L E
WESTPITTSTON–Bill Goldsworthy
will wear two hats until Tuesday, when
he submits his resignation as mayor.
Goldsworthy, 56, has been hired as
deputy director of the Northeast region-
al governor’s office that covers 18 coun-
ties.
He began working in the position that
pays $65,000 a year last week, he said
Saturday.
Goldsworthy saidhe
traveled to Harrisburg
a few times to meet
with representatives of
Gov. Tom Corbett
about the position that
opened with the
change in administra-
tions in January.
“I was very interested in it,” said the
lifelong Republican.
Goldsworthy said he had no idea
whether others were interviewed for the
spot, and he said he was excited to sup-
port the governor.
As deputy director, he will be the gov-
ernor’s point man in the region, meeting
with elected officials, dealing with con-
stituents andissues that develop, includ-
ing natural gas drilling in the Marcellus
Shale formation.
“I’m sure that will be one of the top-
ics,” said Goldsworthy.
He shares the office with Harry
Forbes, a former Pike County commis-
sioner. Throughout the state there are
four regional offices.
For nearly 15 years, Goldsworthy has
been mayor of the borough of West Pitt-
ston. He also served on council and as a
zoning officer and fire chief.
He said he was allowed to stay in pub-
lic office until next week and will recom-
mendTonyDeniscotosucceedhiminof-
fice.
“He’s a great people person,” said
Goldsworthy.
The two men have worked together
for 20 years, said Goldsworthy.
“He has the community at heart,” he
said, adding Denisco is a lifelong resi-
dent of the borough and has been very
active in the community. Denisco serves
as the borough’s Emergency Manage-
ment Agency director.
Likewise, Goldsworthy saidhe is com-
mitted to working for the betterment of
the community. His new position gives
him the opportunity to help a lot more
people compared to the mayor’s office.
In addition to departing his elected of-
fice, Goldsworthy will leave his position
as vice president of major accounts for
Golden Business Machines in Kingston,
where he has worked for 31 years, and
give up his real estate license.
He added he is taking a pay cut in his
new job but is able to deal with that be-
cause of changes at home.
“I have four children who have gradu-
ated and moved out of the house,” he
said.
W. Pittston
mayor sees
a statewide
opportunity
Bill Goldsworthy now working for
Gov. Tom Corbett. The mayor wants
Tony Denisco to succeed him.
By JERRY LYNOTT
jlynott@timesleader.com
Goldsworthy
Once upon a time, a young couple
drove past a small church in Dallas. He
already knewhe wanted to be a priest.
She already knew she wanted to be a
certain priest’s wife. “Wouldn’t it be
nice to have that as our church?” they
asked each other.
A few years, two ordinations and a
wedding later, the Rev. Jack Prater and
his wife, Ingrid, found themselves
called to serve at that little church and
for the next 35years, Prater ministered
to the spiritual needs of the congrega-
tionas rector of Princeof PeaceEpisco-
pal Church.
That ministry made such an impres-
siononthe Prince of Peace community
that parishioners made Prater Rector
Emeritus when he retired. And today,
more than 14 years after he stepped
aside, the current congregation of his
former parish will recognize years of
devotion to ministry by dedicating the
church’s community room to Jack and
Ingrid Prater.
The dedication and reception will
take place following the 9 a.m. Mass
and will include the unveiling of a
plaque naming the room in honor of
the Praters. Parishioner Jean Carson
coordinated the event to celebrate the
Praters’ ministry at Prince of Peace,
which began Labor Day weekend in
1962.
“Back in 1968 or 1969, my family
came to Prince of Peace. Jack and In-
grid and their children and all the par-
ishioners made us feel so welcome. It
REL I GI ON
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
The Rev. Jack Prater and his wife Ingrid have served Prince of Peace Episcopal Church in Dallas for many years.
Recently the church honored them by naming the community room for them.
Living the faith
A remarkable couple is honored
By JANINE UNGVARSKY
For The Times Leader
See PRATERS, Page 6A
Jack and Ingrid and their
children and all the parish-
ioners made us feel so wel-
come. It was like coming
home.”
Jean Carson
Parishioner
WILKES-BARRE TWP. – Breathing,
it’s essential and natural. It’s taken for
grantedwhenall is fair, yet whenthebal-
ance is thrown off the body reacts to the
suffocation due to lack of air. It’s an all-
too-common occurrence for people liv-
ing with asthma and other respiratory
problems, leaving those who suffer on
thesidelines andout of breath.
The ninth annual Fight for Air Walk,
previously named the Asthma Walk,
opened Saturday morning under over-
cast skies at King’s College’s Betzler
Fields. Hundreds of children and adults
participated in the mile-long walk sup-
Taking a few steps toward a healthier world
Hundreds turn out for a day of fun
– and to help those suffering from
breathing problems.
By JOHN KRISPIN
jkrispin@timesleader.com
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER.
The Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton Penguins
mascot Tux and the
Cross Valley Feder-
al Credit Union
mascot Scottie
Saver lead walkers
in the American
Lung Association’s
Fight for Air Walk
Saturday morning
at King’s College’s
Betzler Fields in
Wilkes-Barre Town-
ship. Formerly
known as the Asth-
ma Walk, the event
is a fun way to raise
money for research
into breathing-
related problems.
Hundreds participa-
ted in the event this
year..
See WALK, Page 6A
C M Y K

PAGE 4A SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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on 2
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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 PAGE 5A
ISLAMABAD
Al-Qaida leader killed
A
n al-Qaida leader sought in the
2008 Mumbai siege and rumored
to be a longshot choice to succeed
Osama bin Laden was believed killed in
a U.S. drone attack as he met with
other militants in an apple orchard in
Pakistan, an intelligence official said
Saturday. If confirmed, it would be
another blow against the terror orga-
nization a month after the slaying of its
leader.
The purported death of Ilyas Kash-
miri — who also was accused of killing
many Pakistanis — could help soothe
US-Pakistan ties that nearly unraveled
after the May 2 bin Laden raid. While it
was unclear how Kashmiri was tracked,
his name was on a list of militants that
both countries recently agreed to joint-
ly target as part of measures to restore
trust, officials have said.
It also would be a major victory for
U.S. intelligence, particularly the con-
troversial CIA-run drone program.
WILDWOOD, N.J.
Amusement park reopens
A Jersey shore boardwalk amuse-
ment park that closed after an 11-year-
old girl tumbled from a moving Ferris
wheel to her death reopened Saturday
while investigators tried to figure out
what caused her fall.
A spokeswoman for Morey’s Mari-
ner’s Landing Pier in Wildwood said
the park reopened at noon. It was
closed Friday night, hours after the
death of 11-year-old Abiah Jones.
Jones was with her classmates from
Pleasant Tech Academy when she
plunged about 100 feet, from near the
top of the ride, and landed in the pas-
senger loading area, police and amuse-
ment park officials said. She was pro-
nounced dead at a hospital about 45
minutes later.
The Ferris wheel was to remain
closed until the cause of the girl’s fall is
determined.
ZAGREB, CROATIA
Pope is backing Croatia
Pope Benedict XVI strongly backed
Croatia’s bid to join the European
Union as he arrived in the Balkan na-
tion Saturday, but said he could under-
stand fears among euroskeptics of the
EU’s “overly strong” centralized bu-
reaucracy.
The pontiff also expressed the Vat-
ican’s long-running concern that Eu-
rope needs to be reminded of its Chris-
tian roots “for the sake of historical
truth” as he began his first trip as pope
to Croatia, a deeply Roman Catholic
country that his predecessor visited
three times during and after the bloody
Balkan wars of the 1990s.
Benedict is spending the weekend to
mark the Croatian church’s national
family day, and he was warmly wel-
comed by thousands of young Croats
who braved a steady rain while waiting
for Benedict to arrive for an evening
prayer vigil.
ORLANDO, FLA.
Forensic expert takes stand
An FBI forensic expert says a hair
removed from the trunk of Casey An-
thony’s car is consistent with hair from
a dead body.
Karen Korsberg Lowe testified Sat-
urday in Anthony’s murder trial. The
Florida mother is accused of killing her
2-year-old daughter, Caylee.
Lowe says she examined a light-
brown, 9-inch-long hair for this case.
She says the hair was similar to one
pulled from Caylee’s brush and was not
similar to a hair sample from Casey
Anthony.
She also says the hair showed charac-
teristics consistent with decomposi-
tion.
I N B R I E F
AP PHOTO
Going to see the Goddess of Mercy
Tourists visit the Ofuna Kannon, or
Goddess of Mercy, in Ofuna, south of
Tokyo, Saturday.
KABUL, Afghanistan — U.S. De-
fense Secretary Robert Gates appealed
for patience with an unpopular war and
said Saturday that only modest U.S.
troop reductions would make sense
this summer in a still unstable Afghan-
istan.
On his 12th and final visit to Afghan-
istan as Pentagon chief, Gates held out
the possibility of a turning point in the
war by year’s end. But Gates, who’s re-
tiring June 30, said much depends on
whether the death of al-Qaida leader
Osama bin Laden creates a new open-
ing for peace negotiations with leaders
of the Taliban insurgency.
This and other aspects of the war,
now in its 10th year, were on the agen-
da for Gates’ meetings Saturday with
Gen. David Petraeus, the top U.S. and
NATO commander here, and with U.S.
Ambassador Karl Eikenberry. A deci-
sion on U.S. troop reductions is expect-
ed in the next couple of weeks.
Gates stressed the effectiveness of
U.S.-led NATO military operations
against the Taliban over the past year,
after President Barack Obama ordered
an extra 30,000 U.S. troops to Afghan-
istan. Gains have been notable in the
south, the heartland of the Taliban
movement.
“I believe that if we can hold on to
the territory that has been recaptured
fromthe Taliban ... and perhaps expand
that security, that we will be in position
toward the end of this year to perhaps
have a successful opening to reconcil-
iation” with the Taliban — “or at least
be in a position where we can say we’ve
turned the corner here in Afghanistan,”
Gates said.
“Making any changes prior to that
time would be premature,” he added.
Together with remarks he made
about Afghanistan earlier Saturday at a
security conference in Singapore,
Gates’ statements suggest that he wor-
ries that large U.S. troop cuts this year
would run the risk of undermining bat-
tlefield gains and jeopardize a NATO-
endorsed plan to remove all foreign
combat troops from Afghanistan by
2015. The White House is pushing for
bigger reductions than are favored by
the military.
Gates: Patience needed for war
U.S. Defense secretary held out the
possibility of a turning point in
Afghanistan by year’s end.
AP PHOTO
U.S. Secretary of
Defense Robert
Gates is greeted
upon his arrival in
Kabul by U.S. Gen.
David Petraeus, left,
commander of in-
ternational forces in
Afghanistan, Sat-
urday. Gates was
making his farewell
trip to Afghanistan
as U.S. defense
secretary.
By ROBERT BURNS
AP National Security Writer
CHICAGO — Millions of
women at higher-than-usual risk
of breast cancer have a new op-
tion for preventing the disease.
Pfizer Inc.’s Aromasin cut the
risk of developing breast cancer
by more than half, without the
side effects that have curbed en-
thusiasm for other prevention
drugs, a major study found.
It was the first test in healthy
women of new-
er hormone-
blocking pills
called aroma-
tase inhibitors,
sold as Arimi-
dex, Femara
and Aromasin,
and in generic
form. They’re
used now to
prevent recur-
rences in
breast cancer
patients who are past meno-
pause, and doctors have long
suspected they may help pre-
vent initial cases, too.
Prevention drugs aren’t ad-
vised for women at average risk
of breast cancer. Those at high-
er risk because of gene muta-
tions or other reasons already
have two choices for prevention
— tamoxifen and raloxifene.
But these drugs are unpopular
because they carry small risks
of uterine cancer, blood clots
and other problems.
“Here’s a third breast cancer
prevention drug that may in
fact be safer,” said Dr. Allen
Lichter, chief executive of the
American Society of Clinical
Oncology.
New drug
cuts risk
of cancer
Hormone-blocking pills can
reduce chances of women
getting breast cancer.
It was the
first test in
healthy wom-
en of newer
hormone-
blocking pills
called aroma-
tase inhib-
itors.
By MARILYNN MARCHIONE
AP Medical Writer
was hit by another roundof airstrikes and
at least eight explosions sounded in the
capital.
The use of helicopters significantly
ramped up NATO’s operations and was a
major boost to Libyan rebels, just a day
after the fighters forced government
troops from three western towns and
broke the siege of a fourth. It was yet an-
other erosion of Gadhafi’s power since
the eruption in mid-February of the up-
rising to end his 42-year rule.
NATO said the helicopters struck
BENGHAZI, Libya — British and
French attack helicopters struck for the
first time inside Libya, giving the NATO
campaign more muscle against Moam-
mar Gadhafi’s forces. Hours later, Tripoli
troops trying to hide in populated areas,
militaryvehicles andequipment. Lt. Gen.
Charles Bouchard, commander of the Li-
bya operation, said the engagement
“demonstrates the unique capabilities
brought to bear by attack helicopters.”
Until now, NATO has relied on attack
jets, generally flying above 15,000 feet
(4,500 meters) —nearly three miles (five
kilometers) high. The jets primarily
strike government targets but there have
been cases where they missed and hit re-
bels instead.
Choppers strike Gadhafi troops
British and French attack gives
NATO campaign more strength and
boosts Libyan rebel effort.
By HADEEL AL-SHALCHI
Associated Press
SANAA, Yemen — Yemen’s wound-
ed president accepted an offer from
the Saudi king to travel there for med-
ical treatment for burns and wounds
from a splintered pulpit blown apart in
a opposition rocket attack, but had not
yet left Sanaa, the capital, by Saturday
night.
A flurry of conflicting reports about
President Ali Abdullah Saleh’s where-
abouts and condition spread through
the Middle East late Saturday after Ye-
meni government officials and opposi-
tion tribal leaders reported that Saudi
King Abdullah had mediated a cease-
fire in the raging conflict in Yemen.
Abdullah intervened to tamp down
what has become an all-out military
conflict on his southern border.
The capital and other areas of Ye-
men grew quiet for the first time in
days after dawn Saturday, though the
head of the tribal confederation bat-
tling Saleh’s forces accused them of
not observing the cease-fire.
Injured Yemen leader takes Saudi offer
AP PHOTO
Yemeni vehicle with family belongings
flees Sanaa due to clashes between
tribesmen and security forces.
By AHMED AL-HAJ
Associated Press
➛ N A T I O N & W O R L D
2
9
1
0
7
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A ROYAL REVIEWFROM THE DUKE
AP PHOTO
P
rince William, the Duke of Cambridge, takes part in the Colonel’s Review, on Horse Guards Parade, in Lon-
don Saturday. Every year in the months of May and June there are three Trooping the Color parades. The
Colonel’s Review is the second rehearsal and takes place on the Saturday one week before the Queen’s Birth-
day Parade.
C M Y K
PAGE 6A SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ N E W S
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was like coming home,” Carson
said.
Even after Carson and her fam-
ily moved away, they stayed in
touch with the Praters.
“By then, they were not only
part of our parish, they were
friends,” she said, “so we stayed
in contact and it was like we nev-
er left.”
A few years ago, Carson re-
turned to the area and to Prince
of Peace. Whenthe idea of honor-
ing the Praters came up, she said
she was happy to take the lead on
arranging a special day for her
long-time friends.
“They did so much for the par-
ish and they care about everybo-
dy. Even when you were talking
to them and asking about them,
they turned it around to find out
how you were and what was go-
ing on with you,” she said. “They
are just wonderful people.”
It’s clear the Praters felt the
same about their years at Prince
of Peace.
“The whole experience at
Prince of Peace was tremendous.
That’s why were there forever,
for 35 years,” said Jack, 77. “It
was such a warm community to
be in. It always was that way.”
“We had antique shows, we
had craft shows and couples
group. There was lots of fellow-
ship, and not just on Sunday
mornings. The spirit was good
there,” said Ingrid, 78. “Gosh, we
had so much fun!
The couple smiled recalling
the youth group and the craft
group that met in the very room
now being dedicated to them.
“We had a group there that
helped design the diocesan quilt,
which is still on display in the ca-
thedral (Church of the Nativity
in Bethlehem),” Ingrid said, not-
ing that the group was so fun to
be with that a woman who was
neither a parishioner nor even
Episcopalian joined in to help
with the quilt design.
Of course, in 35 years all the
moments weren’t good. Both
Jack and Ingrid quickly recall
one of the worst: a mid-1960s fu-
neral.
“I buried a whole family –
mother, father and three children
– from a New Year’s Day early
morning fire. That is very much
imprinted in my mind,” said
Jack.
The Praters said there were a
few other much more minor
challenges, what they called “lit-
tle edges,” from time to time.
“But they were smoothed over
and you don’t see those now
when you’re looking back,” Jack
said.
Looking all the way back to the
beginning finds Jack, a Forty
Fort native, and Ingrid, who is
from Germany, meeting when
both were students at what was
then Wilkes College. Even then,
he said, he knew he was headed
for the priesthood.
“I was brought up in and al-
ways loved everything about the
Episcopal Church. I just knew
that was what I wanted to do,”
said Jack, whose older brother
and younger sister are also Epis-
copal priests.
After graduating from Wilkes,
he attended Virginia Theological
Seminary in Alexandria. His
classes and fellowship with his
classmates stand out as happy
memories of that time, Jack said.
The food does not.
“But they had peanut butter
jars on every table, so if you
didn’t like the food you could eat
that,” he said.
He was ordained as a transi-
tional deacon at Grace Church in
Kingston in 1958.
“When you’re ordained (in the
Episcopal Church), you’re a dea-
con for the first six months so
you can’t celebrate the Euchar-
ist,” he said. That came after his
second ordination at Holy Apos-
tles Church in St. Clair.
“I can remember the first Eu-
charist I served,” Jack said. “It
was Christmas Eve and it was
such a humbling experience to
have that privilege given to you.
It was just marvelous.”
For a time, his ministry was in
the St. Clair and Minersville ar-
ea, where he celebrated Masses
at three churches each week. In
1962, the Prince of Peace congre-
gation chose him as their new
rector.
“I remember being very im-
pressed with the area when they
took us for a tour, and with the
new Dallas High School which
was just being built and which
they are now tearing down,” In-
grid said. By then, the couple had
two children and a third on the
way. “We looked at it and said,
‘There is our high school, where
our children will go.’ It was so
new, so beautiful.”
The Prater children did all
graduate from Dallas, and all
took as active a role in the Prince
of Peace congregation as their
parents. The two boys served as
acolytes, while the Prater’s
daughter played the organ.
“We hired her as a substitute
until we could finda replacement
-- whichhappened30 years later,”
Jack said, noting with obvious
pride that his daughter “did a
great job” as organist and choir
director.
“It was our family church,”
said Ingrid of the church she and
Jack still belong to. “Our chil-
dren were married there, Jack
baptized many of our grandchil-
dren there. I don’t think the kids
minded it, being preacher’s kids.
That might be because other
than service to Prince of Peace,
family was the most important
thing in the Praters’ lives.
“I could have loved golf, but I
preferred not to take that time
away from the kids,” Jack said.
“He always took Saturday off,
not Monday like many ministers,
so we could have that time with
the children,” Ingrid said.
Another priority for Jack dur-
ing his ministry was visits to his
parishioners.
“He left Monday at 8 a.m. and
went calling. That’s how he ex-
pressed his pastoral calling, see-
ing where people were living,
where they were having difficul-
ties, where they had joys,” Ingrid
said.
“To me, it was essential,” Jack
said. “That’s how you get to
know your people. There’s no
better way to get to know them.
And doing that, I had 35 great
years of ministry.”
That ministry also included
decades of prison ministry,
where the Praters taught a
course in decision making and
problemsolving at the State Cor-
rectional Institution
at Dallas. To this day, both
Jack and Ingrid continue minis-
tering to several life inmates
through correspondence.
He retired in 1997 and other
thana brief five-monthstint as an
interim pastor at Trinity Church
in West Pittston while that par-
ish was calling a new rector, the
Praters’ lives turned more to-
ward family and spending time
with their growing brood of
grandchildren, which now num-
bers11. But, Jack concedes, some
parts of being retired have been
hard.
“I miss the people, and I miss
offering services. Christmas Eve
and Easter especially, that’s very
difficult for me, not to be cele-
brating Eucharist,” Jack said, his
regret and longing visible on his
face.
Reflecting on their years of ser-
vice, Jack said he knows how he
would like to be remembered.
“I want themto say I was a car-
ing priest,” he said. “That was al-
ways my simple hope and wish.”
The fact that the Prince of
Peace congregation is naming
the parish community roomafter
him would seem to acknowledge
that he has accomplished goal.
“This is just unbelievable, and
humbling,” Jack said.
“When they named himRector
Emeritus at the time of his retire-
ment, that was honor enough.
This just tops it off,” said Ingrid.
“It has been so great to be at
Prince of Peace. It was a wonder-
ful, wonderful time.”
“It certainly was,” said Jack.
“That’s why we stayed there 35
years. That’s why we’re still
there.”
PRATERS
Continued from Page 3A
Jack, age 77, was raised in Forty
Fort
Ingrid, age 78, is a native of Ger-
many
Met while both were students at
Wilkes College
Married in November 1957; cur-
rently reside in Plymouth Town-
ship
Parents of three: Debbie Chap-
man, John and Scott; they have 11
grandchildren
Jack was ordained as an Episcopal
priest in 1958, served in St. Clair
and Minersville before returning to
this area
Served as rector of Prince of
Peace Episcopal Church in Dallas
for 35 years; retired in 1997
Ingrid enjoys reading, while Jack
enjoys watching sports. Both love
spending time watching their
grandchildren’s activities
A B O U T T H E P R AT E R S
‘we need to record this,’”
McGroarty said.
Recording sessions lasted
more than 50 hours at the
Rock Street Music studio,
whose owner Richie Kos-
suth donated the space. Ex-
ecutive producers of the CD
are Kevin Nesses and Shan-
na Zell of Oasis Records,
based in Lodi, N.J. Music
contributors are Jim Bren-
nan and John Mahon.
Area businesses that con-
tributed to the production
are Ace Robbins Heating
and Propane, Tunkhannock,
Sheldon Kukuchka Funeral
Home, Tunkhannock, and
Tunkhannock Monument
Company.
All proceeds of the sale of
the CD will be given to the
Miller family, Lynch and
McGroarty said.
“This is the first compact
disc I worked on involving
bagpipes, it was definitely a
learning experience,”
McGroarty said. “It’s an in-
teresting CD for a noble
cause.”
Lynch said it was
McGroarty’s idea to change
The song was renamed
“The Hero’s Call” to incor-
porate the wider tribute.
“There was such an out-
pouring of emotion by the
public after Joshwas killed,”
Lynch said. “I was sitting at
home one night watching
TV when I thought there
have been songs written for
other heroes, for police, and
the military. Why not a song
for Josh?”
Lynch picked up his bag-
pipe and with Sands, “The
Hero Call” was born.
After the song made its
debut, Lynch started asking
around about producing the
song onto a compact disc.
Other state troopers re-
ferred Lynch to Kevin
McGroarty, of West Pitt-
ston, who is on the board of
directors for the state police
Camp Cadet program.
“They played the song a
couple of times and I said,
“The Hero Miller” to “The
Hero’s Call” to honor fallen
first-responders and service
members.
“Chuck (Sands) and I
were OK with the change,
we just took it one step fur-
ther to honor all those killed
while protecting the public
and our country,” Lynch
said.
Miller was killed in a
shooting while attempting
to rescue a kidnapped child
on Route 611 in Coolbaugh
Township, Monroe County.
Lynch said Miller’s wid-
ow, Angela, agreed to the
production of the compact
disc.
“It took several months to
get it to where we liked it,”
Lynch said. “We spent hours
in the studio, recording and
re-recording and editing,
and recording. There are
other songs on the CD hon-
oringall branches of the U.S.
Armed Forces.”
MUSICAL
Continued from Page 3A
To hear “The Hero’s Call,” go
to timesleader.com.
O N T H E W E B
portingthelocal AmericanLungAsso-
ciation.
Donna Ray-Reifler, manager of spe-
cial events for the Lung Association,
says that respiratory problems can be
fatal.
“Lung cancer is the leading cancer
killer to begin with. Lung cancer is
something we are very interested in
finding answers for, like COPD, em-
physema, pneumonia, asthma, among
others. These are the major killers.
“Asthma is definitely still as disturb-
ing as it has been in the past. It’s not
that we’ve backeddownwithresearch.
We still have our asthma camp in the
community, and we still have educa-
tional programs as well.”
The Cross Valley Federal Credit
Union has been the event’s main spon-
sor sinceits inception. Members of the
credit union were on hand, raffling
prizes and conducting registration.
Someitems upfor rafflewereanApple
I Pad, Knoebels Amusement Resort
all-day passes, and more.
Chris George, a member of e-servic-
esforthecreditunion, wasonhandaid-
ingintheraffle. Hesaidthewalkreally
hits homebecausehis sonis anasthma
victim. He took place in the walk.
“This (event) makes people more
aware of lung disease,” said Colleen
Phillips, vice president of marketing
for the Cross Valley Federal Credit
Union. “People come out, and it gets
themtalking.”
People like 8-year old Elisha Miller
of Luzerne. Shewalkedwithher moth-
er, Susan Miller, in this, her first time.
“It’safuntime, andthemascotsarefun-
ny.” Elisha suffers from asthma but
didn’t need to use her inhaler for the
walk. Her mother said it was a good
day.
Ray-Reifler says that the goal of the
day has been unchanged in the past
eight years.
“It’s actually a celebrationat the end
supporting new research. It’s a lot of
fun and people really get a kick out of
it.”
WALK
Continued from Page 3A
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — Two
members of a famed acrobatic family
commemoratedpatriarchKarl Wallen-
daonSaturdaybycompletingthestunt
that killed him, walking between two
towers of a seaside hotel on a wire 100
feet (31 meters) above the ground,
without a net.
NikWallenda saidhehadplannedto
walk by himself across a 300-foot-long
(91-meter-long) wire, but his mother
convincedhimtoletherjoinhimonthe
reconstruction of the fatal 1978 stunt.
“I’ve been mentally prepared my en-
tire life for this,” he said. “I’ve seen the
video of my great-grandfather falling
hundreds of times. It’s something I’ve
been wanting to do for all of us, for our
family.”
Hesaidheinitiallyrejectedarequest
byhismother, DelilahWallenda, tojoin
him.
“Just because of safety,” he said.
“We’ve obviously lost several family
members doing this.”
Two Wallenda family members re-enact fatal wire walk in Puerto Rico
By DANICA COTO
Associated Press
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 PAGE 7A
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105 S. Thomas Ave. • Kingston
HARRISBURG — About once
a month on average since the be-
ginning of the year, Republican-
controlled states have approved
laws requiring voters to show
photo identification at the polls.
Kansas, SouthCarolina, Texas,
Wisconsin, Tennessee —all have
either adoptednewrequirements
or expanded existing identifica-
tion laws to specify photo IDs,
pushing the total number of
statesthat requirethemto13. Six-
teenotherstatesrequirenon-pho-
to identification.
Pennsylvania — with its huge
Republican gains in last year’s
midterm elections that included
the governorship and control of
both houses of the Legislature —
is nowpoised to consider a photo
ID bill. The House State Govern-
ment Committee sent it to the
floor and initial consideration
couldcome as early as next week.
Whether the state will join or
buck the national trend is any-
one’s guess.
In2006, mostly onthe strength
of Republican votes, the Legisla-
ture passed a bill that required all
voters to show identification ev-
erytimetheyvote. FormerDemo-
cratic governor Ed Rendell ve-
toedthemeasure, sayingit would
make voting unnecessarily diffi-
cult. Currently, only people vot-
ing in a polling place for the first
time are required to showID.
Whatever the outcome, the lat-
est bill sets up a showdown be-
tween Republicans who have
fought for years to require identi-
ficationat the polls, saying that is
needed to prevent election fraud,
and Democrats who say there is
little evidence of abuse and that
the GOP’s real motivation is to
hold down turnout among voter
groups that lean toward Demo-
cratic candidates.
So far, more Democrats than
Republicans are publicly talking
about the bill. The state Demo-
cratic Party planned to put up on-
line ads urging senior citizens to
call their legislators to register
opposition to the measure. Older
people, as well as low-income
people, students and minorities,
are among the groups that critics
say wouldbe most affectedby the
proposal.
“It addresses a problem that
doesn’t exist,” party spokesman
Mark Nicastre said.
The bill, sponsoredby Rep. Da-
ryl Metcalfe, would require all
voterstoshowpoll officialsavalid
document issued by the state or
federal governments that in-
cludes their name and photo-
graph. Thosewholacksuchdocu-
mentation could obtain identifi-
cationcardsthat thestateDepart-
ment of Transportation would be
required to issue at no cost to the
voter.
Metcalfe, R-Butler, saystheleg-
islation would reduce voter fraud
by requiring nothing more than a
form of identification that is al-
readyroutinelyrequiredfor activ-
ities that include operating a mo-
tor vehicle, boarding a commer-
cial airplane or cashing a check.
Thebill “isessential topreserving
thesacredfreedomof votingfrom
the ever-present forces of corrup-
tionseekingtooverridethewill of
the people,” Metcalfe said.
The American Civil Liberties
Union, Common Cause and the
League of Women Voters all op-
pose the measure.
Democrats argue that many se-
nior citizens lack government-is-
sued identification and that the
additional redtapecoulddiscour-
age themfromvoting.
Pennsylvania considers approving photo ID bill
So far, more Democrats than
Republicans are publicly
talking about the bill.
By PETER JACKSON
Associated Press
HARRISBURG — The heady,
initial optimism that new Gov.
TomCorbett’s major agenda items
would advance quickly through a
Legislature controlled by his fel-
low Republicans is dissolving as
thedetailsget sticky, philosophical
differences emerge and the debate
is increasingly strident.
Now, the Senate’s
Judiciary Committee
chairman is standing
up to the governor,
House leaders and
leading business lob-
bying groups over a
bill that would limit
the exposure of some
civil court defendants
to damages awarded
by juries.
Privatization of the
state-controlled liquor
stores is on hold while
Republicans work out
details of abill that has
yet to be introduced
and await a study of
howmuchmoney the state should
expect to reap.
And votes, at least for now, ap-
pear to be lacking for bills that
would make it harder to increase
school property taxes without vot-
er approval and to expand the
amount of taxpayer money availa-
bletopayfor childrentoattendpri-
vate schools.
All must overcome strong oppo-
sition from Democrats and labor
unions. Meanwhile, sniping be-
tween Corbett and Republican
lawmakers is largely being done
quietly while they insist publicly
that bumps anddisagreements are
minor enough to be resolved in
short order.
With legislators expecting to
wrap up a state budget within the
next four weeks and leave Harris-
burg until September, it is increas-
ingly likely that Corbett’s major
planks may have to wait until the
fall — at least.
Suchatimelineis not unusual in
Pennsylvania’s characteristically
deliberative Legislature. But ex-
pectations early in
the year had been
much more ambi-
tious, given Novem-
ber’s strong GOP
election perform-
ance and the party’s
control of the Legis-
lature and gover-
nor’s office.
“I think you’re go-
ingtosee significant
cooperation be-
tween the House
andSenateinresolv-
ing a significant
number of issues,”
said House Majority
Leader Mike Turzai,
R-Allegheny. “We all knowthat we
have to get the budget done and
we have to get it done in a timely
and responsible manner, but I
think ... some of the priority issues
of this administration and these
chambers will get done by June
30.”
Tactical andphilosophical differ-
ences betweenthe House andSen-
ate are apparent.
For instance, Rep. Curt Schrod-
er, R-Chester, expressed irritation
that twice this year a Senate com-
mitteechairmanhas pronounceda
bill “deadonarrival” after it passed
the House. And amid finger-point-
ing over why a private-school
voucher bill hasn’t passed the Sen-
ate, Schroder saidheis planningto
introducehisowntwo-bill package
on the subject.
Corbett’s spokesman, Kevin
Harley, saidthereis still hopefor at
least acoupleof thegovernor’s ma-
jor priorities to pass in June.
“June 30’s not here yet,” Harley
said. “Certainly the priority is to
get abalancedbudget without rais-
ing taxes ... and we’ll continue to
move forward on these other is-
sues. It’s very important to get
these things done.”
Still, the governor’s ability to
persuadelawmakersisinquestion.
For instance, a school voucher
bill remains stuck in the Senate
even after Corbett’s staff got in-
volved in hammering out details.
And the House last week voted
down a major unemployment
compensation bill that he had sup-
ported.
“You run for governor, and on a
30,000-foot level you can run on a
‘I’m for that and I’m against that’
level,” said David Patti, president
and CEOof Pennsylvanians for Ef-
fective Government, a Harrisburg-
based business advocacy group.
“Once you’re elected, you come
down to a 5,000-foot level. Now
you get into tactical issues and im-
plementation issues that you nev-
er thought of before — and that
takes some time.”
Corbett’s deftness at pushinghis
agenda should improve once he
gets more top aides firmly in place
and learns how to use the bully
pulpit that comes with the office,
Patti said.
One high-priority Corbett bill
with a chance of passage in June
deals with “joint and several liabil-
ity” —theabilityof awrongedper-
son to recoup money for damages
incourt —that ispittingadvocates
of business owners, insurers and
health care institutions against
trial lawyers and unions.
The law in Pennsylvania cur-
rently allows a persontopursue all
of the jury-awarded damages from
a group of defendants in an acci-
dent, regardless of how big or
small their share of the blame is.
Often, a primary defendant is un-
able to pay their share.
A bill that passed the House in
April would limit the ability of a
wrongedpersontorecoupahigher
proportion of damages than the
share of an individual defendant’s
blame, whichopponents say could
leave many accident victims
wronged, injured and without jus-
tice.
The governor believes the bill is
important to the economic vitality
of Pennsylvania, Harley said, and
thebill’ssupporterssaythecurrent
law is harmful and unfair to busi-
ness owners.
The measure is currently sitting
in the Senate Judiciary Commit-
tee, where the chairman, Sen.
Stewart Greenleaf, R-Montgom-
ery, isstudyingit andholdinghear-
ings and meetings.
Patti, Turzai, Corbett andothers
point out that similar bills have
passed Republican-controlled leg-
islatures twice in the past decade,
but one measure was overturned
by state appellate courts on proce-
dural grounds and the other was
vetoed by former governor Ed
Rendell.
And Senate leaders who are
fielding complaints from the bill’s
championssaytheywon’t pressure
Greenleaf or circumvent his com-
mittee.
“When I’m in the Legislature,
I’mgoing to do what I think is fair
and just,” Greenleaf said. “That’s
what I’mall about. I don’t feel any
pressure.”
Philosophical differences slow down pace of Pa. governor’s agenda
It is increasingly likely that
Corbett’s major planks may
have to wait until the fall.
By MARC LEVY
Associated Press
AP FILE PHOTO
Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett, right, greets Jim Walsh before
addressing the K&L Gates sponsored Appalachian basin oil & gas
seminar in the Pittsburgh suburb of Greentree.
“I think you’re
going to see sig-
nificant cooper-
ation between
the House and
Senate in resolv-
ing a significant
number of is-
sue.’’
Mike Turzai
House majority leader
C M Y K
PAGE 8A SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
2
9
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C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 PAGE 9A
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AD CORRECTION
The Correct Dates for the Lark Mountain
Marketplace Anniversary Open House is
The Times Leader and Lark Mountain Marketplace apologize
for any inconvenience this may have caused its customers.
Friday-Sunday, June 3,4 and 5.
Lark Mountain Marketplace • 306 Wilkes-Barre Twp. Blvd.
Wilkes-Barre Twp., PA 18702 • 822-8855
The ad inThe Guide on Friday, June 3, stated the incorrect dates.
LOS ANGELES — Paul
Schrade easily recites the details
of the last day of his life before he
was shot in the head alongside
his friend, Sen. Robert F. Kenne-
dy. He knows it all by heart, every
step he took, every sight and
sound as if it was yesterday.
In the 43 years Sunday since
that transformative night when
Schrade came close to losing his
life, he has understood the de-
tails. But he is shadowed to this
day by nagging questions: What
really happened that night and
who made it happen?
Schrade, at 86, tall, white
haired and projecting the vitality
of a much younger man, has giv-
en the second half of his life over
to preserving Kennedy’s legacy
and trying to unravel the puzzle
of his friend’s assassination. He
believes there was more than one
gunman in the pantry of the Am-
bassador Hotel whenhe andKen-
nedy and four others were shot.
And he plans to publish his story
about what he has learned. For
now, he declines to say what that
is.
He estimates he has spent a cu-
mulative 10 years chasing clues
and he’s still at it.
“It’s always on my mind,”
Schrade said. “It has to be. The
family is not involved because
they can’t handle reliving the
pain and suffering and they don’t
want to expose Ethel to it. But I
always keepa member of the fam-
ily informed if we’re about to re-
lease anything.”
But Schrade, who tries to live
by the ideals Kennedy espoused,
has a lot more tothinkabout than
the past.
After sinking into deep depres-
sion following the assassination,
Schrade found a way to move on
byachievingadreamwhichsome
thought could never happen, the
creation of a complex of public
schools dedicated to Kennedy’s
legacy on the Ambassador Hotel
site.
“Talk about the school, not
about me,” he urged a reporter.
But the two are inevitably in-
tertwined. The recently opened
state-of-the-art school library
bears a large sign: “Paul Schrade
Library,” and there is a plaque
noting his “23 years of struggle to
build the finest living memorial”
to Kennedy.
The Robert F. Kennedy Com-
munity Schools opened last Sep-
tember. The complex of six
schools where a student can go
fromkindergarten to high school
graduation in one location was
built at a cost of $578 million, the
most expensive school in the na-
tion. The campus includes a thea-
ter where the old Cocoanut
Grove night club stood with Mo-
roccan decor and the same palm
leaf carpet pattern that was em-
blematic of the room where mo-
vie stars and presidents posed for
pictures.
It is a reminder of how the ho-
tel looked the early morning
hours of June 5, 1968 when tri-
umph turned to tragedy in sec-
onds.
Schrade remembers the cheers
of the crowd and the touch of
Kennedy’s hand as they mounted
a platform before thousands of
supporters who helped him win
the California Democratic presi-
dential primary.
“He gave me new recognition
for everything I had done. He
thankedme fromthe podiumand
hegrabbedmyhand. I was theon-
lyoneheshookhands withonthe
platform ,” Schrade said..
Schrade, thenwesternregional
director of the UnitedAutoWork-
ers Union, had been the labor
chair of Kennedy’s campaign and
was at his side at many events in-
cluding a meeting with farm-
worker leader Cesar Chavez in
rural Delano. On the fateful
night, he was waiting with Ken-
nedy to see if he would win the
pivotal primary.
‘”He knew it was life or death
politically that night,” says
Schrade. “And it became a
death.”
But first, he said, there was joy
as the tide of votes turned and
Kennedy’s victory seemed as-
sured.
“There was a wonderful spirit
upstairs on the fifth floor of the
Ambassador Hotel,” he said. “I
sat with Bob and Ethel. There
came a point when the decision
was made to go downstairs a lit-
tle after midnight.”
REMEMBERI NG RF K Shooting survivor Paul Schrade creates complex of public schools
Victim preserves the legacy of slain politician
By LINDA DEUTSCH
AP Special Correspondent
AP PHOTO
Paul Schrade stands inside the Paul Schrade Library at Robert F.
Kennedy Community Schools as a mural depicting Sen. Robert F.
Kennedy and Cesar Chavez breaking bread sits in the background,
Friday in Los Angeles.
WILKES-BARRE–Forthepast
year and a half, the corner of
North Street and North Main has
borne the touch of the Rev. Tho-
mas J. O’Hara, C.S.C., in the new
King’s College building that re-
placedabandonedanddeteriorat-
ed buildings, an effort he spear-
headed. Now, itwill bearhisname
as well.
At a President’s Receptionheld
SaturdayeveninginO’Hara’shon-
or, local businessman Charles
Parenteannouncedthatthebuild-
ing currently known as Gateway
Corners would be renamed Tho-
mas J. O’Hara Hall.
O’Hara will step down June 30
after 12 years as the college’s
eighth president. The Hazleton
native and former professor was
also awardedthe KilburnMedal.
O’Hara honored at farewell reception
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Thomas R. Smith
gives the Rev
Thomas O’Hara,
C.S.C., the Lane
Dixon Kilburn
medal at his
President’s Re-
ception. O’Hara
will step down
June 30 after 12
years as the
college’s eighth
president.
Departing King’s College
president gets award and
building named in his honor.
By JANINE UNGVARSKY
Times Leader Correspondent
See O’HARA, Page 14A
K
PAGE 10A SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ O B I T U A R I E S
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through Thursday and 7:30
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ling arrangements, with
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O B I T U A R Y P O L I C Y
Historic
Hanover Cemetery
Founded June 9, 1776
NowAvailable
Cremation Niches.
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689 Main Rd.
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(570) 709-5801
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The Family of the Late
John Koch Jr.
May 12, 2011
On behalf of the Koch family,
we would like to extend our
thanks and appreciation for
your thoughtful donation made
in the memory of John Koch Jr.
We deeply appreciate your expression
of sympathy and we are grateful
for relatives and friends like
you at this time of sorrow.
The Koch Family
M .J. JUD G E
M ON UM EN T CO.
M ON UM EN TS -M ARK ERS -L ETTERIN G
8 2 9 -4 8 8 1
N extto the Big Co w o n Rt. 309
ANTONISHAK – Michael Sr., memo-
rial service 3 p.m. today at the
Maher-Collins Funeral Home, 360
N. Maple Ave., Kingston. The
family will receive friends from 2
p.m. until the time of the service.
CHURNETSKI – Edward, funeral
9:30 a.m. Monday from the
Stanley S. Stegura Funeral Home
Inc., 614 S. Hanover St., Nanti-
coke. Mass of Christian Burial 10
a.m. in the secondary site of St.
Faustina’s Parish, formerly St.
Mary of Czestochowa, Nanticoke.
Friends may call from 2 to 4 p.m.
today.
DYAK – Jack, friends may call from
5 to 7 p.m. Monday in the Met-
calfe and Shaver Funeral Home
Inc., 504 Wyoming Ave., Wyom-
ing.
FINDORA – Elizabeth, funeral 9
a.m. Monday from the Yeosock
Funeral Home, 40 S. Main St.,
Plains Township. Mass of Chris-
tian Burial 9:30 a.m. at St. Mary’s
Church of the Immaculate Con-
ception, Wilkes-Barre. Friends
may call from 4 to 6 p.m. today.
IMBRIGLIA – Rose Barbara, Shiva
will be observed at the home of
Jane and Al Groh, 63 Pringle St.,
Kingston, from 2 to 4 p.m. today.
KUTER – Joseph, funeral 9:30 a.m.
Monday from the E. Blake Collins
Funeral Home, 159 George Ave.,
Wilkes-Barre. Mass of Christian
Burial 10 a.m. in St. Benedict’s
Church, Wilkes-Barre. Friends
may call from 5 to 8 p.m. today.
LUCENT – Del, funeral 9:15 a.m.
Monday from the H. Merritt
Hughes Funeral Home Inc., 211
Luzerne Ave., West Pittston.
Burial Office and Requiem Mass
10 a.m. in Holy Cross Episcopal
Church, Wilkes-Barre. Friends
may call from 2 to 5 p.m. today. A
Vigil Service will be conducted at
4:30 p.m. today.
PISKORIK – Helen, funeral services
will be held at 9:30 a.m. Monday
at the Edwards and Russin Funer-
al Home, 717 Main St., Edwards-
ville. Requiem Service at St. John
the Baptist Orthodox Church,
Edwardsville. Friends may call
from 4 to 7 p.m. today. A Paras-
tas Service will be held at 6:30
p.m.
ROMASHKO – Evelyn, funeral at
9:30 a.m. Tuesday from the S.J.
Grontkowski Funeral Home, 530
W. Main St., Plymouth. Divine
Liturgy 10 a.m. in Ss. Peter & Paul
Ukrainian Catholic Church, Ply-
mouth. Friends may call from 4 to
7 p.m. Monday. Parastas Service
will be held at 4 p.m. Monday.
SHUPP – Harold, funeral 11 a.m.
Monday from the Metcalfe and
Shaver Funeral Home Inc., 504
Wyoming Ave., Wyoming. Friends
may call from 4 to 7 p.m. today in
the funeral home.
SOYKA – Helen, funeral 9 a.m.
today from the Metcalfe and
Shaver Funeral Home Inc., 504
Wyoming Ave., Wyoming. Mass of
Christian Burial 9:30 a.m. in St.
John the Evangelist Church,
Pittston.
TOMSAK – Margaret, funeral 9 a.m.
Monday from the Metcalfe and
Shaver Funeral Home Inc., 504
Wyoming Ave., Wyoming. Mass of
Christian Burial 9:30 a.m. in Our
Lady of Sorrows Church of St.
Monica’s Parish, West Wyoming.
Friends may call from 4 to 7 p.m.
today.
YANEFSKI – Aldona, Mass of Chris-
tian Burial 11 a.m. Monday from
Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church,
Lake Silkworth. Friends may call
at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church
from10:30 to 11 a.m. prior to the
Mass at the church.
FUNERALS
M
arguerite Amendola, 86, of
South Hancock Street, Wilkes-
Barre, passed away Saturday, June
4, 2011, in Hospice Community
Care at Geisinger South Wilkes-
Barre.
She was born in Wilkes-Barre, on
October 31, 1924, a daughter of the
late Joseph and Theresa Giordano
Altavilla. Marguerite was a gradu-
ate of Hanover Township High
School. She was formerly employed
in her younger years at the Ameri-
can Tobacco Co., the J.B. Carr Bis-
cuit Co., and at the Fernbach Silk
Mill.
Marguerite and her husband, An-
thony, resided in Rumson, N.J., for
34 years prior to returning to the
Wilkes-Barre area in1986. She was a
member of St. Andrew’s Parish, Par-
rish Street, Wilkes-Barre, and a
member of the Ashley Senior Citi-
zens Clubat St. Leo’s ChurchinAsh-
ley. She also volunteered for many
years with the Salvation Army in
Wilkes-Barre.
Marguerite and her husband, An-
thony C. Amendola, would have cel-
ebrated their 61st wedding anniver-
sary on June 10, 2011.
She was preceded in death by her
sisters, Marose Petro, Mary Zuba
and Rita Bozinko; and by her broth-
ers, John Lenzi, Joseph and Gerald
Altavilla.
Surviving, in addition to her hus-
band, are sister, Dolores Mahle, Ha-
nover Township; numerous nieces
and nephews and grand nieces and
grand nephews; and godchildren,
GeraldAltavilla, RonPetro, Rita Bo-
den, Nancy Gawlas and David Blu-
mel.
Marguerite’s husband, Tony, and
her entirefamilywouldliketothank
the nurses and staff of Erwine Hos-
pice and Hospice Community Care
for the loving care and support that
they provided.
Funeral services will be held at
9:30 a.m. Wednesday from the Nat
& Gawlas Funeral Home, 89 Park
Ave., Wilkes-Barre, with a Mass of
Christian Burial to follow at 10 a.m.
in St. Andrew’s Parish, 316 Parrish
St., Wilkes-Barre. Interment will be
in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Hanover
Township. Friends may call from 6
to 8 p.m. Tuesday at the funeral
home.
In lieu of flowers, memorial con-
tributions may be made to the Sal-
vation Army, c/o the Salvation Ar-
my Citadel, 17 S. Pennsylvania Ave.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA18701.
Online condolences may be sent
to www.natandgawlasfuneralhome-
.com.
Marguerite Amendola
June 4, 2011
MARYAQUILINA, 99, formerly
of Wyoming, passed away Friday,
June 3, 2011, in the Doylestown
Hospital Hospice.
Arrangements are pending
from the Metcalfe and Shaver Fu-
neral Home Inc., 504 Wyoming
Ave., Wyoming.
A
lice “Allie” Daw Heffernan, 76,
of Lehman Township, passed
away early Saturday morning, June
4, 2011, at her home following a
brief illness.
Born April 24, 1935, in Wilkes-
Barre, she was a daughter of the late
Dr. and Mrs. William J. Daw. She
was a graduate of WyomingSemina-
ry, class of 1953, where she lettered
in field hockey and basketball. She
went to Hood College, Frederick,
Md.
She was preceded in death by her
husbandof 44 years, Thomas F. Hef-
fernan II, former publisher of the
Sunday Independent Newspaper in
Wilkes-Barre, in 2001.
Mrs. Heffernan was a member of
the Shavertown United Methodist
Church.
Allie, as shewas knowntoall, was
a life member of the Lehman Volun-
teer Fire Co., ambulance chief there
for 20 years, andshe was a paramed-
ic and EMT in Lehman for over 30
years, retiring from volunteer ser-
vice in 2010. She was a previous
board member of the EMS of NEPA
and past president of the Back
Mountain Ambulance Association.
She was an avid bridge player, com-
peting in several card groups
around the Wyoming Valley.
She was a member of The Daugh-
ters of the American Revolution,
The Westmoreland Club, The
Wyoming Seminary Sports Hall of
Fame, and a past member of the Ju-
nior League of Wilkes-Barre.
She was preceded in death, in ad-
dition to her husband, by her broth-
er, William J. Daw, Florida; and sis-
ter, Mary Ellen Fine, Dallas.
Mrs. Heffernan is survived by her
son Thomas E. Heffernan, Lehman
Township; daughters, Ann Koval
and Helen Hagenbaugh, both of
Lehman Township; grandchildren,
Thomas F. Heffernan III, Astoria,
Ore., William Heffernan, Lehman
Township, Kallie and Hunter Root,
both of Lehman Township; great-
grandson Matthew Heffernan; as
well as nieces and nephews.
Funeral service will be private
and at the convenience of the family
with the Rev. James Wert officiat-
ing. The interment will be in Fern
Knoll Burial Park, Dallas. Family
andfriends may call from4 to7 p.m.
Tuesday at the Hugh B. Hughes &
SonInc. Funeral Home, 1044Wyom-
ing Ave., Forty Fort.
Memorial contributions, if desir-
ed, can be made to the Shavertown
United Methodist Church, 163 N.
Pioneer Ave., Shavertown, PA
18708.
Alice Daw Heffernan
June 4, 2011
WILLIAM JAMES KEATS, of
Wilkes-Barre, passed away Satur-
day, June 4, 2011, at the Wilkes-
Barre General Hospital.
Funeral arrangements will be
announced by E. Blake Collins Fu-
neral Home, Wilkes-Barre.
LOUISE PERRINS passed away
Thursday, June 2, 2011, at Heritage
House Hospice, Wilkes-Barre.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the Charles V. Sher-
bin Funeral Home, Hanover Town-
ship.
T
homas P. Piatt, 57, of Pikes
Creek, passedawayunexpected-
ly Friday, June 3, 2011, at the Geis-
inger Wyoming Valley Medical Cen-
ter, Plains Township.
Mr. Piatt was born March 20,
1954, in Kingston, and was a son of
the late HowardL. andDolores Jean
Vann Piatt Sr.
He graduated fromLake-Lehman
High School in1972 and owned and
operated Tom Piatt Excavating. He
was alsowas co-owner of the former
Pikes Creek Pipe &Supply Co. with
his late brother, Howard “Sarge”
Piatt Jr., who passed away February
18, 2011.
Tom enjoyed being outdoors and
working on the farm. His favorite
hobbies included restoring antique
trucks, working in the garage and
four-wheeling with his son, Tommy.
Surviving are daughters, Jamie
Lee Babcock of Pikes Creek, Lind-
say Lee Piatt of Sweet Valley; son
Thomas Howard Piatt, at home;
grandsons, Wyatt Ryder Babcock
and Gavin Sawyer Babcock; broth-
ers, Lonnie R. Piatt of Pikes Creek
and Bob W. Piatt of Falls; sisters, Al-
ice Jean Martin of Pikes Creek, Lin-
da Brown of Cleveland, Ohio, Vir-
ginia Ide of Dallas, Nancy Piatt of
Missoula, Mont., and Deborah Piatt
of Mountain Top; as well as nieces
and nephews.
Funeral will held at 11 a.m. Tues-
day from the Curtis L. Swanson Fu-
neral Home Inc., corner of routes 29
and 118, Pikes Creek, with the Rev.
Kenneth Brown officiating. Inter-
ment will be in the Maple Grove
Cemetery, Pikes Creek. Friends
may call from 6 to 9 p.m. Monday.
The family requests that, in lieu
of flowers, memorial contributions
be sent to the Tom Piatt Memorial
Fund, c/o First National Bank, 2378
State Route 118, Hunlock Creek, PA
18621, to be put in trust for his son
Tommy’s education; or the Sweet
Valley Ambulance Association, P.O.
Box 207, Sweet Valley, PA18656.
Thomas P. Piatt
June 3, 2011
A
llen N. “Itchy” Stratton, of Forty
Fort, went to be with the Lord
Friday, June 3, 2011, with his family
at his side.
BornSeptember 29, 1933, inNan-
ticoke, he was a son of the late Ri-
chard Harold Stratton and Marie
Meinline Stratton, and stepson to
the late Martha Grey Stratton.
He attended Kingston High
School and was a U.S. Navy veteran
of the Korean Conflict. He was a
member of the Wyoming Avenue
Christian Church, Kingston, where
he served as a deacon. Allen was a
43-year member of the Irem Shrin-
ers, were he served a term as Presi-
dent of the Irem Transportation
Unit, a member of the Masonic Blue
Lodge No. 395, F.&A.M. in King-
ston, Caldwell Consistory of
Bloomsburg, and the Northeastern
Pennsylvania Grand &Glorious Or-
der of Hillbilly Decree.
He was also involved in the devel-
opment of the R.V. Campground
site at Irem. Allen was a profession-
al truck driver and a member of the
Teamsters Union, where he served
as a business agent.
In addition to his parents, he was
precededindeathby his brother, Ri-
chard H. “Dick” Stratton.
Surviving are his beloved wife of
55 years this June 23, Nina Davis
Stratton; daughter and son-in-law,
Ninaleigh and Thomas Wozniak of
Forty Fort; daughter Leah Marie
Strattonof Swoyersville; andsonAl-
len L. “Alby” Stratton of Forty Fort;
grandson, the love of his life, Tyler
Davis Wozniak of Forty Fort; sister
and brother-in-law, Sandy Gray
Bunn and Richard “Dick” Bunn; sis-
ter, Donna “D.R.” Gray; sister-in-law
Dale Stratton; as well as brother and
sister-in-law, George “Corky” and
Leah Davis Brussock of Kingston.
Funeral service will be pri-
vate and at the convenience of
the family fromthe HughB. Hughes
& Son Inc. Funeral Home, 1044
Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort, with his
pastor, the Rev. Norman Beck, offi-
ciating. The interment will be pri-
vate. Family and friends may call
from7 to 9 p.m. today at the funeral
home.
In lieu of flowers, memorial con-
tributions, if desired, can be made
to Shriner’s Hospital for Children,
c\o Irem Country Club, 1340 Coun-
try Club Road, Dallas, PA 18612;
Kingston/Forty Fort Ambulance
Association, 600 Wyoming Ave.,
Kingston, PA18704; or the S.P.C.A.
of Luzerne County, 524 E. Main St.,
Fox Hill Road, Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702.
Allen N. ‘Itchy’ Stratton
June 3, 2011
H
elena M. Toole, 96, of Pittston,
died Thursday, June 2, 2011, at
Highland Manor, Exeter. She was the
widowof Ralph V. Toole, who died in
1994.
Born in Pittston on March 9, 1915,
a daughter of the late John and Helen
Gardner Dessoye, she was a member
of Our Lady of the Eucharist Parish,
Pittston.
Helena was a graduate of Pittston
High School. She was formerly em-
ployed by Pennsylvania Gas &Water
Co. and Grablick’s Dairy as a book-
keeper and cashier.
The family wishes to extend spe-
cial thanks to Dr. Charles Manganiel-
lo, the staff of Highland Manor and
the staff of Hospice for their support
and comfort.
She was also preceded in death by
a daughter Maureen; andthree broth-
ers, John, Joseph and Bernard Des-
soye.
Surviving are two sons, Ralph,
Pittston Township, and Donald, Old
Forge; four grandchildren, Christine
Germano, Kim Stinson, Shawna Ur-
ban and Seth Toole; six great-grand-
children, Lauren and Alyssa Germa-
no, Ireland Stinson and Meredith,
Gerek and Erica Urban; as well as
nieces and nephews.
A Mass of Christian Burial will
be celebrated at 9:30 a.m. Monday in
Our Lady of the Eucharist Parish,
Pittston. Interment will be held in St.
Mary’s AssumptionCemetery, Hugh-
estown. The family will receive
friends at thechurchfrom9a.m. until
time of service.
In lieu of flowers, the family asks
that donations be made to the Care
and Concern Health Clinic, 37 Wil-
liam St., Pittston, PA18640.
Arrangements have been entrust-
ed to the Ruane & Regan Funeral
Home, 18 Kennedy St., Pittston.
Helena M. Toole
June 2, 2011
MITZIE SAKOWSKI, 97, of
Pine Street, Hanover Section of
Nanticoke, passed away Saturday,
June 4, 2011, inthe Hospice Unit at
Geisinger South Wilkes-Barre.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the Stanley S. Steg-
ura Funeral Home Inc., Nanticoke.
JOSEPHINE CHESNA
SCHMIDT, 85, formerly of Mount
Pocono, died Tuesday, May 31,
2011, in Arizona, where she resid-
ed for several years. She was pre-
ceded in death by parents, Joseph
and Elizabeth Bogdon Chesna;
brothers, Albert, Herman, Joseph
and Raymond Chesna; and sisters,
Francie Ondish, Alberta Sheridan,
Della Vivian and Lillian Stosick.
Surviving are nieces and nephews.
Friends and family are invited
to a Mass of Christian Burial at 11
a.m. Saturday in St. Robert Bellar-
mine Parish, Wilkes-Barre (St.
Aloyisius Church). Interment will
follow in St. Casimir’s Cemetery,
Muhlenburg, Pa. Arrangements
are by S.J. Grontkowski Funeral
Home, Plymouth. Visit
www.sjgrontkowskifuneralhome-
.com to submit condolences.
E
lizabeth “Betty” Findora, 88, of
Ford Avenue, Kingston, died
Wednesday, June 1, 2011, at the
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital.
Born in Kingston, she was a
daughter of the late William A. and
Elizabeth Bohn-Vivian Ward. Betty
was a graduate of G.A.R. Memorial
High School, class of 1940, and was
formerly employed as a secretary
for Wilkes-Barre School Boards,
U.S. Naval Department, and Ide Air
Equipment.
An avid golfer, Mrs. Findora had
been an active member of the Wom-
en’s Golfing Teamat Fox Hill Coun-
try Club for years and was the recip-
ient of many golfing awards.
She was preceded in death by her
husband of 40 years, Joseph; sister,
Jeanne Ward Griffith; and niece El-
izabeth Ann.
Surviving are a sister, Dorothy
Ludden, Kingston; nieces, Lynn Ja-
cobs, Karen Reidy, Cheryl Edwards,
Louise Fiduccia, and Gail Berger;
nephews, Michael Ludden, Wil-
liam, John and David Griffith.
Funeral services will be at 9
a.m. Monday from the Yeosock Fu-
neral Home, 40 S. Main St., Plains
Township, with a Mass of Christian
Burial at 9:30 a.m. at St. Mary’s
Church of the Immaculate Concep-
tion, Wilkes-Barre. Interment will
be held in St. Mary’s Cemetery, Ha-
nover Township. Friends may call
from 4 to 6 p.m. today.
Elizabeth Findora
June 1, 2011
Henry T. Rem-
bish Jr., 37, of
Dupont, for-
merly of
Wilkes-Barre,
passed away
Friday, June 3,
2011, at his
home.
He was born in Wilkes-Barre,
May 10, 1974, and was a son of
Henry T. Rembish Sr. and the late
Alberta (Madden) Rembish.
Henry was a member of St. John
the Evangelist Church, Pittston.
He was a 1991 graduate of Cough-
lin High School, Luzerne County
Community College and Wilkes-
University. He worked for Pride
Mobility for 10 years.
Deeplydevotedtofamily, Henry
will always be remembered as a
loving husband and father. Henry
cherished his bond with his 13-
month-old son, Madden.
Although just a child, it is likely
that Henry’s love for Madden
made an indelible impression that
will remain with Madden all the
days of his life.
Henry was an avid collector of
Star Wars Yoda treasures. Over the
years, heamassedanextensivecol-
lectionthat has beendeemedNo. 1
in the United States and No. 2 in
the world. Henry’s fascination
with the wise and gentle Yoda
fueled his collector’s passion in
ways that are bothrare andimpres-
sive. This collection and the care
Henry took in maintaining and
preserving it will remain an impor-
tant part of his legacy.
Inadditiontohis father andson,
Henry is survived by his wife of
two years, Joyce (Smihosky) Rem-
bish; his brothers, Leo Febish of
Nevada and Robert Swan and his
wife, Kim, of Dupont; his sisters,
Donna and her husband, David
Hontz, of Wilkes-Barre, Darlene
O’Brien of Wilkes-Barre, Kelly
Rembish of Wilkes-Barre, and
Trisha Nardone and her husband,
Jim, of Virginia. Henry is also sur-
vived by his stepmother, Jean
Rembish of Hanover Township;
his father- and mother-in-law, Paul
andAndreaSmihoskyof Avoca; his
brothers-in-law, Michael and Brian
Smihosky; his dog Max; as well as
several nieces; nephews; aunts; un-
cles and cousins.
A memorial service will be
held at 1 p.m. Tuesday at St. John
the Baptist Cemetery, 121 School-
ey Ave., Exeter. Friends may call
from 5 to 8 p.m. Monday at Kies-
inger Funeral Services Inc., 255
McAlpine St., Duryea.
Inlieuof flowers, memorial con-
tributions may be made in care of
Madden Rembish.
Online condolences may be
made to www.kiesingerfuneralser-
vices.com.
Henry T.
Rembish Jr.
June 3, 2011
Helen Fedrow
Piskorik, 93, of
Swoyersville, has
fallen asleep in
the Lord on the
Feast of the As-
cension of Our
Lord Thursday,
June 2, 2011. Her
husband of 63 years was the late Ge-
orge Piskorik.
Helen was born January 25, 1918,
in Larksville, a daughter of the late
Peter and Johanna Novak Fedrow.
She was a graduate of Larksville Pub-
lic High School. Helen was an excel-
lent seamstress employed in the
Greater WyomingValley Garment In-
dustry.
She was a member of the Interna-
tional Ladies Workers Union. She
was a faithful member of St. John the
Baptist Orthodox Church, Edwards-
ville, and the Mothers and Daughters
Club of the Church. She also was a
member of the Ladies Auxiliary Post
644, Swoyersville.
In addition to her parents and hus-
band, she was preceded in death by
her daughter Dorothy Savitsky; and
her son George “Butch” Piskorik Jr.;
her brothers, Paul and John Fedrow;
and her sisters, Veronica Fedrow, An-
na Brennan, and Katherine Phillips.
Surviving are her son Paul Pisko-
rikandwife, Mary Ann, Swoyersville;
her daughter Chrissy Collura and
husband, Matthew, Sweet Valley; her
grandchildren, Stan Savitsky Jr., Su-
zanne Monseur, Joe Piskorik, Stacie
Holena, LezlieCox, P.J. Piskorik, and
Matt, Todd and Josh Collura; and
great-grandchildren, Karlee Holena,
Jake and Kyle Piskorik, Mariah Mon-
seur and Ethan and Tyler Collura;
son-in-law Stanley Savitsky; and
daughter-in-law Betty Piskorik, Har-
veys Lake; her sisters, MaryRock, Ed-
wardsville, Eva Turaj, Courtdale, and
Elizabeth Wozniak, Harveys Lake;
her brothers, Michael Fedrow, New
Jersey, Daniel Fedrow, Courtdale,
William Fedrow, Dushore, and Ed-
ward Fedrow, Harveys Lake; as well
as numerous nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be held at
9:30 a.m. Monday at the Edwards
and Russin Funeral Home, 717
Main St., Edwardsville, with a Requi-
emService at St. Johnthe Baptist Or-
thodox Church, 93 Zerby Ave., Ed-
wardsville, with the Rev. Martin
Browne officiating. Interment will
follow in the parish cemetery, Prin-
gle. Family and friends may call from
4 to 7 p.m. today. A Parastas Service
will be held at 6:30 p.m.
Helen Fedrow
Piskorik
June 2, 2011
ROBERT GEORGE KLEIN, 52,
of Wilkes-Barre, died Tuesday,
May 31, 2011.
Funeral arrangements are
pending fromthe Yeosock Funeral
Home, 40S. MainSt., Plains Town-
ship.
JAMES MOORE JR., 52, of
Wilkes-Barre, died Tuesday, May
31, 2011.
Funeral arrangements are
pending fromthe Yeosock Funeral
Home, 40S. MainSt., Plains Town-
ship.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 PAGE 11A
➛ N E W S
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“I don’t know where they will go
next.”
Housed in the basement of St.
Stephen’s Episcopal Churchat 35
South Franklin St., REACH is
open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
Personal approach
Wolownik, 53, the director for
10 years, goes about her job like a
den mother hovering over her
pack. She cares about her clients
and they return the affection ten-
fold.
The people
that use RE-
ACH services
are worried
about what an
already uncer-
tain future
holds. They
don’t want to
see their
“home” go
away.
But the real-
ization that
there is not
much that they
can do about it
leaves them
even more
frightened.
“No kid says
that when he
grows up he
wants to be
homeless,” said
Bryan Hogan,
49. “If this
place closes, a lot of people will
be stuck.”
Wolownik said REACH pro-
vides a place for homeless people
to go everyday; to hang out, kib-
bitz, joke around, watch TV, and
relax. It gives them somewhere
to go to escape the challenge of
not having anywhere to go.
“When they’re here, they are
not out wandering around the
streets,” Wolownik said. “Many
of them can’t make it out there.
They have mental and/or phys-
ical issues.”
So they walk through the door,
down the steps to the church
basement where they are wel-
comed, not judged.
They are treated with respect
and with a sincere desire to be
helped. As Wolownik says, they
get help to navigate through a
complicated system to obtain
benefits and services; to find
jobs; toget their feet firmly plant-
ed on the road to recovery.
Wolownik said REACH helps
those who can work find work
andthose whocan’t worksurvive
day to day.
She talks about the homeless
women she deals with – “couch
surfers” she calls them. These
are women who bounce from
apartment toapartment sleeping
on couches until they are discov-
ered by landlords and are re-
moved.
When they can’t find another
couch to crash on, the women
jointheir fellowhomeless menin
“abandominiums” – vacant
buildings that are used for shel-
ter.
Morning roll call
Wolownik said when Shep-
herds of the Streets began, the
purpose was to keep families to-
gether and out of the foster care
system. Now, Wolownik said, the
goal is to keep people’s lives to-
gether. She does roll call every
morning to check for missing
regulars.
Two of Wolownik’s “family of
homeless people” – Robert “Bob-
by” Klein and James Moore Jr. -
died in a fire last week at 73 Sulli-
van St., a 15-minute walk from
REACH.
“I really don’t know what will
become of them,” Wolownik said
of her clients. “That’s why we are
so worried. We’re concerned that
they won’t be able to get where
they need to be. A certain per-
centage will never be able to get
where they need to be.”
Wolownik said13 of her clients
died last year and 13 more the
year before.
“As long as they’re alive,
there’s always hope,” she said.
“God doesn’t give you an infinite
number of chances; this may be
your last chance. Opportunity
knocks once; temptation leans
on the doorbell.”
State Rep. Eddie Day Pashin-
ski, D-Wilkes-Barre, has spoken
with the Rev. Daniel Gunn, rec-
tor at St. Stephen’s, about what
can be done to help the home-
less.
“Rev. Gunn told me he has
been speaking to Monsignor Jo-
seph Kelly at Catholic Social Ser-
vices about creatinga permanent
homeless shelter in the city,”
Pashinski said. “There’s just no
money for these programs.”
Mayor Tom Leighton is aware
of the decisionto close the home-
less day care center. He knows
that the clients will have no place
to gather in a matter of weeks
andrealizes many of themwill be
on the city’s streets.
“With REACH closing, people
in need of their services will still
need and seek those services
somewhere,” Leighton said.
“The city has worked extremely
hard to provide a safe and clean
city for all, andthat remains a pri-
ority.
“The city does not discrimi-
nate, and we have no expecta-
tions that the closure of REACH
will necessarily lead to an in-
crease in any type of criminal or
unseemly behavior in the down-
townor other areas of the city. As
they have on a daily basis, police
will respond to situations as they
develop and take appropriate ac-
tion based on the facts of the sit-
uation,” he said.
So where will they go? Wolow-
nik said it best.
“You will see themin libraries,
coffee shops, hotel lobbies,
stores and others,” she said.
“They will be wherever they are
tolerated for as long as they are
allowed.”
HOMELESS
Continued from Page 1A
CLARK VAN ORDEN PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Bryan Hogan sorts some dishes that were donated to REACH. Hogan said that sometimes he will volunteer to help out with different
jobs at REACH.
• Chronic homeless: Lacking the
necessary life skills to live on their
own and to hold a job.
• Episodic homeless: Possess
some skills, but have a tendency
to make bad decisions like addic-
tion and/or alcohol dependency.
• Situational homeless: Recently
divorced or separated or jobless;
no local family or family is alien-
ated.
T Y P E S O F H O M E L E S S
Couch surfing: Moving from place
to place, crashing on couches until
they are evicted by intolerable
landlords.
Abandos or abandominiums:
Vacant buildings where homeless
people seek shelter at night.
H O M E L E S S T E R M S
Skip Constable works on his art during a recent visit to REACH.
“We’re
concerned
that they
won’t be
able to get
where they
need to be.
A certain
percentage
will never
be able to
get where
they need
to be.”
Stefanie
Wolownik
REACH
executive
director
C M Y K
PAGE 12A SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ N E W S
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er Teresa’s Haven (formerly
VISION); Ruth’s Place (women
only); and the Domestic Vio-
lence Center. Stefanie Wolow-
nik, executive director at RE-
ACH, says there isn’t enough
being done to help the home-
less and she says more people
will be facing difficult sit-
uations in the future.
Here are five stories and
faces of the homeless in
Wilkes-Barre:
Mike Smith
Originally from Phoenix,
Ariz., Smith, 62, has lived in
the Wilkes-Barre area most of
his life. He’s been out of work
for five years and had been
homeless for two and a half
years before recently getting
an apartment.
“I lost everything,” Smith
said. “I never expected to be
homeless. This place needs to
stay open; people need help. I
think things are only going to
get worse.”
The road to homelessness
can be rough and Smith’s sto-
ry is typical. He’s divorced and
his four sons really don’t keep
in touch, despite all of them
living locally. His health is not
good; he has cardiac and back
problems. He receives Social
Security Disability and that
allows him to pay his rent and
put gas in his car. He comes
to REACH daily for a little
food and help in searching for
a job.
“People like me need a
place to call home,” Smith
said.
By that he means a place
where he can meet his friends
and talk. When REACH closes
at 4:30 p.m., Smith heads to
his apartment to a more lone-
ly existence. He looks forward
to returning to the church
basement he and so many
others call home.
Skip Constable
When Constable’s wife,
Joanne, died, he said he didn’t
handle it very well. Constable,
56, of Pittsburgh, has lived in
Wilkes-Barre the last 17
months.
A salesman, Constable has
been out of work for more
than two years. He has battled
some physical issues as he’s
tried to get back on his feet.
While looking for a job,
Constable stops at REACH
and he works on his art. He
paints and draws and finds
pleasure in his art. He said
Wolownik helped him connect
with an apartment and a job.
“There’s help around here if
you want it,” Constable said.
“I feel fortunate that I’ve been
able to recover. If it wasn’t for
REACH, I don’t think I ever
would have been able to make
it back.”
Constable said people have
the wrong impression of home-
less people. He said the ster-
eotypical image people have of
the homeless is a drunken old
bum.
“The reality is that today’s
homeless are not that different
than ‘normal’ people,” he said.
“Some are recently divorced or
separated or have lost jobs.”
Constable is an articulate
man who can’t wait to start
his new job.
“We all have choices and
decisions to make,” he said. “I
decided to do whatever I
could to better myself.”
If REACH closes, Constable
said homeless people will lose
the one place where they can
have a cup of coffee and feel
normal.
“Nobody knows what they
are going to do,” Constable
said. “This is a good place; it
shouldn’t just disappear.”
Bryan Hogan
Hogan, 49, was born in East
Stroudsburg, moved to New
Jersey when he was a child
and ended up in Sugarloaf
Township. He moved to
Wilkes-Barre a few years ago
to seek help.
After Hogan’s 7-month-old
son died he said he “spent the
next year in a bottle.”
“I spent all my savings,” he
said.
A veteran of the U.S. Navy,
Hogan got help through the
Veterans Assistance Subsidized
Housing program. He lives in
an apartment in Kingston.
“REACH pointed me in the
right direction,” Hogan said.
“This is a place to gather to
see friends and seek help.
REACH helps people who are
down and out.”
Hogan said Wolownik helped
him furnish his apartment.
She found him a dresser, a
bed, dishes and pots and pans.
“Politicians must realize that
the homeless problem is not
going away,” Hogan said. “It
will only get worse.”
Hogan said his life is getting
better. He volunteers as much
as he can at REACH to try to
help people get their lives
back.
On Wolownik’s door a sign
hangs: “Nobody gets in to see
the wizard; not nobody; not
no how.”
Kathy Boston
A 48-year-old woman, Bos-
ton spent 15 years on the
streets of Wilkes-Barre before
she was able to rent an apart-
ment five years ago. During
her lifetime, Boston has done
what she has had to do to
stay above water.
Wolownik said Boston has
always found a way to feed
her kids and provide diapers
for them when they were
young.
A familiar face around the
city, Boston always offers a
smile and a hug. Homeless-
ness and street living haven’t
made her bitter – cynical, yes,
but not bitter.
“They always have money
for things not as important as
this place,” Boston said of the
world she lives in. “I just don’t
understand why we can’t take
care of people.”
Boston has an apartment
now. She’s proud of that. She
is determined to keep the roof
over her head. No more street
living for her. And she cares
about her fellow men and
women.
“There should be more fund-
ing for the homeless,” she
said. “They should build a
Homeless Hotel.”
Jeb
A handyman who still does
carpentry and odd jobs, Jeb
lives in the woods somewhere
in Larksville. He says his place
isn’t so bad. He lives under a
tarp and he has more than
one level to his woodsy pad.
At 56, Jeb has no family – his
past includes a marriage and
kids, but he doesn’t talk about
that time.
“It can’t be reconciled,” Jeb
says.
Originally from William-
sport, Jeb has lived in the
woods for nine years. He said
he survives the winters by
using a kerosene heater and
wearing more clothes. He
visits REACH every day. He
wouldn’t give his last name;
he said he’s off the grid and
wants to stay there.
“If not for this place, I
would have no identity,” Jeb
said. “This place means a lot
to a lot of people – a lot of
them have no place to go.”
And where will they go after
July 1?
“You’ll see them in store-
fronts, parks and hotel lob-
bies,” Jeb said. “And the next
stop for a lot of them will be
jail.”
Jeb said he has been all
over the U.S. and he has expe-
rienced the homeless scene in
many cities. He said REACH
is the best program he has
ever encountered.
“They help people,” he said.
“That’s what this place has
done for me.”
REACH
Continued from Page 1A
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
A poster of the faces of some of the homeless who have passed away in recent years hangs in the dayroom of REACH.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 PAGE 13A
➛ C L I C K
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LEADERSHIP W-B
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CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Mary Ruane, Mountain Top, and Pat Gilhooley, Laflin
BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Irene Sisk, left, and Tina Dowd
S. JOHN WILKIN PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Daniel and Abby Haddle
Kyle Johnson, left, Courtdale, Sam Craven, Larksville,
and Matt Johnson, Courtdale
Bill Sisk, left, and Sydney Johnson Maureen Rodgers, left, and MaryJo Blaine
Jim and Susan Pall, Dallas
John and Morgan Dowd Diane McAndrew, left, and Tracy Elick
Erin, left, and her mother Susan Ryan, Lehman Township
Madison Dowd, left, and Charlotte Gunnemann
Sam Wagner and Therese Spagnola
Cole, left, and Chris Comiskey, Dallas Dawn Mihneski, left, and Tanya Zegarski Nicole and Scott Gerrone
C M Y K
PAGE 14A SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ N E W S
paid $230,000 in March for the
former St. Nazarius Church in
the Pardeesville section of the
township, with plans to turn the
property into a community cen-
ter and fitness facility, said town-
ship Supervisor Bill Gallagher.
“It’s a beautiful property. It
overlooks the mountain,” Gal-
lagher said.
Santino Ferretti, of West
Wyoming, and Patrick Hadley, of
Pittston, paid $280,000 in De-
cember for the former Blessed
Sacrament Roman Catholic
Church on Division Street in
Hughestown.
The men have rented out the
rectory and are converting the
church into four apartments,
said Hughestown Borough
Council President Wayne Quick.
The church closed last fall.
“It was a concern of the resi-
dents when the church became
vacant because they didn’t know
what it was going to be,” Quick
said. “They’re doing a nice job
with the renovations. They did a
lot of landscaping outside al-
ready.”
The former St. John’s Church
on Miller Street in Luzerne was
sold last July for $28,200 to the
Clarks Summit-based Celestial
Church of Christ Word of God
Parish, records show. The Celes-
tial Church has been holding ser-
vices in the building, said bor-
ough council President Michael
Jancuska.
“Right now it’s a productive
building. You don’t want a build-
ing to be left alone and become
dilapidated,” he said.
Retired Penn State professor
Francis D. Pierucci purchased
the massive former St. John’s
Slavonic Roman Catholic
Church in Foster Township for
$30,000 in November, with
dreams of turning it into an an-
tique business. Pierucci died a
month later, leaving the build-
ing’s fate unknown.
Pierucci’s friend, Melissa Lon-
gazel, said he wanted the 7,822-
square-foot stone church be-
cause it was old like the treasures
he planned to display inside. The
church’s high ceilings would
have been ideal for displaying his
tapestries, Longazel said.
Hazleton resident Thomas C.
Bast is now the proud owner of
the former rectory of Holy Trin-
ity Slovak Roman Catholic
Church on North Wyoming
Street in Hazleton. He purchased
the property through a Realtor in
September for $125,000.
Bast said he liked its first-floor
suite and space for his extended
family. The building once
housed a priest, assistants, a
housekeeper and cook, he said.
People still refer to his house
as the rectory because it’s next to
the vacant and unsold church, he
said. The church auditorium is
across the street.
Relic of past use
One lingering sign of his
home’s past remains in the base-
ment – a large safe that once
stored church monetary collec-
tions. The safe door is open, but
he can’t use it because nobody
knows the combination. The safe
is too heavy to remove.
Bast said he feels at home in
the former church property.
“There are creeks and groans
and doors that close by them-
selves, but it’s turned out real
nice,” he said.
The Hazle Township Munici-
pal Authority is using the former
Church of the Sacred Heart of Je-
sus community building on
Route 940 for offices and storage,
said township Supervisor Gal-
lagher. The authority paid
$175,000 to buy the building in
February.
Another authority – the Lu-
zerne County Housing Authority
– bought the former Sacred
Heart Church in Plains Town-
ship for $150,000 in January. The
authority plans to demolish the
church and convent and build an
apartment building for the elder-
ly, officials have said.
Harrisburg resident Daniel
McGlynn bought the former St.
Vincent’s Church parsonage for
$95,000 in September. McGlynn
could not be reached for com-
ment, and borough officials say
they have not received a propos-
al from McGlynn stating how he
plans to reuse the roughly 7,000-
square-foot brick residential
property.
At least one more purchase is
in the works.
Theatrical future
The Nuremberg Community
Players is about to close on the
former St. Joseph Catholic
Church in the Nuremberg sec-
tion of Black Creek Township.
Built in 1888, the church host-
ed its final Mass last June and is
slated to be sold to the theater
group for roughly $28,000.
The theater group wanted a
permanent home for its perform-
ances and chose the former
church because it has good
acoustics, pews that will provide
plenty of seating and room for a
stage and would keep the group
in the county’s southwest edge,
said theater group member Ann
Bonacci.
“It’s very exciting because
members of that congregation
are pleased that the church will
be used again,” Bonacci said.
The Rev. Patrick McDowell,
pastor of the Sacred Heart and
St. Joseph Parish, said the sale
will allow the parish to save
money on maintenance and
property taxes on the former
church. Residents will still get to
enjoy the building, and theater is
a “proper fit” for a former sacred
building, he said.
The former St. Christopher’s
in Bear Creek Township was sold
with the condition that it can’t be
used for any purpose that con-
flicted with church doctrine,
Smith said.
The cross atop the steeple will
be removed this summer, but the
stained glass windows and part
of the name will remain. The
building will be called the St.
Christopher Community Center,
he said.
“One of the reasons we’re
keeping the stained glass and
name is to preserve the history of
that building,” Smith said. “Peo-
ple got married there. Children
were baptized there. There is a
sense of respect we have to have
for that facility.”
The Nuremberg Community
Players haven’t decided on a
name for its former church build-
ing, but the group has a plan to
pay homage to its roots, Bonacci
said.
“We’re hoping to do “God-
spell” as our first performance in
the new building. We thought
that would be a great way to
start,” she said.
The deed for the sale of the for-
mer St. Nazarius Church in Hazle
Township contains a detailed cov-
enant stipulating that the proper-
ty may not be used for any pur-
pose that contradicts the teach-
ings or doctrine of the Catholic
Church or diocese.
The buyers and their succes-
sors and heirs must “respect the
nature of the prior use” as a
church and may not use the prop-
erty to “denigrate human digni-
ty,” the deed says. The buyers
must also “give proper respect” to
the “right to life of all persons
born and unborn,” it says.
Location: Division Street, Hugh-
estown
Buyer: Santino Ferretti and Pa-
trick Hadley
Purchase: December 2010,
$280,000
F O R M E R B L E S S E D
S A C R A M E N T R O M A N
C AT H O L I C C H U R C H
Location: State Route 115, Bear
Creek Township
Buyer: Bear Creek Foundation,
Inc.
Purchase: December 2010,
$148,000
F O R M E R S T.
C H R I S T O P H E R ’ S
R O M A N C AT H O L I C
C H U R C H
Location: Pardeesville section of
Hazle Township
Buyer: Giovanni and Paula Ann
DiBlasi
Purchase: March 2011, $230,000
F O R M E R S T.
N A Z A R I U S C H U R C H
Location: Foster Township
Buyer: Francis D. Pierucci
Purchase: November 2010,
$30,000
F O R M E R S T. J O H N ’ S
S L AV O N I C R O M A N
C AT H O L I C C H U R C H
Location: North Wyoming Street,
Hazleton
Buyer: Thomas C. Bast
Purchase: September 2010,
$125,000
F O R M E R H O LY
T R I N I T Y S L O VA K
R O M A N C AT H O L I C
C H U R C H R E C T O R Y
Location: Miller Street, Luzerne
Buyer: Celestial Church of Christ
Word of God Parish
Purchase: July 2010, $28,200
F O R M E R S T. J O H N ’ S
C H U R C H
Location: State Route 940, Hazle
Township
Buyer: Hazle Township Municipal
Authority
Purchase: February 2011, $175,000
F O R M E R C H U R C H O F
T H E S A C R E D H E A R T
O F J E S U S C O M M U N I T Y
B U I L D I N G
Location: North Main Street,
Plains Township
Buyer: Luzerne County Housing
Authority
Purchase: January 2011, $150,000
F O R M E R S A C R E D
H E A R T C H U R C H
Location: Church Street, Ply-
mouth
Buyer: Daniel McGlynn
Purchase: September 2010,
$95,000
F O R M E R S T.
V I N C E N T ’ S C H U R C H
PA R S O N A G E
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Jim Smith, CEO of the Bear Creek Community Charter School, stands in the former St. Christoph-
er’s Roman Catholic Church, now a community center for the school and residents of Bear Creek
Township. The Bear Creek Foundation purchased the vacant church for $148,000 in December.
CHURCHES
Continued from Page 1A
Luzerne County has started
taxing church properties that are
not usedfor religious services, of-
ficials say.
The county Board of Assess-
ment Appeals had authorized the
assessor’s office to proceed with
the taxation plan around the end
of 2009 after other counties start-
ing issuing tax bills to closed
churches and parochial schools.
The first tax bills went out last
year, and some additional church
properties wereaddedtotherolls
this year, records show.
The law says all churches or
“actual places of regularly stated
religious worship” should be ex-
empt, but county Assessment Di-
rector Tony Alu said this condi-
tion isn’t met when there is no
regular worship.
County assessment records
show an estimated 30 church
properties have returned to taxa-
ble status to date. Most are part
of the Diocese of Scranton, which
implemented a consolidation
plan to close some schools and
churches throughout the county
to save money.
The 30 properties have a com-
bined assessed value of about
$8.6 million, which equates to
roughly $44,995 in county tax
revenue. The rest of the tax bill
varies based on each property’s
school and municipal tax rates.
Court-level assessment ap-
peals are pending on at least 11of
the 30 properties, according to a
review of records in the protho-
notary office.
Scranton Diocese spokesman
William Genello said the diocese
has been reviewing each church
property added to the tax rolls
and files an appeal “if necessary.”
“The diocese is committed to
workingwithtaxingbodies toen-
sure that taxes are properly ap-
plied and appropriately paid,”
Genello said.
Attorney Francis J. Hoegen has
been handling most of the assess-
ment appeals for the diocese, re-
cords show.
Some church properties that
were part of the diocese consoli-
dation plan should remain ex-
empt because they are still used
for religious activities, Hoegen
said.
“The fundamental use hasn’t
changed, but the frequency of use
has changed in some cases,” he
said.
Some of Hoegen’s appeals at-
tempt to return properties to tax-
exempt status, while others seek
assessment reductions.
The assessments were lowered
on several properties because the
churches were demolished, ac-
cording to county records.
For example, the former St.
Mark’s Roman Catholic Church
in Jenkins Township was added
to the tax rolls for 2010 at an as-
sessment of $224,400-- $9,000for
the land and $215,400 for the
church. The property is now as-
sessed at $15,000 because the
church was torn down.
Luzerne County begins taxing some church properties
By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
jandes@timesleader.com
where our role as educators
played a role; teaching her that
learning is fun, to love learn-
ing.”
Both Sukanya and her parents
said they did not expect her to
win the contest and that the
process of learning, not the
prize, was their ultimate goal.
“It wasn’t about winning; We
want her to appreciate the lan-
guage,” Abhi Roy said. “It was
more of a learning project, and
not for just for her, for us too.”
“They wanted me to win, but
they didn’t expect me to win or
put any pressure on me,” Suka-
nya said. “They were just really
supportive and helpful.”
So what did her parents think
the moment she correctly
spelled ‘cymotrichous’ and won
the top award?
“It was surreal,” Abhi Roy
said. “At that moment you really
don’t think too much. All of a
sudden it’s your daughter. We
were happy for her, but it all
happens too soon.”
MARK BOWEN/SCRIPPS NATIONAL SPELLING BEE
Sukanya Roy talks with her parents, Mousumi and Abhi Roy, after
the spelling bee competition in Maryland.
MARK BOWEN/SCRIPPS NATIONAL SPELLING BEE
Sukanya Roy meets CNN’s Wolf Blitzer after winning the national
championship.
PRIZE
Continued from Page 1A
The award is given in recogni-
tion of distinguished service to
the college and has only been
awarded 10 times in the school’s
65year history, accordingtoJohn
McAndrew, director of public re-
lations. O’Hara, a member of the
King’s class of 1971 and the first
alumnus to serve as the college’s
president, wastoutedforhisfocus
on improving the community, his
tireless efforts to upgrade the col-
lege’s facilities and most of all for
his focus onstudents.
“Father Tom is such a great
leadernotonlyineducationbutin
everythinghedoes,”saidLuzerne
County Community College
President Thomas P. Leary.
O’Hara’s quiet effectiveness at
getting things done and his hum-
blehumilitywill bemissed, Leary
said, but he said the greatest loss
will be to the students.
“The greatest of all Tom’s ac-
complishments is that he’s made
King’s the most student-centered
college inthe country,” saidEber-
hard Faber, IV, who served as
chairman of the college’s board
for most of O’Hara’s tenure as
president.
In offering a toast in honor of
his long time friend and col-
league, Faber said the event Sat-
urday wasn’t a goodbye because
O’Harawill returntotheschool to
teach after taking a year’s sabbat-
ical todomissionworkinUganda,
BangladeshandIndia.
He praised O’Hara for his ac-
complishments in making the
school greener and safer, for ex-
panding and renovating the facil-
ities and for garnering national
recognition for a school with a
mission of providing a good edu-
cation to students of working
class parents.“He believes stu-
dents are the most important
thingandheinspires others tobe-
lieve that, too,” Faber said.
In addressing the crowd of
more than 400 gathered in the
Sheehy Farmer Center, which
was also renovated during his
presidency, O’Hara offered
thanks to his family, friends and
the King’s family and reminded
them of the importance of rela-
tionships.
O’Hara, whofor theentireterm
of his presidency also served as a
resident counselor in a freshman
dormat Holy Cross Hall, spoke of
watchingeachclassdevelopintel-
lectually, spiritually, emotionally
and in maturity, and admitted to
being teary eyed as he watches
eachclass graduate.
“I’m teary eyed because I can’t
believe what I’ve seen before me
and how they’ve changed,” he
said. “I am who I am because of
myrelationshipswithyou. Youall
have transformed my life,” O’Ha-
ra said. “Godbless you, Godbless
King’s College andGodbless this
community.”
O’HARA
Continued from Page 9A
C M Y K
PEOPLE S E C T I O N B
timesleader.com
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011
S
olemnly I gaze out from the
podium at the auditorium full
of young soon-to-be-grads in
their gowns and mortarboards.
Their young eyes are riveted upon
me, since they know full well that in
the next few moments I will present
them with the golden capstone of
their formal educations — a com-
mencement address that would
make a classical Roman orator
proud, one that will ring in their
memories forever. When they are old
and gray they will shake their heads
and say, “By God, he put me on the
right track for sure.”
Well, maybe not. Actually I think
I’m the last person in the Western
Hemisphere that any self-respecting
school district or college would ever
invite in to offer wisdom to the
young folks.
That being the case, here is my
annual wish list of “what I would
say to the grads if I had the chance.”
Ahem!
Guys and girls, did you know that
your ancestors were dancin’ fools?
Yes, it’s true: granddaddy and grand-
mama probably met one summer
night in the pavilion at Sans Souci
or Hanson’s parks. And — pay atten-
tion now — they were better candi-
dates for “Dancing With the Stars”
than you will ever be, because their
high schools held a dance in the
gym every week, with live music.
Why do I bring up this odd cultur-
al fact? I do so to show you that
things in life change, sometimes for
good and sometimes for ill. If you
think everyone born before 1990 was
nothing more than an evolutionary
step on the way to your glorious
self, and if you’re also convinced
that the world will always be your
familiar one of Facebook and music
apps and somebody you’ve never
heard of going to war for you, then
you have the common sense level of
that little swinging tassel on your
cap.
Point Number Two! Resist the
temptation to get a tattoo, unless it’s
so hidden and underplayed that no
one except the undertaker will ever
see it.
Let’s say you’ve reached the final
interview stage in your quest to
become a partner in a law firm, the
CEO of a pharmaceutical company, a
superintendent of schools or a bish-
op. Confident and relaxed, you lean
forward toward your would-be boss
to make a point and a neon purple
“Born to raise hell” suddenly flashes
into view on your forearm. My, how
unfortunate! Can you spell “long-
term judgment”?
Finally, I present you with one of
the great mysteries of our time – the
presence of Dallas Cowboys mer-
chandise in every clothing depart-
ment in Luzerne County. Although
I’ve never personally seen anyone
placing those be-starred hats and
coffee mugs in front of the checkout
clerk with a hearty “yeeehaw,” I’m
sure it all didn’t just grow there and
a manager ordered it because some-
one is buying it.
Point: There will always be things
in this world we do not understand
fully. Scripture and science might
someday lead us to the answers to
what troubles us. In the meantime
we should be humble — inquisitive,
but humble — and see ourselves as
pilgrims in the search for knowl-
edge. Oh, we’re just positive that
presidential candidate Joe Blow’s
bumper sticker blather about (fill in
the blank) really will keep America
great. Right? Case closed! Well, can
you tell me why a man in Honey Pot
is this moment shedding tears of joy
because he managed to get the last
$49.95 shirt with “Romo” on the
back?
OK, everybody out! It’s party time.
TOM MOONEY
R E M E M B E R W H E N
Go onward
with humility
and curiosity
Tom Mooney is a Times Leader columnist.
Reach him at tmooney2@ptd.net.
S
tanley“Ruby” Wroblewski is theformer owner andoperator of Ruby’s InninNanti-
coke. In 2008, Wroblewski, 89, turned over the business to his son, Jimmy. A na-
tive of Glen Lyon, “Ruby” has lived in Nanticoke most of his life, served in the
UnitedStates Navy during WorldWar II, andopenedRuby’s Innin1972. Eleanor, his
wife of 63 years, still makes pizza at the business and he also remains a fixture
there, helpinggratecheeseandmakesauceeveryweek. Theyhavethreegrand-
daughters and three great-granddaughters. They live in Nanticoke.
What inspired you, at age 50
back in 1972, to open a pizzeria
and bar? “I was working up at a
pencil factory in Mountaintop, but
we lived a block away from here.
My wife and I used to come in here
onceinawhile, andthegentleman
had this place for sale. I asked my
wife, ‘Would you like to make piz-
za?’ Shesaid, ‘Yeah,’ andI said‘OK,
we’re buying the place.’ I thought
we’d keep it for three years, and
we’re here for 39.”
What doyouenjoyabout it?You
seem to have a great family sit-
uation here, with your wife, son
and granddaughters all helping
out. “I enjoy everything. And I
enjoy the customers. I’ll go out
andhaveadrinkwiththembythe
bar sometimes. I don’t do as much
as I used to, but I help when they get real
busy, and I still help grate the cheese and
make sauce. My mind wants to do more, but the body
can’t do it.”
What’s your favorite style of pizza on your menu?
“Pepperoni and sausage.”
What do you do to relax? “I used to fish, until lately. I
have to watch now, walking around stones and all ...”
How do you stay fit? “First thing in the morning, as
soonas I comein, I walkaroundtheinn10times toloosen
up. And I have an exercise bike.”
Music? “Johnny Cash. And polkas. I still listen to the
polkas. Stanky (John Stankovic) comes in here on occa-
sion.”
Follow sports? “I like the Yankees and Phillies.”
That’s an interesting mix. Who’d you root for in the
2009 World Series? “I’m always for the Yankees if
they’re in the Series.”
You’ve got some photos on display of yourself and
NASCAR truck driving champion Todd Bodine. Your
son says he married a girl from the area, and that
you’re good friends. “He comes in here every time he’s
in town.”
MEET STANLEY “RUBY” WROBLEWSKI
See MEET, Page 4B
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venthoughhe has livedinthe UnitedStates for 20years and
has mastered English, Rajesh Nahar still dreams in Hindi.
Nahar, 47, is an oncologist with Medical Oncology Associ-
atesinKingston. Recently, however, hehasbeguntopursuehisdream
of acting and is finding great success. The doctor/dramatist will be
thefirst totell youachievementsdidnot materializeovernight. Much
ashisdreamseveryeveningunfoldinhisnativelanguage, therootsof
his waking dreams can be traced to his native land.
“When I was growing up in Kolkata,
[India] I was taught that you have to in-
vest a lot of time into your ambitions be-
fore you can expect something to come
from them,” Nahar says. That might ex-
plainsome of his boyhoodhabits. “When
I was young, I didnot have a lot of access
toAmericanmovies, but I was greatly in-
fluenced by Indian cinema, Bollywood,”
he said, so much so that he would lock
himself in his room and re-enact scenes
fromthe films. “I wouldpractice alone in
my room for hours and hours, often in
front of amirror towatchmyexpressions
and to work on my timing.” Nahar’s self-
teaching led to theater work and a cas-
sette recording job in India. While his
family recognized his talents for singing
andacting, theyhadother hopesfor their
natural-born thespian.
Occupation: Oncologist, freelance
actor
Residence: Plains Township
Education: St. Xavier’s
College, Medical
School Calcutta
Family: Wife,
Manisha
Hobbies:
Studying
languages,
travel
Website:
www.raj-
theactor.com
YouTube Chan-
nel: www.you-
tube.com/user/
rnahar1
ABOUT RAJESH NAHAR
See ACTOR, Page 4B
S. JOHN WILKIN/THE TIMES LEADER
In addition to being an oncologist, Rajesh Nahar, of Medical Oncology Associates, Kingston, is also pursuing an acting
career.
In June 2010, Nahar traveled to Orlando for the Actors, Models, & Talent for Christ (AMTC)
Summer Convention, which enabled him to test his acting chops in 10 different events.
By HOLLY VAN LEUVEN For The Times Leader
C M Y K
PAGE 2B SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ O C C A S I O N S
M
r. and Mrs. Terrence A. McMa-
hon III, Chester Springs, former-
ly of Duryea, announce the engage-
ment and approaching marriage of
their daughter, Elizabeth, to Shawn
A. Kaciubij.
The bride-to-be is the grand-
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. T.A. McMa-
hon Jr., Moosic, and the late Mr. and
Mrs. Edmund S. Runsky, Avoca.
The prospective groom is the son
of Diane Kaciubij, Manor, and Bodie
Kaciubij, North Huntingdon.
Elizabeth is a graduate of the
Scranton Preparatory School and
earned her bachelor’s degree from
Villanova University. She is a certi-
fied public accountant and a senior
manager with ParenteBeard LLC,
Pittsburgh.
Shawn is a graduate of Hempfield
Area High School and earned his
bachelor’s degree from Clarion Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania. He is a certi-
fied public accountant and a princi-
pal with S.R. Snodgrass, A.C., Wex-
ford.
A June wedding is planned.
McMahon, Kaciubij
K
ellyann Daley and John Schuh,
together with their families,
announce their engagement and
upcoming marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Rosemary and Gerald Daley, Pittston.
She is the granddaughter of the late
Frank and Margaret Mary Lavelle and
Frank and Theresa Daley, Pittston.
The prospective groom is the son
of John and Elaine Schuh, Avoca. He
is the grandson of the late Nancy and
Charles Jones, Avoca, and John and
Virginia Schuh, Scranton.
Kelly is a 2001 graduate of Pittston
Area High School and a 2007 gradu-
ate of Wilkes University, earning a
Doctorate in Pharmacy. She is em-
ployed with Rite Aid.
John is a 2002 graduate of Pittston
Area High School and a 2006 gradu-
ate of Wilkes University, earning a
Bachelor of Arts degree in elemen-
tary education. He is employed at
Pittston Area and Radio Shack.
The wedding is set for Aug. 20,
2011, at St. John the Evangelist
Church, Pittston.
Schuh, Daley
M
r. and Mrs. Daniel Kaczmarczyk,
Hanover Township, announce
the engagement and approaching
marriage of their daughter, April Ann
Kaczmarczyk, to Matthew Harris, son
of David Dwyer, West Wyoming, and
Emma Harris, Hanover Township.
The bride-to-be is the granddaught-
er of Anna Kaczmarczyk and the late
Alexander Kaczmarczyk, Upper As-
kam, and the late Michael and Mary
Witinski, Witinski’s Villa.
She is a 2009 graduate of Luzerne
County Community College, where
she earned an associate degree in
general studies. She is pursuing her
Bachelor of Arts degree in anthropol-
ogy at Bloomsburg University and
will graduate May 2012. She is em-
ployed at her family-owned business.
The prospective groom is the
grandson of the late Vernice and
Erma Harris, Wilkes-Barre.
Matthew is a 2004 graduate of
Hanover Area High School. He is a
2009 graduate of Luzerne County
Community College, where he
earned an associate degree in journal-
ism. He is employed at Boden, Pitt-
ston.
The couple will be united in mar-
riage Aug. 6, 2011, at Holy Family
Church, Sugar Notch. They will hon-
eymoon in Negril, Jamaica.
Harris, Kaczmarczyk
M
r. and Mrs. Thomas Mulroy,
Wilkes-Barre, announce the
engagement and approaching mar-
riage of their daughter, Jill Marie, to
Steven Bruce Geller, son of Veleda
Geller, Boynton Beach, Fla., and the
late Walter Geller.
The bride-to-be is the grand-
daughter of the late Genevieve and
Vincent McGilloway and the late
John and Irene Mulroy, all of
Wilkes-Barre.
Jill is a graduate of Greene Cen-
tral High School and earned a bach-
elor’s degree in management from
Purdue University. She is employed
as the accounting coordinator for
the City of Wilkes-Barre.
The prospective groom is the
grandson of the late Harry and Anna
Geller and the late Ann Kellerman
Abrams and Hyman Kellerman.
Steven is a graduate of Piscataway
Central High School and earned a
bachelor’s degree in finance from
Kean University. He is the owner of
Geller Appraisal Services LLC and
works as an independent senior
property adjuster for Cunningham
Lindsey, Plymouth Meeting.
The wedding is set for Oct. 29,
2011, at St. Andrew Church, Wilkes-
Barre. The Rev. James E. McGaha-
gan and Rabbi Dr. Reeve Robert
Brenner will co-officiate.
Geller, Mulroy
A
lyssa Marie Gill and Daniel Jo-
seph Piccillo, together with their
families, announce their engagement
and approaching marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Robert and Debra Gill, Shavertown,
Pa.
The prospective groom is the son
of Sebastian and Jean Piccillo, Wyom-
ing, Pa.
Alyssa is a 2006 graduate of Bishop
O’Reilly High School. She is a 2010
graduate of King’s College, where she
earned her Bachelor of Science de-
gree in biology and neuroscience. She
is pursuing a degree of Doctor of
Podiatric Medicine at Temple Uni-
versity School of Podiatric Medicine.
Daniel is a 2003 graduate of Dallas
High School. He is a 2007 graduate of
King’s College, where he earned his
Bachelor of Science degree in biology
with a minor in neuroscience. He is
also a 2009 graduate of New York
Chiropractic College, where he
earned a degree in Doctor of Chi-
ropractic Medicine. He is employed
at a private practice in center city
Philadelphia and is also an adjunct
professor of biology at Philadelphia
Community College.
The couple will exchange vows
July 23, 2011, at St. Ignatius, King-
ston, Pa., followed by a reception
held at the Westmoreland Club,
Wilkes-Barre, Pa.
Gill, Piccillo
J
ennifer Kianka and Jeff Bason,
together with their parents,
announce their engagement and
upcoming wedding.
The bride-to-be is the daughter
of William and Eileen Kianka,
Hopewell, N.J.
The prospective groom is the
son of Larry and Joyce Bason,
Conyngham, Pa.
Jennifer is a 1986 graduate of
Hopewell Valley Central High
School, Pennington, N.J. She is
employed at Endodontics Ltd.,
Langhorne, Pa., and AKA Hair
Salon, New Hope, N.J.
Jeff is a 1985 graduate of West
Hazleton High School and a 1989
graduate of King’s College,
Wilkes-Barre, Pa. He is employed
as a finance manager at Johnson
& Johnson Pharmaceutical,
Springhouse, N.J.
The couple will exchange vows
on Oct. 24, 201, in Las Vegas,
Nev.
Bason, Kianka
M
r. and Mrs. Thomas M. Gill,
Nanticoke, will celebrate their
50th wedding anniversary June 10,
2011. They were married in St. Jo-
seph’s Church, Nanticoke, by the late
Rev. John J. Dzurko.
Mrs. Gill is the former Dolores A.
Pelehach, daughter of the late Steve
and Helen Pelehach, Nanticoke.
Mr. Gill is the son of the late An-
thony and Ethel Gill, Nanticoke.
The couple has four children, the
late Thomas M. Gill Jr., Kenneth W.
Gill, Steven R. Gill and JoAnn Gill, all
of Nanticoke.
To commemorate the occasion a
50th wedding anniversary Mass will
be held at 2 p.m. today at St. Peter’s
Cathedral in Scranton and another
Mass will be celebrated at 11 a.m.
June 12 at St. Faustina’s Church,
Nanticoke.
The Gills
Geisinger Wyoming Valley
Medical Center
Solinski, Janell and Joe, Dallas, a daugh-
ter, May 21.
Cook, Holly and Shaun Pallo, Elmhurst, a
daughter, May 21.
Wagner, Cathyjo and Keith Kemmerer,
Kingston, a daughter, May 21.
Barteau, Jodi and Cody Fletcher, Thorn-
hurst, a daughter, May 21.
Miraglia, Natashia and Jeffrey Victor,
Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, May 21.
Buchan, Patricia, Wilkes-Barre, a son, May
22.
Quinn, Jennifer and Joshua Flaim, Sug-
arloaf, a daughter, May 22.
Weitz, Roni and David, Hughestown, a
daughter, May 22.
Gronski, Justine and Donald Warren,
Plymouth a daughter, May 22.
Brown, Stacey and Alexander Smith,
Exeter, a son, May 23.
Pinson, Amber and Jesse, Drums, a son,
May 23.
Pekarski, Nicole and Justin, Plains Town-
ship, a son, May 23.
Wilcocks-Young, Amberly and Jason
Wallick, Factoryville, a daughter, May
23.
Letteer, Nicole and Jake, Hunlock Creek,
a daughter, May 24.
Long, Gwynne and Brian, Kingston, a son,
May 24.
Eden, Kristin and Jeremy, Wapwallopen, a
daughter, May 24.
Wincek, Abby and Jeremy Shaver, Plains
Township, twin sons, May 24.
Wolfe, Donna and David, Moosic, a son,
May 25.
Sromovski, Kelly and Andrew, Luzerne, a
son, May 25.
Ecenrode, Kristyn and Shane, Dallas, a
daughter, May 25.
Tokar, Tokara and Eugene Walker Jr.,
Duryea, a daughter, May 25.
Saporito, Kara and Daniel, Plains Town-
ship, a son, May 26.
Searfoss, Haylee and AzimHosein, White
Haven, a son, May 27.
McKenzie, Jamie and Craig Daniels,
Hanover Township, a daughter, May 27.
Mahle, Jeanine and John, Larksville, a
son, May 27.
Ginocchietti, Aubrey and Michelangelo,
Pittston, a daughter, May 27.
Jinks, Sarah and Jonathan, Wilkes-Barre,
a daughter, May 28.
Cotton, Rachel and Albert Simon, Ed-
wardsville, a son, May 30.
Ayers, Georgeann and Michael DeGraw,
Plymouth, a son, May 31.
Cook, Lynn and Wayne Shannon, Tunk-
hannock, a daughter, May 31.
Hajkowski, Keri and Tom, Dallas, a son,
May 31.
Kester, Kelly, Nanticoke, a son, May 31.
Nesbitt Women’s and Children’s Center
at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital
Swetz, Kristen and Brian, Swoyersville, a
son, May 23.
Zeske-Vidzicki, Danielle and Wayne
Vidzicki, Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, May
23.
Tomko, Amanda and Joseph, Nanticoke, a
daughter, May 23.
Coolbaugh, Denise, West Pittston, a
daughter, May 24.
Oravic, Nicole and Josh, Jenkins Town-
ship, a daughter, May 25.
Rivera, Miriam A. and Khalif R. Wiggins,
Wilkes-Barre, a son, May 25.
Niedzwiecki, Nicole and Kelly Edwards,
Wilkes-Barre, a son, May 25.
Truax, Stacy and David, Kingston, a son,
May 25.
Sevison, Amanda M. and William F., Ed-
wardsville, a daughter, May 25.
Arnold, Samantha and James Hayes,
Edwardsville, a son, May 27.
Giardina, Anita M. and James Patrick
McKeown III, Bear Creek Township, a
son, May 27.
Wolfe, Tiffany and Arthur Lee, Hunlock
Creek, a son, May 27.
Bohan, Kristen and Ron Krushinski,
Nanticoke, a son, May 27.
Martin, Jennifer and Thomas, Wilkes-
Barre, a daughter, May 27.
Guerin, Crystal and Robert, Pittston, a
daughter, May 28.
Youngblood, Donna and John, Exeter, a
son, May 28.
Pask, Lauren and George Andrejko,
Hanover Township, a daughter, May 29.
Rogan, Erin and John Balut Jr., Wilkes-
Barre, a daughter, May 29.
Walters, Jennifer and Joshua Anderson,
Kingston, a daughter, May 29.
Naugle, Jennifer and Jason, Dallas, twin
daughter and son, May 29.
Wasmanski, Stephanie and Jason, King-
ston, a daughter, May 30.
Rivera, Dana and Joshua, Wilkes-Barre, a
daughter, May 30.
BIRTHS
G
erry andSandy Wazeter, Trucks-
ville, celebratedtheir 25thwedding
anniversary onMay 24, 2011. They were
marriedonMay 24, 1986, at St. Vincent
de Paul Church, Bayonne, N.J., by the
Rev. DavidJ. Baratelli.
Sandy is the former Sandy Laden,
daughter of the late MartinLadenand
Lois Laden, currently residingin
Trucksville.
She graduatedfromBayonne High
School andJersey City State College
andrecently retiredfromthe U.S. Postal
Service OIG.
Gerry is the sonof the late Leonand
EdithWazeter.
He graduatedfromE.L. Meyers High
School andKing’s College andworked
for the Social Security Administration
for 25 years prior tohis retirement.
The couple has one son, GerardH.
Wazeter.
They celebratedtheir anniversary
witha family dinner.
The Wazeters
Lehigh Valley Hospital, Allentown
Hoffman, Sandra and Edward, Plains
Township, a daughter, May 8.
OUT-OF-TOWN BIRTHS
WILKES-BARRE: King’s College stu-
dents Kaitlin Falatovich, Katherine
Moore, Paul Ofcharsky, Chris Wilson
and Cory Zalewski were recently award-
ed 2010 Pennsylvania Associated Press
Broadcasters Association Awards for
projects that were broadcast on the col-
lege’s radio station, WRKC-FM. The
Pennsylvania APnews awards recognize
outstanding broadcast journalism ef-
forts by AP-member radio and television
stations, cable television and networks
in Pennsylvania.
Falatovich, Hazleton, received a third-
place award in the feature category for
her piece, “Curtain Comes Down on the
Cafe Metropolis,” about the closing of a
popular Wilkes-Barre club for young
people and its impact on their lives.
Moore, Hanover Township, earned a
silver ADDY Award for her public ser-
vice announcement for the Boy Scouts
of Northeastern Pennsylvania. Her work
was part of the Shoval Grant received by
WRKC to help local non-profits create
public service announcements.
Ofcharsky, Clarks Summit, andZalew-
ski, Wall, N.J., received a third-place
award in the sports play-by-play catego-
ry for united commentary of King’s Col-
lege homecoming football game against
Widener University.
Wilson, Dallas, won a third-place
Mark of Excellence Award from The So-
ciety of Professional Journalists for a fea-
ture piece, “Things That Go Boom,”
about King’s Chemistry Department’s
Halloween presentation for young peo-
ple in the community.
King’s students win awards for broadcasts
Boyd Dodson Elementary School
Boyd Dodson Elementary School re-
cently announced the Honor Roll.
Grade 6: Highest Honors: Alison Ge-
orge, Luan Hoang, Luan and Ashlee
Shaver. High Honors: Josafat Brito,
Ariana Contreras, George Mastro-
pasqua, Jimmy Than and Jeffrey
Vergara. Honors: Patricia Dapas,
Noah Edwards, Jeannette Evans,
Joshua Goodwin, Katlyn Heck, Daniel
Hogan, Nefetia Lundy, Anna Shaver
and Tesha Todd.
Grade 5: Highest Honors: Khira Cook,
Lesly Cruz and Vanessa Everett. High
Honors: Serenity Bonk, Janelle Czer-
pak, Ariana Dale, Chloe Delp, Wendy
Espinoza, Oneisha Garallues, Michael
Hughes, Chelsea Lezama, Gianna
Miller, Kiara Mitchell, Meghan Moyer,
Jaryah Patterson, Ronald Peguero,
Isabel Ponce, Jada Redditt, Kayla
Secter, Kaylee Smith, Analy Suarez-
Vergara and Ny’Sira Thomas. Hon-
ors: Ariel Boyer, Jawane Buckner,
Crystal Colon, Miguel Lorenzo Disla,
Rashell Fixmer, Heavyn Garvey, Jessi-
ca Harris, Tyler Harris, D’Andra Ho-
ward, Alexa Read, Frankie Rosa, Vin-
cent Todd and Tawanna Winstead.
Grade 4: Highest Honors: Emily Apol-
inaro, Paige Dean, Skylar Elmy, Ste-
phanie Hinz, Casey Mulligan, Macken-
zie Shovlin and Tyler Yelland. High
Honors: Ashley Amigon, Rafael Ami-
gon, Amanda Barberio, Kyle Baxter,
Van Bui, Carl Clemonts, Tiarra Coop-
er, Destiny Englert, MaryKay Giza,
Nicole Jarski, Kelly Rivera, Juan
Rojas, Kasia Stewart, Destiny Tolbert
and Asucena Vergara. Honors: Elvira
Amigon, Genivere Bosheers, Michael
Botting, Matthew Brennan, Jessica
Chintalla, Savon Collins, Kacie Hogan,
Erica Koprowski, Maryam Kratz, An-
gel Lopez, Jared O’Day, Miguel Olea
and Latifat Oseni.
Grade 3: Highest Honors: Alexis Ju-
lian, Collin Mosier, Rachell Reyes-
Martinez, Rosalinda Sosa and Tim-
othy Wielgopolski. High Honors:
Najeeb Bilal, Kiyana Daniely, Cylee
Delp, Zachary Dougalas, Destiny
Hopkins, Destiny Howard, Aishah
Khairi, Zuleima Mero, Casey Molina-
Vergara, Amira Neville, Miracle Ruriz,
Michael Smeraglio and Kobe Sofa.
Honors: Honesty Arroyo, Heather
Campbell, Curtis Chandler, Nevina
Dietterick, Paige Farina, Michael Fox,
Rachel George, Skylynn Gonzalez,
Kennedy Hoagland, Andrew Koonrad,
Kory Linscott, Aleanny Martinez,
Tiana Mitchell, Tahira Neville, Jah-
maal Patterson, Holly Raineri, Sonia
Rakowski, Benjamin Ramsaroop,
Ashley Salddivar, Jeremy Simon,
Yamilet Sosa, Crystal Tlatenchi, Mari-
lyn Torres and Kristian Vasquez.
HONOR ROLL
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 PAGE 3B
➛ O C C A S I O N S
The Times Leader allows you to
decide how your wedding notice
reads, with a few caveats.
Wedding announcements run in
Sunday’s People section, with
black-and-white photos, free of
charge.
Articles must be limited to 220
words, and we reserve the right to
edit announcements that exceed
that word count. Announcements
must be typed or submitted via
www.timesleader.com. (Click on
the "people" tab, then “weddings”
and follow the instructions from
there.) Submissions must include
a daytime contact phone number
and must be received within 10
months of the wedding date. We
do not run first-year anniversary
announcements or announce-
ments of weddings that took place
more than a year ago. (Wedding
photographers often can supply
you with a black-and-white proof
in advance of other album pho-
tographs.)
All other social announcements
must be typed and include a day-
time contact phone number.
Announcements of births at local
hospitals are submitted by hospi-
tals and published on Sundays.
Out-of-town announcements
with local connections also are
accepted. Photos are only accept-
ed with baptism, dedication or
other religious-ceremony an-
nouncements but not birth an-
nouncements.
Engagement announcements
must be submitted at least one
month before the wedding date to
guarantee publication and must
include the wedding date. We
cannot publish engagement an-
nouncements once the wedding
has taken place.
Anniversary photographs are
published free of charge at the
10th wedding anniversary and
subsequent five-year milestones.
Other anniversaries will be pub-
lished, as space allows, without
photographs.
Drop off articles at the Times
Leader or mail to:
The Times Leader
People Section
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA18711
Questions can be directed to
Kathy Sweetra at 829-7250 or
e-mailed to people@timeslead-
er.com.
SOCIAL PAGE GUIDELINES
D
estyne Baum and Charles Fino
were united in the sacrament
of marriage June 5, 2010, at Our
Lady of Mt. Carmel Church, Pitt-
ston, by the Rev. Paul McDonnell.
The bride is the daughter of
Paula Hetro Baum, Pittston, and
Robert Baum, Carbondale. She is
the granddaughter of Sophie He-
tro and the late Paul Hetro,
Wyoming, and Robert and Cathe-
rine Baum, Dalton.
The groom is the son of Stephen
and Marilyn Hoover, Exeter, and
Charles and Mary Fino, Wyoming.
He is the grandson of the late
James and Betty Loftus, West
Pittston, and the late Charles and
Barbara Fino, Pittston.
The bride was given away in
marriage by her parents. She
chose her best friend, Tabitha
Barletta, as her maid of honor.
Bridesmaids were Stephanie Fino,
sister of the groom, and Saliena
Alaimo, Jennifer Dominick, Maura
Kivak, Kristy Moran, Melissa
Myers, Natalie Scarantino and
Kelly Vincelli, all best friends of
the bride.
The groom chose his cousin,
Christopher Loftus, as his best
man. Groomsmen were Robert
Baum and Paul Baum, brothers of
the bride, and Martin Connors,
James Grudzinski, Anthony Gudz,
Ronald Rinaldi and Jeffrey Win-
ters, all friends of the groom. Ju-
nior groomsman was Paul Baum
Jr., nephew of the bride.
Flower girl was Angelina Baum,
niece of the bride. Ring bearer was
Logan Baum, nephew of the bride.
Scriptural readings were given
by Mary Lou Fino, aunt and god-
mother of the groom, and Sandra
Timek, godmother of bride. Musi-
cal selections were provided by
Joseph Sabol with Supplee Strings
and Jack Martin on trumpet. Solo-
ist was Cora Artim.
A bridal shower was hosted by
the mother of the bride, brides-
maids and godmother of the bride
at The Waterfront, Plains Town-
ship. The parents of the groom
hosted a rehearsal dinner at Our
Lady of Mt. Carmel Parish Center,
Pittston. Fox Hill Country Club,
Exeter, was the setting for the
cocktail hour and wedding recep-
tion.
The bride is a 1999 graduate of
Pittston Area High School. She
earned an associate’s degree in
vascular technology from Lacka-
wanna College. She is employed
by United Surgical Associates
P.C., Carbondale, as a registered
vascular technologist.
The groom is a 1990 graduate of
Wyoming Area High School and
Luzerne County Community Col-
lege. He is a veteran of the Army
Reserve/Pennsylvania National
Guard. He is employed by the
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.
The couple honeymooned in
Hawaii. They reside in Pittston.
Baum, Fino
D
iane Krolikowski and William
Ljungquist, along with their
children, are happy to announce
that they were united in marriage
by the Rev. David Diehl at a dou-
ble-ring ceremony at the River
Commons, Wilkes-Barre on April
30, 2011.
Diane Krolikowski is the daugh-
ter of Doreen Coleman and the
late James Coleman, Myrtle
Beach, S.C.
William Ljungquist is the son of
the late Willard and Audrey Ljung-
quist.
Diane graduated with a Bachelor
of Science degree in nursing from
Wilkes University and earned her
Master of Science degree in health
care administration from King’s
College. She is employed as the
ACEO for Wyoming Valley Health
Care Systems, Wilkes-Barre.
William graduated from Hacket-
stown Vo-Tech High School. He is
retired from Mars, Hacketstown,
N.J., and is employed at Sanofi
Aventis, Scotrun.
The bride was escorted down
the aisle by her youngest son,
James Krolikowski. She chose her
son, Matthew R. Krolikowski, as
her man of honor. Daughter of the
groom, Katherine Haney, perform-
ed the duties of best woman.
Colin Gatti, nephew of the bride,
set up materials for their sand
ceremony during the exchange of
their wedding vows. Bagpipe mu-
sic was played by their longtime
friend, James Duke.
The reception was held at St.
Maria Goretti, Laflin. Music was
arranged by the bride’s brother-in-
law, Peter Gatti, and included the
performance of an original song, “I
Found Love.” Nichole Plaza, niece
of the bride, also performed a solo
during the reception.
Following the reception, the
couple honeymooned in Cancun,
Mexico. They reside in Eagle
Rock, Hazleton.
Krolikowski,
Ljungquist
C
arrie Anne Kutney and Kevin
Joseph Amann were united in
marriage on Oct. 10, 2010, at the
Cameron Estate Inn, Mount Joy,
by the Rev. Theresa Gilberti.
The bride is the daughter of
Ronald Kutney and Albert and
Beth Ciliberto. She is the grand-
daughter of Albert and Albina
Ciliberto; the late Joseph and
Rita Kutney; and the late Joseph
Kulnis and Irene Farrell.
The groom is the son of Steven
Amann and Donna Bieble. He is
the grandson of the late Joseph
and Arlene Amann and the late
Joseph Bieble and Rosella Hun-
zer.
The bride, escorted by her fa-
ther and step-father, was attended
by her twin sister, Amanda Kut-
ney, maid of honor, and brides-
maids Rebecca Kutney and Lau-
ren Ciliberto, sisters of the bride,
and Kristine Evans and Hilary
Thomas, friends of the bride.
The groom chose friends, Scott
Huber and Ted Shudak, as best
men. Groomsmen were friends,
Kevin Doyle, Dave Thompson and
Keith Kittrick.
The bride was honored at a
bridal shower hosted by her
mother and maid/bridesmaids at
the Quality Inn and Suites,
Wilkes-Barre. The rehearsal din-
ner was hosted by the mother of
the groom at La Terra Bakery and
Restaurant, Leola. A dinner re-
ception was held at Cameron
Estate.
The bride is a graduate of
G.A.R. Memorial High School
and Dickinson College. She is
employed by the Commonwealth
of Pennsylvania.
The groom attended E.L.
Meyers High School and served
active duty in the United States
Army. He is employed by the
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.
The couple honeymooned in
Hawaii and resides in Harrisburg.
Kutney, Amann
M
r. and Mrs. Paul Chmil cele-
brated their 50th wedding
anniversary June 3, 2011. They
were married June 3, 1961, at
St. Theresa’s Church, Wilkes-
Barre, by the Rev. Arnold R.
Smith.
Mrs. Chmil is the former Regi-
na Sharkey, daughter of the late
Cornelius and Mary Oakes Shar-
key. She is a graduate of St.
Mary’s High School, Wilkes-
Barre, and is retired from Acme
Markets.
Mr. Chmil is the son of the
late John and Mary Gulick
Chmil. He graduated from Ash-
ley High School. He served in
the U.S. Navy and retired from
Certainteed, Mountain Top.
Maid of honor was Ann Shar-
key Wrazen, sister of the bride.
Bridesmaid was Sylvia Lucas.
Best man was John Stelmack,
cousin of the groom. Groom-
sman was Cornelius “Neil” Shar-
key, brother of the bride.
They have three children: Paul
Chmil Jr. and wife, Joyce, Ha-
nover Township; the Rev. John
Chmil, Wellsboro; and Kim
Quinn and husband, Mitch, Ha-
nover Township.
They have six grandchildren,
Paul John III, Bethany and Nelly
Chmil, Zach Redding and Katie
and Kearney Quinn.
A family dinner will be held
to celebrate the occasion.
The Chmils
R
obert J. Belles and Sandra C. Davis
were married on June 3, 1961, by
the Rev. George DeMuth in St. Nicho-
las Church, Wilkes-Barre. This year the
couple celebrates their 50th wedding
anniversary.
Bob has been the owner of his own
small business, Belles Construction
Company, since1957.
Sandy is retired fromthe Wilkes-
Barre Area School District, where she
worked as a teacher’s aide for 25 years.
The couple has five children and
nine grandchildren: Robert Jr., who
lives in Dallas with his daughter, Erin;
Mark, who lives in Wilkes-Barre with
his wife, Nancy, and their children,
Mark and Rachel; Sharon Aiken, who
lives in Harpers Ferry, W.Va., with her
husband, Marty, and children, Alyson
and Julia; Tom, who lives in Jenkins
Township, with his wife, Arianna, and
her children, Abby and Carl; and Joe,
who lives in Plains Township with his
wife, Denise, and children, Lauren and
Joey.
The couple is still close with their
friends who were a part of their wed-
ding ceremony, Peggy Malarkey Den-
nis, Dorothy Schintz McGraw, Sandy
Davies McCormick, Mark Umphred,
Mike Rushton and the late TomMason.
Bob and Sandy celebrated their
anniversary with their family and
friends at a dinner at Costello’s Restau-
rant in Edwardsville.
The Belleses
M
cKenzie Avery
Stochla was
baptized on April 30,
2011, by the Rev.
Charles Grube at St.
Paul’s Lutheran
Church in Dallas.
McKenzie is the daughter of Tam-
my and John Stochla, Larksville.
Godparents are Jonathan Stochla
and Tanya Gilbert.
McKenzie A. Stochla
baptized
T
wo sets of four generations re-
cently gathered to celebrate the
85th birthday of Ethel Priestman.
In the top photo, from left: Eric
Grenewicz, father; Ethel Priestman,
great-grandmother holding Jillian
Grenewicz, great-granddaughter; and
Debbie Grenewicz, grandmother.
In the bottom photo, from left: Kim
Dickson, mother; Ethel Priestman,
great-grandmother, holding Tommy
Dickson, great-grandson; and Tom
Priestman, grandfather.
Generations gather
Clare and Richard Kakareka, Plains
Township, announce the engagement
of their son, Rich Maley, to Erin
Cork, daughter of Kaye and David
Cork, St. Charles, Mo.
The prospective groom is the
grandson of William Woolfolk and the
late Noreen Woolfolk.
He earned a master’s degree in
education from Marywood Universi-
ty, Scranton, and is employed by the
Stafford County School District near
Fredericksburg, Va.
The bride-to-be earned a master’s
degree in textiles from Southern
Illinois University, Edwardsville, Ill.
She is employed by Germanna Com-
munity College, Virginia.
Cork, Maley
J
im Broda, Plains Township, and
Kim Stacknick, Scranton, were
united in marriage on Feb. 14 in Las
Vegas, Nev.
The groom is the son of John Bro-
da and Martha Broda, Pittston.
He is a 1997 graduate of Pittston
Area High School and attended Lu-
zerne County Community College.
He is the owner of Rebennack Ap-
pliance and the proprietor of Gate-
way Inc.
The bride is the daughter of Bob
and Alexine Stacknick, Dickson City.
She is a graduate of Mid Valley
High School and Penn State Uni-
versity, where she earned a degree in
biology with a minor in business. She
also has a license in cosmetology.
The couple honeymooned in Italy.
They reside in Plains Township.
Stacknick, Broda
A
nnouncement is made of the
engagement and upcoming wed-
ding of Michelle McAndrew, Scran-
ton, to Jason Shannon, Nanticoke.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Carl and Bernice McAndrew, Scran-
ton.
She is a graduate of Scranton High
School. She earned a Bachelor of
Science degree in business from The
Pennsylvania State University. She is
a transportation coach at Lowes
Home Improvement RDC, Pittston.
The prospective groom is the son
of Edward and Cynthia Shannon,
Nanticoke.
He is a graduate of Greater Nanti-
coke Area High School. He earned a
Bachelor of Science degree in logis-
tics from The Pennsylvania State
University. He is an administrative
supervisor at Sears Holdings, Goulds-
boro.
The wedding is set for 1:30 p.m.
Nov. 26 in St. Paul’s Parish, Green
Ridge.
Shannon, McAndrew
C M Y K
PAGE 4B SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Favorite city? “New York.”
Favorite vacation spot?
“Wildwood. I used to love to
swim. And I can still swim, but
not as much. They sort of watch
me now.”
Favorite TV show? “Sanford
& Son.”
Favorite food? “Filet mignon.
And I like any kind of soup.”
Always in the fridge? “Ice
cream and cold cuts.”
Favorite movies? “I used to
like to go see cowboy pictures.
Therewasatheater inNanticoke
called The Rex, and they mostly
had cowboy pictures. I’d go and
staytheretwicetoseethem. Not
just once. I liked themso much.”
What were some of your
more memorable experiences
inWorldWar II?“I was ontorpe-
do boats. We were going
throughBrisbane, Australia, and
the Australians were practicing
with their planes. They were div-
ing at ships, and they took the
top of our ship right off. They
were practicing, and they got
killed. Also, my brother was a
bombardier, and I met up with
him over there and went on a
bombing mission with him in a
B-24 over the Philippines. We
left at 5 o’clock in the morning
and came back about five in the
afternoon. It was almost a 12-
hour mission.”
Favorite quote? “My second
gradeteacher toldus, ’You’ll find
out that it’s a hard, cruel world.’
That stuck with me.”
It seems like many things in
your lifehappenedfor areason,
right down to howyou came up
with your special pizza. “My fa-
ther was from Poland, and my
mother was from here. My fa-
ther worked in the mines, until
he got black lung, and I helped
them out as much as I could. I
was only a kid, and I worked in a
bakery, and that’s why they sent
me to cooks and bakers school
when I got into the Navy. When I
bought this place, they had a
pretty goodpizza, but I thought I
could make the pizza better.”
MEET
Continued from Page 1B
Alan K. Stout writes about local
people. Reach him at 829-7131.
“Everyone in my family was in
business. My father was a stock-
broker. My grandfather encour-
aged me to be a doctor, to be
something different, and one of
my aunts, who was like a second
mother to me, agreed with him.”
Nahar’s relatives might have en-
couragedhimtotakeupmedicine
for more than diversity’s sake.
The oncologist, energetic but ev-
er-humble, demurely admits that
as a student at South Point High
School inKolkata, whichenabled
the brightest students to letter in
academics, heearnedtheschool’s
special recognition five subjects:
history, geography, biology,
math, and physics. He decided to
honor his family’s wishes and en-
roll in medical school, and the
hours spent in front of the mirror
gavewaytohoursspent inthelab.
“True, I did not love medicine
at first, but I have learned that if
you dig deep enough into any-
thing, you will find something
about it that interests you.” As if
his early successes in acting
didn’t prove it, Nahar has always
had a gift for communicating.
This skill enabledhimtopass eas-
ily between the realms of art and
science. “When I was young, I
used to enjoy playing teacher
with my cousins,” he says. “I
wouldtype upquestions for them
to answer. When they got them
right, I gave them prizes, and
when they got them wrong, I
would explain to them why. Ev-
erything can be explained to
someone in understandable
terms—except mayberocket sci-
ence. When I go to a computer
store, I look for the person who
cananswer myquestions ina way
I will understand, and I strive to
be the person who can offer good
explanations to my patients.”
Nahar’s reputation as both a
good student and teacher has
served him well. In 1982, he
earned his medical degree at
Medical College Calcutta. In
1991, he traveled to Florida to vis-
it the aunt who had encouraged
him to pursue medicine, his only
relative in the United States. He
liked it so much that he decided
to stay. He went on to pass his
U.S. medical licensing exam and
scoredinthe top1percent. Nahar
then completed his internship at
LenoxHill Hospital inManhattan
andspent time inLansing, Mich.,
and Syracuse, N.Y., before set-
tling down in Wilkes-Barre with
his wife, Manisha.
Since 2002, Nahar has served
asanoncologist withMedical On-
cology Associates (MOA) in
Kingston in conjunction with
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. It
seemed the love he developed for
reaching his patients had com-
pletely supplanted his acting am-
bitions until Dr. David Green-
wald, a colleague at MOA,
hatched a novel way to spread
some holiday cheer.
“It was December 2009 when
Dr. Greenwald came to me with
an idea,” he says. “He wanted to
make a videotoshowat the office
holiday party.” The video, called
“Twilight at MOA,” parodied the
popular “Twilight” book series
and had featured Nahar playing a
comical vampire. The short film
kept the 50-odd party guests in
stitches, encouraging the oncolo-
gist to return to his childhood
passion.
In June 2010, Nahar traveled to
Orlando for the Actors, Models,
& Talent for Christ (AMTC)
Summer Convention, which en-
abled himto test his acting chops
in 10 different events. His per-
formances in such categories as
Monologue, Improvisation, Cold-
read and Commercial caught the
interest of many top talent agen-
cies, including Don Buchwald in
NewYork City and Kristene Wal-
lis in Los Angeles. The attention
Nahar received in Orlando led
him to dozens of auditions and
projects. To pursue them, howev-
er, he had to make some weighty
decisions.
To balance both his passions,
Nahar decided to limit his oncol-
ogy practice. “I now work only
Wednesday, Thursday andFriday
for MOA,” he explains, “and I see
my patients only at General Hos-
pital. Because of the last-minute
nature of audition calls, it would
be unfair to my patients if I tried
to schedule regular office hours.”
Now Nahar dedicates Monday
and Tuesday to acting, often us-
ing these two days to attend dra-
ma or singing lessons, either lo-
callyor inNewYork. He acknowl-
edges that this rekindling comes
with concessions. “Since decid-
ingtopracticemedicineonlypart
time, I make about a fourth of
what I used to. And if I am called
to audition Wednesday through
Friday, I have to decline.”
Even still, Nahar has found a
great deal of success in a short
span of time. Most recently, his
performance in the music video
“Dr. Raj, Rapper” ledtoanomina-
tion for Best Music Video at
April’s 168 Film Festival in Los
Angeles. The video, originally
shown at the festival, can be
viewedonNahar’s YouTubechan-
nel. Nahar has garnered roles in
several films now in production:
he will play a mad scientist for a
new horror film being produced
by the NewYork Arts Academy, a
villainous roleintheindependent
horror film titled “Catskill Park”
anda leadingroleinanupcoming
web series in which he will por-
tray a locksmith. Nahar has even
begunwritingacomedy-dramaof
his own about an Indian family
that moves to Edison, N.J. For
now, Nahar’s projects aremost ac-
cessible through his website and
his YouTube account, but he
hopes his dedication and talents
will lead himto international rec-
ognition.
The route to Nahar’s self-fulfill-
ment has been more complicated
and eventful than he ever imag-
ined. “Everyonehastoput downa
dream for practical matters at
some point,” he says. Nahar
hopes, however, that everyone
can find it within them to pick
those dreams back up, even if the
timing doesn’t seem ideal. Be-
cause to Nahar, who as a doctor
lives his belief that everyone de-
serves a high quality of life, the
only thing more fascinating than
watching dreams unfold in Hindi
or in English is to act themout in
real time.
ACTOR
Continued from Page 1B
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C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 PAGE 5B
Photographs and information must
be received two full weeks before your
child’s birthday.
To ensure accurate publication, your
information must be typed or comput-
er-generated. Include your child’s
name, age and birthday, parents’,
grandparents’ and great-grandparents’
names and their towns of residence,
any siblings and their ages.
Don’t forget to include a daytime
contact phone number.
We cannot return photos submitted
for publication in community news,
including birthday photos, occasions
photos and all publicity photos.
Please do not submit precious or
original professional photographs that
require return because such photos can
become damaged, or occasionally lost,
in the production process.
Send to: Times Leader Birthdays, 15
North Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-
0250.
GUIDELINES
Children’s birthdays (ages 1-16) will be published free of charge
➛ C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
If your child’s photo and birthday
announcement is on this page, it will
automatically be entered into the
“Happy Birthday Shopping Spree”
drawing for a $50 certificate. One
winner will be announced on the first
of the month on this page.
WIN A $50 GIFT
CERTIFICATE
Kyle Bernard Castle, son of
Bernie and Michele Castle, Par-
sons, is celebrating his eighth
birthday today, June 5. Kyle is a
grandson of Elaine Snyder, Par-
sons; the late Edward Snyder;
Agnes Castle, Sugar Notch; and
the late Bernard Castle. He has a
brother, Ryan, 12.
Kyle B. Castle
Mallory J. McGeehan, daughter
of Bob and Bonnie McGeehan,
Shavertown, is celebrating her
seventh birthday today, June 5.
Mallory is a granddaughter of
Robert and Dolores McGeehan,
Plains Township, and the late
Robert and Judith Adams. She is
a great-granddaughter of Tho-
mas and Evelyn McGeehan,
Mountain Top, and Dolores
Evans, Plains Township. Mallory
has a brother, Lucas, 9.
Mallory J. McGeehan
Edward Steven Sankus, son of
Edward and Sharon Sankus,
Duryea, is celebrating his 13th
birthday today, June 5. Edward
is a grandson of Stanley and Rita
Benczkowski, Hudson, and the
late Edward and Victoria Sankus.
He has a sister, Abigail.
Edward S. Sankus
Adrienne Arline Wren, daughter
of Ted and Lisa Wren, Plymouth,
is celebrating her fourth birth-
day today, June 5. Adrienne is a
granddaughter of Richard and
Jean Dydynski and Jean and Ted
Wren Sr., all of Plymouth. She
has a brother, Nathaniel, 7.
Adrienne A. Wren
Jasen J.J. Elias Lobacz Jr., son
of Jasen Lobacz Sr. and Amanda
Smith, Sweet Valley, is cele-
brating his fifth birthday today,
June 5. J.J. is a grandson of the
late Walter Lobacz and Sandy
Lobacz, Sweet Valley, and Abra-
ham Lopez and Heidi Walter,
both of Wilkes-Barre. He has two
sisters, Giana, 12, and Ceaira, 9.
Jasen E. Lobacz Jr.
Rylie Elizabeth Stevens, daugh-
ter of Mark and Melissa Stevens,
Kingston, celebrated her sixth
birthday June 3. Rylie is a grand-
daughter of Nancy Mazzillo,
Kingston, and Richard and
Joanne Stevens, Wilkes-Barre.
She is a great-granddaughter of
John and Nancy Borsavage,
Plymouth, and Viola Stevens,
Mountain Top. Rylie has a broth-
er, Ryan, 7.
Rylie E. Stevens
HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
Junior and senior students at GAR Memorial Junior-Senior High School were recently selected as
recipients of the Ray Sunday Student of the Month Award. One junior and one senior student is selected
each month from September through April to receive the award namd in honor of the late Ray Sunday
who was a respected member of the GAR social studies faculty. Some of the award winners, from left,
first row, are Henry Lopez, Tristino Altavilla, Kaitlin McCann, Sarah Kolc, Stefanie Short and Nancy Pa-
checo. Second row: Jessica Wills, Jahlil Harvey, Breah Cooper, Korey Welkey, Natanael Miliano, Hector
Izaguirre, Antwone Easter and Barbara Yelland. India Brooks and Kimberly Wolfe were also award recip-
ients.
Students of the Month named at GAR
King’s College recently completed a family literacy program for parents of pre-school Hispanic chil-
dren. The program was sponsored by the college’s Hispanic Outreach Program and funded from a grant
from Target Corp. Participating parents met for 75-minute sessions every Saturday and Sunday for six
weeks. Classes were held at both King’s and St. Nicholas Church and school. Parents were given instruc-
tion and aids designed to help their children, ages 3-5, prepare for kindergarten. The facilitators for the
program participated in the Bilingual Financial Workplace Certificate Program sponsored by Wall Street
West. Some of the participants, from left, first row, are Emilia Hernandez, Dalisa Robles, Hector Castro,
Ada Soriano, Sabreena Tlatenchi, Crystal Tlatenchi, Lizette Tecotl and Carlos Tecotl. Second row: Teresa
Sosa and Migdalia Toribio, instructors; Teresa Castro; Marina Hernandez; Evelia Tlatenchi; Vanessa Tla-
tenchi; Erin McDonald, King’s student and intern with the McGowan Hispanic Outreach Program; and
Marisol Tecotl.
Hispanic Outreach program helps parents prepare kids for kindergarten
Students in kindergarten through sixth grades at Boyd Dodson Elementary School celebrated His-
panic heritage and diversity with a Cinco de Mayo celebration. Fourth- through sixth-grade students
completed a Webquest project created by Dodson English as a Second Language (ESL) teachers. They
also learned the hat dance, created crafts and researched notable persons of Hispanic heritage and
held a ‘heritage walk’ honoring them. First-, second- and third-grade students performed songs which
celebrated Cinco de Mayo. The students enjoyed a fiesta feast sponsored by The Nutrition Group, dis-
trict food service provider, and director David Feller. Some of the participants, from left, first row, are
Jeffrey Vergara, Angel Meza, Priscilla Laureano, Van Bui and Andri Laureano. Second row: ESL teach-
ers Lynn Sebia, Mille Roke, Sandra Jackson and Sara Swaditch and Gina Bartoletti, principal, Dodson
Elementary.
Boyd Dodson students celebrate Cinco de Mayo
Pre-kindergarten through
eighth-grade students at St. Jude
School recently participated in a
Lenten service project to benefit
the Friends of the Poor in Scran-
ton. Students donated a wide
variety of Easter candy and relat-
ed items for children’s Easter
baskets that were prepared for
delivery by the fourth and eighth
graders. Some of the participa-
nts, from left, first row, are Josh
Gronka, Katie Wills, Matthew
DiGangi, Dominic Capaci, Dean
Limongelli, Michael McCarthy
and Alyson Rymar. Second row:
Jillian Hayden, Abby Wolfgang,
Caitlin Croke, Alana Wilson, Ann
Cosgrove, Gabrielle Mohutsky
and Renee Brown.
Lenten project benefits
Friends of the Poor
C M Y K
PAGE 6B SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Solomon Plains Junior High
School
Solomon Plains Junior High School
recently announced the third
quarter Honor Roll.
Grade 7: Highest Honors: Wyatt
Hardy, Olivia Dalbo, Shae Lyn
Briggs, Griffen Gdovin, Austin
Kopeck, Matthew Monaghan,
Krystina Prince, Mary Tona, Liz-
beth Jaramillo, Walkiria Perez,
Tamar Bourdeau, Michael Brown,
Ryan Jackloski, Sarah Jamieson,
Vita Kozub, Tyler Kurilla, Casey
Lello, Paige Parsnik, Deanna Ri-
chards, Nicholas Zalaffi, Robert
Anstett, Nicholas Cerep, Joshua
Gartley, Josh Hvozodovic, Jacob
Khalife, Michael Koury, Kalie Reed-
,Victoria Rominski, Thomas
Schwab, Emma Sukowski, Brigid
Wood, Kyra Wozniak, Aaron Tosh.
High Honors: Shaiann Butts,
Samantha Rafferty, Elisa Rivera,
Agripina Torres, Anna Anderson-
Dirisio, Ryan Christian, Christine
Evans, Jasmine Figueroa, Evelina
Meshko, Hailey Sheilds, Stephanie
Torres, Ashley Chell, Desiree
Fischer, Colin Krokos, Kyle Kruger,
Maricarmen Padilla, Jessica Abra-
ham, Katrina Chiogna Solovey,
James Conroy, Ashley Frew,
Breanne Georgetti, Mikensie Lee,
Brandon Tosh, Chelsea Hernandez,
Jesse Miller, Ashleigh Brzenchek,
Ryan Colleran, Khalid Credle, Ryan
Douglas, Emily Glycenfer, Isreal
Gonzalez, Star Gyle, Zachary
Kenzakowski, Meghan Kosek, Amy
Llewellyn, Natayla Lowman, Josh-
ua Lozada, Thomas Lyons, Joseph
Mansfeild , Alexandra Rivera,
Samantha Simms, Kylie Hummel,
Alaina Klapat, Kennedy Rinish,
Cassidy Steligo, Andrew Wynn,
Amie Babocarr, Tyler Brzozowski,
Stanley Goeckel, Katelyn Green,
April Llewellyn, Rhea Mamola,
Alexandra Namey, Austin Popple,
Katrina Sennett, Jacob Soller,
Kristen Wilde, Zachary Banaszek,
Phillip Guiliano, Evan McManus,
Jayda Lyn Nafus, Arden Sorani,
Jason Voitek, Hailee, Dumont,
Alyssa Smalls, William Torres,
Amber Dunlap. Honors: Melanie
Aberant, Brittany Colson, Juan
Galeno, Aaron Tosh, Nina Bealla,
Robert Colon, Michael Pisano,
Kimberly Sanchez, Nicholas
Sthcur, Robin Jones, Rhea Kross,
Kimmy Martinez, Megan Novak,
Donald Rorick, Savannah Grimes,
Mera Holmes, Hannah Kessler,
Laurel Nestor, Kaden Washburn,
Kaitlyn McDonald, Dana Price,
Kelsie Stachokus, Jessica Grum-
blis, Kyle Johns, Sam Meehan,
Bryson Wardle, Christopher
Wright, Evelina Guzman, Jade
Wielgosz, Danielle Casey, Jade
Wielgosz, David Ceklosky, Brandon
Howell, John Kozich, Maddison
Black, Allison Cosgrove, Matthew
Frankelli, Jason Lammers, Allyssa
Smalls, Rachel Wallace, Amber
Myers, Jada Lyn Nafus.
Grade 8: Highest Honors: Nathanie-
la Bourdeau, Cory Vanchure,
Jessica Harvey, Ryan Corcoran,
Adam Ercolani, Kourtney Kukow-
ski, Christine Lapsansky, Catherine
Silveri, Amber Colleran, Sarah
Debiasi, Kelsey Gabrielle, Emily
Hall, Robert Hawkins, Jacqueline
Kline, Thomas Kozerski, Volodymyr
Kunderevych, Kayla Losito, Be-
thany Paulukonis, Carly Ray, Carlos
Rodulfo, Victoria Walter, Michael
Yanchuk, Katherine Lanning,
Kaitlyn Lukashewski, Rachael
Supinski, Darren Miller, Carmen
Garcia, Morgan McKenna. High
Honors: Rachael Luton, Tommy
Marmolijo, Isabel Sanchez, Phillip
Torres, Grace Weed, Brianna Won-
doloski, Kathryn Askew, Shaun
Austin, Melissa Barkus, Tyler
Bonick, Kassandra Cebula, Marc
Esser, Sierra Price, Kimberly Riv-
era, Rebecca Scott, Olivia Vogue,
Victoria Vogue, Nicole Ciprich,
Rowan Connelly, Jeremy Grivenski,
Alexander Kane, Kelly McGraw,
Gabrielle McNeil, Sarah Pradel,
Bailey Brannigan, Dylan Clewell,
Sydney Hendrick, Kyle Schneikart,
Frank Wojtash, Shelly Bizubm, Auri
Bohan, Scott Christian, Lauren
Hoffman, Zachary Johns, Megan
Lercara, Carianna Makowski,
Morgan McKenna, Joseph Miraglia,
Edward Slavish, Marque White,
Brandon Catone, Kayla Cunning-
ham, Mikayla Hoskins, Amber
Reese, Kelly Smith, Lauren Bailey,
Patrick Barrow, Bailey Bukevich,
Carmen Garcia, Michael Malacari,
Dominique Miragia, Rhaelynn
Francek, Darren Miller, Timothy
Elick, Alana Lathrop, Carl Konze,
Kristen Bailey. Honors: Carlos
Perdomo, Anna Marie Shaffer,
Sabrina Chew, Katelyn Gemski,
Brenden Jones, Cody McCord,
Rosario Tlapia, James McGettigan,
Julianne Mondulick, Zachary
Mykulyn, Heather Reed, Tyler
Uravage, Nicholas Yankowski,
Madison Leslie, Christopher Sebia,
Amanda Josulevicz, Haley McEl-
nea, Shelby Shaffer, Zoey Spak,
Aransy Abrew, Cesarina Ortega,
Nicholas Peterlin, Jeffrey Hughes,
Norah Rosencrans, Steven Shaffer,
Mackenzie Smith, Ryan Gorki, Lee
McCracken, Tommy Marmolejo,
John Elick, Marquel White, Damian
Farrell.
Rice Elementary School
Kevin Seyer, principal, Rice Ele-
mentary School, recently an-
nounced the Honor Roll for the
third quarter.
Principal’s Honors: Ali Ajaz, Paige
Allen, Lance Blass, Gregory Chang,
Alyssa Cuono, Kimberly Floyd,
Alexa Gaetano, Amanda Goss,
Sarah Klush, Allison Knorek, Mack-
enzie Koslop, Cataldo Lamarca,
Madison Maharty, Garrett McAfee,
Rebecca Navin, Jordan Olenginski,
Alexandra Olszyk, Amelia Prezkop,
Jake Rosner, Troy Simko, Olivia
Stemrich, Stephanie Thorpe, Emily
Traficante.
Honors: Brandon Andes, Ian Antosh,
Dylan Ayling, Claudia Bafunno,
Annah Barber, Jacob Barney,
Brandon Belfonti, Daniel Belfonti,
Kristina Cragle, Alexander De-
spirito, Drake Dewald, Matthew
Dopp, Sierra Erwine, Steven Evans,
Aaron Frihart, Kyle Frisbie, Jacob
Gerlach, Jessica Gittens, Seth
Gollmer, Paige Good, Madisyn
Granoski, Corey Gulvas, Madeline
Heller, Brianna Hischak, Zachary
Humenick, Zariah Januszewski,
Marissa Katinsky, Thomas Keber,
Bradley Kotarsky, Brittany Krout,
Trever Kuhn, Matthieu Lacoste,
Madisyn Lowe-Konen, Justin
Lukashewski, Scott Mangan Jr.,
Marissa Margalis, Kristina May-
ewski, Gabriella McElhattan, John
McGroarty, Jarrod Merrifield,
Nicholas Miller, Kaytlyn Miscavage,
Maria Morgante, Jason O’Neill,
Kristen Petroski, Madison Pohar-
ski, Brittany Randall, Kyle Richards,
Hunter Rinehimer, Monica Schuler,
Kaitlin Snipas, Francis Sromoski,
Lacey Stemrich, Timothy Stewart,
Hannah Williams, Mandi Wise,
Jamie Witinski.
HONOR ROLLS
Fellerman & Ciarimboli, a personal injury law firm in Kingston
and Scranton, recently announced Ariel Cordick, Plymouth, as the
winner of the Safe Prom Pledge contest. Cordick, a senior at
Wyoming Valley West High School, and five of her friends received
an all-expense paid limousine provided by Touch of Class Limou-
sine Inc., Edwardsville, on prom night. Cordick won the limousine
by signing the ‘Safe Prom Pledge,’ committing to a prom night free
of drinking and driving. The pledge was initiated by Fellerman &
Ciarimboli in order to promote a safe prom night and graduation
season for area high school students. At the award presentation,
from left: attorney Ed Ciarimboli; Melanie Picarretta, assistant
principal, Wyoming Valley West; Cordick; David Robbins, vice princi-
pal, Wyoming Valley West; and attorney Greg Fellerman.
WVW student wins ‘Safe Prom Pledge’ contest
Luzerne County Community College Dental Department and the
Northeast Pennsylvania Dental Hygiene Association recently held
a Kids’ Cavity Prevention Day. Services were provided to 49 chil-
dren, ages three to 16. The program included free dental exams,
free cavity varnish to strengthen enamel and help prevent tooth
decay, free pit and fissure sealants, free oral hygiene instruction
and a free toothbrush. The Blue Ribbon Foundation of Blue Cross
of Northeastern Pennsylvania and the Procter & Gamble Founda-
tion funded a portion of the supplies for the program. From left:
Mary Dolon, grant specialist/writer, LCCC; Thomas P. Leary, presi-
dent, LCCC; Jennifer R. Deemer, grant and program specialist, Blue
Cross of Northeastern Pennsylvania; Alex Fried, public relations
manager, Procter & Gamble Paper Products Co.; Maureen Savner,
associate professor, dental hygiene, LCCC; and Julie Cleary, dental
health chairperson, Northeast PA Dental Hygiene Association and
associate professor, dental hygiene, LCCC.
Kids’ Cavity Prevention Day held at LCCC
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital School of Nursing Class of 1961
held its 50th anniversary reunion April 29 at The Café, Route 315,
Wilkes-Barre. Donations were made for the son of Peggy Morgan
who was injured in Kuwait. Nancy Dwyer is the president of the
alumni association. Classmates in attendance, from left, first row,
are Esther Link Edwards, Anne Chervenitski Kotch, Nancy Pluto
Parker, Joyce Ginochetti Marotti, Ruth Praschunas and Gloria Jean
Baker Sigmann. Second row: Marie Augustine Cardone, Becky
Lavix Kulbaski, Gayl Klingerman, Peggy Fuge Morgan, Bettie Little-
ford Matzoni, Carol Castellani Phillips, Carol DeAngelo Friedman,
Dottie Adams Mattey and Marie Danilock Turri.
W-B General nurses hold 50th reunion
Wyoming Seminary College Preparatory School in Kingston
recently presented its annual Joseph C. Donchess Distinguished
Service Award to four people who demonstrated exceptional ser-
vice to the community and Wyoming Seminary. The four recipients
are Dr. Howard C. Beane, Class of 1949, Camp Hill; Nancy T. Hedden,
Hazle Township; Susan Weiss Shoval, Class of 1970, Kingston; and
Robert S. Tippett, Class of 1942, Kingston. The award is the highest
honor bestowed by the Wyoming Seminary Board of Trustees. It
expresses appreciation for the life and example and sacrifices and
devotion of those who are honored. At the special awards recep-
tion, from left: Dr. Kip Nygren, president, Wyoming Seminary; Mary
Lopatto, class of 1972, chair of the Honors and Awards Committee
of the Board of Trustees; Beane; Shoval; Hedden; Tippett; and the
late Rusty Flack, a member of the class of 1972 and chairman of
Wyoming Seminary Board of Trustees.
Sem alumni earn awards for community service
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 PAGE 7B
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Bethany Brody, Edwardsville, has
been named the winner of the
Wallace F. and Sue B. Stettler
Scholarship
Award at
Wyoming
Seminary
College Prepar-
atory School in
Kingston. The
late Wallace
Stettler was
president
emeritus of
Wyoming Seminary, serving as
the school’s ninth president from
1967 to 1990. Established in 1990,
the award is given to a returning
student who performs to his or
her academic ability; participa-
tes enthusiastically in the life of
the school; gives evidence on
campus and/or in the communi-
ty at large of caring for others
and a sensitivity to the needs of
people; and possesses the traits
to project that caring and sensi-
tivity constructively in the world.
Brody, a rising senior, is the
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David
Brody.
Keri L. Franklin, daughter of John
and Karen Franklin, Tunkhan-
nock, recently graduated from
St. John’s
University,
Staten Island,
N.Y., summa
cum laude,
with a Bachelor
of Arts degree
in psychology
and a minor in
criminal jus-
tice. Franklin was in the honors
program and a member of Psi
Chi International Honor Society
in Psychology, Omicron Delta
Kappa Leadership Honor Socie-
ty, Lambda Kappa Phi Honor
Society and Phi Eta Sigma Fresh-
man Honor Society. She plans to
attend George Washington
University to earn a doctorate in
clinical psychology.
Mona Krubitzer Stecker, Hunting-
ton, W.Va., formerly of Plains
Township, earned her Doctorate
in Nursing Practice degree from
West Virginia University on May
14. Dr. Stecker’s Capstone Project
was entitled, “The Evaluation of
the Effectiveness of a Structured
Educational Program on Nurses’
Assessment Ratings in an Epi-
lepsy Monitoring Unit.” Dr. Steck-
er is the daughter of the late
Eileen V. Krubitzer and William J.
Krubitzer. She
is a graduate of
Coughlin High
School, Wilkes-
Barre, and
earned her
baccalaureate
degree in
nursing from
Wilkes Uni-
versity, Wilkes-Barre, and her
master’s degree in nursing from
Misericordia University, Dallas.
Dr. Stecker is married to Dr. Mark
Stecker and together they estab-
lished the Cabell Huntington
Hospital/Marshall University
Epilepsy Center located in Hun-
tington, W.Va.
Amanda Marie Kutney, daughter
of Ronald Kutney, Harrisburg,
and Albert and Beth Ciliberto,
Wilkes-Barre, recently earned
her Doctor of Philosphy in
Chemistry from The Ohio State
University. Kutney is a 2000
graduate of G.A.R. Memorial
High School and a 2004 gradu-
ate of Lebanon Valley College.
She is an undergraduate profes-
sor in North Carolina.
Several local students were re-
cently inducted into Phi Sigma
Tau, the national honor society
for philosophy at The University
of Scranton. New inductees are
Kathleen K. Lavelle, Avoca;
Ryan P. Pipan, Forty Fort; Emily
L. Deubler, Dallas; Philip J.
Kachmar, Kingston; Amy E.
Klug, Mountain Top; Anthony J.
Stefanelli, Thornhurst; Kira N.
Wagner, Sugarloaf; and Ann E.
Zeleniak, Taylor.
Kelly McGlynn, Plains Township,
was recently presented with the
Dr. Dennis J. Foreman Lead-
ership Award given by the Stu-
dent Leadership and Activities
department at the commence-
ment awards ceremony at Saint
Joseph’s University in Philadel-
phia.
Lauren Barnes, Mountain Top, has
accepted membership in The
National Society of Collegiate
Scholars (NSCS). Barnes will be
honored during an induction
convocation this fall on the
campus of The Pennsylvania
State University. NSCS is a mem-
ber of the Association of College
Honor Societies and is the na-
tion’s only interdisciplinary
honors organization for first-
and second-year college stu-
dents. Membership is by in-
vitation only, based on grade-
point average and class stand-
ing.
NAMES AND FACES
Brody
Franklin
Stecker
James M. Coughlin High School
James M. Coughlin High School
recently announced the third
quarter Honor Roll.
Grade 12: Highest Honors: Peter
Andrews, Shelley Black, Mat-
thew Bucci, David Cantoran,
Kevin Cantoran, Danielle Cerep,
Crystal Chudoba, Marlowe
Estioko, Kristi Gabriele, Michael
Goble, Marley Gozick, Kendra
Hayward, Jack Johnson, Tracy
Kosek, Brittany Kulesza, Victoria
Martin, Jeremy Melton, Michael
Moorhead, Abby Lynn Moules,
Jackie Nat, Jordan Okun, Korey
Ann Patrizi, Mary Patterson,
Joshua Popple, Amanda Ryan,
Jenna Silliboy, Holly St. Clair,
Kaitlyn Varneke, Corinne Walker,
Kyle Washney, Casey Waslasky,
Timothy Wychock, Joshua
Zukowski. High Honors: Rebec-
ca Arent, Ashley Bella, Rachel
Belles, Allissa Binker, Bradley
Bozinski, Maria Cantoran, Mi-
chael Cibello, Jessica Cleary,
Alexandra Cole, Ashley Colon,
Timothy Cornelius, Justin Cos-
key, Bryanne Dudzik, Allison
Fehlinger, Minerva Gaspar, An-
thony Grillini, Deanna Groszew-
ski, Michael Harrison, Ryan
Haupt, Courtney Jones, Mark
Kenzakoski, Nicole Kosisky Sky
Kuren, Rachel Libertucci, Ga-
briela Lopez-Sosa, James
McCrone, Noelle Mondulick,
Marissa Nicoletti, Michael O’Mal-
ley, Maria Parri, Kaylee Patron-
ick, Samantha Popple, Emma
Pugh, Kiah Randolph, Eric Ro-
leski, Benjamin Rubinstein,
Sabrina Serpico, Kate Slenzak,
Robert Sorokas, Alexis Spagno-
la, Brian Suchoski, Desiree
Vanderlick, Lindsay Varneke,
Nicole Walsh, Alyssa Wincek,
Michael Woolard, Jenna You-
koski. Honors: Michael Answini,
Ashley Austin, Jose Avila, Olivia
Banta, John Dale, Joshua Davis,
Brittany Doyle, Richard Evans,
Jonathan Ferdinand, Ashley
Fox, Michael Greboniski, Robert
Gulich, Nicholas Hillman, Mat-
thew Hunzer, Casey Hutter,
Charles Josulevicz, Ashley
Kasper, Ainsley Klapat, Kelly
Knorr, Kara Krueger, Frank
Lefkoski, Anthony Lopez, Mat-
thew Menendez, Jason Moskel,
Megan Olshefski, Nicolas Orte-
ga, Brian Pascucci, Dixitkumar
Patel, Kendra Peebles, David
Poole, Daniel Post, Joseph
Rogan, Tyler Seiger, Alessandro
Serpico, Hayley Smith, Olivia
Spagnola, Melissa Svab, Corey
Swaditch, Stephanie Symons,
Raymond Szescila, Michael
Tirko, Ashley Tirpak, Ranjel
Tlatenchi, Taylor Tosh, Stephen
Turner, Holli Wachilla and Chris-
topher Ward.
Grade 1 1: Highest Honors: Cara
Answini, Rosa Bartoletti, Britta-
ny Bella, Sabrina Bella, Saman-
tha Bitzer, Sara Blazejewski,
Logan Carroll, James Chmiola,
Kayla Eaton, Jeremy Evanko,
Laura Evans, Shelby Flaherty,
Justin Francis, Andrea Grillini,
Dannah Hayward, Julie Hughes,
Eric Klemchak, Joseph Kubicki,
Trystin Lamereaux, Eligh La-
siewicki, Summer Lentini, Co-
reen Lingle, David Long, El-
izabeth Long, Hannah Lukatch-
ik, Jenna Lutchko, Ian Mercado,
Stephanie Milewski, Marissa
Miller, Matthew Miraglia, Alyssa
Monaghan, Anthony Nestor,
Bailey Novak, Ivy Nulton, Linda
Obando-Wilson, Anthony Pana-
way, Kara Pawloski, Heather
Pilcavage, Richard Poplawski,
Ashley Ray, Kaushal Savalia,
Amanda Sax, Cayla Sebastian,
Kirby Silliboy, Aldrin Soriano,
Sally Sosa, Gregory Stankiewicz,
Brooke Stepanski, Ryan Syp-
niewski, Alexandra Szoke, Alli-
son Townsend, Jessica Walsh,
Madison Zamsky, Stephanie
Zedolik. High Honors: Lynn
Aguilar, Zuhey Aguilar, Jordan
Answini, Gerdwine Bourdeau,
Nola Carsillo, Christopher Cinti,
Kyle Cunningham, Shahara
Davis, Michelle Diaz, Marina
Dunsavage, Rebecca Emmert,
Clifford Francis, Kayla Franck-
iewicz, Heather Gaydos, Domin-
ick Gulius, Jasvir Jacobs-Singh,
Kevin Kandrac, Jason Lepore,
Amber Lynn Mahalick, Cara
Martin, Liana Meshko, Russell
Monroe, Kallista Myers, Erica
Nanni, Tina Olson, Joseph Pars-
nik, Allison Peck, Matthew Phil-
lips, Sierra Pinkney-Williams,
Berenice Rodriguez, Kyle
Schmidt, Karalee Schneikart,
Paul Scull, John Skursky, Maris-
sa Smith, Jonathon Stack,
Kaitlin Sypniewski, Nicole Tir-
pak, Troy Vannucchi, Kevin
Zingaretti. Honors: Jonathan
Altemos, Julie Barry, Ashley
Bevan, Adam Bohonko, Dylan
Concini, Mary Corcoran Michael
Czerniakowski, Brandon Darius,
Devon Davis, Kevin Dering,
Thomas Donato, Clint Donovan,
Ialik Etheridge, Grace Fazzi,
Danielle Georgetti, Emilie Gur-
dock, Jawanna Harper, Eric
Heffers, Thomas Himlin, Lindsey
Humanik, Tyheem Jenkins,
Sierra Kelley, Karlie Kennedy,
Jacob Kruika, Sarah Lasoski,
Marissa Lercara, Jurika Marti-
nez, Brittany Maza, McKenzie
McDonough, Zachery McNeill,
Tiffany Miller, Kaitlyn Mondulick,
Stephanie Nace, Peter Nanni,
Nicholas Nardone, Jeremy
Ozark, Maximo Ramos, Robert
Reilley, Caitlin Rocker, Whitney
Ruiz, Gregory Serafin, Joshua
Stankinas, Mitchell Stepp, Jo-
seph Vera, Edward Walsh, Mat-
thew Westawski, Brittaney Rose
Wood-Turinski, Alexander Zup-
po.
Grade 10: Highest Honors: Sa-
muel Andrews, Cindy Anusiew-
icz, Hunter Bednarczyk, Kaitlyn
Benczkowski, Andrey Boris,
Frank Brandolino, SpoorthyChal-
la, Wendy Chew, Maria Cinti,
Julia Demellier, Zachary Evans,
Shamus Gartley, Shelby Hess,
David Hontz, Madysen Jones,
Joseph Jordan, Mackenzie
Keats, Michaela Keats, Skylar
Kopeck, Summer Kubicki, Jo-
seph Lanning, Michael Lewan-
dowski, Breanne Lloyd, Alisha
Loeffler, Sara Long, Hailley
Malenovitch, Justin Malinowski,
Lorianne Masi, Samantha May-
wald, Matthew Moorhead, Julia
Moskel, Joshua Moules, Cassidy
Moyer, Theodore Mykulyn,
HONOR ROLLS
See HONOR, Page 8B
C M Y K
PAGE 8B SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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1325 RIVER ROAD,
WILKES-BARRE, TUFT TEX PLAZA
235-1264
NANTICOKE: Team Walk-
ing Divas, a participant in the
American Cancer Society’s
Relay for Life, will hold a car
wash noon-5 p.m. Thursday at
Luzerne County Community
College’s Public Safety Train-
ing Institute on Prospect
Street. All proceeds will benefit
the American Cancer Society.
The Relay for Life will take
place for the first time at Lu-
zerne County Community
College from10 a.m. June 18 to
10 a.m. June 19.
WILKES-BARRE: Tickets
for GAR Memorial Senior High
School’s commencement cere-
monies will be on sale in the
school’s main office on June 14
and 15 during regular school
hours. Tickets are $1 each, cash
only. Seating is limited and
tickets will be sold on a first
come, first-served basis. No
tickets will be sold at the door
on graduation day. Commence-
ment will take place at 1 p.m.
on June 16 in the high school
auditorium.
IN BRIEF
Justin Okun, Mykela Pacurariu,
Dylan Robbins, Jessica Ross,
Nathan Sauers, Danyelle
Schweit, Nicholas Scupski, Nath-
an Sienkiewicz, Casey Silvi,
Jessica Sims, Felicia Solovey,
Raizy Sosa, Sergey Svintozelsky,
Aaron Tohme, Haley Waslasky,
Caitlin Wood, Catherine Yankow-
ski. High Honors: Danielle Ad-
cock, Alexander Beaver, Steven
Dobbs, Christopher Domiano,
Rebecca Elmy, Bradley Emerick,
Williams Engle III, Kimberly
Flores, Dominque Gurns, Karina
Hoover, Ryan Javick, Joseph
Kenzakoski, Michealena Kowalc-
zyk, Jacqueline Marroquin,
Elizabeth Martin, Aaliyah Mas-
sey, Emily Motsko, Derek Nowak,
Seth Perrin, Jordan Phillips,
Joseph Ramos, Gerald Ryan,
Alexander Scheuerman, Alvin
Soriano, Aaron Strait, Paige
Tedik, Joseph Tona, Caitlin Vu-
kovich, Morgan Wanyo, Nicole
Wasmanski, Yi Nuo Wu. Honors:
Joseph Borick, Amy Cherinko,
Edward Ciprich, Monica Diaz,
Justin Gaughan, Juan Gonzalez
Jr., Justin Gooday, Elvis Herrera,
Stacie Howell, Adam Hutz, Jorge
Jaramillo, Jr., Shelby Kresge,
Karynn Krouchick, Susana Lo-
pez, Michael McGraw, Latifah
Minnick, Mark Miraglia, Jr., Aus-
tin Popish, David Price III, Mitch-
ell Rivera, Elizabeth Rosencrans,
Melanie Sweeney, Joshua Tarnal-
icki, Sara Walkowiak, Breanna
White, Joshua Wilk, Cory Wright,
Amber Zendzion.
Grade 9: Highest Honors: Alex
Anderson, Kyra Castano, Lauren
Castellana, Alexander Cerep,
Valerie Davi, Emily Dupak, Al-
izabeth Ellsworth, Dhalia Espino-
za, Joseph Gayoski, Adam Giova-
nelli, April Haupt, Corey Hauser,
Sarah Jarnot, Anthony Khalife,
Sommer Kosko, William Kozub,
Kyle Lupas, Benjamin Manarski,
Jessica Miorelli, Keighlyn Oliver,
David Parsnik, Timothy Pilch,
Thomas Pistack, Evan Popple,
Jennifer Reynoso, Jessica Rey-
noso, Angeline Rubasky, Bridget
Ryan, Barry Schiel, Caitlin Walsh,
Kelby Washburn, Michael Woz-
niak, Stephen Zedolik. High
Honors: Courtney Answini,
Katlyn Barber, Jessica Bencz-
kowski, Nicolas Bishop, Yuriy
Boris, Ruben Bourdeau, Alex-
andra Bukeavich, Abasi Chong,
Katelyn Colleran, Kaitlyn Coskey,
Christopher Dennis, Marc Dona-
to, Bradley Dunn, Nicholas Fazio,
Colin Gobbler, Collin Gozick,
Lauren Gryskevicz, Nandi Har-
rington, Megan Hughes, Caitlin
Jaworski, John Jones, Richard
Kenzakoski, Erica Kline, Daulton
Lentini, Charles Long, Jessica
Luton, David Marriggi, Kyle
McGrady, Kelvin Mejia, Jeremy
Miller, Megan Mosley, Jesenia
Nava, Kimberly Nestorick,Erin
O’Day, Martin Oley, Yamileth
Orduna, Michael Osmanski,
Bruce Panattieri, Matthew Parry,
Kathleen Pascual, Nima Patel,
William Poray, Ilham Priyambo-
do, Joshua Reilly, Emily Ri-
chards, Sarah Riviello, Marissa
Ross, Daniel Sales, Dana
Schneider, Tyler Schweit, Jo-
nathan Sims, Alexandria Soller,
Kayla Stachokus, Julie Suchocki,
Rebecca Svab, Kelly Tlatenchi,
Steven Tlatenchi, Kaitlyn Tredin-
nick, Destiny Warnagiris, Tiffany
Young, Sarah Zbierski. Honors:
Eric Adamczyk, Paula Almenda-
rez, Molly Andress, Troy Bankus,
Amanda Benczkowski, Austin
Brzozowski, Susana Camarillo,
Erin Chmiola, Ingrid Da Costa,
Elizabeth Dohman, Jacob Farr,
Nora Fazzi, James Filippini Erin
Flanagan, Elijah Foster, Jaclyn
Froelick, Michael Galli, Marisa
Gribble, Arianne Grilli, Anait
Guzman, Sharif Hasan, Caroline
Hayduk, Kelsi Jenkins, Lisa
Joyce, Breanna Kemmerer,
Meghan Krumsky, John Lacomy,
Stephanie Lauer, Khang Le,
Emilee Lester, Anthony Malacari,
Jade Matusick, Miranda
McLaughlin, Paul Meehan, Tris-
tan Mercado, Kaitlyn Nagy,
Dominique Oko, Jessica Ozark,
Tamas Pifko, Kayla Sakowski,
Anthony Serpico, Alia Sod, Kim-
berly Sosa, Saray Sosa, Korey
Spak, Leyven Stallings, Nykia
Taylor, Tyler Ulrich, Anthony
Vaimaona, Abigail Viola, Lucia
Walkowiak, Kayleigh Wardle, Eric
Williams, Alexander Worosilla,
Alana Yakabouski, Stephanie
Yankoski, Robert Zimmerman.
Pittston Area Senior High
School
John Haas, principal, Pittston Area
Senior High School, recently
announced the third quarter
Honor Roll:
Grade 12: Honors with Distinc-
tion: William Ardoline, Tyler
Baran, Tyler Bauman, Shelby
Bentler, Amanda Boland, Jordon
Bone, Rachael Branas, Mariah
Buckley, Brandilen Burke, Kyle
Callahan, Cara Capozucca, Maria
Carone, James Castellino, Jenny
Chaump, Angelia Clark, Whitney
Cooper, Joseph V Coyne, Ash-
leigh Crispell, Mariah Curtis,
Tyler Daczka, Bryanna Darben-
zio, Michael DiMaggio, Michael
Domarasky, Ashley Drouse,
William Elko, Ralph Emmett,
Robert Falvo, Shannon Gilhooley,
Miranda Godlewski, Anthony
Guariglia, Jennifer Hreha, Sa-
mantha Hurtt, Jonathon Jugus,
Alexandria Kelly, Sara Kielbasa,
Samantha Kirn, Kathryn Kitcho,
Ashley Kocher, Annarose Kosie-
rowski, Brianna Kresge, Michael
Lenchak, Frederick Lokuta,
Brandon Lombardo, John Lom-
bardo, Kyle Magda, Ryan Maroni,
Heather Marsico, Danielle
McDade, Arturo Mejia, Robert
Meranti, Mitchell Miller, Christina
Musto, Peter Nallin, Jessie Nap-
kora, Taylor Pascoe, Jennifer
Peters, Niclole Pitts, John Poli,
Cory Poplawski, Vlincent Riggi,
Dominic Rinaldi, Amy Ruda,
Maria Sagliocco, Joshua Savaki-
nus, Rachel Scanlon, Erin
Schneider, Frank Shannon, Desti-
ny Simon, Alyssa Stella, Kaylene
Sutkowski, Michael Szumski,
Amanda Tracy, Megan Velehoski,
Justin Wall, Letitia Warunek,
James Whispell, Emily Zielinski,
Emily Zurek. First Honors:
Thomas Adel, James Alfano,
John Baiera, William Balasavage,
Carly Bellas, Antonella Castro,
Nicholas Collins, Charles Come-
ta, Alyssa Donato, Chelsey Fetter,
Jonathan Forkin, Brandon
Hampton, Caitlin Hunter, Lyndsie
Johndrow, Chelsea Jones, Katie
Joyce, Lindsey Karzenoski, Ryan
Kochanowski, Andrea Krevey,
Matthew LaPorte Taryn Leyshon,
David McLean, Kelsey Mundenar,
Erica Murdock, Ronald Musto,
Thomas Nissen, Danielle Oliveri,
Jacob Parrick, Anthony Passa-
rella, Aaron Pepe, John Pe-
terson, Kathleen Prest, Keri
Promovitz, Christine Rizzo, Tyler
Robinson, Alyssa Scatena, Josh-
ua Smith, Christina Varvaglione,
Kendra Yakobitis. Second Hon-
ors: Aylin Akbay, Elburus Can-
goz, Robert Cappelloni, Daniel
Cottrell, Alisa Decker, Raymond
DelPriore, Danielle Dorosky,
Carolyn Falcone, Michael Flan-
nelly, Kayley Gedrich, Marc
George, Dierdra Gruver, Thomas
Hawksley, Emil Ishley, Abigail
Jakuboski, Amy Jones, Chelsey
Karp, Kelsey Knowles, Barbara
LaSota, Rachel Loicono, Robert
Macario, Samantha Oliveri,
Christy Petro, Angelina Russo,
Rachel Smyden.
Grade 1 1: Honors with Distinction:
Thomas Allardyce, Anthony
Amitia, Shelby Aruscavage,
Jessica Baker, Joshua Blaker,
Kathleen Blazosek, Emily Bog-
dan, Tina Boyanowski, Nicolette
Bradshaw, Kaitlin Brady, Charles
Bressler, Ciera Callahan, Vincen-
zo Chimento, Pietro Colella,
Elizabeth Cox, Tyler Cummings,
Brittany Czerniakowski, Christine
D’Agostino, Brian Delaney, David
Dragon, Dominique Exter, Mi-
chelle Fernando, Nina Fischer,
Paul Gestl, Brian Gima, Jordan
Gruttadauria, Jennifer Hadley,
Rebecca Hetro, Michael Hizny,
Rachel Kashuba, Kelly Keener,
Alexander Korjeski, Sara Kosik,
Christopher Kovaleski, Kara
Kozar, Robert Kuzynski, James
LaMarca, Jamie Lee, Timothy
Lello, Kelly Lynn, Anthony Manci-
ni, Katherine McGinty, Ashley
Menichini, Kenneth Miller, Sa-
mantha Moluski, Amy Mozeleski,
Christopher Musto, Kristi Naylor,
Kimberlee O’Hop, Jessica Oliveri,
Grace O’Neil, Michael Panuski,
Anna Podrasky, Ariel Porzuczek,
Rachele Poveromo, Nicholas
Remsky, Anthony Schwab, Chris-
ten Sedlak, Jenna Sharr, Steven
Sklanka, Alison Slomba, Shelby
Smith, Michael Stankoski, Steven
Stravinski, Matthew Taylor, Tanya
Tiffany, Gabrielle Vaxmonsky,
David Whispell, Mallory Yozwiak.
First Honors: Jonathan Aston,
Miranda Bellas, Bianca Bolton,
Donald Booth, James Connors,
Devon Davis, Sarah DeMace,
Patrick Dougherty, Danielle
Fereck, Afton Fonzo, Joseph
Harth, Joshua Herron, Saman-
tha Horchos, Stephanie Jugus,
Patrick Kaczmarczyk, Susan
Kitcho, Edward Klein, Thomas
Matthews, Kendall Melochick,
Taylor Miller, Todd Mitchell,
Patrick Nallin, Benjamin Pace, Ali
Quinn, Elizabeth Raffa, Chris-
topher Santana, Jamie Scaranti-
no, Samantha Scialpi, Keith
Tonte, Marissa Vogue, Jessica
Welter, Edward Winn III, Bryan
Winters, Thomas Wolcott. Sec-
ond Honors: Samantha Bird,
Edward Byrd, Caitlynn Cad-
walder, Michelle Coyne, John
Cummings, Amanda Dockett,
Madeline Dworak, Bruce Ed-
wards, Christopher Gerrity,
Brittany Gilley, Angelo Guariglia,
Evan Hahn, Katlyn Jumper,
Cherie Klush, Alexandra Kochis,
Anthony Lizza, Caroline Manga-
niello, Bradley McKitish, Jaret
Monteforte, Marissa Nardone,
Ashley Sadberry, Kevin Tonte,
Christopher Wesolowski, Ashley
Young, Emily Zera.
Grade 10: Honors with Distinc-
tion: Frank Ardo, Kyle Berlinski,
Aaron Black, Nicholas Bolka,
Maria Capitano, Anthony Capo-
zucca, Matthew Carroll, Michael
Chisdock, Anthony Cotto, Jordan
Cumbo, Christian Curtis, Kevin
Dolman, Sarah Driscoll, Austin
Elko, Kristen Fereck, Carmella
Gagliardi, Cassandra Giarratano,
Lauren Golden, Michael Harding,
Jeremy Homschek, Mianna
Hopkins, John Kielbasa, Austin
Kostelansky, Kyle Kostelansky,
Joseph Koytek, Kaitlynn Kutchta,
Olivia Lanza, Jenna Leiva,
James Lizza, Catherine Lombar-
do, Jamie Lombardo, Kristen
Lombardo, Katrina Luztecki,
Christopher Lynch, Felix Mascelli,
Elizabeth Mikitish, Connor Mitch-
ell, Kelly Mitchell, Brian Mlod-
zienski, Nicholas Montini, James
Musto, Cassie Nocito, Calvin
O’Boyle, Karlee Patton, Mark
Prebish, Suraj Pursnani, Shelby
Rinaldi, Joshua Rugletic, Bryan
Russo, Marina Sell, Matthew
Shamnoski, Julia Shandra, Amy
Silinskie, Jillian Starinsky, Jo-
seph Starinksy, Stephen Starin-
sky, Amanda Stella, Brian Ston-
ikinis, Cory Tobin, Jonathan
Tonte, Ian Tracy, Ryan Tracy,
Shannon Turner, Miranda Wru-
nek, Kaitlynn Wolfram, Matthew
Yatison. First Honors: James
Ardoline, Nicole Baker, Alicia
Chopyak, Sara Czerniakowski,
Trina Davilla, Ronald D’Eliseo,
Ciara Edwards, Santo Giambra,
Ryan Hawksley, Justin Martinelli,
John Minich, Nicole Piccoletti,
Matthew Pierantoni, Kevin Psol-
ka, Joshua Reynolds, Dakota
Rowan, Gary Thomas, James
Tugend, Michael Twardowski.
Second Honors: Timothy Allen,
Alexandria Anastasia, Justin
Coe, Kaalyn Girman, Lisa Karp,
Haley Kline, Kristopher Littleton,
Kaitlyn McGuire, Ashley Muchler,
Angelina Reed, Kristen Santey,
Michael Sell, Alexandria Serafin,
Taylor Stull, Carissa Suhockey,
Marissa Vogel, Justin Wilk, Ariele
Williams, Hannah Zondlo.
Grade 9: Honors with Distinction:
Michael Antal,Rhiannon Av-
visato, Anthony Baldiga, Kevin
Boone, Ali Brady, Nicole Chaiko,
Joseph Champi, Enrico Connors,
Caitlin Conway, Robert Costello,
Christopher Cummings, Alexa
Danko, Lori DeFazio, Anthony
D’Eliseo Jr.,Dominique DelPriore,
Megn Doughtery, James Em-
mett, Brandon Ferrance, Marie
Terese Fox, Lea Garibaldi, Candi-
do Green, Mason Gross, Michael
Harth, Emily Herron, Katie Job-
son, Allison Kizer, Rachel Lazev-
nick, Steven Lee, Sierra Lieback,
Carmen LoBrutto, Rachel Longo,
Iene Magdon Cameron Marotto,
Jennifer Mataloni, Dana Maurizi,
Patrick McGinty, Breana Miller,
Kallie Miller, Mark Miscavage,
Jenna Mundenar, Leanne Para,
Justin Peterson, Michael Pies-
zala, Troy Platukus, Charles Poli,
Taylor Powers, Joshua Razvillas,
Taylor Roberts, Alyssa Rodzinak,
Sara Ruby, Michael Schwab,
Rachel Simansky, Kyle Sommer,
Tyler Spurlin, Bridget Starinsky,
Alyssa Talerico, Kayla Vogue,
Carly Walker, Trent Woodruff,
Tyler Woodruff, Meredith Yoz-
wiak. First Honors: Daniel Bra-
dy, Laura Brady, Casey Deaton,
Tyler Demich, Anthony Halat,
Kenneth Hoover, Brittany Hypo-
lite, Kyler Kovaleski, Adrian
Langan, Kaycee Langan, Tyler
Lutecki, Nicole Mayerski, Mat-
thew Miller, Brittni Morrell, Sa-
mantha Moska, Matthew Mott,
Tyler Mullen, Samanth Piazza,
Cody Powell, Jacqueline Raben-
der, Alleysha Reynolds, Evan
Rosengrant, Kaitlyn Simyan,
Kaitlyn Wallace, Richard Wein-
stock, David Wilczdwski, James
Wychock, Jean Luc Yur Chak,
Mariah Zimmerman, Haleigh
Zurek. Second Honors: Taylor
Balasavage, Christine Briggs,
Samantha Coleman, Daniel
Costantino, Robert Dudek,
Megan Farrell, Kayle Forkin,
Robert Haas, Aarika Hennington,
Maria Lussi, Patrick Lynch,
Jennifer Meck, Mark Modlesky,
John Nickol, Courtney Osiecki,
Cales Owens, Robert Ryzner, Ian
Satkowski, Eric Scatena, Emily
Schwartz, Kevin Wesolowski,
Marissa Williams, Andrew Yuhas.
HONOR
Continued fromPage 7B
Wyoming Valley West Student Council participated in Candy’s
Place Rainbow Walk on May 7 at Kirby Park. The students raised
$500 in donations; assisted with the set up and clean up; and
participated in the walk. They also earned the high school award
for their donation and participation. Some of the participants,
from left, first row, are Erica Naugle, Kee Mullings and Veronica
Zimmerman. Second row: Tom Griffith, Student Council adviser;
Billy Parsons; Jocelyn Sickler; Jimmy Kopec; and Karen Wills, Stu-
dent Council adviser.
WVW students walk for Candy’s Place
Six psychology students were inducted into the Wilkes University
chapter of Psi Chi International Honor Society at a recent ceremo-
ny held in conjunction with King’s College and Misericordia Uni-
versity. Inductees must be psychology majors or minors who have
completed 45 undergraduate credits and at least three psychology
courses at Wilkes with a psychology grade-point average of at least
3.4 or an overall grade-point average of 3.0. Inductees, from left,
first row: Linzey Astleford, Archbald; Brianna Edgar, Lehighton;
Maura Kelly, Hummelstown; and Kathryn Welsh, Mountain Top.
Second row: Robert Bohlander, professor of psychology, Wilkes;
Courtney Gans, Hazle Township; Jeromy Hrabovecky, Wilkes-Barre;
and Meridith Selden, assistant professor of psychology, Wilkes.
Wilkes psychology students join honor society
Luzerne Intermediate Unit 18 recently completed another suc-
cessful year of its NASA Endeavor Program. The final competition
was an in-house project to design and build a model of a lunar
habitat. Judges were Phil Pack and two NASA engineers. First-
through fourth-place finishers received trophies and a piece of a
meteorite. Winners were: Tunkhannock Area Middle School, first
place; Solomon/Plains Junior High School, second place; Hanover
Area Jr.-Sr. High School, third place; and Meyers Jr.-Sr. High School,
fourth place. Members of the winning Tunkhannock Area Middle
School team, from left, are Daniel Shurtleff, Skyler Roote, Aidin
Cronin, Emma Pizzolanti, Eric Stamer and Doug Thomas.
Winners named for LIU NASA program competition
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 PAGE 9B
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8th ANNUAL
NATIONAL TRAILS DAY
HIKE &BIKE
Greater Hazleton Area Civic Partnership’s Rails to Trails
Saturday, June 11
l
11 a.m. - 2 p.m.
At the Hazleton Rails to Trails, Routes 93 and 424, Hazleton
11:00 a.m. - Opening Ceremony
Tree Dedications with guest appearances
by local government representatives.
11:15 a.m. - Hike & Bike Begins
Noon - 2:00 p.m. - Free Picnic Style Lunch
Parking for Hikers & Bikers
Degenhart Health Center parking lot
1749 East Broad Street, Hazleton
Healthy Beginnings Parking lot
1701 East Broad Street, Hazleton
Events/Activities:
• Appearance by the Eckley Players
• Free Bike Maintenance and Tips
• Free Bike Helmets for Children (while supplies last)
• Live snakes, frogs & other critters by
Creation Station
• Free health screenings
• A Keystone Active Zone (KAZ)
Passport Trail
• Environmental Walk
• Information displays & entertainment
• Free Chair Massages
• And Much More!
Voluntary donations welcome to beneft the ongoing
maintenance and further development of the
Hazleton Rails to Trails.
For more information
call 570.455.1509
Co-sponsored by:
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for all ages!
• New EZ Digger Exercise Station
• Rock Climbing Wall (ages 16 and up only)
• Learn to Geocache and find the
hidden treasure.
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King’s College
King’s College recently announced
the spring Dean’s List.
A: Laurienne Abraham, Jennifer
Acuna, Jose Adames, Janelle
Adams, Andrew Agustini, Adrian
Albertini, Maxwell Allegro, Marie
Michele Allen, Matthew Alles,
Mario Amadeo, Megan Amey,
Megan Anascavage, Brittni
Andaloro, Kaitlyn Apolinaro,
Janeen Arancio, Kaitlyn Ann
Aritz, Nicholas Armenti, Lindsay
Atchison, Amanda Avery, Kath-
eryn Avila, Stephanie Avvento
and Jessie Ayers.
B: James Baczkowski, Jennifer
Bader, Priyanka Bahl, Ashley
Bahlatzis, Preston Balavage,
Ashley Balogach, Tara Banville,
William Baratta, Rolf Barcelon,
Shawna Barcheski, Laura Barna,
Kevin Barry, Adam Barry, Jean-
nette Bartlow, Rachael Barto,
Christina Bartolomei, Kristen
Baumes, Allison Baumgartner,
Jacqueline Bauza, Alysha Beck,
Christopher Becker, Jonathan
Beekman, Luke Beermann,
Meghan Bell, Shawnna Benedict,
Matthew Bennett, Marissa Berar-
docco, Mikhail Bespartochnyy,
Sarah Beyer, Emily Biffen, Britta-
ny Bigelow, Donald Bird, Thomas
Blachek, Michael Blessing, Ke-
ziah Block, Allyson Blonski,
Michael Bocan, Sarah Bolton,
Daniel Bonga, Aimee Bono,
Mikhail Boris, William Borysew-
icz, Amanda Bowden, Amanda
Bowers, Heather Bowman, Alys-
sa Bozzett, Adam Brasky, Lauren
Breen, Ashley Breznak, Dana
Briggs, Amanda Brodhead,
Stephanie Bronson, Brianne
Brosky, Richard Brower, Faith
Brown, Molly Brown, Megan
Buchala, Emily Buchman, Nicole
Buckman, Alexa Bullis, Stephanie
Burke, Kelly Burns, Loretta Bush-
ick and Elizabeth Butler.
C: Ruthly Cadestin, Joseph Caffrey,
Ryan Cain, Tyler Calkins, Marga-
ret Callan, Kelly Caloway, Sarah
Calvaresi, Matthew Campbell,
Kayla Canastra, Gabrielle Car-
bone, Jorge Carcamo, Amanda
Cardone, Adam Carey, Courtney
Carey, Paige Carlin, Timothy
Carroll, Amanda Casey, Michael
Cassic, David Centak, Justyna
Cerefin, Dominic Cesare, Ryan
Charnitski, Tanya Cheeseman,
Michael Chmielewski, Sara Ciar-
lo, Madeline Cielski, Adriane
Cimino, Rebecca Coleman, Ro-
man Collins, Maria Cometa,
Therese Conrad, Kevin Conroy,
Courtney Conway, Jennifer
Cook, Carissa Cook, James Cook,
Kaitlyn Coombs, Kasey Corbett,
Sarah Cordani, Gianna Cordasco,
Ryan Cordingly, Morgan Coslett,
Bryan Coslett, Alicia Cox, Jeffery
Cox, Jillian Crackett, Natalie
Crawley, Amanda Creveling,
Evan Crisman, Kayla Cross,
Alexandra Crowell, Kayleen
Cuddy, John Cuiffo, Lianne
Cuscani and Jamie Cybulski.
D: Molly Dahl, Dominic Daley, Mi-
chael Daly, Daniel Danoski, Cyn-
thia Darby, Diana Darby, Kathe-
rine Darby, Sarah Darte, Nicole
Dauria, Steven Davi, Robert
Davies, Robert Davis, William
Davis, Joshua Debellas, Tara
Decker, Catherine D’Elia, Alicia
Demarco, Elizabeth Demko,
Sierra Denight, Christina Dennis,
Maria Deno, Stephanie Deremer,
Michael Derry, Angela Desiderio,
Dexter Dethmers, Megan Devine,
Caitlin Dewey, David Dewitt,
Nicholas Diaco, Richard Dicasoli,
Daniel DiClementi, James Dillon,
Giancarlo Dilonardo, Anthony
Dimitrion, Anthony Disalvo,
Emily Dishong, Rachel Docktor,
Jacob Dohmen, Zachary Dolei-
den, Alicia Dombroski, Anna
Domday, Jamie Donahue, Ryan
Donovan, Joel Dorman, Anthony
Dormann, Morgan Douglas, Eric
Drevitch, Brittany Driscoll, Za-
chary Druhm, Bianca Dunbar,
Danielle Dunham, Thaddeus
Dziedzic and Jessica Dzugan.
E: Jenna Ebersole, Robert Eckert,
Hannah Eckles, Rachel Edelman,
Edwyn Edwards, Julie Edwards,
Justin Eimers, William Elliott,
Heather Elphick, Jillian Emerick,
Kaitlyn Escott, Nicholas Etzold,
Amanda Evans, Kristine Evans,
Lindsey Evans and Ryan Evans.
F: Kenneth Faldetta, Peter Fanning,
Connor Farnan, Ryan Farrell,
Ashley Fedorick, Candace Fegley,
Samantha Feisel, Robert Figlock,
Clare Finn, Matthew Fiorino,
Samantha Fisher, Kelly Flannery,
Dana Flasser, Carmen Flores,
William Floyd, Benjamin Fore-
man, Joseph Foreman, Jillian
Foster, Tyler Freas, Jamie Free-
man, Aimee Fritzges and Joseph
Furr.
G: Sean Gaffney, Roni Gallo, Alicia
Garavaglia, Louis Garcia, Kyle
Garon, Christopher Gatpo, Alli-
son Gatrone, Michael Gavlick,
Alyssa Gawlas, Stephanie Gaw-
las, Craig Geibert, Melinda Genti-
lesco, Brandi George, Joseph
George, Michael Gergel, Harry
Giacometti, Shane Gibbons,
Daniel Gilbert, Kevin Gilbertson,
Teresina Gildea, Kyle Gilligan,
Jonathan Gilmore, Kellyn Gim-
bel, Wendy Girmen, Ryan Glenn,
Amanda Goetz, Michaelene
Gongliewski, Michael Gonzalez,
Katherine Gonzalez, Devin
Gormley, Audra Gould, Allison
Gourniak, William Grabinski,
Leanne Grabski, Tyler Graham,
Chelsea Graziano, Robert Green-
halgh, Kelly Greenway, Eric
Grego, Catherine Grey, Kelsey
Griesback, Michael Griffith,
Timothy Griffith, John Grimes,
Megan Grohol, Deric Grohowski,
Robert Groom, Colleen Grosen-
ick, Alyssa Grove, Christine
Guarino, Carmella Gubbiotti,
Annemarie Guest, Christina
Gugliotti, Brent Guzik and Sarah
Guzinski.
H: Kamila Hacia, Christopher Hack-
er, Jordan Haddock, Brittany
Haight, Jennifer Halabura, Jill
Hall, Chelsea Hamershock, Jen-
nie Hampton, Karlee Hantz,
Hillary Hanwell, Richard Hardy,
Megan Harrold, Ronald Harvey,
Garrett Harvey, Devin Hassay,
Allison Hawk, Brittany Heaney,
James Heffers, Gareth Hen-
derson, Kyley Henry, Matthew
Henry, Jason Herman, Ashley
Hettel, Alicia Higgs, Alyssa Hill,
Rebecca Hilmer, Colleen Hoeg,
Michele Hoffman, Rachel Hoff-
nagle, Erin Holcomb, Caitlin
Holehan, Krystna Homanko,
Christopher Hooper, Daniel
Horn, Amanda Horton, Alyx-
andra Howard, Catherine
Hughes, Michel Hughes, Stepha-
nie Hughes, Exaud Hugho, John
Humble, Andrew Hunadi, Sara
Hunter and Carla Huntzinger.
I: Megan Inama.
J: Lindsey Jachim, Brianna Jacobs,
Tyler James, Christian Janus-
ziewicz, Tracy Jayne, Timothy
Jeter, Melissa Johnson, Natalie
Johnson, Shaliyah Jones, Katie
Jones, William Joyce and Kristen
Justice.
K: Nicole Kaetzel, Joshua Kamin-
ski, Cody Karalunas, Felicia
Kaufmann, Alison Kearns, Julie
Kearns, Carl Kellar, Kristopher
Kelly, Timothy Kelly, Christopher
Kempinski, Kaley Kennedy, Kyle
Kepfinger, Katherine Kern, Jessi-
ca Kerrigan, Emily Kesselring,
Kyle Kidd, Adriane Kinner, Cath-
ryn Kinsman, Joseph Kirchon,
Alexander Kish, Samantha Kish-
bach, Kelly Klaproth, Christopher
Kleva, Francesca Klinger, Briana
Klug, Allison Knerr, Amanda
Knowles, Kelci Koch, Matthew
Koncz, Corey Koons, Ryan Kopy-
cienski, Daniel Kosydar, Eric
Kotch, Matthew Kotch, Melissa
Kozerski, Jennifer Kozerski,
Matthew Krah, Konrad Kraszew-
ski, Jessica Kresge, Douglas
Krysan, Jessica Krzywicki, Mat-
thew Kujat and Vanessa Kundrik.
L: Vincent Laconti, Andrew La-
fratte, Amber Laird, Mary Kate
Lambert, Elyse Laneski, Megan
Lange, Kristy Langella, Alyssa
Larick, Ryan Lawrence, Devin
Leffler, Kristina Leiby, Leah
Leikheim, Brandon Leon-Gam-
betta, Amanda Leonhart, Bren-
ton Lewandowski, Christopher
Lewandowski, Kevin Lewis,
Lauren Lienert, Tiffany Lines,
Jessica Linskey, Kathryn Lisante,
Justine Lisella, Jenni Lisiewski,
Tina Lispi, Colleen Lizewski,
Jarryd Lokuta, Dawn Long,
Melissa Loomis, Kenneth Loo-
mis, Ryan Lord, Jillian Luckasav-
age, Eric Ludwig, Shannon Lush-
efski and Katlyn Lytle.
M: Stephen Macioch, Tina Mago-
wan, Ashley Makarczyk, Matthew
Malak, Christine Malecki, Karen
Maley, Abigail Malloy, Talia Ma-
mola, Chelsea Manes, Kaitlin
Mangan, Patricia Manning, Holly
Mannucci, Gregory Maresca,
Samela Mariano, Alisa Marino,
Christopher Marino, Amanda
Marra, Maryann Marselles, Chris-
topher Marshall, Janelle Mar-
shallick, Christine Martin, Alex-
ander Martino, Christina Marvin,
Paul Marzella, Kaitlin Mastrobat-
tista, Karmen Matusek, Abigail
Mayernik, Amber Mays, Alex-
andra Mazaleski, Shannon
Mccarthy, Vincent Mcclosky,
Mark Mccracken, Ashley Mccul-
loch, Erin Mcdonald, Colleen
Mcentee, Erin McGinley, Scott
Mcgonigal, Sean Mcgowan,
Shannon Mcgowan, Rob Mcgui-
ness, Charles Mcguinness, Mick-
ayla Mchale, Timothy Mcmanus,
Brandon Mcnulty, Kelly Mcphail,
Meagan Mcroberts, Paige McWil-
liams, Nicole Mead, Anthony
Melf, Kyle Melfe, Thomas Me-
luskey, Manuel Mendes, Ana
Mendez, Katlin Michaels, Daniel
Migatulski, Christopher Milewski,
Alyssa Miller, Andrew Miller,
Clyde Miller, Brett Mirigliani,
Amanda Misencik, Thomas
Mitchell, Nicole Mitkus, Kevin
Mockler, Elyssa Molino, Erica
Molino, Nicole Molino, Jennifer
Momenzadeh, Logan Monaco,
Joseph Monaghan, Lee Ann
Monaghan, Jenny Monge, Kathe-
rine Moore, Patrick Moran, Carly
Morcom, Daniel Mortensen,
Lindsay Mosser, Robert Moulton,
Kevin Moulton, Samantha Moyer,
Kimberly Mulligan, Megan Mun-
dy, Nicole Munley, Shelby Mun-
son, Jennifer Murnin, Kaitlin
Murphy, Brian Murray, Danielle
Murray, Brittany Muscatell and
Julie Musto.
N: David Nat, Margaret Nealer,
Drake Nester, Ashley Newton,
Minh Nguyen, Matthew Nice,
Kirstie Nicol, Mary Nied, Elyssa
Nieddu, Gregory Noga, Kaitlyn
Nonamaker and Teresa Nota-
ristefano.
O: Ian Oakley, Jacquelyn O’Brien,
Meghan O’Kane, Mara Olenick,
Jenna Oley, Amy Oliveri, Saman-
tha Olson, Jill O’Malley, Kristoph-
er Opiel, Samantha Orr and
Jennifer Orso.
P: David Pace, Elizabeth Paese,
Adam Pajka, Jessica Palermo,
Kathleen Paley, Brian Palladino,
Allison Pamlanye, Erica Pan-
dolfo, Ashley Panko, Andrew
Panzitta, Laura Panzitta, Jessica
Pardo, Michael Parshall, Joseph
Parsons, Kesha Patel, Giustina
Pavia, Scott Pavone, Larissa
Pekol, Carly Pengrin, Christis
Perillo, Erin Perry, Alex Peslak,
Stephen Peters, Katie Phelan,
Samantha Phelan, Joshua Phil-
lips, Kathryn Phillips, Lisa Pia-
nezza, Kristen Piazza, Diana
Pierce, Nicole Pierson, Melissa
Pirigyi, Justin Pisarcik, Harry
Pockevich, Jessica Porter, An-
thony Posimato, Sara Potteiger,
Christopher Prater, John Prater,
Anthony Price, Lauren Pristash,
Laura Provenzano, Justin Pshar,
Kristen Pstrak and Courtlynn
Pulcini.
Q: Ryan Querci and Jenera Qui-
nones.
R: Jessica Rafalko, Elizabeth Ra-
falko, Cerise Rapp, Nicole Rave,
Andrew Reichard, Michael Reilly,
Nicholas Reisig, Alecia Rella,
Brendan Rennwanz, Kellie Rhiel,
Denis Rice, John Rice, Jeremy
Rich, Kirk Riley, Robert Riley,
Bridget Rishcoff, Ashley Robbins,
Chandra Robbins, Jerry Robbins,
Yessica Robles, Corey Rocco-
grandi, Alyssa Rogers, Nicole
Rogers, Joel Rojas, Heather
Rosato, Shannon Rowan, Kyle
Rowan, Thomas Rozelle, Cory
Ruda, David Rugge, Sean Rulon,
Candice Russ, Michael Ruth and
Kayla Rutkoski.
S: Gabrielle Sabo, Lyndsey Sabol,
Sarah Sabulski, Tamara Sager,
Erika Samuels, John Sanchez,
Karina Sanchez, Timothy Sand-
erson, Robert Santopietro, Sal-
vador Sapienza, Suzan Sari,
Charles Savage, Jessica Savino,
Anthony Scaccia, Stephanie
Scalfer, Joseph Scarcella, Ashley
Scarpetta, Danielle Scartelli, Teri
Lynn Scatena, Marc Schaffer,
Jenna Schappell, Madeline
Schiminger, Michelle Schmid,
Brianne Schmidt, Alicia Schroed-
er, Kristine Schutz, Sarah Scinto,
Anthony Scro, Anna Scutt, Eric
Seacrist, Kelsie Seese, Jessica
Sekelski, Michael Selby, Tyler
Serbin, Patrick Seslar, Evan
Seward, Anne Shaffer, Keli Sha-
nahan, Hannah Sharp, Chris-
topher Sharry, Samantha Shel-
ton, Alexandra Shinert, Benjamin
Shively, Lauren Shovlin, Jacque-
line Sikora, Isabel Silva, Saman-
tha Simcox, James Simmons,
Amber Simone, Daniel Simpson,
Michael Sipsky, Emily Sisk, Theo-
dore Siskovich, Samantha Skel-
lington, Christopher Skevofilax,
Brittany Slattery, Adam Sleboda,
Carissa Smith, Charles Smith,
Lauren Smith, Monica Smith,
Taylor Smith, Emily Snyder,
Brittany Sohle, Kayla Solomon,
Katie Sopp, Amy Sperling, Holly
Spikol, Laura Sposato, James
Sprague, Marco Stallone, Michael
Stampone, Ashtyn Stang, Clinton
Staniorski, Andrew Stclair, Britta-
ny Steele, Cassandra Stento,
Ashley Stephens, Meghan Ster-
nat, Ian Stewart, Teyah Stiely,
Joshua Stocker, Kirsten Strauss,
Victoria Stuccio, Lauren Su-
checki, Kati Sudnick, Brian Sura,
Lauren Susek, Ashlee Swanson,
Brandon Sweeney, Maura Swee-
ney, Mary Swensen, Patricia
Swope and Lindsay Szalkowski.
T: Jillian Tallarico, Thomas Taras-
zewski, Kristina Tarnef, Daniel
Taroli, Rebecca Taylor, Kevin
Taylor, Danielle Terracciano,
Rebecca Terry, Ashley Thomas,
Ashlie Thomas, Gabrielle Tho-
mas, Caitlin Thompson, Chris-
topher Thompson, Jeffrey Tim-
lin, Chelsea Tiso, Christopher
Tobias, Michael Toma, Kevin
Tomaszewski, Jane Tomkinson,
Abigail Torres, Nathaniel Towns-
and, Cathleen Traino, Jacqueline
Treboschi, Albert Trinisewski,
Margaret Troxell, Andrew Tumi-
nello, Cassandra Turczyn, Briana
Turnbaugh and Corey Turner.
U: Christopher Uhl, Amanda Urban
and Sarah Urban.
V: Justin Vacula, Kristen Van Au-
ken, Ross Vanlaarhoven, Ashley
Varga, Amanda Vasiliou, Daniel
Vaskalis, Stephanie Venarchick,
Cara Verazin, Renee Voith,
Courtney Vojtko, and Chelsea
Voorhees.
W: Angela Wagner, Christina Waicu-
lonis, Alisha Wainwright, Olivia
Walakovits, Amanda Waligun,
Colin Walsh, Felicia Walsh, Lind-
say Warburton, Kara Washing-
ton, Teresa Wasiluk, Kimberly
Wasmanski, Matthew Wayne,
Daniel Webb, Samantha Weidner,
Erica Weihbrecht, Ryan Weiner,
Rebecca Weinschenk, Christian
Weiser, Matthew Weitz, Carissa
Welles, Lauren Wenner, Meghan
Wernimont, James Westlake,
Kirsten Wetzel, Ryan Wetzelberg-
er, Jason Wheeler, Brandon
White, Corey White, Brooke
Whiteko, Tiffany Wiencek, Nicho-
las Wilder, Gregory Williams,
David Wilson, Christopher Wil-
son, Meredith Wolfe, Matthew
Wolfmayer, Gregory Wolovich,
Sebastian Woolbert, Devon
Woolfolk, Kyle Woolfolk, Jamie
Woolfolk and Kevin Wrenn.
Y: Amanda Yakobitis, Megan Ya-
koski, Robert Yanik, Jordan
Yatsko, Sarah Yedlock, Sabrina
Yelverton, Sarah Yocius, Ashley
Young, Douglas Young and
Victoria Yozwiak.
Z: Erica Zack, Cassandra Zapo-
tocky, Felicia Zawatski, Tabitha
Zawatski, Edward Zema, Michael
Zema, Zachary Zerbe, Sean
Ziller, Angelo Zingaretti, Rachel
Zinni, Michael Zurek and Mark
Zurek.
DEAN’S LIST
C M Y K
PAGE 10B SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Seventeen adult learners at Misericordia University were recently inducted into the Alpha Sigma
Lambda National Honor Society during a brunch and induction ceremony. The honor society for con-
tinuing education students recognizes the special achievements of adults who accomplish academic
excellence while facing competing interests of home and work. Alpha Sigma Lambda inductees and
university alumni also attended the annual event. New inductees are: Andrew J. Bohensky, Dushore;
Sharon Marie Clark, Sweet Valley; Mauri Ann Conforti, Dunmore; Sharon Conway, Plains Township;
Amanda Deisroth, Hazleton; Kristina English, Laceyville; William Evans, Shavertown; Bruce Fahey,
Exeter; Elwood Groner III, Dallas; Lois R. Gross, Trucksville; Laura Herbener, Freeland; Mark Allen
Jones, Wilkes-Barre; Sandra Kozloski, Dallas; Carol Martonick, Drums; Melissa McCracken, Wilkes-Barre;
Melanie Ann Mortimer, Bear Creek Township; and Karen Marie Olszyk, Mountain Top. Some of the
inductees and alumni in attendance, from left, first row: Maria Kerrigan, Old Forge; Marie Poplawski,
Dupont; Joan Bonczek, Clarks Summit; English; Conway; Gross; Kozloski; and Barbara Leggat, Harveys
Lake. Second row: CarrieAnn Tykosh, Drums; Oradell Banker, Mehoopany; Susan Eckroth, Hunlock
Creek; Marlene Kluger, Glen Lyon; Madelyn Roote, Trucksville; Clark; Martin Stronko, Hazleton; Groner;
Fahey; Bohensky; Olszyk; Cynthia Brin, Dallas; and Francis Semanski, Hunlock Creek.
Continuing education students join honor society at Misericordia
Nine students from Holy Redeemer High School earned awards during the National French Contest
and were honored during an awards ceremony and dinner at King’s College. The contest, which in-
cluded oral and written examinations of French linguistics and syntax, was sponsored by the NEPA
Chapter of the American Association of Teachers of French. Award winners, from left: Rachel Simon,
Hughestown, second place, French I; Karley Stasko, Warrior Run, second place, French IV; Patrick Loft-
us, Mountain Top, first place, French II; Louis Jablowski, Wilkes-Barre Township, second place, French II;
Elsbeth Turcan, Exeter, second place, French III. Second row: Barbara Alfano, French faculty member;
Matt Collins, Dallas, honorable mention, French II; Alia Gestl, Pittston, honorable mention, French II;
Sarah Williams, Mountain Top, third place, French II; Kelly Grebeck, Swoyersville, honorable mention,
French III.
Holy Redeemer students earn honors in National French Contest
Wyoming Seminary Upper School students recently were honored for their achievements in Spanish
based on their scores in the 2011 National Spanish Examination. Sponsored by the American Associ-
ation of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese, the test is administered to more than 89,000 students
across the nation. Students take an on-line test and compete in 14 categories for certificates and gold,
silver and bronze awards. Some of the honored students, from left, first row: Kelsey Dolhon, Kingston;
Jessica Kim, Beijing, China; Jamie Goldstein, Mountain Top; and Nada Bader, Mountain Top. Second
row: Jamie Williams, Wilkes-Barre; Lauren Fernandez, Dallas; Ben Hornung, Forty Fort; Katherine
Schraeder, Luzerne; Mary Thede, Dallas; and Sun Ho Lee, Seoul, South Korea. Third row: Hannah Ga-
briel, Forty Fort; Joshua McLucas, Chambersburg; Adithya Pugazhendhi, Mountain Top; Zachary Wise,
Shavertown; and Sarah Knaggs, Mercersburg. Also honored was William Thede, Dallas.
Seminary Upper School students earn honors for Spanish scores
The first-grade classes of Wyoming Valley West Schuyler Avenue Elementary School, Kingston, re-
cently entertained their families as part of an end-of-the-school year event. The children, under the
direction of their teachers Lenora Minetola and Sara Napkori, performed the musical play entitled
Wackadoo Zoo. Refreshments were served after the performance. Some of the participants, from left,
first row, are Dalton Krochmaluk, Madison Vitale, Jacob Stitzer, Shayla Harmon, and Jonathan Lantz.
Second row: Hailey Oelke, Julia Price, Madison Savage, Angeline Arroyo, Irvenise Miliano, Treyvon
Garrity, Jonathan Scarpelli, Sabrina Thompson, McKenzie Dourand, Komal Mathon, Lee Ann McDer-
mott, and Gabriel Brunn. Third row: Jacob Wolfe, Aiden Sgaggero, Mary Sanchez, Sebastian Favata,
David Booth, Destanie Lehman, Samantha Buffer, Brennan Keefer, Jude Nichol, Stepan Prodanets,
Skylee Young, Zanya Hickson and Ryan Sullivan. Fourth row: Minetola, Kayla Sincavage, Jeremy Long,
Connor Kavanagh, Robert Gryskavicz, Abby Goleach, Patrick Ruda, Tiarra Rivas, Liam Frace, Connor
Kazokas, Gabrielle Zim, Sydney Evans, and Napkori. Jayden Schwartz also participated.
Schuyler Avenue first-graders get musical with Wackadoo Zoo
C M Y K
SPORTS S E C T I O N C
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011
timesleader.com
T
he principal owner and presi-
dent of Wilkes-Barre’s newest
sports franchise knows he’s
taking a risk by introducing the area
to indoor lacrosse.
“We’re prepared to take a loss,”
Jim Jennings said, “if we need to.”
But Jennings is more accustomed
to winning.
The 49-year-old Easton resident
has experienced success owning
minor league basketball teams in the
CBA and USBL – including one he
inaugurated in the Lehigh Valley
called the Pennsylvania ValleyDawgs.
He served as the commissioner of
the National Lacrosse League from
2000 to 2009, and it blossomed from
a six-team regional venture into a
20-team national circuit.
Now he believes he can turn a
sport of wonder into a hit when his
team debuts at Mohegan Sun Arena
next year in the newly formed North
American Lacrosse League.
“This was just something you just
have to go out and do,” Jennings
said. “We’re not going to know if
we’re successful until opening
night.”
But he believes Northeastern
Pennsylvania has everything to gain
by giving this wild and wacky game
a chance.
“It’s more exciting than basketball,
for sure,” Jennings boasted. “And it’s
easier to understand than hockey.
Those two things are going to play
in our favor. And it’s high-scoring.”
Score one for optimism.
New game in town
The new, yet-to-be-named lacrosse
team will need it in cash-strapped
Northeastern Pennsylvania, where
the highest minor league baseball
and hockey franchises find it chal-
lenging to lure fans willing to spend
an extra buck.
And where an indoor football team
called the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton
Pioneers played in two af2 league
championship games and still wound
up losing money before the entire
league folded.
“We don’t think we’re going to
come in here and average 10,000
(fans) right off the bat,” Jennings
said. “Up here, what we need to do
is average 1,500 to 2,000 a game to
make money.”
Could this sport really make it in
an area that not only hasn’t em-
braced lacrosse, but hasn’t even
thought about it?
“We don’t know much about la-
crosse,” Wilkes-Barre Township may-
or Carl Kuren admitted. “But years
ago, we didn’t know much about
hockey. And we all know how that
turned out.”
The turnout is still respectable for
that Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins
– the AHL affiliate of the Pittsburgh
Penguins - after more than a decade
in the area.
The Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yan-
kees – the Triple-A affiliate of the
New York Yankees – still attract
near-capacity crowds a few times a
year despite steadily sagging overall
attendance figures.
Fans of those sports figure they
can at least watch players on their
way to the big time.
Who has time to watch a sport
relatively unknown in its new home?
“Once people see this game and
the action and the excitement,
they’re going to keep coming back,”
predicted Chip Santee, a minority
owner in Northeastern Pennsylva-
nia’s franchise. “I think you’re going
to like what you see.”
The challenge will be getting peo-
ple to notice it. Because when it
comes to this area’s fans in the
stands, seeing is believing.
PAUL SOKOLOSKI
O P I N I O N
Owner believes
lacrosse will be
a big hit in area
Paul Sokoloski is a Times Leader sports
columnist. You may reach him at 970-7109 or
email him at psokoloski@timesleader.com.
VANCOUVER, British Colum-
bia —Everybody knewAlex Bur-
rows was fast. Just not this fast.
With the second-speediest
overtime goal in NHLplayoff and
finals history, Vancouver’s biting-
ly talented forward moved the
Canucks halfway to their first
Stanley Cup title.
Burrows circled the net and
scoreda stunninggoal 11seconds
into overtime, and Vancouver
took a 2-0 lead in the Stanley Cup
finals with a 3-2
victory over the
Boston Bruins
on Saturday
night.
Right after
the opening
faceoff of over-
time, Burrows
received a pass
from Daniel Se-
din and streaked
down the
boards, eluding
Boston captain
Zdeno Chara be-
hind the net be-
fore extending
his stick for a
wraparound
goal, beating out-of-position goa-
lie Tim Thomas for his second
score of the game.
Game 3 is Monday in Boston.
Only four teams have rallied
from an 0-2 series deficit to win
the Stanley Cup finals in 46 tries,
although Sidney Crosby’s Pitts-
burgh Penguins did it against De-
troit in 2009.
Burrows’ goal nearly was the
fastest OT goal in finals history,
taking just a bit longer thanBrian
Skrudland’s goal for Montreal 9
seconds into Game 2 against Cal-
gary on May 18, 1986.
Sedin tied it with 10:23 left in
the third period, and Roberto Lu-
ongo made 28 saves for the Ca-
nucks. But the night belonged to
Burrows, who avoided suspen-
sion for this game after being ac-
cused of biting Boston’s Patrice
Bergeron in Game 1. He also up
Sedin’s tying goal with a sharp
pass from the slot.
Thomas stopped 30 shots for
the Bruins, but his trademark ag-
gressiveness put himtoofar away
fromhis net duringthe brief over-
time. Burrows used his speed to
elude the 6-foot-9 Chara before
slipping the puck into Thomas’
unguarded net.
Mark Recchi put the Bruins
aheadinthe secondperiodwitha
S TA N L E Y C U P F I N A L S
Canucks
win just
seconds
into OT
Player accused of biting foe
scores two goals, including
game-winning wraparound.
See CANUCKS, Page 5C
3
CANUCKS
2
BRUINS
By GREG BEACHAM
AP Sports Writer
beating defending
champion Francesca
Schiavone of Italy 6-4,
7-6 (0) at Roland Gar-
ros on Saturday. The
sixth-seeded Li used
powerful ground-
strokes to compile a 31-12 edge in win-
ners, and won the last nine points of
the match, a run that began when
the fifth-seeded Schiavone was
flustered by a line call she was
sure was wrong.
“China tennis — we’re get-
ting bigger and bigger,” said Li,
who is projected to rise to a ca-
reer-best No. 4 in Monday’s
new WTA rankings.
PARIS — As China’s Li Na tossed the ball
while serving at match point in the French
Open final, a cry from a fan in the stands
pierced the silence at Court Philippe Chatrier.
Distracted, Li stopped and let the ball drop.
The words of support were in Mandarin: “Jia
you!” —whichloosely translates to “Let’s go!”
After so many years of “Come on” and “Allez”
and “Vamos,” there’s a new language on the
tennis landscape.
Li became the first Chinese player, man or
woman, to win a Grand Slam singles title by
F R E N C H O P E N
Li wins a Slam for China
Li Na reacts as
she plays Italy’s
Francesca Schia-
vone during their
women’s final
match for the
French Open
Saturday .
See OPEN, Page 5C
Li Na becomes communist nation’s first
tennis player – man or woman – to win
one of the four major tournaments.
By HOWARD FENDRICH
AP Tennis Writer
HANOVER TWP. – Matt Kachurak
walked up to the tee on the 15th hole,
took out his 5-iron, and lofted a shot 189
yards within one foot of the pin.
No big deal.
Earlier hehadhit aball towithininches
of the same pin.
“It always makes it a lot easier,” said
Kachurak about his two shots on 15.
Kachurak and his dad, Dave, teamed
up to defeat the defending champions of
the Wyoming Valley Country Club Clas-
sic and number-two seeded John Olszew-
ski and Eric Williams 3 and 2 in a better-
ball quarterfinal to advance to the semi-
finals today.
The Kachuraks along withthe teams of
Rick Berry and Tom Wasilewski, Joe
Weiscarger and John Gershey and Scott
Barth and Lou Belgio make up the final
four teams left inthe championshipflight
of the Wyoming Valley Country Club
Classic.
The team of Williams and Olszewski
were 1-up after a birdie on the second
hole, but the Kachuraks took advantage
of their opponents’ bogey on the seventh
hole to even the match up.
“We just tried to stay calm,” said Matt
Kachurak. “Great opponents we had,
they are both great players, we just want-
ed to chip away.”
On the eighth, the Kachuraks started
chipping and took a 1-up lead when Dave
Kachurak birdied the hole.
From there, they never looked back.
They built on their lead, going 2-up on
the defending champions when Matt
Kachurak birdied the par-5 12th hole.
Matt stepped up on the 15th hole and
put his shot withina foot of the pinto eas-
ily record a birdie and win the hole giving
the Kachuraks a 3-up lead with three
holes remaining.
Olszewski and Williams would have
had to win every hole to force a playoff,
but both teams shot par on the16th, halv-
ing the hole to give the Kachuraks a 3 and
2 victory.
A R E A G O L F
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Tom Wasilewski of Kingston (right) is congratulated with a hug by playing partner Rick Berry of Forty Fort after Wasilewski
sank a birdie putt on the 18th hole to give his team a victory over Ted Komoroski and Brandon Matthews on Saturday.
Semifinals set at WVCC Classic
Kachurak father and son team beats
defending champions John Olszewski
and Eric Williams in the quarterfinals.
By MATT PAGE
For the Times Leader
See CLASSIC, Page 5C
INSIDE: To see more photos from the tourna-
ment, turn to Page 4C.
MOOSIC -- One game after hav-
ing his personal four-game win-
ning streak snapped, Duane Below
reached back and found his old
form.
The Scranton/Wilkes-Barre
Yankees were powerless to stop
him.
Below struck out eight over six
dominant innings Saturday and re-
habbing Detroit Tigers slugger
Magglio Ordonez ripped three hits
as the ToledoMudHens rippedthe
Yankees, 7-3 at PNC Field.
That’s where Below was at his
best.
HestymiedtheYankees for most
of the night, save for Scranton/
Wilkes-Barre’s two-run fourth in-
ning that evened the score. But Be-
lowresponded by retiring seven of
his final eight hitters - includinghis
final three strikeouts.
After he left, Yankees prospect
Brandon Laird belted his third
homer of the season for the game’s
final run in the ninth inning.
The Mud Hens struck first
I L B A S E B A L L
Toledo pitcher Below near top of his game in victory
7
MUD HENS
3
YANKEES
Rehabbing Detroit Tigers slugger
Magglio Ordonez had three hits,
an RBI and a run scored.
By PAUL SOKOLOSKI
psokoloski@timesleader.com
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Yankees shortstop Ramiro Pena fields a ground ball in the second
inning hit by Toledo’s Cale Iorg. See SWB, Page 5C
K
PAGE 2C SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S C O R E B O A R D
POLITICAL REPORT
Odds to win the Republican nomination in 2012
Mitt Romney 5/2
Tim Pawlenty 7/2
Sarah Palin 6/1
Jon Huntsman 8/1
Michele Bachmann 10/1
John Boehner 15/1
Newt Gingrich 15/1
Jon Thune 15/1
Rudy Giuliani 20/1
Rick Perry 20/1
Michael Bloomberg 20/1
Bobby Jindal 25/1
Ron Paul 25/1
Jeb Bush 25/1
Chris Christie 25/1
Paul Ryan 40/1
Rick Santorum 50/1
BASEBALL
Favorite Odds Underdog
American League
Rangers -$135 INDIANS
ORIOLES -$125 Blue Jays
RED SOX -$130 A’s
ROYALS -$155 Twins
WHITE SOX -$150 Tigers
Yankees -$125 ANGELS
MARINERS -$128 Rays
National League
REDS -$125 Dodgers
MARLINS -$145 Brewers
Phillies -$200 PIRATES
CARDS -$162 Cubs
GIANTS -$135 Rockies
D’BACKS -$175 Nationals
PADRES -$145 Astros
Braves -$135 METS
NBA Finals
Favorite Points Underdog
MAVERICKS 2.5 Heat
AME RI C A’ S L I NE
By ROXY ROXBOROUGH
L O C A L
C A L E N D A R
Today
SENIOR LEGION BASEBALL
(5:45 p.m. unless noted)
Old Forge at Greater Pittston
Hazleton at Wilkes-Barre
Nanticoke at Northwest
Plains at Swoyersville
Mountain Top at Back Mountain
Monday
SENIOR LEGION BASEBALL
(5:45 p.m. unless noted)
Northwest at Wilkes-Barre
Greater Pittston at Plains
Old Forge at Hazleton
Back Mountain at Swoyersville
Nanticoke at Tunkhannock
Tuesday
SENIOR LEGION BASEBALL
(5:45 p.m. unless noted)
Mountain Top at Swoyersville
Wednesday
SENIOR LEGION BASEBALL
(5:45 p.m. unless noted)
Back Mountain at Greater Pittston
Tunkhannock at Wilkes-Barre
Old Forge at Northwest
Nanticoke at Mountain Top
Friday
SENIOR LEGION BASEBALL
(5:45 p.m. unless noted)
Swoyersville at Nanticoke
Plains at Northwest
Hazleton at Back Mountain
Saturday
SENIOR LEGION BASEBALL
(5:45 p.m. unless noted)
Greater Pittston at Hazleton, 2 p.m.
Tunkhannock at Old Forge, 2 p.m.
Wilkes-Barre at Mountain Top, 2 p.m.
W H A T ’ S O N T V
Sunday, June 5
AUTO RACING
12:30 p.m.
FOX — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, STP 400, at Kansas
City, Kan.
4:30 p.m.
ESPN2 — NHRA, Supernationals, at Englishtown,
N.J. (same-day tape)
COLLEGE SOFTBALL
1 p.m.
ESPN—World Series, game11, teams TBD, at Ok-
lahoma City
3:30 p.m.
ESPN—World Series, game12, teams TBD, at Ok-
lahoma City
7 p.m.
ESPN2 — World Series, game 13, teams TBD, at
Oklahoma City (if necessary)
9:30 p.m.
ESPN2 — World Series, game 14, teams TBD, at
Oklahoma City (if necessary)
CYCLING
7 p.m.
VERSUS — Criterium du Dauphine Libere, pro-
logue, at Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne, France (same-
day tape)
8 p.m.
VERSUS — Philadelphia International Champion-
ship (same-day tape)
GOLF
9 a.m.
TGC — European PGA Tour, Wales Open, final
round, at Newport, Wales
Noon
TGC—PGA Tour, the Memorial Tournament, final
round, at Dublin, Ohio
2 p.m.
TGC — Nationwide Tour, Prince George’s County
Open, final round, at College Park, Md.
2:30 p.m.
CBS — PGA Tour, the Memorial Tournament, final
round, at Dublin, Ohio
4:30 p.m.
TGC—ShopRiteLPGAClassic, final round, at Gal-
loway, N.J.
7:30 p.m.
TGC—Champions Tour, Principal Charity Classic,
final round, at Des Moines, Iowa (same-day tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1:35 p.m.
ROOT – Philadelphia at Pittsburgh
2 p.m.
TBS — Chicago Cubs at St. Louis
WGN — Detroit at Chicago White Sox
3:35 p.m.
YES – New York Yankees at Los Angeles Angels
8 p.m.
ESPN — Atlanta at N.Y. Mets
MOTORSPORTS
8 a.m.
SPEED — MotoGP World Championship, Catalu-
nyan Grand Prix, at Barcelona, Spain
6 p.m.
SPEED—MotoGP Moto2, Catalunyan Grand Prix,
at Barcelona, Spain (same-day tape)
12 Mid.
SPEED — AMA Pro Racing, at Elkhart Lake, Wis.
(same-day tape)
NBA BASKETBALL
8 p.m.
ABC — Playoffs, finals, game 3, Miami at Dallas
RUGBY
2 p.m.
VERSUS — Sevens Collegiate Championship,
semifinals, teams TBD, at Philadelphia
4 p.m.
NBC — Sevens Collegiate Championship, bronze
medal and championship matches, teams TBD, at
Philadelphia
SOCCER
2 p.m.
ESPN2 — Women’s national teams, exhibition,
U.S. vs. Mexico, at Harrison, N.J.
TENNIS
9 a.m.
NBC — French Open, men’s championship match,
at Paris (live and same-day tape)
T R A N S A C T I O N S
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Activated 1B Derrek Lee
from the 15-day DL. Optioned LHP Pedro Viola to
Bowie (EL).
LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Activated INF Howie
Kendrick from the 15-day DL.
National League
LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Placed RHP Jon
Garland and SS Rafael Furcal on the 15-day DL.
Called up RHP John Ely and INF Ivan De Jesus
from Albuquerque (PCL).
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES—Recalled OF John
Mayberry Jr. fromLehigh Valley (IL). Placed1B-OF
Ross Gload on the paternity leave list.
Atlantic League
LONGISLAND DUCKS—Signed LHP Shane You-
man.
Midwest League
QUAD CITIES RIVER BANDITS—Announced INF
Greg Garcia was promoted Palm Beach (FSL) and
INF Joseph Bergman was transferred to the team
from extended spring training.
North American League
SANANGELOCOLTS—SignedINFAustinLaspril-
la and INF Davis Page.
FOOTBALL
Canadian Football League
EDMONTON ESKIMOS—Released DB Elliott Ri-
chardson and K Chris Bodnar.
WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS—Released FB Jon
Oosterhuis, Signed WR Kito Poblah.
Arena Football League
SAN JOSE SABERCATS—Signed DL Ikenna Ike.
Activated WR James Roe off team suspension.
I L S T A N D I N G S
At A Glance
All Times EDT
North Division
W L Pct. GB
Lehigh Valley (Phillies) ........... 34 20 .630 —
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre
(Yankees) ................................. 29 23 .558 4
Pawtucket (Red Sox) .............. 29 25 .537 5
Buffalo (Mets)........................... 26 30 .464 9
Syracuse (Nationals)............... 22 30 .423 11
Rochester (Twins) ................... 21 31 .404 12
South Division
W L Pct. GB
Durham (Rays) ....................... 30 24 .556 —
Gwinnett (Braves) .................. 26 28 .481 4
Charlotte (White Sox)............ 24 29 .453 5
1
⁄2
Norfolk (Orioles)..................... 19 36 .345 11
1
⁄2
West Division
W L Pct. GB
Columbus (Indians)................ 36 19 .655 —
Louisville (Reds) .................... 32 23 .582 4
Indianapolis (Pirates) ............. 26 30 .464 10
1
⁄2
Toledo (Tigers)....................... 25 31 .446 11
1
⁄2
Friday's Games
Pawtucket 6, Durham 3
Norfolk 7, Rochester 2
Buffalo 3, Gwinnett 2
Louisville 10, Columbus 4
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre 4, Toledo 3
Lehigh Valley 5, Charlotte 1
Indianapolis 3, Syracuse 1
Saturday's Games
Columbus at Louisville, (n)
Pawtucket at Durham, (n)
Norfolk at Rochester, (n)
Toledo at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, (n)
Buffalo at Gwinnett, (n)
Syracuse at Indianapolis, (n)
Lehigh Valley at Charlotte, (n)
Sunday's Games
Toledo at Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, 1:05 p.m.
Norfolk at Rochester, 1:05 p.m.
Buffalo at Gwinnett, 2:05 p.m.
Syracuse at Indianapolis, 2:05 p.m.
Lehigh Valley at Charlotte, 2:15 p.m.
Louisville at Columbus, 5:05 p.m.
Pawtucket at Durham, 5:05 p.m.
E L S T A N D I N G S
At A Glance
All Times EDT
Eastern Division
W L Pct. GB
New Hampshire (Blue Jays) . 35 19 .648 —
Trenton (Yankees) ................. 33 21 .611 2
New Britain (Twins) ............... 30 23 .566 4
1
⁄2
Reading (Phillies)................... 29 24 .547 5
1
⁄2
Binghamton (Mets) ................ 17 35 .327 17
Portland (Red Sox) ................ 17 36 .321 17
1
⁄2
Western Division
W L Pct. GB
Harrisburg (Nationals)............. 30 22 .577 —
Altoona (Pirates) ...................... 28 26 .519 3
Erie (Tigers) ............................. 26 27 .491 4
1
⁄2
Akron (Indians)......................... 26 30 .464 6
Bowie (Orioles) ........................ 26 30 .464 6
Richmond (Giants) .................. 25 29 .463 6
Friday's Games
Portland 7, Altoona 2
Binghamton 6, Akron 2
New Britain 5, Bowie 0
Erie 6, Harrisburg 5, 10 innings
Reading 5, Richmond 0
Trenton 7, New Hampshire 6
Saturday's Games
New Britain at Bowie, (n)
Portland at Altoona, (n)
Binghamton at Akron, (n)
Harrisburg at Erie, (n).
Reading at Richmond, (n)
New Hampshire at Trenton, (n)
Sunday's Games
New Hampshire at Trenton, 1:05 p.m.
Binghamton at Akron, 1:05 p.m.
Harrisburg at Erie, 1:05 p.m.
Reading at Richmond, 2:05 p.m.
New Britain at Bowie, 2:05 p.m.
Portland at Altoona, 6 p.m.
N A S C A R
Sprint Cup-STP 400 Lineup
After Saturday qualifying; race Sunday
At Kansas Speedway
Kansas City, Kan.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (22) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 174.752.
2. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 174.154.
3. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 174.081.
4. (83) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 173.991.
5. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 173.851.
6. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 173.706.
7. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 173.65.
8. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 173.611.
9. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 173.589.
10. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 173.494.
11. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 173.422.
12. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 173.388.
13. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 173.36.
14. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 173.249.
15. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 173.193.
16. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 173.099.
17. (4) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 173.033.
18. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 172.905.
19. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 172.855.
20. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 172.772.
21. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 172.756.
22. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 172.75.
23. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota, 172.723.
24. (51) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 172.717.
25. (2) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 172.507.
26. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford, 172.232.
27. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 172.035.
28. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 171.881.
29. (30) David Stremme, Chevrolet, 171.876.
30. (38) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 171.723.
31. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 171.576.
32. (46) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 171.516.
33. (13) Casey Mears, Toyota, 171.499.
34. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 171.445.
35. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 171.249.
36. (81) Scott Riggs, Chevrolet, 170.983.
37. (66) Michael McDowell, Toyota, 170.8.
38. (34) David Gilliland, Ford, 170.751.
39. (71) Andy Lally, Ford, 170.589.
40. (60) Mike Skinner, Toyota, 170.063.
Failed to Qualify
41. (37) Tony Raines, Ford, 169.705.
42. (50) T.J. Bell, Toyota, 169.566.
43. (32) Patrick Carpentier, Ford, Owner Points.
44. (7) Johnny Sauter, Dodge, Owner Points.
45. (36) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, Owner Points.
NASCAR Camping
World Truck
O'Reilly Auto Parts 250
Results
Saturday
At Kansas Speedway
Kansas City, Kan.
Lap length: 1.5 miles
(Start position in parentheses)
1. (2) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 167 laps, 149.2 rat-
ing, 0 points, $36,950.
2. (3) Johnny Sauter, Chevrolet, 167, 122.7, 43,
$35,750.
3. (10) Todd Bodine, Toyota, 167, 118.6, 42,
$25,600.
4. (6) James Buescher, Chevrolet, 167, 111.9, 41,
$18,750.
5. (8) Joey Coulter, Chevrolet, 167, 94.7, 40,
$16,625.
6. (11) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 167, 103.5, 0, $12,500.
7. (24) Brendan Gaughan, Toyota, 167, 85.9, 37,
$15,300.
8. (4) Nelson Piquet Jr., Chevrolet, 167, 96.1, 36,
$13,925.
9. (9) Brad Sweet, Chevrolet, 167, 96.1, 36,
$13,850.
10. (19) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 167, 77.8, 34,
$15,125.
11. (7) Parker Kligerman, Dodge, 167, 101.2, 33,
$13,750.
12. (1) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 167, 88, 32,
$15,825.
13. (15) Miguel Paludo, Toyota, 167, 84.7, 32,
$13,550.
14. (12) Timothy Peters, Toyota, 167, 69.8, 30,
$13,500.
15. (16) Cole Whitt, Chevrolet, 167, 81.3, 30,
$14,775.
16. (22) David Starr, Toyota, 167, 66.7, 28, $13,375.
17. (13) Jason White, Chevrolet, 167, 71.4, 27,
$13,300.
18. (17) Matt Crafton, Chevrolet, 167, 77.3, 27,
$13,250.
19. (18) Justin Lofton, Toyota, 167, 70.1, 26,
$13,200.
20. (27) Justin Marks, Chevrolet, 167, 57.5, 24,
$13,850.
21. (35) Ricky Carmichael, Chevrolet, 167, 53.9, 23,
$11,850.
22. (20) Max Papis, Toyota, 167, 59.4, 22, $11,825.
23. (25) Craig Goess, Toyota, 167, 51.1, 21,
$10,800.
24. (21) Johanna Long, Toyota, 166, 45.7, 20,
$10,775.
25. (26) Nick Hoffman, Ford, 166, 40.7, 19, $10,900.
26. (33) Bryan Silas, Ford, 166, 38.6, 0, $10,725.
27. (32) Jennifer Jo Cobb, Ford, 165, 33.5, 0,
$11,050.
28. (14) Clay Rogers, Chevrolet, 160, 52.9, 16,
$10,675.
29. (23) Shane Sieg, Chevrolet, accident, 111, 54,
15, $10,625.
30. (5) Ron Hornaday Jr., Chevrolet, 101, 40, 14,
$10,600.
31. (29) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, oil pressure, 60,
43.1, 13, $11,075.
32. (31) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, power steering, 42,
33.5, 0, $10,550.
33. (36) NormBenning, Chevrolet, suspension, 22,
29.7, 11, $10,525.
34. (30) Chris Jones, Chevrolet, vibration, 10, 34, 0,
$10,500.
35. (34) Mike Garvey, Chevrolet, transmission, 7,
30.4, 9, $10,475.
36. (28) Scott Riggs, Toyota, rear gear, 4, 31, 0,
$10,446.
———
Race Statistics
Average Speed of Race Winner: 120.691 mph.
Time of Race: 2 hours, 4 minutes, 32 seconds.
Margin of Victory: 1.695 seconds.
Caution Flags: 7 for 28 laps.
Lead Changes: 15 among 10 drivers.
Lap Leaders: C.Bowyer 1-49; J.Buescher 50;
J.Coulter 51; M.Crafton 52-54; J.Lofton 55-61;
M.Paludo 62; C.Bowyer 63-65; J.Sauter 66-76;
C.Bowyer 77-99; B.Sweet 100-102; T.Bodine
103-108; C.Bowyer 109-111; C.Whitt 112-118; T.Bo-
dine 119-121; C.Bowyer 122-167.
Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led):
C.Bowyer, 5 times for 124 laps; J.Sauter, 1 time for
11laps; T.Bodine, 2 times for 9 laps; C.Whitt, 1time
for 7laps; J.Lofton, 1timefor 7laps; B.Sweet, 1time
for 3laps; M.Crafton, 1timefor 3laps; J.Buescher, 1
time for 1lap; J.Coulter, 1time for 1lap; M.Paludo, 1
time for 1 lap.
Top10inPoints: 1. J.Sauter, 302; 2. C.Whitt, 290; 3.
A.Dillon, 272; 4. M.Crafton, 270; 5. T.Peters, 255; 6.
R.Hornaday Jr., 246; 7. J.Buescher, 243; 8. P.Kli-
german, 228; 9. T.Bodine, 224; 10. B.Gaughan,
215.
P G A
The Memorial Par Scores
Saturday
At Muirfield Village Golf Club
Dublin, Ohio
Purse: $6.2 million
Yardage: 7,352;Par 72
(a-amateur)
Third Round
Steve Stricker ..............................68-67-69—204-12
Jonathan Byrd..............................71-67-69—207 -9
Matt Kuchar ..................................69-71-68—208 -8
Brandt Jobe..................................71-68-69—208 -8
Mark Wilson.................................70-73-66—209 -7
Shaun Micheel .............................69-73-67—209 -7
Rory McIlroy.................................66-72-71—209 -7
Marc Leishman............................73-71-66—210 -6
Kevin Chappell ............................69-73-68—210 -6
Troy Matteson..............................73-69-68—210 -6
Hunter Mahan..............................69-72-69—210 -6
Gary Woodland ...........................72-69-69—210 -6
Rod Pampling..............................72-66-72—210 -6
Scott Piercy..................................75-67-69—211 -5
Brett Wetterich.............................70-71-70—211 -5
Dustin Johnson ...........................68-73-70—211 -5
Scott Stallings..............................68-76-68—212 -4
Webb Simpson............................72-70-70—212 -4
Charles Howell III........................72-70-70—212 -4
John Senden ...............................71-70-71—212 -4
Luke Donald.................................70-69-73—212 -4
Ricky Barnes................................68-70-74—212 -4
Charl Schwartzel .........................72-71-70—213 -3
Camilo Villegas............................73-69-71—213 -3
Ben Curtis ....................................70-75-69—214 -2
J.J. Henry.....................................70-75-69—214 -2
Brian Davis...................................73-71-70—214 -2
Angel Cabrera .............................70-73-71—214 -2
Phil Mickelson .............................72-70-72—214 -2
Kevin Streelman..........................74-68-72—214 -2
Davis Love III ...............................69-73-72—214 -2
Bo Van Pelt ..................................72-70-72—214 -2
Ryan Moore .................................69-70-75—214 -2
Kevin Stadler ...............................71-68-75—214 -2
Aaron Baddeley...........................71-68-75—214 -2
Zack Miller....................................72-73-70—215 -1
Nick O’Hern .................................73-72-70—215 -1
Bubba Watson .............................75-69-71—215 -1
D.A. Points ...................................71-72-72—215 -1
Rickie Fowler ...............................68-73-74—215 -1
Stewart Cink ................................68-73-74—215 -1
Matt Bettencourt ..........................68-72-75—215 -1
Kyle Stanley.................................72-73-71—216 E
Rocco Mediate.............................68-76-72—216 E
Blake Adams................................71-73-72—216 E
J.B. Holmes .................................72-72-72—216 E
K.J. Choi .......................................70-73-73—216 E
Bill Haas .......................................71-71-74—216 E
Drew Weaver...............................71-70-75—216 E
Josh Teater ..................................67-72-77—216 E
Chez Reavie................................75-69-73—217 +1
Brendon de Jonge ......................71-73-73—217 +1
Alex Cejka....................................71-72-74—217 +1
Brendan Steele............................70-71-76—217 +1
Jason Bohn..................................70-71-76—217 +1
Edoardo Molinari .........................72-69-76—217 +1
Bryce Molder ...............................68-73-76—217 +1
Charlie Wi.....................................73-72-73—218 +2
Pat Perez......................................71-74-73—218 +2
Chris DiMarco..............................67-77-74—218 +2
Robert Garrigus ..........................69-75-74—218 +2
Arjun Atwal ...................................73-71-74—218 +2
Charley Hoffman .........................69-74-75—218 +2
Chris Riley....................................66-75-77—218 +2
Ryuji Imada..................................71-70-77—218 +2
Ernie Els.......................................71-73-75—219 +3
Chris Couch.................................70-73-76—219 +3
David Duval .................................72-73-75—220 +4
Vijay Singh ...................................73-72-76—221 +5
Robert Karlsson ..........................74-71-76—221 +5
Johnson Wagner.........................71-74-77—222 +6
Daniel Summerhays....................72-71-80—223 +7
Justin Leonard.............................73-72-79—224 +8
C H A M P I O N S
T O U R
Principal Charity Classic
Scores
Saturday
At Glen Oaks CC
West Des Moines, Iowa
Purse: $1,725,000
Yardage: 6,879;Par: 71
Second Round
Mark Brooks ............................................65-67—132
Mark Calcavecchia.................................67-66—133
Bob Gilder................................................68-66—134
Peter Senior ............................................67-67—134
Jay Don Blake.........................................72-64—136
Brad Bryant..............................................71-65—136
Mike Goodes...........................................70-66—136
Steve Pate ...............................................70-66—136
Rod Spittle...............................................68-68—136
Bruce Fleisher.........................................72-65—137
Larry Mize................................................70-67—137
Michael Allen...........................................69-68—137
Chien Soon Lu ........................................69-68—137
Tom Lehman ...........................................68-69—137
Jeff Hart ...................................................68-69—137
Tom Jenkins............................................70-68—138
David Frost ..............................................70-68—138
Mark O’Meara .........................................69-69—138
Lee Rinker ...............................................74-65—139
Bill Glasson .............................................73-66—139
Loren Roberts.........................................73-66—139
Hal Sutton................................................71-68—139
Morris Hatalsky .......................................70-69—139
Robert Thompson ..................................71-68—139
John Huston............................................70-69—139
Bobby Wadkins.......................................68-71—139
Nick Price.................................................68-71—139
Joey Sindelar ..........................................68-71—139
Steve Lowery ..........................................74-66—140
Roger Chapman .....................................73-67—140
Gary Hallberg..........................................71-69—140
D.A. Weibring..........................................71-69—140
Bobby Clampett ......................................71-69—140
Scott Simpson.........................................69-71—140
Tim Simpson ...........................................68-72—140
Tommy Armour III...................................73-68—141
Keith Clearwater .....................................73-68—141
Wayne Levi ..............................................73-68—141
Frankie Minoza........................................73-68—141
John Cook ...............................................72-69—141
Peter Jacobsen.......................................72-69—141
Chip Beck ................................................72-69—141
Gil Morgan ...............................................72-69—141
Tom Kite...................................................72-69—141
Larry Nelson............................................71-70—141
Tom Purtzer.............................................74-68—142
Hale Irwin.................................................73-69—142
Tom Pernice, Jr. .....................................73-69—142
Jeff Sluman..............................................72-70—142
David Eger...............................................70-72—142
Phil Blackmar ..........................................75-68—143
Dana Quigley...........................................74-69—143
David Peoples.........................................75-68—143
Jay Haas ..................................................74-69—143
Ronnie Black...........................................74-69—143
Mike Reid.................................................71-72—143
Damon Green..........................................75-69—144
Vicente Fernandez .................................75-69—144
Dan Forsman...........................................74-70—144
Jim Thorpe...............................................74-70—144
Lonnie Nielsen........................................73-71—144
Ben Crenshaw.........................................73-71—144
Mark McNulty ..........................................73-71—144
Olin Browne.............................................72-72—144
Jerry Pate.................................................77-68—145
Craig Stadler ...........................................75-70—145
John Morse..............................................72-73—145
Joe Daley.................................................71-74—145
Tom Wargo..............................................71-74—145
Gary Koch................................................74-72—146
Joe Ozaki .................................................73-73—146
Ted Schulz...............................................72-74—146
Blaine McCallister...................................72-74—146
Willie Wood .............................................78-69—147
J.L. Lewis.................................................76-71—147
Fred Funk ................................................79-69—148
Keith Fergus............................................76-73—149
Jim Gallagher, Jr. ...................................80-71—151
Fuzzy Zoeller...........................................81-70—151
Mike McCullough....................................78-76—154
N C A A G O L F
Division I Men's Results
Saturday
At Karsten Creek
Stillwater, Okla.
Yardage: 7,416; Par 72
Team Match Play Semifinals
Augusta State (7) def. Oklahoma State (3), 3-2
Taylor Gooch, Oklahoma State, def. def. Olle
Bengtsson, Augusta St., 7 and 5.
Carter Newman, Augusta St., def. Sean Einhaus,
Oklahoma State, 19th hole.
Morgan Hoffmann, Oklahoma State, def. Mitchell
Krywulycz, Augusta St., 1 up.
Henrik Norlander, Augusta St., def. Kevin Tway,
Oklahoma State, 3 and 1.
Patrick Reed, Augusta St., def. Peter Uihlein, Okla-
homa State, 8 and 7.
Georgia (5) def. Duke (8), 3-2
Bryden MacPherson, Georgia, def. Austin Cody,
Duke, 2 and 1.
Julian Suri, Duke., def. T.J. Mitchell, Georgia, 3 and
2.
Wes Roach, Duke, def. Hudson Swafford, Georgia,
2 and 1.
Russell Henley, Georgia, def. Tim Gornik, Duke, 3
and 2.
Harris English, Georgia, def. Brinson Paolini, Duke,
5 and 4.
N B A
Playoff Glance
All Times EDT
(x-if necessary)
FINALS
(Best-of-7)
Miami 1, Dallas 1
Tuesday, May 31: Miami 92, Dallas 84
Thursday, June 2: Dallas 95, Miami 93
Sunday, June 5: Miami at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Tuesday, June 7: Miami at Dallas, 9 p.m.
Thursday, June 9: Miami at Dallas, 9 p.m.
x-Sunday, June 12: Dallas at Miami, 8 p.m.
x-Tuesday, June 14: Dallas at Miami, 9 p.m.
/
(Series tied at 1-1)
DALLAS MAVERICKS
.....................................FG FT Reb Avg
..................................... G M-A M-A O-T A Pts
Nowitzki ...................... 2 17-4015-15 1-19 625.5
Marion ........................ 2 15-26 6-7 6-18 718.0
Terry ........................... 2 8-21 9-10 2-2 614.0
Chandler..................... 2 7-10 8-13 4-11 211.0
Kidd............................. 2 5-15 0-0 1-1211 7.5
Stevenson.................. 2 5-9 0-0 1-5 0 7.5
Barea .......................... 2 3-15 1-2 0-3 4 3.5
Haywood .................... 2 1-3 3-6 2-7 0 2.5
Cardinal ...................... 1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0.0
Stojakovic .................. 2 0-3 0-0 0-0 0 0.0
Totals.......................... 261-14242-5317-773689.5
3-Point Goals: 15-39, .385 (Kidd 5-12, Stevenson
5-8, Terry 3-9, Nowitzki 2-4, Barea 0-3, Stojakovic
0-3).
MIAMI HEAT
.....................................FG FT Reb Avg
..................................... G M-A M-A O-T A Pts
Wade .......................... 2 22-3910-17 5-151229.0
James......................... 2 17-31 4-6 1-17 922.0
Bosh............................ 2 9-3413-16 7-17 315.5
Chalmers.................... 2 6-16 5-8 1-1 410.5
Bibby........................... 2 5-12 0-0 0-1 3 7.0
Haslem....................... 2 4-11 1-1 2-9 1 4.5
Miller ........................... 2 2-8 0-0 2-9 1 3.0
Howard....................... 1 0-1 2-2 3-3 0 2.0
Anthony...................... 2 0-1 0-0 1-4 0 0.0
Totals.......................... 265-15335-5022-763392.5
3-Point Goals: 20-54, .370(James 6-12, Bibby 4-11,
Chalmers 4-13, Wade 4-11, Miller 2-7).
Dallas................................................45503747—179
Miami ................................................44504645—185
A—Game 1 at Miami, 20,003.
A—Game 2 at Miami, 20,003.
P I A A
B A S E B A L L
P L A Y O F F S
All teams are listed by (district-seed)
CLASS 4A
FIRST ROUND
Monday, June 6
•Spring-Ford (1-1) vs. Spring Grove (3-3) at Great
Valley H.S., Malvern, 4 p.m.
•Monsignor Bonner (12-1) vs. Council Rock
South (1-4) at FDR Park, Philadelphia, 4:15 p.m.
•Williamsport (4-1) vs. Manheim Township (3-2)
at Bowman Field, Williamsport, 6:30 p.m.
•Nazareth (11-1) vs. Council Rock North (1-3) at
Parkland H.S., Allentown, 5 p.m.
•Cedar Cliff (3-1) vs. Methacton (1-5) at Northern
York H.S., Dillsburg, 3:30 p.m.
•Conestoga (1-2) vs. Frankford (12-2) at Neu-
mann University, Aston, 3 p.m.
•Seneca Valley (7-1) vs. Erie McDowell (10-1) at
Pullman Park, Butler, 4 p.m.
•DuBois (9-1) vs. Peters Township (7-2) at
Berwind Park, St. Marys, 5 p.m.
QUARTERFINALS
Thursday, June 9
First-round winners at neutral sites
SEMIFINALS
Monday, June 13
Quarterfinal winners at neutral sites
CHAMPIONSHIP
Friday, June 17
Semifinal winners at Lubrano Park, State College,
6 p.m.
__________
CLASS 3A
FIRST ROUND
Monday, June 6
•Mechanicsburg (3-1) vs. Franklin Towne Charter
(12-2) at Northern York H.S., Dillsburg, 1 p.m.
•Tunkhannock (2-1) vs. Jersey Shore (4-1) at
King's College, 4:30 p.m.
•Neumann-Goretti (12-1) vs. Twin Valley (3-2) at
FDR Park, Philadelphia, 12:30 p.m.
•Upper Moreland (1-1) vs. Blue Mountain (11-1) at
Spring-Ford H.S., Royersford, 4 p.m.
•Somerset (5-1) vs. Northern York (3-3) at Blair
County Ballpark, Altoona, 4 p.m.
•Punxsutawney (9-1) vs. Hampton (7-2) at
Brockway H.S., 2 p.m.
•Elizabeth Forward (7-1) vs. Carrick (8-1) at
Burkett Sports Complex, Robinson Twp., 4 p.m.
•Grove City (10-1) vs. Chartiers Valley (7-3) at
Jerry Uht Park, Erie, 6 p.m.
QUARTERFINALS
Thursday, June 9
First-round winners at neutral sites
SEMIFINALS
Monday, June 13
Quarterfinal winners at neutral sites
CHAMPIONSHIP
Friday, June 17
Semifinal winners at Lubrano Park, State College,
1 p.m.
__________
CLASS 2A
FIRST ROUND
Monday, June 6
•Oley Valley (3-1) vs. Nueva Esperanza (12-2) at
Muhlenberg H.S., 3:30 p.m.
•Salisbury Township (11-1) vs. Towanda (4-2) at
Easton Area H.S., 5 p.m.
•Danville (4-1) vs. Lake-Lehman (2-1) at
Bowman Field, Williamsport, 4 p.m.
•Springfield Township (1-1) vs. York Catholic
(3-2) at La Salle College H.S., Glenside, 3 p.m.
•Riverside (7-1) vs. Karns City (9-1) at Burkett
Sports Complex, Robinson Twp., 2 p.m.
•Sagertown (10-1) vs. Laurel (7-4) at Jerry Uht
Park, Erie, noon
•Bedford (5-1) vs. Waynesburg (7-2) at Shanks-
ville Stoneycreek H.S., Shanksville, 4:30 p.m.
•Central (6-1) vs. Mohawk (7-3) at Blair County
Ballpark, Altoona, 6:30 p.m.
QUARTERFINALS
Thursday, June 9
First-round winners at neutral sites
SEMIFINALS
Monday, June 13
Quarterfinal winners at neutral sites
CHAMPIONSHIP
Friday, June 17
Semifinal winners at Lubrano Park, State College,
3:30 p.m.
__________
CLASS A
FIRST ROUND
Monday, June 6
•Reading Central Catholic (3-1) vs. Masterman
(12-1) at Muhlenberg H.S., 6 p.m.
•Tri-Valley (11-1) vs. Calvary Christian (1-1) at
Walter Stump Stadium, Pine Grove, 5 p.m.
•Old Forge (2-1) vs. Muncy (4-1) at Connell
Park, Scranton, 4:30 p.m.
•Salisbury Elk Lick (5-1) vs. Lancaster Country
Day (3-2) at McConnellsburg H.S., 4:30 p.m.
•Neshannock (7-1) vs. Bishop McCort (6-2) at
Pullman Park, Butler, 2 p.m.
•Mercyhurst Prep (10-1) vs. Coudersport (9-2) at
Jerry Uht Stadium, Erie, 3 p.m.
•Elk County Catholic (9-1) vs. Serra Catholic (7-3)
at Brockway H.S., 4:30 p.m.
•Bishop Carroll (6-1) vs. Chartiers Houston (7-2)
at First Commonwealth Field, Homer City, 4 p.m.
QUARTERFINALS
Thursday, June 9
First-round winners at neutral sites
SEMIFINALS
Monday, June 13
Quarterfinal winners at neutral sites
CHAMPIONSHIP
Friday, June 17
Semifinal winners at Lubrano Park, State College,
10:30 a.m.
N C A A
S O F T B A L L
Division I Softball World Series Glance
At ASA Hall of Fame Stadium
Oklahoma City
All Times EDT
Double Elimination
x-if necessary
Thursday, June 2
Alabama 1, California 0
Baylor 1, Oklahoma State 0, 8 innings
Arizona State 3, Oklahoma 1
Florida 6, Missouri 2
Friday, June 3
Alabama 3, Baylor 0
Arizona State 6, Florida 5
Saturday, June 4
California 6, Oklahoma State 2, OSU eliminated
Missouri 4, Oklahoma 1, OU eliminated
Game 9 — Florida (53-11) vs. California (45-12), 7
p.m.
Game10 —Baylor (46-14) vs. Missouri (53-9), 9:30
p.m.
Sunday, June 5
Game 11 — Alabama (53-9) vs. Game 9 winner, 1
p.m.
Game 12 — Arizona State (57-6) vs. Game 10 win-
ner, 3:30 p.m.
x-Game13 —Game11winner vs. Game11loser, 7
p.m.
x-Game 14 — Game 12 winner vs. Game 12 loser,
9:30 p.m.
NOTE: If only one game is necessary, it will be
played at 7 p.m.
Championship Series
(Best-of-3)
Monday, June 6: Teams TBD, 8 p.m.
Tuesday, June 7: Teams TBD, 8 p.m.
x-Wednesday, June 8: Teams TBD, 8 p.m.
N C A A
B A S E B A L L
Division I Baseball Regionals
Glance
All Times EDT
Double Elimination
x-if necessary
At Davenport Field
Charlottesville, Va.
Friday, June 3
Virginia 6, Navy 0
St. John’s 2, East Carolina 0
Saturday, June 4
East Carolina 6, Navy 1, Navy eliminated
Game 4 — Virginia (50-9) vs. St. John’s (36-20), 6
p.m.
Sunday, June 5
Game 5 —East Carolina (40-20) vs. Game 4 loser,
1 p.m.
Game 6 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 6
p.m.
Monday, June 6
x-Game 7 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 6
p.m.
At Boshamer Stadium
Chapel Hill, N.C.
Friday, June 3
James Madison 11, Florida International 7
North Carolina 4, Maine 0
Saturday, June 4
Maine 4, Florida International 1, FIU eliminated
Game 4 — James Madison (41-17) vs. North Car-
olina (46-14), 6 p.m.
Sunday, June 5
Game 5 — Maine (33-23) vs. Game 4 loser, 1 p.m.
Game 6 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 6
p.m.
Monday, June 6
x-Game 7 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 6
p.m.
At Doug Kingsmore Stadium
Clemson, S.C.
Friday, June 3
Coastal Carolina 13, Connecticut 1
Clemson 11, Sacred Heart 1
Saturday, June 4
Connecticut 13, Sacred Heart 3
Game 4 — Coastal Carolina (42-18) vs. Clemson
(42-18), 7 p.m.
Sunday, June 5
Game 5 —Connecticut (42-18-1) vs. Game 4 loser,
3 p.m.
Game 6 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 7
p.m.
Monday, June 6
x-Game 7 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 7
p.m.
At Carolina Stadium
Columbia, S.C.
Friday, June 3
Stetson 8, N.C. State 7
South Carolina 2, Georgia Southern 1
Saturday, June 4
N.C. State 5, Georgia Southern 2, GSU eliminated
Game 4 — Stetson (42-18) vs. South Carolina
(46-14), 7 p.m.
Sunday, June 5
Game 5 — N.C. State (35-26) vs. Game 4 loser, 1
p.m.
Game 6 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 7
p.m.
Monday, June 6
x-Game 7 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 7
p.m.
At Russ Chandler Stadium
Atlanta
Friday, June 3
Mississippi State 3, Southern Mississippi 0
Austin Peay 2, Georgia Tech 1
Saturday, June 4
Georgia Tech 6, Southern Mississippi 2, USMelim-
inated
Game4—Mississippi State(35-23) vs. AustinPeay
(34-22), 7 p.m.
Sunday, June 5
Game 5 —Game 3 winner vs. Game 4 loser, 3 p.m.
Game 6 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 7
p.m.
Monday, June 6
x-Game 7 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 7
p.m.
At Alfred A. McKethan Stadium
Gainesville, Fla.
Friday, June 3
Miami 7, Jacksonville 2
Florida 17, Manhattan 3
Saturday, June 4
Jacksonville 5, Manhattan 4, Manhattan eliminated
Florida 5, Miami 4
Sunday, June 5
Jacksonville (37-23) vs. Miami (37-22), Noon
Florida (47-16) vs. Jacksonville-Miami winner, 4
p.m.
Monday, June 6
x-Florida vs. Jacksonville-Miami winner, 7 p.m.
At Dick Howser Stadium
Tallahassee, Fla.
Friday, June 3
Alabama 5, UCF 3
Florida State 6, Bethune-Cookman 5
Saturday, June 4
UCF 16, Bethune-Cookman 5, B-C eliminated
Game 4 — Alabama (34-26) vs. Florida State
(43-17), 6 p.m.
Sunday, June 5
Game 5 —UCF(39-22) Game 3 winner vs. Game 4
loser, Noon
Game 6 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 6
p.m.
Monday, June 6
x-Game 7 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 6
p.m.
At Hawkins Field
Nashville, Tenn.
Friday, June 3
Troy 9, Oklahoma State 2
Vanderbilt 10, Belmont 0
Saturday, June 4
Belmont 3, Oklahoma State 2, OSU eliminated
Game 4 — Troy (43-17) vs. Vanderbilt (48-10), 8
p.m.
Sunday, June 5
Game 5 — Belmont (37-25) vs. Game 4 loser, 3
p.m.
Game 6 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 8
p.m.
Monday, June 6
x-Game 7 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 3
p.m.
At Reckling Park
Houston
Friday, June 3
Baylor 6, California 4
Rice 14, Alcorn State 2
Saturday, June 4
California 10, Alcorn State 6, ASU eliminated
Game 4 — Baylor (30-26) vs. Rice (42-19), 7 p.m.
Sunday, June 5
Game 5 — California (32-21) Game 3 winner vs.
Game 4 loser, 3 p.m.
Game 6 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 7
p.m.
Monday, June 6
x-Game 7 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 7
p.m.
At Olsen Field
College Station, Texas
Friday, June 3
Seton Hall 4, Arizona 0
Texas A&M11, Wright State 0
Saturday, June 4
Arizona 13, Wright State 0, Wright St. eliminated
Game 4 — Seton Hall (34-23) vs. Texas A&M
(43-18), 7:35 p.m.
Sunday, June 5
Game 5 — Arizona (37-20) vs. Game 4 loser, 1:35
p.m.
Game 6 —Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 7:35
p.m.
Monday, June 6
x-Game 7 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner,
7:35 p.m.
At UFCU Disch-Falk Field
Austin, Texas
Friday, June 3
Kent State 4, Texas State 2, 11 innings
Texas 5, Princeton 3
Saturday, June 4
Texas State 3, Princeton 1, Princeton eliminated
Game 4 — Kent State (44-15) vs. Texas (44-15),
7:30 p.m.
Sunday, June 5
Game 5 —Texas State (41-22) vs. Game 4 loser, 2
p.m.
Game 6 —Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 7:30
p.m.
Monday, June 6
x-Game 7 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 2
p.m.
At Lupton Baseball Stadium
Fort Worth, Texas
Friday, June 3
Dallas Baptist 3, Oklahoma 2, 10 innings
TCU10, Oral Roberts 2
Saturday, June 4
Oral Roberts 7, Oklahoma 0, OU eliminated
Game 4 —Dallas Baptist (40-17) vs. TCU(43-17), 8
p.m.
Sunday, June 5
Game 5 —Oral Roberts (37-21) vs. Game 4 loser, 3
p.m.
Game 6 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 8
p.m.
Monday, June 6
x-Game 7 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 8
p.m.
At Packard Stadium
Tempe, Ariz.
Friday, June 3
Charlotte 3, Arkansas 2
Arizona State 4, New Mexico 2
Saturday, June 4
Arkansas 3, New Mexico 0, UNM eliminated
Game 4 — Charlotte (43-14) vs. Arizona State
(40-16), 10 p.m.
Sunday, June 5
Game 5 — Arkansas (39-21) vs. Game 4 loser, 4
p.m.
Game 6 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 9
p.m.
Monday, June 6
x-Game 7 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner,
9:30 p.m.
At Goss Stadium
Corvallis, Ore.
Friday, June 3
Creighton 2, Georgia 1
Oregon State 7, UALR 3, 9 p.m.
Saturday, June 4
Georgia 7, UALR 3, UALR eliminated
Game 4 — Creighton (45-14) vs. Oregon State
(39-17), 9 p.m.
Sunday, June 5
Game5—Georgia(32-31) vs. Game4loser, 4p.m.
Game 6 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 9
p.m.
Monday, June 6
x-Game 7 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 9
p.m.
At Goodwin Field
Fullerton, Calif.
Friday, June 3
Stanford 10, Kansas State 3
Cal State Fullerton 10, Illinois 4
Saturday, June 4
Game 3 —Kansas State (36-24) vs. Illinois (28-26),
7 p.m.
Game 4 — Stanford (33-20) vs. Cal State Fullerton
(41-15), 11 p.m.
Sunday, June 5
Game 5 —Game 3 winner vs. Game 4 loser, 7 p.m.
Game 6 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 11
p.m.
Monday, June 6
x-Game 7 —Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 11
p.m.
At Jackie Robinson Stadium
Los Angeles
Friday, June 3
UC Irvine 12, Fresno State 6
San Francisco 3, UCLA 0
Saturday, June 4
Game 3 — Fresno State (40-15) vs. UCLA (33-23),
5 p.m.
Game 4 — UC Irvine (40-16) vs. San Francisco
(32-23), 9 p.m.
Sunday, June 5
Game 5 —Game 3 winner vs. Game 4 loser, 5 p.m.
Game 6 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 9
p.m.
Monday, June 6
x-Game 7 — Game 4 winner vs. Game 5 winner, 9
p.m.
N H L
Playoff Glance
All Times EDT
STANLEY CUP FINALS
(Best-of-7)
Vancouver 1, Boston 0
Wednesday, June 1: Vancouver 1, Boston 0
Saturday, June 4: Boston at Vancouver, 8 p.m.
Monday, June 6: Vancouver at Boston, 8 p.m.
Wednesday, June 8: Vancouver at Boston, 8 p.m.
x-Friday, June 10: Boston at Vancouver, 8 p.m.
x-Monday, June 13: Vancouver at Boston, 8 p.m.
x-Wednesday, June 15: Boston at Vancouver, 8
p.m.
F I G H T
S C H E D U L E
June 1
At Roseland Ballroom, New York (ESPN2), Kenny
Galarza vs. Irving Garcia, 10, welterweights;Tho-
mas Dulorme vs. DeMarcus Corley, 10, welter-
weights.
At Mendoza, Argentina, Jean Piero Perez vs. Juan
Carlos Reveco, 12, for the interim WBA World fly-
weight title.
At Chumash Casino, Santa Ynez, Calif. (SHO), La-
teef Kayode vs. Matt Godfrey, 10, cruiserweight-
s;Chros Avalos vs. Khabir Suleymanov, 10, super
bantamweights.
June 11
At Roseland Ballroom, New York (SHO), Hector
Sanchez vs. Vincent Arroyo, 10, junior welter-
weights;Luis Del Valle vs. Dat Nguyen, 10, feather-
weights.
At TBA, Mexico, Austin Trout vs. David Lopez, 12,
for Trout’s WBA World light middleweight title.
June 17
At Panama City, Panama, Anselmo Moreno vs. Lo-
renzo Parra, 12, for Moreno’s WBA Super World
bantamweight title;Gennady Golovkin vs. Kassim
Ouma, 12, for Golovkin’s WBA World middleweight
title.
At Austin, Texas (ESPN2), Karim Mayfield vs.
Steve Forbes, 10, welterweights;Fernando Guerre-
ro vs. Michael Medina, 10, middleweights.
June 18
At Mendoza, Argentina, Jonathan Barros vs. Celes-
tino Caballero, 12, for Barros’ WBA featherweight ti-
tle;Juan Carlos Cano vs. Rudy Santiago Ruiz, 10,
featherweights.
At Guadalajara, Mexico (HBO), Saul Alvarez vs.
Ryan Rhodes, 12, for Alvarez’s WBCjunior middle-
weight title;Jason Litzau vs. Adrien Broner, 10, ju-
nior lightweights;Jose Osorio vs. Alex Monterroza,
10, junior lightweights;Sergio Villanueva vs. Onalvi
Sierra, 10, featherweights.
June 24
At Pechanga Resort and Casino, Temecula, Calif.
(ESPN2), John Molina vs. Robert Frankel, 10, light-
weights;Michael Dallas Jr. vs. Mauricio Herrera, 10,
lightweights.
June 25
At Cologne, Germany, Felix Sturm vs. Matthew
Macklin, 12, for Sturm’s WBA Super middleweight
title.
At St. Louis (HBO), Tavoris Cloud vs. Yusaf Mack,
12, for Cloud’s IBF light heavyweight title;Bermane
Stivernevs. Ray Austin, 12, WBCheavyweight elim-
inator;DevonAlexander vs. Lucas Matthysse, 12, ju-
nior welterweights;Cornelius Bundragevs. Sechew
Powell, 12, for Bundrage’s IBF junior middleweight
title;GuillermoJones vs. RyanCoyne, 12, for Jones’
WBA World cruiserweight title.
At TBA, Mexico, Humberto Soto vs. Motoki Sasaki,
12, for Soto’s WBClightweight title;Antonio Lozada
Jr. vs. RobertoOrtiz, 12, junior welterweights;David
De La Mora vs. Gerardo Marin, 12, bantamweight-
s;Arturo Badillo vs. Cesar Gandara, 12, junior ban-
tamweights.
July 1
At TBA, Thailand, Pongsaklek Wonjongkamvs. Ta-
kuyaKogawa. 12, for Wonjongkam’s WBCflyweight
title.
At San Antonio (ESPN2), Mark Melligen vs. Robert
Garcia, 10, junior middleweights.
July 2
At Hamburg, Germany (HBO), Wladimir Klitschko
vs. David Haye, 12, for IBF-WBA Super World-
WBO-IBO heavyweight titles;Ola Afolabi vs. Terry
Dunstan, 12, for Afolabi’s WBO Inter-Continental
cruiserweight title.
July 8
At the Celebrity Theater, Phoenix (ESPN2), Jesus
Gonzalez vs. Henry Buchanan, 12, for the vacant
NABF, super middleweight title.
July 9
At Bucharest, Romania, Lucian Bute, vs. Jean-Paul
Mendy, 12, for Bute’s IBF super middleweight title.
At Boardwalk Hall, Atlantic City, N.J. (HBO), Paul
Williams vs. Erislandy Lara, 12, junior middle-
weights;Akifumi Shimoda vs. Rico Ramos, 12, for
Shimoda’s WBA World super bantamweight title.
At the Home Depot Center, Carson, Calif. (SHO),
Brandon Rios vs. Urbano Antillon, 12, for Rios’ WBA
World lightweight title;Kermit Cintron vs. Carlos
Molina, 10, junior middleweights.
July 15
At Roseland Ballroom, New York (ESPN2), Pawel
Wolak vs. Delvin Rodriguez, 10, junior middle-
weights.
July 16
At Munich, Germany, Sergei Liakhovich vs. Robert
Helenius, 12, heavyweights.
July 20
At Sydney Entertainment Centre, Sydney, Danny
Green vs. Antonio Tarver, 12, for Green’s IBOcrui-
serweight title.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 PAGE 3C
➛ S P O R T S
WEST PITTSTON – The
coach was handing out tips at
the 34th annual West Pittston
Anthracite 4 Mile Run on Satur-
day.
Chris Wadas, head track and
cross country coach at Miser-
icordia University, rantovictory
in 20 minutes, 22 seconds. The
29-year-old from Plains Town-
ship outran second-place finish-
er Frankie Redman, 22, of Hard-
ing, a recent grad from Wadas’
running team, by 51 seconds.
David McLean, 18, of Pittston
Township, who will be running
for Wadas next season, finished
third, 1:33 behind Redman.
“I pulled away from
(McLean) about a half mile into
the race,” said Wadas, who runs
for the Keystone Elite Track
Club, based in Harrisburg. “I
went over the first mile in 4:57,
the second mile in 5:03. I was
happy with that time. I was
shooting for 5:15 over mile
three, but finished that in 5:18.
But I closed over mile four in 5
miles flat. I was really happy
with that. It was a personal best
for me in this race. But running
alone, with nobody pushing me,
and considering the hills in this
race -- I’ll take it!”
Wadas’ personal best time ina
four mile race is 20:09.
Wadas saidthat Redman, who
finished second overall, ran a
smart race.
“He went out in third place,”
said Wadas. “He ran his own
race.”
Redman passed McLean after
the first mile to move into sec-
ond place.
Redman competed in the 800-
meter run for the Cougars in the
NCAA Div. III Championships
recently in Delaware, Ohio, fin-
ishing 13th overall, missing out
on All-America honors by less
than a second.
It was payback time for Dee-
dra Porfirio as she avenged a
loss she suffered to Ali Ostrum
in April (Wyoming Valley Chil-
dren’s Association’s Do it for the
Kids 5K), winning top honors
with a seventh-place overall fin-
ish in 24:56. Ostrum finished
ninthoverall, 25seconds behind
Porfirio.
“I went out fast right fromthe
start like I usually do,” said Por-
firio, who ran track and cross
country for Pittston Area High
School. “(Ali) was right behind
me for the first two and a half
miles. Then I surged a little and
pulled ahead. Then I just kept
that strong pace to the finish.”
Ostrumran cross country and
track for Misericordia Universi-
ty a few years ago. Like Wadas,
Ostrum runs for the Keystone
Elite Track Club.
Note: Wadas’s twin brother,
Nick, of Kingston, finished
fourth among the men in 23:15.
Monica Obsitos, 23, of Wilkes-
Barre, one of the area’s better lo-
cal triathletes, finished third
among the females in 26:18.
34 TH ANNUAL WEST PITT-
STON ANTHRACITE 4 MILE 4
MILE RUN RESULTS
Top 10
Chris Wadas, 29, Plains Twp.,
20:22
Frankie Redman, 22, Harding,
21:13
David McLean, 18, Pittston Twp.,
22:46
Nick Wadas, 29, Kingston, 23:15
Jamie Connors, 17, Pittston, 24:12
Mike Coco, 48, Exeter, 24:37
Deedra Porfirio, 34, W. Pittston,
24:56
Mike McAndrew, 51, Avoca, 25:00
Ali Ostrum, 24, Hanover Twp.,
25:21
Jay Albers, 38, White Haven,
25:29
Male award winners: Overall: 1. C.
Wadas; 2. Redman; 3. McLean.
Age group winners: 14 & under: 1.
Nick McGuire, Plains Twp., 20:22;
2. Marc Minichello, W. Pittston,
41:00. 15-19: 1. Jamie Connors,
Pittston, 24:12; 2. Will Butkiewicz,
Kingston, 26:43; 3. Nick Perugini,
W. Wyoming, na. 20-24: 1. David
Riviello, Pittston Twp., 27:40; 2. Ed
Streany, Dallas, 37:39. 25-29: 1.
Nick Wadas, Kingston, 23:15; 2.
Mike Struckus, Pittston, 29:29; 3.
John Truett, W. Pittston, 34:37.
30-34: 1. Robert Gronski Jr., Lu-
zerne, 25:36. 35-39: 1. Jay Albers,
White Haven, 25:29; 2. John
Zawadski, Luzerne, 25:36; 3. Rob
Strungis, Mountain Top, 26:24.
Masters division: 40-44: 1. Don
Shearer, W. Pittston, 27:46; 2. Phil
Pisano, Pittston, 28:22; 3. Brian
Lisowski, Throop, 28:27. 45-49: 1.
Mike Coco, Exeter, 25:00; 2. Ge-
orge Dunbar, Old Forge, 25:32; 3.
Joe Kichilinsky, Wyoming, 35:45.
50-59: 1. Mike McAndrew, Avoca,
25:00; 2. Dave Jiunta, W. Wyom-
ing, 27:09; 3. John Sobota, Forty
Fort, 27:29. 60-64: 1. Joe Dutko,
Mountain Top, 28:38; 2. Gary
Hosmer, Marietta, Ga., 29:39; 3.
Robert Gronski Sr., Moosic, 33:54.
65 & over: 1. Len Sowinski, Scott
Twp., 27:16; 2. Gary Dougherty,
Shavertown, 36:58; 3. Joe Naugh-
ton, Pocono Pines, 39:03. Special
award: First male West Pittston
resident to finish: Don Shearer,
43, 27:41.
Top 5 female finishers
Deedra Porfirio, 34, W. Pittston,
24:56
Ali Ostrum, 24, Hanover Twp.,
25:21
Monica Obsitos, 23, Wilkes-Barre,
26:18
Lynn Dolan, 47, W. Wyoming,
27:46
Jen Hawk, 40, Wyoming, 28:33
Female award winners: Overall: 1.
Porfirio; 2. Ostrum; 3. Obsitos.
Age group winners: 14 & under: 1.
Natalie Salkowski, Mountain Top,
32:01. 15-19: 1. Katlyn Kuchta,
Duryea, 30:18; 2. Catherine Lom-
bardo, Pittston, 30:18; 3. Michelle
Golden, W. Pittston, 30:19. 20-24:
1. Rebecca Aratz, W. Pittston,
35:59; 2. Candyce Musinski, W.
Pittston, 41:37. 25-29: 1. .Desiree
Lamphear, Luzerne, 31:25; 2.
Victoria Blazick, Trucksville,
35:09; 3. Sara Urban, Luzerne,
38:19. 30-34: 1. Tracy Zalenski,
Plains Twp., 29:41; 2. Charlene
Gquilina, Wyoming, 30:03; 3. Kim
Zalenski, Plains Twp., 30:07. 35-
39: 1. Kerry Zawadski, Luzerne,
28:46; 2. Jen Karcutskie, Dallas,
30:22; 3. Angie Hughes, Mountain
Top, 30:01. Masters division: 40-
44: 1. Jen Heck, W. Wyoming,
28:33; 2. Traci Dutko-Strungis,
Mountain Top, 30:19; 3. Cathy
DeGiosid,. Jefferson Twp., 36:36.
45-49: 1. Lynn Dolan, w. Wyoming,
27:46; 2. Ruth Brumagin, Moun-
tain Top, 35:52; 3. Paula Glogow-
ski, Falls, 46:45. 50-59: 1. Bev
Tomasak, Edwardsville, 33:42; 2.
Patty Phillips, Hanover Twp.,
34:07; 3. Susah Farrell, W. Pitt-
ston, 35:05. 60 & over: 1. Dee
Cordora, Swoyersville, 35:11. Spe-
cial award: Overall: First female
West Pittston resident to finish:
Porfirio.
Field: 127 (run-110 finishers, five
no shows; walk-10, two no shows)
Official starter: Charlie Burns.
Timing: Vince Wojnar (Wyoming
Valley Striders). Results: Insta
Results. Race director: Don Shear-
er.
Schedule
Sunday, June 19: Wilkes-Barre
Duathlon (3 mile run, 16.9 mile
bike, 3 miler run) at 7:30 a.m. at
Wilkes-Barre Public Square. Info:
Nickly Pachucki, 8232191. ext. 141.
L O C A L R U N N I N G
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Deedra Porfirio was top female
finisher Saturday.
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Chris Wadas was the overall
winner Saturday.
Coach races to win
at Anthracite Run
By ROBERT MINER
For The Times Leader
KANSAS CITY, Mo. —Once a
year the St. Louis Cardinals come
to Kansas City and remind the
Royals how dumb they were in
1999.
That’s the year Bill Althaus of
the Independence, Mo., Examin-
er, practically pleaded with the
front office to take a look at this
muscular kid he’d seen belting
tape measure home runs for Ft.
Osage High, a short drive from
Kauffman Stadium.
They did. But they decided the
big youngster lacked a true posi-
tion and was probably going to
have trouble keeping his weight
down. So they sat by while St.
Louis drafted Albert Pujols and
molded himinto a three-time Na-
tional League MVP, one of the
most feared power hitters of his
time.
Compounding the Royals’ em-
barrassment, the greatness that
got away is put on full display
year after year when the Cardi-
nals play interleague games in
KC. With friends and family
cramming the park, Pujols has re-
ached base in every game he’s ev-
er played in the home park of the
home town team that snubbed
him.
Now, 11 years later, can the
Royals afford to let it happen
again? It’s a different administra-
tion, a different general manager.
But can they take a chance on let-
ting another potential superstar
from their own neighborhood
slip through their fingers?
It’s a decision they’ll face on
Monday night if local high school
legend Bubba Starling is still
available when the Royals pick
overall No. 5.
Unlike Pujols, whose vast po-
tential was suspected only by a
few, Starling is practically a
household name among sports
fans in Kansas City and wherever
major league scouts and general
managers discuss great 5-tool
prospects.
A multisport star for suburban
Gardner-Edgerton High School
just southwest of Kansas City,
Starling was the Kansas high
school athlete of the year. Ac-
cording to his growing legend,
the modest, well behaved Bubba
hits 500-foot home runs, throws a
football 55 yards from his knees
and dunks over basketball play-
ers who stand half a foot taller.
Carrying 200 pounds on a chi-
seled 6-foot-5 frame, he’s the best
high school athlete in the draft,
according to Baseball America.
And he certainly is no secret to
the Royals. They’ve been court-
ing himsince he was 14, bringing
him to games, letting him hit in
their indoor facility.
But, there’s a catch. A big
catch. Besides being a standout
outfielder, he was a great high
school quarterback who rushed
for 2,471 yards and 31 touch-
downs his senior season. Recruit-
ed by just about every major pro-
gram in America, he picked Ne-
braska.
As the baseball draft approach-
es, the Huskers are reminding
himalmost daily of their promise
to also let him play baseball.
The Royals aren’t saying what
they’ll do if Bubba’s on the board.
If they pass on him, fans are sure
to be upset.
“What I would say is that it’s
obviously an important question
for our organization and for the
Kansas City community,” said
general manager Dayton Moore.
“But it’s very inappropriate for
me to comment at this time
about any individual player. It’s
not fair to the player, it’s not fair
to our organization, and it’s not
fair to the other 29 organiza-
tions.”
Starling’s mom works at the
high school and his dad is em-
ployed by an excavating compa-
ny. Therearealsotwoathletic sis-
ters in the modest, close-knit
home which didn’t have cable TV
until last year.
Withsuperagent Scott Boras as
his advisor, and wielding serious
leverage in the form of a Nebras-
ka football scholarship, Starling
will probably command a signing
bonus in the $6 million-$8 mil-
lion range no matter who drafts
him.
Could the family turn down
such money? Could any family?
It’s going to be a tough deci-
sion.
In a twist, Boras, in this in-
stance, will in effect be working
on behalf of the club who drafts
his client because he’ll be doing
his best to talk Bubba into a base-
ball career.
Rest assured the Cornhuskers
won’t sit silently by. Athletic di-
rector and former coach TomOs-
borne recently sent a handwrit-
ten note telling Bubba he could
be another Eric Crouch, whowon
the 2001 Heisman at Nebraska.
M A J O R L E A G U E B A S E B A L L
Can KC pass on home-grown kid?
Missing out on high school
star could remind Royal fans
of team’s passing on Pujols.
By DOUG TUCKER
AP Sports Writer
AP FILE PHOTO
Gardner-Edgerton High
School’s Bubba Starling could
be a great catch for the Kansas
City Royals.
LOS ANGELES — Christy
Martin returned to the ring six
months after she was left for dead
following a brutal attack, losing
to Dakota Stone after breaking
her right hand.
Martin was winning on all
three scorecards Saturday night
at Staples Center when the ring
doctor stoppedthe fight at 1:09 of
the sixth and final round.
Jim Martin, her husband and
longtime trainer, is charged with
attempted first-degree murder
and aggravated battery for the at-
tackonMartinonNov. 23at their
home in Orlando, Fla. His trail is
scheduled for October.
Martin had told him that she
was leaving him for another
woman.
“The Coal Miner’s Daughter”
continues to battle emotional
scars but recovered quickly
enough physically to schedule a
fight for April. She pulled out be-
cause of a rib injury.
Hall stops Bell
HOLLYWOOD, Fla. —Former
light-heavyweight contender Ri-
chard Hall knocked out former
cruiserweight champion O’Neil
Bell in the second round Satur-
day night.
Hall pressed the action quickly
in the cruiserweight bout be-
tween native Jamaicans at the
Hard Rock Live Arena. He sent
Bell to a corner, connecting with
lefts to the head early on.
In the second, Hall (30-8, 28
KOs) staggered the 36-year-old
Bell with a punishing left to the
head near the ropes. Bell’s knees
buckled, Hall followed with two
additional shots to the head and
referee Sam Burgos stopped the
bout at 1:58 of the round.
Bell (24-4-1) won the vacant
IBF cruiserweight belt with a
unanimous decision over Dale
Brownin2005. After onesuccess-
ful defense, Bell won a decision
over WBA and WBC champion
Jean Marc Mormeck in a unifica-
tion bout in January 2007.
Botha posts victory
JOHANNESBURG — Promis-
ing South African heavyweight
Flo Simba was stopped in the
sixth round by veteran Francois
Botha on Saturday night for his
first defeat in 11 professional
fights.
The 21-year-old Simba was
rocked by two big right hands
fromBotha —21years his senior
— and the referee stepped in
soon after with Simba out on his
feet.
Botha, who lost to Mike Tyson,
Lennox Lewis and Evander Holy-
field in his career, improved to
48-5withthreedraws andoneno-
contest.
B O X I N G
Martin’s
comeback
a setback
The Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Dakota Stone, right, connects with Christy Martin during their welterweight boxing match on Sat-
urday in Los Angeles.
The Pittsburgh Penguins
signed forward Nick Johnson
to a one-year contract, execu-
tive vice president and general
manager Ray Shero an-
nounced Saturday.
Johnson, who was sched-
uled to become an unrestrict-
ed free agent on July 1, opted
to re-sign with the Penguins to
a two-way deal worth
$550,000 at the NHL level that
runs through the 2011-12 sea-
son.
Johnson, 25, appeared in
four games for Pittsburgh this
past season, posting three
points (1G-2A) before suffer-
ing a concussion that side-
lined him for the remaining 23
games of the regular season
and playoffs.
Johnson (6-foot-2, 196
pounds) spent the majority of
the year with Pittsburgh’s top-
minor league affiliate, Wilkes-
Barre/Scranton of the Amer-
ican Hockey League. He post-
ed 20 goals, 39 points, 10 pow-
er-play goals and a plus-12 rat-
ing in 48 games with WBS.
Johnson, Pittsburgh’s third-
round pick (67th overall) in
the 2004 NHL Entry Draft, has
played 10 games with Pitts-
burgh in his career, notching
two goals and five points. He
has played three-plus seasons
with WBS after turning pro in
2007-08. He has totaled 50
goals, 94 points and a plus-46
rating in 169 career games
with WBS, adding 15 postsea-
son points (8G-7A) in 26 con-
tests.
The Calgary, Alberta native
played four seasons at Dart-
mouth from 2004-07. He fin-
ished his college career with
125 points (57G-68A) in 133
games. Johnson was named
First-Team All-ECAC and First-
Team All-Ivy League as a se-
nior after scoring 35 points
(10G-25A) in 32 games.
H O C K E Y
Penguins sign forward Nick Johnson to 1-year contract
The Times Leader staff
INGLEWOOD, Calif. —
Trainer John Sadler’s over-
whelming favorite Twirling
Candy used a huge rally from
fifth at the top of the stretch to
win the $150,000 Californian
Stakes on Saturday at Holly-
wood Park.
Ridden by Joel Rosario and
running for the first time with-
out blinkers, Twirling Candy
was tentative at first and nearly
dropped to last, but found his
footing in the stretch and took
the lead in the final sixteenth to
beat Setsuko by 1
1
⁄4 lengths, cov-
ering 1 1-8 miles in 1:50.
“He was very relaxed without
the blinkers,” Rosario said. “He
can do anything. When he sees
horses in front of him he just
goes and gets them.”
The winner paid $2.80, $2.20
and $2.10. Setsuko paid $2.80
and $2.60, while Aggie Engi-
neer paid $3.60 to show.
The victory ended an 0-for-24
stakes drought for Sadler, who
opened 2011 with a hot streak of
several stakes wins at Santa An-
ita.
H O R S E R A C I N G
Twirling Candy captures Californian Stakes at Hollywood Park
The Associated Press
C M Y K
PAGE 4C SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S P O R T S
SIGHTS AT THE WYOMING VALLEY COUNTRY CLUB INVITATIONAL
From left, Chris W. Schwartz of Pittston, Chris Schwartz of Hanover Township,
Dan Novak of Nanticoke, and Joe Butcher of Newport Township at the Wyom-
ing Valley Country Club Invitational.
Participants in Saturday’s Wyoming Valley Country Club
Invitational at Wyoming Valley Country Club warm up.
Brian Kersteter of Mountain Top stares down
his tee shot from the 14th.
PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Wyoming Valley Country Club Invitational participants putt out on the 13th hole on Saturday.
Ted Komoroski hits from out of a greenside bunker on No. 18
during Saturday’s Wyoming Valley Country Club Invitational.
From left, Don Crossin of Plains, Mike Duda of Mountain Top, Mark Jones and Rich Serafin,
both of Laflin.
Brandon Matthews tries a
little body English.
Steve Shipierski,
of Nanticoke, Joe
Wnorowski, of
Hanover Township,
John Kotsko, and
Scott Safko, both
of Mountain Top,
at the Wyoming
Valley Country
Club Invitational
Saturday.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 PAGE 5C
➛ S P O R T S
Shealreadywasthefirst woman
fromthat nationof morethan1bil-
lion people to win a WTA singles
title, the first to enter the top10 in
the rankings, andthe first to make
it to a GrandSlamfinal —she lost
to Kim Clijsters at the Australian
Open in January.
Thinking back to that defeat, Li
said: “I had no experience. I was
very nervous. For my second time
in a final, I had the experience. I
knewhowtodoit. AndI hadmore
self-confidence.”
Tennis is considered an elite
sport in China, and while partici-
pation is rapidly increasing, it still
trails basketball, soccer and table
tennis, among others. But Li’s vic-
tory was big news back home,
where the match finished shortly
after 11 p.m. local time on a holi-
day weekend.
State broadcaster CCTVposted
the banner, “We love you Li Na,”
ontheir gushingcoverage, andan-
nouncer Tong Kexin pronounced:
“This has left areallydeepimpres-
sion on the world.” People at the
Green Bank Tennis Club on Beij-
ing’s northern edge gathered to
eat barbecued food, drink beer
and watch the events from Paris
on a big-screen TV set up on a
court. Some waved Chinese flags
duringthe postmatchtrophycere-
mony.
Li broke away fromthe Chinese
government’s sports system in
late 2008 under an experimental
reform policy for tennis players
dubbed “Fly Alone.” Li was given
the freedom to choose her own
coach and schedule and to keep
much more of her earnings: Previ-
ously, she turned over 65 percent
to the authorities; now it’s 12 per-
cent. That comes to about
$205,000 of the $1.7 million
French Open winner’s check.
“We took a lot of risks with this
reform. When we let them fly, we
didn’t knowif theywouldsucceed.
That they have now succeeded,
means our reform was correct,”
said Sun Jinfang, an official with
the Chinese Tennis Association.
“This reform will serve as a good
example for reforms in other
sports.”
At her news conference, Li wore
anewT-shirt withChinesecharac-
ters that mean “sport changes ev-
erything,” and offered thanks to
Sun.
“Without her reform, then pos-
sibly we wouldn’t have achieved
this success,” Li said.
Whena reporter mentionedthe
June 1989 crackdown on pro-de-
mocracy demonstrators in Tia-
nanmen Square and asked wheth-
er her victory could spark a sports
revolution, Li said she’s “just” a
tennis player and added, “I don’t
need to answer ... this question.”
Her tennis game, filled with flat
forehands and backhands, looks
better-built for hard courts, rather
than the slow, red clay of Paris. In-
deed, Li never had won a clay-
court tournament until Saturday.
She lost inthe thirdroundinthree
of herpreviousfourFrenchOpens,
includingagainst Schiavoneayear
ago.
But Li’s movement on clay is
better now, Schiavone explained,
saying: “She slides a little bit
more.”
Li repeatedly set up points with
her backhand, then closed them
with her forehand, and she fin-
ished with 21 winners from the
baseline, 15 more than Schiavone.
Only after Li controlled the first
set andtheearlypart of thesecond
did Schiavone begin working her
way into the match.
“I tried to push more, to risk
more,” Schiavone said.
She broke to 4-all in the second,
and held to lead 6-5. The 12th
game was pivotal.
Serving at deuce, Li smacked a
backhand that landed near a side-
line but initially was called out by
alinejudge, whichwouldhavegiv-
en Schiavone a set point.
OPEN
Continued from Page 1C
PARIS — Francesca Schia-
vone stood over the ball mark,
staring down at the white line
and red clay in disbelief as her
chances to retain her French
Open title slowly slipped away.
The chair umpire had just
ruled that Li Na’s shot touched
the line, erasing what Schiavone
thought would be her first set
point — and only third break
point — of the match.
From then on, Schiavone
didn’t win another point.
“That ball was out,” Schia-
vone said after losing the final
6-4, 7-6 (0) Saturday at Roland
Garros. “So what do you do?
You’re playing tennis, you have
to go back to playing tennis and
think about what you need to
do.
“Obviously, I think it was a
big mistake. But it’s up to the
tournament and others to watch
that match again and evaluate
the call.”
For the gritty Italian, that was
the moment when her hopes of
staging a comeback blew away
like the dust under her feet.
She put a backhand into the
net on the next point, allowing
Li to even the second set score
to 6-6. The Chinese player, the
first from her country to win a
Grand Slam singles title, then
won all seven points in the tie-
breaker.
But minutes earlier, with
Schiavone leading 6-5, 40-40 on
Li’s serve, her opponent’s back-
hand sailed across the court and
was called out by the line judge,
giving the Italian a crucial break
point.
Li disagreed, and chair um-
pire Louise Engzell came to
investigate. She and Schiavone
stood over the line pointing at
the spot for several seconds,
arguing where the ball landed.
Engzell had the final decision,
and called it in.
“If the ball is out, I call it out.
If the ball is in, it’s in,” Schia-
vone said. “That’s what they
(taught) me when I was young,
and that’s what I want to teach
to the kids in the future. So if I
call the ball out, the (probabil-
ity) that I make a mistake is
really low. So if you explain (to)
me that this is the mark and
that the ball is out ... I can be-
lieve you. But that ball, no.”
Because the ball leaves a
mark on the clay, the French
Open is the only Grand Slam
tournament that doesn’t use an
electronic challenge system to
check contentious calls. That
leaves the players to plead their
case to the chair umpire and
take their chances.
“What do I have to say? The
truth, or do I have to joke?”
Schiavone said. “One call can’t
make the difference so much,
but in that moment, you have to
really check the ball. That’s
what I’m contesting.”
DOUBLES TROUBLE: Mitch-
ell Krueger and Shane Vinsant,
fresh off a loss in the boys dou-
bles final at the French Open,
are already thinking ahead.
The American teens lost to
Roberto Carballes Baena and
Andres Artunedo Martinavarr of
Spain 5-7, 7-6 (5), 10-5 Saturday
at Roland Garros.
“It makes us more hungry for
another final to win it next time,
especially with Wimbledon
coming up and then the U.S.
Open after that,” Krueger said.
“I definitely want to get back to
it because I think we have the
potential to win it.”
In the girls doubles final,
second-seeded Irina Khromache-
va and Maryna Zanevska of
Russia defeated Victoria Kan of
Russia and Demi Schuurs of the
Netherlands 6-4, 7-5.
FUTURE FEDERER: Marko
Osmakcic, a 12-year-old from
Zurich, Switzerland, beat Artem
Dubrivniy of Russia on Saturday
to win the Longines Futures
Tennis Aces World Champion-
ship, an event that included 16
boys aged 12 or younger — one
from each of 16 countries.
Afterward, Osmakcic and
Dubrivniy got to play an exhibi-
tion doubles match with past
French Open champions Andre
Agassi and Jim Courier.
Controversial call
shatters Schiavone
By SAMUEL PETREQUIN
AP Sports Writer
FRENCH OPEN
N O T E B O O K
“When I didn’t have a good
hole (my dad) picked me up; I
couldn’t askfor a better partner,”
said Matt Kachurak. “I wouldn’t
want to play with anybody else.”
The Kachuraks will take on
the team of Berry and Wasilew-
ski at 8:33 a.m. today. In the oth-
er semifinal, Weiscarger and
Gershey will take on Barth and
Belgio at 8:24 a.m.
The winner of the two better-
ball matches will compete in the
final at 2:27 p.m.
To get there, the Kachuraks
defeated Mike Blazick and Mark
Kopec in the first round before
knocking off Olszewski and Wil-
liams.
Berry and Wasilewski defeat-
ed Ted Komoroski and Brandon
Matthews before defeating Tom
Iskra and Jim Gardas.
Weiscarger and Gershey de-
feated Max Hritzik and Chet
Blazick before beating Mark Ja-
rolen and Len Coleman.
Barth and Belgio knocked off
top-seeded Jeff Bellas and Tom
Lyons before defeating Joe Wer-
ner and Jeff Howanitz.
TODAY’S TEE TIMES
7:30am FRED SCHIEL; DAVE PIECZYNSKI; BILL
JONES; JOHN DAVISON
7:39am RONSIMON; BRUCEBRENNER; MARTY
KLEIN; JOE SKVARLA
7:39am JOHN REESE; WES PARKER; BOB SE-
LIG; RICK SUTLIFF
7:48am STAN KEMPINSKI; GENE SALKO; DAN
LECO; PAT WIELGOPOLSKI
7:48am TONY POINTEK; JOE HOWANITZ; RAY
LICK; SHELDON RICHARDS
7:57am ROBERT ROSTOCK; KEVIN BARNO;
BRIAN McDERMOTT; ART ROGO
7:57am JAY BURKHART; BOB BURKHART; JOE
WNOROWSKI; STEVE SHIPIERSKI
8:06am JOE YOZVIAK; ANDREW YOZIAK; VIC-
TOR SWIDERSKI; JOE BARANOWSKI
8:06am HARRY GAUGHAN; JAMES BARRETT;
JAMES LENTINI; DAULTON LENTINI
8:15am GEOFF DENT; DALE DENT; J.P. AN-
DREJKO; JEFF ANDREJKO
8:15am VINCETASSITANO; CHRISBEGGS; REX
KEMPINSKI; TOM KEMPINSKI
8:24am JOE WEISCARGER; JOHN GERSHEY;
SCOTT BARTH; LOU BELGIO
8:24am JOHN CHURNETSKI; WALLY KUHAR-
CHIK; DAN BARNES; JOHN BOBECK
8:33am RICK BERRY; TOM WASILEWSKI; DAVE
KACHURAK; MATT KACHURAK
8:33am TOM ZABRESKY; GEORGE FREDMON-
SKI; DINO MAZARKI; PAUL TOMEK
8:42am JOE MANOSKI; KEN SWIDERSKI; JOHN
LISMAN; JAMES SHERIDAN
8:51am JOHN KOTSKO; SCOTT SAFKO; MATT
MARTIN; FRANK DEGAETANO
8:51am JOHN KONICKI; PETE KONICKI; KEN
THOMA; JAMES FALZONE
9:00am RON DROBENAK; BRIAN BALUTIS; LEN
BUTCZYNSKI; BRIAN MARCINKOWSKI
9:00am CHRIS SCHWARTZ; CHRIS W
SCHWARTZ; JAMES SCOREY; PAUL KISH
9:09am FRANK SLUCKI; FRANK SLUCKI III; TOM
GORMEN; MOLLY GORMAN
9:09am LEN LULIS; ALEX MCLAUCHLIN; NED
ENDLER; PAT ENDLER
9:18am JACK WILK; MIKE WILK; LOUMASTRINI;
DAN CORNALI
9:18am JOE PERUGINO; FRED LOMBARDO;
LARRY KARNES; FLOYD BOWEN
9:27am TOM MACNEELY; PAUL MURPHY;
CHRISTAN CHWIEJ; STEVE CHWIEJ
9:27am BOB BIRK; RON DOVMAN; NED DELA-
NEY; GENE CAPRIO
9:36am HENRY GOLDOWSKI; STEVE BOLIN-
GER; FRANK SCHIEL; FRANK SCHIEL JR
12:30pm JOE BEGGS; TONY GENOBLE; RON
HUMMER; JIM SABATINI
12:39pm PAUL MURRAY; DAN CHAUMP; JOE
BUTCHER; DAN NOVAK
12:39pm JEFF BELLAS; TOM LYONS; MIKE ZA-
POTOSKI; SCOTT FRANCIS
12:48pm TOM STELTZER; D.L. SADVARY; JOE
MARUT; DON WOLFE
12:48pm MARK JAROLEN; LEN COLEMAN; MAX
HRITZIK; CHET BLAZICK
12:57pm EDNORK; STEVE TOKACH; MARK SO-
PRANO; JOHN CALLAHAN
12:57pm STEVE SKIRO; ART BRUNN JR; JACK
DIGWOOD; JASON MARKS
1:06pm COREY MITCHELL; COREY MITCHELL
JR; GREG READY; ROB LEE
1:06pm JOE WERNER; JEFF HOWANITZ; TOM
ISKRA; JIM GARDAS
1:15pm FRAN FISHER; KEVIN FISHER; TOM
MASTRINI; MARK DINGMAN
1:15pm DAVID OWCA; DENNIS OWCA; MIKE
BLAZICK; MARK KOPEC
1:24pm JOHN LEIGHTON; RICH CROSSIN; JOE
PATRIZI; KEN RALSTON
1:24pm JOHN OLSZEWSKI; ERIC WILLIAMS;
TED KOMOROSKI; BRANDON MATTHEWS
1:33pm T.J. COOK; JASON MOORE; DREW
MAMARY; ERIC PLISKO
1:33pm MARTY BEHM; GARY KRAWETZ; KEVIN
KEYES; KEVIN POLIFKO
1:42pm PETEOLSZEWSKI; CHADRADO; JERRY
DECKER; JIM THOMAS III
1:42pm MIKE DUDA; DON CROSSIN; JOHN
MUENCH; JOHN KOTIS
1:51pm RANDY CATALANOTTE; BRIAN
KERSTETER; MARK JONES; RICH SERAFIN
1:51pm TONY GRABOWSKI; GEORGE JONES;
DAVE BIENIAS; PAUL SKRIP
2:00pm MANNY MIHALOS; GENE CHIAVACCI;
MIKE HIRTHLER; MIKE HIRTHLER JR
2:00pm JOHN MILLER; KEITH KOPEC; JIM THO-
MAS; DAVID THOMAS
2:09pm GEORGE REIMILLER; JOE MANTIONE;
ED BRADY; NEAL BUKEAVICH
2:18pm JOHN KEMPINSKI; DAN KEMPINSKI;
PAUL BERDY; TOM GILL
CLASSIC
Continued from Page 1C
thanks to Ordonez -- who’s reco-
vering from an ankle injury and
is expected to rejoin the parent
Tigers this week.
Will Rhymes began the game
with a sharp single to right field
against Yankees starter Adam
Warren, whocame intothe game
with a 3-1 record and hadn’t lost
in nearly a month.
But Ordonez helped change
that, slamming a double to cen-
ter to bring Rhymes home with
the game’s first run. Ordonez al-
so singled and scored during To-
ledo’s two-run ninth inning, and
scorched a single to left field in
the fifth.
But Toledo’s offensive attack
was really driven by Ryan Strie-
by.
Before driving in the game’s fi-
nal three runs on a three-hit
night, the fifth-place hitter in To-
ledo’s lineup banged a double to
center field in the fourth inning.
Strieby eventually scored when
Cale Iorgbeat out a bases-loaded
dribbler to third base for an in-
field single.
That gave the Mud Hens a 2-0
lead, but it didn’t take long for
the Yankees to get even.
They briefly solved Below in
thebottomof thefourth, as Jorge
Vazquez crackeda hardsingle off
the left field wall and Brandon
Lairdshot a double downthe left
field line. Kevin Russo drew a
two-out walk to fill the bases
with Yankees, then Dan Brewer
laced a two-run single to center
field.
But that was all Below surren-
dered.
He escapedfurther damage by
fanning Luis Nunez, then al-
lowed only Ramiro Pena’s fifth-
inning double over his final two
innings.
Two Toledo relievers then fin-
ished the job, retiring all nine
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre batters
over the final three frames.
Just as quickly as Scranton/
Wilkes-Barre tied the score, the
Mud Hens grabbed the lead
back.
Timo Perez and Ordonez both
singled to open the fifth inning,
andPerez eventuallycame home
on Strieby’s RBI groundout.
But Strieby, a hard-hitting first
baseman, wasn’t quite done.
Rhymes and Perez both reac-
hed on infield hits in the seventh
inning, moved up a base on a
wild pitch and scurried home
when Strieby slammed a single
to center field -- giving him the
team lead with 31 RBIs on the
season.
Strieby also singled and
scored in the last inning, when a
two-out, two-run single by Clete
Thomas ended Toledo’s scoring
andsent theYankees totheir sec-
ond straight loss to open a four-
game series at PNC Field.
The Yankees will try to snap
that mini-skid by sending Carlos
Silva to the mound for today’s
1:05 p.m. start. Silva, a former
major league starter with the
Philadelphia Phillies and Chica-
go Cubs, is 2-0 with a 3.44 ERA
since joining Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre two weeks ago.
HOW THEY SCORED
MUD HENS FIRST: Will Rhymes began the
game with a sharp single to right-center field and
moved to second on a groundout. Rehabbing De-
troit Tigers star Magglio Ordonez drilled a double to
bring home Rhymes. MUD HENS 1, YANKEES 0.
MUD HENS FOURTH: Ryan Strieby ripped a
double, Bryan Pounds beat out a hit to deep short-
stop and Clete Thomas walked to fill the bases with
one out. Cale Iorg then sent a dribbler between the
pitcher’s mound and third base for an infield hit that
scored Strieby. MUD HENS 2, YANKEES 0.
YANKEESFOURTH: Andjust likethat, theYan-
kees got even. JorgeVazquez bangedalongsingle
off the left field wall, Brandon Laird shot a double
into left field and Kevin Russo drew a two-out walk
to load the bases. Dan Brewer followed by unload-
ing a liner to center field for a two-run single that
scored Vazquez and Laird. YANKEES 2, MUD
HENS 2.
MUD HENS FIFTH: Toledo got the lead right
back when Timo Perez and Ordonez both singled,
followed by two consecutive groundouts that led
Perez home. MUD HENS 3, YANKEES 2.
MUDHENSSEVENTH: Will Rhymes and Timo
Perez both reached on infield singles to begin the
inning. Both advanced a base on a wild pitch and
rode home on Strieby’s two-out, two-run single.
MUD HENS 5, YANKEES 2.
MUD HENS NINTH: Ordonez and Strieby both
singled to wrap up three-hit nights for both, and
Bryan Pounds drew a walk. Clete Thomas deliver-
ed Ordonez and Strieby home with a hard single to
left field. MUD HENS 7, YANKEES 2.
YANKEES NINTH: Brandon Laird led off by
blasting his third homer of the season, a booming
shot over the left-center field wall. MUD HENS 7,
YANKEES 3.
SWB
Continued from Page 1C
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Yankees center fielder Greg Golson makes a catch in the fourth
inning on a fly ball by Toledo’s Scott Thorman.
Next Game: 1:05 p.m. today vs.
Toledo at PNC Field
Probable starters: Yankees
Carlos Silva (RHP, 2-0, 3.44 ERA)
vs. Toledo’s Adam Wilk (LHP, 4-4,
3.54 ERA).
Radio: WICK-1400 AM, WYCK
1340-AM, WFBS 1280-AM, WCDL
1440-AM, WILK 910/989-AM with
Mike Vander Wood.
On Deck: The Yankees conclude
their four-game series with the
Mud Hens at 7:05 p.m. Monday
before welcoming Charlotte to
town for another four-game set.
L O O K I N G A H E A D
power-play goal just 2:35 after
Milan Lucic scored Boston’s first
goal of the finals. Recchi, the
NHL’s oldest active player at 43,
ended the Bruins’ 5-for-68 pow-
er-play drought with a deflection
from the slot.
The Canucks got a pregame
boost from the inspirational re-
turn of center Manny Malhotra,
who hadn’t played since incur-
ring a career-threatening eye in-
jury on March 16. The Canucks
also played without top defense-
man Dan Hamhuis, who missed
his first gameof theplayoffs after
getting hurt midway through
Game1while delivering a check.
AndrewAlberts filled in, playing
his first game in four weeks.
But until Sedin’s late goal,
Boston played a second straight
game of impressive shutdown
defense against Vancouver’s
vaunted top line featuring the
NHL’s last two scoring cham-
pions —Daniel andtwinbrother
Henrik Sedin.
Turns out the Bruins should
have been paying attention to
Burrows, their less-heralded li-
nemate who has 17 points in the
postseason.
Burrows scored his first goal
while skating on Vancouver’s
second-team, power-play unit
with just 12 seconds left in the
man advantage, taking a short
pass from Chris Higgins and
flicking a shot under Thomas’
arm.
The Bruins had scored just
one goal in their previous seven
periods of playoff hockey before
Lucic finally ended the drought
in the second period. The Van-
couver native bulledintothe slot
and batted the rebound of John-
ny Boychuk’s shot under Luon-
go’s extended pad.
The goal ended Luongo’s play-
off shutout streak at 137 min-
utes, 26 seconds.
Recchi put the Bruins ahead
2:35 later, scoring just their sec-
ond road power-play goal of the
entire postseason. The veteran
forward from nearby Kamloops,
British Columbia, artfully de-
flected a heavy shot by Chara,
who moved back to the point on
Boston’s power play after play-
ing in front of Luongo in Game1.
The Bruins had just one goal
on the power play in six games
before Recchi scored. Recchi,
who plans to retire if the Bruins
win the Cup, hadn’t scored any
goals in their previous 11 playoff
games since April 30.
The Sedins’ line finally con-
nected midway through the
third period after Daniel took
the puck away from Chara in
Boston’s end. Burrows eventual-
ly foundDaniel Sedinonthe oth-
er side of Thomas’ net, and the
NHL scoring champion fired
home his ninth goal of the post-
season.
Malhotra seemed unlikely to
make an impact on Vancouver’s
playoff run when a deflected
puck hit him in the face nearly
three months ago. He needed
two operations around his left
eye, yet the cerebral faceoff spe-
cialist anddefensiveforwardsur-
prised the Canucks with his rap-
idrecovery, returningtopractice
three weeks ago.
After a false start before Game
1, Malhotra was ready Saturday.
When he stepped on the ice
wearing a full face shield for pre-
game warmups, Vancouver’s
fans rose and roared, waving
white towels — and when his
face appeared on the scoreboard
between warmups and the open-
ing faceoff, the crowd chanted
his name.
When Malhotra stepped onto
the ice 1:48 into the first period
for a faceoff at center ice, he got
an arena-shaking ovation — and
he won the draw cleanly.
Malhotra played nearly 7
1
⁄2
minutes and won 86 percent of
his faceoffs.
In Wednesday’s opener, Van-
couver won on Raffi Torres’ dra-
matic goal after 59
1
⁄2 scoreless
minutes. Both teams failed to
score on six power plays, but
generated numerous chances
that were denied by two of the
NHL’s best goalies.
Vancouver is chasing the first
NHL title in its four-decade fran-
chise history after two previous
failed trips to the finals. The
Bruins haven’t won the Stanley
Cup since 1972, losing their last
five finals appearances.
NOTES: The Canucks haven’t
lost at home since May 7. ... Van-
couver C Alexandre Bolduc was
scratched in Malhotra’s favor. ...
Hamhuis is third in ice time
among the Canucks during the
playoffs, averaging 24:50. He’s
second with 38 blocked shots. ...
Alberts hadn’t played since May
3, sitting out nine games as a
healthy scratch. ... Thomas
broke Andy Moog’s franchise re-
cord for minutes played in a sin-
gle postseason. Moog played
1,196 minutes during Boston’s
run to the 1990 finals.
CANUCKS
Continued from Page 1C
AP PHOTO
Vancouver Canucks left wing Daniel Sedin celebrates after scoring the second goal against Boston
Bruins goalie Tim Thomas Saturday during the third period of Game 2 of the Stanley Cup Finals in
Vancouver, British Columbia.
C M Y K
PAGE 6C SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ M A J O R L E A G U E B A S E B A L L
PITTSBURGH — Charlie
Morton pitched seven solid
innings and the Pittsburgh
Pirates sent the Philadelphia
Phillies to their fourth consec-
utive loss, 6-3 Saturday night.
Andrew McCutchen and
Lyle Overbay each had three
hits and Brandon Wood home-
red for Pittsburgh (28-29),
which has won four of five and
could complete a sweep of
first-place Philadelphia on
Sunday to reach .500.
Morton was 2-12 with a 7.57
ERA last season as the Pirates
lost 105 games. But he has won
four of his past five decisions
to improve to 6-2. His ERA
stands at 2.52 — fourth in the
NL — after allowing a total of
six earned runs over his past
five starts.
Mets 5, Braves 0
NEW YORK — Dillon Gee
outpitched Jair Jurrjens to
remain unbeaten this season
and Jose Reyes hit a bases-
loaded triple, leading the New
York Mets past the Atlanta
Braves 5-0 on Saturday night.
Pinch-hitter Jason Pridie
snapped a scoreless tie with an
RBI single in the seventh and
the Mets took advantage of an
error by shortstop Alex Gon-
zalez to score five times in the
inning.
New York’s struggling bull-
pen finally preserved a lead,
too, with Pedro Beato and Tim
Byrdak combining for two
perfect innings to close it out.
Brewers 3, Marlins 2
MIAMI — Prince Fielder
homered and Yuniesky Be-
tancourt hit a tiebreaking RBI
double in Milwaukee’s two-run
seventh inning, helping the
Brewers beat the Florida Mar-
lins 3-2 on Saturday night.
Yovani Gallardo pitched six
effective innings to win his
sixth consecutive start and
Milwaukee posted back-to-back
wins in South Florida for the
first time since April 10-11,
2007.
Dodgers 11, Reds 8, 11 innings
CINCINNATI — Matt Kemp
hit a tying grand slam in the
eighth inning for his second
homer of the game, and Jamey
Carroll singled in the go-ahead
run in the 11th, sending the
Los Angeles Dodgers to an 11-8
victory over the Cincinnati
Reds on Saturday.
The Dodgers pulled off their
biggest comeback of the season
and improved to 5-0 in extra
innings.
Cardinals 5, Cubs 4, 12 innings
ST. LOUIS — Albert Pujols
hit his second homer of the
game with two outs in the 12th
inning to give the St. Louis
Cardinals a 5-4 victory over the
Chicago Cubs on Saturday.
Pujols had his ninth game-
ending homer of his career and
first since Aug. 16, 2009,
against the Padres on a 2-1
pitch from Jeff Samardzija
(3-2) as the Cardinals prevailed
in 95-degree heat. He has 41
career multihomer games, two
of them this season, and has
homered three times the last
two games to emerge from a
power funk.
Rockies 2, Giants 1
SAN FRANCISCO — Troy
Tulowitzki had three hits and
drove in a run, Jhoulys Chacin
pitched six effective innings
and the Colorado Rockies beat
the San Francisco Giants 2-1 on
Saturday.
Chacin (6-4) allowed one run
and four hits to end a personal
two-game losing streak and
help the Rockies win in San
Francisco for the first time in
five games.
Diamondbacks 2, Nationals 0
PHOENIX — Joe Saunders
escaped two early jams to go
seven innings in a combined
four-hitter, lifting the Arizona
Diamondbacks to a 2-0 win
over the Washington Nationals
Saturday night.
N AT I O N A L L E A G U E R O U N D U P
Bucs’ Morton
salts away Phils
The Associated Press
BOSTON—J.D. Drewsin-
gled home Carl Crawford from
second with two outs in the14th
inning Saturday, lifting the Bos-
ton Red Sox to a 9-8 win over the
Oakland Athletics after closer
Jonathan Papelbon blewa four-
run lead in the ninth.
Crawford had four hits and
drove in three runs and Adrian
Gonzalez had a solo homer and
three hits for the Red Sox, who
posted their 15th win in 20
games.
Conor Jackson had a tying,
pinch-hit two-run single in the
ninth and a key double in the
11th as Oakland grabbed the
lead, but AndrewBailey couldn’t
hold it. The Athletics lost their
fifth straight.
Alfredo Aceves (3-1) pitched
four innings for the win.
Crawford doubled into the
left-field corner against Guiller-
mo Moscoso (2-1). After Jed
Lowrie was intentionally walk-
ed, Drewlined a single to right-
center to end the 5-hour, 17-
minute game.
Rays 3, Mariners 2
SEATTLE—Jeremy Hellick-
son picked up where he left off in
May, pitching neatly into the
eighth inning to lead the Tampa
Bay Rays to a 3-2 victory over
the Seattle Mariners on Sat-
urday.
Rangers 4, Indians 0
CLEVELAND—Derek Hol-
land tossed a five-hitter for his
second career shutout and the
Texas Rangers beat the Cleve-
land Indians 4-0 on Saturday
night.
Josh Hamilton and Nelson
Cruz each hit a two-run homer
as Texas won for the seventh
time in eight games to improve
to15-8 since May10.
Orioles 5, Blue Jays 3
BALTIMORE—Mark Rey-
nolds hit a grand slamand Jake
Arrieta pitched six effective
innings to lead the Baltimore
Orioles to a 5-3 win over the
Toronto Blue Jays on Saturday
night.
With the Orioles trailing 3-1in
the sixth, Reynolds hit the first
pitch fromRicky Romero into
the left-center stands for his
eighth homer of the season and
the first slamof his career in129
home runs.
Arrieta (7-3), allowed three
runs on five hits, walking four
and striking out one. While his
line didn’t look impressive, he
got better as he went along —
retiring his last seven batters.
Twins 7, Royals 2
KANSAS CITY, Mo. —Alexi
Casilla matched a career high
with four hits and drove in two
runs, leading the Minnesota
Twins to a 7-2 victory over the
Kansas City Royals on Saturday
night.
Casilla stroked RBI singles in
the third and seventh innings to
help the Twins to their third
straight win, equaling a season
high. Casilla’s other four-hit
game was Sept. 3, 2007 against
the Cleveland Indians.
Tigers 4, White Sox 2
CHICAGO—Miguel Cabrera
hit a tiebreaking two-run homer
with two out in the ninth inning,
sending Justin Verlander and the
Detroit Tigers to a 4-2 victory
over the Chicago White Sox on
Saturday night.
A M E R I C A N L E A G U E R O U N D U P
Drew draws up win in
14th inning for BoSox
The Associated Press
STANDINGS/STATS
F R I D A Y ’ S
L A T E B O X E S
Angels 3, Yankees 2
New York Los Angeles
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Jeter ss 3 0 0 0 MIzturs 2b 5 0 1 0
Grndrs cf 4 0 0 0 Aybar ss 4 1 1 0
Teixeir 1b 3 0 0 0 Abreu lf 3 1 1 1
AlRdrg 3b 3 2 1 0 Willits lf 0 0 0 0
Cano 2b 4 0 0 0 TrHntr rf 3 0 0 0
Martin c 4 0 1 1 Callasp 3b 4 0 1 1
Swisher rf 2 0 0 0 Branyn dh 3 1 1 0
Posada dh 3 0 1 1
BoWlsn
ph-dh 1 0 0 0
Gardnr lf 3 0 0 0 Trumo 1b 3 0 2 0
Mathis c 3 0 0 0
Bourjos cf 3 0 2 1
Totals 29 2 3 2 Totals 32 3 9 3
New York ........................... 010 100 000 — 2
Los Angeles....................... 200 100 00x — 3
DP—New York 1, Los Angeles 1. LOB—New York
5, Los Angeles 10. 2B—Al.Rodriguez (11), Posada
(6), Abreu (15), Trumbo (10). SB—M.Izturis (6),
Bourjos (7). CS—M.Izturis (4).
IP H R ER BB SO
New York
Nova L,4-4............... 6 8 3 2 2 2
Robertson................ 1 0 0 0 1 2
Logan........................ 0 1 0 0 0 0
Ayala......................... 1 0 0 0 1 0
Los Angeles
Weaver W,7-4......... 7 3 2 2 4 8
S.Downs H,8 ........... 1 0 0 0 1 1
Walden S,13-16...... 1 0 0 0 0 2
Nova pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Logan pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
HBP—by Ayala (Bourjos). WP—Nova. PB—Mar-
tin.
Umpires—Home, Mike Estabrook;First, Marty Fos-
ter;Second, Bill Welke;Third, Tim Tschida.
T—2:49. A—42,521 (45,389).
Diamondbacks 4, Nationals 0
Washington Arizona
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Berndn lf 4 0 0 0 RRorts 3b 4 1 2 0
Dsmnd ss 4 0 1 0 KJhnsn 2b 2 0 0 0
L.Nix rf 4 0 1 0 J.Upton rf 2 1 1 0
Morse 1b 4 0 0 0 S.Drew ss 4 0 1 3
Espinos 2b 2 0 0 0 CYoung cf 4 1 1 1
Ankiel cf 3 0 0 0 Monter c 3 0 1 0
IRdrgz c 3 0 1 0 Nady 1b 3 0 1 0
HrstnJr 3b 3 0 0 0 GParra lf 4 0 1 0
Maya p 1 0 0 0 Cllmntr p 2 1 0 0
Slaten p 0 0 0 0 DHrndz p 0 0 0 0
Coffey p 0 0 0 0 Brrghs ph 1 0 0 0
Cora ph 1 0 0 0 Patersn p 0 0 0 0
Kimall p 0 0 0 0
Stairs ph 1 0 0 0
HRdrgz p 0 0 0 0
Totals 30 0 3 0 Totals 29 4 8 4
Washington ....................... 000 000 000 — 0
Arizona............................... 010 030 00x — 4
DP—Washington 1. LOB—Washington 4, Arizona
8. 2B—I.Rodriguez (5), R.Roberts (8), Montero
(14), G.Parra (5). 3B—S.Drew (3). HR—C.Young
(10). SB—J.Upton (11). CS—R.Roberts (4).
IP H R ER BB SO
Washington
Maya L,0-1............... 4
1
⁄3 6 4 4 3 4
Slaten........................ 0 1 0 0 0 0
Coffey.......................
2
⁄3 0 0 0 1 2
Kimball...................... 2 1 0 0 1 2
H.Rodriguez ............ 1 0 0 0 0 2
Arizona
Collmenter W,4-1.... 7 3 0 0 1 5
Da.Hernandez ......... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Paterson................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Slaten pitched to 1 batter in the 5th.
HBP—by Kimball (J.Upton), by Maya (J.Upton).
Umpires—Home, Bruce Dreckman;First, Vic Cara-
pazza;Second, Rob Drake;Third, Gary Darling.
T—2:45. A—20,332 (48,633).
Mariners 7, Rays 0
Tampa Bay Seattle
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Damon dh 3 0 1 0 ISuzuki rf 4 1 0 0
Zobrist 2b 4 0 2 0 Ryan ss 3 1 0 0
Longori 3b 4 0 0 0 Smoak 1b 2 1 1 2
Joyce rf 4 0 0 0 Cust dh 2 1 0 1
BUpton cf 3 0 0 0 FGtrrz cf 4 0 0 0
SRdrgz ss 3 0 0 0 AKndy 2b 3 1 1 2
FLopez 1b 3 0 1 0 Olivo c 4 1 2 2
Jaso c 3 0 0 0 Figgins 3b 4 0 0 0
Ruggin lf 3 0 0 0 Peguer lf 3 1 0 0
Totals 30 0 4 0 Totals 29 7 4 7
Tampa Bay......................... 000 000 000 — 0
Seattle ................................ 103 030 00x — 7
E—S.Rodriguez (5). DP—Seattle 1. LOB—Tampa
Bay 4, Seattle 6. HR—Smoak (10), A.Kennedy (5),
Olivo (5). SB—Zobrist (6). S—Ryan.
IP H R ER BB SO
Tampa Bay
Sonnanstine L,0-2 .. 5 4 7 7 5 1
A.Russell .................. 1
2
⁄3 0 0 0 1 1
C.Ramos..................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Farnsworth............... 1 0 0 0 0 2
Seattle
Vargas W,4-3 .......... 9 4 0 0 1 4
HBP—by Sonnanstine (Peguero). WP—Vargas.
Umpires—Home, Jim Wolf;First, Derryl Cousins-
;Second, Jim Joyce;Third, Mark Ripperger.
T—2:21. A—24,492 (47,878).
Padres 3, Astros 1
Houston San Diego
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Bourn cf 4 0 1 0 Denorfi cf 3 1 2 1
Barmes ss 4 0 2 0 Bartlett ss 3 1 2 0
Pence rf 4 0 1 0 Headly 3b 4 0 1 0
Ca.Lee lf 3 0 0 0 Ludwck lf 2 1 1 1
Kppngr 2b 4 0 0 0 Cantu 1b 4 0 0 0
Wallac 1b 3 0 0 0 Cnghm rf 2 0 1 1
CJhnsn 3b 4 1 2 0 Hawpe ph 1 0 0 0
Towles c 2 0 0 1 H.Bell p 0 0 0 0
MDwns ph 1 0 0 0 Forsyth 2b 3 0 0 0
Happ p 2 0 0 0 RJhnsn c 3 0 0 0
AngSnc ph 1 0 0 0 Mosely p 2 0 0 0
FRdrgz p 0 0 0 0 Tekotte ph 1 0 0 0
MAdms p 0 0 0 0
EPtrsn rf 0 0 0 0
Totals 32 1 6 1 Totals 28 3 7 3
Houston.............................. 000 100 000 — 1
San Diego.......................... 000 210 00x — 3
E—Towles (3). LOB—Houston 7, San Diego 6.
2B—Barmes (7), Cunningham (1). 3B—C.Johnson
2 (3). HR—Denorfia (4). SB—Bourn (23), Bartlett
(10). CS—Bartlett (2). S—Towles.
IP H R ER BB SO
Houston
Happ L,3-7............... 6 6 3 3 2 2
Fe.Rodriguez........... 2 1 0 0 2 3
San Diego
Moseley W,2-6........ 7 6 1 1 1 5
M.Adams H,10 ........ 1 0 0 0 0 2
H.Bell S,15-16......... 1 0 0 0 1 2
Balk—Happ.
Umpires—Home, Greg Gibson;First, Todd Tiche-
nor;Second, Sam Holbrook;Third, Gerry Davis.
T—2:41. A—20,056 (42,691).
Giants 3, Rockies 1
Colorado San Francisco
ab r h bi ab r h bi
S.Smith rf 5 0 0 0 Torres cf 4 0 0 0
JHerrr 2b 4 0 0 0 Burriss 3b 4 0 3 0
CGnzlz lf 3 1 1 0 FSnchz 2b 4 1 1 0
Tlwtzk ss 3 0 1 0 Huff 1b 4 0 0 0
Helton 1b 3 0 0 1 Schrhlt rf 4 1 1 0
Wggntn 3b 4 0 0 0 C.Ross lf 3 1 2 2
Iannett c 2 0 0 0 BCrwfr ss 2 0 1 1
Fowler cf 3 0 0 0 Whitsd c 3 0 0 0
Giambi ph 1 0 1 0 Cain p 2 0 1 0
Nelson pr 0 0 0 0 Rownd ph 1 0 0 0
Nicasio p 2 0 2 0 JaLopz p 0 0 0 0
EYong ph 1 0 0 0 BrWlsn p 0 0 0 0
Belisle p 0 0 0 0
MtRynl p 0 0 0 0
Splrghs ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 32 1 5 1 Totals 31 3 9 3
Colorado ............................ 000 100 000 — 1
San Francisco.................... 000 300 00x — 3
DP—Colorado1. LOB—Colorado 9, San Francisco
5. 2B—Tulowitzki (12), Nicasio 2 (2), C.Ross 2 (8),
B.Crawford (2). SB—C.Gonzalez (8). CS—Burriss
(2).
IP H R ER BB SO
Colorado
Nicasio L,1-1 ........... 6 9 3 3 1 3
Belisle....................... 1 0 0 0 0 2
Mat.Reynolds........... 1 0 0 0 0 3
San Francisco
Cain W,4-4............... 7 4 1 1 4 7
Ja.Lopez H,8 ........... 1 0 0 0 0 2
Br.Wilson S,16-18 .. 1 1 0 0 1 1
WP—Nicasio, Cain.
Umpires—Home, James Hoye;First, Paul Emmel-
;Second, Mike Muchlinski;Third, Bill Miller.
T—2:33. A—41,021 (41,915).
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Texas 11, Cleveland 2
Toronto 8, Baltimore 4
Boston 8, Oakland 6
Chicago White Sox 6, Detroit 4
Minnesota 5, Kansas City 2
L.A. Angels 3, N.Y. Yankees 2
Seattle 7, Tampa Bay 0
Saturday's Games
Boston 9, Oakland 8, 14 innings
Tampa Bay 3, Seattle 2
Texas 4, Cleveland 0
Baltimore 5, Toronto 3
Detroit 4, Chicago White Sox 2
Minnesota 7, Kansas City 2
N.Y. Yankees at L.A. Angels, 9:05 p.m.
Sunday's Games
Texas (C.Wilson5-3) at Cleveland(Talbot 2-1), 1:05
p.m.
Oakland (Anderson 3-5) at Boston (Lackey 2-5),
1:35 p.m.
Toronto (Jo-.Reyes 1-4) at Baltimore (Guthrie 2-7),
1:35 p.m.
Detroit (Penny 4-4) at Chicago White Sox (Peavy
2-0), 2:10 p.m.
Minnesota (Duensing 2-5) at Kansas City (Francis
2-5), 2:10 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Colon 3-3) at L.A. Angels (Pineiro
2-2), 3:35 p.m.
Tampa Bay (W.Davis 4-5) at Seattle (Bedard 3-4),
4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
Minnesota at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Oakland at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m.
Detroit at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Seattle at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Toronto at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Pittsburgh 2, Philadelphia 1, 12 innings
Atlanta 6, N.Y. Mets 3
Cincinnati 2, L.A. Dodgers 1
Milwaukee 6, Florida 5
St. Louis 6, Chicago Cubs 1
Arizona 4, Washington 0
San Diego 3, Houston 1
San Francisco 3, Colorado 1
Saturday's Games
St. Louis 5, Chicago Cubs 4, 12 innings
Colorado 2, San Francisco 1
L.A. Dodgers 11, Cincinnati 8, 11 innings
Pittsburgh 6, Philadelphia 3
N.Y. Mets 5, Atlanta 0
Milwaukee 3, Florida 2
Arizona 2, Washington 0
Houston at San Diego, 8:35 p.m.
Sunday's Games
L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 4-4) at Cincinnati (T.Wood
4-3), 1:10 p.m.
Milwaukee (Narveson 2-4) at Florida (Ani.Sanchez
5-1), 1:10 p.m.
Philadelphia(Halladay 7-3) at Pittsburgh(Ja.McDo-
nald 3-3), 1:35 p.m.
ChicagoCubs (Zambrano5-2) at St. Louis (Carpen-
ter 1-5), 2:15 p.m.
Colorado (Hammel 3-5) at San Francisco (Vogel-
song 3-1), 4:05 p.m.
Washington (Marquis 6-2) at Arizona (I.Kennedy
6-2), 4:10 p.m.
Houston (Lyles 0-0) at San Diego (Latos 3-6), 6:35
p.m.
Atlanta (T.Hudson 4-4) at N.Y. Mets (Dickey 2-6),
8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
L.A. Dodgers at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Milwaukee at Florida, 7:10 p.m.
Colorado at San Diego, 10:05 p.m.
Washington at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
N A T I O N A L
L E A G U E
Pirates 6, Phillies 3
Philadelphia Pittsburgh
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Rollins ss 2 1 1 0 Tabata lf 4 1 1 0
WValdz ss 2 0 1 0 Paul rf 3 0 1 0
Polanc 3b 5 0 2 1 AMcCt cf 4 1 3 2
Utley 2b 5 0 1 0 Walker 2b 3 0 0 0
Howard 1b 4 0 0 1 Overay 1b 4 1 3 1
Victorn cf 4 1 1 0 CSnydr c 3 0 0 1
Ibanez lf 4 1 2 0 BrWod 3b 4 2 1 1
DBrwn rf 3 0 1 1 Cedeno ss 4 0 1 0
Sardinh c 2 0 0 0 Morton p 2 0 0 0
Ruiz ph 0 0 0 0 Diaz ph 0 1 0 0
Kndrck p 1 0 0 0 Veras p 0 0 0 0
Zagrsk p 0 0 0 0 GJones ph 1 0 0 0
Mrtnz ph 1 0 0 0 Hanrhn p 0 0 0 0
JRomr p 0 0 0 0
Baez p 0 0 0 0
BFrncs ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 34 3 9 3 Totals 32 610 5
Philadelphia....................... 100 100 001 — 3
Pittsburgh .......................... 200 200 11x — 6
E—W.Valdez (3). DP—Pittsburgh 1. LOB—Phila-
delphia 9, Pittsburgh 6. 2B—Rollins (11), Ibanez
(11), Tabata (11), A.McCutchen 2 (11), Overbay (11),
Cedeno (8). 3B—Overbay (1). HR—Br.Wood (1).
SB—Diaz (3). CS—Paul (2). S—K.Kendrick, Paul.
IP H R ER BB SO
Philadelphia
K.Kendrick L,3-4..... 5 8 4 4 0 0
Zagurski ................... 1 1 0 0 0 1
J.Romero ................. 1 1 1 1 2 2
Baez.......................... 1 0 1 0 1 0
Pittsburgh
Morton W,6-2 .......... 7 6 2 2 2 5
Veras H,10............... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Hanrahan.................. 1 3 1 1 1 1
HBP—by Morton (Sardinha). WP—Baez.
Umpires—Home, Joe West;First, Angel Hernan-
dez;Second, Angel Campos;Third, Chad Fairchild.
T—3:01. A—39,441 (38,362).
Mets 5, Braves 0
Atlanta New York
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Prado lf 4 0 1 0 JosRys ss 4 1 1 3
AlGnzlz ss 4 0 1 0 Turner 3b 3 0 1 1
C.Jones 3b 4 0 0 0 Beltran rf 4 0 0 0
McCnn c 3 0 0 0 Beato p 0 0 0 0
Fremn 1b 4 0 0 0 Byrdak p 0 0 0 0
Uggla 2b 3 0 1 0 DnMrp 1b 4 0 2 0
Hinske rf 3 0 0 0 Pagan cf 4 0 0 0
Mather cf 2 0 1 0 Bay lf 4 1 0 0
Jurrjns p 0 0 0 0 Thole c 3 1 2 0
Proctor p 0 0 0 0 RTejad 2b 2 1 1 0
MaYng ph 1 0 0 0 Gee p 2 0 0 0
Sherrill p 0 0 0 0 Pridie ph-rf 1 1 1 1
Totals 28 0 4 0 Totals 31 5 8 5
Atlanta ................................ 000 000 000 — 0
New York ........................... 000 000 50x — 5
E—Ale.Gonzalez (4). DP—Atlanta1. LOB—Atlanta
5, New York 4. 2B—Uggla (8), Thole (7).
3B—Jos.Reyes (10). SB—Turner (3). CS—Prado
(5). S—Jurrjens 2. SF—Turner.
IP H R ER BB SO
Atlanta
Jurrjens L,7-2 .......... 6
1
⁄3 6 4 3 0 6
Proctor......................
2
⁄3 1 1 1 0 0
Sherrill ...................... 1 1 0 0 0 0
New York
Gee W,6-0 ............... 7 4 0 0 2 2
Beato......................... 1
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Byrdak ......................
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
HBP—by Jurrjens (R.Tejada). WP—Jurrjens.
Umpires—Home, Alan Porter;First, Fieldin Cul-
breth;Second, Gary Cederstrom;Third, Lance
Barksdale.
T—2:19. A—28,114 (41,800).
Dodgers 11, Reds 8, 11 innings
Los Angeles Cincinnati
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Carroll ss 5 2 4 1 Stubbs cf 5 1 2 1
Miles 2b-3b 5 2 3 3 BPhllps 2b 6 1 2 1
Ethier rf 5 1 0 1 Votto 1b 4 1 2 3
Kemp cf 5 2 3 6 Rolen 3b 5 0 0 0
Blake 3b 4 0 0 0 Bruce rf 5 0 1 0
Guerra p 0 0 0 0 Horst p 0 0 0 0
Troncs p 0 0 0 0 JGoms lf 3 0 0 0
Loney 1b 6 0 1 0 Masset p 0 0 0 0
Sands lf 4 0 0 0 Bray p 0 0 0 0
Elbert p 0 0 0 0 Ondrsk p 0 0 0 0
Guerrir p 0 0 0 0 Arrdnd p 0 0 0 0
JuCastr 2b 1 1 1 0 Cairo ph 1 0 0 0
Navarr c 4 1 1 0 Hanign c 1 1 1 0
Kershw p 1 0 0 0 RHrndz c 3 2 2 0
MacDgl p 0 0 0 0 Leake pr 0 0 0 0
GwynJ ph-lf 3 2 2 0 Corder p 0 0 0 0
Fisher p 0 0 0 0
FLewis rf 1 0 0 0
Janish ss 5 1 1 1
Cueto p 1 0 0 0
Heisey ph-lf 3 1 2 2
Totals 43111511 Totals 43 813 8
Los Angeles............. 001 000 150 04 — 11
Cincinnati ................. 000 004 300 01 — 8
E—Fisher (1), Stubbs (1). DP—Cincinnati 2. LOB—
Los Angeles 7, Cincinnati 6. 2B—Stubbs (11). HR—
Kemp 2 (15), Votto (8). CS—Votto (4). S—Navarro,
Kershaw, Cueto. SF—Miles.
IP H R ER BB SO
Los Angeles
Kershaw ................... 6
2
⁄3 6 6 6 2 9
MacDougal ..............
1
⁄3 2 1 1 0 0
Elbert ........................ 1 0 0 0 0 1
Guerrier .................... 1 1 0 0 0 0
Guerra W,1-0 .......... 1
1
⁄3 2 1 1 1 1
Troncoso..................
2
⁄3 2 0 0 0 0
Cincinnati
Cueto........................ 7 5 2 2 1 3
Masset......................
1
⁄3 3 3 3 0 1
Bray........................... 0 0 1 1 1 0
Ondrusek BS,2-2....
2
⁄3 2 1 1 0 1
Arredondo................ 1 1 0 0 1 1
Cordero.................... 1 0 0 0 1 1
Fisher L,0-3 .............
2
⁄3 4 4 3 1 0
Horst .........................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Bray pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
WP—Guerra, Cueto. Balk—Horst.
Umpires—Home, Hunter Wendelstedt;First, Brian
Knight;Second, Jerry Layne;Third, Bob Davidson.
T—3:58. A—40,324 (42,319).
Rockies 2, Giants 1
Colorado San Francisco
ab r h bi ab r h bi
EYong cf 3 1 1 0 Torres cf 4 0 1 0
Fowler cf 0 0 0 0 Burriss 2b 4 0 0 0
JHerrr 2b 3 0 0 0 Schrhlt rf 3 0 1 0
CGnzlz lf 4 0 1 0 Huff 1b 3 0 0 0
Tlwtzk ss 4 1 3 1 C.Ross lf 4 1 1 1
Wggntn 1b 4 0 1 0 BCrwfr ss 4 0 0 0
Street p 0 0 0 0 MTejad 3b 3 0 1 0
Splrghs rf 4 0 1 0 CStwrt c 2 0 0 0
Nelson 3b 3 0 1 0 Rownd ph 1 0 0 0
JMorls c 3 0 0 0 Affeldt p 0 0 0 0
Chacin p 2 0 0 0 RRmrz p 0 0 0 0
Lndstr p 0 0 0 0 Bmgrn p 1 0 0 0
S.Smith ph 1 0 1 0 Burrell ph 1 0 0 0
RBtncr p 0 0 0 0 Whitsd c 0 0 0 0
Helton 1b 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 2 9 1 Totals 30 1 4 1
Colorado ............................ 000 011 000 — 2
San Francisco.................... 000 001 000 — 1
E—B.Crawford (2). DP—San Francisco 1. LOB—
Colorado 6, San Francisco 5. 2B—Torres (12),
Schierholtz (6). HR—C.Ross (5). SB—Tulowitzki
(4). CS—C.Gonzalez (2). S—Fowler, J.Herrera.
IP H R ER BB SO
Colorado
Chacin W,6-4 .......... 6 4 1 1 3 2
Lindstrom H,9.......... 1 0 0 0 0 0
R.Betancourt H,13.. 1 0 0 0 0 0
Street S,15-17......... 1 0 0 0 0 0
San Francisco
Bumgarner L,2-7..... 7 7 2 1 1 6
Affeldt ....................... 1 1 0 0 0 1
R.Ramirez................ 1 1 0 0 1 0
PB—Whiteside.
Umpires—Home, Paul Emmel;First, Mike Muchlin-
ski;Second, Bill Miller;Third, James Hoye.
T—2:41. A—41,046 (41,915).
Cardinals 5, Cubs 4, 12 innings
Chicago St. Louis
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Fukdm rf 6 0 3 1 Theriot ss 5 2 1 0
Barney 2b-ss 6 0 1 0 Jay lf-cf 6 0 1 0
SCastro ss 6 1 1 0 Pujols 1b 4 3 3 4
Smrdzj p 0 0 0 0 Brkmn rf 5 0 1 1
C.Pena 1b 5 1 2 2 Rasms cf 3 0 0 0
Marml p 0 0 0 0 Batista p 0 0 0 0
LeMahi 2b 0 0 0 0 MHmlt ph 1 0 0 0
DeWitt 3b 5 0 1 0 Salas p 0 0 0 0
Soto c 5 1 1 0 T.Cruz ph 1 0 0 0
Colvin lf-1b 5 0 0 0 ESnchz p 0 0 0 0
Campn cf 5 1 2 1 YMolin c 4 0 1 0
R.Wells p 3 0 1 0 MCrpnt 3b 5 0 1 0
Marshll p 0 0 0 0 Descals 2b 2 0 0 0
BSnydr ph 1 0 0 0 Motte p 0 0 0 0
K.Wood p 0 0 0 0 Miller p 0 0 0 0
JRussll p 0 0 0 0 Craig lf 3 0 1 0
Montnz lf 1 0 0 0 Lohse p 1 0 0 0
Schmkr 2b 2 0 0 0
Greene
ph-2b 2 0 0 0
Totals 48 412 4 Totals 44 5 9 5
Chicago.................... 000 004 000 000 — 4
St. Louis................... 000 202 000 001 — 5
Two outs when winning run scored.
E—DeWitt (4). DP—Chicago 1. LOB—Chicago 8,
St. Louis 8. 2B—Fukudome 2 (7), Soto (10), Pujols
(7), M.Carpenter (1). HR—C.Pena (8), Pujols 2
(12). CS—Y.Molina (4).
IP H R ER BB SO
Chicago
R.Wells..................... 5
2
⁄3 3 4 4 1 1
Marshall BS,1-2 ...... 1
1
⁄3 2 0 0 0 1
K.Wood .................... 2 1 0 0 0 2
J.Russell ..................
1
⁄3 1 0 0 1 0
Marmol ..................... 1
2
⁄3 1 0 0 0 3
Samardzija L,3-2.....
2
⁄3 1 1 1 0 0
St. Louis
Lohse........................ 5
2
⁄3 11 4 4 0 5
Motte.........................
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Miller .........................
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
Batista....................... 2
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
Salas......................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
E.Sanchez W,2-1.... 2 0 0 0 0 2
HBP—by K.Wood (Pujols), by Marmol (Y.Molina).
Umpires—Home, Marvin Hudson;First, Ted Bar-
rett;Second, Ron Kulpa;Third, D.J. Reyburn.
T—3:48. A—43,195 (43,975).
Brewers 3, Marlins 2
Milwaukee Florida
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Weeks 2b 4 0 1 0 Coghln cf 5 1 3 0
C.Hart rf 4 0 0 0 Bonifac ss 4 0 0 0
Braun lf 4 0 1 0 Morrsn lf 4 0 0 0
Fielder 1b 3 1 1 1 GSnchz 1b 4 1 3 1
McGeh 3b 4 0 0 0 Dobbs 3b 4 0 0 0
Lucroy c 4 1 1 0 Stanton rf 4 0 0 0
YBtncr ss 4 0 1 1 J.Buck c 3 0 0 0
Morgan cf 3 1 1 1 Infante 2b 3 0 1 0
Gallard p 2 0 0 0 Cousins pr 0 0 0 0
Hwkns p 0 0 0 0 Volstad p 3 0 1 0
Brddck p 0 0 0 0 R.Webb p 0 0 0 0
Counsll ph 1 0 1 0 Choate p 0 0 0 0
Loe p 0 0 0 0 Cishek p 0 0 0 0
Axford p 0 0 0 0 OMrtnz ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 33 3 7 3 Totals 35 2 8 1
Milwaukee.......................... 001 000 200 — 3
Florida ................................ 100 001 000 — 2
E—McGehee2(9), Morgan(2), Bonifacio(3). DP—
Florida 2. LOB—Milwaukee 4, Florida 9.
2B—Y.Betancourt (9). HR—Fielder (13), Morgan
(1). SB—Weeks (7). CS—Braun (3), Coghlan (6).
S—Bonifacio.
IP H R ER BB SO
Milwaukee
Gallardo W,8-2........ 6 6 2 1 2 5
Hawkins H,6.............
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
Braddock H,2 ..........
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Loe H,10 .................. 1 1 0 0 0 1
Axford S,15-17........ 1 1 0 0 0 2
Florida
Volstad L,2-5........... 7 6 3 3 1 4
R.Webb.................... 1 1 0 0 0 1
Choate......................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Cishek ......................
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
WP—Axford, Volstad.
Umpires—Home, CB Bucknor;First, Jerry Meals-
;Second, Dale Scott;Third, Dan Iassogna.
T—2:54. A—17,204 (38,560).
Diamondbacks 2, Nationals 0
Washington Arizona
ab r h bi ab r h bi
HrstnJr 3b 4 0 2 0 RRorts 3b 4 0 0 0
Dsmnd ss 2 0 0 0 KJhnsn 2b 2 1 0 0
L.Nix ph 1 0 1 0 J.Upton rf 4 0 1 0
Kimall p 0 0 0 0 S.Drew ss 2 0 1 1
Werth rf 1 0 0 0 CYoung cf 3 1 1 0
Morse 1b 4 0 0 0 Nady 1b 3 0 1 1
Espinos 2b 3 0 0 0 GParra lf 3 0 0 0
WRams c 4 0 0 0 HBlanc c 2 0 0 0
Ankiel cf 4 0 1 0 JSndrs p 2 0 0 0
Bixler lf 3 0 0 0 Brrghs ph 1 0 0 0
Berndn ph 1 0 0 0 DHrndz p 0 0 0 0
LHrndz p 2 0 0 0 Putz p 0 0 0 0
Cora ph-ss 1 0 0 0
Totals 30 0 4 0 Totals 26 2 4 2
Washington ....................... 000 000 000 — 0
Arizona............................... 100 000 10x — 2
E—Nady (2). DP—Washington 2. LOB—Washing-
ton 8, Arizona 4. 2B—Hairston Jr. (8), Ankiel (5),
Nady (7). 3B—S.Drew (4). SB—Desmond (17),
Werth (7). CS—K.Johnson (1). S—Desmond.
IP H R ER BB SO
Washington
L.Hernandez L,3-7.. 7 4 2 2 4 3
Kimball...................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Arizona
J.Saunders W,3-5... 7 2 0 0 2 5
Da.Hernandez H,8.. 1 1 0 0 1 2
Putz S,17-18............ 1 1 0 0 0 1
HBP—by J.Saunders (Werth).
Umpires—Home, Vic Carapazza;First, Rob Drake-
;Second, Gary Darling;Third, Bruce Dreckman.
T—2:31. A—26,199 (48,633).
A M E R I C A N
L E A G U E
Red Sox 9, Athletics 8, 14
innings
Oakland Boston
ab r h bi ab r h bi
DeJess rf 3 1 0 0 Ellsury cf 7 1 4 1
AnLRc 3b 0 0 0 0 Pedroia 2b 5 1 1 1
CJcksn ph-3b 3 0 2 2 AdGnzl 1b 5 2 3 1
Sweeny cf-rf 5 1 2 1
Sutton
pr-1b 2 0 0 0
Wlngh lf 5 0 1 2 Youkils 3b 5 1 2 1
Matsui dh 7 0 1 0 Ortiz dh 4 0 1 0
KSuzuk pr-dh 0 0 0 0
Reddck
pr-dh 0 1 0 0
M.Ellis 2b 7 1 2 0
Camrn
ph-dh 3 0 0 0
Barton 1b 5 2 2 0 Crwfrd lf 7 2 4 3
Powell c 7 0 1 0 Lowrie ss 6 0 0 0
Kzmnff 3b 2 0 0 0 J.Drew rf 7 0 2 2
Crisp ph-cf 4 1 1 0 Varitek c 3 0 0 0
Pnngtn ss 4 2 2 2 Sltlmch c 3 1 1 0
Totals 52 814 7 Totals 57 918 9
Oakland............ 000 002 104 010 00 — 8
Boston .............. 100 013 020 010 01 — 9
Two outs when winning run scored.
E—Pedroia (3). DP—Oakland 1, Boston 3. LOB—
Oakland 11, Boston 12. 2B—C.Jackson (7), Pen-
nington (5), Ellsbury (18), Youkilis 2 (17), Ortiz (15),
C.Crawford 2 (11), Saltalamacchia (7). HR—
Ad.Gonzalez (11). SB—Ellsbury 2 (22), C.Crawford
(8). CS—J.Drew (1). SF—Sweeney, Pennington.
IP H R ER BB SO
Oakland
Cahill......................... 7 8 5 5 1 8
Ziegler ......................
2
⁄3 1 1 1 0 1
Breslow.................... 0 2 1 1 0 0
De Los Santos.........
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
Fuentes .................... 2 2 0 0 0 1
A.Bailey BS,1-1....... 1 2 1 1 1 3
Devine...................... 1 0 0 0 1 2
Wuertz...................... 1 1 0 0 1 1
Moscoso L,2-1 ........
2
⁄3 2 1 1 1 0
Boston
Beckett ..................... 6 4 3 3 3 4
Albers H,4................
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
Hottovy H,1..............
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Bard H,11................. 1 1 0 0 0 1
Papelbon..................
1
⁄3 3 4 3 1 1
Jenks ........................ 1
2
⁄3 2 0 0 0 3
Aceves W,3-1.......... 4 3 1 1 2 2
Beckett pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
Breslow pitched to 2 batters in the 8th.
HBP—by Beckett (DeJesus). WP—Beckett.
Umpires—Home, Tony Randazzo;First, Larry Va-
nover;Second, Brian Gorman;Third, Dan Bellino.
T—5:17. A—37,485 (37,065).
Rays 3, Mariners 2
Tampa Bay Seattle
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Damon dh 5 1 2 1 ISuzuki rf 4 0 0 0
Zobrist 2b 5 0 2 2 Ryan ss 4 0 0 0
Joyce rf 3 0 0 0 Smoak 1b 4 0 1 0
Longori 3b 2 0 1 0 Cust dh 3 0 0 0
SRdrgz 3b 2 0 0 0 AKndy 2b 3 0 0 0
Ktchm 1b 4 0 0 0 FGtrrz cf 3 0 0 0
BUpton cf 2 0 0 0 Peguer lf 3 1 2 0
Fuld lf 3 1 1 0 Figgins 3b 3 0 0 0
Jaso c 3 1 1 0 CGmnz c 2 0 0 0
Brignc ss 4 0 0 0 Olivo ph-c 1 1 1 2
Totals 33 3 7 3 Totals 30 2 4 2
Tampa Bay......................... 030 000 000 — 3
Seattle ................................ 000 000 020 — 2
E—Smoak (3). DP—Tampa Bay 1. LOB—Tampa
Bay 8, Seattle 2. 2B—Damon (8), Smoak (13), Pe-
guero (2). HR—Olivo (6). CS—B.Upton (4).
IP H R ER BB SO
Tampa Bay
Hellickson W,7-3..... 7
1
⁄3 3 1 1 1 4
Jo.Peralta H,9 .........
2
⁄3 1 1 1 0 0
Farnsworth S,11-12 1 0 0 0 0 1
Seattle
Fister L,3-6 .............. 7 7 3 3 4 6
Pauley....................... 2 0 0 0 1 0
Umpires—Home, Derryl Cousins;First, Jim Joyce-
;Second, Mark Ripperger;Third, Jim Wolf.
T—2:36. A—28,843 (47,878).
Orioles 5, Blue Jays 3
Toronto Baltimore
ab r h bi ab r h bi
YEscor ss 5 0 0 0 Andino 2b 5 0 1 0
CPttrsn lf 4 1 3 1 Markks rf 4 0 2 0
Bautist rf 3 0 0 0 AdJons cf 4 0 1 0
Lind dh 3 0 0 0 Guerrr dh 4 0 1 0
JRiver 1b 4 1 1 0 D.Lee 1b 4 2 2 0
Arencii c 3 0 0 0 Wieters c 4 1 2 0
A.Hill 2b 4 0 2 0 Hardy ss 3 1 1 1
RDavis cf 3 1 1 1 MrRynl 3b 4 1 1 4
McCoy 3b 2 0 1 1 Reimld lf 2 0 0 0
Encrnc ph 1 0 0 0 Pie pr-lf 0 0 0 0
Totals 32 3 8 3 Totals 34 511 5
Toronto............................... 110 100 000 — 3
Baltimore............................ 010 004 00x — 5
E—Arrieta (1). DP—Baltimore 1. LOB—Toronto 7,
Baltimore8. 2B—Wieters (9). HR—C.Patterson(5),
Mar.Reynolds (8). SB—R.Davis 2 (18). CS—
McCoy (1), Markakis (1). SF—R.Davis.
IP H R ER BB SO
Toronto
R.Romero L,5-5 ...... 7
2
⁄3 11 5 5 3 5
Dotel .........................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
Baltimore
Arrieta W,7-3........... 6 5 3 3 4 1
Ji.Johnson H,8 ........ 1 0 0 0 0 0
Uehara H,7 .............. 1 1 0 0 0 3
Gregg S,10-13 ........ 1 2 0 0 0 2
Umpires—Home, DougEddings;First, KerwinDan-
ley;Second, Dana DeMuth;Third, Paul Nauert.
T—2:32. A—20,086 (45,438).
Rangers 4, Indians 0
Texas Cleveland
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Kinsler 2b 4 0 0 0 Brantly lf 4 0 1 0
Andrus ss 3 1 1 0 OCarer 2b 4 0 0 0
JHmltn cf 4 1 2 2 ACarer ss 4 0 1 0
MiYong dh 4 0 0 0 CSantn 1b 4 0 1 0
ABeltre 3b 3 1 0 0 GSizmr cf 3 0 1 0
N.Cruz rf 4 1 1 2 Duncan dh 4 0 0 0
Morlnd 1b 4 0 1 0 Kearns rf 4 0 1 0
Torreal c 4 0 2 0 Marson c 3 0 0 0
DvMrp lf 3 0 1 0 Everett 3b 2 0 0 0
Totals 33 4 8 4 Totals 32 0 5 0
Texas.................................. 200 000 200 — 4
Cleveland........................... 000 000 000 — 0
E—A.Beltre (6). DP—Texas 1, Cleveland 1. LOB—
Texas 4, Cleveland 7. 2B—Torrealba (8), A.Cabre-
ra (15). HR—J.Hamilton (3), N.Cruz (12). CS—Tor-
realba (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
Texas
D.Holland W,5-1...... 9 5 0 0 1 5
Cleveland
Carmona L,3-7........ 6
1
⁄3 7 4 4 1 2
R.Perez ....................
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
J.Smith ..................... 1 1 0 0 1 1
Pestano.................... 0 0 0 0 0 0
Durbin....................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBP—by D.Holland (G.Sizemore).
Umpires—Home, Eric Cooper;First, TimTimmons-
;Second, Mark Carlson;Third, Jeff Kellogg.
T—2:28. A—30,130 (43,441).
Twins 7, Royals 2
Minnesota Kansas City
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Revere cf 5 2 2 1 Gordon lf 5 1 2 0
ACasill ss 5 1 4 2 MeCarr cf 3 0 2 0
Cuddyr 1b 5 1 2 2 Hosmer 1b 5 0 2 1
Valenci 3b 5 0 0 1 Francr rf 4 0 1 1
DYong dh 5 0 1 1 Butler dh 4 0 0 0
Dnklm lf 3 0 1 0 Aviles 3b 2 0 0 0
Repko rf 4 0 0 0 Getz 2b 4 0 0 0
RRiver c 4 1 1 0 Treanr c 2 0 0 0
Tolbert 2b 4 2 2 0 AEscor ss 4 1 1 0
Totals 40 713 7 Totals 33 2 8 2
Minnesota.......................... 001 002 301 — 7
Kansas City ....................... 002 000 000 — 2
E—A.Escobar (4). DP—Kansas City 1. LOB—Min-
nesota 8, Kansas City11. 2B—A.Casilla (6), Tolbert
2 (7). HR—Cuddyer (7). SB—Me.Cabrera (6),
Aviles (9). S—Me.Cabrera. SF—Francoeur.
IP H R ER BB SO
Minnesota
Blackburn W,5-4..... 5 7 2 2 1 2
Slama H,1 ................ 1 0 0 0 1 1
Dumatrait..................
2
⁄3 0 0 0 1 1
Hoey ......................... 1 0 0 0 2 1
Al.Burnett H,2..........
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Mijares...................... 1 1 0 0 0 1
Kansas City
Hochevar L,3-6 ....... 6 11 6 6 0 2
L.Coleman ............... 1 1 0 0 1 1
Soria ......................... 1 0 0 0 0 0
Crow......................... 1 1 1 1 0 3
Hochevar pitched to 4 batters in the 7th.
HBP—by Hochevar (Dinkelman). WP—Slama.
Umpires—Home, Chris Guccione;First, Cory Bla-
ser;Second, Mike Winters;Third, Mike Everitt.
Tigers 4, White Sox 2
Detroit Chicago
ab r h bi ab r h bi
AJcksn cf 5 2 3 0 Pierre lf 3 0 1 0
Kelly 3b-rf 3 0 0 0 AlRmrz ss 4 0 2 0
Boesch rf 4 1 2 2 Quentin dh 2 0 1 0
Worth 3b 0 0 0 0 Przyns c 4 0 0 0
MiCarr 1b 4 1 1 2 Rios cf 3 0 0 0
VMrtnz dh 3 0 1 0 Lillirdg rf 4 1 1 0
Dirks lf 4 0 0 0 A.Dunn 1b 4 0 0 0
JhPerlt ss 2 0 0 0 Bckhm 2b 4 1 1 2
Avila c 4 0 1 0 Morel 3b 3 0 1 0
Raburn 2b 4 0 1 0
Santiag 2b 0 0 0 0
Totals 33 4 9 4 Totals 31 2 7 2
Detroit................................. 200 000 002 — 4
Chicago.............................. 000 020 000 — 2
E—Verlander (3). DP—Detroit 2, Chicago2. LOB—
Detroit 10, Chicago 6. 2B—V.Martinez (14).
3B—A.Jackson (3). HR—Boesch (5), Mi.Cabrera
(12), Beckham (5). SB—A.Jackson (9). S—Kelly,
Pierre.
IP H R ER BB SO
Detroit
Verlander W,6-3...... 8 7 2 2 1 7
Valverde S,15-15.... 1 0 0 0 1 1
Chicago
E.Jackson................ 6 7 2 2 4 5
Sale........................... 1
1
⁄3 0 0 0 3 0
Crain L,2-2............... 1
1
⁄3 2 2 2 0 1
Ohman......................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
HBP—by Verlander (Quentin).
Umpires—Home, Mike DiMuro;First, Jim Rey-
nolds;Second, Tim Welke;Third, Andy Fletcher.
S T A N D I N G S
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
New York ....................................... 31 24 .564 — — 6-4 L-1 17-13 14-11
Boston............................................ 32 26 .552
1
⁄2 — 6-4 W-2 18-13 14-13
Tampa Bay..................................... 30 28 .517 2
1
⁄2 2 4-6 W-1 14-16 16-12
Toronto........................................... 29 29 .500 3
1
⁄2 3 5-5 L-1 15-14 14-15
Baltimore........................................ 26 30 .464 5
1
⁄2 5 4-6 W-1 16-15 10-15
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Cleveland ..................................... 33 23 .589 — — 3-7 L-3 19-9 14-14
Detroit ........................................... 29 27 .518 4 2 6-4 L-1 17-11 12-16
Chicago ........................................ 28 31 .475 6
1
⁄2 4
1
⁄2 6-4 W-4 11-13 17-18
Kansas City.................................. 25 33 .431 9 7 3-7 L-3 19-17 6-16
Minnesota .................................... 20 37 .351 13
1
⁄2 11
1
⁄2 4-6 W-3 6-15 14-22
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Texas ............................................. 33 26 .559 — — 8-2 W-4 19-11 14-15
Seattle ............................................ 30 28 .517 2
1
⁄2 2 7-3 L-1 17-15 13-13
Los Angeles .................................. 30 29 .508 3 2
1
⁄2 5-5 W-1 14-13 16-16
Oakland.......................................... 27 32 .458 6 5
1
⁄2 4-6 L-5 14-15 13-17
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Philadelphia................................... 34 24 .586 — — 5-5 L-4 19-10 15-14
Florida............................................ 31 25 .554 2 — 4-6 L-3 14-14 17-11
Atlanta............................................ 32 27 .542 2
1
⁄2
1
⁄2 6-4 L-1 17-13 15-14
New York ....................................... 27 31 .466 7 5 4-6 W-1 14-17 13-14
Washington ................................... 25 32 .439 8
1
⁄2 6
1
⁄2 4-6 L-1 14-12 11-20
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
St. Louis......................................... 35 25 .583 — — 5-5 W-2 17-12 18-13
Milwaukee...................................... 32 26 .552 2 — 7-3 W-2 21-7 11-19
Cincinnati ....................................... 30 29 .508 4
1
⁄2 2
1
⁄2 4-6 L-1 18-13 12-16
Pittsburgh ...................................... 28 29 .491 5
1
⁄2 3
1
⁄2 6-4 W-2 11-14 17-15
Chicago.......................................... 23 33 .411 10 8 2-8 L-5 12-19 11-14
Houston ......................................... 23 35 .397 11 9 5-5 L-1 11-17 12-18
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Arizona........................................... 32 26 .552 — — 8-2 W-1 19-12 13-14
San Francisco ............................... 32 26 .552 — — 5-5 L-1 14-9 18-17
Colorado........................................ 27 30 .474 4
1
⁄2 4
1
⁄2 3-7 W-1 13-15 14-15
Los Angeles .................................. 27 32 .458 5
1
⁄2 5
1
⁄2 6-4 W-1 15-16 12-16
San Diego...................................... 25 33 .431 7 7 6-4 W-1 10-21 15-12
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 PAGE 7C

C M Y K
PAGE 8C SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S P O R T S
DUBLIN, Ohio —Steve Strick-
er went from doing everything
right to having just about every-
thing go wrong as his lead was
cut inhalf over the final five holes
Saturday at the Memorial.
The good news for Stricker is
that he had a six-shot lead at one
point, andhis 3-under 69 at Muir-
field Village still kept him three
shots clear of Jonathan Byrd go-
ing into the final round.
Stricker holed out for eagle
from 113 yards on the second
hole, made another eagle with a
3-iron into 6 feet on the par-5 fifth
and looked as though he might
run away from the field when he
rolled in a 25-foot birdie putt on
the par-3 eighth.
But he missed three putts in-
side 7 feet — one of them for par
— over the final five holes, and
his tee shot on the 18th landed in
the middle of a sand-filled divot,
sending his approach beyond the
green in thick rough. Stricker
chipped out to 3 feet to escape
with par and leave himself some
decent vibes going into today.
He was at 12-under 204 as he
goes for his 10th career victory.
Byrd made birdie on the 18th
hole for a 69 that will put him in
the final group today with a
chance towinfor the secondtime
this year. Thanks to the late fade
by Stricker, several others have a
chance that at one time didn’t
look possible.
Matt Kuchar, who made six
birdies in his opening nine holes,
hada 68despite twobogeys inhis
last four holes. He was four shots
behind, along with Brandt Jobe,
who shot a 69.
Rory McIlroy couldn’t get the
clean round he wanted. The 22-
year-old from Northern Ireland,
making a rare PGA Tour appear-
ance, choppedupthe par-3fourth
hole for a double bogey, hit into
the water on the par-5 11th for a
bogey and was falling back until
he rallied with an eagle putt on
the 15th. He wound up with a 71
and was five shots behind, along
with Mark Wilson (66) and for-
mer PGA champion Shaun Mi-
cheel (67).
Luke Donald, in his debut as
the No. 1player in the world, was
trying to make a charge on the
back nine until he made two care-
less bogeys and had to settled for
a 73. Donald was at 4-under 212,
eight shots out of the lead. About
the only thing Donald can likely
achieve today is to go for his 10th
straight finish in the top 10. Do-
nald was tied for 17th.
Phil Mickelson shot a 72 and
was 10 shots behind, which he at-
tributed mainly to his putting.
An amazing start gave Stricker
strokes to burn toward the end of
his round.
After an 8-footer to save par
from a bunker on the opening
hole, Stricker had 113 yards on
No. 2. He reached into his pocket
for a tee to clean out a chunk of
dirt in his 53-degree wedge, set
up over the ball and hit a perfect
shot that spun into the cup for an
eagle. Three holes later, he hit 3-
iron over the water with just
enough draw to catch the ridge
and settled 6 feet away for anoth-
er eagle.
Going back to the second
round, it was his third eagle in
seven holes. And he became only
the 13th player on the PGA Tour
since 1983 to make an eagle on a
par 3, par 4 and par 5 in the same
tournament.
P R O G O L F
Stricker still up by 3 strokes at Memorial
Jonathan Byrd cut Stricker’s
6-shot lead in half over the
final five holes.
DOUG FERGUSON
AP Golf Writer
AP PHOTO
Steve Stricker hits from the sand to the first green during the
third round of the Memorial golf tournament Saturday.
DALLAS —After two days of
intense filmstudy and painstak-
ing analysis of the final 14 pos-
sessions in their end-of-game
collapse in Game 2 of the NBA
finals, the Miami Heat finally
came up with the reason why.
It wasn’t a highly technical
reason.
“We let one go,” Dwyane
Wade said.
And entering Game 3 of the
NBA finals, the Heat will try to
let Game 2 go again. The way
Miami sees it, carrying over the
stigma of that loss —one of the
worst late-game collapses in fi-
nalshistory—wouldonlydoom
them again tonight when the
scene shifts to steamy Dallas for
the first of three games on the
Mavericks’ home floor.
Dallas rallied from 15 points
down in the final 7 minutes to
beat Miami in Game 2, outscor-
ing the Heat 22-5 to finish the
game and knot the series.
Thanks to that win, Mavs’ fans
still mayseeanother NBAcham-
pionship celebration, only this
time, by the Western Confer-
ence champions and not a Heat
team that hoisted a trophy at
Dallas after the 2006 finals.
“In the playoffs, it’s a win or a
loss. However it comes by, it’s a
win or a loss,” Heat forward Le-
Bron James said. “We’ve moved
on from Game 2, seen the mis-
takes we’ve made. Seen some of
the great things we’ve done as
well. It’s a winor loss. The series
is tied1-1. We never get too high
or too low in the series. We
haven’t gottentoohighor lowin
the regular season as well.”
Game 3 is crucial for so many
obvious reasons, like the Heat
wanting not to deal with anoth-
er stumble and the Mavericks
wanting to keep momentum
rolling and retain home-court
advantage. Statistically, there’s
proof that it’s a Texas-sized
swing game as well. Since the
NBAwent tothe2-3-2format for
the finals, teams have now split
the first two games 12 times. In
the previous 11, the winner of
Game 3 has always gone on to
win the championship.
Bigwhoop, bothteams saidin
response to that one.
“Wejust can’t let up. We’renot
good enough to just relax,” said
Mavericks forwardDirkNowitz-
ki, who led Dallas’ late-game
charge in Game 2 at Miami. “We
need to play with an edge at all
times ineverygame. Sohopeful-
ly, with the crowd behind us,
we’re going to have a great
game. Just looking at this one
game.”
Heat coach Erik Spoelstra
was more succinct.
“I think both teams have
bucked a lot of those numbers
and odds up to this point al-
ready,” he said. “We’re a non-tra-
ditional team.”
Maybe that’s one of the rea-
sons why the Heat were soloose
Saturday.
Players arrived at the arena
around noon, most with head-
phones onas they walkedoff the
bus, bobbing heads in time with
the music and nodding to peo-
pleas theywalkedby. James and
Wade were chatting and laugh-
ing, a few players checked out
the turf that would host an Are-
na Football League game later
Saturday night and some
stretched their arms to tap the
goalposts as they walked across
the floor where a basketball
court will be today.
N B A F I N A L S
AP PHOTO
The Miami Heat’s Dwyane Wade answers a question during a press conference before practice
Saturday in Dallas.
AP PHOTO
The Dallas Mavericks’ Dirk Nowitzki laughs as he answers a question during a press conference
after practice, Saturday in Dallas.
Heat ready to forget collapse
Miami players say they just
let one get away in Game 2
against Dallas.
TIMREYNOLDS
AP Sports Writer
MIAMI AT DALLAS
WHEN: 8 p.m., today
TV: ABC/WNEP-16
G A M E 3
STATE COLLEGE — Former
Villanova assistant Patrick Cham-
bersspent afranticweekmullinga
major move that could have land-
ed him a job back at a power con-
ference school back in his home
state of Pennsylvania.
Of course, Chambers called his
former boss withtheWildcats, Jay
Wright, for ad-
vice after Penn
State came call-
ingtoleave Bos-
ton University
to take over the
Nittany Lions
program.
Wright gave
his protege a
thumbs-up.
“I spoke to Jay all week ... I
sought his wisdomand his knowl-
edge, discussedthejob, what it en-
tailed and needed to be done,”
Chambers said Friday night after
taking the Penn State job. “He is
an incredible mentor.”
Now the Nittany Lions have a
head coach with roots that run
deepintosoutheasternPennsylva-
nia in Chambers, a Philadelphia-
area native who played college
ball under PhiladelphiaUniversity
coach and 2011 Naismith Basket-
ball Hall of Fame inductee Herb
Magee.
It’s at Villanova where Cham-
bers raised his coaching profile,
rising quickly to become Wright’s
top assistant in 2008 following
four years on the staff. Chambers
left for the Terriers the following
season, lasting two years there be-
fore taking the Penn State offer
Friday.
Chambers replaces Ed DeChel-
lis, whoresignedMay24toaccept
the same job at Navy.
Anunexpectedcoachingsearch
soon followed, with Chambers’
name almost immediately surfac-
ingasapotential candidatefollow-
ing the successful run at Boston.
The Terriers lost to Kansas in the
second round of the NCAA tour-
nament this spring.
“I tell youwhat, it’s beena crazy
week, traveling and meeting,”
Chambers said. “Alot of sleepless
nights, just tryingtokeepmytime
programtogether.”
Wright was a sounding board.
PennStateandtheBigTenarea
step up from Boston and the
America East Conference. But the
Nittany Lions have also had mid-
dling success, struggling to win
consistently and attract top
recruits.
The program is going through
yet another makeover, even after
DeChellis ledhis almamater toits
first NCAA appearance in a dec-
ade with a second-round loss to
Temple.
C O L L E G E B A S K E T B A L L
PSU lands
coach with
Wright stuff
New Penn State men’s mentor
Chambers gets thumbs up
from Villanova boss Wright.
GENARO C. ARMAS
AP Sports Writer
Chambers
EUGENE, Ore. — Defending
champion Allyson Felix finished
third in the Prefontaine Classic
400 meters Saturday and world
champion Caster Semenya
placed second in the 800 in her
American debut.
Amantle Montsho of Botswa-
na won the 400 in 50.59 seconds,
while Felix crossed in 51.41 to
trail fellow American Debbie
Dunn by 0.04. Felix is a three-
time world champion and a two-
time Olympic silver medalist in
the 200.
Semenya timed 1 minute,
58.88 seconds to finish 0.59 be-
hind Kenia Sinclair of Jamaica.
The South African won the
event at the 2009 world cham-
pionships but was unable to
complete for much of last year
because of controversial gender
testing.
The Pre, as it is known, is the
fourth stop on the international
Diamond League circuit.
Jamaican Steve Mullings won
the100 in a meet record 9.80, the
thirdbest time onAmericansoil.
Justin Gatlin, who last year
came off a four-year suspension
for doping, finished sixth in
9.97, his first result under 10 sec-
onds since his return.
Gatlin denies he knowingly
used performance-enhancing
substances, claiming a massage
therapist, Eugene resident Chris
Whetstine, used a testosterone-
like cream on his legs in the
spring of 2006. Whetstine has
denied Gatlin’s allegations.
Gatlin, who won the 100 me-
ters at the Pre in both 2005 and
2006, was reinstated last year
and has recently been compet-
ing in minor meets in Europe.
He is still excluded from major
European events, and Rajne So-
derberg, the director of the
Stockholm Diamond League
event, said in an e-mail Friday
that the ban still holds.
P R E F O N TA I N E C L A S S I C
Defending champion Felix
finishes 3rd at 400 meters
By ANNE M. PETERSON
AP Sports Writer
COLUMBUS, Ohio — Two-
time Heisman Trophy winner Ar-
chie Griffin wants to reassure
Ohio State fans that things will
get better.
“Yep. It has been tough. But
Ohio State is more thanfootball,”
Griffin said this week after Jim
Tressel was forced to resign as
headcoachinthe midst of a wide-
spreadNCAAinquiry. “It’s a great
university, a lot of great things
happening at the university. We
will bounce back, no question
about it.”
Griffin, 56, is president and
CEOof Ohio State’s alumni asso-
ciation. Now 36 years removed
frombecoming the only player to
win college football’s most covet-
ed individual award for a second
time, he said there is nowa drive
to rebuild.
“Ohio State has a wonderful
tradition, a great program,” he
said. “It’s been proven out over
the years. And we’ll continue to
have that type of program. We’ll
continue to try and put the best
players on the field as well as the
coaches. So that’s certainly going
tobe what the powers that be will
look to do.”
Tressel was forcedtostepaside
Monday after admitting he knew
some of his players had taken im-
proper benefits that would have
made them ineligible under
NCAA bylaws. He found out in
April 2010 about possible viola-
tions by his players but did not
tell anyone at OhioState for more
than nine months, contrary to his
contract and NCAA rules.
Five players — including star
quarterback Terrelle Pryor —
have been suspended for the first
fivegames this fall for takingcash
and discounted tattoos froma lo-
cal tattoo-parlor owner for signed
jerseys andgloves, Big Tencham-
pionship rings and other memor-
abilia.
The NCAAandOhioState con-
tinue to investigate all areas of
the athletic department, includ-
ingallegations regardingathletes
and their cars and football play-
ers receiving improper benefits
at the tattoo-parlor.
The athletic department and
football team could receive fur-
ther penalties when Ohio State
goes beforetheNCAAcommittee
on infractions in Indianapolis on
Aug. 12.
Another Heisman winner —
this one from archrival Michigan
— said it’s premature to guess at
the Buckeyes’ future.
“What’s going to happen to the
program? Well, we don’t know if
No. 2 (Pryor) is going to line up,”
former Michigan star and 1991
Heisman winner Desmond Ho-
ward told the Detroit Free Press.
“It seems like there’s a lot more
that’s happening down there, so I
don’t want to right in the middle
of things say this is what’s going
to happen and then next week we
have a new revelation.”
C O L L E G E F O O T B A L L
Griffin says OSU
will bounce back
Two-time Heisman Trophy
winner believes alma mater
will return to prominence.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 PAGE 9C
2
9
3
0
0
1
C M Y K
AT PLAY
➛ WWW. T I ME S L E ADE R. C OM/ S P ORT S
PAGE 10C SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
USTA Strikers win title
The USTA Strikers 97 girls soccer team participated in
the 12th Annual FC Delco Tournament on Memorial Day
weekend. The team played squads from Virginia, New York
and Pennsylvania and winning the championship. Pictured
are team members. First row, from left: Taylor Caridi, Alee
Pettit. Second row: Emma Bakewell, Lydia Lawson, Ruby
Mattson, Audrey Williams, Liz Shoemaker. Third Row:
Coach Pat Upton, Maya Kornfeld, Tiffany Zukosky, Paige
Elmy, Mary Tona, Emma Sukowaski and Amelia Hossage.
Foursome wins tournament
Children’s Service Center’s 10th Annual Golf Tournament
was held May 27 at Blue Ridge Trail in Mountain Top. Forty-
five sponsors supported the event, including Eastern Insur-
ance Group and Penn Millers Insurance, who were principal
co-sponsors. Tournament champions, with a score of 62,
were, from left, Colin Hopkins, Mary Beth Guyette, Mike
Hopkins and Wilkes-Barre Mayor Tom Leighton.
Tamanini headed to Villanova
Christopher Tamanini, a senior at Dallas High School, will
continue his academic and athletic careers at Villanova
University in the Fall. Tamanini will attend Villanova’s
School of Business majoring in economics. He will swim for
the Division I Wildcats swim team. Tamanini concluded his
high school swimming career by capturing two medals at
the 2011 PIAA Class 2A State Swimming Championships at
Bucknell University. Pictured are, first row from left: Tim
Tamanini, father; Christopher Tamanini; and Sandy Tamani-
ni, mother Second row: Romayne Mosier, Dallas High
School head swim coach and Jeffrey Shaffer, Dallas High
School principal.
Firm AC team wins title
The AAU FIRM AC Elite U16 Team, coached by Darnell
Ford, recently won the Who Got Game? tournament at
Lake-Lehman High School. Pictured are team members.
First row, from left: Ford, Sarah Shaffer, Lauren Szerencsits,
Dallas Ely. Second row: Tara Zdancewich, Taylor Reilly, Ce-
leste Robinson, Megan Kress, Kaitlyn Smicherko and Lisa
Kitner.
Rock Solid captures crown
The Rock Solid AAU sixth grade girls basketball team
recently competed in a tournament at East Stroudsburg
University. The team finished a perfect 4-0 and outscored
their opponents 134-53. Pictured are, first row: Alexis Pyzia,
Talia Kosierowski, Sara Lojewski, Sam Delamater. Second
row: Courtney Devens, Sarah Sabaluski, Paige Evans, Em-
ma Lehman and Kirsten Durling. Absent from photo was
Maddie Kelley, Katie Wolfgang and Breezy Coolbaugh. The
team is coached by Chad Lojewski and Mark Lacey.
Seventh graders finish perfect
The Rock Solid seventh grade girls AAU basketball team
recently competed in a tournament in East Stroudsburg.
The team finished a perfect 4-0 and outscored its oppo-
nents 156-88. Pictured are, first row: Katie Kravitsky, Lau-
ren Slavoski, Emilee Zawatski, Brielle Brace, Kayla Hons.
Second row, Nicole Wright, Rachael Solano, Coach Chad
Lojewski, Courtney Kijek, Courtney Hoats, Nicole Wren.
Absent from photo was Head Coach Mark Lacey.
Rangers win 4th straight title
The Northwest Area Lady Rangers recently won the
Wyoming Valley Conference title for the fourth year in a
row. Pictured are team members. First row, from left: Ra-
chel Whitesell. Second row: Susie Mendergo, Angela Lewis,
AnnaMae Olivo, Rachel Linso, Amanda Howley, cheerleader
Abby Calarco, Maranda Koehn. Third row: Emily Buerger,
Taylor Perlis, Kate Agnello, Jaden Perrillo, Sara Gleco, Ash-
ley Williams, Sara Kashnicki, Kyleigh Wall. First-year coach-
es with Lady Rangers Karen May and Jim Miner. Missing
from photo: Olivia McCorkel, Sierra Macierowski, Brandy
Macierowski and Kristin Bomboy.
Yankee visits school
Eric Wordekemper, starting pitcher for the Scran-
ton\Wilkes-Barre Yankees, volunteered his time to visit with
students from Heights-Murray Elementary School, Wilkes-
Barre Area School District, during National Children’s Book
Week. The visit was sponsored by the Wyoming Valley Coa-
lition on Literacy. Wordekemper signed autographs and
shared stories about his career and baseball in general
prior to reading to the students during the school’s annual
Pen Pal luncheon. He was accompanied by Mike Vander
Woude, director of media relations and broadcasting for
the Yankees. Seated from left are Wordekemper, Vander
Woude and Desmond McCance. Second row from left are
Jamie Andrews, Heights-Murray teacher, Zyon Johnson,
Diamond Currie, Mia Bach, Chris DePaula and Yaha Sonko.
Third row from left are Helene Flannery, project director,
RSVP; Helen Semanski, Heights-Murray teacher, Hal Ga-
briel, Heights-Murray principal, and Michael Caprari,
Heights-Murray reading coach.
Ryan an Academic All-American
Erin Ryan from Holy Redeemer High School was recently
named to the Academic All-American Team. A senior mem-
ber of the girls swimming team, Ryan has been recognized
by the National Interscholastic Swimming Coaches Associ-
ation (NISCA) as a scholar athlete. To qualify for this award,
senior athletes must have a minimum of a 3.75 grade point
average cumulative from freshman year to first semester
senior year and must be a varsity letter winner. Ryan, a
high honors student and the daughter of Joe and Susan
Ryan of Lehman, qualified with a grade point average of
4.2. She has been a four-year member of the varsity girls
swimming team at Holy Redeemer High School and served
as a captain of the team this past season. Since her fresh-
man year, she has helped her team to four straight Wyom-
ing Valley Conference Southern Division titles. In addition,
Erin has played a large part in the team’s consecutive PIAA
District 2 championship titles in 2010 and in 2011.
Redeemer tourney winners
The top flight tournament winners in the Holy Redeemer
School System Golf Classic held at Blue Ridge Trails Golf
Course with a score of 61 were, from left, Bruce Gutterman,
Kingston; John Parsons, Bear Creek; and Don Deremer and
Tony Gallis, both of Dallas. The tournament benefitted Dio-
cesan Catholic Schools in Luzerne County.
Magic wins league title
The Mountain Top Magic U12 girls recently finished in first
place of the Northeast Travel Soccer League. The team is
coached by Kim Kaminski, Brian Hons, Tony Ellis and Amy
Daiute. Pictured with their medals are first row, from left:
Tatiana Kogoy and Alyssa Cuono. Second row: Grace Fed-
ero, Madison Maharty, Ally Olszyk, Emily Hons and Autumn
Kaminski. Third row: Emily Traficante, Taylor Herron, Mady
Heller, Shyla Seesoltz, Kaitlin Snipas and Maria Ellis. Mis-
sing from photo is Gianna Uhl.
The Times Leader will accept photos, standings and sto-
ries from readers about youth and adult recreation activ-
ities. We’re also encouraging anyone in a league – darts,
pool, Frisbee, etc. – to submit standings and results to us.
E-mailed photos should be sent in a jpeg format. Those
that are not in a jpeg format might not be published. All
submitted items should have contact information as well to
ensure publication.
Items will not be accepted over the telephone. They may
be e-mailed to tlsports@timesleader.com with “At Play” in
the subject, faxed to 831-7319, dropped off at the Times
Leader or mailed to Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N. Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250.
AT P L AY P O L I C Y
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 PAGE 11C

➛ S P O R T S
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
LOST: TAN MALE
POMERANIAN
vicinity of Huntsville
Reservoir, Dallas
Township. Brown
leather collar and
chipped tooth,
answers to “Tazz”.
If found please call
570-675-0385
150 Special Notices
MONTY MONTY SA SAYS YS
Marty B. and his
partner are a
class act. Great
effort so far.
Bringing it home
today. Thanks to
Dr. P.K. I could-
n't have done it
with out your
help. Big Larry
and Floyd had a
great weekend
so far...Keep it
up.
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
506 Administrative/
Clerical
CLERICAL:
District Office Assis-
tant needed on a
temporary basis
working 28 hours/
week in our Pittston,
PA office. This posi-
tion provides gener-
al clerical and word
processing support
for the planning and
implementing of all
the administrative
procedures and
functions in the Dis-
tricts Office, in order
to maintain a
smooth work flow &
insure the workload
is handled efficient-
ly. Requires 50 wpm
typing, Microsoft
Office suite experi-
ence and at least
one (1) year of office
experience.
Submit your resume
with salary require-
ments and typing
speed to:
union4workers@
yahoo.com
or fax 202-639-4019
Reference
DOA-STT052911.
No calls please.
512 Business/
Strategic
Management
242 Highland Park
Boulevard
Wilkes Barre, PA
18702
The Hilton Garden
Inn, Wilkes-Barre,
PA is looking for a
General Manager
This position is
responsible for
directing all opera-
tions of the hotel in
accordance with the
policies and profit
objectives of the
company in a man-
ner that provides
superior service and
value to our guests.
The General Man-
ager is expected to
take charge of all
components of his/
her property’s busi-
ness, serving as a
positive role model
for all co-workers
while representing
the owner’s fiduciary
interests. Responsi-
bilities include gen-
erating maximum
financial and opera-
tional performance,
developing and nur-
turing a team of co-
workers that are
directed towards
the achievement of
the hotel’s goals &
priorities, champi-
oning the Hotel’s
business plan and
operation budget
process and lead
the sales & revenue
building efforts.
College degree
required; hotel/
restaurant manage-
ment or culinary
school education
preferred. Minimum
3 years hotel opera-
tions experience
required. Also pre-
fer food & beverage
experience. Com-
puter experience
(Windows/Microsoft
Office/Excel), Front
Office PMS (Hilton
System 21/OnQ pre-
ferred), Food & Bev-
erage sanitation,
Food & Beverage
POS.
Interested candi-
dates should apply
online at www.
high.net/careers.
Owned and
operated by
HIGH HOTELS LTD
www.high.net/
hotels.
Post-offer drug
screen and
background check
required.
EOE M/F/D/V
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
522 Education/
Training
READING SPECIALIST
High School posi-
tions. PA certificate
required. Send
application & copies
of credentials to
Stephen Brod-
merkel, Strouds-
burg Area School
District, 123 Linden
St., Stroudsburg, PA
18360. EOE.
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
COOKS
COOKS
Full/Part time.
Experience
necessary. Good
starting wage.
Apply in person:
Lakeside Skillet
Lakeside Drive
Harveys Lake
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
COOK
Part Time
Experienced cook
with excellent
communication
skills to assist our
Dietary Depart-
ment with prepar-
ing delicious
meals. Healthcare
experience is a +
Great Pay, PTO
& Benefits
Email: Jobs@
horizonhrs.com
Fax:
866-854-8688
Please
complete
application
Birchwood
Nursing &
Rehab
395 Middle Rd.,
Nanticoke, PA
Wilkes-Barre
Area
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
CABLE TV CONTRACTOR
For collections and
disconnects in the
Scranton area.
Must have van or
pickup truck. Own
tools and insurance.
Call 717-342-3086
MECHANIC MECHANIC
Experienced Heavy
Equipment Mechan-
ic. Must have your
own tools. Full Ben-
efit Package is
available. Apply in
person at:
Coal Contractors
100 Hazlebrook Rd.
Hazle Township
(570) 450-5086
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
538 Janitorial/
Cleaning
DURYEA POSITION FOR
FACILITY CLEANER
Part time opening
for individuals that
would like to work
4:30pm-9pm
Monday-Friday and
every 3rd Saturday
-2hours. Must be
able to work in fast
pace environment.
Experience in com-
mercial cleaning
preferred. Stable
work history
required. Team
atmosphere.
Apply online at
www.sovereigncs.
com EOE- Drug
Free workplace
PART TIME PITTSTON-
FLOOR CARE
5:30 pm - 10:30 pm
Monday-Friday for
person with floor
care experience
and stable work his-
tory. Must be able to
meet pre-employ-
ment background.
Lifting up to 50lbs.
Will provide addi-
tional floor care
training. Apply online
at: www.
sovereigncs.com
EOE Drug Free
Workplace.
FULL TIME
FACILITY SPECIALIST
Sovereign is seek-
ing experience facil-
ity cleaners & floor
care staff for Mon-
day-Friday 4pm-12
midnight. 40 hours a
week. Must have
valid license, stable
work history, and no
less than 2 years in
facility cleaning, or
commercial janitorial
background. Starting
rates $10.00/hour.
Apply online at:
www.
sovereigncs.com
EOE - Drug Free
Workplace
542 Logistics/
Transportation
CDL DRIVERS
Opening for CDL
Drivers. 2 years
Experience in
Transporting and
Knowledge of Con-
struction Equip-
ment. Must Have
Good Driving
Record. We Offer
Top Wages and
Benefits Package.
Apply in Person and
Ask for:
Paul or Mike
Falzone’s Towing
Service, Inc.
271 N. Sherman St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702
570-823-2100
DRIVER- LARGE BODY
TRUCK (CLASS A)
Scranton based
company in need of
additional CDL
Class A driver for
same day deliver
runs. Full time 7:30
pm-4:30pm. Must
be able to lift up to
75lbs & provide cur-
rent DOT. Be home
daily, no overnight.
2-3 days a week
driving non CDL
truck. Hourly rate
for Class A experi-
ence no less than 3
years. Up to $12.50/
hour. Background
check required.
Apply online at:
www.papaper.com
EOE Drug Free
Workplace.
DRIVERS
A local based com-
pany seeks Class A
CDL Driver for Local
/ Regional Delivery.
Up To $20 Per hour.
Taking Calls Sunday
214-534-3790
Drivers CDL A-
Home Most
Nights With Our
Dedicated
Runs!
2-day orientation
and great miles will
have you earning
big money in no
time. Home most
nights, great equip-
ment and benefits
$500 Sign-On
Bonus
CDL-A and good
driving record
required.
New Terminal
Opening Soon -
Allentown, PA
877-211-8682
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
548 Medical/Health
JOB F
JOB F
AIR
AIR
Come work for a
team that works for
you!
NOW HIRING
RN’S•LPN’S•CNA’S
Tuesday, June 7
Hampton Inn
22 Montage Moun-
tain Road Scranton
10am-6pm
Don’t forget to
bring your
credentials!
CareGivers America
570-587-4000
nicolec@caregiver-
samerica.com
PROGRAM ASSISTANT
Part time wanted to
become part of a
dedicated and cre-
ative team to assist
with personal care
and activities.
Call Shannon @
570-823-5161 or
fax to 570-820-
3930. EOE
548 Medical/Health
LONG TERM CARE
POSITIONS
Little Flower Manor
is seeking candi-
dates to fill the fol-
lowing positions at
their skilled nursing
facilities.
Candidates should
be willing to work at
different locations
on an as needed
basis.
• NURSING ASSISTANTS
– Full and Part Time
all shifts
• $500.00 SIGN-ON
Bonus for Full Time
3-11 Nurse Aides
• RN SUPERVISOR
– per diem –
all shifts
• RN CHARGE
– per diem –
all shifts
• Attractive per
diem rates
Apply:
LITTLE FLOWER
MANOR
200 S. Meade St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702
pmelski@lfmstr.com
Fax: 570-408-9760
EOE
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
573 Warehouse
FULL TIME
WAREHOUSE PERSON
Scranton based
company seeks
experienced inven-
tory & order pickers
for full time job.
Monday-Friday
8am-5pm or 7:30-
4:30pm. No week-
end. Hourly rates
starts at $10.00.
Must have valid
license for driving
and stable work his-
tory. No less than 3
years warehouse
experience.
Apply online at:
www.papaper.com
EOE-Drug Free
Workplace.
OPEN HOUSE
WEDNESDAY 6/8
1:00 PM UNTIL 3 PM
We are a National
Convenience Store
Distribution Compa-
ny seeking 2ND and
3RD SHIFT ORDER
SELECTORS.
All positions are Full
time minimum 40
hours per week, with
a generous benefit
package, & various
bonus programs!
Apply @
100 West End Rd.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18706
NO PHONE CALLS
PLEASE!
SHOW UP AND BE
INTERVIEWED!!
All applicants sub-
ject to pre-employ-
ment drug and
background check.
E O E
575 Employment
Services
JOB WINNING
RESUMES
20 years creating
successful resumes.
We help you get job
interviews.
Call 570-602-6383
Executive Science
Corporation
700
MERCHANDISE
NANTICOKE
132 E Broad St
Monday-Friday
10:00AM-5:00PM
Closed Weekends
Or By Appointment
Honda Generator
GX160, Consew
Walking Foot
Sewing Machine
Model 206RB1,
aluminum platform
16’x12’, fiberglass
ladder 26’ & 28’,
Delta saw, old
carpenters wood
bench with vice,
antique corner cab-
inet, church pews,
Shop Master band
saw, stained win-
dow with bull eyes
41’x91’ (3 pieces).
Stack On tool chest
with tools. (Selling
together). Loads of
tools. Much more
smalls. Too many
items to list
(570) 855-7197 or
(570) 328-3428
HUGE HUGE
LIQUIDA LIQUIDATION TION
SALE SALE
NANTICOKE
Opening June 11th,
Saturdays 8am-4pm
St. John’s
Orthodox Church
106 Welles St.
Hanover Section
Vendors Pay $15
at gate
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
800
PETS & ANIMALS
815 Dogs
CHIHUAHUA FOX TERRIER
9 weeks old. Very
friendly. $275/each
(570) 371-3441
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP
86 Allenberry Dr.
FOR SALE BY OWNER
Bright & spacious,
1800 sq. ft. 2 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
Townhome with
great views.
Finished lower level,
hardwood floors,
central air, modern
kitchen and baths.
private deck.
Move in condition.
$126,900.
570-574-3192
912 Lots & Acreage
EAGLE ROCK RESORT
Beautiful wooded
corner lot - ideal
for a home. Fea-
tures excellent
views and quiet
resort serenity.
Club amenities
for property own-
ers include golf,
spa, pools and
much more!
.30 acres.
Price reduced
to $25,000
917-519-7532
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
PITTSTON
Available In July
3rd floor, 3 bed-
room Living room &
den, full eat in
kitchen, full bath.
$550 + security.
Sewer & garbage
included. Call (570)
883-0505
WILKES-BARRE
LAFAYETTE GARDENS
SAVE MONEY THIS YEAR!
113 Edison St.
Quiet neighborhood.
2 bedroom apart-
ments available for
immediate occu-
pancy. Heat & hot
water included. $625
Call Aileen at
570-822-7944
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
Purebred Animals?
Sell them here with a
classified ad!
570-829-7130
We Need Your Help!
Anonymous Tip Line
1-888-796-5519
Luzerne County Sheriff’s Office
“A lot better than we expect-
ed,” Kyle Busch said. “The guys
did a good job with it and gave
me a good piece to run a good
lap. That’s all we can ask for.
We’ve been having sort of a
struggle this weekend so far and
trying to make something out of
nothing here.”
Jamie McMurray, who grew
up in nearby Joplin, Mo., and
visited the tornado-ravaged
town Thursday, will start sixth.
Sprint Cup points leader Carl
Edwards, also a Missouri native,
will start seventh — the highest
of any of the Fords in the field.
“I’m not going to tell you ex-
actly what I did wrong, but I
know it was something,” Ed-
wards said. “I think we are going
to have a really good shot at this
race and that would mean a lot
to me.”
Dale Earnhardt Jr.’s momen-
KANSAS CITY, Kan. — Kurt
Busch had never run all that
well in Kansas, and a spinout
during practice Friday certainly
didn’t make it look as if he was
about to turn that around.
Less than 24 hours and a few
tweaks later, Busch captured the
pole for NASCAR’s Sprint Cup
race at Kansas Speedway and re-
versed a decade of tough luck at
the 1.5-mile track.
Busch, who had never started
higher than seventh in 10 career
starts in Kansas and has never
finished in the top five, topped
the leaderboard at 174.752 mph
in his No. 22 Dodge on Saturday.
Busch snapped out of an ex-
tended funk with a fourth-place
finish last week in Charlotte. He
had to have front end damage
repaired following Friday’s spin,
and that and other changes
helped produce his first pole
since Michigan last June and the
13th of his career.
“I have to thank my guys for
standing behind me, not just
through (Friday) but through
some of the tough times we’ve
been through as of late,” Busch
said. “It’s an amazing world, the
world of motorsports. One day
you’re down, the next day you’re
up.”
Juan Pablo Montoya will start
second in today’s race, followed
by Kyle Busch and Brian Vickers.
Joey Logano qualified fifth,
giving Toyota three cars in the
top five.
tum after a gut-wrenching but
promising second-place finish at
Charlotte stalled with a qualify-
ing run of 28th. Jimmie John-
son, who beat Edwards to win
here in 2008, will start 31st —
by far his worst position in Kan-
sas.
Today’s race will mark the
midway point of the Sprint Cup’s
regular season, and three drivers
looking to move up in the Chase
for the Sprint Cup championship
standings are hoping to become
Kansas’ first three-time winner.
Tony Stewart (13th), Greg Bif-
fle (14th) and Jeff Gordon
(22nd) all have a pair of wins
here — but none of them will
start in the top 10.
Gordon, who took Kansas’s
first two races in 2001-02, has
seven top-five finishes at the
track and four in a row.
Biffle took first in 2007, won
again last fall in a Chase event
and has the best driver rating of
any driver at Kansas, ahead of
Johnson. Stewart won Kansas in
2006 and 2009.
Of course, the way this season
has gone almost anyone has a
realistic shot at a win. Just five
of the 12 winners in the Cup se-
ries so far this season have start-
ed from 20th or better.
This is the first summer
Sprint Cup race on the schedule
for Kansas, which added an
event for 2011. Drivers expect
the track to be hot and slick for
today’s race, which will start at
noon local time.
The track will host its tradi-
tional fall race on October 9.
N A S C A R
Kurt Busch wins Kansas pole
Driver overcomes Friday
spinout to grab No. 1 spot
in qualifying Saturday.
By LUKE MEREDITH
AP Sports Writer
AP PHOTO
Kurt Busch talks with a crew member after qualifying for the STP
400 Sprint Cup race at Kansas Speedway Saturday.
NEW YORK— While fans
fret about the NFLlockout af-
fectingeverythingfromtrain-
ing camps to regular-season
games, marketing partners
for the league and the players
association aren’t panicking.
Or fleeing.
They are making contin-
gency plans, of course, be-
cause the time when spon-
sors and advertisers must
make decisions on how loyal
they can be to pro football is
rapidly approaching.
“We’re not at an Armaged-
don date. We not staring that
in the face this week,” Eric
Grubman, NFL executive
vice president of business op-
erations for the NFL, told
The Associated Press during
the owners’ meetings last
week. “The demandis good, I
think strong. The platformof
being with the NFL remains
very valuable and healthy.
“We have had losses (of po-
tential new sponsors) that
won’t return immediately.
With some of those, people
have saidthey are not signing
with us because of the labor
situation. Those dollars have
moved on forever, but those
partners have not, I think. I
think when we get back to
(playing) games, I like our
chances to get them back.
“We’re scratching and
clawing to show them this,
the value is still going to be
there.”
On the other side, NFL
Players, the marketing arm
for the players association,
says it has not lost any mar-
keting partners. Keith Gor-
don, the organization’s presi-
dent, believes the worth of its
players to advertisers and
sponsors could actually grow
should the lockout continue
into the fall.
“While sponsors are hop-
ing that football resumes in
the fall, they’re also position-
ing themselves to maximize
player involvement without
games being played,” he said.
“The lockout provides grea-
ter access to players at a time
when they would normally
be inaccessible.
“While unfortunate, it cre-
ates an opportunity for play-
ers that would otherwise not
be present.”
But those players already
are indanger of losing money
— aside from what they cur-
rently are spending for med-
ical coverage and what they
potentially will lose in salary
and bonuses if training
camps, the preseason and re-
al games are lost.
“Ingeneral, the most costly
part of the lockout has been
the contraction of the com-
mercial opportunities for
players with NFL sponsors,”
Gordon said. “In particular,
those (sponsors) who have
either decided not to renew
or those who have shifted
dollars elsewhere.
“Sponsors usually spend
the summer months working
with players and integrating
them into creative (cam-
paigns) for their season-long
marketing campaigns.”
One sponsor, Procter and
Gamble, has said it’s making
alternate plans. Others surely
are, as well. “Of course, we
hope that an agreement is re-
ached soon and the season
commences as scheduled,”
P&G spokeswoman Anne
Westbrook said.
So are the league’s broad-
cast partners, who might
have the most to lose without
a new collective bargaining
agreement soon. The last
thing ESPN, NBC, Fox or
CBS wants is the loss of the
cash cow that comes with
regular-season telecasts.
Forget the advance pay-
ments the networks already
paid the NFL that are being
held up by Judge David Doty
in Minneapolis. Eventually,
games will be played and the
networks will get the pro-
gramming they paid for.
What they might not get,
given a protracted labor im-
passe, are the boffo ratings
the NFL drew last year. They
might not get their money’s
worth if fans are turned off to
the NFL.
N F L L A B O R D I S P U T E
AP PHOTO
Ted Olson, a lawyer representing NFL players, speaks after
leaving the federal courthouse Friday, in St. Louis.
Sponsors are not
running for cover
League and players say
they haven’t lost many
sponsors yet.
By BARRY WILNER
AP Pro Football Writer
C M Y K
PAGE 12C SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
OUTDOORS
➛ WWW. T I ME S L E ADE R. C OM/ S P ORT S
I
thought something was amiss this
spring when I didn’t hear a single
gobbler in the weeks leading up to
the spring season.
Every year as April rolled into May,
gobbling was as common a sound as
the calls of songbirds as they welcomed
the spring.
But not this year.
Even when the spring gobbler season
began, the turkeys were quiet.
And it wasn’t just me who wasn’t
hearing turkeys gobble.
Tony Hudak is a die-hard turkey
hunter and he spends tons of hours in
the woods from February up to the
spring season locating gobblers.
He locates them by listening for
them, and this year he didn’t hear
much.
Hudak said he typically locates
around 100 gobblers throughout the
region each year before the start of the
season.
This year he only heard 30.
It made for a difficult spring hunting
season.
“This spring was one of the tough-
est, if not the toughest that I have ever
experienced,” Hudak said. “The lack of
gobbling on most days made for some
long mornings, and there was little a
guy could do to provoke a bird.”
Pennsylvania wasn’t the only state
that had silent gobblers.
Rain may have caused real troubles
Hudak, who hunts turkeys all over
the country, said the gobblers were also
silent in Alabama, North Carolina and
Delaware. A guide he knows in Ver-
mont actually cancelled spring gobbler
hunts because the birds simply weren’t
talking.
Did the hard winter or the late start
to spring have anything to do with the
gobblers remaining silent?
Or is it just part of turkey hunting?
Some hunters have said they hear
less gobbling each year. I’ve noticed
that after the first week or two the
gobbling decreases substantially.
While less gobbling made things
tough on hunters this season, there
was another aspect to the spring that
was tough on turkeys in general.
Rain.
We got a ton of it, consistently.
Rain is one of the worst things for
turkey poults after they hatch.
Dr. Walt Cottrell, the wildlife veter-
inarian for the Pennsylvania Game
Commission, said wet weather and
cool temperatures are a fatal combina-
tion for many species of young wildlife,
especially turkey poults.
“If it’s cool, then the insects aren’t
there, they can’t eat enough and go
into a negative energy balance,” Cot-
trell said. “And if it’s wet, they simply
get hypothermia and die.”
Turkey hens start to nest during mid
to late April and it takes about 28 days
for the eggs to hatch. One reason why
turkey poults are so susceptible to rain
is they don’t have the protection of
fully developed feathers that can shed
water.
And water is one thing we’ve had
plenty of this spring.
According to the National Weather
Service, we’ve had more than 16 inches
of rain since March 1 – almost seven
inches more than normal.
Almost half of that 16 inches of rain
fell in May, most of the time day after
day.
Everything in the woods was
drenched, including any turkey poults
that hatched a bit early.
Still, the recent warmup certainly
helped, but the verdict is still out if it
came in time to avoid any type of sig-
nificant impact to turkey poults.
“I don’t know. It’s tough to measure
because after a turkey poult dies it
disintegrates fast,” Cottrell said.
Just like finding a reason why gob-
blers seem to gobble less some years,
gauging turkey poult mortality is a
difficult puzzle to solve.
TOM VENESKY
O U T D O O R S
An especially
quiet spring
turkey season
The Factoryville Sportsman’s Club will
hold a benefit sporting clay shoot on
Saturday. The shoot will benefit the
club’s youth shooting team. Cost will be
$15 for 50 birds and $30 for 100 birds.
The shoot will run from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Kitchen will be open all day. For direc-
tions due to a detour, check out our web
site at www.fscweb.org. Eye and ear
protection required.
The Central Susquehanna Woodland
Owners Association will sponsor a
program on woodland management on
June 12 at 1:30 p.m. at the Park Family
Farm and Forest in the Benton area.
The Parks have a diverse wood lot with
many of the issues facing central Penn-
sylvania woodland owners. They have
built a 10-acre deer exclosure fence and
smaller fences with oak seedlings, allow-
ing participants to see first-hand how
much deer really impact the forest.
Attendees will also see how old pine
plantations have been managed and the
results of new hardwood plantings in
some of the fields.
The site also has mature forests with
looming questions: what can be done
with the hemlock trees being attacked by
woolly adelgid and with the ash trees
given the impending impact of the emer-
ald ash borer? The public is invited to
come and learn about what the Parks
have done, so that participants can
better manage their own wood lots. This
free program will be held at the Park
Family Farm and Forest, 2098 County
Line Road, Benton, Columbia County. For
further information and directions, con-
tact Henry Williams at 458-0157 or e-mail
CSWOA1@gmail.com.
The Pennsylvania Game Commission
board will hold its upcoming meeting on
June 27-28, in the auditorium of the
agency’s Harrisburg headquarters at
2001 Elmerton Ave., just off the Progress
Avenue exit of Interstate 81 in Harrisburg.
On Monday, June 27, the Board will gath-
er public comments and hear Game
Commission staff reports beginning at
8:30 a.m. Doors will open at 7:45 a.m.
Registration for those interested in of-
fering public testimony – limited to five
minutes – also will begin at that time.
On Tuesday, June 28, beginning at 8:30
a.m., the Game Commission will take up
its prepared agenda, which will be posted
on the agency’s website prior to the
meeting. Doors will open at 7:45 a.m.
For those unable to attend this meeting,
the Game Commission will webcast the
meeting beginning with the Game Com-
mission staff reports on Monday, immedi-
ately following the conclusion of public
comments. The full Board meeting on
Tuesday will be webcast beginning at
8:30 a.m. An icon will be posted on the
agency’s website (www.pgc.state.pa.us)
on Monday and Tuesday to access the
webcasts.
Pennsylvania hunting and furtaker
licenses for the 2011-2012 seasons will go
on sale beginning Monday, June 13. Li-
censes will be available through the
Game Commission’s Pennsylvania Auto-
mated License System (PALS), over-the-
counter at all Game Commission region
offices and the Harrisburg headquarters,
as well as the more than 600 in-state
and out-of-state issuing agents. Licenses
also are available through the PALS
website: https://www.pa.wildlifeli-
cense.com.
For the 2011-12 license year, all fees are
the same as they have been since 1999.
There is a 70-cent transaction fee at-
tached to the purchase of each license
and permit, which is paid directly to
Active Outdoors, the Nashville-based
company that runs PALS. Returning
PALS customers are encouraged to
provide their Customer Identification
Number (CID) to speed up processing.
O U T D O O R S N O T E S
As the wildlife veter-
inarian for the Pennsylva-
nia Game Commission, Dr.
Walt Cottrell has seen his
share of ticks.
He’s seen them on bear,
deer and virtually every
mammal that roams Penn-
sylvania’s woods. So does
that mean the deer and
bear living in tick-infested
woods are also suffering
from the same lyme dis-
ease that impacts pets and
people?
Not really, Cottrell said.
“I’ve seen bears just cov-
ered with ticks in the
spring. Their skin will be
red and encrusted, but they
don’t get sick with the
disease,” he said. “It ap-
pears only domestic ani-
mals and people suffer, and
we don’t exactly know why
a deer or bear doesn’t get
infected.”
Even the deer mouse –
which Cottrell said is the
primary carrier of the bac-
teria that causes lyme dis-
ease, may only have a tem-
porary fever and immune
response when it’s infected.
Still, wildlife play a key
role in the spread of lyme
disease to people and pets.
According to Cottrell,
ticks aren’t born with the
lyme disease infection.
When a larval tick hatches,
if it feeds on a deer mouse
carrying the bacteria then
that tick is infected for life.
When the infected larvae
emerges the next year as a
nymph, it can transmit the
bacteria when it feeds on
other hosts, such as deer.
“The more hosts, such as
deer, that there are, then
the more blood meal there
is for ticks. That can lead
to an increase in tick repro-
duction,” Cottrell said.
Other carriers of the
lyme bacteria include chip-
munks and rabbits to a
lesser degree, Cottrell said.
While infected ticks do
feed on deer, bear and
other game species, hun-
ters shouldn’t worry about
eating that meat because
cooking it will kill the
bacteria.
Lyme disease isn’t the
only health risk that ticks
pose to people. Cottrell
said ticks can also transmit
anaplasmosis and ehrlichio-
sis (both of which can
cause fever, headache, fa-
tigue, and muscle aches).
“These are bad actors yet
very treatable,” Cottrell
said. “Since sportsmen are
at risk of being bitten by
an infected tick, it’s impor-
tant that they mention
there was an exposure
when they see their doc-
tor.”
Disease
doesn’t
sicken
wildlife
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
There are two times during the year
that Dr. Doug Ayers of the Plains Animal
Hospital said ticks are the worst.
In the fall and right now.
“We see ticks every other day,” Ayers
said. “When the ground temperature
reaches 50 degrees and the sun hits it,
they start moving around.
“Ticks are getting worse and they’re
really spreading.”
Years ago, Ayers said, ticks and the
threat of lyme disease was limited to
rural mountainous areas. But now, the
range has spread and ticks can nowbe
found in urban areas.
Ayers sees it all the time at his practice.
Adog whose owner lived in Plains was
recently brought to Ayers and subse-
quent tests showed it had Rocky Moun-
tain spotted fever and lyme disease –
both are carried by ticks.
“This dog was exposed to a tick with
both diseases, and it was in Plains. It’s
certainly spread fromthe mountains to
the cities,” Ayers said, adding the in-
crease in ticks and lyme disease has been
gradually increasing over the last 12
years.
“I’ve been practicing for 21years and it
wasn’t like this then,” he said.
While all pets are susceptible to ticks,
Ayers said hunting dogs are more vul-
T I C K S A N D T H E T H R E AT O F LY M E D I S E A S E
All pets susceptible
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Dr Doug Ayers examines a dog for ticks by checking the eyes at the Plains Animal Hospital recently.
Inspect after each trip afield
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
USE FINE-TIPPED TWEEZERS and protect
your fingers with a tissue, paper towel, or
latex gloves. Avoid removing ticks with your
bare hands.
GRASP THE TICK as close to the skin sur-
face as possible and pull upward with steady,
even pressure. Don’t twist or jerk the tick;
this can cause the mouth-parts to break off
and remain in the skin. If this happens, re-
move the mouth-parts with tweezers. If you
are unable to remove the mouth easily with
clean tweezers, leave it alone and let the
skin heal.
AFTER REMOVING the tick, thoroughly
disinfect the bite and your hands with rub-
bing
alcohol, an iodine scrub, or soap and water.
AVOID FOLKLORE REMEDIES such as
"painting" the tick with nail polish or pet-
roleum jelly, or using heat to make the tick
detach from the skin. Your goal is to remove
the tick as quickly as possible -- not waiting
for it to detach.
R E M O V I N G A T I C K
See PETS, Page 13C
Timing is everything when
it comes to a tick bite.
And your chances of get-
ting one are greatest right
now.
According to Dr. Steven
Ostroff, acting physician
general for the Pennsylvania
Department of Health, May
and June are the peak season
when it comes to tick activity.
Now is when ticks in the
nymph stage have emerged
from hibernation and are
prowling the woods actively
looking for a blood meal.
That voracious feeding
behavior decreases over the
summer, Ostroff said, and
now is the time to be vigilant
for ticks after spending time
in the outdoors.
And if you do find one
stuck to your skin, you basi-
cally have 24 hours to get it
off before it can infect you
with lyme disease.
Once a tick attaches to the
skin, it begins feeding until it
is engorged. Then, Ostroff
said, it begins regurgitating
into the host, and that’s when
the lyme bacteria can enter a
person.
“If you see a tick on you,
get rid of it very quickly and
the likelihood of transmitting
lyme disease is very low,”
Ostroff said. “If the tick is
engorged, it means it’s been
on you for some time.”
Several species of ticks
exist in Pennsylvania, but the
major culprit for lyme disease
is Ixodes scapularis, or the
deer tick. States such as Con-
necticut, New Jersey, Rhode
Island and New York have
higher rates of lyme disease
than Pennsylvania, Ostroff
People can be infected after 24 hours
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
Lyme disease prevention tips
from the state Department of
Health:
ANYONE BITTEN by a tick
should watch the area where
the tick was attached for the
next month or so. If a rash
develops at the site from which
the tick was removed, or if a
rash develops elsewhere on the
body at any time, consult a
physician. Lyme disease is
nearly always cured by a 10-day
to two-week course of oral
antibiotics when appropriately
treated at this stage (when the
rash appears).
THE RISK of being bitten by an
infected tick can be decreased
by using the following
precautions:
(1) Use insect repellent contain-
ing low concentrations (10 to 30
percent) of diethyltoluamide
(DEET) on clothing and exposed
skin (not face):
(a) Apply DEET sparingly on
exposed skin; do not use under
clothing.
(b) Do not use DEET on the
hands of young children; avoid
applying to areas around
the eyes and mouth.
(c) Do not use DEET over cuts,
wounds or irritated skin. Wash
treated skin with soap
and water after returning in-
doors; wash treated clothing.
(d) Avoid spraying in enclosed
areas; do not use DEET near
food.
(2) Avoid tick-infested areas;
(3) Wear light-colored clothing
so ticks can be spotted more
easily;
(4) Tuck pant legs into socks or
boots, and shirts into pants;
(5) Tape the areas where pants
and socks meet;
(6) Wear a hat, long-sleeved
shirt, and long pants for added
protection;
(7) Walk in the center of trails to
avoid overhanging brush;
(8) Check yourself, family mem-
bers and pets for ticks after
leaving potentially tick-
infested areas and promptly
remove any ticks detected.
S U G G E S T I O N S T O AV E R T LY M E D I S E A S E
See PEOPLE, Page 13C
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 PAGE 13C
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said, but since the Keystone
state has between 4,000 and
5,000 cases each year, it ranks in
the top five in the country.
Three regions of the country
are known as “lyme disease ar-
eas,” – the Eastern seaboard
(which includes Pennsylvania),
the upper Midwest and Califor-
nia. Ostroff said that the 10
states that make up the Eastern
seaboard account for 90 percent
of the lyme disease cases in the
country.
And the situation is getting
worse.
A little more than a decade
ago most of the lyme disease
cases were occurring in a narrow
strip along the ocean, in places
such as New Jersey, Connecti-
cut, and islands off of Massachu-
setts. In Pennsylvania, most
lyme disease cases occurred in
and around Philadelphia.
“That’s not the case any-
more,” Ostroff said. “It appears
to be moving westward and
northward, and infected ticks
are relatively common in the
central and northeastern parts
of the state.”
As far as a reason for the
spread, Ostroff said nobody real-
ly know for sure.
But, he said, one factor in the
spread of lyme disease isn’t the
tick, but people.
“We’re increasingly building
housing in areas that were once
wooded. We’re going to where
the tick thrives,” Ostroff said. “A
primary driver for who’s at risk
is people whose backyard abuts
a forest. That’s prime territory
for ticks.”
PEOPLE
Continued from Page 12C
nerable because they frequent ar-
eas where ticks thrive. Water-
ways are one such area, he said,
because wildlife tend to congre-
gate and travel through such ar-
eas, increasing the presence of
ticks.
The situationhas gottensobad
that therearesometicks that may
be becoming resistant to pesti-
cides that kill ticks, Ayers said.
So what can a pet owner do to
protect their dog or cat?
Ayers recommended inspect-
ing your pet for ticks after each
trip afield and using the “higher
end” topical treatments.
And get your pet tested.
“When we check a dog for
heartworm,10to15percent come
uppositivefor lymediseaseor ex-
posure to lyme disease,” Ayers
said. “Most can beat it, but once
in a blue moon we get a dog that
has liver damage as a result.”
PETS
Continued from Page 12C
Running back John Henry
Johnson, a member of the San
Francisco 49ers’ famed “Million
Dollar Backfield” in the
mid-1950s, died in Tracy, Calif.,
on Friday at the age of 81, ac-
cording to several relatives and
close friends.
Family members said John-
son’s health had been in decline
the past five years.
Johnson’s pro playing career
spanned 14 seasons, including 13
in the NFL and now-defunct
American Football League, and
culminated with his induction
into the Pro Football Hall of
Fame. He prepped at Pittsburg
(Calif.) High School.
“For kids in this town, and for
me, he was more than a role
model; a hero, you might say,”
said Federal Glover, who played
football for Pittsburg High and
now is a District V Supervisor.
“He paved the way and inspired
dozens of others to say to them-
selves, ‘I may come from a small
town and a small high school,
but I can play in the big
leagues.”’
Johnson’s most productive
seasons came with the Pitts-
burgh Steelers in the ’60s, when
he twice rushed for more than
1,000 yards. He also was a mem-
ber of the Detroit Lions’ title-
winning team in 1957.
However, it was during his
three seasons with the 49ers for
which Johnson is best remem-
bered. He teamed with running
backs Joe “The Jet” Perry and
Hugh McElhenny and quarter-
back Y.A. Tittle from 1954-56 to
comprise what many regard as
the best backfield in history.
“John Henry Johnson helped
create the legacy of professional
athletes coming out of Pitts-
burg,” Glover said in a news re-
lease. “Ever since John Henry
graduated from Pittsburg High
in (1949), a remarkable string of
professional athletes have come
out of this relatively small com-
munity.”
McElhenny and Tittle did not
return phone calls seeking com-
ment. Perry died at 84 on April
25.
The 49ers weren’t aware of
Johnson’s passing until Friday
evening and did not issue a state-
ment.
Current Pittsburg varsity foot-
ball coach Victor Galli said John-
son’s size and toughness made
him a player for the ages.
“You watch film of him, and
he’s amazing,” Galli said. “He
would be successful in today’s
NFL because he was such a
tough, hard-nosed football play-
er.”
Johnson’s No. 35 is retired at
Pittsburg High, and his framed
jersey hangs in the weight room.
Johnson’s football career took
root in the Bay Area. He played
collegiately at Saint Mary’s and
Arizona State before he was se-
lected by the Pittsburgh Steelers
in the second round of the 1953
NFL draft—No. 18 overall.
Johnson, 6-foot-2 and 210
pounds, elected to play in Cana-
da in 1953, but he joined the
49ers after one season in the
Canadian Football League and
became an instant hit when he
rushed for 681 yards, second in
the league, and nine touchdowns
his rookie season. He was select-
ed to four Pro Bowls during a
career that yielded 6,803 yards
rushing and 48 touchdowns.
N F L
John Henry Johnson dead at 81
Pro Football Hall of Famer was
part of San Francisco’s
“Million Dollar Backfield.”
By STEVE CORKRAN
Contra Costa Times
C M Y K
PAGE 14C SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Average 76/54
Record High 98 in 1919
Record Low 40 in 1977
Yesterday 0
Month to date 15
Year to date 94
Last year to date 123
Normal year to date 50
*Index of fuel consumption, how far the day’s
mean temperature was above 65 degrees.
Precipitation
Yesterday 0.03”
Month to date 0.03”
Normal month to date 0.52”
Year to date 21.39”
Normal year to date 14.72”
Susquehanna Stage Chg. Fld. Stg
Wilkes-Barre 4.80 -0.96 22.0
Towanda 2.79 -0.43 21.0
Lehigh
Bethlehem 2.86 0.54 16.0
Delaware
Port Jervis 3.69 -0.30 18.0
Today’s high/
Tonight’s low
TODAY’S SUMMARY
Highs: 74-81. Lows: 53-58. Chance of
showers and thunderstorms today and
tonight.
The Poconos
Highs: 71-77. Lows: 61-63. Isolated
showers and thunderstorms possible
today and tonight.
The Jersey Shore
Highs: 71-83. Lows: 49-58. Becoming
partly cloudy and pleasant today.
Clearing skies tonight.
The Finger Lakes
Highs: 80-81. Lows: 60-62. Chance for
showers and thunderstorms today and
tonight.
Brandywine Valley
Highs: 76-83. Lows: 62-67. Chance for
showers and thunderstorms today and
tonight.
Delmarva/Ocean City
Anchorage 55/47/.00 59/45/sh 61/47/pc
Atlanta 92/74/.00 96/71/s 94/69/pc
Baltimore 81/50/.00 82/62/t 83/63/pc
Boston 64/56/.00 67/57/pc 68/56/pc
Buffalo 69/51/.33 73/58/s 78/56/pc
Charlotte 88/58/.00 93/68/t 91/65/pc
Chicago 91/72/.18 74/55/t 77/68/t
Cleveland 92/59/.00 73/55/pc 79/60/pc
Dallas 95/71/.00 98/75/pc 99/75/pc
Denver 76/48/.00 91/62/s 95/60/s
Detroit 92/61/.00 80/58/pc 78/60/pc
Honolulu 79/69/.22 87/73/s 87/73/s
Houston 97/71/.00 97/72/pc 97/72/pc
Indianapolis 94/67/.00 86/64/t 85/66/t
Las Vegas 89/65/.00 95/70/s 83/64/s
Los Angeles 64/55/.00 67/57/c 67/58/pc
Miami 89/79/.00 85/76/s 87/76/pc
Milwaukee 86/71/.00 72/53/pc 76/60/t
Minneapolis 84/65/.00 80/63/pc 85/65/t
Myrtle Beach 82/66/.00 88/72/t 85/72/s
Nashville 95/69/.00 95/70/t 95/71/pc
New Orleans 99/75/.00 94/76/pc 94/76/pc
Norfolk 84/59/.00 87/68/t 86/69/pc
Oklahoma City 94/64/.00 94/69/pc 95/71/pc
Omaha 88/69/.00 90/67/pc 95/70/s
Orlando 91/67/.00 91/70/s 93/72/pc
Phoenix 99/69/.00 106/78/s 100/73/s
Pittsburgh 85/53/.00 81/54/pc 81/55/s
Portland, Ore. 83/51/.00 81/53/pc 70/53/pc
St. Louis 98/79/.00 96/74/t 97/72/pc
Salt Lake City 74/44/.00 87/58/s 86/51/pc
San Antonio 94/73/.00 98/69/pc 98/72/pc
San Diego 67/60/.00 68/56/pc 67/55/s
San Francisco 64/55/.66 66/53/sh 63/53/sh
Seattle 75/50/.00 78/53/s 68/52/c
Tampa 93/73/.00 91/72/s 93/76/pc
Tucson 101/59/.00 103/70/s 100/66/s
Washington, DC 84/61/.00 83/63/t 84/63/pc
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
Amsterdam 79/59/.00 72/55/sh 64/48/c
Baghdad 104/79/.00 108/82/s 112/79/s
Beijing 90/64/.00 88/71/pc 90/69/pc
Berlin 84/55/.00 87/71/pc 80/62/t
Buenos Aires 54/36/.00 59/45/s 57/43/sh
Dublin 64/45/.00 57/43/sh 59/48/c
Frankfurt 86/63/.00 81/61/t 75/59/t
Hong Kong 90/81/.00 87/81/t 88/80/t
Jerusalem 86/61/.00 83/60/s 82/61/s
London 79/54/.00 72/48/c 66/52/c
Mexico City 81/52/.00 75/57/t 81/58/t
Montreal 70/48/.00 70/61/sh 75/55/sh
Moscow 70/52/.00 79/54/s 77/52/s
Paris 86/63/.00 77/59/t 73/54/t
Rio de Janeiro 79/66/.00 70/62/s 78/63/s
Riyadh 108/84/.00 110/84/s 112/82/s
Rome 82/64/.00 81/63/t 80/64/c
San Juan 84/76/.18 86/76/t 84/77/t
Tokyo 75/66/.00 75/65/c 77/64/s
Warsaw 79/59/.00 82/61/s 84/63/pc
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
WORLD CITIES
River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snowflurries, i-ice.
Philadelphia
81/63
Reading
80/59
Scranton
Wilkes-Barre
81/58
80/58
Harrisburg
82/59
Atlantic City
77/62
New York City
75/62
Syracuse
79/57
Pottsville
79/57
Albany
76/57
Binghamton
Towanda
71/52
81/52
State College
80/55
Poughkeepsie
76/56
98/75
74/55
91/62
95/73
80/63
67/57
64/52
93/73
83/55
78/53
75/62
80/58
96/71
85/76
97/72
87/73
54/43
59/45
83/63
Sun and Moon
Sunrise Sunset
Today 5:32a 8:33p
Tomorrow 5:31a 8:33p
Moonrise Moonset
Today 9:08a 11:34p
Tomorrow 10:17a none
First Full Last New
June 8 June 15 June 23 July 1
After the sunny
skies of
Memorial Day
weekend a few
days ago, we've
got some big
shoes. This
weekend clearly
won't be a
repeat perform-
ance...after
showers moved
through yester-
day afternoon.
Expect periods
of sun midday
today, but more
showers and
maybe even a
thunderstorm
will develop this
afternoon in
response to a
trough of low
pressure stalling
out over the
eastern half of
the
Commonwealth.
Temperatures
will make it into
the upper 70s,
but the real
warm weather
arrives later in
the week. Highs
will climb to near
90 by Thursday
as a brief ridge
of high pressure
builds over the
northeast. It will
be short-lived,
with more
spring-like
weather return-
ing by next
weekend.
-Ryan Coyle
NATIONAL FORECAST: A storm system is expected to generate showers and thunderstorms from the
Mid-Atlantic to the Ohio Valley today. Some of these storms may be severe. A few weaker showers
and thunderstorms will also be possible over portions of the Northeast. In the West, a Pacific storm
will continue to spread rain showers into California and Oregon.
Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Int’l Airport
Temperatures
Cooling Degree Days*
Precipitation
TODAY
Partly sunny,
a thunderstorm
MONDAY
Partly
sunny, a
storm
80°
55°
WEDNESDAY
Partly
sunny
88°
60°
THURSDAY
Partly
sunny, a
T-storm
90°
62°
FRIDAY
Partly
sunny, a
T-storm
82°
62°
SATURDAY
Partly
sunny
82°
55°
TUESDAY
Partly
sunny
85°
55°
77
°
54
°
C M Y K
BUSINESS S E C T I O N D
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011
timesleader.com
GREETINGS, Class
of 2011.
You have worked
hard in college these
past four years — five
or six years for some
of you — and are
about to enter the
real world.
That world, as “The Daily Show”
host Jon Stewart told William & Mary
graduates in 2004, is a little different
than life on campus. “The biggest
difference,” Stewart told them, “is you
will now be paying for things.”
Indeed, finances will play a big role
in your life from now on. Two-thirds of
you leaving school with a bachelor’s
degree will be shouldering student
loans. And you’ll have to start repaying
them before you know it.
One of your life’s biggest financial
goals — though you may not believe
this now — must be saving for retire-
ment. By the time you retire, there will
be even fewer pensions than today,
and Social Security benefits will be
stingier than what your grandparents
now enjoy.
But the financial outlook is by no
means bleak. The job market for new
graduates remains challenging, but it’s
the best since the 2008 financial crisis.
And you have something priceless
that your parents and grandparents
don’t have — time.
Start saving now, even small
amounts, and it will pay big dividends
down the road because your invest-
ments will have more years to grow.
Even if you invest as little as $200 a
month in a Roth IRA and earn an 8
percent annual return, you’ll be a mil-
lionaire by the time you reach your full
retirement age of 67.
Here are some suggestions to get
you on a sound financial path:
STUDENT LOANS: Graduates who
borrowed for college are carrying an
average of $27,200 in student loan
debt, calculates Mark Kantrowitz,
publisher of financial aid sites FinAi-
d.org and Fastweb.com.
Most of these loans are from the
federal government, and you generally
have to start repaying them six
months after graduation. Uncle Sam
offers a variety of repayment options
to help struggling borrowers.
If federal loans eat up most of your
paycheck, for instance, you may be
eligible for an income-based repay-
ment plan. Payments won’t exceed 15
percent of discretionary income. And if
your earnings are really paltry, you
might not have to pay anything at all.
Any debt remaining after 25 years is
erased — or after 10 years, if you have
been in public service for a decade.
If you can’t find a job, you may be
able to defer payments on federal
loans for up to three years. Or you may
qualify for a forbearance, in which
payments are suspended or tempo-
rarily reduced. Explore your options at
studentaid.ed.gov.
You also might consider volunteer-
ing with AmeriCorps if you can’t find
other work, Kantrowitz said. The
program offers education awards
worth up to $5,550 a year that can be
applied to reducing federal student
loan debt, he says. Even if you volun-
teer only for the summer, the award is
pro-rated.
Whatever you do, don’t default. The
penalties are harsh. And the govern-
ment can garnish wages, tax refunds
and even Social Security benefits in
retirement to collect its due.
HEALTH INSURANCE: If you’re
fortunate, you will land a job that
provides health care insurance.
If not, you can remain on your par-
ents’ workplace plan until you turn 26,
thanks to health care reform.
Workers sometimes pay extra to
cover dependents. This means that
your parents might have to shell out
more to keep you on their plan.
Not all parents are generous,
though. A recent survey sponsored by
online broker eHealthInsurance found
that four out of 10 parents said they
would keep an adult child on a health
plan only if it didn’t cost them any-
thing. Tough love.
Another option is to buy an individ-
ual policy. Young adults are usually
PERSONAL FINANCE
E I L E E N A M B R O S E
A few tips
on finances
for new grads
See FINANCE, Page 4D
NEW YORK — Wal-Mart is in
a race against time to give the
people what they want before
they get comfortable shopping
elsewhere.
Shoppers who switched to oth-
er stores when Wal-Mart decided
to ditch best-selling toothbrush
brands, craft supplies and bolts
of fabric may be hard to win back.
The company has taken nine
months to restore thousands of
grocery items, including some
bestselling brands, it dumped
from its shelves two years ago.
The idea was to tidy up stores for
the wealthier customers it had
won during the recession.
Grocery sales have improved,
rising in the low single digits in
the first quarter. But overall traf-
fic at its U.S. namesake stores
has been down and revenue at
stores open at least a year has
posted eight straight quarters of
declines on a year-over-year ba-
sis.
Wal-Mart says it will take until
the end of the year to restock the
rest of the store with items that
were culled, from craft supplies
to home furnishings. That will go
a long way toward restoring Wal-
Mart’s ability to provide one-stop
shopping, which could be a plus
as shoppers make fewer trips to
save on gasoline.
“The customer, for the most
part, is still in the store shop-
ping, but they started doing
some more shopping elsewhere,
and we want to bring them back.
We know that it’s easy to lose
them.” said Wal-Mart Stores
Inc.’s chief financial officer Char-
les Holley during a Citi Global
Consumer Conference last week.
Dollar stores, which benefited
from shoppers trying to stretch
their dollars in the recession, are
continuing to gain new custom-
ers and post higher revenue. The
trend has accelerated as gasoline
prices closed in on $4 a gallon.
Dollar stores more adroitly
AP FILE PHOTO
Wal-Mart Stores Inc., the world’s
largest retailer, restores thou-
sands of products it slashed in
an overzealous bid to clean up
its stores, it’s going back to its
roots like catering to enthusi-
asts of hunting and fishing,
while experimenting in new
areas.
Wal-Mart
regains
footing
By ANNE D’INNOCENZIO
AP Retail Writer
See WALMART, Page 4D
ASTHEPOCONO
Raceway prepares for
the upcoming Pocono
500 Sprint Cup Series
race onJune12, select
Walmart stores near
the Pocono Raceway
will host exclusive
NASCARfanevents throughthe new
Race Time program. Customers are
invitedto attendthese special events and
enjoy racing car displays andracing
simulator machines.
Participating stores near the Pocono
Raceway include:
•The Wilkes-Barre Township Market-
place Walmart onHighlandPark Boule-
vardonThursday fromnoon- 6 p.m.
•The Mount Pocono Walmart on
Route 940 onSaturday from11a.m. - 5
p.m.
Events at bothstops that are free and
opento the public include the Mars
M&MShowCar Simulator, General
Mills Cheerios showcar, Kraft’s Oreo
Ritz Nationwide showcar, Coca Cola
five-seat racing simulator, Pepsi Max
simulator andAmp tire changer sim-
ulator.
For country music fans, local radio
stationFroggy101will be at the Wilkes-
Barre Township store broadcasting
remotely onThursday from. 11a.m. to1
p.m.
Mrs. T’s Pierogies are a favorite of
mine. Andso is ice cream. ThoughI
wouldn’t eat themtogether, I’ll certainly
take advantage of the package deal being
offeredat several grocers. Essentially you
buy three boxes of pierogies, use your
club card– andinsome cases, the cou-
ponprintedinthe store’s circular -- and
youget a free store brandice cream.
At Price Chopper youget a free half-
gallonof Central Classics ice cream
whenyoubuy the pierogies between
June 5 and11. At Weis, it’s just any Weis
Quality ice creamup to $2.99 whenyou
buy the pierogies betweenJune 5 and11.
At Shur Save, youget a free Shur Save
48-ounce ice creamwhenyoubuy the
pierogies betweenJune12 and18; at
Giant, get a free package of Giant ice
creamsandwiches or ice creamup to
$2.50 betweenJune 5 and11withthe
pierogie purchase; andat Redner’s, you
get a free half gallonof Redner’s ice
creamwhenyoubuy the pierogies be-
tweenJune 5 and11. All purchases must
be made inone transaction. Go to
www.pierogies.com/icecreamfor more
information.
Making the offer evensweeter is the
$1off three boxes of Mrs. T’s Pierogies
foundintoday’s Times Leader coupon
inserts.
Here are two offers fromDunkinDo-
nuts that will take the heat off your bud-
get. NowthroughJune 26, get any size
icedtea or icedcoffee for 99 cents plus
tax.
What’s cheaper than99 cents? How
about free. Andthat’s what you’ll get a
9.5 ounce canof Seattle’s Best icedcoffee
for whenyoutake the couponfoundin
today’s paper to any retailer that sells it.
Here are the rest of this week’s best
uses of coupons foundintoday’s Times
Leader at area retailers:
•Price Chopper andRedner’s have
select Ball Park hot dog packages buy-
one, get-one free. There’s a $1off any two
Ball Park products coupon.
•Weis has select containers of All
laundry detergents onsale for $2.99. Use
the $1off couponto pay just $1.99.
ANDREW M. SEDER
S T E A L S & D E A L S
Vroom, zoom to nearby Walmart stores for NASCAR fan events
Andrew M. Seder, a Times Leader staff
writer, may be reached at 570-829-7269. If
you know of any local steals or deals, send
them to aseder@timesleader.com.
R
ecent Misericordia University graduate Alysia Ardo won’t
let proposedstatefundingcuts or possiblelayoffs dashher
lifelonghopeof beingateacher, but shedoeshaveabackup
plan. •Her “PlanB” asshecallsit involvesworkingasasubstitute
teacher or a therapeutic staff support worker if her applications to
area school districts fail tolandher a teachingjob. “I will takeany-
thing I can get,” Ardo said.
The Misericordia University graduate
said she hopes the state’s proposed bud-
get that would cut $400 million from
publicschool educationdoesn’t pass. Re-
publican Gov. Tom Corbett’s proposed
budget for 2011-12 would mean a loss of
$22 million for Luzerne County public
schools while Lackawanna County
schools would see $14.5 million in cuts.
The 21-year-old said her dream to be-
come a teacher has been a life-long one.
“I usedtoplayteacher withmystuffed
animals all the time.”
There was no doubt she wanted to
teach after graduating from the former
Seton Catholic High School.
“The right opportunity will come
along at the right time,” she said. The
Pittston woman is applying for jobs
throughout Northeastern Pennsylvania
but said some of her former Misericor-
dia classmates are looking out-of-state.
Ardo said she’s not willing to relocate to
find a teaching job.
“I’m a family person. I need my fam-
ily.”
Wilkes University Class of 2011 mem-
ber JasonHomzaearnedabachelor’s de-
gree in earth and environmental science
and a minor in secondary education. He
said other education majors he knows
haven’t beenswayedfromtheir decision
to become public school teachers.
“They are, however, realizing that
finding a teaching position will require
themto leave the area or even the state,
or become further educated and certi-
fied in multiple content areas and spe-
cialtiesinordertoremainascompetitive
as possible.”
Homza, 26, is a Wyoming Valley West
graduate and a Marine Corps combat
veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom. He
served as president of Wilkes Universi-
ty’s Kappa Delta Pi national education
honor society.
“I have recently started my job search
by keeping close track of school district
websites and newspapers for job post-
ings,” he said. He prefers tohanddeliver
his application to districts, he noted.
“I started my searches at school dis-
tricts in the area, and am working my
way out,” he said. Homza, of Kingston,
saidhe is also keeping his eyes openand
applying for positions such as teaching
summer school to add valuable experi-
ence to his resume.
“Teacher layoffs throughout the state
havecertainlyraisedsomeconcerns and
createdsome uncertainty among educa-
tion majors regarding their future and
chancesfor employment,” hesaid. Hom-
za said those who choose the teaching
profession do so because they have the
talent, passion and knowledge essential
to succeed.
“These young educators are dedicat-
ed and persistent, and will remain so
even through uncertain times,” Homza
CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK / FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Ashley Fedorick, of Weatherly, graduated from King’s College with cum laude honors and a Bachelor of Arts degree in
elementary education with a second major in early childhood education. At the school’s graduation ceremony, she
points to the mortarboard of Kristine Evans, of Lumberton, N.J., who graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in
elementary education and had a humorous message for all to see.
THE BACKUP PLAN
Education grads and students hope for jobs, but are mapping out avenues
By BONNIE ADAMS Times Leader Correspondent
SUBMITTED PHOTO
Recent Misericordia University grad-
uate Jason Homza with his mother
Joanne Homza at the graduation
event last month. Homza, like many
Class of 2011 members, is still looking
for a teaching job.
“These young educators are dedicated and persistent, and will remain so
even through uncertain times. This is also the reason why I have not
rethought my choice of career.”
Jason Homza, 2011 Misericordia graduate
See EDUCATION, Page 3D
C M Y K
PAGE 2D SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ B U S I N E S S
2
9
1
8
9
5
Combined Preliminary Notice of Potential Impact on Important
Resources, and Notice of the Availability of an Environmental
Assessment
Lower Lackawanna Valley Sewer Authority
Luzerne County
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MISERICORDIA UNIVERSITY
The university recently awarded
tenure and promotion to six
members of the faculty.
Allan W. Austin was promoted to
professor of history. A resident
of Dallas Town-
ship, he has
been a mem-
ber of the
history faculty
since 2001. He
holds a docto-
rate in U.S.
history from
the University
of Cincinnati
and master’s and bachelor’s
degrees from Bowling Green
State University.
Joseph Curran, chair of the Reli-
gious Studies Department, was
promoted to
associate
professor and
tenured. A
resident of
Dallas Town-
ship, he joined
the Miser-
icordia faculty
in 2005 and
teaches classes
in world religions and Christian
thought. He holds a bachelor’s
degree from the University of
Scranton and his doctorate from
Boston College.
Thomas Hajkowski, director of the
honors program, was promoted
to associate
professor of
history and
tenured. A
resident of
Dallas Town-
ship, he over-
sees the in-
terdisciplinary
program that
offers enriched
core curriculum courses and
extracurricular learning experi-
ences. He holds a bachelor’s
degree from Seton Hall Uni-
versity, a master’s degree from
Villanova University, and a doc-
torate from Northwestern Uni-
versity.
Cynthia Glawe Mailloux, associate
professor and chairperson of the
Nursing Department, received
tenure. A
resident of
Mountain Top,
she teaches
nursing re-
search and
graduate nurs-
ing education
courses. She
holds a docto-
rate degree in
nursing with a concentration in
education from Penn State
University, a master’s degree in
nursing from Misericordia Uni-
versity and a bachelor’s degree
in nursing from Wilkes Uni-
versity. She is a member of the
Pennsylvania State Nurse Asso-
ciation, American Association of
Colleges of Nursing, and the
National League for Nursing.
Steven J. Tedford, was promoted
to associate professor of mathe-
matics. A resident of Mountain
Top, he joined
the faculty of
Misericordia in
2008 as a
visiting profes-
sor and was
named assist-
ant professor
in 2009. He
holds both
doctorate and
master’s degrees from Bingham-
ton University and a bachelor’s
degree from Marist College, all in
the field of mathematics. He is a
member of the Mathematical
Association of America and the
American Mathematic Society.
David C. Wright Jr., chair of the
History Department, was pro-
moted to professor of history. A
resident of Dallas Township, has
been a member of the Depart-
ment of History at Misericordia
since 1988 and department chair
since 2003. His research in-
terests include modern French
history, mod-
ern European
cultural and
intellectual
history, social
movements
and contempo-
rary popular
culture.
BORTON LAWSON
Two new employees recently joined
the architectural and engineer-
ing design firm. Both will be
based in the firm’s Wilkes-Barre
office.
Jonathan Chesnick is a member
of the surveying team. His re-
sponsibilities include directing or
conducting surveys to establish
legal boundaries for properties;
computing geodetic measure-
ments and interpreting survey
data; recording survey results
and calculating terrain charac-
teristics. Chesnick holds a bach-
elor’s degree in surveying engi-
neering and a minor in business
from The Pennsylvania State
University. He was previously
employed as a survey tech-
nician.
Douglas Bogdan is a surveyor. He
holds a bachelor’s degree in
surveying engineering from
Alfred State
College, New
York, and has
experience
with the tech-
nical and legal
aspects of
surveying, title
and deed
sketching,
AutoCAD and
GIS/GPS application.
CORPORATE LADDER
Submit announcements of business
promotions, hirings and other events
to Corporate Ladder by email to
tlbusiness@timesleader.com; by mail
to 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250; or by fax to (570) 829-
5537. Photos in jpg format may be
attached to email.
Austin
Curran
Hajkowski
Mailloux
Tedford
Wright
Bogdan
MAEA Human Resources
Roundtable
The Northeast Pennsylvania Manu-
facturers and Employers Associ-
ation will hold a Human Re-
sources Roundtable from11 a.m.-1
p.m. on Thursday, June 16 at the
Pottsville Club, Pottsville. Lunch
will be served at noon. Cost is
$36 per person for members or
$72 per person for non-mem-
bers.
Attorneys Doug Smillie and Deirdre
Kamber Todd, of the law firm
Fitzpatrick, Lentz, and Bubba,
PC, will give a presentation
entitled, “The Rising Tide of
Discrimination Litigation: How to
Keep Your Company Out of the
Flood.” The presentation will
cover the definition of what
constitutes a discrimination
claim; an explanation of how
discrimination cases are born;
and an explanation of how com-
plaints become litigation. Partici-
pants will learn about best prac-
tices for preventing discrimi-
nation claims; creating proper
policies, procedures, training,
and documentation to protect
both the company and the indi-
vidual; working with govern-
mental agencies to resolve
charges of discrimination; and
handling employment litigation.
For more information or to register,
contact Darlene Robbins at
622-0992 or by email at drob-
bins@maea.biz.
BUSINESS AGENDA
Pinnacle Rehab, a family run,
locally owned physical ther-
apy practice, recently moved
to a new location at 520
Third Ave., Kingston. The
new location keeps the
sense of interaction that
patients love while maintain-
ing privacy. Each treatment
area has adjustable lighting
for patient’s comfort and
new equipment has been
added to help patients get
the most out of their rehab/
physical therapy experience.
Pinnacle Rehab is owned by
Kevin and Bridget Barno.
OPEN FOR
BUSINESS
Four Tobyhanna Army Depot
employees were recently recog-
nized for their years of govern-
ment service during a Length of
Service Ceremony. Robert
Cays, Stroudsburg, information
technology specialist in the
Automated Mission Support
Division, Production Engineer-
ing Directorate, was recognized
for 50 years of service. Thirty-
year honorees include Cynthia
Foster, Covington Township,
transportation assistant in the
Equipment and Supply Division,
Public Works Directorate; Rob-
ert Harvey, Plains Township,
electronics mechanic in the
Avionics Division, Command,
Control and Computer Systems/
Avionics Directorate; and Wil-
liam Delling, Hawley, forklift/
tractor operator in the Material
Management Division, Produc-
tion Management Directorate.
Employees of Rural Health Cor-
poration of Northeastern
Pennsylvania, a private non-
profit organization with six
medical and three dental cen-
ters located throughout Lu-
zerne and Wyoming counties,
recently received length of
service awards during the com-
pany’s 40th corporate anni-
versary celebration. Those
receiving awards were Eliza-
beth David, Harveys Lake;
Patricia Brooks, Dallas; Marie
Barron, Freeland; Edward P.
Michael, president, Hanover
Twosnhip; Martin Buridge,
Forty Fort; Dr. Gwen Galasso,
medical director, Pittston; Mark
Orsoz,Berwick; and Dr. Martin
McMahon, dental director,
Dallas.
Mark Kalaus, Scranton, recently
received the Adjunct Faculty
Excellence in Teaching Award at
King’s College. The award,
established last year, recognizes
a part-time instructor whose
presence is important in fulfill-
ing King’s mission and in exhib-
iting excellence in the class-
room. Kalaus has been a faculty
member for 30 years. He has
taught courses in morality and
ethics, social justice, Catholic
perspectives of belief and the
Church. He also is co-director of
the college’s first-year experi-
ence, which involves new stu-
dents in campus events and
programs and coordinates
volunteer projects in the com-
munity.
Diversified Information Tech-
nologies’ Louisville, Ky., docu-
ment storage facility was re-
cently certified by the National
Archives and Records Adminis-
tration (NARA) to preserve
critical government documents
including Medicare and Med-
icaid records. The Louisville
facility is the fifth location to
receive NARA certification for
the Scranton-based information
management provider. To
achieve certification, facilities
must meet standards related to
security, fire and water protec-
tion, insects and earthquakes to
ensure the safety of federal
records. The certification lasts
for 10 years.
Reilly Finishing Technologies, a
privately held metal-finishing
company, recently received
Nadcap accreditation for chem-
ical processing. The Nanticoke
company received the accred-
itation by demonstrating its
ongoing commitment to quality
by satisfying customer require-
ments and industry specifica-
tions. Nadcap is the Perform-
ance Review Institute’s brand
name for the industry-managed
program for special processes
in the aerospace industry.
Robert J. Gillespie Jr. of the
Hazleton law firm of Gillespie,
Miscavige, Ferdinand & Baranko,
LLC, was
recently
named a
Pennsylva-
nia Super
Lawyer by
Philadelphia
Magazine.
He is among
a select
group of
only five percent of Pennsylva-
nia lawyers who have received
that designation. He is the only
Hazleton lawyer to have re-
ceived the designation in the
field of personal injury for five
consecutive years.
Melissa A. Scartelli, Daniel J.
Distasio and Michael J. Kowal-
ski, all partners in the Scranton
and Wilkes-Barre personal
injury law firm of Scartelli,
Distasio & Kowalski, P.C., were
named Pennsylvania Super
Lawyers by Philadelphia Maga-
zine for the third consecutive
year. They are among a select
group of only five percent of
Pennsylvania lawyers who have
received that designation.
BUSINESS AWARDS
Gillespie
NEW YORK — The govern-
ment is moving forward with its
crackdown on the country’s for-
profit schools, aiming to protect
students from taking on too
much debt to attend schools that
do nothing for their job prospec-
ts.
But student advocates protest
that the final version of the De-
partment of Education’s “gainful
employment” rule, released
Thursday, is way too soft. Mean-
while, schools and industry lob-
byists rail that the DOE has no
legal standing to even impose
the rule at all.
Only investors appeared hap-
py with the outcome the day the
rule were released. Shares of for-
profit school companies soared
as investors viewed the scope of
the DOE’s new regulations as
having a much less dire impact
on the sector than they had
feared. Analysts say the rule is
more lenient than they and most
shareholders had expected —
“meaningfully watered down,”
said R.W. Baird’s Amy Junker.
Corinthian Colleges Inc., one
of the schools considered most
at risk of having to shut down
programs or make a significant
overhaul to its business to com-
ply with the rule, jumped nearly
27 percent. Shares of the nation’s
largest chain, Apollo Group Inc.,
which owns the University of
Phoenix, rose 11 percent. DeVry
gained nearly 15 percent.
Most students at career colleg-
es and vocational schools pay
tuition with federal financial aid
dollars. But that leaves taxpayers
on the hook if students can’t find
good jobs and default on their
loans. And they are defaulting in
large numbers. Students at for-
profit institutions suchas techni-
Big student debt could limit schools’ aid access
By TALI ARBEL
AP Business Writer
See DEBT, Page 3D
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 PAGE 3D
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said. “This is alsothereasonwhyI
have not rethought my choice of
career.”
King’s College Education De-
partment Chairwoman Denise
Reboli said the school has tried to
helpeducationmajors bypointing
out job fairs and other venues for
school districts that are hiring.
“Many who want to stay local
realizethat theywill likelyneedto
serve as substitute teachers for a
coupleyears beforebeinghiredby
a district, during which time they
are seeking additional certifica-
tions in higher needed areas like
English-as-a-second language or
returning to graduate school.”
Reboli saidit’s difficult todeter-
mine nowwhat job prospects will
be for recent education graduates
because many school districts
haven’t made final decisions on
whether or not they will hire new
faculty members for the upcom-
ing academic year.
Looking out-of-state might not
be the answer for some.
Arecent AssociatedPress story
explained that states around the
country are decreasing education
spending to close budget gaps
while school districts are running
out of federal stimulusmoneythat
prevented widespread job losses
the past two years.
Wilkes University’s Robert
Gardner, an assistant professor of
education, tells students that al-
though it’s a difficult economic
time, education will always be an
institution that people want and
need.
“The proposed teacher layoffs
have raised concern among our
education students; however,
they are not discouraged,” Gardn-
er said.
Misericordia’s Kingsley Banya,
chairman of the Dallas Township
school’steacher educationdepart-
ment, said he saw the impact of
budget cuts to education during
his 20 years in Florida.
“No professional wants to walk
whereyoudon’t knowwhat thefu-
ture holds,” he said.
Banya said one of his concerns
is the morale of those teachers
who supervise student teachers
and how that morale might affect
both education majors and chil-
dren in the classroom. He said
some education graduates are
considering relocating to find
work.
“They feel they should cast
their net wider by moving out of
state,” he said.
He said that he and his col-
leagues tell education majors that
within five years there will be 1.5
million teachers retiring nation-
wide and that students should
“stay the course.” Banya said that
means they might have to move
out of this area to gain experience
before returning and finding a
teaching job.
Banya said education majors
seemhopeful that theprospect for
finding work will improve.
“We all have to live on hope.
We’re trying to keep their spirits
up,” he said.
EDUCATION
Continued from Page 1D
WASHINGTON — Where did
all the workers go?
The labor force — those who
have a job or are looking for one
—is gettingsmaller, eventhough
the economy is growing and
steadily adding jobs. That trend
defies the rules of a normal eco-
nomic recovery.
Nobodyis surewhyit’s happen-
ing. Economists think some of
the missing workers have retired,
have entered college or are get-
ting by on government disability
checks. Others have probably just
given up looking for work.
“Asmall work force means mil-
lions of discouraged workers,
lower output in the future and a
weak recovery,” says Rep. Kevin
Brady of Texas, the ranking Re-
publican on the Congress’ Joint
Economic Committee. “Those
are unhealthy signs.”
By the government’s defini-
tion, if youquit looking, you’re no
longer counted as unemployed.
And you’re no longer part of the
labor force.
Since November, the number
of Americans counted as employ-
ed has grown by 765,000, to just
shy of 139 million. The nationhas
been creating jobs every month
as the economy recovers. The
economy added 244,000 jobs in
April.
But the number of Americans
counted as unemployed has
shrunk by much more — almost
1.3 million — during this time.
That means the labor force has
dropped by 529,000 workers.
The percentage of adults in the
labor force is a figure that econo-
mists call the participation rate.
It is 64.2 percent, the smallest
since 1984. And that’s become a
mystery toeconomists. Normally
after a recession, an improving
economy lures job seekers back
into the labor market. This time,
manyarestayingonthesidelines.
Their decision not to seek
work means the drop in unem-
ployment from9.8 percent in No-
vember to 9 percent in April isn’t
as good as it looks.
If the 529,000 missing workers
had been out scavenging for a job
without success, the unemploy-
ment rate would have been 9.3
percent in April, not the reported
rate of 9 percent. And if the par-
ticipation rate were as high as it
was whenthe recessionbegan, 66
percent, in December 2007, the
unemployment rate could have
been as high as 11.5 percent.
A majority of the 42 econo-
mists in the latest Associated
Press quarterly economic survey
said they expect the labor force
participation rate to start grow-
ing consistently before the year
ends. Twelve don’t expect it to
happen until next year at the ear-
liest. Five think it never will.
The labor force grew by just
15,000inApril fromMarch—not
evenenoughto keep up withpop-
ulation growth.
Labor force shrinks
as job seekers give up
By PAUL WISEMAN
AP Economics Writer
TOKYO — The Japanese gov-
ernment wants the country’s suit-
loving salarymen to be bold this
summer. Ditch the stuffy jacket
andtie. Andfor the goodof a coun-
try facing a power crunch, go light
and casual.
Japan’s “Super Cool Biz” cam-
paignkickedoff Wednesday witha
government-sponsored fashion
show featuring outfits appropriate
for theofficeyet cool enoughtoen-
dure the sweltering heat.
This summer may be especially
brutal. The loss of the Fukushima
Dai-ichi nuclear power plant,
which was crippled by the March
11tsunami, meanselectricitycould
be in short supply around the na-
tion’s capital, Tokyo, during espe-
cially hot days.
To prevent blackouts, the gov-
ernment is asking companies and
government offices to cut electric-
ity usage by 15 percent. It wants
companies to limit air condition-
ingandset roomtemperatures at a
warm 28 degrees Celsius (82 de-
grees Fahrenheit).
The idea isn’t new. “Cool Biz”
wasintroducedin2005bytheenvi-
ronment minister at thetime, Yuri-
ko Koike. The campaign was part
of efforts to fight global warming.
But with Japan dealing with an
ongoing nuclear crisis and the af-
termath of a magnitude-9.0 earth-
quake and tsunami, officials decid-
ed they needed to take Cool Biz
one step further this year.
“When we started Cool Biz in
2005, people said it was undigni-
fied and sloppy,” Koike said at the
fashion show held at a Tokyo de-
partment store. “But this is now
the sixth year, and people have
grown accustomed to it.”
Surveys bytheCabinet Officein-
dicate that companies are gradual-
ly jumping on board. In a 2009 na-
tionwide poll, 57 percent of about
2,000 respondents reported that
Cool Biz hadbeenimplementedin
their workplaces. The figure stood
at 47 percent two years earlier and
at less than a third in 2005.
So what’s different with Super
Cool Biz?
First, the dress code. Poloshirts,
Aloha shirts and sneakers are ac-
ceptable now under the environ-
ment ministry’srelaxedguidelines.
Jeans and sandals are OK too un-
der certain circumstances.
Men might even think of carry-
ing a fan or trying a pair of tight
pedal pusherslikeonemodel wore,
though whether such fashion ex-
tremes would actually catch on is
another matter.
Notably missing from the envi-
ronment ministry’s dress code are
specific rules for women. Despite
the omission, Wednesday’s fashion
show included ensembles for
women as well.
Khakis, white pants and airy
polyester dresses areall apparently
acceptable.
Japan wants businessmen to shed suits, save energy
AP PHOTO
A model presents a casual
office wear during a ’Super
Cool Biz’ fashion show. The
campaign kicked off with the
government-sponsored event
featuring outfits appropriate
for the office yet cool enough
to endure the sweltering heat.
By TOMOKO A. HOSAKA
Associated Press
cal programs and culinary
schools represent just 12 percent
of all higher education students
but 46 percent of all student loan
dollars in default. The average
student earning an associate de-
gree at a for-profit school carries
$14,000 in federal loan debt ver-
sus the $0 debt burden of most
community college students.
So the DOE has set criteria
that for-profit schools must meet
in order to maintain access to
federal financial aid dollars,
whichcanrepresent upto90per-
cent of a school’s revenue. If
graduates owe too much relative
to their income, or too few for-
mer students are paying back
their tuition loans on time,
schools stand to lose access to
Pell grants and federal student
aid. Such a loss would seriously
crimp schools’ ability to attract
students and make money.
Under final terms of the law,
schools will only be able to re-
ceive federal-paid tuition if at
least 35 percent of its former stu-
dents are repaying their loans.
The agency drew up the gain-
ful employment rule in 2010, but
delayed putting it into effect as it
faced heavy lobbying from
schools and politicians. For the
past 18 months, the DOE has
been negotiating the scope of
gainful employment with indus-
try representatives and advo-
cates. Last summer, the DOE re-
leased a draft of the regulation
and the tough proposed stance
spurred a sell-off in education
shares. Companies fought hard
against it. The DOE received
more than 90,000 comments
about the rule. Corinthian alone
has spent more than $1 million
since the beginning of last year
on lobbying.
The lobbying appears to have
worked. Under therule’s original
terms, programs that failed to
meet the criteria wouldhave lost
federal loan eligibility immedi-
ately andenrollment wouldhave
been frozen at any school in dan-
ger of failing. But the finalized
rule gives schools multiple
chances over a four-year period
to improve their stats. That
means no school will be in dan-
ger of losing funding for a pro-
gramuntil 2015, rather thannext
year. After “three strikes,” a
school will lose eligibility for
three years.
DEBT
Continued from Page 2D
C M Y K
PAGE 4D SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ B U S I N E S S
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Play at these courses:
Applewood Golf Course
454 Mt. Zion Road, Harding, PA (570) 388-2500
Arnold’s Golf Course
490B. West Third St., Nescopeck, PA (570) 752-7022
Blue Ridge Trail Golf Club
260 Country Club Dr., Mountain Top, PA (570) 868-4653
Briarwood “East” & “West” Golf Clubs
4775 West Market Street, York, PA (717) 792-9776
Emanon Country Club
Old State Road, RR#1 Box 78, Falls, PA (570) 388-6112
Fernwood Hotel Resort
Route 209, Bushkill, PA (888) 337-6966
Hollenback Golf Course
1050 N. Washington St., Wilkes Barre, PA (570) 821-1169
Lakeland Golf Club
Route 107, Fleetville, PA (570) 945-9983
Maple Hill Public Golf Course
S. Ridge Rd., Springville, PA (570) 965-2324
Mill Race Golf Course
4584 Red Rock Road, Benton, PA (570) 925-2040
Morgan Hills Golf Course
219 Hunlock Harveyville Rd., Hunlock, PA (570) 256-3444
Mountain Laurel Golf Course
HC1, Box 9A1, White Haven (570) 443-7424
Mountain Valley Golf Course
1021 Brockton Mountain Dr., Barnesville, PA (570) 467-2242
Sand Springs Country Club
1 Sand Springs Drive, Drums, PA (570) 788-5845
Shadowbrook Inn and Resort
Route 6E, East Tunkhannock, PA (800) 955-0295
Shawnee Inn & Golf Resort
1 River Rd., Shawnee On The Delaware, PA (800) 742-9633
Stone Hedge Country Club
49 Bridge St., Tunkhannock, PA (570) 836-5108
Sugarloaf Golf Course
18 Golf Course Road, Sugarloaf, PA (570) 384-4097
Towanda Country Club
Box 6180, Towanda, PA (570) 265-6939
Traditions at the Glen
4301 Watson Blvd., Johnson City, NY (607) 797-2381
Twin Oaks Golf Course
RR3 Box 283, Dallas, PA (570) 333-4360
Villas Crossing Golf Course
521 Golf Road, Tamaqua, PA (570) 386-4515
White Birch Golf Course
660 Tuscarora Park Rd., Barnesville, PA (570) 467-2525
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Send us his funniest photo & he could be our King for the Day
and win a package worth over $2,000 fromthese sponsors:
timesleader.com
To enter, click on King For The Day at
Submit your photo by Wednesday, June 6th. Entires must be received via email to qualify.
The Times Leader
KINGFORTHEDAY
Think your dad is the funniest dad?
Q: I have a co-worker who is
running a Web-based business
oncompany time. “Linn” spends
hours monitoring her website,
taking orders, sending invoices
and arranging for shipments. At
the end of the day, she prints out
her documents and takes them
home.
Linn gives more time to her
business than to her job, but our
boss appears to be completely
unaware of these activities. He
occasionally asks other employ-
ees to help Linn out because
she’s so busy. However, she’s just
busy making money for herself.
Linn’s behavior is just plain
wrong, and she should not be al-
lowed to get away with it. Is
there anything I can do?
A: Bluntly put, Linn is a thief.
By accepting a paycheck, then
using work time for her own per-
sonal gain, she is effectively
stealing from the company. Ad-
visingmanagement of this trans-
gression is no different than re-
porting someone who pockets
money from a cash register.
If youworkina large business,
you can ask the human re-
sources manager or corporate
attorney to investigate while
keeping your name confidential.
However, if you’re in a small
company, going directly to man-
agement may be your only op-
tion. In that case, have a con-
cerned colleague accompany
you to verify your story.
When you describe the situa-
tion, remain calm and focus on
the facts. For example: “I
thought you should know that
Linn has been running a person-
al business on company time.
She spends several hours a day
selling products through her
website. Other employees are
becoming resentful because
she’s falling behind in her work.
We would appreciate your inves-
tigating this.”
Once you inform the powers-
that-be, you will have done all
that you can do. If your manage-
ment is at all competent, Linn
will soon be operating her busi-
ness at home.
Q: One of my employees con-
stantly criticizes her colleagues
for making “immoral” life choic-
es. Her judgmental remarks are
creating a very uncomfortable
atmosphere on our team. As a
business owner, I feel I have a re-
sponsibility to keep people from
being harassed this way. What
should I do?
A: For starters, you should tell
this self-righteous woman that
she must immediately stop lec-
turing co-workers about their
personal lives. Explain that this
rule applies to all team mem-
bers, including anyone who
might criticize her own life
choices.
To ensure that everyone un-
derstands your expectations,
discuss the issue in a teammeet-
ingwithout mentioningthis par-
ticular employee. The others
may assume that her behavior
triggered your remarks, but
that’s OK as long as you don’t
single her out.
For example: “As team mem-
bers, we need to recognize and
respect the boundary between
our work and our personal lives.
Making critical comments
about a colleague’s lifestyle is
disruptive to the teamand total-
ly unacceptable. If anyone ever
treats youthis way, please let me
know.”
A stern admonition may re-
solve the problem. But if your
sanctimonious employee stub-
bornly refuses to curb her offen-
sive behavior, the only solution
is to remove her from the team.
OFFICE COACH
Co-worker’s side business must be reported
Marie G. McIntyre is a workplace
coach and the author of “Secrets to
Winning at Office Politics.” Send in
questions and get free coaching tips
at http://www.yourofficecoach.com,
or follow her on Twitter officecoach.
By MARIE G. MCINTYRE
McClatchy-Tribune News Service
healthy, so the premiums on this
policy can be cheaper than stick-
ing with a parent’s plan, says
Carrie McLean, a consumer
health insurance specialist with
eHealthInsurance.
Still, if the costs are similar,
young adults usually are better
off with the parent’s group plan
because the benefits tend to be
better, she says.
RETIREMENT: “Start saving
for retirement immediately,” said
Stuart Ritter, a financial planner
with T. Rowe Price in Baltimore.
Your employer likely will offer
a 401(k) or a similar retirement
plan. You contribute through
payroll deductions before taxes
have been taken out. Employers
typically kick in some cash, too.
You’ll pay income taxes on the
nest egg when you make with-
drawals in retirement.
Or, if your employer doesn’t
offer a plan, open a Roth IRA.
You contribute money that’s
already been taxed. But the big
Roth benefit is that any invest-
ment growth won’t be taxed in
retirement.
To maintain your lifestyle in
retirement, new grads should set
aside 13 percent of gross pay
each year, which includes any
employer contribution, Ritter
said.
FINANCE
Continued from Page 1D
Automobile club AAA recently
launched the latest addition to its
suite of free mobile applications
with the release of the AAA Insur-
ance app for iPhone and iPad.
The AAA Insurance app walks
drivers through the post-traffic
crash process of collecting infor-
mation, photos and even request-
ing a tow truck.
“Being involved in a traffic crash
canbetraumatic, evenif all thepar-
ties involved are uninjured. There
are a lot of things to do and infor-
mation to collect following a colli-
sion that can seem overwhelming
whencombinedwiththe stress of a
car crash,” said Jim Lardear, direc-
tor of Public and Government Af-
fairs for AAA Mid-Atlantic, which
serves the Wilkes-Barre region.
“The AAA Insurance app provides
step-by-step instructions on what
information you should gather, in-
cluding photos, in addition to re-
questing a tow truck for you.”
The AAA Insurance app pro-
vides AAA’s recommended steps
on what to do immediately after a
traffic collision and helps you gath-
er important information about
the crash needed to submit an in-
surance claim, such as:
· Taking photos of the crash
scene and damage to the vehi-
cles and property
· Documentingvehiclemodels
and people involved in the crash
· Documenting the location of
the crash
· Identifying damage to vehi-
cles by making a few taps on
your phone
· Documenting witnesses and
police report details
The app also provides one-
touch access to call police and
emergency services, AAA to re-
quest a tow and the AAA Insur-
ance claims department, for
those AAA Insurance policyhol-
ders.
The app allows users to store
their auto insurance company’s
contact information, policy
number, drivers on the policy
andvehicles onthe policy, which
can be password protected for
privacy. Additionally, users can
view a summary of the traffic
crash details and email a report
straight from their iPhone.
AAAInsurance is available for
free from the iTunes App Store
on iPhone or at
www.itunes.com/appstore. Vis-
it AAA.com/mobilefor further
details.
AAA adds insurance
app for iPhone, iPad
By Times Leader Staff
maneuvered the post-recession
economy. They have expanded
their inventory, particularly
brand names, become more
competitive on price and are
expanding to new locations.
Meanwhile, some wealthier
shoppers are trading back up to
the mall or higher-end grocery
stores like Whole Foods.
Wal-Mart is increasingly
“caught in the middle” between
dollar stores and more expen-
sive stores, Wall Street Strate-
gies analyst Brian Sozzi. “Now,
it’s trying to return to its roots,
but it’s facing old competitors
— the dollar stores — that are
getting much better.”
Richard Hastings, a consum-
er strategist with Global Hun-
ter Securities, gives Wal-Mart
two years to woo back its U.S.
customers before their new
shopping habits are imprinted.
But the restocking has taken
longer than Wal-Mart predict-
ed. In November, it had said
that the merchandise it cut
would be restored by this past
spring.
Even when Wal-Mart has
been able to get goods to the
stores, the company known for
its efficiency and precision has
had trouble getting them onto
shelves, says Cameron Smith,
who recruits executives for
Wal-Mart suppliers and also
serves as an adviser.
Suppliers using third parties
to backstop the placement of
their goods on the shelves, he
said. That adds to their costs.
Palettes of merchandise are
crowding aisles, Sozzi notes.
Shares of Wal-Mart have
tracked closer to its profits than
its domestic sales this past
year, and its international busi-
ness has propped up revenue
and profits. Wal-Mart shares
are up 7 over the past 12
months. But they peaked in late
January and have lost 5 percent
since the company said it
would not predict when U.S.
revenue at stores open at least a
year will begin growing, after
setting a target date for last ho-
liday season and missing it.
The namesake Walmart stores
account for 62 percent of the
company’s revenue; interna-
tional makes up 26 percent.
WALMART
Continued from Page 1D
AP PHOTO
Teyonce Armstrong, right, 7, and her brothers Keith, 6, and Mark-
quis, 11, play by the door of a Harlem Deal$ store in New York. The
company said at the end of May it continues to see more cus-
tomers who are spending more per visit. Dollar stores pose the
biggest threat to Wal-Mart, the nation’s biggest retailer.
MarketPulse
Stan Choe, Kristen Girard • AP
ANOTHER JUNE SWOON
May was a bad month for stocks: The
S&P 500 dropped 1.4 percent for its
worst loss in nine months. Too bad
June is usually a struggle. Since World
War II, the S&P 500 has dropped in
June nearly as many times as it has
gained. June has been just a flat
month overall for the index since 1945,
tying it for third worst in the year. By
June, companies are mostly done re-
porting first-quarter earnings, which
means investors focus more on eco-
nomic data. It’s been mostly scary
lately. The job and housing markets
are still weak, and European nations
are struggling to repay their debts.
Many of the same problems dogged
the market last summer, and the S&P
500 lost 5.4 percent in June 2010.
THANKS FOR THE MEMORIES
It makes sense that investors would buy
stocks that have done well for them be-
fore. It just doesn’t make much of a dif-
ference. Researchers from the universi-
ties of Arizona, California-Berkeley and
California-Davis searched through the
trading histories of more than 700,000
individual investors. They found that
when investors buy a stock they already
owned in the past year, they’re only half
as likely to buy ones that had lost them
money. The researchers attributed it to
investors wanting to forget the regret
associated with bad trades. The bias,
though, makes little difference. When
investors do buy a previous winner, they
end up doing about the same as if they
had bought any other stock of similar
size and growth characteristics.
PEEKING UP
Natural gas prices are near their high for the year again, climbing
6 percent through Friday. Hot weather across much of the coun-
try has helped: More air conditioners whirring mean more de-
mand for electricity, which means more demand for gas from
power plants. But don’t get carried away. Gas has been a disap-
pointing investment for nearly three years, and some analysts
expect it to continue. Gas’ struggles started in 2008, when prices
crashed from $13 per 1,000 cubic feet in the summer to $5 by
the winter. One problem
has been supply. There’s
too much of it. Demand
may also weaken later this
summer, Barclays Capital
says. Bigger-than-normal
snowmelts in the North-
west mean utilities will get
more power from their hy-
droelectric dams, limiting
the need for gas. Hydroelectric dam in Rufus, Oregon
Source: Standard & Poor’s
Equity Research
J F M A M J A S O N J D
-0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0 percent
S&P 500 average monthly
performance, since 1945
en pe
Source: FactSet
2011 natural gas
price change
-16
-12
-8
-4
0
4
8
12 percent nt
J F M A M J
Brad Hinton, a fund manager and
director of research for Wallace R.
Weitz & Co., looks to own compa-
nies that are good values and easy
to understand.
What compa-
nies do you
like?
We’ve been
buying Target
(TGT) recently
on the retail
side. We think
it’s a great sto-
ry: a very under-
standable basic
business with
some interest-
ing things going on right now.
They’re undergoing [a] remodel
program that they’re rolling out to
their store base which introduces
groceries and other consumables
to a bigger percentage of the store,
which is ... where the consumer is
going now. [They’re] not able to re-
ally spend much on [discretionary
goods] but [are] getting the day-
to-day basics. They also have the
REDcard, which is a 5 percent dis-
count store-branded card, which is
helping to drive traffic especially
among their most loyal customers.
But Target’s stock has fallen 11
percent over the past year. Why?
Discretionary retail names have
been subject to the whims of the
marketplace. When people are
feeling good about the economy,
they tend to bid them up. When
people are concerned about either
a double-dip or a [sluggish] envi-
ronment, they tend to get beaten
down. Our view is fairly conserva-
tive. We think the economy will
continue to bump along and stay
positive, but we certainly don’t
have any real optimistic scenarios
baked into our view.
What about technology?
Large-cap tech just seems very
beaten up. We’ve owned Microsoft
for a number of years now. It
trades at 9 times earnings. It has
great [brands] in Office, Windows
and other business lines. It’s sitting
on $50 billion in cash, although it’s
soon to go to $41.5 billion after
they purchase Skype.
Is it surprising that technology
stocks have become values?
Many companies that we never
thought we’d have the chance of
owning 10 years ago are kind of
coming into our wheelhouse.
We’ve looked at Cisco, we don’t
own it currently, but that’s an ex-
ample of something that we never
thought would fall into value territo-
ry. We do own Google, which is a
[growth] business, but still a rela-
tively reasonably priced stock. ...
Dell is also in the sweet spot of
large-cap, boring tech that every-
body loves to hate. And, again, it’s
just an incredibly cheap, misunder-
stood business.
You also own Liberty Media.
What do you make of their bid
for Barnes & Noble?
That’s an interesting one. We un-
derstand the appeal of [Barnes &
Noble’s] Nook [e-reader]. We have
not studied it closely, so we don’t
have a strong opinion on what the
business is worth. The [Liberty]
management team has an incredi-
ble track record of employing capi-
tal efficiently on behalf of share-
holders, so we tend to give them
the benefit of the doubt and we’re
very interested in learning more
about it over time and what they’re
seeing there.
What industries look expensive?
We’ve found that since the March
2009 bottom, small-cap stocks and
particularly speculative small-cap
stocks have done the best. I don’t
think we’d go as far to say they’re
ahead of themselves. But I think
we’re not finding much value there.
What advice would you give to
individual investors?
The hardest thing in human nature
is to chase what’s been hot most
recently and that probably takes
the form of asset allocation more
than anything else. I think a lot of
individual investors who are under-
standably scared and cautious af-
ter the financial meltdown kind of
fled to the perceived safety of
bonds at that point in times when
bonds had very attractive valua-
tions. Our concern would probably
be that if the stock rally continues
to run, hopefully people don’t
choose to get back into stocks at
the wrong time again.
Finding clear
values
Hinton
InsiderQ&A
Stocks from emerging mar-
kets are, well, so 2010. This
year, bonds have been the bet-
ter investment.
Mutual funds that invest in
emerging market bonds re-
turned 4.5 percent in 2011
through Wednesday. Emerging
market stock funds were flat
over the same time.
Several trends are luring in-
vestors to debt issued by
emerging markets:
• HEALTHIER FINANCES.
Greece and other European
countries are struggling to re-
pay their debts. The U.S. may
default in August unless it rais-
es its debt limit. Emerging
economies, in contrast, have
much less debt. “Many of
these countries have more
pristine balance sheets and
higher real interest rates,”
bond manager Bill Gross wrote
in a recent commentary. He
runs PIMCO’s Total Return
fund, which has $243 billion in
assets. He sold all his Trea-
sury holdings in February.
• PROSPECTS FOR RISING
CURRENCIES. One Mexican
peso was worth 8.057 cents in
at the end of 2010. On
Wednesday, it was worth 8.56
cents, or 6.2 percent more in
dollars. T. Rowe Price just
launched a fund to buy bonds
issued in emerging market cur-
rencies to take advantage of
such gains. It already had a
fund that invested in emerging
markets’ dollar-denominated
debt.
• FASTER ECONOMIC
GROWTH. China and other
emerging economies are
struggling with inflation, but
economists still expect China’s
growth to more than triple that
of the U.S. next year.
Some analysts see dips
ahead in coming months, even
though they like emerging mar-
ket bonds for the long term.
Credit Suisse analysts, for ex-
ample, say a series of discour-
aging economic data reports
around the world may cause
prices to swing through the
summer. Emerging market
bonds have also had a shaky
past. Russia defaulted in1998,
for example.
Bonding with
emerging markets
S. Choe, K. Girard • AP SOURCES: FactSet, International Monetary Fund, Morningstar Data through June 1
Emerging market bonds have
been some of the year's better
investments.
Emerging market bond mutual funds
World bond funds
Emerging market stock mutual funds
4.5%
4.0
FLAT
YTD returns
Investors are drawn by:
rising currency values for
emerging markets...
Mexican Peso
South Korean won
Brazilian real
4.7
6.2%
4.1
YTD gain versus dollar
...and stronger balance sheets.
Advanced economies
Emerging economies
Government debt as a percentage
of overall economy
’09 ’10 ’11 ’12 ’13 ’14
0
25
50
75
100
125 percent
’08
Air Products APD 64.13 9 96.00 89.63 -4.33 -4.6 t t -1.5+32.93 2 8.2 17 2.6
Amer Water Works AWK 19.78 9 30.70 29.05 -0.77 -2.6 t s 14.9+46.64 113.7a 18 3.0
Amerigas Part LP APU 38.84 5 51.50 44.23 -0.96 -2.1 t t -9.4+15.94 3 14.5 29 6.7
Aqua America Inc WTR 16.65 8 23.79 21.70 -0.66 -3.0 t t -3.5+28.00 2 0.8 22 2.9
Arch Dan Mid ADM 24.42 5 38.02 30.39 -1.82 -5.7 t t 1.0+21.46 3 -4.8 9 2.1
AutoZone Inc AZO 183.70 9299.60 285.48 -11.23 -3.8 s s 4.7+47.97 1 25.5 16 ...
Bank of America BAC 10.91 1 16.10 11.28 -0.40 -3.4 t t -15.4—28.40 5-19.0 21 0.4
Bk of NY Mellon BK 23.78 4 32.50 26.90 -0.82 -3.0 t t -10.9 +.07 4 -1.9 13 1.9
Bon Ton Store BONT 6.08 4 17.49 9.63 -1.01 -9.5 t t -23.9—20.66 4-17.1 74 2.1
CIGNA Corp CI 29.12 0 50.45 49.61 0.14 0.3 s s 35.3+42.67 1 8.9 9 0.1
CVS Caremark Corp CVS 26.84 9 39.50 37.97 -0.83 -2.1 s s 9.2 +9.51 3 6.2 15 1.3
CocaCola KO 49.47 9 68.77 65.53 -0.98 -1.5 t s -0.4+27.62 2 10.8 13 2.9
Comcast Corp A CMCSA 16.76 8 27.16 24.23 -0.66 -2.7 t t 10.8+33.84 2 2.5 18 1.9
Community Bk Sys CBU 21.33 3 28.95 23.42 -1.23 -5.0 t t -15.7 +5.63 3 6.9 12 4.1
Community Hlth Sys CYH 22.33 3 42.50 26.69 -1.96 -6.8 t t -28.6—34.55 5 -7.0 9 ...
Entercom Comm ETM 4.97 4 13.63 8.38 -1.02 -10.9 t t -27.6—33.49 5-15.5 7 ...
Fairchild Semicond FCS 7.71 8 21.02 17.07 -0.90 -5.0 t t 9.4+72.08 1 -0.6 12 ...
Frontier Comm FTR 6.96 6 9.84 8.52 -0.29 -3.3 s s -12.4+12.85 3 0.8 61 8.8
Genpact Ltd G 13.09 5 18.71 15.53 -0.40 -2.5 t s 2.2 —8.38 4 0.8a 25 1.2
Harte Hanks Inc HHS 7.59 1 13.74 7.81 -0.62 -7.4 t t -38.8—38.44 5-19.3 10 4.1
Heinz HNZ 42.88 9 55.00 53.20 -1.48 -2.7 s s 7.6+22.36 3 7.5 17 3.6
Hershey Company HSY 45.31 8 58.20 54.51 -0.51 -0.9 t s 15.6+13.01 3 1.5 24 2.5
Kraft Foods KFT 27.59 9 35.44 34.10 -0.65 -1.9 s s 8.2+20.42 3 3.6 20 3.4
Lowes Cos LOW 19.35 6 27.45 23.40 -0.85 -3.5 t t -6.7 —2.45 4 -4.6 16 2.4
M&T Bank MTB 72.03 6 96.15 85.79 -1.83 -2.1 t t -1.4+12.20 3 -3.2 14 3.3
McDonalds Corp MCD 65.31 9 83.08 80.54 -1.08 -1.3 s s 4.9+22.21 3 21.9 17 3.0
NBT Bncp NBTB 19.27 3 24.98 20.79 -0.79 -3.7 t t -13.9 —3.44 4 1.6 12 3.8
Nexstar Bdcstg Grp NXST 3.64 6 9.26 6.72 -0.37 -5.2 t t 12.2+13.90 3 5.3 ... ...
PNC Financial PNC 49.43 7 65.19 59.34 -3.20 -5.1 t t -2.3 —3.30 4 -0.6 9 2.4
PPL Corp PPL 24.10 9 28.38 27.77 -0.09 -0.3 s s 5.5+12.50 3 2.3 12 5.0
Penn Millers Hldg PMIC 11.98 0 17.72 17.15 -0.05 -0.3 t s 29.6+16.27 3 ... ... ...
Penna REIT PEI 10.03 9 17.34 16.27 -0.76 -4.5 s s 12.0+16.34 3 -9.5 ... 3.7
PepsiCo PEP 60.32 8 71.89 68.97 -0.91 -1.3 t s 5.6 +11.92 3 5.1 18 3.0
Philip Morris Intl PM 42.94 0 71.75 68.99 -1.53 -2.2 s s 17.9+58.80 113.7a 17 3.7
Procter & Gamble PG 58.92 8 67.72 65.43 -0.77 -1.2 s s 1.7 +9.06 3 6.4 17 3.2
Prudential Fncl PRU 48.56 7 67.52 61.26 -1.91 -3.0 t t 4.3 +5.23 4 -3.3 9 1.9
SLM Corp SLM 10.05 9 17.11 16.30 -0.44 -2.6 t s 29.5+42.73 1-20.6 9 2.5
SLM Corp flt pfB SLMpB 32.41 0 60.00 58.50 0.26 0.4 s s 33.5 ... 0.0 ... 7.9
Southn Union Co SUG 20.40 9 30.50 29.34 -0.73 -2.4 s s 21.9+41.69 1 5.1 15 2.0
TJX Cos TJX 39.56 8 54.94 51.02 -2.44 -4.6 t s 14.9 +11.58 3 17.6 16 1.5
UGI Corp UGI 24.90 8 33.53 31.34 -0.95 -2.9 t t -0.8+23.77 2 8.0 13 3.3
Verizon Comm VZ 25.79 8 38.95 35.63 -1.04 -2.8 t t -0.4+45.38 1 9.0 21 5.5
WalMart Strs WMT 47.77 6 57.90 53.66 -1.04 -1.9 t s -0.5 +6.33 3 4.2 13 2.7
Weis Mkts WMK 32.56 7 41.82 38.50 -2.12 -5.2 t t -4.5+18.14 3 0.8 15 3.0
52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG%CHG %CHG%RTN RANK %RTN
COMPANY TICKER LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD
Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns
annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quar-
ters. Rank classifies a stock’s performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).
LocalStocks
SOURCE: FactSet
Stocks for the bold
Stock
Screener
The economic recovery is stalling, and that’s punishing steel makers, airlines
and others whose profits are closely tied to the economy’s strength.
Analysts call these “cyclical” stocks, and they’ve been losers as
discouraging economic data piled up over the last month. Makers of metals
and other materials in the S&P 500, for example, fell 5.8 percent between
the end of April and Thursday. Utility companies rose 0.2 percent over that
time. Utility profits move up and down less with the economy, making them
a so-called “defensive” industry.
But JPMorgan strategist Thomas Lee says this is as an opportunity to buy
cyclical stocks on the cheap. He sees cyclical stocks regaining momentum, as
the Federal Reserve keeps interest rates low. Economic data have also been
so bad that economists cut forecasts for future reports. That ups the odds that
future economic reports will beat expectations, which would help cyclical stocks.
Another attraction: Cyclical stocks are now cheaper than defensive stocks,
based on their earnings. That’s a flip from their historical track record. Investors
have usually paid more for each $1 in profit of a cyclical stock than for a
defensive stock.
This screen shows 20 stocks that bold investors may want to consider. All
are cyclical stocks, and JPMorgan rates all as “Outperform.”
Data through midday June 2 *1=buy;2=hold;3=sell
CLOSE
DIV.
YIELD
AVG.
BROKER
RATING* COMPANY TICKER
United Continental UAL $23.04 -4.2% 0.0% 1.2
Goldcorp GG 48.81 7.5 0.8 1.2
Las Vegas Sands LVS 42.19 -7.1 0.0 1.3
Kinross Gold KGC 15.79 -15.7 0.6 1.3
Interpublic Group IPG 11.50 7.3 2.1 1.3
Liberty Media Holding LINTA 18.09 12.8 0.0 1.3
Cliffs Natural Resources CLF 88.31 12.9 0.6 1.3
Delta Air Lines DAL 9.62 -23.9 0.0 1.3
Freeport-McMoRan FCX 49.78 -16.1 2.0 1.3
Robert Half International RHI 26.56 -11.9 2.1 1.3
General Motors GM 29.60 -20.7 0.0 1.3
Broadcom BRCM 34.99 -20.4 1.0 1.4
Symantec SYMC 18.80 11.6 0.0 1.4
Rockwell Collins COL 59.99 3.0 1.6 1.5
Newmont Mining NEM 55.14 -10.0 1.5 1.5
11 2 .2
1.2
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.4
1.4
1.5
1 5 1.5
YTD
CHANGE
iPath ShtExt Rus2000 RTSA 31.98 5.75 21.9 18.3 ...
Barc ShortC LevS&P BXDC 38.30 3.95 11.5 13.9 ...
iPath ShtExt S&P500 SFSA 33.37 3.41 11.4 14.9 ...
ProShs UltPro ShtR2K SRTY 18.72 1.65 9.7 6.5 -64.2
Direxion SCapBear 3x TZA 38.01 3.35 9.7 6.5 430.6
Direx SOX Bear 3X SOXS 62.46 5.50 9.7 15.6 93.5
iPath Beta Cotton CTNN 53.94 4.57 9.3 12.9 ...
Pro UltPro ShtMid400 SMDD 21.41 1.70 8.6 7.0 -62.8
ProShs UltSht Silver ZSL 17.97 1.35 8.1 -22.2 -47.6
Direxion FinBear 3x FAZ 46.77 3.46 8.0 13.4 213.6
Direxion MCapBear3x MWN 36.65 2.73 8.0 5.7 90.2
ProSh UltSht R2KG SKK 41.00 2.70 7.0 4.9 138.9
ProSh UltSht BasMat SMN 18.12 1.18 7.0 6.3 -55.6
ProSh UltSh Semi SSG 49.93 3.17 6.8 12.4 201.3
Pro UltPro ShtDow30 SDOW 33.95 2.16 6.8 10.6 -52.0
C-Trk CitiVolIdx CVOL 30.97 1.97 6.8 -4.7 ...
Direxion LCapBear 3x BGZ 36.63 2.34 6.8 7.4 129.7
ProShs UltSht S&P500 SPXU 16.49 1.04 6.7 7.8 -52.2
ProSh UltSht R2K TWM 44.30 2.70 6.5 4.6 111.1
Dirx DlyRtlBear2x RETS 24.71 1.50 6.4 8.1 ...
ProSh UltSht SmCap SDD 47.66 2.78 6.2 4.5 115.6
ProSh UltSh Indls SIJ 45.97 2.69 6.2 9.2 118.1
iPath LgEnh EAFE MFLA 128.19 7.26 6.0 -0.5 ...
Direxion TechBear 3x TYP 21.98 1.24 6.0 11.8 151.4
Barc iPath Cotton BAL 89.65 4.88 5.8 10.8 146.6
ProSh UltSh ConsSvcs SCC 19.01 1.05 5.8 5.1 -39.1
ProSh UltraSht MidC MZZ 40.67 2.21 5.7 4.8 113.8
iPath LongEnh EmMkts EMLB 116.48 6.18 5.6 -0.9 ...
ProSh UltShtR2KVal SJH 50.57 2.63 5.5 3.9 133.4
ProSh UltSht Fin SKF 63.42 3.27 5.4 8.9 200.8
ProSh UltShtRMCG SDK 47.59 2.38 5.3 3.6 102.3
Fact GoldBullSPBear FSG 28.82 1.46 5.3 12.8 ...
ProSh UltSh ConsGds SZK 24.00 1.16 5.1 1.9 -40.8
ProShs UltPro ShtQQQ SQQQ 26.29 1.28 5.1 10.1 -57.4
Dir Dly Gold Bear2x DUST 43.10 2.04 5.0 -2.0 ...
ProSh UltShtRMCVal SJL 50.75 2.35 4.9 3.7 115.1
ProShs Ultra Euro ULE 30.78 1.45 4.9 4.1 37.6
DBPwSh 3xShortUSD UDNT 21.97 1.01 4.8 9.4 ...
ProSh UltShtR1KG SFK 20.67 0.95 4.8 5.3 -41.4
Rydex Inv 2x SP 500 RSW 34.79 1.52 4.6 5.5 -37.6
Fact OilBull/SPBear FOL 24.22 1.07 4.6 10.0 ...
ProShs UltShort Dow DXD 18.02 0.79 4.6 7.0 -37.8
ProSh UltraSht S&P SDS 21.44 0.93 4.5 5.3 -37.6
iPath Beta Nat Gas DCNG 52.64 2.26 4.5 6.7 ...
ProShs UltSht R3K TWQ 14.34 0.59 4.3 3.8 -39.6
MS MVect DLg Euro URR 34.02 1.40 4.3 3.1 37.9
Direxion REst Bear3x DRV 12.42 0.51 4.3 -2.4 76.5
Barc iPath Sugar SGG 76.60 3.08 4.2 16.6 94.5
Direxion EngyBear 3x ERY 15.20 0.61 4.2 -2.8 28.3
ProSh UltraSht Tel TLL 36.64 1.49 4.2 -4.3 157.9
Exchange-Traded Funds
FRIDAY CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN
NAME TICKER CLOSE WK 1WK 1MO 1YR
Dow industrials
-2.3%
-3.9%
Nasdaq
-2.3%
-3.4%
S&P 500
-2.3%
-3.0%
Russell 2000
-3.4%
-3.0%
LARGE-CAP
SMALL-CAP
q
q
p
q
q
p
q
q
p
q
q
p
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
+5.0%
+3.0%
+3.4%
+3.1%
Treasury yields drop
The yield on the 10-year Treasury note slipped below
3 percent this past week as nervous investors bought
Treasurys. Abond’s yield moves in the opposite di-
rection of its price. Mortgage rates fell for the seventh
consecutive week. The rate on the 30-year loan fell
to 4.55 percent from 4.60 percent. The average rate
on the 15-year fixed mortgage fell to 3.74 percent
from 3.78 percent. Both are at lows for the year.
InterestRates
MIN
Money market mutual funds YIELD INVEST PHONE
3.25
3.25
3.25
.13
.13
.13
PRIME
RATE
FED
FUNDS
Taxable—national avg 0.01
Flex-funds Money Market/Retail 0.11 $ 2,500 min (800) 325-3539
Tax-exempt—national avg 0.01
Alpine Municipal MMF/Investor 0.15 $ 2,500 min (888) 785-5578
Broad market Lehman 2.76 0.01 t t -0.47 3.29 2.35
Triple-A corporate Moody’s 4.99 0.07 s t -0.03 5.31 4.24
Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman 3.68 0.00 t t -0.86 4.58 3.47
FRIDAY
6 MO AGO
1 YR AGO
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
U.S. BOND INDEXES YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
Municipal Bond Buyer 5.27 -0.09 t t 0.17 5.95 4.86
U.S. high yield Barclays 6.88 0.03 s s -2.50 9.52 6.61
Treasury Barclays 1.86 -0.05 t t -0.28 2.46 1.35
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
TREASURYS YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
3-month T-Bill 0.03 0.00 s t -0.10 0.17
1-year T-Bill 0.19 -0.01 s t -0.20 0.39 0.17
6-month T-Bill 0.09 0.00 s t -0.12 0.21 0.05
2-year T-Note 0.41 -0.06 t t -0.39 0.83 0.31
5-year T-Note 1.60 -0.11 t t -0.55 2.39 1.02
10-year T-Note 2.99 -0.08 t t -0.38 3.72 2.38
30-year T-Bond 4.23 0.00 t t -0.06 4.77 3.53
Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 PAGE 5D
➛ B U S I N E S S
AMF
ARM b +1.0 -1.1 7.51 7.35 7.43 +.01
Acadian
EmgMkts d +1.7 +8.9 21.65 15.30 20.55 +.04
AdvisorOne
AmerigoN +3.5 +3.4 14.44 10.72 13.81 -.25
Alger Group
CapApInsI +5.7 +8.5 23.01 16.35 21.90 -.44
CapApprA m +5.7 +8.5 16.12 11.44 15.31 -.31
MdCpGInsI +6.8 +2.9 16.21 10.83 15.16 -.40
SmCpGrthO +6.8 +5.5 36.82 24.61 34.23 -1.26
SmCpInstI +6.7 +5.0 31.94 21.29 29.71 -1.09
Allegiant
UltShtBdI +.3 +3.3 10.05 10.00 10.01 ...
Alliance Bernstein
BalShrA m +6.4 +2.7 16.02 12.87 15.67 -.22
BalShrB m +6.0 +2.0 15.00 12.08 14.67 -.21
BalWlthStrA m +3.5 +3.2 12.55 10.22 12.19 -.12
BalWlthStrC m +3.2 +2.5 12.49 10.19 12.13 -.12
CoreOppA m +8.1 +3.4 12.84 9.10 12.44 -.26
GlTmtcGA m -.3 +5.8 81.41 58.26 76.89 -1.37
GlblBondA m +2.5 +8.2 8.58 8.16 8.45 -.01
GlblBondC m +2.2 +7.4 8.61 8.18 8.48 ...
GrowA m +4.8 +1.6 40.02 29.24 38.33 -.95
GrowIncA m +7.6 +.8 3.67 2.69 3.55 -.08
HighIncA m +5.2 +11.9 9.31 8.36 9.25 -.01
HighIncC m +4.9 +11.0 9.41 8.46 9.35 -.02
IntGrA m +2.3 +1.8 16.42 12.10 15.73 +.13
IntlValA m +1.2 -4.5 14.78 11.10 13.82 -.09
IntlValAdv +1.3 -4.2 15.06 11.32 14.10 -.08
LgCapGrA m +5.1 +5.6 27.62 19.67 26.04 -.64
LgCapGrAd +5.2 +5.9 28.91 20.58 27.28 -.66
MuInCAA m +4.3 +3.9 11.09 10.14 10.67 +.03
MuInNYA m +4.0 +4.2 10.12 9.39 9.83 +.03
MuInNatlA m +4.3 +4.0 10.12 9.33 9.79 +.03
SMCpGrA m +9.9 +5.2 7.11 4.25 6.65 -.21
SmMidValA m +1.6 +5.3 19.24 13.41 17.95 -.53
TxMgdWlApStAd +2.7 -.3 13.16 9.94 12.55 -.21
WlthApprStr +3.3 +.7 13.09 9.65 12.45 -.20
WlthApprStrA m +3.1 +.4 13.07 9.63 12.42 -.21
Allianz
NFJDivVlA m +5.8 +.4 12.40 9.37 11.94 -.24
NFJDivVlC m +5.5 -.3 12.44 9.41 11.97 -.24
NFJEqIncD b +5.8 +.4 12.42 9.39 11.96 -.24
NFJIntVlA m +4.6 +6.0 22.38 16.82 21.59 -.16
NFJSmCVlA m +4.5 +6.6 31.65 23.14 29.83 -.91
NFJSmCVlC m +4.2 +5.8 30.29 22.14 28.53 -.88
Alpine
DynDiv d +4.6 -2.3 5.14 3.90 4.82 -.05
InRelEstY d +3.2 -1.6 27.18 18.82 26.78 +.20
UlShTxAdv d +.8 +3.1 10.06 10.03 10.04 -.01
Amana
Growth m +2.3 +6.1 26.22 20.05 25.29 -.51
Income m +4.1 +6.6 34.50 26.30 32.84 -.97
American Beacon
BalAMR +2.9 +3.5 13.01 11.17 12.64 -.19
IntlEqAMR d +8.0 +2.1 18.52 13.44 17.78 ...
IntlEqInv +7.7 +1.5 18.33 13.18 17.59 ...
LgCpVlAMR +2.9 +1.3 20.86 15.91 19.82 -.51
LgCpVlInv +2.6 +.7 20.02 15.29 19.01 -.49
SmCapAMR +2.5 +3.7 21.83 15.09 20.30 -.70
SmCpVlInv +2.2 +3.1 21.35 14.82 19.84 -.68
American Cent
BalInv +4.8 +4.1 16.37 13.65 16.12 -.10
CAInTFBdIv +4.4 +4.3 11.56 10.73 11.23 +.02
DivBdInv +2.9 +6.8 11.16 10.61 10.92 +.01
EmgMktInv d +1.7 +7.7 9.64 6.73 9.13 +.06
EqGrowInv +6.1 +1.7 22.85 17.04 22.11 -.24
EqIncA m +4.1 +3.7 7.66 6.21 7.48 -.09
EqIncC m +3.8 +3.0 7.66 6.21 7.47 -.09
EqIncInv +4.1 +4.0 7.66 6.21 7.48 -.09
Gift +6.7 +7.6 30.85 21.19 29.99 -.25
GinMaeInv +3.2 +6.6 11.10 10.72 11.06 +.03
GlGold d -9.2 +10.2 27.26 18.88 23.68 -.58
GovBdInv +2.6 +6.5 11.50 10.96 11.30 +.02
GrowthAdv m +4.5 +5.5 27.57 20.11 26.61 -.34
GrowthInv +4.6 +5.8 28.00 20.43 27.04 -.34
HeritA m +6.8 +9.2 22.51 14.84 21.80 -.23
HeritInv +6.9 +9.5 23.14 15.23 22.42 -.24
InTTxFBInv +4.0 +4.6 11.39 10.63 11.09 +.03
IncGrInv +5.8 +1.0 26.22 19.69 25.30 -.29
IncGroA m +5.7 +.7 26.19 19.67 25.27 -.29
InfAdjAdv m +4.8 +6.1 12.40 11.52 12.33 +.02
InfAdjI +4.8 +6.4 12.45 11.56 12.37 +.01
IntlBd +6.6 +5.6 15.24 13.03 14.71 +.11
IntlDisIv d +4.0 +2.2 11.78 7.87 11.14 +.04
IntlGrInv d +6.0 +3.4 12.19 8.46 11.63 ...
LS2025Inv +4.4 +4.8 12.39 10.23 12.16 -.07
LgCoVlInv +4.5 -.3 5.95 4.56 5.75 -.08
MdCpValIv +3.9 +6.0 13.49 10.43 13.05 -.20
NTEqGrIns +6.0 +1.9 10.48 7.84 10.14 -.11
NTGrthIns +4.7 +6.1 12.87 9.40 12.43 -.15
NTLgCmVlI +4.4 -.3 9.09 6.96 8.78 -.13
OneChAgg +4.9 +4.6 13.01 10.06 12.65 -.09
OneChCon +4.3 +5.0 11.58 9.99 11.44 -.05
OneChMod +4.6 +4.8 12.34 10.03 12.08 -.07
RealEstIv +10.7 +1.1 21.04 14.57 20.32 -.39
SelectInv +7.0 +4.6 41.39 29.72 40.41 -.33
ShTmGovIv +.8 +3.9 9.89 9.71 9.80 ...
SmCpValAdv m +1.1 +5.7 9.59 6.99 9.08 -.16
SmCpValIv +1.2 +6.0 9.63 7.02 9.12 -.16
StrAlAgIv +4.7 +4.6 8.17 6.30 7.93 -.06
StrAlMd +4.4 +4.8 6.95 5.63 6.80 -.04
StrAlMd m +4.4 +4.6 6.94 5.62 6.79 -.04
UltraInv +6.4 +3.8 24.63 17.78 24.09 -.19
ValueInv +3.8 +2.0 6.14 4.77 5.93 -.09
VistaInv +5.2 +2.4 18.30 12.38 17.58 -.25
American Funds
AMCAPA m +4.2 +3.5 20.44 15.28 19.63 -.41
AMCAPB m +3.8 +2.7 19.49 14.67 18.70 -.40
BalA m +3.8 +4.0 19.07 15.49 18.52 -.27
BalB m +3.6 +3.3 18.99 15.44 18.44 -.27
BondA m +3.3 +3.9 12.56 12.02 12.42 +.02
BondAmerB m +3.0 +3.1 12.56 12.02 12.42 +.02
CapIncBuA m +5.6 +4.0 53.07 43.95 52.24 -.20
CapIncBuB m +5.3 +3.2 53.07 43.91 52.20 -.21
CapWldBdA m +5.2 +6.8 21.53 19.51 21.29 +.18
CpWldGrIA m +5.4 +4.3 38.88 29.35 37.49 -.19
CpWldGrIB m +5.0 +3.5 38.66 29.16 37.25 -.19
EurPacGrA m +4.5 +4.8 45.12 33.17 43.24 +.10
EurPacGrB m +4.2 +4.0 44.65 32.78 42.76 +.10
FnInvA m +4.9 +3.4 40.16 29.89 38.37 -.68
FnInvB m +4.6 +2.6 40.03 29.81 38.22 -.69
GrthAmA m +3.1 +2.4 32.93 25.00 31.38 -.63
GrthAmB m +2.8 +1.6 31.89 24.17 30.36 -.62
HiIncA m +5.4 +7.3 11.61 10.55 11.53 -.02
HiIncMuA m +3.4 +2.2 14.26 13.10 13.65 +.05
IncAmerA m +5.8 +4.1 17.74 14.61 17.34 -.17
IncAmerB m +5.5 +3.3 17.60 14.51 17.19 -.18
IntBdAmA m +2.1 +4.0 13.74 13.30 13.58 +.03
IntlGrInA m +6.2 NA 34.29 25.76 32.99 -.02
InvCoAmA m +2.3 +1.8 30.12 23.39 28.69 -.61
InvCoAmB m +2.0 +1.0 29.99 23.30 28.54 -.61
LtdTmTxEA m +3.2 +4.2 16.04 15.29 15.76 +.03
MutualA m +4.4 +3.3 27.24 21.52 26.28 -.53
NewEconA m +5.3 +4.9 27.48 20.50 26.67 -.28
NewPerspA m +3.8 +5.3 31.04 23.12 29.71 -.22
NewPerspB m +3.5 +4.5 30.55 22.72 29.23 -.21
NwWrldA m +2.1 +9.4 57.43 43.88 55.75 +.18
NwWrldB m +1.8 +8.6 56.42 43.09 54.74 +.17
STBdFdofAmA m +.7 NA 10.18 10.03 10.10 ...
SmCpWldA m +2.3 +5.3 41.61 30.53 39.76 -.35
SmCpWldB m +2.0 +4.5 39.45 28.95 37.66 -.35
TDR2010A m +4.1 NA 9.61 8.44 9.48 -.05
TDR2015A m +3.9 NA 9.70 8.33 9.51 -.07
TDR2020A m +4.1 NA 9.67 8.08 9.44 -.08
TDR2025A m +4.1 NA 9.84 7.89 9.54 -.10
TDR2030A m +4.1 NA 10.11 7.94 9.76 -.12
TaxEBdAmA m +3.9 +3.7 12.54 11.53 12.07 +.03
TaxECAA m +4.1 +3.4 16.63 15.19 15.94 +.06
USGovSecA m +2.5 +5.7 14.79 13.66 14.14 +.04
WAMutInvA m +5.3 +1.9 29.67 22.58 28.49 -.61
WAMutInvB m +5.0 +1.2 29.46 22.43 28.28 -.60
Aquila
HITaxFA m +3.0 +3.8 11.60 11.04 11.36 +.01
Arbitrage
ArbtrageR m +1.3 +4.0 12.93 12.39 12.77 +.03
Ariel
Apprec b +5.6 +5.8 46.84 32.10 44.77 -1.17
Ariel b +3.4 +2.5 53.61 35.47 50.21 -1.87
Artio Global
GlobHiYldA b +6.0 +9.1 11.15 10.27 10.96 -.01
IntlEqA b +1.3 +.4 31.51 24.07 29.79 +.01
IntlEqIIA b +1.2 +1.3 13.28 10.11 12.54 -.01
Artisan
IntSmCpIv d +6.5 +6.4 21.58 14.99 21.19 +.42
Intl d +6.1 +2.4 24.23 17.13 23.03 ...
IntlVal d +5.7 +5.9 29.31 21.25 28.65 +.10
MdCpVal +9.2 +7.1 22.79 16.84 21.93 -.46
MidCap +6.5 +8.6 37.48 24.84 35.83 -1.05
SmCapVal +4.7 +6.5 18.61 13.37 17.64 -.53
Aston Funds
MidCapN b +1.5 +8.4 34.58 24.75 32.43 -.84
MtgClGrN b +2.7 +4.6 25.71 20.23 24.79 -.52
TAMROSmCN b +4.8 +6.1 23.56 15.56 22.17 -.60
BBH
BrdMktFxI d +.9 +4.5 10.47 10.27 10.43 ...
IntlEqN d +6.2 +2.6 14.21 10.78 13.87 ...
TaxEffEq d +7.5 +7.5 15.74 12.05 15.40 -.19
BNY Mellon
BalFd +3.5 +4.9 11.69 9.59 11.36 -.13
BondFd +3.1 +6.6 13.47 12.94 13.31 ...
EmgMkts +.1 +9.6 12.40 9.07 11.85 +.10
IntlM +5.3 -.4 11.86 8.78 11.34 -.03
IntmBdM +2.3 +5.9 13.24 12.81 13.04 -.01
LgCpStkM +4.2 +2.4 9.48 6.90 9.00 -.23
MidCpStM +5.7 +4.7 13.68 8.96 12.95 -.41
NtlIntM +3.9 +4.7 13.75 12.73 13.27 +.03
NtlShTM +1.2 +3.1 13.01 12.85 12.94 +.01
PAIntMu +3.6 +4.1 12.96 12.13 12.59 +.03
SmCpStkM +3.9 +1.2 12.97 8.70 12.18 -.38
Baird
AggrInst +4.0 +6.2 10.91 10.42 10.76 +.03
CrPlBInst +4.5 +7.9 10.88 10.41 10.78 +.03
IntBdInst +3.8 +6.5 11.31 10.80 11.12 +.03
IntMunIns +4.1 +5.4 11.79 11.21 11.64 +.03
ShTmBdIns +1.8 +4.4 9.81 9.63 9.76 +.01
Barclays Global Inv
LP2020R m +4.2 +3.2 16.01 13.29 15.72 -.13
Baron
Asset b +4.8 +3.1 61.10 44.23 57.95 -1.48
Growth b +6.9 +4.1 57.22 40.23 54.79 -1.07
Partners b +4.9 +2.9 22.80 15.39 21.57 -.68
SmCap b +8.4 +4.9 26.93 18.53 25.78 -.70
Bernstein
CAMuni +3.2 +4.2 14.96 14.09 14.46 +.03
DiversMui +3.1 +4.4 14.84 14.14 14.51 +.03
EmgMkts +.4 +8.3 35.25 25.49 33.43 +.14
IntDur +3.8 +6.9 14.27 13.54 14.02 +.02
IntlPort +1.7 -3.5 16.62 12.58 15.89 +.06
NYMuni +3.1 +4.3 14.61 13.94 14.30 +.03
ShDurDivr +1.2 +2.8 12.72 12.53 12.65 +.01
ShDurPlu +1.0 +2.8 11.96 11.81 11.95 +.01
TxMIntl +1.8 -3.6 16.74 12.66 16.01 +.06
Berwyn
Income d +2.9 +8.5 13.71 12.76 13.54 -.11
BlackRock
BalCapA m +7.8 +3.2 23.51 18.95 22.98 -.31
BasicValA m +3.4 +2.0 27.93 20.96 26.45 -.70
BasicValC m +3.1 +1.2 26.17 19.64 24.77 -.65
Engy&ResA m +4.3 +4.7 44.83 26.49 40.98 -1.01
EqDivA m +4.8 +3.6 19.12 14.48 18.29 -.42
EqDivR b +4.6 +3.3 19.21 14.55 18.37 -.42
EquitDivC m +4.5 +2.9 18.74 14.19 17.91 -.41
GlbDynEqA m +3.3 +5.1 13.50 10.22 12.85 -.13
GlobAlcA m +3.5 +6.7 20.75 17.00 20.10 -.10
GlobAlcB m +3.2 +5.8 20.22 16.56 19.57 -.10
GlobAlcC m +3.1 +5.9 19.34 15.85 18.71 -.11
GlobAlcR m +3.3 +6.3 20.08 16.46 19.44 -.10
GovtInIvA m +2.3 +5.0 11.23 10.60 10.96 +.03
HiIncA m +6.1 +7.8 4.97 4.41 4.93 -.01
HiYldInvA m +5.5 +8.5 7.95 7.10 7.87 -.02
HthScOpA m +11.1 +9.8 32.53 25.80 31.48 -.50
InflPrBndA m +4.3 +6.7 11.60 10.54 11.03 +.02
InflPrBndC m +4.0 +5.9 11.58 10.53 11.02 +.02
IntlOppA m +3.5 +4.0 36.24 26.06 34.67 +.11
LCCrInvA m +10.6 +.8 12.52 8.95 12.03 -.27
LCCrInvC m +10.1 0.0 11.57 8.28 11.11 -.26
LatinAmA m -4.7 +16.1 77.62 55.35 71.48 +.23
LgCapValA m +8.0 -.1 16.58 11.95 15.78 -.47
LowDurSvc b +1.9 +3.5 9.75 9.55 9.73 ...
MidCpValEqA m +5.2 +4.1 12.57 9.18 12.03 -.36
NatMuniA m +4.2 +3.9 10.47 9.48 10.07 +.03
NatResD m +3.9 +6.2 72.62 47.67 66.73 -1.06
S&P500A b +4.0 +1.8 16.72 12.57 15.97 -.38
TotRtrnA m +2.7 NA 11.47 10.83 11.24 ...
USOppInvC m +2.8 +6.5 38.87 27.63 36.82 -1.24
USOppsIvA m +3.2 +7.3 42.71 30.23 40.49 -1.36
ValOpptyA m +4.5 +.4 21.41 14.24 19.94 -.72
Brandywine
BlueFd +.3 -1.2 27.37 19.61 25.72 -.76
Brandywin +5.0 -.6 30.08 19.53 27.89 -.97
Bridgeway
UltSmCoMk d +1.1 -1.5 16.00 11.20 14.93 -.48
Brown Advisory
GrowEq d +5.2 +8.2 14.01 9.95 13.44 -.32
Brown Cap Mgmt
SmCo Is d +9.5 +11.7 50.00 32.88 47.90 -1.51
Buffalo
MidCap d +3.7 +5.7 18.21 13.25 17.53 -.33
SmallCap d +2.8 +4.4 28.58 20.78 26.94 -.78
USAGlob d +4.1 +6.4 27.18 19.45 26.15 -.56
CG Capital Markets
CrFixIn +3.2 +7.3 8.88 8.27 8.51 -.01
EmgMktEq +.8 +8.9 18.12 13.48 17.43 +.09
IntlEqInv +4.7 +1.6 11.61 8.33 11.07 -.01
LgCapGro +3.7 +3.8 16.09 11.42 15.31 -.30
LgCapVal +5.4 +.3 9.64 7.28 9.24 -.20
CGM
Focus -10.7 +1.5 36.39 24.44 31.08 -.77
Mutual -7.7 +3.8 30.21 22.53 27.19 -.44
Realty +9.3 +9.3 30.09 19.95 29.21 -.42
Calamos
ConvC m +2.6 +4.7 20.92 17.92 20.03 -.30
ConvertA m +3.0 +5.5 21.03 17.99 20.15 -.30
GlbGrIncA m +3.6 +5.2 11.56 9.20 11.15 -.08
GrIncA m +4.3 +5.1 34.35 26.77 32.75 -.51
GrIncC m +3.9 +4.3 34.45 26.92 32.83 -.51
GrowA m +4.4 +3.3 58.70 41.56 55.71 -1.13
GrowB m +4.0 +2.5 58.21 41.47 55.20 -1.14
GrowC m +4.0 +2.5 53.27 37.95 50.52 -1.04
MktNuInA m +1.9 +3.1 12.33 11.18 12.18 -.07
Calvert
BalancedA m +3.2 +2.1 28.83 24.05 28.10 -.42
BondA m +2.9 +5.0 16.05 15.37 15.79 +.01
EquityA m +6.6 +4.8 39.34 28.43 38.14 -.79
IncomeA m +3.6 +4.4 16.32 15.64 16.26 -.01
ShDurIncA m +1.9 +5.1 16.71 16.36 16.56 ...
Cambiar
OppInv +5.8 +2.7 20.38 13.98 19.41 -.47
Champlain Investment
ChSmlComp b +6.7 +7.9 16.46 11.28 15.56 -.45
Clipper
Clipper +6.2 -.8 67.79 51.94 65.79 -1.27
Cohen & Steers
Realty +10.7 +3.9 66.63 46.42 64.44 -1.20
Colorado BondShares
COBdShrs f +1.9 +4.3 9.20 8.95 9.06 +.01
Columbia
AcornA m +4.5 +5.0 32.30 22.85 30.56 -.77
AcornC m +4.2 +4.1 29.58 21.11 27.97 -.71
AcornIntA m +4.4 +6.7 43.72 31.37 42.65 +.44
AcornIntZ +4.5 +7.1 43.82 31.44 42.76 +.45
AcornSelA m -2.5 +4.1 29.34 21.15 27.25 -.59
AcornSelZ -2.3 +4.4 30.20 21.72 28.06 -.60
AcornUSAZ +6.4 +3.9 32.21 21.26 30.39 -.95
AcornZ +4.6 +5.3 33.38 23.54 31.59 -.79
BondZ +3.2 +6.2 9.62 9.14 9.41 +.02
CntrnCoreA m +3.8 +6.0 15.44 11.18 14.81 -.33
CntrnCoreZ +3.9 +6.3 15.51 11.24 14.89 -.32
ComInfoA m +2.5 +9.1 48.80 35.02 45.82 -1.15
ComInfoC m +2.2 +8.3 40.48 29.19 37.93 -.95
DivBondA m +3.3 +5.8 5.12 4.91 5.10 ...
DivBondI +3.4 +6.2 5.13 4.92 5.11 ...
DivIncA m +4.1 +4.0 14.06 10.95 13.52 -.31
DivIncZ +4.2 +4.3 14.07 10.95 13.53 -.31
DivOppA m +7.2 +4.7 8.58 6.29 8.28 -.21
DivrEqInA m +3.1 +1.3 10.96 7.97 10.38 -.28
EmMktOppA m -.3 +9.8 10.33 7.65 9.86 +.06
EnrNatRsZ +2.0 +5.1 26.05 16.96 23.63 -.53
EqValueA m +3.4 +1.5 11.35 8.21 10.74 -.28
FlRateA m +3.0 +3.6 9.11 8.44 9.04 -.02
GlblTechA m +1.1 +7.7 22.24 16.79 21.08 -.41
HYMuniZ +3.6 +2.0 10.11 9.18 9.57 +.04
HiYldBdA m +5.3 +8.0 2.88 2.58 2.85 -.01
IncBldA m +4.9 +6.0 10.95 9.81 10.85 -.05
IncOppA m +5.2 +8.0 10.16 9.28 9.77 -.03
IncomeZ +4.7 +6.9 9.96 9.35 9.92 +.01
IntlOpZ +.6 +1.2 12.67 9.17 12.05 +.06
IntlVaZ +5.2 +.8 15.39 12.11 14.86 -.06
IntmBdZ +3.4 +6.6 9.25 8.91 9.20 ...
ItmMunBdZ +4.3 +4.4 10.72 10.02 10.46 +.03
LarCaCorZ +3.4 +2.6 14.17 10.58 13.57 -.33
LfBalA m +4.0 +5.4 11.92 9.42 11.58 -.14
LgCpGrowA m +4.7 +4.0 25.60 18.39 24.28 -.67
LgCpGrowZ +4.7 +4.3 26.18 18.81 24.83 -.69
LgCpIxA b +4.1 +2.0 26.37 19.77 25.20 -.59
LgCrQuantA m +5.5 +1.2 5.95 4.39 5.71 -.12
LtdDurCrdA m +2.7 +5.2 10.11 9.75 10.09 +.01
MAIntlEqA m +3.2 0.0 12.97 9.44 12.41 +.06
MAIntlEqZ +3.4 +.2 13.15 9.56 12.58 +.07
Mar21CA m +.7 +1.7 14.61 10.63 13.68 -.44
Mar21CC m +.4 +.9 13.61 9.95 12.72 -.41
Mar21CZ +.9 +1.9 14.94 10.85 14.00 -.44
MarFocEqA m +.9 +2.6 24.39 17.36 22.93 -.42
MarFocEqZ +1.0 +2.9 24.94 17.74 23.45 -.43
MarGrIA m +3.0 +2.1 22.06 15.54 20.95 -.47
MarGrIZ +3.1 +2.3 22.47 15.80 21.34 -.47
MdCapGthZ +8.8 +7.3 30.40 19.75 28.98 -.84
MdCapIdxZ +6.4 +5.7 12.93 8.96 12.26 -.36
MdCpValOppA m +5.2 +3.3 8.63 5.98 8.28 -.24
MdCpValZ +5.1 +3.2 14.81 10.46 14.14 -.42
MdCpVlA m +5.0 +3.0 14.79 10.45 14.12 -.42
MidGrOppA m +3.4 +6.2 12.42 8.51 11.70 -.37
ORIntmMuniBdZ +4.0 +4.3 12.67 11.85 12.33 +.03
PBAggA m +5.0 +3.5 11.00 8.38 10.60 -.17
PBModA m +4.7 +5.1 11.22 9.30 10.99 -.10
PBModAggA m +4.9 +4.3 11.11 8.82 10.79 -.13
PBModConA m +4.3 +5.3 10.99 9.50 10.84 -.07
SIIncZ +1.7 +4.6 10.03 9.89 9.98 +.01
SelSmCapZ -2.5 +2.1 18.98 12.85 17.31 -.64
ShTmMuZ +1.2 +3.4 10.60 10.46 10.53 +.01
SmCaVaIIA m +5.1 +3.2 15.40 10.17 14.38 -.51
SmCaVaIIZ +5.3 +3.5 15.51 10.25 14.49 -.51
SmCapCrZ +3.3 +4.8 17.49 11.92 16.42 -.48
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
GlbA m +3.7 +7.4 49.61 39.01 48.08 -.30
Gold m -2.0 +14.7 35.84 26.19 33.26 -.30
OverseasA m +3.2 +6.7 24.05 19.09 23.38 +.09
USValueA m +5.0 +5.8 17.64 14.38 17.14 -.27
First Investors
BlChipA m +3.9 +1.1 22.89 17.70 21.94 -.50
GrowIncA m +5.6 +2.1 15.79 11.56 15.12 -.42
IncomeA m +4.6 +4.5 2.58 2.34 2.55 -.01
InvGradeA m +4.4 +6.0 9.92 9.26 9.75 +.01
OpportA m +6.8 +3.9 30.52 20.56 29.04 -.86
TaxEA m +4.2 +4.1 10.11 9.18 9.65 +.03
TotalRetA m +4.6 +4.3 15.95 13.18 15.59 -.24
FrankTemp-Franklin
AZ TF A m +3.9 +3.8 11.11 9.93 10.56 +.03
AdjUSA m +.8 +3.6 8.93 8.84 8.85 ...
AdjUSC m +.5 +3.1 8.93 8.84 8.84 ...
BalInv m +1.2 -.1 50.62 36.40 47.78 -1.16
BioDis A m +12.5 +7.2 79.21 53.99 77.21 -.89
CA TF A m +3.9 +3.6 7.25 6.48 6.83 +.01
CA TF C m +3.6 +3.0 7.24 6.47 6.82 +.01
CAHY A m +3.4 +2.8 9.73 8.68 9.10 +.03
CAInTF A m +4.5 +3.3 12.40 11.08 11.80 +.03
CAInt A m +3.4 +3.9 11.81 10.93 11.34 +.03
CO TF A m +5.0 +3.7 12.01 10.65 11.45 +.04
CaTxFrAdv +4.0 +3.7 7.22 6.47 6.82 +.01
China A m +2.6 +15.2 42.33 30.90 40.88 -.17
ChinaAdv +2.7 +15.6 42.61 31.10 41.16 -.17
CvtSc A m +5.1 +5.7 16.51 12.86 15.96 -.32
DynaTechA m +6.2 +7.3 33.26 23.50 32.03 -.53
EqIn A m +2.8 +.8 17.94 13.78 17.16 -.33
FL TF A m +4.1 +4.0 11.69 10.75 11.34 +.04
FLRtDAAdv +2.4 +3.4 9.26 8.88 9.20 -.01
Fed TF A m +5.0 +4.1 12.16 10.93 11.67 ...
Fed TF C m +4.8 +3.5 12.16 10.93 11.67 +.01
FedIntA m +4.2 +4.5 12.08 11.19 11.69 +.03
FedLmtT/FIncA m +2.0 +3.8 10.49 10.25 10.43 +.01
FedTxFrIA +5.1 +4.2 12.16 10.94 11.68 ...
FlRtDAC m +2.1 +2.7 9.25 8.87 9.19 -.01
FlRtDAccA m +2.3 +3.1 9.25 8.87 9.19 -.01
FlxCpGr A m +3.3 +4.4 52.42 37.91 49.81 -1.30
FlxCpGrAd +3.5 +4.7 53.26 38.44 50.63 -1.31
GoldPrAdv -10.0 +17.0 53.67 36.72 47.90 -.71
GoldPrM A m -10.1 +16.7 51.50 35.28 45.91 -.69
GoldPrM C m -10.4 +15.8 49.28 33.88 43.76 -.66
GrowAdv +3.7 +4.8 48.18 36.66 46.32 -.96
GrowB m +3.3 +3.7 46.05 35.11 44.23 -.93
GrowC m +3.3 +3.7 45.56 34.74 43.76 -.92
Growth A m +3.6 +4.5 48.13 36.62 46.26 -.97
HY TF A m +5.1 +3.8 10.39 9.31 9.90 +.05
HY TF C m +4.9 +3.2 10.53 9.44 10.04 +.05
HighIncA m +5.7 +8.1 2.06 1.87 2.04 -.01
HighIncC m +4.8 +7.5 2.08 1.88 2.05 -.02
InSCGrAd +4.5 +6.8 17.81 13.18 17.54 +.26
Income A m +6.4 +5.9 2.30 1.97 2.25 -.02
Income C m +6.1 +5.3 2.32 1.99 2.27 -.02
IncomeAdv +6.1 +5.9 2.29 1.96 2.23 -.03
IncomeB m +6.0 +5.0 2.29 1.97 2.24 -.02
IncomeR b +5.9 +5.5 2.27 1.95 2.22 -.02
InsTF A m +4.9 +3.7 12.19 10.93 11.71 +.05
LoDurTReA m +2.2 +5.2 10.48 10.17 10.46 ...
MATFA m +5.1 +3.6 11.95 10.64 11.40 +.03
MD TF A m +3.4 +3.5 11.73 10.58 11.15 +.05
MITFA m +4.5 +3.8 12.22 11.12 11.75 +.03
MNTFA m +4.9 +4.5 12.55 11.47 12.18 +.02
MO TF A m +4.4 +3.9 12.33 11.14 11.84 +.05
NC TF A m +4.5 +4.1 12.51 11.29 12.04 +.04
NJ TF A m +3.6 +4.0 12.36 11.13 11.79 +.05
NY TF A m +4.2 +4.2 12.01 10.72 11.45 ...
NY TF C m +3.9 +3.6 11.99 10.71 11.44 +.01
NYIntTFA m +4.3 +4.3 11.57 10.72 11.21 +.03
NatResA m +4.9 +8.8 45.14 27.63 41.66 -.77
OHTFA m +4.8 +4.0 12.78 11.50 12.28 +.04
OR TF A m +4.8 +4.4 12.22 11.08 11.78 +.04
PA TF A m +4.6 +4.1 10.57 9.49 10.15 +.04
PR TF A m +3.7 +3.9 12.16 10.77 11.46 +.09
RealRetA m +3.2 +5.6 11.53 10.62 11.35 -.07
RisDivAdv +4.9 +2.8 35.71 27.50 34.41 -.88
RisDv A m +4.8 +2.5 35.75 27.54 34.44 -.89
RisDv C m +4.5 +1.8 35.26 27.18 33.96 -.87
SmCpGI C m +3.9 +4.3 37.10 25.18 34.78 -1.15
SmCpValA m -.4 +2.7 48.15 33.28 44.43 -1.57
SmCpVlAd -.2 +3.0 49.53 34.23 45.72 -1.61
SmMCpGAdv +4.4 +5.4 42.73 28.77 40.10 -1.32
SmMdCpGrA m +4.3 +5.1 41.47 27.98 38.91 -1.28
StrInc A m +4.6 +7.7 10.71 9.94 10.67 -.02
StrIncAdv +4.7 +7.9 10.72 9.95 10.68 -.02
Strinc C m +4.4 +7.2 10.70 9.94 10.67 -.02
TotRetAdv +4.6 +6.9 10.42 9.80 10.38 +.03
TotalRetA m +4.5 +6.6 10.40 9.79 10.36 +.03
US Gov A m +3.2 +6.3 6.88 6.63 6.84 +.01
US Gov C m +3.0 +5.8 6.84 6.59 6.80 +.01
USGovtAdv +3.3 +6.5 6.90 6.65 6.86 +.01
Utils A m +7.9 +5.9 12.72 10.12 12.30 -.28
Utils C m +7.7 +5.4 12.66 10.09 12.26 -.26
VA TF A m +4.7 +4.0 11.93 10.77 11.51 +.04
FrankTemp-Mutual
Beacon A m +5.4 +.6 13.16 10.67 12.90 -.15
Beacon Z +5.6 +.9 13.26 10.78 13.00 -.15
Discov A m +4.9 +5.3 31.31 25.55 30.62 -.26
Discov C m +4.6 +4.6 31.00 25.28 30.30 -.26
Discov Z +5.0 +5.7 31.71 25.88 31.02 -.26
DiscovR b +4.8 +5.1 31.01 25.31 30.32 -.26
Euro A m +5.4 +5.0 22.76 19.07 22.19 -.07
Euro Z +5.5 +5.3 23.22 19.45 22.65 -.07
QuestA m +4.8 +4.5 18.76 15.15 18.41 -.19
QuestC m +4.5 +3.8 18.53 15.06 18.18 -.19
QuestZ +5.0 +4.8 18.92 15.24 18.58 -.18
Shares A m +5.4 +1.2 22.28 18.05 21.75 -.32
Shares C m +5.1 +.5 22.03 17.83 21.50 -.31
Shares Z +5.5 +1.5 22.47 18.20 21.94 -.32
FrankTemp-Templeton
BricA m -2.3 +9.5 15.97 11.70 14.84 -.03
DvMk A m -.2 +7.2 26.96 19.55 25.47 +.03
EmgMktIs -.5 +7.7 17.50 12.75 16.61 +.02
Fgn A m +9.5 +4.6 7.89 5.54 7.64 +.03
Frgn Adv +9.4 +4.8 7.80 5.49 7.56 +.02
Frgn C m +9.1 +3.8 7.71 5.42 7.46 +.02
GlBond A m +4.7 +11.7 14.08 12.79 13.97 +.04
GlBond C m +4.5 +11.3 14.10 12.81 14.00 +.05
GlBondAdv +4.8 +12.0 14.04 13.28 13.94 +.05
GlOp A m +7.3 +3.5 19.77 14.77 19.02 -.07
GlSmCo A m +2.2 +4.3 7.91 5.62 7.60 -.03
Growth A m +8.7 0.0 20.04 14.70 19.34 -.11
Growth Ad +8.8 +.2 20.05 14.71 19.35 -.11
Growth C m +8.3 -.8 19.54 14.31 18.84 -.11
IncomeA m +5.4 +6.9 3.01 2.43 2.95 ...
IncomeC m +4.9 +6.5 3.01 2.42 2.94 -.01
World A m +6.5 +2.4 16.39 12.25 15.81 -.12
Franklin Templeton
ConAllcC m +2.7 +4.8 14.04 12.35 13.85 -.06
ConAllctA m +3.0 +5.6 14.27 12.54 14.08 -.07
CoreAll A m +5.2 +2.4 13.55 10.22 13.06 -.22
FndAllA m +6.7 +2.1 11.43 9.05 11.16 -.10
FndAllC m +6.4 +1.4 11.25 8.94 10.98 -.10
GrAllcA m +3.5 +5.0 16.21 12.91 15.72 -.19
HYldTFInA +5.2 +3.9 10.42 9.34 9.93 +.05
TemHdCurA m +5.7 +5.8 10.40 8.25 10.33 +.10
TemMdTaC m +3.0 +5.0 14.58 12.37 14.29 -.10
TemMdTarA m +3.3 +5.8 14.90 12.63 14.61 -.11
GE
ElfunTr +5.3 +3.6 45.57 35.00 43.58 -.96
ElfunTxE +4.1 +4.6 12.06 11.02 11.56 +.03
S&SInc +3.9 +5.7 11.56 10.96 11.53 +.01
S&SProg +3.2 +3.2 43.40 33.17 41.50 -.92
GMO
DomBdVI +1.5 +5.8 4.24 3.88 3.88 -.36
EmgDbtIII +5.7 +10.2 9.62 7.93 9.62 +.05
EmgDbtIV +5.7 +10.3 9.61 7.92 9.61 +.05
EmgMktII +3.3 +9.2 15.87 11.08 15.14 +.11
EmgMktIII +3.3 +9.2 15.91 11.11 15.17 +.10
EmgMktIV +3.3 +9.2 15.81 11.04 15.08 +.11
EmgMktV +3.3 +9.3 15.79 11.03 15.06 +.10
EmgMktsVI +3.4 +9.3 15.82 11.05 15.09 +.11
ForIII +5.4 +.3 13.43 9.87 12.82 +.03
ForIV +5.5 +.3 13.76 10.10 13.13 +.03
ForSmCaS +6.6 +6.1 15.11 10.28 14.61 +.13
InCorEqIV +6.5 +1.1 32.18 22.83 30.92 -.01
IntCEqIII +6.5 +1.0 32.20 22.84 30.94 ...
IntCEqVI +6.6 +1.1 32.15 22.81 30.90 ...
IntGEqIII +6.2 +3.5 25.36 17.75 24.60 +.02
IntGEqIV +6.2 NA 25.37 17.76 24.61 +.01
IntIVlIII +6.5 +.2 24.29 17.38 23.26 +.03
IntItVlIV +6.5 +.3 24.28 17.37 23.25 +.03
IntlSmIII +7.3 +4.0 9.00 6.04 8.78 +.05
QuIII +6.3 +3.9 21.83 17.16 21.26 -.29
QuIV +6.3 +4.0 21.85 17.17 21.28 -.28
QuVI +6.3 NA 21.84 17.17 21.27 -.28
StFxInVI +4.5 +2.3 15.84 14.93 15.80 -.02
TxMdIEIII +6.9 +1.8 16.22 11.52 15.57 +.02
USCorEqVI +5.6 +1.6 12.51 9.63 12.11 -.22
Gabelli
AssetAAA m +5.3 +5.7 53.83 38.79 51.54 -1.16
EqIncomeAAA m +5.8 +4.7 22.30 16.60 21.50 -.42
GoldAAA m -7.6 +12.3 36.71 27.26 33.00 -.55
GrowthAAA m +.8 +1.7 33.47 24.66 31.63 -.49
SmCpGrAAA m +3.1 +6.5 36.89 25.80 34.97 -.83
UtilA m +6.5 +6.3 6.71 5.86 6.48 -.07
UtilAAA m +6.3 +6.3 6.66 5.83 6.43 -.08
UtilC m +6.1 +5.5 6.00 5.34 5.79 -.07
Value m +7.2 +4.6 17.32 12.68 16.71 -.40
Gartmore
LrgCapA m +4.5 +2.5 16.07 12.35 15.45 -.32
Gateway
GatewayA m +2.3 +2.3 26.98 24.00 26.56 -.22
Goldman Sachs
BalStrA m +3.6 +3.5 10.76 9.32 10.56 -.03
CapGrA m +2.5 +2.4 22.67 17.33 21.73 -.55
G&IStrA m +4.6 +2.3 11.30 9.23 11.00 -.03
GovtIncA m +2.4 +5.5 15.90 14.78 15.26 +.05
GrIncA m +2.4 +.1 22.50 17.40 21.51 -.55
GrOppA m +3.0 +7.4 25.09 18.37 23.65 -.91
GrStrA m +5.1 +.9 11.72 9.09 11.30 -.06
HiYieldA m +4.9 +6.9 7.47 6.81 7.40 -.02
LgCapValA m +2.6 +.8 12.67 9.68 12.10 -.33
MidCapVaA m +4.3 +4.2 39.04 27.65 37.44 -1.09
ShDuGovA m +.6 +4.7 10.50 10.21 10.29 +.01
SmCpValA m +3.8 +4.4 43.38 30.34 41.01 -1.36
StrIntEqA m +4.3 +.2 11.22 8.19 10.67 +.01
Greenspring
Greensprretl d +1.6 +4.9 25.20 22.58 24.57 -.27
GuideStone Funds
AggAllGS4 +4.3 +1.6 12.87 9.50 12.30 -.20
BlcAlloGS4 +4.0 +4.7 12.83 10.93 12.60 -.09
GrAlloGS4 +4.2 +3.2 13.20 10.51 12.79 -.15
GrEqGS4 +2.8 +2.6 20.26 14.50 19.43 -.42
IntEqGS4 +4.8 +2.0 14.65 10.65 14.07 +.04
LowDurGS4 +1.5 +4.6 13.49 13.20 13.39 +.01
MedDurGS4 +3.4 +7.0 14.48 13.51 14.04 +.02
SmCapGS4 +7.6 +2.8 16.54 10.87 15.56 -.52
ValEqGS4 +5.0 +.2 15.59 11.41 14.83 -.37
Harbor
Bond +3.4 +8.2 12.45 11.77 12.42 +.03
CapApInst +5.0 +4.6 40.02 29.37 38.54 -.98
CapAprAdm b +4.8 +4.3 39.82 29.22 38.33 -.98
CapAprInv b +4.8 +4.2 39.56 29.06 38.08 -.98
HiYBdInst d +4.3 +7.6 11.33 10.49 11.21 -.02
IntlAdm m +6.9 +6.0 66.94 46.37 64.31 +.35
IntlGr d +.5 +1.6 13.07 9.49 12.43 +.06
IntlInstl d +7.0 +6.3 67.42 46.69 64.79 +.35
IntlInv m +6.8 +5.9 66.74 46.21 64.10 +.34
MidCpGr +8.7 +5.7 9.88 6.63 9.35 -.30
SmCpGr +5.4 +5.8 14.38 9.86 13.56 -.42
SmCpVal +6.3 +1.6 22.00 15.62 20.83 -.59
Harding Loevner
SmCapIdxZ +4.2 +3.6 19.08 13.35 17.58 -1.03
SmCpGthIZ +8.0 +6.8 36.99 23.42 34.14 -1.47
SmCpValIA m +.4 +3.3 47.76 34.92 44.93 -1.40
SmCpValIZ +.5 +3.6 50.13 36.63 47.18 -1.46
StLgCpGrA m +8.9 NA 14.05 9.38 13.65 -.24
StLgCpGrZ +9.1 +7.9 14.16 9.43 13.76 -.24
StrInvZ +3.4 +4.0 20.96 14.82 19.79 -.37
StratAllocA m +4.7 +2.5 10.04 8.17 9.83 -.09
StratIncA m +4.8 +7.3 6.28 5.82 6.16 +.01
StratIncZ +5.0 +7.5 6.21 5.76 6.09 +.01
TaxEA m +5.0 +4.0 13.79 12.35 13.13 +.06
TaxEBdA m +4.2 +3.7 3.89 3.51 3.72 +.01
TaxEZ +5.1 +4.2 13.79 12.35 13.13 +.06
USGovMorA m +5.9 +6.9 5.49 5.16 5.49 +.03
ValRestrZ +1.2 +2.3 54.18 37.85 51.02 -1.59
ValueA m +1.6 0.0 12.23 9.27 11.68 -.34
ValueZ +1.8 +.3 12.25 9.28 11.71 -.34
Commerce
Bond +3.8 +7.8 20.44 19.61 20.27 +.02
Constellation
SndsSelGrII +4.6 +6.6 10.83 7.46 10.47 -.14
DFA
1YrFixInI +.6 +3.2 10.38 10.31 10.36 ...
2YrGlbFII +.6 +3.3 10.30 10.13 10.21 ...
5YearGovI +1.8 +4.8 11.17 10.69 10.95 +.02
5YrGlbFII +3.0 +5.0 11.75 10.78 11.21 +.03
EMktsSoCo +.4 NA 15.50 11.62 14.82 +.13
EmMkCrEqI +.6 +13.5 23.21 16.71 22.29 +.19
EmMktValI -.9 +14.0 38.10 28.24 35.85 +.24
EmMtSmCpI +.6 +15.4 25.24 18.23 24.20 +.46
EmgMktI +1.3 +12.3 32.37 23.42 31.07 +.17
GlEqInst +4.3 +3.1 14.76 10.65 14.04 -.23
Glob6040I +4.0 +4.5 13.69 11.08 13.32 -.11
InfPrtScI +5.9 NA 11.91 11.09 11.91 +.07
IntGovFII +3.1 +7.1 12.91 12.09 12.60 +.05
IntRlEstI +10.2 NA 5.59 3.71 5.53 +.03
IntSmCapI +4.9 +3.3 18.94 13.30 18.05 +.02
IntlValu3 +4.2 +2.2 18.91 13.45 17.86 -.07
LgCapIntI +4.7 +1.9 21.80 15.92 20.79 -.06
RelEstScI +10.6 +2.5 24.64 17.26 23.84 -.41
STMuniBdI +1.5 +3.0 10.41 10.21 10.33 +.01
TMIntlVal +4.0 +2.5 16.56 11.75 15.61 -.06
TMMkWVal +5.7 +1.1 16.73 11.84 15.87 -.44
TMMkWVal2 +5.8 +1.3 16.11 11.39 15.28 -.42
TMUSEq +4.5 +2.4 14.81 10.91 14.13 -.35
TMUSTarVal +2.7 +.6 23.61 16.00 22.04 -.70
TMUSmCp +3.7 +1.4 25.49 17.19 23.78 -.81
USCorEq1I +4.6 +3.1 12.09 8.71 11.48 -.32
USCorEq2I +4.3 +2.7 12.07 8.62 11.42 -.34
USLgCo +4.3 +2.4 10.76 8.07 10.29 -.24
USLgVal3 +6.7 +1.3 17.21 12.26 16.39 -.43
USLgValI +6.7 +1.2 22.48 16.02 21.40 -.56
USMicroI +2.7 +1.9 15.13 10.30 14.13 -.45
Dreyfus
Apprecia +6.4 +3.8 42.06 31.31 40.63 -.61
AtvMdCpA f +6.3 -.7 36.88 26.58 34.91 -.77
BasSP500 +4.1 +2.2 27.98 20.96 26.62 -.63
BondIdxIn b +3.1 +6.0 10.85 10.38 10.72 +.03
BstSMCpGI +7.9 +6.1 15.90 10.86 15.15 -.47
BstSmCpVl +1.0 +2.2 25.11 18.32 23.26 -.86
CAAMTBdZ +4.4 +3.6 14.90 13.35 14.18 +.05
DiscStkR b +4.3 +3.0 33.52 24.46 31.88 -.77
Dreyfus +4.1 +3.0 9.80 7.21 9.34 -.26
EmergMarI d -1.5 +9.5 13.95 10.59 13.34 +.13
EmgLead +.1 -3.0 22.39 15.03 ...
EmgMkts m -1.6 +9.3 13.87 10.51 13.25 +.12
GNMA Z b +3.6 +6.2 15.90 15.25 15.90 +.05
GrowInc +4.0 +2.9 15.40 11.14 14.68 -.36
GrtChinaA m -6.2 +16.9 55.00 37.67 47.10 -.18
HiYldA m +5.6 +7.6 6.84 6.16 6.77 -.02
HiYldI +5.9 +7.8 6.84 6.17 6.78 -.02
IntBndA f +6.4 +10.8 17.20 16.53 17.12 +.24
IntIncA f +4.2 +6.5 13.45 12.82 13.42 +.02
IntMuBd +4.4 +4.3 13.89 13.00 13.57 +.04
IntlStkI +4.7 NA 14.75 11.01 14.35 -.02
IntlStkIx +4.4 +.6 16.44 11.91 15.58 -.04
MidCapIdx +6.3 +5.4 31.27 21.87 29.63 -.90
MuniBd +3.8 +3.3 11.58 10.53 11.05 +.04
NJMuniA f +3.6 +3.5 13.10 11.86 12.46 +.04
NYTaxEBd +4.0 +4.1 15.22 13.92 14.62 +.05
OppMdCpVaA f +6.5 +7.9 38.37 25.47 36.40 -1.39
SIMuBdD b +1.9 +3.7 13.33 13.02 13.20 +.01
SP500Idx +4.0 +1.9 37.66 28.92 35.97 -.86
SmCapIdx +4.3 +3.5 22.56 15.98 21.29 -.71
SmCoVal +.4 +11.0 32.83 21.96 30.29 -1.25
StratValA f +3.7 +2.6 30.96 22.81 29.55 -.76
TechGrA f +3.4 +7.2 34.86 23.69 33.59 -.72
WldwdeGrA f +10.0 +5.4 44.68 33.33 43.70 -.16
Driehaus
ActiveInc +2.0 +6.4 11.35 10.76 11.20 -.04
EmMktGr d +2.6 +11.1 34.42 24.28 33.05 +.05
Dupree
KYTxFInc +4.5 +4.7 7.92 7.33 7.68 +.02
Eagle
CapApprA m +2.0 +2.5 29.72 22.76 28.47 -.75
MidCpStA m +1.0 +3.7 29.41 21.40 27.84 -.77
SmCpGrthA m +8.3 +7.6 43.18 27.21 41.27 -1.49
Eaton Vance
DivBldrA m +3.5 +2.9 10.68 8.45 10.25 -.12
FlRtHIA m +3.3 +4.3 9.50 8.92 9.46 -.01
Floating-Rate A m +2.9 +3.8 9.41 8.91 9.38 -.01
FltRateC m +2.6 +3.0 9.09 8.60 9.06 ...
FltRtAdv b +2.9 +3.8 9.10 8.61 9.07 -.01
GovOblA m +1.8 +5.8 7.65 7.39 7.50 +.02
GtrIndiaA m -11.4 +7.1 29.97 22.11 24.96 +.38
HiIncOppA m +5.8 +6.6 4.52 4.07 4.49 -.01
USSmValI +1.6 +1.5 28.21 18.50 25.99 -.91
USSmallI +4.1 +4.0 23.76 15.89 22.21 -.75
USTgtValI +2.6 +2.8 18.31 12.42 17.07 -.55
USVecEqI +4.0 +2.1 12.00 8.39 11.29 -.35
DWS-Investments
DrSmCpVlA m +.2 +3.7 39.85 28.99 36.88 -1.34
LgCapValA m +4.8 +2.8 18.78 14.73 18.23 -.40
LgCapValS +5.0 +3.1 18.79 14.73 18.24 -.39
DWS-Scudder
BalA m +3.0 +2.6 9.59 7.98 9.33 -.09
CATFIncA m +4.4 +3.9 7.47 6.70 7.13 +.03
CapGrA m +1.5 +3.6 58.29 43.03 55.27 -1.45
CapGrS +1.6 +3.9 58.70 43.36 55.67 -1.46
EnhEMFIS d +.9 +6.2 11.53 10.39 10.84 +.10
Eq500S +4.1 +2.2153.28 114.86 146.45 -3.46
GNMAS +4.4 +6.8 15.65 15.04 15.63 +.10
GlbTS d +4.0 +1.6 25.90 19.11 24.79 -.23
GrIncS +5.9 +2.4 18.10 13.35 17.23 -.42
GvtSc m +4.1 +6.6 9.00 8.62 8.97 +.06
HiIncA m +4.9 +6.9 4.96 4.53 4.89 -.01
HlthCareS d +13.6 +6.6 28.50 21.24 27.66 -.41
IntTFrS +4.2 +4.6 11.76 10.91 11.44 +.03
IntlS d +2.1 -1.4 49.01 37.27 46.25 ...
LAEqS d -5.9 +10.1 53.68 40.77 50.00 ...
MgdMuniA m +4.2 +4.5 9.25 8.39 8.85 +.03
MgdMuniS +4.3 +4.7 9.26 8.40 8.86 +.03
SPInxS +4.0 +2.0 18.13 13.58 17.32 -.42
ShDurPS +1.9 +4.2 9.64 9.49 9.54 -.01
StrHiYldTxFA m +3.6 +3.6 12.52 11.18 11.83 +.05
StrHiYldTxFS +3.7 +3.8 12.53 11.19 11.84 +.05
StrValA m +3.1 -2.8 35.44 26.65 33.65 -.80
TechA m +2.6 +4.9 14.76 10.37 13.84 -.22
Davis
FinclA m +1.1 -.4 33.73 26.45 32.10 -.49
NYVentA m +1.7 +1.0 36.90 28.46 34.94 -1.10
NYVentB m +1.3 +.1 35.33 27.23 33.41 -1.06
NYVentC m +1.4 +.2 35.60 27.44 33.68 -1.07
Delaware Invest
CorpBdIs +4.9 +9.0 6.35 5.76 6.01 -.01
DiverIncA m +4.0 +8.9 9.84 9.14 9.40 +.02
EmgMktA m +.6 +12.1 17.03 12.20 16.11 -.02
GrowOppA m +14.8 +8.5 25.30 16.72 24.51 -.32
LgValA m +7.9 +1.6 16.67 12.15 16.10 -.35
LtdDvIncA m +2.1 +6.0 9.05 8.83 9.00 ...
OpFixIncI +4.0 +8.0 9.87 9.26 9.80 +.03
OptLgCpIs +4.0 +2.8 13.16 9.44 12.53 -.27
OptLgValI +6.2 +2.2 11.42 8.49 11.05 -.24
TaxFIntA m +3.3 +4.1 12.12 11.26 11.69 +.03
TaxFMNA m +4.4 +4.1 12.74 11.67 12.29 +.05
TaxFPAA m +3.6 +4.2 8.13 7.36 7.75 +.03
TaxFUSAA m +3.8 +3.9 11.64 10.62 11.16 +.04
Diamond Hill
LngShortA m +2.7 +.7 17.32 14.67 16.70 -.16
LngShortI +2.9 +1.0 17.52 14.79 16.89 -.17
LrgCapI +4.6 +2.9 16.12 12.40 15.50 -.33
SmCapA m +2.7 +3.6 27.74 21.10 26.49 -.66
Dimensional Investme
IntCorEqI +4.7 +2.6 12.33 8.79 11.76 ...
IntlSCoI +5.1 +4.1 18.73 13.00 18.05 +.09
IntlValuI +4.1 +2.0 20.21 14.38 19.08 -.07
Direxion
DynHYBdI b +3.2 +1.1 14.95 14.09 14.68 -.10
Dodge & Cox
Bal +5.2 +2.1 75.65 59.93 73.47 -1.17
GlbStock +4.4 NA 9.72 7.14 9.29 -.10
Income +3.7 +7.1 13.60 13.15 13.57 +.02
IntlStk +3.6 +3.0 38.80 27.90 36.98 -.04
Stock +5.4 -.4 118.20 87.05 113.18 -2.49
Domini Social Invmts
SocEqInv m +6.2 +2.7 32.81 24.27 31.45 -.60
HiIncOppB m +5.2 +5.9 4.52 4.08 4.49 -.02
IncBosA m +5.4 +7.6 6.00 5.47 5.96 -.01
LrgCpValA m +1.0 +.9 19.26 15.13 18.36 -.45
LrgCpValC m +.7 +.1 19.25 15.14 18.34 -.45
NatlMuniA m +4.4 +.5 10.03 8.44 9.08 +.06
NatlMuniB m +4.1 -.2 10.03 8.44 9.08 +.06
NatlMuniC m +4.1 -.2 10.03 8.44 9.08 +.06
PAMuniA m +5.0 +2.3 9.25 8.22 8.80 +.05
PaTxMgEMI d +1.5 +12.3 53.81 39.71 51.91 +.35
StrIncA m +2.5 +7.3 8.26 8.10 8.24 ...
StratIncC m +2.2 +6.5 7.80 7.65 7.77 ...
TMG1.0 +2.9 +1.9574.45 435.73 547.82 -13.59
TMG1.1A m +2.7 +1.5 25.66 19.51 24.47 -.60
TMGlbDivIncA m +6.5 +1.7 10.51 8.44 10.16 -.05
TMGlbDivIncC m +6.0 +.9 10.49 8.43 10.13 -.06
TaxMgdVlA m +1.2 +.4 17.94 14.12 17.11 -.40
WldwHealA m +12.2 +6.9 10.68 8.19 10.49 -.08
FAM
Value +5.1 +2.4 49.12 38.16 47.65 -1.02
FBR
FBRFocus m -1.5 +5.1 51.90 38.90 49.08 -1.41
FMI
CommStk +4.3 +7.9 27.49 20.91 26.17 -.86
Focus +5.5 +7.8 33.81 23.07 32.00 -1.16
LgCap +5.3 +5.1 17.00 13.23 16.43 -.35
FPA
Capital m +9.6 +6.7 47.08 30.86 45.16 -.81
Cres d +5.1 +6.2 28.71 23.99 28.15 -.15
NewInc m +1.6 +4.2 11.07 10.82 10.91 ...
Fairholme Funds
Fairhome d -10.7 +5.4 36.53 28.24 31.77 -.91
Federated
CapAprA m -.5 +2.5 20.00 15.48 18.93 -.42
ClvrValA m +5.4 +1.8 15.75 11.60 15.16 -.35
HiIncBdA m +4.9 +8.2 7.77 7.11 7.72 -.01
InterConA m +5.5 +4.0 55.09 37.34 52.64 +.50
KaufmanA m +2.9 +3.8 5.89 4.37 5.65 -.08
KaufmanB m +2.7 +3.3 5.56 4.13 5.34 -.07
KaufmanC m +2.7 +3.3 5.56 4.13 5.34 -.07
KaufmanR m +2.7 +3.8 5.89 4.38 5.65 -.08
KaufmnSCA m +3.4 +3.5 28.37 19.09 27.09 -.71
MuniSecsA f +4.4 +3.0 10.34 9.34 9.88 +.03
MuniUltA m +.7 +2.2 10.05 10.01 10.04 ...
PrdntBr m -6.3 -1.1 5.65 4.26 4.43 +.10
StrValA m +7.7 +1.9 4.80 3.76 4.66 -.07
StratIncA f +4.1 +8.1 9.45 8.58 9.28 +.02
TotRetBdA m +3.1 +6.4 11.48 11.02 11.31 +.02
USGovSecA f +2.7 +5.4 7.93 7.66 7.85 +.01
Fidelity
AstMgr20 x +2.9 +4.8 13.17 12.01 13.07 -.04
AstMgr50 +3.7 +4.7 16.27 13.52 15.94 -.10
AstMgr85 +3.9 +3.9 14.51 10.85 13.92 -.18
Bal +4.1 +3.9 19.40 15.94 18.92 -.20
BlChGrow +5.0 +5.8 49.64 34.78 47.60 -1.03
BlChVal +4.6 -1.4 11.88 9.04 11.31 -.22
CAMuInc d +4.2 +3.9 12.37 11.33 11.90 +.03
CASITxFre d +2.2 +4.3 10.81 10.49 10.67 +.01
CTMuInc d +4.2 +4.6 11.84 11.01 11.52 +.02
Canada d +2.3 +7.2 63.77 46.30 59.48 -1.03
CapApr +4.1 +2.3 27.33 20.41 26.37 -.39
CapInc d +5.5 +10.2 9.95 8.47 9.74 -.09
ChinaReg d +1.6 +13.3 34.07 25.11 33.03 +.27
Contra +3.0 +4.6 72.91 54.99 69.68 -1.33
ConvSec +5.5 +6.2 27.62 21.07 26.68 -.66
DiscEq +4.8 +.1 24.96 19.05 23.62 -.53
DivGrow +3.2 +4.0 31.04 21.79 29.35 -.70
DivStk +4.1 +2.4 16.30 12.06 15.58 -.33
DivrIntl d +3.7 +1.1 32.85 23.93 31.27 +.10
EmergAsia d +4.2 +10.3 32.86 23.40 31.90 +.29
EmgMkt d +.9 +7.3 27.86 20.32 26.58 +.18
EqInc +3.7 +.5 48.11 35.94 45.79 -1.06
EqInc II +3.9 +.1 19.84 14.86 18.91 -.43
EuCapApr d +5.6 +1.0 21.27 14.36 20.11 +.07
Europe d +5.7 +1.9 35.01 23.88 33.12 +.13
ExpMulNat d +2.9 +1.7 23.65 17.70 22.44 -.50
FF2015 +4.0 +4.2 12.05 10.07 11.75 -.07
FF2035 +4.3 +2.9 12.45 9.53 11.92 -.12
FF2040 +4.4 +2.7 8.71 6.64 8.33 -.09
Fidelity +5.4 +3.2 35.76 25.78 33.88 -.68
Fifty +4.7 +.7 19.26 13.85 18.46 -.49
FltRtHiIn d +1.7 +4.7 9.91 9.37 9.85 -.02
FocStk +7.0 +5.7 15.26 10.30 14.60 -.41
FocuHiInc d +4.5 +6.8 9.57 8.79 9.40 -.02
FourInOne +4.4 +3.1 29.24 22.66 28.18 -.40
Fr2045 +4.4 +2.7 10.33 7.83 9.87 -.10
Fr2050 +4.3 +2.4 10.23 7.66 9.75 -.11
Free2000 +2.9 +4.2 12.37 11.34 12.25 -.03
Free2005 +3.5 +4.0 11.38 9.77 11.15 -.05
Free2010 +3.9 +4.4 14.42 12.11 14.06 -.08
Free2020 +4.2 +3.7 14.75 11.96 14.31 -.10
Free2025 +4.2 +3.7 12.40 9.81 11.96 -.10
Free2030 +4.3 +3.0 14.86 11.61 14.30 -.13
FreeInc x +2.9 +4.4 11.65 10.74 11.55 -.03
GNMA +3.9 +7.2 11.94 11.30 11.75 +.06
GlbCmtyStk d +.1 NA 18.55 12.22 17.15 -.37
GlobBal d +4.8 +6.1 24.07 18.76 23.38 -.10
GovtInc +2.8 +6.4 10.97 10.26 10.62 +.03
GrDiscov +6.5 +4.9 15.24 10.46 14.57 -.28
GrStr d +4.2 +3.7 22.26 15.60 21.30 -.60
GrowCo +7.8 +6.9 93.53 64.17 89.66 -2.08
GrowInc +3.8 -4.9 19.75 14.60 18.95 -.36
HiInc d +5.0 +8.6 9.24 8.31 9.15 -.03
Indepndnc +4.3 +4.9 26.75 18.16 25.39 -.61
InfProtBd +5.0 +5.7 12.21 11.39 12.12 +.04
IntBond +3.4 +5.8 10.86 10.38 10.77 +.02
IntGovt +2.4 +5.8 11.21 10.58 10.90 +.03
IntMuniInc d +3.3 +4.5 10.48 9.89 10.19 +.02
IntSmOpp d +5.6 -2.3 11.28 7.91 10.97 +.09
IntlCptlAppr d +3.4 +1.2 14.03 9.92 13.33 -.02
IntlDisc d +2.8 +2.0 35.83 25.96 33.96 +.04
IntlSmCp d +5.6 +3.5 23.10 16.16 22.45 +.29
InvGrdBd +3.9 +5.6 7.60 7.23 7.58 +.02
Japan d -8.9 -6.2 11.87 9.65 10.19 -.05
LargeCap +3.6 +3.7 19.10 13.84 18.24 -.42
LatinAm d -.8 +12.7 60.50 44.77 58.54 +.06
LevCoSt d +4.8 +3.7 31.59 21.30 29.77 -1.19
LgCpVal +4.8 -1.7 11.52 8.87 11.02 -.27
LowPriStk d +7.0 +5.3 42.57 30.93 41.06 -.59
MAMuInc d +4.1 +4.4 12.32 11.38 11.91 +.04
MIMuInc d +3.5 +4.4 12.24 11.45 11.86 +.02
MNMuInc d +3.9 +4.5 11.79 11.08 11.51 +.03
Magellan +1.9 0.0 77.46 58.10 72.92 -1.76
MdCpVal d +5.0 +3.3 17.57 12.44 16.74 -.54
MeCpSto +3.3 +2.3 10.79 8.05 10.32 -.21
MidCap d +5.3 +3.3 31.78 22.04 30.38 -.86
MtgSec +3.5 +5.1 11.07 10.69 11.06 +.05
MuniInc d +4.2 +4.3 12.97 11.94 12.56 +.04
NJMuInc d +3.2 +4.2 11.94 11.03 11.47 +.04
NYMuInc d +3.9 +4.5 13.36 12.28 12.88 +.04
NewMille +6.0 +4.8 32.26 23.28 30.87 -.67
NewMktIn d +3.9 +9.5 16.63 15.01 15.89 +.08
Nordic d +7.8 +4.7 38.84 24.58 37.03 +.30
OHMuInc d +4.0 +4.5 11.97 11.11 11.64 +.03
OTC +8.0 +9.8 62.30 41.75 59.32 -1.16
Overseas d +4.1 -.2 35.56 25.84 33.82 +.13
PAMuInc d +3.8 +4.3 11.12 10.30 10.73 +.02
PacBasin d +.2 +5.2 27.12 19.97 26.13 +.16
Puritan +4.3 +4.5 19.18 15.52 18.62 -.23
RealInv d +9.9 +2.1 29.23 20.33 28.23 -.53
RelEstInc x +5.3 +5.1 10.98 9.60 10.76 -.19
Series100Index +3.1 NA 9.45 7.23 9.01 -.18
ShIntMu d +2.1 +4.0 10.82 10.54 10.71 +.01
ShTmBond +1.5 +2.7 8.54 8.39 8.53 ...
SmCapRetr d +4.7 +8.8 22.78 15.40 21.43 -.77
SmCapStk d +4.0 +5.6 21.72 14.68 20.38 -.80
SmCpGr d +6.8 +5.3 17.84 11.86 16.75 -.51
SmCpOpp +5.3 NA 12.24 7.90 11.42 -.40
SmCpVal d +.7 +5.0 16.78 12.35 15.72 -.48
StkSelec +3.9 +2.6 28.16 20.13 26.75 -.62
StrDivInc +8.3 +2.1 11.65 9.11 11.37 -.18
StratInc +5.0 +8.5 11.67 10.72 11.38 +.02
StratRRet d +4.4 +4.4 10.11 8.48 9.96 -.01
StratRRnI d +4.4 +4.4 10.09 8.46 9.94 -.01
TaxFrB d +4.1 +4.5 11.19 10.27 10.78 +.02
Tel&Util +7.7 +3.9 17.63 13.39 17.13 -.33
TotalBd +3.9 +6.9 11.16 10.64 10.97 +.02
Trend +7.0 +6.0 75.18 51.59 72.11 -1.65
USBdIdxInv +3.3 +5.9 11.71 11.16 11.55 +.03
Value +4.6 +1.8 75.87 53.86 71.86 -1.94
ValueDis +4.2 +.9 16.04 11.82 15.26 -.41
Worldwid d +5.0 +4.4 20.56 14.47 19.60 -.25
Fidelity Advisor
AstMgr70 +3.9 +4.1 17.52 13.68 16.96 -.17
BalT m +4.0 +3.1 15.99 13.11 15.59 -.16
CapDevO +6.0 +3.4 12.00 8.35 11.33 -.25
DivIntlA m +4.0 -.8 17.47 12.66 16.68 +.04
DivIntlIs d +4.1 -.5 17.75 12.86 16.95 +.04
DivIntlT m +3.8 -1.0 17.31 12.55 16.52 +.03
EmMktIncI d +3.8 +9.5 13.89 12.54 13.30 +.06
EqGrowA m +6.3 +3.2 60.10 41.10 57.38 -1.11
EqGrowI +6.5 +3.6 64.02 43.77 61.14 -1.18
EqGrowT m +6.2 +3.1 59.82 40.93 57.11 -1.11
EqIncA m +5.3 +.3 25.01 18.61 24.03 -.47
EqIncI +5.3 +.6 25.77 19.16 24.76 -.48
EqIncT m +5.1 +.1 25.37 18.87 24.37 -.48
FltRateA m +1.7 +4.5 9.92 9.38 9.87 -.01
FltRateC m +1.3 +3.7 9.92 9.38 9.86 -.02
FltRateI d +1.7 +4.7 9.90 9.36 9.85 -.01
Fr2010A m +3.7 +4.2 12.21 10.22 11.93 -.06
Fr2015A m +3.7 +4.0 12.17 10.14 11.88 -.07
Fr2020A m +3.9 +3.4 12.80 10.34 12.43 -.09
Fr2020T m +3.8 +3.2 12.79 10.33 12.43 -.08
Fr2025A m +4.0 +3.4 12.46 9.81 12.03 -.10
Fr2030A m +4.0 +2.7 13.11 10.19 12.64 -.11
Fr2035A m +4.0 +2.6 12.51 9.51 12.00 -.12
Fr2040A m +4.0 +2.4 13.38 10.14 12.82 -.13
GrowIncI +3.9 +1.7 18.69 13.76 17.94 -.34
GrowOppT m +7.9 +3.1 38.91 26.08 37.15 -.95
HiIncAdvA m +6.1 +7.9 10.50 8.99 10.34 -.10
HiIncAdvI d +6.2 +8.2 9.98 8.57 9.82 -.09
HiIncAdvT m +6.1 +8.0 10.55 9.03 10.39 -.09
LeverA m +4.9 +4.0 38.29 25.91 36.08 -1.42
LeverC m +4.5 +3.3 36.42 24.75 34.30 -1.36
LeverI +5.0 +4.3 38.73 26.22 36.51 -1.44
LeverT m +4.8 +3.8 37.60 25.46 35.43 -1.40
LrgCapI +3.6 +3.7 20.29 14.73 19.38 -.45
Mid-CpIIA m +1.7 +4.9 19.17 14.07 18.20 -.27
Mid-CpIII +1.8 +5.1 19.42 14.22 18.44 -.27
MidCapA m +3.1 +1.5 21.62 15.48 20.66 -.56
MidCapT m +3.1 +1.3 21.81 15.64 20.84 -.57
MidCpIIT m +1.6 +4.7 19.03 14.00 18.07 -.27
NewInsA m +2.6 +4.1 21.40 16.21 20.45 -.39
NewInsC m +2.4 +3.3 20.39 15.50 19.48 -.37
NewInsI +2.8 +4.3 21.62 16.37 20.67 -.39
NewInsT m +2.6 +3.8 21.15 16.04 20.21 -.39
OverseaI d +5.2 +2.1 20.39 14.13 19.47 +.10
ShFixInI +1.6 +3.1 9.30 9.14 9.29 ...
SmCapA m +7.7 +6.8 27.83 20.76 26.57 -.52
SmCapC m +7.4 +6.0 24.75 18.70 23.62 -.47
SmCapI +7.9 +7.1 29.15 21.65 27.84 -.55
SmCapT m +7.6 +6.6 26.86 20.11 25.64 -.51
StSlctSmCp d +5.7 +2.6 20.94 13.43 19.56 -.68
StratIncA m +4.9 +8.3 13.09 12.02 12.71 +.02
StratIncC m +4.6 +7.5 13.06 12.00 12.69 +.02
StratIncI +4.9 +8.6 13.22 12.14 12.85 +.02
StratIncT m +4.9 +8.3 13.08 12.01 12.71 +.02
TechA m +2.8 +7.9 27.46 18.34 25.72 -.52
TotBondA m +3.7 +6.5 11.17 10.64 10.97 +.02
TotBondI +3.9 +6.8 11.15 10.62 10.96 +.03
ValStratT m +4.7 +3.0 28.43 19.76 27.11 -.89
Fidelity Select
Biotech d +18.5 +7.0 88.60 58.55 86.48 -.94
BrokInv d -6.5 -2.0 55.95 42.21 49.04 -1.50
Chemical d +9.2 +12.9 111.04 63.99 104.22 -2.50
CommEq d +6.1 +6.1 30.20 19.74 28.12 -.65
Computer d +4.3 +10.6 62.42 42.57 58.85 -.92
ConsStpl d +7.2 +9.8 73.98 57.47 72.58 -.79
DefAero d +7.3 +4.9 82.73 59.81 78.48 -1.80
Electron d +5.9 +3.5 54.98 34.61 51.22 -2.28
Energy d +10.3 +4.9 62.56 37.16 57.61 -1.13
EnergySvc d +10.2 +3.6 88.76 46.90 81.94 -.48
FinSvc d -5.6 -9.4 65.17 51.47 58.13 -1.96
Gold d -5.8 +13.1 55.28 40.37 48.15 -.91
HealtCar d +13.7 +7.4145.90 100.51 141.66 -2.16
Industr d +4.0 +6.4 26.12 17.59 24.18 -.71
Materials d +2.3 +10.1 74.58 47.18 69.48 -1.95
MedDeliv d +18.5 +7.0 61.69 39.12 58.85 -.90
MedEqSys d +12.0 +10.2 31.96 21.95 30.71 -.71
NatGas d +4.4 +.8 37.23 25.57 34.64 -.77
NatRes d +7.4 +7.5 40.76 24.65 37.33 -.83
Pharm d +13.9 +8.9 14.07 10.20 13.77 -.12
SelctUtil d +6.8 +4.0 53.22 41.59 51.54 -.95
SoftwCom d +3.9 +11.6 89.73 63.21 85.03 -2.20
Tech d +3.0 +9.4105.02 70.10 98.50 -1.96
Telecom d +8.0 +4.8 51.78 37.43 50.12 -1.21
Fidelity Spartan
500IdxInv +4.2 +2.3 48.31 36.36 46.17 -1.09
ExtMktIdI d +5.3 +5.2 41.87 29.12 39.69 -1.19
FdSpIntIv +4.3 +7.5 11.39 10.41 10.98 +.07
IntlIdxIn d +5.2 +1.3 38.58 28.13 36.88 +.03
TotMktIdI d +4.5 +2.9 39.77 29.40 37.96 -.94
First American
RealA m +10.3 +5.0 20.38 14.20 19.75 -.33
First Eagle
FndofAmY b +7.4 +7.1 28.62 20.85 27.82 -.45
PERCENT RETURN
SPECIALTY FUNDS YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
BALANCED
INTERNATIONAL
BOND FUNDS
Mutual Fund Categories
Conservative Allocation (CA) 3.75 12.96 3.87 4.19
Moderate Allocation (MA) 3.76 16.13 2.20 3.46
Health (SH) 14.42 25.96 8.16 6.19
Natural Resources (SN) 1.69 31.35 -4.68 5.89
Real Estate (SR) 9.73 26.20 1.68 2.16
Technology (ST) 3.76 24.50 5.80 6.69
Target-Date 2000-2010 (TA) 3.57 13.84 2.02 3.57
Target-Date 2011-2015 (TD) 4.00 16.36 1.24 3.00
Target-Date 2016-2020 (TE) 3.87 16.61 1.23 2.95
Divers. Emerging Mkt. (EM) -0.04 25.57 -0.54 9.01
Europe Stock (ES) 7.24 31.92 -3.92 1.99
Foreign Small/Mid Val (FA) 5.08 32.94 0.02 3.49
Foreign Large Blend (FB) 4.37 27.59 -4.01 1.24
Foreign Large Growth (FG) 4.47 29.75 -2.43 3.00
Foreign Small/Mid Gr. (FR) 4.39 36.07 0.03 3.57
Foreign Large Value (FV) 5.33 26.73 -4.39 0.57
World Allocation (IH) 3.74 19.46 2.26 5.29
World Stock (WS) 4.44 24.58 -0.85 2.66
Interm-Term Bond (CI) 3.46 7.66 6.41 5.93
Interm. Government (GI) 2.89 4.78 5.58 5.69
High Yield Muni (HM) 3.29 2.08 1.76 1.30
High Yield Bond (HY) 5.11 16.85 8.73 7.06
Muni National Interm (MI) 3.56 3.24 4.29 4.05
Muni National Long (ML) 4.14 2.43 3.52 3.23
Muni Short (MS) 1.72 2.13 2.80 3.10
6.8
32.1
6.1
4.8
9.0
31.5
2.3
5.5
5.7
22.6
-1.8
-0.1
7.2
29.0
4.1
5.1
5.1
23.6
5.5
4.1
3.9
17.5
0.9
3.4
2.9
19.7
8.0
4.6
5.2
19.4
4.7
3.0
2.2
19.6
0.0
3.1
SV SB SG
MV MB MG
LV LB LG YTD
1YR
3YR
5YR
YTD
1YR
3YR
5YR
YTD
1YR
3YR
5YR
L
A
R
G
E
-
C
A
P
M
I
D
-
C
A
P
S
M
A
L
L
-
C
A
P
VALUE GROWTH BLEND
*– Annualized
William Kennedy has put up strong numbers since taking over as
manager in 2004. He recently cut the fund’s stake in emerging
markets stocks by about half, to about 6 percent.
FundFocus
Foreign Large Blend CATEGORY
MORNINGSTAR
RATING™
ASSETS
EXP RATIO
MANAGER
SINCE
RETURNS 3-MO
YTD
1-YR
3-YR ANNL
5-YR-ANNL
★★★★✩
$8,312 million
-1.2
+2.8
+27.1
-4.2
+2.0
1.05%
William Kennedy
2004-10-31
TOP 5 HOLDINGS PCT
Royal Dutch Shell PLC B 2.3
BHP Billiton PLC 1.85
Siemens AG 1.63
Novo-Nordisk A S 1.61
Softbank Corporation 1.56
Fidelity IntlDisc d FIGRX
Fund Focus
C M Y K
PAGE 6D SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ M U T U A L S
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 PAGE 7D
➛ M U T U A L S
EmgMkts d -1.5 +8.7 52.86 39.98 51.03 +.67
Hartford
AdvHLSFIB b +3.4 +3.4 20.77 16.86 20.21 -.29
AdvHLSIA +3.5 +3.6 20.55 16.69 19.99 -.29
AdviserA m +3.3 +3.2 15.65 12.65 15.22 -.22
BalAlA m +4.1 +4.1 12.07 9.82 11.77 -.12
CapAppIIA m +3.6 +4.7 15.27 10.84 14.46 -.34
CapApr C m -1.2 +1.0 32.29 24.42 30.36 -.81
CapAprA m -.9 +1.8 36.47 27.43 34.31 -.91
CapAprB m -1.3 +1.0 32.09 24.29 30.16 -.81
CapAprI -.8 NA 36.51 27.39 34.35 -.91
ChksBalsA m +2.2 NA 10.04 8.27 9.72 -.15
CpApHLSIA +2.0 +3.8 45.67 33.13 43.22 -1.05
CpApHLSIB b +1.9 +3.5 45.25 32.82 42.81 -1.04
DivGrowA m +4.2 +3.7 20.65 15.66 19.74 -.41
DivGrowI +4.3 NA 20.59 15.61 19.69 -.41
DsEqHLSIA +6.2 +2.4 13.02 9.59 12.52 -.29
DvGrHLSIA +4.5 +4.0 21.31 16.18 20.37 -.43
DvGrHLSIB b +4.3 +3.8 21.25 16.13 20.30 -.43
EqIncA m +5.3 +3.9 13.87 10.54 13.39 -.31
FloatRtA m +2.6 +3.5 9.01 8.48 8.92 -.02
FloatRtC m +2.3 +2.7 9.00 8.47 8.91 -.02
FloatRtI +2.7 NA 9.01 8.49 8.93 -.01
GlbAllAstA m +1.9 NA 11.83 10.49 11.44 -.09
GlbGrthIA +3.6 +.4 17.09 12.01 16.19 -.22
GrAlA m +4.0 +3.5 12.45 9.54 12.00 -.18
GrOpHLSIA +6.3 +4.1 28.94 20.00 27.49 -.89
GrOppA m +5.9 +3.7 29.88 20.77 28.35 -.93
GrOppL m +5.9 +3.9 30.70 21.32 29.13 -.96
HiYdHLSIA +6.1 +8.9 9.74 8.16 9.71 -.02
InOpHLSIA +3.0 +5.2 13.31 9.62 12.84 +.04
IndHLSIA +4.1 +2.1 28.54 21.47 27.27 -.65
InflPlC m +4.7 +5.8 12.20 10.95 11.55 +.04
InflPlusA m +5.1 +6.6 12.32 11.08 11.69 +.04
MCVlHLSIA +3.4 +4.3 11.26 7.92 10.67 -.36
MdCpHLSIA +5.3 +6.0 28.80 20.62 27.40 -.70
MidCapA m +5.0 +5.3 24.30 17.48 23.10 -.60
MidCapC m +4.7 +4.6 21.25 15.36 20.19 -.52
Sm-CpGrHLSIA +10.3 +5.4 24.81 15.28 23.56 -.77
SmCoHLSIA +10.3 +4.3 20.65 13.32 19.49 -.66
StkHLSIA +3.5 +2.3 44.46 32.79 42.42 -.96
TRBdHLSIA +3.3 +5.3 11.54 10.81 11.26 +.01
TRBdHLSIA b +3.3 +5.1 11.46 10.76 11.20 +.01
TotRetBdA m +3.0 +4.9 10.76 10.36 10.65 ...
USHLSIA +1.9 +3.3 11.17 10.36 10.65 +.02
ValHLSIA +3.1 +3.5 11.68 8.77 11.11 -.29
Heartland
SelectVal m +2.5 +5.1 31.69 23.25 29.92 -.90
Value m +3.9 +2.8 48.48 33.76 45.54 -1.10
ValuePlus m +.8 +9.0 32.39 22.65 30.06 -1.04
Henderson
IntlOppA m +7.4 +3.9 23.63 17.63 22.66 ...
IntlOppC m +7.1 +3.1 22.36 16.69 21.43 ...
Homestead
Value d +7.2 +1.9 34.22 25.45 32.92 -.70
Hotchkis & Wiley
LgCapValA m +1.1 -3.2 17.55 13.12 16.45 -.45
Hussman
StrTotRet d +1.7 +7.2 12.86 12.04 12.33 +.01
StratGrth d +.5 -.6 13.53 11.84 12.35 +.05
ICON
Energy +7.1 +6.1 23.11 14.53 21.47 -.32
ING
CorpLeadB +9.0 +5.6 23.25 16.10 22.11 -.51
GNMAIncA m +3.7 +6.4 9.00 8.71 8.99 ...
GlREstA m +6.3 +2.2 17.57 13.21 17.20 -.11
IntlVal A m +4.6 -.1 12.72 9.85 12.16 -.04
RussiaA m +1.8 +7.0 46.06 29.77 41.47 +.07
TRPGrEqI +2.9 +3.8 58.73 42.62 56.07 -1.40
INVESCO
AmerValA m +5.4 +4.9 30.05 21.92 28.63 -1.03
AsPacGrA m +4.6 +13.6 32.41 23.46 31.50 +.12
CapDevA m +6.3 +2.0 18.51 12.71 17.43 -.53
CharterA m +5.8 +5.0 17.60 13.78 17.10 -.30
ComstockA m +4.2 +1.6 17.20 12.78 16.33 -.36
ComstockB m +4.2 +1.4 17.20 12.78 16.33 -.36
ComstockC m +3.8 +.9 17.20 12.78 16.32 -.36
ConstellA m +2.9 -1.0 24.89 18.32 23.97 -.58
ConstellB m +2.6 -1.7 22.32 16.53 21.47 -.52
CorpBondA m +4.2 +6.6 6.95 6.50 6.88 -.01
DevMkt A m +1.7 +11.9 34.78 26.42 33.67 +.13
DivDivA m +4.1 +3.8 13.18 10.32 12.71 -.32
DivDivInv b +4.1 +3.9 13.18 10.32 12.71 -.32
DynInv b +8.7 +3.8 25.36 16.86 24.20 -.70
EnergyA m +7.2 +7.2 47.82 29.13 44.40 -.52
EnergyInv b +7.2 +7.2 47.65 29.02 44.24 -.52
EqIncomeA m +3.4 +4.0 9.17 7.32 8.84 -.15
EqIncomeB m +3.3 +3.7 9.00 7.18 8.67 -.15
EqIncomeC m +3.0 +3.2 9.04 7.21 8.70 -.15
EqWSP500A m +5.8 +4.1 33.96 24.54 32.51 -.94
EuroGrA m +10.9 +3.9 34.74 24.35 34.06 +.22
FloatRtA m +2.8 +3.0 7.88 7.34 7.81 -.01
GlHlthCrA m +15.1 +5.2 31.40 23.28 30.76 -.34
GlHlthCrI m +15.2 +5.2 31.41 23.28 30.77 -.34
GlS&MGrA m +5.8 +4.4 21.01 15.30 20.13 -.17
GlbCEqtyA m +2.6 -.2 14.16 10.77 13.41 -.16
GlobEqA m +7.1 -.2 11.88 8.65 11.50 -.09
GovtSecsA m +1.9 +3.4 9.87 9.44 9.67 -.01
GrowIncA m +3.2 +2.2 20.86 15.61 19.79 -.44
HiYldA m +4.5 +8.4 4.35 3.97 4.31 -.01
HiYldMuA m +3.5 +2.1 9.67 8.64 9.05 +.04
HiYldMuC m +3.2 +1.3 9.65 8.63 9.03 +.04
InsTaxFA m +3.9 +1.7 16.79 15.24 16.00 +.04
IntlGrA m +6.2 +4.7 30.19 22.22 29.28 +.01
MidCapGrA m +4.8 +6.9 33.16 22.79 31.18 -1.01
MidCpCrA m +4.7 +5.6 25.34 19.97 24.26 -.63
MuniIncA m +3.9 +2.6 13.56 12.23 12.83 +.05
PacGrowB m -1.6 +3.8 22.83 17.74 21.96 -.08
RealEstA m +9.5 +2.8 24.15 17.40 23.42 -.35
SP500IdxA m +4.0 +1.9 14.74 11.04 14.08 -.34
SmCapEqA m +7.1 +4.3 13.91 9.20 13.11 -.46
SmCapGrA m +8.8 +5.7 32.98 21.79 31.12 -1.12
SmCapValA m +1.7 +6.9 19.72 14.03 18.33 -.71
SmCpGrA m +7.9 +4.4 12.67 8.61 11.97 -.41
Summit b +4.0 +1.6 12.76 9.42 12.29 -.29
TaxESecY +4.2 +3.6 11.21 10.05 10.59 +.02
TechInv b +6.4 +5.2 36.18 24.41 34.48 -.85
TxFrInmA3 m +3.8 +4.8 11.59 10.92 11.36 +.02
USMortA m +3.4 +4.7 13.25 12.84 13.23 +.04
Ivy
AssetSTrB m +5.3 +8.1 26.09 19.73 24.85 -.24
AssetStrA m +5.6 +9.0 27.05 20.34 25.78 -.25
AssetStrC m +5.3 +8.1 26.22 19.82 24.98 -.24
AssetStrY m +5.6 +8.9 27.10 20.38 25.82 -.25
GlNatResA m +1.5 +3.8 24.76 15.21 21.93 -1.05
GlNatResC m +1.2 +3.0 21.47 13.26 19.00 -.91
GlNatResI d +1.6 NA 25.26 15.47 22.38 -1.07
GlbNatrlY m +1.5 +4.0 25.06 15.38 22.21 -1.06
HiIncA m +5.4 +9.5 8.69 8.11 8.47 -.01
HiIncC m +5.1 +8.6 8.69 8.11 8.47 -.01
IntlValA m +4.0 +5.6 17.98 12.73 17.24 +.06
LgCpGrA m +3.2 +3.8 14.05 10.40 13.40 -.32
LtdTmBdA m +1.8 +5.5 11.37 11.00 11.18 +.01
MdCpGrA m +4.9 +8.2 18.85 12.90 17.87 -.59
PacOppA m +3.2 +10.7 17.89 13.52 17.25 +.07
ScTechA m +8.0 +9.7 35.64 26.06 34.04 -.55
ScTechY m +8.0 +9.8 37.12 27.12 35.46 -.56
JPMorgan
CoreBondA m +2.9 +6.9 11.75 11.33 11.62 -.02
CoreBondC m +2.6 +6.2 11.81 11.38 11.68 -.01
DiversMidCapGrA m+5.8 +5.2 23.81 16.11 22.73 -.69
EqIdxA m +4.1 +1.9 30.96 23.22 29.58 -.70
GovtBdA m +3.6 +6.6 11.32 10.65 11.08 ...
HighStatA m +1.9 +.8 15.38 14.95 15.31 +.03
HighYldA m +5.0 +8.6 8.39 7.61 8.29 -.06
InvBalA m +3.6 +5.0 12.83 10.95 12.60 -.06
InvBalC m +3.4 +4.5 12.68 10.83 12.45 -.06
InvConGrA m +3.1 +5.2 11.53 10.44 11.41 -.05
InvConGrC m +2.9 +4.6 11.50 10.41 11.38 -.04
InvGrInA m +4.0 +4.3 13.60 10.99 13.25 -.09
InvGrowA m +4.3 +3.4 14.55 11.14 14.03 -.14
MidCapVal m +5.5 +4.1 25.35 18.63 24.40 -.65
SmCapEqA m +6.3 +7.4 37.65 27.07 35.91 -1.28
SmCapEqR5 +6.5 +7.9 41.02 29.41 39.15 -1.39
USEquityA m +2.3 +4.4 10.99 8.23 10.45 -.24
James Advantage
GoldRainA b +2.9 +6.3 20.86 18.22 20.58 -.15
Janus
BalC m +4.3 NA 26.68 22.89 26.06 -.32
BalJ +4.7 +7.0 26.72 23.33 26.12 -.32
BalS b +4.6 NA 26.72 22.91 26.12 -.31
ContrJ -2.6 +1.7 15.36 12.32 14.25 -.23
EntrprsJ +5.2 +7.4 65.02 44.79 62.19 -1.27
FlxBdJ +3.9 +8.2 11.06 10.34 10.65 +.01
FortyA m +.6 +5.1 35.77 28.15 33.93 -.54
FortyS b +.5 +4.9 35.28 27.80 33.46 -.53
Gr&IncJ +5.7 +.7 33.60 25.62 32.22 -.70
HiYldJ d +4.8 +8.4 9.35 8.33 9.25 -.04
J +2.3 +3.2 31.19 23.93 29.82 -.51
OrionJ d +.5 +6.4 12.81 9.24 11.93 -.14
OverseasJ d -5.2 +8.7 53.66 40.10 48.03 -.10
PerkinsMCVJ +4.2 +6.0 24.66 18.87 23.51 -.55
PerkinsSCVJ +2.1 +7.2 25.96 20.61 24.47 -.69
RsrchJ +3.8 +6.3 31.84 22.92 30.53 -.60
ShTmBdJ +1.6 +5.2 3.14 3.07 3.10 ...
TwentyJ -.2 +6.0 68.99 54.09 65.60 -.94
WorldwideJ d +1.8 +2.1 49.99 37.89 47.40 -.41
Janus Aspen
Bal Is +4.9 +7.4 30.37 25.49 29.69 -.36
FortyIs +.8 +5.7 37.85 29.55 36.01 -.53
IntlGrIs -6.4 +9.8 59.90 44.00 53.44 -.17
JanusI +2.5 +3.8 26.02 19.97 24.87 -.42
MidCpIs +5.3 +7.5 42.69 29.34 40.76 -.89
WldWGrIs +1.9 +2.5 32.36 24.54 30.71 -.26
Jensen
J b +3.7 +4.7 29.42 22.57 28.03 -.79
John Hancock
BalA m +1.9 +6.7 16.07 13.44 15.58 -.23
BondA m +4.4 +7.9 15.91 14.93 15.86 ...
ClsscValA m +3.6 -3.5 18.18 13.47 17.27 -.33
HiYldA m +2.8 +4.7 4.08 3.51 3.91 -.06
IntlCoreA m +6.2 +.6 32.28 22.86 30.96 -.01
LgCpEqA m +1.0 +7.1 27.84 21.04 26.27 -.69
LgCpEqC m +.7 +6.3 25.76 19.46 24.29 -.64
LifAg1 b +3.8 +2.4 13.36 9.89 12.75 -.23
LifBa1 b +4.1 +4.6 13.73 11.31 13.37 -.15
LifCo1 b +4.0 +6.1 13.24 12.16 13.16 -.04
LifGr1 b +3.8 +3.6 13.85 10.84 13.33 -.20
LifMo1 b +4.1 +5.4 13.24 11.53 13.05 -.09
RegBankA m -4.6 -5.6 15.50 12.04 13.98 -.52
SmCapEqA m +6.7 +3.7 27.78 17.16 26.34 -.92
SovInvA m +3.3 +2.1 17.12 13.24 16.18 -.41
StrIncA m +4.4 +8.5 6.88 6.27 6.83 -.01
StrIncC m +4.1 +7.7 6.88 6.26 6.83 -.01
TaxFBdA m +4.0 +3.9 10.19 9.28 9.74 +.03
Keeley
SmCapVal m +2.9 +.8 27.77 18.33 25.69 -.97
Kinetics
Paradigm d +2.5 +1.6 25.22 18.31 23.89 -.39
LKCM
SmCpEqI d +9.9 +3.7 24.94 15.68 23.62 -.86
Laudus
GrInvUSLCGr d +5.8 +7.9 13.87 9.84 13.31 -.26
InMktMstS d +4.6 +5.3 20.78 14.61 20.12 +.04
IntlFxInc d +6.0 NA 12.45 10.66 12.45 +.15
IntlMstrI d +4.5 +5.1 20.78 14.61 20.12 +.04
Lazard
EmgMktEqO m -.6 +11.5 22.82 17.13 22.06 +.14
Legg Mason/Western
AggGrowA m +8.7 +1.7124.09 82.78 120.57 -1.64
AggGrowB m +8.3 +.9106.37 71.52 103.27 -1.42
AggrsvGrC m +8.5 +1.1108.34 72.65 105.21 -1.45
ApprecA m +3.7 +3.6 14.82 11.52 14.22 -.32
CAMncpA m +4.8 +4.0 16.41 14.85 15.85 +.05
EqIncBldA m +4.7 +1.6 13.71 10.94 13.26 -.24
EquityO +2.3 +2.3 13.34 10.17 12.68 -.32
FdmACValA m +1.2 +.9 14.87 10.75 13.86 -.35
GovtSecsA m +4.4 +6.6 10.67 10.15 10.67 +.04
LSAllc70A m +4.0 +3.0 13.61 10.70 13.16 -.19
LSAllc85A m +4.2 +1.7 14.05 10.59 13.47 -.24
LgCpGrA m +1.8 +2.4 25.94 19.52 24.70 -.66
MdCpCoA m +5.4 +5.0 23.57 16.28 22.44 -.86
MgdMuniA m +4.9 +4.8 16.13 14.47 15.52 +.07
MgdMuniC m +4.7 +4.2 16.14 14.48 15.53 +.07
MuBdLtdA m +4.2 +4.1 6.55 6.00 6.31 +.02
MuBdLtdC b +4.1 +3.5 6.56 6.01 6.32 +.02
MuBdNYA m +4.5 +4.7 13.87 12.49 13.37 +.05
MuHiIncA m +3.3 +3.4 14.24 12.82 13.41 +.06
OpportntC m -7.9 -5.8 11.81 8.51 10.15 -.45
SmCpGrA m +5.4 +4.9 19.16 12.91 18.10 -.56
SpecInvC m +2.5 +.6 34.33 25.20 32.46 -.88
ValueC m +.6 -6.9 42.42 31.94 39.11 -.96
Leuthold
AssetAl m +3.5 +3.3 11.35 9.13 10.86 -.16
CoreInv d +5.3 +5.2 18.39 14.75 17.76 -.23
Longleaf Partners
Intl +1.7 +1.7 16.21 12.42 15.60 +.01
LongPart +8.2 +1.1 31.49 23.47 30.59 -.61
SmCap +11.5 +6.5 30.43 21.32 29.58 -.70
Loomis Sayles
BondR b +6.9 +8.3 14.95 13.36 14.89 +.01
GlbBdR b +6.1 +7.3 17.25 15.22 17.22 +.16
SmCpVaR b +4.2 +4.3 29.10 19.73 27.48 -.88
Lord Abbett
AffiliatA m +1.7 -.2 12.45 9.21 11.75 -.33
AffiliatC m +1.4 -.8 12.44 9.21 11.73 -.33
AlphaA m +4.1 +5.9 26.82 18.28 25.13 -.67
BalA m +4.2 +4.6 11.31 9.20 10.97 -.11
BondDebA m +5.7 +7.7 8.12 7.25 8.05 -.04
BondDebB m +5.5 +7.0 8.15 7.27 8.08 -.04
BondDebC m +5.4 +7.0 8.14 7.27 8.07 -.04
ClsscStckA m -1.0 +3.1 31.31 23.51 29.29 -.85
CptStrcA m +4.0 +4.0 12.63 9.92 12.17 -.22
DevGrowA m +7.0 +8.9 24.70 15.15 22.80 -.87
FdmtlEqtyA m +3.9 +4.6 14.05 10.18 13.42 -.36
FdmtlEqtyC m +3.7 +3.9 13.34 9.69 12.74 -.34
FltRateF b +2.4 NA 9.44 9.30 9.35 -.01
GrOpportA m +5.3 +7.5 25.24 16.65 23.82 -.90
HYMuniBdA m +2.0 -1.1 11.88 10.64 10.94 +.04
HiYldA m +5.8 +8.8 8.04 7.27 7.98 -.02
IncmA m +5.5 +8.6 2.93 2.73 2.93 +.01
IntlCorEqA m +6.5 +2.1 13.57 9.70 13.00 +.02
MidCpValA m +5.8 +2.4 18.20 12.60 17.40 -.51
NatlTaxFA m +4.1 +2.8 10.89 9.71 10.27 +.04
ShDurIncA m +2.3 +6.5 4.68 4.57 4.62 ...
ShDurIncC m +2.0 +5.7 4.71 4.60 4.65 ...
SmCpBlnA m +7.5 +2.0 17.50 11.71 16.31 -.53
SmCpValA m +2.8 +5.7 34.93 23.99 32.32 -1.15
TotRetA m +3.8 +7.0 11.45 10.58 10.91 +.02
MFS
AggGrAlA m +5.4 +3.7 15.49 11.44 15.03 -.13
BondA m +4.7 +7.9 13.76 12.82 13.70 +.01
ConAlocA m +4.1 +6.1 13.18 11.58 13.08 -.04
CoreEqA m +3.9 +4.0 19.19 14.18 18.43 -.43
CoreGrA m +2.8 +2.7 18.85 14.14 18.08 -.43
GlTotRtA m +5.9 +5.1 14.26 11.77 14.03 -.03
GovtSecA m +2.6 +6.2 10.46 9.99 10.29 +.03
GrAllocA m +5.2 +4.7 14.99 11.63 14.64 -.10
GrAllocB m +4.8 +4.0 14.80 11.48 14.45 -.10
GrAllocC m +4.8 +4.0 14.76 11.45 14.41 -.10
GrowA m +4.0 +6.1 44.89 32.94 43.56 -.49
HiYLDOpA m +6.0 +6.7 6.60 5.90 6.57 ...
HighIncA m +5.3 +6.8 3.56 3.20 3.54 -.01
HighIncI +5.4 +7.1 3.56 3.20 3.54 ...
IntDivA m +5.5 +4.1 14.66 10.57 14.27 +.05
IntlNDisA m +6.1 +5.7 23.72 16.65 23.20 +.10
IntlNDisI +6.2 +6.0 24.37 17.10 23.84 +.11
IntlValA m +7.2 +3.4 26.76 20.17 26.35 +.13
LtdMatA m +1.5 +3.8 6.27 6.17 6.20 ...
MAInvA m +4.0 +4.0 20.83 15.86 19.91 -.52
MAInvC m +3.7 +3.3 20.11 15.32 19.25 -.46
MAInvGrA m +5.2 +5.0 16.47 12.17 16.06 -.15
MdCpValI +6.1 +3.9 14.70 10.35 14.14 -.38
MidCapGrI +5.1 +1.1 10.23 7.15 9.88 -.14
ModAllocA m +4.8 +5.6 14.23 11.74 14.02 -.07
ModAllocC m +4.4 +4.9 14.06 11.58 13.84 -.07
MuHiIncA f +3.2 +2.9 7.78 7.03 7.31 +.03
MuIncA m +3.4 +4.1 8.59 7.79 8.14 +.03
MuLtdMtA m +2.4 +4.0 8.10 7.84 8.00 +.01
NewDiscA m +7.8 +9.3 27.05 17.64 25.72 -.95
NewDiscI +8.0 +9.6 28.39 18.48 27.00 -1.00
ResBdA m +3.7 +6.7 10.68 10.21 10.65 +.01
ResBondI +3.8 +6.9 10.69 10.21 10.65 ...
ResIntlA m +6.8 +2.6 16.73 11.86 16.26 +.08
ResIntlI +7.0 +2.9 17.27 12.24 16.79 +.08
ResearchA m +4.5 +4.3 26.84 19.94 26.09 -.34
ResearchI +4.6 +4.6 27.35 20.31 26.58 -.35
TotRetA m +4.1 +3.6 14.85 12.61 14.55 -.16
TotRetB m +3.8 +2.9 14.85 12.61 14.56 -.15
TotRetC m +3.8 +2.9 14.92 12.66 14.62 -.15
UtilA m +10.9 +10.0 18.25 13.61 18.03 -.10
UtilC m +10.5 +9.2 18.19 13.57 17.97 -.09
ValueA m +4.3 +2.6 24.78 19.03 23.72 -.56
ValueC m +4.0 +1.9 24.55 18.86 23.48 -.56
ValueI +4.4 +2.9 24.89 19.11 23.83 -.56
MainStay
ConvertA m +4.4 +6.9 17.35 13.31 16.71 -.28
FltgRateA m +1.9 +3.9 9.55 9.14 9.50 -.01
HiYldCorA m +4.5 +6.9 6.04 5.61 5.98 -.04
HiYldCorC m +4.2 +6.1 6.01 5.59 5.96 -.04
LgCapGrA m +5.4 +6.0 7.79 5.45 7.43 -.17
Mairs & Power
GrthInv +2.9 +3.1 78.14 61.08 74.27 -2.17
Managers
AMGFQGlAA m +2.1 +1.7 10.84 9.58 9.78 -.16
Bond +6.0 +8.1 26.67 24.82 26.60 +.03
MgrsPIMCOBd +3.8 +8.1 10.76 10.16 10.66 +.02
Manning & Napier
Internati +8.8 +6.2 9.82 6.90 9.63 +.10
PBConTrmS +3.7 +6.1 13.55 12.41 13.34 -.03
PBExtTrmS +4.9 +5.2 16.56 13.45 16.27 -.16
PBMaxTrmS +4.1 +4.2 17.76 13.34 17.15 -.26
PBModTrmS +4.3 +5.2 13.59 11.72 13.41 -.10
WrldOppA +8.6 +5.7 9.62 7.04 9.35 +.02
Marshall
SmCpGrInv d +3.1 +7.6 21.58 13.55 19.60 -.72
Marsico
21stCent m +.6 +1.4 15.35 11.14 14.35 -.46
FlexCap m +3.2 NA 14.70 10.15 14.06 -.19
Focus m +.8 +2.2 19.41 13.80 18.24 -.32
Grow m +3.5 +2.0 21.11 14.86 20.03 -.44
MassMutual
PremIntlEqtyS +8.7 +5.7 16.02 11.38 15.69 +.18
SelFundmtlValS +3.3 +3.2 11.36 8.58 10.84 -.28
SelGlAlcS +3.2 NA 11.51 9.41 11.14 -.07
SelIndxEqS +4.0 +1.9 12.75 9.59 12.18 -.29
SelIndxEqZ +4.1 +2.1 12.75 9.59 12.18 -.29
SelMdCpGrEqIIA m+5.5 +6.4 16.64 11.55 15.79 -.44
SelMdCpGrEqIIL +5.7 +6.6 17.11 11.85 16.24 -.44
SelMdCpGrEqIIS +5.8 +6.9 17.56 12.14 16.67 -.46
SlSmGrEqS +6.5 +4.3 19.91 13.39 18.37 -.74
MassMutual Inst
PremCoreBndS +3.7 +6.9 11.39 10.61 11.37 +.03
Masters’ Select
IntlIntl d +6.1 +4.7 16.61 11.42 15.97 +.01
Matthews Asian
China d +1.1 +20.3 31.71 23.75 29.67 -.10
GrInc d +2.0 +10.0 18.68 15.52 18.40 +.12
India d -6.8 +14.6 23.02 17.01 20.03 +.42
PacEqInc d +1.1 NA 14.60 12.07 14.38 +.08
PacTiger d +1.8 +13.8 24.40 18.18 23.86 +.22
Merger
Merger m +3.0 +4.1 16.28 15.46 16.25 -.01
Meridian
MeridnGr d +3.9 +7.9 48.43 33.72 46.31 -1.46
Value d +.6 +2.9 30.70 22.54 29.07 -.94
Merk
HrdCurInv b +6.4 +7.3 13.17 10.84 12.98 +.16
Metropolitan West
Hi-YldBdM b +5.1 +9.6 11.02 10.07 10.87 -.04
LowDurBd b +2.2 +3.4 8.68 8.30 8.67 +.01
TotRtBd b +3.6 +8.5 10.79 10.27 10.56 ...
Morgan Stanley
FocGrA m +7.6 +7.5 39.73 26.34 38.40 -.08
StrategiA m +4.3 +4.2 17.31 13.74 16.81 -.08
USGovSecB m +3.5 +3.4 9.58 8.43 8.75 +.03
Muhlenkamp
Muhlenkmp +2.2 -4.1 58.49 46.64 54.98 -1.50
Munder Funds
MdCpCrGrA m +5.9 +4.4 30.86 21.78 29.53 -.90
Nations
LgCpIxZ +4.2 +2.2 26.48 19.85 25.31 -.60
Nationwide
DesModSvc b +4.1 +3.6 9.98 8.27 9.75 -.07
FundD m +5.7 +.8 14.84 11.06 14.30 -.19
IDAggSrv b +5.1 +2.3 9.35 6.96 8.99 -.09
IDModAgSv b +4.8 +3.0 9.86 7.69 9.55 -.08
IntlIdxA m +4.6 +.6 8.11 5.92 7.74 -.01
S&P500Svc m +4.0 +1.7 11.38 8.55 10.87 -.26
Natixis
CGMTgtEqA m -5.5 +3.3 11.46 8.53 10.51 -.31
InvBndA m +5.4 +8.7 12.76 11.86 12.53 -.02
InvBndC m +5.1 +7.9 12.68 11.78 12.44 -.02
StratIncA m +7.3 +8.5 15.59 13.84 15.52 ...
StratIncC m +6.9 +7.7 15.68 13.90 15.60 -.01
Neuberger Berman
FocusInv +3.6 -.7 21.34 16.07 20.33 -.52
GenesAdv b +6.4 +6.2 31.08 21.93 29.37 -.80
GenesisInv +6.5 +6.5 37.44 26.35 35.39 -.97
GenesisTr +6.5 +6.4 53.67 37.80 50.72 -1.39
GuardnInv +5.5 +3.4 16.40 11.95 15.64 -.43
PartnerTr b +3.2 +1.1 22.96 16.51 21.83 -.51
PartnrAdv b +3.1 +.9 19.80 14.26 18.82 -.44
PartnrInv +3.2 +1.3 29.93 21.51 28.45 -.68
SmCpGrInv +6.0 +3.1 20.28 13.49 18.96 -.77
SocRespInv +5.5 +3.9 28.13 20.55 26.86 -.69
SocRespTr b +5.4 +3.7 19.27 14.10 18.39 -.48
New Covenant
Growth +4.4 +1.3 33.62 24.97 32.31 -.60
Income +2.8 +3.0 23.20 22.35 23.00 +.05
Nicholas
Nichol +5.5 +4.9 49.59 37.40 47.64 -1.56
Northeast Investors
Northeast +3.7 +3.7 6.42 5.79 6.22 -.03
Northern
BdIndx +3.0 NA 10.88 10.35 10.69 +.02
FixedIn +3.4 +5.9 10.72 10.02 10.35 +.02
GlbREIdx d +5.0 NA 8.91 6.57 8.72 -.05
HYFixInc d +5.8 +7.1 7.55 6.77 7.49 -.02
HiYMuni +3.7 +.7 8.46 7.64 8.04 +.03
IntTaxE +4.2 +4.2 10.74 9.76 10.27 +.03
IntlIndex d +4.8 +.9 11.58 10.10 11.04 -.02
MMIntlEq d +2.0 NA 10.60 7.94 10.14 -.04
MMMidCap +5.9 NA 12.98 9.06 12.34 -.36
MMSmCp +5.2 NA 11.40 7.76 10.82 -.17
MdCapIndx +6.4 +5.5 13.43 12.32 12.73 -.38
ShIntUSGv +1.3 +4.4 10.73 10.24 10.45 +.02
SmCapIdx +5.0 +3.2 9.52 6.50 9.04 -.17
SmCapVal +2.0 +2.5 16.45 11.64 15.51 -.45
StkIdx +4.1 +2.1 16.89 12.66 16.14 -.38
TaxE +5.2 +4.4 10.95 9.68 10.35 +.04
Nuveen
HiYldMunA m +4.1 -1.8 16.07 13.77 14.67 +.09
HiYldMunC m +3.8 -2.3 16.06 13.76 14.66 +.09
IntlValA m -.4 +2.7 27.27 21.58 25.96 -.19
LtdTmMuA m +2.9 +4.1 11.09 10.68 10.97 +.02
LtdTmMuC m +2.8 +3.8 11.05 10.64 10.93 +.02
NWQVlOppA m +1.5 +9.6 36.81 29.40 35.61 -.59
NWQVlOppC m +1.2 +8.8 35.93 28.70 34.73 -.58
Oakmark
EqIncI +4.0 +6.4 29.68 24.50 28.85 -.46
GlSelI d +7.0 NA 12.39 9.18 11.85 -.12
Global I d +1.3 +4.0 23.93 18.07 22.77 -.37
Intl I d +4.7 +4.6 21.01 15.47 20.32 ...
IntlSmCpI d +1.0 +3.9 15.20 10.99 14.52 +.05
Oakmark I d +4.9 +4.5 45.29 34.67 43.33 -.95
Select I d +7.2 +2.2 30.73 23.12 29.43 -.65
Old Mutual Advisor F
FocusedZ d +3.4 +4.1 22.80 17.52 21.79 -.43
Old Westbury
FixedInc +2.5 +6.5 12.00 11.47 11.78 +.03
GlbSmMdCp +5.8 +9.0 16.95 12.18 16.36 -.18
LgCapEq +1.4 +.5 13.05 10.01 12.35 -.33
MuniBd +2.6 +4.6 12.43 11.56 11.90 +.03
NonUSLgCp +3.3 +1.1 11.63 7.99 10.97 -.03
RealRet +2.6 +4.8 11.60 8.74 11.18 -.20
Olstein
AllCpVlC m +1.3 -.6 13.43 10.16 12.73 -.39
Oppenheimer
AMTFrMunA m +5.1 -3.4 6.64 5.63 6.07 +.02
AMTFrMunC m +4.7 -4.2 6.60 5.60 6.04 +.02
ActAllocA m +4.2 +.7 10.29 8.06 9.99 -.08
ActAllocC m +3.7 -.1 10.08 7.89 9.77 -.08
AmtFrNYA m +2.7 +1.8 12.06 10.25 10.77 +.06
BalA m +4.8 -1.7 10.69 8.76 10.54 -.08
CAMuniA m +4.3 -1.7 8.31 7.11 7.57 +.04
CapApA m +3.1 +1.1 46.92 35.13 44.92 -1.01
CapApB m +2.7 +.3 41.33 31.16 39.54 -.89
CapApC m +2.7 +.4 41.05 30.93 39.27 -.88
CapApprY +3.2 +1.6 49.10 36.63 47.02 -1.05
CapIncA m +5.8 -.8 9.02 7.90 8.93 -.05
ChampIncA m +6.4 -19.8 2.02 1.79 2.00 ...
CmdtStTRA m +6.8 -9.2 4.25 2.95 3.91 +.01
CmdtStTRY +6.8 -8.8 4.26 2.96 3.92 +.01
CoreBondA m +4.4 -2.6 6.63 6.28 6.61 +.01
CoreBondY +4.5 -2.3 6.62 6.27 6.60 +.01
DevMktA m -.9 +13.9 37.42 27.05 36.16 +.27
DevMktN m -1.0 +13.5 36.17 26.20 34.95 +.27
DevMktY -.7 +14.2 37.05 26.78 35.81 +.27
DevMktsC m -1.1 +13.1 35.91 26.09 34.68 +.26
DiscoverA m +11.5 +6.4 67.85 41.54 62.90 -2.29
EqIncA m +4.6 +5.1 26.53 19.30 25.55 -.60
EquityA m +4.0 +1.7 9.59 7.08 9.18 -.23
GlobA m +7.0 +3.5 67.42 48.55 64.62 -.53
GlobC m +6.7 +2.8 63.28 45.61 60.62 -.50
GlobOpprA m +5.1 +4.8 32.57 24.99 31.25 -.39
GlobOpprC m +4.8 +4.0 30.08 23.08 28.84 -.37
GlobY +7.1 +3.9 67.57 48.68 64.78 -.53
GoldMinA m -7.9 +17.7 51.45 33.84 45.88 -1.02
GoldMinC m -8.2 +16.8 48.74 32.22 43.41 -.98
IntlBondA m +5.3 +9.2 7.04 6.06 6.80 +.11
IntlBondC m +4.9 +8.5 7.01 6.04 6.77 +.10
IntlBondY +5.3 +9.6 7.04 6.06 6.79 +.10
IntlDivA m +3.4 +5.7 13.03 9.67 12.69 +.09
IntlDivC m +3.1 +4.9 12.75 9.47 12.41 +.08
IntlGrY +8.7 +6.3 30.92 21.89 30.33 +.35
IntlGrowA m +8.6 +5.8 31.05 21.98 30.46 +.36
IntlSmCoA m -3.7 +6.9 24.84 16.18 23.75 +.05
IntlSmCoY -3.5 +7.3 24.68 16.04 23.63 +.05
LmtTmMunA m +2.8 +2.9 14.70 13.88 14.28 +.02
LmtTmMunC m +2.4 +2.1 14.64 13.82 14.22 +.02
LtdTmGovA m +1.3 +3.4 9.47 9.35 9.42 +.01
LtdTmGovY +1.5 +3.6 9.46 9.34 9.41 +.01
LtdTmNY m +2.3 +3.7 3.34 3.14 3.23 +.01
LtdTmNY m +1.7 +2.9 3.32 3.13 3.21 ...
MainSSMCA m +5.2 +2.3 22.56 15.89 21.49 -.52
MainSSMCY +5.3 +2.7 23.71 16.70 22.59 -.55
MainStSelA m -2.0 +1.0 13.18 10.25 12.51 -.32
MainStrA m +1.1 +1.2 34.21 25.88 32.75 -.74
MainStrC m +.8 +.5 33.00 24.99 31.58 -.71
ModInvA m +4.3 -.2 9.27 7.66 9.07 -.06
PAMuniA m +3.9 +1.8 11.37 9.89 10.47 +.05
QuBalA m +3.9 +2.2 16.43 13.29 16.03 -.03
QuOpportA m +4.0 +4.9 28.00 23.73 27.45 -.21
RisDivA m +5.0 +3.8 16.89 12.81 16.24 -.36
RisDivY +5.1 +4.1 17.28 13.10 16.62 -.37
RocMuniA m +2.7 +2.1 16.91 14.49 15.24 +.09
RocMuniC m +2.4 +1.3 16.88 14.47 15.21 +.09
RochNtlMC m +4.8 -5.3 7.36 6.25 6.73 +.03
RochNtlMu m +4.9 -4.6 7.37 6.27 6.74 +.02
SmMidValA m +5.6 +2.0 35.48 24.73 33.85 -.99
SrFltRatA m +3.5 +4.5 8.42 8.05 8.40 ...
SrFltRatC m +3.3 +4.0 8.43 7.97 8.41 ...
StrIncA m +5.5 +7.8 4.45 4.00 4.42 +.02
StrIncY +5.8 +8.0 4.44 4.00 4.42 +.03
StratIncC m +5.1 +6.9 4.44 3.99 4.41 +.02
USGovtA m +3.0 +5.4 9.65 9.23 9.49 +.02
ValueA m +5.0 +1.9 24.01 17.37 22.92 -.62
ValueY +5.2 +2.3 24.49 17.73 23.39 -.63
Osterweis
OsterStrInc d +3.2 +7.8 11.92 11.32 11.89 -.01
Osterweis d +4.1 +4.5 29.59 23.18 28.22 -.54
PIMCO
AllAssetA m +5.1 +6.7 12.77 11.68 12.53 ...
AllAssetC m +4.7 +5.9 12.63 11.57 12.38 -.01
AllAssetsD b +5.1 +6.8 12.79 11.70 12.55 -.01
AllAuthA m +5.2 +7.6 11.28 10.43 11.00 +.05
AllAuthC m +4.8 +6.8 11.19 10.34 10.89 +.05
CmRlRtStA m +6.8 +3.6 10.04 7.15 9.53 +.05
CmRlRtStC m +6.6 +2.8 9.84 7.03 9.34 +.06
CmRlRtStD b +6.9 +3.6 10.07 7.17 9.56 +.06
EmgMktA m +3.6 +8.5 11.66 10.49 11.26 +.03
ForUnhgD b +6.3 +8.6 11.62 9.72 11.12 +.12
GNMAA m +3.7 +7.4 11.76 11.25 11.75 +.04
Hi-YldD b +4.9 +7.5 9.54 8.72 9.48 -.02
HiYldA m +4.9 +7.5 9.54 8.72 9.48 -.02
HiYldC m +4.6 +6.7 9.54 8.72 9.48 -.02
LowDrA m +2.1 +5.5 10.77 10.27 10.52 ...
LowDrC m +2.0 +5.0 10.77 10.27 10.52 ...
LowDurD b +2.1 +5.6 10.77 10.27 10.52 ...
RealRetD b +5.0 +6.9 11.91 11.02 11.72 +.04
RealRtnA m +5.0 +6.9 11.91 11.02 11.72 +.04
RealRtnC m +4.8 +6.3 11.91 11.02 11.72 +.04
ShtTermA m +.9 +3.2 9.95 9.85 9.91 ...
ShtTermD b +.9 +3.3 9.95 9.85 9.91 ...
TotRetA m +3.2 +8.3 11.77 10.69 11.06 +.01
TotRetB m +2.9 +7.5 11.77 10.69 11.06 +.01
TotRetC m +2.9 +7.5 11.77 10.69 11.06 +.01
TotRetrnD b +3.3 +8.4 11.77 10.69 11.06 +.01
PRIMECAP Odyssey
AggGr d +8.6 +8.3 18.79 13.54 17.88 -.47
Growth d +7.3 +5.6 17.24 12.44 16.52 -.36
Stock d +5.4 +4.0 15.48 11.83 14.94 -.30
Pacific
PortOptCA m +3.9 +4.6 12.21 10.04 11.92 -.11
Parnassus
EqIncInv +3.9 +6.9 28.61 22.33 27.26 -.62
Parnassus +1.9 +6.2 45.09 31.93 41.27 -1.41
Pax World
Bal b +5.1 +2.8 24.21 18.74 23.49 -.32
Payden
CoreBd +3.0 +5.7 10.75 10.33 10.61 +.02
EmMktBd d +4.4 +9.2 15.02 13.46 14.57 +.09
GNMA +3.6 +7.1 10.60 10.14 10.51 +.03
HighInc d +4.8 +6.2 7.43 6.80 7.36 ...
ShortBd +1.4 +4.3 10.25 10.05 10.17 -.01
Permanent
Portfolio +5.6 +10.0 49.73 39.10 48.37 -.34
Perritt
MicroCap d -.4 +1.8 29.58 21.04 27.32 -.70
Pioneer
Bond A m +4.1 +7.2 9.76 9.34 9.75 +.01
CulValA m +3.0 +1.2 19.73 15.23 18.69 -.32
CulValC m +2.6 +.5 19.53 15.05 18.48 -.32
EqInc A m +6.6 +2.4 28.03 20.80 26.92 -.74
GlobHiYA m +5.1 +7.5 10.95 9.61 10.76 -.06
GlobHiYC m +4.7 +6.7 10.91 9.58 10.71 -.07
GrOppA m +7.4 +3.4 31.08 21.40 29.29 -1.07
HiYldA m +5.8 +7.7 10.82 8.86 10.54 -.12
HiYldC m +5.4 +7.0 11.00 9.00 10.71 -.12
IndependA m +5.3 +.8 12.41 8.74 11.82 -.24
MidCpValA m +4.5 +3.1 23.06 17.02 22.08 -.58
MuniA m +4.5 +3.5 13.69 12.07 12.85 +.07
PioneerA m +2.2 +2.1 43.93 32.45 41.81 -1.11
SmCapEq m +6.4 +6.3 33.07 21.94 30.84 -1.17
StratIncA m +4.0 +8.2 11.17 10.45 11.14 -.01
StratIncC m +3.6 +7.5 10.93 10.22 10.90 -.01
ValueA m +1.8 -2.8 12.26 9.50 11.59 -.24
Principal
BdMtgInst +4.6 +5.3 10.69 9.99 10.66 +.01
CaptApprtnA m +2.8 +3.4 41.71 32.20 39.62 -1.03
DivIntI +4.0 +.8 11.00 7.82 10.52 ...
EqIncA m +5.3 +2.1 18.88 14.67 18.24 -.34
HiYldA m +5.3 +9.0 8.24 7.63 8.14 -.03
HiYldC m +5.0 +8.2 8.30 7.68 8.20 -.02
HiYldII +5.4 +10.0 11.77 10.37 11.30 -.02
InfProI +4.7 +1.1 8.28 7.77 8.17 +.02
IntIInst +4.2 +.9 12.63 8.96 12.02 -.02
IntlGrthI +4.5 -1.1 9.76 7.03 9.38 -.02
L/T2010I +4.5 +3.1 11.92 9.90 11.67 -.11
L/T2020I +4.6 +3.2 12.56 10.02 12.20 -.15
L/T2020J m +4.5 +2.7 12.51 9.97 12.15 -.15
L/T2030I +4.8 +3.0 12.53 9.72 12.12 -.17
L/T2030J m +4.7 +2.5 12.51 9.69 12.10 -.17
L/T2040I +4.7 +2.7 12.79 9.70 12.32 -.19
L/T2050I +4.8 +2.5 12.31 9.21 11.83 -.19
L/TSIInst +4.1 +2.9 11.09 9.98 11.02 -.03
LCBIIInst +3.2 +2.6 10.36 7.79 9.88 -.24
LCGIIInst +3.5 +4.5 8.97 6.74 8.57 -.21
LCGrIInst +4.4 +5.9 10.11 7.21 9.68 -.24
LCIIIInst +4.2 -1.9 11.15 8.41 10.63 -.25
LCVlIInst +4.0 -.6 11.53 8.77 11.03 -.26
LgCGrInst +.7 +2.8 8.70 6.42 8.25 -.19
LgCSP500I +4.2 +2.2 9.58 7.18 9.16 -.21
LgCValI +5.9 +.3 10.37 7.59 9.87 -.25
MCVlIInst +4.7 +4.7 14.30 10.22 13.66 -.40
MGIIIInst +7.8 +5.0 11.99 7.92 11.46 -.35
MidCapBleA m +10.6 +7.2 15.08 11.31 14.66 -.32
PrSecInst +6.4 +6.9 10.32 9.09 10.25 -.07
ReEstSecI +11.2 +3.7 18.47 12.98 17.90 -.29
SAMBalA m +3.8 +4.6 13.54 11.10 13.19 -.16
SAMBalC m +3.5 +3.8 13.40 11.00 13.05 -.16
SAMConGrA m +4.1 +3.3 14.65 11.40 14.12 -.23
SAMConGrB m +3.7 +2.5 14.12 10.97 13.60 -.23
SAMConGrC m +3.8 +2.5 13.93 10.84 13.42 -.21
SAMFleIncA m +3.9 +5.7 11.70 10.59 11.60 -.08
SAMStrGrA m +4.1 +2.5 16.18 12.13 15.48 -.30
SCGrIInst +8.1 +5.7 12.54 7.74 11.67 -.42
SCValIII +2.2 +1.3 10.63 7.25 9.87 -.34
Prudential Investmen
2020FocA m +4.3 +5.1 17.34 12.68 16.57 -.44
2020FocC m +4.0 +4.4 15.56 11.44 14.86 -.40
2020FocZ +4.4 +5.4 17.95 13.09 17.15 -.46
BlendA m +4.5 +3.9 18.87 13.74 17.99 -.48
EqIncC m +5.9 +6.7 13.79 10.50 13.35 -.20
EqOppA m +5.5 +3.6 15.19 11.12 14.65 -.34
GovtIncA m +2.8 +5.9 9.83 9.44 9.75 +.03
HiYieldA m +5.0 +8.6 5.65 5.15 5.61 -.01
HlthSciA m +16.9 +10.0 27.89 18.60 27.22 -.49
IntlEqtyA m +5.8 -1.5 6.85 4.92 6.55 -.01
IntlValA m +5.8 +1.8 22.79 16.48 21.80 +.02
JenMidCapGrA m +7.3 +6.6 30.53 22.15 29.37 -.87
JenMidCapGrZ +7.4 +6.9 31.67 22.91 30.47 -.90
JennGrA m +4.7 +4.1 19.65 14.42 18.89 -.50
JennGrZ +4.8 +4.4 20.41 14.94 19.63 -.51
NatlMuniA m +4.2 +3.6 15.05 13.73 14.47 +.05
NaturResA m -.7 +9.0 62.22 40.42 56.67 -1.16
ShTmCoBdA m +2.5 +6.1 11.72 11.38 11.56 +.01
SmallCoA m +6.5 +5.1 22.83 15.67 21.62 -.66
SmallCoZ +6.7 +5.3 23.86 16.37 22.60 -.69
StkIndexI +4.3 +2.3 30.18 22.68 28.84 -.68
TotRetBdA m +4.8 +8.0 14.36 13.55 14.24 +.06
UtilityA m +8.1 +2.7 11.30 8.55 11.01 -.14
ValueA m +4.9 +1.6 16.32 12.03 15.45 -.37
ValueZ +5.0 +1.8 16.34 12.05 15.47 -.37
Purisima
TotReturn b +2.7 +1.7 21.99 15.64 20.82 -.30
Putnam
AmGovtInA m +3.8 +8.0 9.88 9.44 9.71 +.04
AstAlBalA m +4.1 +3.4 11.69 9.63 11.33 -.12
AstAlGrA m +3.8 +2.9 13.36 10.47 12.77 -.19
AstAlcCoY +3.9 +4.6 9.59 8.69 9.47 -.04
CATxEIncA m +3.5 +3.3 8.12 7.22 7.57 +.03
ConvInGrA m +5.4 +6.0 21.47 17.05 20.96 -.36
DivIncTrC m +4.0 +4.5 8.17 7.76 8.07 ...
DivrInA m +4.3 +5.3 8.28 7.86 8.18 ...
EqIncomeA m +6.0 +4.0 16.67 12.17 15.90 -.39
EqIncomeY +6.1 +4.3 16.67 12.16 15.90 -.39
GeoPutA m +4.3 -.9 12.69 10.54 12.34 -.18
GlbEqA m +10.3 +1.1 9.94 7.07 9.58 -.08
GlbHltCrA m +13.4 +4.5 51.85 38.52 50.79 -.58
GrowIncA m +2.7 -.7 14.68 10.83 13.88 -.35
GrowIncB m +2.4 -1.5 14.41 10.64 13.62 -.34
HiYldA m +5.0 +8.0 8.00 7.19 7.90 -.03
HiYldAdvA m +5.0 +8.4 6.16 5.59 6.09 -.01
IncomeA m +5.0 +7.7 6.97 6.68 6.93 ...
IntlCpOpA m +3.0 +4.2 38.57 26.65 36.75 +.19
IntlEqA m +3.4 -.6 21.83 15.39 20.72 -.09
InvestorA m +4.2 -.5 13.95 10.30 13.29 -.32
MidCapVal m +2.5 +1.8 13.49 9.47 12.73 -.34
MultiCapGrA m +4.2 +2.6 55.41 38.86 52.74 -1.38
NYTxEIncA m +3.5 +3.9 8.74 7.98 8.36 +.02
TaxEIncA m +3.9 +3.8 8.73 7.29 8.36 +.02
TaxFHYldA m +3.1 +2.8 12.07 10.96 11.36 +.04
USGovtInA m +4.1 +8.3 14.44 13.94 14.40 +.06
VoyagerA m -2.0 +6.5 25.49 18.17 23.24 -.64
VoyagerY -1.9 +6.8 26.54 18.93 24.22 -.66
RS
GlNatResA m +3.8 +5.1 41.60 28.30 39.01 -.82
PartnersA m +3.5 +2.9 36.00 25.15 34.25 -.81
SmCpGrthA m +10.7 +6.0 48.62 31.25 46.11 -1.72
ValueA m +.5 +2.6 27.62 20.34 26.04 -.73
RS Funds
CoreEqA m +.3 +6.0 45.58 35.06 42.64 -1.12
EmgMktsA m -3.4 +11.0 27.44 20.93 25.82 -.04
Rainier
CoreEq b +2.8 +1.6 27.05 19.62 25.67 -.66
SmMidCap b +5.9 +2.0 36.86 24.52 34.59 -1.21
RidgeWorth
CapAprI +4.8 +4.5 11.89 8.30 11.36 -.28
HiIncI +6.5 +10.3 7.41 6.43 7.33 -.03
HighYI +6.2 +7.5 10.19 9.08 10.12 -.02
IntlEIxI +6.5 0.0 14.44 10.43 13.67 +.09
IntmBndI +2.9 +6.6 11.03 10.27 10.56 +.02
InvGrBdI +3.8 +5.3 12.56 11.51 12.00 +.03
LgCpVaEqI +3.1 +3.6 13.79 10.31 13.19 -.28
MdCpVlEqI +4.8 +8.6 13.15 9.20 12.41 -.31
SmCapEqI +4.0 +5.5 14.96 10.74 14.24 -.38
SmCapGrI +7.9 +2.0 17.87 11.41 16.61 -.67
TtlRetBndI +3.5 +7.2 11.17 10.28 10.62 +.02
USGovBndI +.9 +4.0 10.11 10.05 10.11 ...
RiverNorth
CoreOpp m +4.9 NA 12.99 11.85 12.73 -.11
Royce
LowStkSer m +2.7 +7.4 19.92 13.10 18.75 -.39
MicrCapIv d +1.6 +6.8 19.30 13.18 17.85 -.43
OpportInv d -.1 +3.8 13.10 8.66 12.07 -.44
PAMutCnslt m +4.1 +3.4 11.80 8.20 11.05 -.35
PAMutInv d +4.6 +4.4 13.00 9.00 12.19 -.38
PremierInv d +6.7 +8.0 22.95 15.59 21.72 -.53
SpecEqInv d +.3 +6.7 22.54 16.60 20.94 -.66
TotRetInv d +3.2 +3.9 14.28 10.49 13.56 -.37
ValPlSvc m +2.9 +2.4 14.72 10.56 13.81 -.48
ValueSvc m +5.9 +7.0 14.21 9.58 13.40 -.40
Russell
EmgMktsS +.6 +11.0 21.93 16.15 20.96 +.10
GlRelEstS +5.7 +1.7 38.69 29.56 37.85 -.33
GlbEqtyS +4.3 NA 9.68 7.05 9.26 -.10
InvGrdBdS +3.3 NA 22.89 21.41 22.10 -.01
ItlDvMktS +4.2 NA 34.64 25.14 33.01 ...
ShDurBdS +1.7 +4.7 19.51 19.02 19.38 -.02
StratBdS +3.8 NA 11.32 10.68 11.03 -.01
TaxExBdS +3.1 +4.4 22.80 21.61 22.20 ...
TxMgdLgCS +4.0 +2.3 21.38 15.52 20.40 -.47
USCoreEqS +2.7 NA 30.16 22.31 28.65 -.73
USQntvEqS +7.4 NA 31.96 23.47 30.74 -.71
USSmMdCpS +4.0 NA 25.30 17.14 23.75 -.79
Russell LifePoints
BalStrA m +4.1 +3.9 11.09 9.21 10.82 -.07
BalStrC b +3.8 +3.1 11.00 9.14 10.72 -.07
BalStrS +4.1 +4.2 11.18 9.29 10.91 -.07
BlStrR3 b +4.1 +3.7 11.12 9.23 10.85 -.07
EqGrStrC b +3.9 +.7 9.39 7.07 9.00 -.09
GrStrA m +4.2 +2.8 10.69 8.39 10.32 -.09
GrStrC b +3.9 +2.0 10.55 8.30 10.17 -.09
GrStrR3 b +4.2 +2.6 10.73 8.42 10.35 -.09
Rydex
Nsdq100Iv +3.3 +6.9 15.71 11.31 14.95 -.28
Rydex/SGI
MCapValA m +2.3 +4.8 35.77 26.44 33.12 -.97
MgFtrStrH b +1.5 NA 26.76 23.75 26.17 +.16
SEI
DlyShDurA +1.5 +4.7 10.72 10.53 10.69 +.02
SSGA
EmgMkts b +1.3 +8.7 23.98 17.43 22.86 +.08
EmgMktsSel b +1.4 +8.9 24.06 17.50 22.95 +.09
IntlStkSl b +5.4 0.0 11.17 8.10 10.63 +.01
S&P500Idx b +4.1 +2.2 22.42 16.82 21.33 -.60
Schwab
1000Inv d +4.4 +2.6 40.64 30.66 38.82 -.93
CoreEqInv d +5.0 +2.1 18.63 13.72 17.67 -.46
DivEqSel d +5.3 +2.4 14.09 10.70 13.47 -.35
FUSLgCInl d +3.9 NA 10.51 7.80 10.02 -.26
FUSSMCIns d +2.9 NA 11.78 7.99 11.05 -.34
GNMA +3.7 +6.6 10.45 10.04 10.45 +.04
HlthCFoc d +14.0 +5.9 18.52 13.53 18.09 -.22
IntlIndex d +5.7 +1.4 19.10 13.92 18.21 -.05
MktTrAlEq d +4.6 +2.3 13.06 9.58 12.43 -.24
MktTrBal d +3.8 +3.2 16.16 13.43 15.76 -.19
PremInc d +2.8 NA 10.54 10.16 10.42 +.03
S&P500Sel d +4.2 +2.3 21.33 16.07 20.39 -.48
SmCapIdx d +4.6 +4.8 23.44 16.02 22.08 -.76
TaxFreeBd +4.1 +4.8 11.72 10.95 11.41 +.03
TotBdMkt +2.9 +3.6 9.45 9.05 9.35 +.02
TotStkMSl d +4.6 +3.0 24.91 18.46 23.79 -.59
Scout
Interntl d +4.4 +5.5 35.42 25.58 33.82 +.03
Selected
AmerShS b +1.8 +1.2 44.52 34.31 42.20 -1.30
American D +2.0 +1.5 44.53 34.33 42.23 -1.30
Sentinel
CmnStkA m +4.8 +3.7 34.23 25.50 32.82 -.72
GovtSecA m +2.8 +6.7 11.24 10.34 10.67 +.04
ShMatGovA m +1.4 +4.6 9.38 9.17 9.28 +.01
SmallCoA m +9.0 +5.9 8.91 6.12 8.45 -.26
Sequoia
Sequoia +10.0 +4.7147.36 112.47 142.24 -2.08
Sit
USGovSec +2.0 +6.1 11.37 11.12 11.37 +.02
Sound Shore
SoundShor +3.0 +1.5 34.47 25.73 32.76 -.84
Spectra
Spectra A m +6.2 +10.9 13.59 9.47 12.94 -.24
Stadion
MgdPortA m -3.5 NA 11.00 9.41 9.93 ...
State Farm
Balanced +3.0 +4.8 57.34 48.83 55.69 -.78
Growth +2.8 +3.5 57.76 44.03 54.56 -1.40
MuniBond +4.4 +5.2 8.91 8.35 8.69 +.01
Stratton
SmCapVal d +5.7 +2.5 55.63 38.32 52.43 -1.78
T Rowe Price
Balanced +4.4 +4.8 20.55 16.65 20.06 -.22
BlChpGAdv b +3.6 +3.8 41.32 29.78 39.47 -.94
BlChpGr +3.7 +4.0 41.37 29.79 39.55 -.93
CapApprec +4.6 +5.8 21.79 17.72 21.25 -.36
CorpInc +4.7 +6.7 10.11 9.39 9.88 +.02
DivGrow +4.9 +3.4 24.86 18.76 23.94 -.57
DivrSmCap d +8.8 +6.9 18.27 11.50 17.21 -.58
EmEurMed d -1.8 +2.5 24.84 16.84 23.00 +.28
EmMktBd d +4.5 +9.1 13.86 12.48 13.48 +.06
EmMktStk d -.2 +8.9 36.99 27.25 35.22 +.06
EqIndex d +4.1 +2.1 36.77 27.55 35.13 -.83
EqtyInc +3.0 +2.1 25.53 19.42 24.31 -.62
EqtyIncAd b +2.9 +1.9 25.49 19.39 24.26 -.62
EurStock d +11.5 +4.7 17.41 11.42 16.73 +.12
ExtMktIdx d +5.4 +4.9 18.09 12.31 17.11 -.52
FinSer -3.1 -3.6 15.40 11.94 13.73 -.42
GNMA +3.1 +6.4 10.10 9.76 10.08 +.04
GlbTech +9.2 +11.0 10.79 7.10 10.29 -.17
GloStk d +1.4 +1.2 19.20 14.47 18.32 -.25
GrStkAdv b +2.9 +3.9 34.38 24.96 32.81 -.83
GrStkR b +2.8 +3.6 33.98 24.72 32.41 -.82
GrowInc +4.3 +2.9 21.84 16.40 21.00 -.56
GrowStk +3.0 +4.1 34.67 25.15 33.11 -.83
HealthSci +18.1 +10.9 36.63 24.60 35.76 -.48
HiYield d +5.5 +8.4 7.00 6.33 6.94 -.02
HiYldAdv m +5.4 +8.2 6.99 6.32 6.93 -.02
IntlBnd d +6.6 +6.8 10.66 9.07 10.49 +.12
IntlBndAd m +6.6 +6.5 10.65 9.06 10.48 +.12
IntlDisc d +5.4 +5.4 47.45 33.63 46.29 +.54
IntlEqIdx d +5.7 +1.7 13.08 9.40 12.48 +.01
IntlGrInc d +7.0 +1.7 14.86 10.56 14.24 ...
IntlStk d +4.6 +3.8 15.35 11.12 14.88 +.07
IntlStkAd m +4.6 +3.6 15.29 11.10 14.83 +.07
LatinAm d -4.8 +15.6 57.59 42.02 54.01 -.08
MDTaxFBd +3.6 +4.2 10.77 9.89 10.33 +.05
MdCpVlAdv b +4.4 +5.6 25.58 19.51 24.65 -.58
MediaTele +7.8 +12.2 58.18 39.43 55.77 -1.02
MidCapVa +4.5 +5.8 25.71 19.62 24.78 -.58
MidCpGr +6.2 +7.6 65.35 46.81 62.13 -1.65
MidCpGrAd b +6.0 +7.4 64.12 46.05 60.94 -1.62
NewAmGro +4.4 +7.0 35.86 25.64 34.44 -.77
NewAsia d +2.3 +15.6 20.17 15.33 19.62 +.19
NewEra +2.0 +5.5 58.14 37.45 53.20 -1.00
NewHoriz +8.6 +6.7 38.26 25.10 36.36 -1.07
NewIncome +3.0 +7.0 9.81 9.36 9.63 +.02
OrseaStk d +6.7 NA 9.24 6.61 8.90 +.01
PerStrBal +4.4 +5.3 20.30 16.30 19.80 -.21
PerStrGr +4.6 +4.1 24.84 18.93 23.97 -.36
PerStrInc +3.9 +5.8 16.86 14.34 16.61 -.11
R2015 +4.2 +4.8 12.72 10.30 12.39 -.13
R2025 +4.3 +4.3 12.99 10.06 12.56 -.17
R2035 +4.3 +4.0 13.28 9.97 12.76 -.21
Real d +10.8 +2.6 19.88 13.79 19.30 -.29
Ret2020R b +4.0 +4.0 17.43 13.78 16.90 -.21
Ret2050 +4.3 NA 10.58 7.94 10.16 -.17
RetInc +3.7 +5.2 13.71 11.91 13.46 -.09
Retir2005 +4.1 +5.3 12.00 10.28 11.80 -.08
Rtmt2010 +4.1 +5.0 16.31 13.60 15.97 -.14
Rtmt2020 +4.3 +4.6 17.67 13.96 17.14 -.21
Rtmt2030 +4.3 +4.1 18.71 14.24 18.03 -.28
Rtmt2040 +4.2 +4.0 18.92 14.18 18.16 -.31
Rtmt2045 +4.2 +4.0 12.60 9.45 12.10 -.21
SciTecAdv b +6.9 +8.2 29.88 20.31 28.57 -.75
SciTech +7.0 +8.3 30.02 20.37 28.70 -.75
ShTmBond +1.4 +4.7 4.91 4.83 4.87 ...
SmCpStk +6.1 +5.8 38.67 26.31 36.52 -1.18
SmCpVal d +2.3 +3.9 39.53 28.50 36.97 -1.16
SmCpValAd m +2.2 +3.6 39.27 28.31 36.72 -1.15
SpecGrow +4.1 +3.8 19.27 14.14 18.43 -.35
SpecInc +4.1 +7.0 12.70 11.74 12.65 -.02
SpecIntl d +5.8 +4.2 11.78 8.43 11.37 +.05
SumMuInc +3.9 +4.2 11.40 10.39 10.92 +.05
SumMuInt +4.1 +4.8 11.64 10.91 11.37 +.02
TaxFHiYld +3.7 +2.8 11.09 10.04 10.54 +.04
TaxFInc +3.9 +4.2 10.17 9.29 9.76 +.03
TaxFShInt +2.2 +4.2 5.66 5.51 5.61 ...
TotMktIdx d +4.2 +2.7 15.50 11.46 14.77 -.37
TrRt2010Ad b +3.9 +4.7 16.23 13.54 15.88 -.15
TrRt2010R b +3.8 +4.4 16.14 13.46 15.79 -.14
TrRt2020Ad b +4.1 +4.3 17.56 13.88 17.02 -.22
TrRt2030Ad b +4.2 +3.9 18.59 14.15 17.90 -.28
TrRt2030R b +4.1 +3.6 18.49 14.07 17.80 -.28
TrRt2040Ad b +4.2 +3.7 18.79 14.08 18.04 -.30
TrRt2040R b +4.1 +3.5 18.70 14.02 17.95 -.30
TxFIncAdv b +3.6 +3.8 10.18 9.29 9.76 +.03
USBdEnIdx d +3.1 +6.5 11.43 10.95 11.30 +.03
USTrInt +3.8 +7.3 6.26 5.74 6.01 +.03
VATaxFBd +4.6 +4.3 11.91 10.87 11.49 +.04
Value +4.8 +2.5 25.63 19.05 24.46 -.56
ValueAd b +4.7 +2.3 25.36 18.88 24.20 -.55
TCW
DivFocN b +4.9 +1.0 11.63 8.27 11.09 -.29
EmgIncI +6.2 +12.4 8.99 7.89 8.92 ...
RltvVlLCI +4.4 +.5 14.92 10.64 14.12 -.34
SelEqI +5.0 +4.5 18.90 13.43 18.17 -.35
SmCapGrI +4.5 +9.5 33.27 22.23 30.68 -1.05
TotRetBdI +3.4 +9.2 10.44 9.87 9.98 -.04
TotRetBdN b +3.4 +8.9 10.79 10.21 10.33 -.03
TFS
MktNeut d +4.6 +8.5 15.63 13.63 15.40 -.05
TIAA-CREF
EqIxRtl b +4.4 +2.6 10.62 7.85 10.13 -.25
Gr&IncRmt +5.5 +5.4 10.11 7.40 9.66 -.24
Gr&IncRtl b +5.5 +5.5 12.11 8.86 11.58 -.28
IntEqIdxRet d +5.1 +1.0 18.45 13.36 17.63 ...
IntlEqRmt d +2.7 +2.1 11.12 7.45 10.50 +.04
Life2010 b +3.9 +4.2 11.66 9.92 11.45 -.08
Life2015 b +4.1 +4.0 11.75 9.76 11.49 -.10
Life2020 b +4.1 +3.5 11.71 9.50 11.40 -.12
Life2025 b +4.3 +3.1 11.64 9.22 11.28 -.13
Life2030 b +4.3 +2.6 11.55 8.93 11.13 -.16
Life2035 b +4.5 +2.6 11.68 8.82 11.21 -.17
Life2040 b +4.4 +2.8 11.91 8.98 11.42 -.17
LrgeCapVal +3.1 +1.3 14.16 10.43 13.45 -.33
MdgAllRtl b +4.3 +4.0 10.47 8.61 10.23 -.09
MidCapGrwthRe +7.0 +5.6 21.40 14.24 20.23 -.60
MidValRmt +5.9 +4.2 18.75 13.30 17.98 -.48
ScChEqR +3.3 +2.8 11.77 8.89 11.23 -.30
SmCapEqRe d +4.8 +2.5 15.95 10.66 14.97 -.49
SmCpBlIdxRet d +3.5 +3.0 15.30 10.47 14.31 -.49
Target
SmCapVal +5.7 +5.3 22.86 16.32 21.49 -.65
Templeton
InFEqSeS +7.1 +4.3 22.33 16.43 21.47 +.14
Thomas White
ThmsWIntl d +3.7 +3.4 18.61 13.62 17.86 +.05
Thompson Plumb
Bond +3.7 +8.6 11.69 11.26 11.69 +.02
Thornburg
IncBldA m +5.6 +7.4 20.23 16.76 19.67 -.11
IncBldC m +5.3 +6.7 20.23 16.76 19.68 -.10
IntlValA m +5.9 +5.7 30.95 22.42 29.67 ...
IntlValC m +5.6 +5.0 29.10 21.14 27.89 +.01
LtdTMuA m +3.1 +4.4 14.34 13.83 14.22 +.02
LtdTMuC m +3.0 +4.1 14.37 13.85 14.25 +.03
LtdTmIncA m +3.8 +6.3 13.51 13.02 13.41 +.03
Value A m +4.2 +3.2 37.64 27.99 35.27 -.86
Thrivent
HiYieldA m +5.2 +7.9 4.97 4.48 4.93 -.01
IncomeA m +4.2 +6.2 8.88 8.26 8.85 -.01
LgCapStkA m +2.7 +.8 23.91 18.12 22.84 -.50
MidCapA m +4.6 +4.1 16.67 11.32 15.69 -.45
MuniBdA m +4.3 +4.2 11.53 10.57 11.09 +.03
Tocqueville
Gold m -3.4 +17.6 91.56 62.51 83.53 -1.92
Tocquevil m +2.8 +2.5 24.34 18.49 23.19 -.57
Touchstone
MdCpGrA m +5.7 +4.6 25.74 17.45 24.29 -.88
Transamerica
AssAllCvA m +3.7 +4.7 11.79 10.30 11.61 -.07
AssAllCvC m +3.5 +4.0 11.71 10.25 11.53 -.07
AssAllGrA m +4.2 +1.8 13.00 9.68 12.49 -.19
AssAllGrC m +3.9 +1.1 12.71 9.47 12.20 -.19
AstAlMdGrA m +3.9 +3.2 12.77 10.16 12.37 -.13
AstAlMdGrC m +3.7 +2.5 12.72 10.11 12.31 -.13
AstAlModA m +4.0 +4.2 12.40 10.38 12.13 -.10
AstAlModC m +3.8 +3.5 12.35 10.33 12.07 -.09
TransEqA m +3.0 +.7 10.36 7.47 9.83 -.20
Transamerica Partner
CoreBd b +3.2 +6.3 11.17 10.68 11.02 +.02
StockIdx b +4.1 +2.1 9.12 6.84 8.72 -.20
Trust for Credit Un
TCUShDur +.9 +3.9 9.79 9.69 9.77 +.01
TCUUltrShGov +.3 +3.2 9.62 9.59 9.61 ...
Turner
MidGrInv +7.4 +5.3 39.73 25.89 37.83 -1.20
Tweedy Browne
GlobVal d +4.1 +4.1 25.26 20.55 24.79 +.01
Tweedy, Browne
Value +3.0 +3.9 20.15 16.20 19.50 -.21
UBS
GlobAllA m +3.0 +2.5 10.59 8.65 10.28 -.02
UBS PACE
AltStrP d +.8 +.4 9.91 9.03 9.50 -.10
GlFxIP d +6.2 +6.7 12.43 10.54 12.36 +.16
GvtSecP d +3.2 +6.9 13.84 12.94 13.33 +.05
IntlEqP d +6.7 -.2 14.17 10.46 13.63 +.01
LgCoVlP d +3.8 +1.3 18.21 13.68 17.37 -.38
LrCoGrP d +4.0 +3.4 19.68 14.07 18.81 -.39
PcIntFIP d +2.7 +5.4 12.24 11.80 12.12 +.03
SmMdGrP d +7.5 +5.5 18.26 11.79 17.17 -.58
SmMdVlP d +3.7 +3.2 18.95 13.34 17.92 -.68
StrFInP d +4.3 +8.8 15.06 13.94 14.44 +.04
US Global Investors
GlobRes m -2.6 +3.6 13.01 8.20 11.60 -.34
WrldPrcMnr m -12.1 +8.4 22.94 14.75 19.58 -.27
USAA
AggGrow +4.3 +2.1 36.18 25.76 34.42 -.77
BalStrat +5.7 +4.0 14.37 11.77 14.05 -.13
CABond +4.5 +2.8 10.51 9.13 9.78 +.07
CapGrowth +3.4 +.5 7.30 5.42 6.95 -.09
Cornerst +4.8 +4.1 24.31 19.93 23.69 -.18
EmergMkt -1.4 +9.0 22.33 16.68 21.31 +.11
ExtMktIdx +5.1 +4.7 14.01 9.87 13.28 -.40
GNMA +3.0 +6.4 10.33 10.03 10.33 +.04
Grow +3.1 +.9 15.87 11.64 15.16 -.36
GrowInc +3.7 +1.9 16.29 12.03 15.57 -.34
HYOpp +6.5 +8.5 8.80 7.81 8.72 -.02
Income +3.7 +7.0 13.09 12.57 13.01 +.04
IncomeStk +6.6 -.3 13.29 9.76 12.71 -.28
IntermBd +5.6 +7.6 10.66 9.88 10.64 +.01
Intl +7.2 +4.5 26.98 19.18 26.08 +.21
PrcMtlMin -8.0 +17.7 43.83 31.88 39.47 -.84
S&P500M +4.1 +2.1 20.43 15.33 19.52 -.46
ShTmBond +1.6 +5.3 9.27 9.13 9.22 +.01
SmCapStk +3.4 +3.0 15.13 10.45 14.16 -.49
TaxEInt +4.1 +4.4 13.28 12.34 12.89 +.03
TaxELgTm +4.8 +3.5 13.32 11.87 12.65 +.06
TaxEShTm +2.1 +3.8 10.77 10.57 10.71 +.01
TgtRt2030 +4.5 NA 12.17 9.91 11.88 -.08
TgtRt2040 +4.3 NA 11.89 9.17 11.48 -.11
VABond +4.9 +3.6 11.21 10.20 10.86 +.04
Value +5.2 +2.6 14.82 10.89 14.14 -.39
WorldGro +7.1 +5.2 20.62 15.01 20.03 -.11
Unified
Wntergrn m +4.9 +7.2 14.87 11.38 14.70 ...
VALIC Co I
ForgnVal +8.5 +3.8 10.37 7.43 10.03 +.02
GlobStrat +7.1 +7.6 12.31 9.79 12.05 -.01
IGrowth +4.2 +4.5 12.01 8.69 11.46 -.26
IntlEq +4.5 +.3 7.04 5.14 6.72 -.01
IntlGrI +6.6 +4.2 12.34 8.73 11.87 +.04
LgCapGr +3.3 +3.4 12.45 9.17 11.93 -.26
MdCpIdx +6.4 +5.5 23.03 15.91 21.83 -.65
Scie&Tech +6.1 +7.8 17.81 12.11 17.00 -.37
SmCpIdx +3.5 +3.0 15.90 10.85 14.86 -.51
StockIdx +4.1 +2.0 27.02 20.61 25.82 -.61
VALIC Co II
IntSmCpEq +3.9 +.8 14.60 10.37 14.14 +.10
MdCpVal +2.3 +3.1 18.23 13.11 17.27 -.57
SmCpVal +4.4 +2.8 14.93 10.17 13.98 -.45
SocResp +5.0 +2.5 12.10 9.10 11.64 -.27
StratBd +4.9 +6.9 11.48 9.99 11.47 +.02
Van Eck
GloHardA m +1.7 +10.4 57.73 35.75 53.21 -1.05
IntlGoldA m -7.2 +18.0 25.83 17.34 22.91 -.41
Vanguard
500Adml +4.2 +2.3125.74 94.17 120.18 -2.83
500Inv +4.2 +2.2125.72 94.17 120.15 -2.83
AssetA +3.7 +1.2 26.44 20.82 25.35 -.61
AssetAdml +3.7 +1.3 59.37 46.75 56.92 -1.38
BalIdx +4.0 +4.7 22.62 18.76 22.13 -.29
BalIdxAdm +4.1 +4.9 22.62 18.76 22.13 -.30
CAIT +4.2 +4.1 11.33 10.51 10.98 +.03
CAITAdml +4.2 +4.2 11.33 10.51 10.98 +.03
CALT +4.4 +3.4 11.48 10.40 10.98 +.04
CALTAdml +4.4 +3.5 11.48 10.40 10.98 +.04
CapOp d +3.5 +4.9 36.17 26.50 34.42 -.84
CapOpAdml d +3.6 +5.0 83.55 61.22 79.52 -1.94
CapVal +4.0 +3.7 12.21 8.32 11.46 -.34
Convrt d +3.7 +7.4 14.20 11.18 13.81 -.25
DevMktIdx d +4.7 +1.2 11.03 8.04 10.53 -.01
DivAppInv +4.7 +3.8 22.97 17.53 21.94 -.53
DivEqInv +4.8 +2.3 22.43 16.31 21.37 -.53
DivGr +5.6 +5.3 15.67 12.11 15.19 -.33
EmMktIAdm d +1.0 NA 42.03 30.72 40.27 +.20
EmerMktId d +1.0 +10.6 31.97 23.35 30.63 +.16
EnergyAdm d +9.6 +6.7141.63 96.08 132.57 -1.65
EnergyInv d +9.6 +6.6 75.42 51.16 70.59 -.88
EqInc +6.9 +3.2 22.40 16.93 21.65 -.48
EqIncAdml +7.0 +3.4 46.95 35.49 45.40 -1.00
EurIdxAdm d +9.7 +2.2 70.05 49.10 66.95 +.20
EuropeIdx d +9.6 +2.0 30.06 20.92 28.72 +.09
ExMktIdSig +5.6 NA 39.55 26.97 37.44 -1.13
ExplAdml +7.2 +3.9 76.59 51.04 72.75 -2.29
Explr +7.2 +3.7 82.27 54.82 78.13 -2.47
ExtdIdAdm +5.6 +4.9 46.03 31.39 43.58 -1.32
ExtndIdx +5.5 +4.7 45.99 31.37 43.54 -1.32
FAWeUSInv d +3.7 NA 20.32 14.76 19.41 ...
FLLTAdml +4.5 +4.4 11.74 10.74 11.35 +.04
GNMA +3.7 +6.9 11.16 10.57 10.99 +.04
GNMAAdml +3.8 +7.0 11.16 10.57 10.99 +.04
GlbEq +5.0 +1.6 19.58 14.38 18.75 -.17
GrIncAdml +4.1 +.7 47.06 35.26 44.76 -1.04
GroInc +4.1 +.6 28.82 21.60 27.40 -.64
GrowthEq +4.1 +1.7 11.73 8.66 11.23 -.28
GrowthIdx +3.9 +4.4 34.10 24.93 32.77 -.74
GrthIdAdm +4.0 +4.6 34.11 24.93 32.78 -.74
GrthIstSg +4.0 NA 31.58 23.08 30.35 -.69
HYCor d +5.6 +7.1 5.88 5.35 5.84 -.01
HYCorAdml d +5.6 +7.3 5.88 5.35 5.84 -.01
HYT/E +4.0 +4.0 10.76 9.82 10.30 +.04
HltCrAdml d +14.0 +6.2 59.40 46.57 58.44 -.39
HlthCare d +14.0 +6.1140.74 110.34 138.47 -.92
ITBond +4.5 +7.7 11.87 10.98 11.48 +.05
ITBondAdm +4.5 +7.8 11.87 10.98 11.48 +.05
ITGradeAd +4.4 +7.4 10.51 9.79 10.06 +.02
ITIGrade +4.3 +7.3 10.51 9.79 10.06 +.02
ITTsry +3.6 +7.3 12.08 11.11 11.62 +.06
ITrsyAdml +3.6 +7.4 12.08 11.11 11.62 +.06
InfPrtAdm +5.0 +6.5 26.84 25.02 26.66 +.14
InflaPro +5.0 +6.4 13.66 12.74 13.57 +.07
IntlExpIn d +3.3 +3.4 17.92 12.47 17.22 +.04
IntlGr d +4.6 +4.4 21.17 14.92 20.23 +.03
IntlGrAdm d +4.7 +4.6 67.38 47.49 64.40 +.12
IntlStkIdxAdm d +3.6 NA 28.57 25.19 27.30 ...
IntlStkIdxISgn d +3.6 NA 34.29 30.22 32.76 ...
IntlVal d +2.1 +1.6 34.50 25.74 32.84 -.17
ItBdIdxSl +4.5 NA 11.87 10.98 11.48 +.05
LTBond +4.9 +7.9 13.22 11.53 12.37 +.02
LTGradeAd +5.4 +7.8 10.04 8.99 9.61 +.01
LTInvGr +5.4 +7.7 10.04 8.99 9.61 +.01
LTTsry +4.2 +7.2 12.80 10.46 11.36 +.05
LTsryAdml +4.3 +7.4 12.80 10.46 11.36 +.05
LgCpIdxAdm +4.5 +2.8 31.62 23.51 30.26 -.72
LgCpIdxSg +4.5 NA 27.58 20.51 26.39 -.63
LifeCon +3.4 +4.5 17.10 14.93 16.84 -.12
LifeGro +4.0 +3.1 23.83 18.44 22.94 -.35
LifeInc +3.1 +5.1 14.52 13.42 14.42 -.05
LifeMod +3.8 +4.1 20.85 17.11 20.32 -.22
MATxEx +4.4 +4.4 10.56 9.72 10.22 +.02
MdGrIxInv +7.4 NA 27.29 18.26 26.28 -.70
MdPDisInv +5.0 NA 17.34 14.59 16.90 -.11
MdVlIxInv +5.9 NA 23.09 16.99 22.07 -.65
MidCapGr +6.5 +5.7 21.27 14.43 20.23 -.63
MidCp +6.7 +4.3 22.57 15.82 21.66 -.61
MidCpAdml +6.7 +4.5102.47 71.79 98.36 -2.75
MidCpIst +6.7 +4.5 22.64 15.87 21.73 -.61
MidCpSgl +6.7 NA 32.34 22.66 31.04 -.87
Morg +4.2 +3.4 19.74 14.17 18.79 -.46
MorgAdml +4.3 +3.6 61.21 43.95 58.29 -1.42
MuHYAdml +4.1 +4.0 10.76 9.82 10.30 +.04
MuInt +4.0 +4.6 13.99 13.04 13.58 +.03
MuIntAdml +4.0 +4.7 13.99 13.04 13.58 +.03
MuLTAdml +4.1 +4.2 11.37 10.39 10.91 +.03
MuLong +4.1 +4.2 11.37 10.39 10.91 +.03
MuLtd +1.8 +3.8 11.20 10.95 11.09 +.01
MuLtdAdml +1.8 +3.9 11.20 10.95 11.09 +.01
MuSht +.9 +3.0 15.98 15.84 15.91 ...
MuShtAdml +.9 +3.1 15.98 15.84 15.91 ...
NJLTAdml +3.3 +4.1 12.03 11.05 11.47 +.03
NYLT +4.0 +4.2 11.43 10.52 11.06 +.05
NYLTAdml +4.1 +4.2 11.43 10.52 11.06 +.05
OHLTte +3.8 +4.4 12.34 11.27 11.84 +.03
PALT +4.0 +4.1 11.38 10.48 10.99 +.03
PALTAdml +4.0 +4.2 11.38 10.48 10.99 +.03
PacIdxAdm d -3.9 -.4 73.70 57.99 67.82 -.53
PacificId d -4.0 -.5 11.35 8.86 10.44 -.08
PrecMtls d -1.4 +8.4 28.35 18.31 26.32 -.37
Prmcp d +4.5 +5.0 71.63 53.02 68.77 -1.53
PrmcpAdml d +4.6 +5.1 74.34 55.03 71.38 -1.58
PrmcpCorI d +5.0 +5.4 15.02 11.11 14.46 -.31
REITIdx d +10.3 +3.3 20.82 14.75 20.13 -.36
REITIdxAd d +10.3 +3.4 88.84 62.93 85.92 -1.53
STBond +1.8 +5.2 10.77 10.48 10.64 +.01
STBondAdm +1.8 +5.3 10.77 10.48 10.64 +.01
STBondSgl +1.8 NA 10.77 10.48 10.64 +.01
STCor +1.9 +5.0 10.91 10.66 10.80 ...
STFed +1.4 +5.0 11.03 10.69 10.86 +.02
STFedAdml +1.4 +5.1 11.03 10.69 10.86 +.02
STGradeAd +1.9 +5.1 10.91 10.66 10.80 ...
STTsry +1.2 +4.5 10.95 10.62 10.78 +.02
STsryAdml +1.3 +4.6 10.95 10.62 10.78 +.02
SelValu d +5.4 +5.0 20.68 15.39 19.78 -.60
SmCapIdx +4.9 +4.6 38.92 26.38 36.45 -1.23
SmCpIdAdm +5.0 +4.7 38.97 26.40 36.50 -1.23
SmCpIndxSgnl +5.0 NA 35.11 23.80 32.89 -1.10
SmGthIdx +7.2 +6.1 25.10 16.13 23.49 -.84
SmGthIst +7.2 +6.3 25.15 16.16 23.54 -.84
SmValIdx +2.6 +2.9 17.52 12.54 16.42 -.52
Star +4.2 +4.7 20.35 16.71 19.89 -.20
StratgcEq +8.8 +1.2 20.96 14.34 19.93 -.57
TgtRe2005 +3.8 +5.3 12.28 11.00 12.18 -.04
TgtRe2010 +3.9 NA 23.54 20.24 23.19 -.14
TgtRe2015 +3.9 +4.7 13.18 11.03 12.91 -.11
TgtRe2020 +4.0 NA 23.57 19.27 22.98 -.23
TgtRe2030 +4.1 NA 23.37 18.26 22.57 -.31
TgtRe2035 +4.2 +3.6 14.18 10.88 13.64 -.20
TgtRe2040 +4.1 NA 23.31 17.83 22.39 -.35
TgtRe2045 +4.2 +3.6 14.64 11.25 14.07 -.21
TgtRe2050 +4.2 NA 23.21 17.88 22.29 -.34
TgtRetInc +3.7 +5.8 11.72 10.56 11.64 -.03
Tgtet2025 +4.0 +4.1 13.53 10.82 13.13 -.15
TotBdAdml +3.2 +6.5 10.94 10.43 10.78 +.03
TotBdMkInv +3.1 +6.4 10.94 10.43 10.78 +.03
TotBdMkSig +3.2 NA 10.94 10.43 10.78 +.03
TotIntl d +3.6 +2.9 17.08 12.34 16.32 ...
TotStIAdm +4.6 +3.0 34.44 25.37 32.87 -.81
TotStISig +4.5 NA 33.24 24.48 31.72 -.79
TotStIdx +4.5 +2.9 34.43 25.36 32.85 -.82
TxMBalAdm +4.5 +4.5 21.03 18.15 20.73 -.20
TxMIntlAdm d +4.8 +1.4 12.70 9.22 12.13 ...
TxMSCAdm +4.5 +3.7 30.03 20.91 28.38 -.94
USGro +5.2 +2.6 20.00 14.60 19.19 -.37
USGroAdml +5.2 +2.8 51.79 37.83 49.70 -.95
USValue +6.6 +.1 11.27 8.37 10.77 -.26
ValIdxAdm +5.0 +1.1 22.78 17.23 21.71 -.53
ValIdxSig +5.0 NA 23.70 17.93 22.59 -.55
ValueIdx +4.9 +.9 22.78 17.23 21.70 -.53
VdHiDivIx +5.9 NA 18.28 13.87 17.59 -.40
WellsI +5.1 +6.9 22.85 20.27 22.61 -.13
WellsIAdm +5.1 +7.0 55.36 49.10 54.78 -.32
Welltn +4.4 +5.5 33.11 27.37 32.26 -.38
WelltnAdm +4.4 +5.6 57.18 47.28 55.72 -.67
WndsIIAdm +5.4 +1.5 50.09 37.70 48.03 -1.11
Wndsr +3.4 +.5 14.68 10.78 13.97 -.36
WndsrAdml +3.4 +.6 49.54 36.35 47.15 -1.22
WndsrII +5.4 +1.4 28.22 21.24 27.06 -.62
Vantagepoint
AggrOpp +5.9 +4.7 12.34 9.12 12.01 -.13
AllEqGr +5.6 +2.9 21.64 16.04 20.91 -.23
BrMktIx +5.3 +3.0 11.21 8.32 10.81 -.15
ConsGro +3.7 +4.4 24.77 21.73 24.49 -.09
CorBdIxI +2.9 +6.0 10.40 9.95 10.24 -.02
EqInc +7.3 +2.9 9.53 7.19 9.27 -.13
GrInc +5.1 +2.9 10.50 7.87 10.16 -.15
Growth +2.5 +1.0 9.36 7.02 9.00 -.11
InfltnPrt +4.2 +6.5 11.64 10.75 11.25 -.07
Intl +7.0 +1.4 10.32 7.53 9.99 +.02
LgTmGro +4.9 +3.9 23.01 18.31 22.46 -.17
LoDurBd +1.5 +4.4 10.18 9.98 10.10 -.01
Mlst2015 +4.3 +4.2 10.98 9.20 10.79 -.07
TradGro +4.2 +4.1 23.56 19.53 23.11 -.15
Victory
DivrStkA f +.6 +2.1 16.59 12.43 15.69 -.37
SpecValA f +2.7 +2.8 17.70 12.70 16.72 -.53
Virtus
BalA m +3.9 +4.2 14.27 11.30 13.87 -.19
ForOppA m +7.5 +3.6 24.23 18.90 23.98 +.16
MulSStA m +3.7 +6.6 4.91 4.60 4.89 ...
MulSStC b +3.7 +6.3 4.96 4.64 4.94 ...
MulSStT m +3.5 +5.8 4.95 4.63 4.93 ...
RealEstA m +10.9 +3.1 31.86 22.20 30.82 -.54
Waddell & Reed
DivOppsA m +2.7 +1.9 16.11 11.48 15.20 -.38
Waddell & Reed Adv
AccumA m +3.7 +2.8 8.09 5.90 7.77 -.15
AssetStrA m +5.7 +9.4 10.34 7.87 9.86 -.09
BondA m +2.8 +5.1 6.46 6.13 6.32 +.02
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IntlGrowA m +7.0 +4.9 10.62 7.45 10.31 +.04
MuniBondA m +3.5 +4.8 7.45 6.88 7.17 +.03
MuniHiInA m +2.6 +3.6 4.89 4.50 4.61 +.01
NewCncptA m +4.9 +9.0 12.47 8.71 11.78 -.40
SciTechA m +7.1 +8.7 11.67 8.54 11.13 -.18
SmCapA m +7.1 +7.3 17.80 11.65 16.57 -.64
ValueA m +3.2 +2.8 12.96 9.69 12.41 -.29
VanguardA m +3.3 +3.2 8.75 6.47 8.34 -.20
Wasatch
CoreGr d +6.8 +3.2 38.38 26.83 36.74 -1.11
LgCpVal d +3.1 +3.9 15.12 11.33 14.30 -.35
Lng/Sht d +5.1 +6.1 13.76 10.81 13.28 -.21
SmCapGr d +4.7 +5.7 43.05 29.34 41.37 -1.05
Weitz
PartVal +5.5 +2.8 22.43 16.73 21.73 -.34
PrtIIIOpp +7.2 +5.9 12.84 9.34 12.48 -.14
ShtIntmInc +2.0 +5.9 12.56 12.33 12.56 +.02
Value +4.7 -.6 30.87 23.68 29.78 -.50
Wells Fargo
AstAlcA f +3.3 +2.4 20.05 15.98 19.30 -.42
AstAlllcA f +4.3 +4.5 12.76 10.68 12.53 -.02
AstAlllcB m +4.0 +3.7 12.63 10.56 12.39 -.03
AstAlllcC m +4.0 +3.7 12.36 10.34 12.13 -.02
CATxFA f +3.6 +3.5 11.02 10.11 10.53 +.04
CmnStkInv +4.9 +7.3 22.56 16.57 21.68 -.59
CrEqA f +4.9 +5.2 29.35 20.99 28.18 -.71
DiscovInv +7.2 +7.8 27.37 17.75 25.62 -.85
DvrCpBldA f +5.3 +2.4 7.43 5.40 7.17 -.17
EmgMktEqA f +1.0 +13.4 23.83 17.35 23.08 +.10
GovSecInv +2.7 +6.0 11.20 10.72 11.05 +.04
GrowInv +10.2 +9.4 37.58 24.51 35.30 -1.01
MidGrA f +2.0 +5.2 6.66 4.68 6.21 -.19
OmgGrA f +4.1 +8.8 41.19 28.05 38.56 -1.22
OpportInv +4.8 +4.5 42.61 30.42 40.69 -1.20
PrecMetA f -5.9 +14.8 93.72 69.99 82.87 -1.38
PrmLrgCoGrA f +5.1 +7.4 10.15 7.26 9.72 -.21
SCpValInv -.9 +4.8 34.38 26.00 32.27 -.69
STMuBdInv +1.7 +3.9 9.98 9.84 9.94 ...
SmCapValA f -.9 +4.7 33.83 25.59 31.75 -.68
SpMdCpValIv +6.3 +4.0 23.31 16.74 22.36 -.50
SpSmCpValA f +.2 +1.9 23.46 16.91 21.85 -.65
UlSTMInA f +.8 +3.3 4.82 4.80 4.82 ...
UlSTMInIv +.8 +3.2 4.83 4.80 4.82 ...
UltSTInIv +.7 +2.3 8.58 8.48 8.57 ...
WBGrBl m +4.0 +2.2 12.02 9.17 11.61 -.11
WlthConAl m +2.7 +4.4 11.05 9.97 10.95 -.02
WlthModBl m +3.2 +3.5 11.60 9.72 11.37 -.06
WlthTactEq m +4.3 +.9 14.14 10.23 13.57 -.18
Westcore
PlusBd d +3.8 +6.0 11.03 10.61 10.93 +.03
Select d +5.8 +10.0 23.81 15.68 22.30 -.84
Westwood
MtyMteAAA m -.1 +8.2 18.39 14.02 17.33 -.33
William Blair
IntlGrN m +1.6 +2.0 22.99 17.02 22.20 +.08
Yacktman
Focused d +6.7 +11.1 19.40 15.30 18.87 -.33
Yacktman d +7.2 +10.2 18.21 14.49 17.73 -.30
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
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YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
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C M Y K
PAGE 8D SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ B U S I N E S S
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C M Y K
VIEWS S E C T I O N E
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011
timesleader.com
“THE COUNTY man-
ager shall be appoint-
ed by a resolution of
County Council
adopted by an affirma-
tive vote of at least a
majority plus one.”
Those words are
chiseled into the new Luzerne County
home rule charter that voters adopted
in November.
Last month, on May 17, we took the
first step toward the selection of that
county manager when 11 Democrats
and 11 Republicans were nominated for
county council. Of the 22 nominated,
plus an unknown number of independ-
ent candidates yet to step forward, 11
people will be elected on Nov. 8. It
takes seven of them, “a majority plus
one,” to choose the chief executive of
Luzerne County.
It is the most important vote that
council members will cast. The qual-
ifications – or lack thereof – of the
person chosen will help determine the
future direction of this region. When
one considers the important authority
vested in the hands of the new county
manager, the 11 elected to council and
the various combinations of seven
therein, become critical.
The new charter states that the
county manager “shall serve as the
head of the Executive Branch of gov-
ernment and be responsible for the
administration of all County oper-
ations, divisions, departments, bu-
reaus, offices, agencies, boards, com-
missions, and other administrative
units of the County government.”
The candidates you ultimately elect
will hire the county executive on your
behalf. It is of singular importance.
Elect the wrong 11 to council, and you
might get a local politico incapable of
doing the job. The downward spiral
will be unabated.
A cursory review of the 22 who have
been nominated suggests several con-
ceivable combinations of seven that
could result in someone being plucked
right out of the courthouse, or from the
ranks of local political parties, and
plopped in the county manager’s chair.
It would be terribly naïve to believe
that such conversations have not and
are not taking place. After all, the
home rule charter clearly states “the
county manager shall appoint, pro-
mote, discipline, suspend, and remove,
all county employees” (according to
law and agreements, of course).
The manager’s authority to hire and
fire, and the political desire to see that
an “acceptable” manager is named, was
reason enough for some council hope-
fuls to run.
The drafters of the home rule charter
spelled out quite clearly that the coun-
ty manager “shall be appointed on the
basis of executive abilities and adminis-
trative qualifications as evidenced by
professional preparation, training, and
experience in public administration,
finance, and/or other fields that dem-
onstrate substantial ability to perform
the functions of County Manager. He/
she shall possess at least a bachelor’s
degree from an accredited college or
university and have at least five years
of relevant work experience.”
Despite the well-meaning intent of
the authors, a majority of seven, deter-
mined to keep things as they are, will
turn those words inside out and put
one of their own in charge.
In addition, the new county manager
is responsible for the creation of a
long-range operational, fiscal and cap-
ital plan, a “state of the county” report
and an “accountability, conduct and
ethics code.”
The manager must represent the
county in all intergovernmental meet-
ings, in matters of economic devel-
opment and will negotiate, award and
sign all agreements to which the coun-
ty is a party. It is a large responsibility.
Voters must elect candidates eager to
forego parochial interests and search
nationwide for the most experienced,
talented and independent executive of
integrity they can find.
Ask the candidates if they are so
inclined. Or, in 2012, are they open to
appointing a local politico to run Lu-
zerne County?
KEVIN BLAUM
I N T H E A R E N A
Conduct search
far and wide
for manager
Kevin Blaum’s column on government, life
and politics appears every Sunday. Contact
him at kblaum@timesleader.com.
IT WAS A cold, blow-
ing, fall day. The boys
were gathered around
the old stove at Hub-
bard Grain and Feed
in the small, central
Texas town of Hub-
bard, and they had
each added a slight nip to the morning
coffee.
The chill left the room and their
ranch-worn, creaking bones. As their
temperatures rose, so did their tem-
pers.
A few favored re-election of the pop-
ular but controversial Texas Commis-
sioner of Agriculture, Democrat Jim
Hightower. There were folks back
then, in 1990, who said ol’ Hightower
might someday be president.
Most liked the up-and-comer, Repub-
lican State Rep. Rick Perry.
They challenged the grain store
owner to phone a Texas newspaper
publisher he knew. I answered the
phone in my office at the Fort Worth
Star-Telegram that early morning and
got an earful of intense lobbying.
The majority of the ranchers around
the stove liked Perry and said he could
beat Hightower, who they disliked.
“Endorse him!” they shouted.
They wanted to hear nothing of the
newspaper’s editorial board and the
formal process we followed in making
election endorsements.
“Be a man!” they demanded. “Listen
to the ranchers and endorse him.”
I acquiesced, not at all certain I
could deliver. But endorsing Perry
turned out to be easy. He was a char-
ming and convincing candidate. Be-
sides, I figured that if anyone knew
who ought to be Commissioner of
Agriculture it would be some ranchers
talking politics at the local grain and
feed store.
Perry beat Hightower in a close race.
That’s when I began to realize that
you can never take Perry for granted.
I learned that after being editor and
publisher of The Times Leader — for
the first time — and moving to Texas.
After spending a number of years run-
ning the Star-Telegram for a national
media chain and later my own newspa-
per company, I saw firsthand that it’s
unwise to count out Gov. Perry on any
front.
But Perry for president?
Perry has been coy about his in-
tentions, but there have been rum-
blings of late that he might join the
growing list of candidates who will
compete for the Republican presi-
dential nomination and the opportuni-
ty to challenge President Obama in the
2012 election. Perry has beaten crowd-
ed fields before, most notably when he
won re-election as governor in 2006
despite being challenged by what
seemed like every notable resident of
Texas except Dallas Cowboys owner
Jerry Jones.
My favorite candidate in that elec-
tion, by the way, was singer/songwrit-
er/novelist Kinky Friedman, whose
catchiest campaign slogan was his
answer to the question of why he was
qualified for governor: “How hard can
it be?”
Being governor of Texas may not be
that difficult but, as Kinky discovered,
beating Rick Perry is close to impos-
sible.
Perry prevailed in that 2006 contest
with just 39 percent of the vote. But a
win is a win.
Rick Perry is a man of infinite sur-
prises.
He was once a good Democrat. Serv-
ing in the grand tradition of rural Dem-
ocrats in Texas, he was elected three
times to two-year terms in the Texas
House of Representatives.
Some who know him say that Rick
was inspired to pursue a career in
politics when he attended — at age 10
or 11 — the 1961 funeral of legendary
Texas lawmaker Sam Rayburn, who
had served as Speaker of the House
both in the state Legislature and in the
United States Congress. With the likes
of Rayburn and Lyndon B. Johnson as
political role models, it made perfect
sense that a young Texan in those
years would sign on with the Demo-
crats.
RICHARD L.
CONNOR
O P I N I O N
Rick Perry:
A candidate of
many surprises
See CONNOR, Page 8E
WASHINGTON — On June 5, 1981,
the U.S. Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention issued a warning shot
to the world when they reported the
first known cases of what would soon
be called AIDS.
In its Morbidity and Mortality Week-
ly Report, the CDC reported that five
gay men had been hospitalized in Los
Angeles with a rare strain of pneumo-
nia that mainly afflicted people with
compromised immune systems. Two
of the men already had died.
The occurrence “in these 5 previous-
ly healthy individuals without a clini-
cally apparent underlying immunodef-
iciency is unusual,” the now-historic re-
port reads. “The fact that these pa-
tients were all homosexuals suggests
an association” between the pneumo-
nia they developedand“some aspect of
a homosexual lifestyle or disease ac-
quired through sexual contact.”
It wasn’t until July 1982 that one of
the worst global killers of all time
wouldtakeits formal nameas Acquired
Immune Deficiency Syndrome. But it
took longer for the public to under-
stand that gay men weren’t the only
ones at risk.
In the years that followed, AIDS
would engulf the world in fear as it
spread among intravenous drug users,
hemophiliacs, pregnant women and in-
fants. Along the way, “safe sex” went
from a catch phrase to a lifestyle for
many.
“Once it became clear that it was in
the blood supply and was caused by a
virus, people went from total denial
and complacency to much more of a
panic mode,” recalled James Curran,
who headed the CDC’s first task force
on the mysterious disease back in1981.
“When those first five cases were re-
ported, there were already 250,000 gay
men in the U.S who were infected with
the virus.”
Onthe30thanniversaryof theCDC’s
groundbreaking report, the worldwide
numbers for AIDS simply astound:
more than 30 million dead, and anoth-
er 33.3 million people who either live
with the disease or HIV, the virus that
causes it. Two-thirds of the world’s
AIDS and HIV patients live in sub-Sah-
aran Africa.
In the U.S., where more than a mil-
lion people have HIV or AIDS, the dis-
ease has killed more than 617,000 peo-
ple.
The epidemic-turned-pandemic has
AIDS at 30: Killer has been tamed, but not conquered
By TONY PUGH
McClatchy Newspapers
See AIDS, Page 6E
W
ASHINGTON—As a liberal tax-code activist, Robert McIntyre shockedWash-
ingtonin1984whenhe revealedthat General Electric was one of 17companies
that paid no U.S. corporate taxes for three straight years. • The finding by
McIntyre’s organization, Citizens for Tax Justice, sparked national outrage that helped
pave the way for the Tax Reform Act of 1986. That landmark legislation eliminated tax
loopholes to broaden the tax base while also lowering the corporate tax rate. • It also
increased corporate tax revenue flowing into the Treasury by 34 percent.
As the Obama administration
readies a proposal to overhaul the
nation’s corporate tax structure
once again, some of the same tax-
code giveaways that prompted the
1986 overhaul have reappeared.
GE’s low U.S. corporate tax burden
is still ruffling populist feathers,
lobbyists and legislators have pad-
ded the tax code with hundreds of
new loopholes and McIntyre is
again agitating for change.
This time around, he’s joined by
dozens of national and state organi-
zations that want corporations to
pay down a larger share of this
year’s $1.5 trillion federal deficit.
They’re urging Congress and the
Obama administration to make it
happen.
To simplify the tax system, Presi-
dent BarackObama wants toclosea
host of corporate taxbreaks anduse
the extra revenue that would gener-
ate to offset a reduction in the cor-
porate tax rate. America’s top cor-
porate tax rate of 35 percent is one
of thehighest intheworld, but most
companies pay a much lower effec-
tive tax rate because the system is
riddled with tax breaks.
“Get rid of the loopholes. Level
the playing field. And use the sav-
ings to lower the corporate tax rate
for the first time in25 years —with-
out adding to our deficit. It can be
done,” Obama said to applause dur-
ing his State of the Union address.
But Obama’s approach wouldn’t
take the revenue gained by ending
loopholes to pay down the deficit,
as theliberals propose; he’duseit all
as a tradeoff for the lower corporate
tax rate.
Obama’s stand is rooted in politi-
cal reality: Any plan to end corpo-
rate tax breaks and steer the reve-
nues to the Treasury would be con-
sidered a tax increase by business
and Republicans — and would be
dead on arrival in the GOP-led
House of Representatives. So in-
stead, Obama backs a budget-neu-
tral plan that would make the tax
Outraged over taxes
MCT PHOTO
In 1984, Robert McIntyre shocked Washington by revealing that 17 companies paid no corporate taxes leading to
the Tax Reform Act of 1986. As head of Citizens for Tax Justice, McIntyre is lobbying for another reform to tax-
es to have large corporations help pay more of the deficit.
By TONY PUGH McClatchy Newspapers
A look at corporate taxes
The share of federal income taxes paid varies widely by type of business,
according to a study of more than 5,900 publicly-traded companies.
Average effective tax rates for selected industries:
Top five corporate tax breaks
Industry sector (number of firms studied)
Retail automotive (15)
Electric utility, East (25)
Trucking (33)
Cable TV (24)
Aerospace/defense (63)
Medical services (139)
Hotel/gaming (52)
Banks (418)
Petroleum producing (163)
Internet (180)
32.05%
30.56%
25.48%
22.98%
21.1%
20.56%
15.93%
11.89%
8.47%
7.89%
Drug (301)
Biotechnology (120)
6.72%
5.74%
$70.6
© 2011 MCT
Tax incentives for businesses, from 2010-2014, in billions
Deferral of taxes on offshore corporate profits
$45.3 Exclusion of interest on public state, local government debt
$43.2 Deduction for domestic manufacturing
$38.0 Deferral of taxes on income from selling U.S. inventory abroad
$37.1 Accelerated depreciation on equipment
Source: Professor Aswath Damodran, New York University; Joint Committee on Taxation;
Citizens for Tax Justice Graphic: Judy Treible
See TAXES, Page 7E
K
PAGE 2E SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S E RV I NG T HE P UB L I C T RUS T S I NC E 1 8 81
Editorial
“What can I say about these kids?
I love ’em so much.”
Mark LeValley
The Lake-Lehman varsity baseball coach led his
team to a District 2 Class 2A championship
Thursday. Some of the players had been with the
coach for as many as nine years at several different levels of play.
ONE OF the painfully re-
vealing episodes in Barack
Obama’s book “Dreams
From My Father” describes
his early experience listen-
ing to a sermon by the Rev.
Jeremiah Wright. Among
the things said in that sermon was that
“white folks’ greed runs a world in need.”
Obama was literally moved to tears by that
sermon.
This sermon might have been like a reve-
lation to Obama, but its explanation of
economic and other differences was among
the oldest – and most factually discredited –
explanations of such difference among all
sorts of peoples in all sorts of places. Yet it
is an explanation that has long been politi-
cally seductive in countries around the
world.
What could be more emotionally satis-
fying than seeing others who have done
better in the world as the villains responsib-
le for your not having done as well? It is the
ideal political explanation, from the stand-
point of mass appeal, whether or not it
makes any sense.
At various times and places, it has been
the preferred explanation for the economic
differences between the Sinhalese and the
Tamil minority in Sri Lanka, the Africans
and the Lebanese in Sierra Leone, the
Czechs and the Germans in Bohemia and
numerous other groups.
The idea that the rich have gotten rich by
making the poor poor has been an ideolog-
ical theme that has played well in Third
World countries, to explain why they lag so
far behind the West.
None of this was original with Jeremiah
Wright. All he added was his own colorful
gutter style of expressing it, which so cap-
tivated the man who is now president.
There is obviously something there with
very deep emotional appeal. Moreover,
there will never be a lack of evil deeds to
make that explanation seem plausible.
Because the Western culture has been
ascendant in the world in recent centuries,
the image of rich white people and poor
non-white people has made a deep impres-
sion, whether in theories of racial superior-
ity – which were big among “progressives”
in the early 20th century – or in theories of
exploitation among “progressives” later on.
In a wider view of history, however, it
becomes clear that, for centuries before the
European ascendancy, Europe lagged far
behind China in many achievements. Since
neither of them changed much genetically
between those times and the later rise of
Europe, it is hard to reconcile this role re-
versal with racial theories.
More important, the Chinese were not to
blame for Europe’s problems – which would
not be solved until the Europeans them-
selves finally got their own act together,
instead of blaming others.
It is hard to reconcile “exploitation” theo-
ries with the facts. While there have been
conquered peoples made poorer by their
conquerors, especially by Spanish conquer-
ors in the Western Hemisphere, in general
most poor countries were poor for reasons
that existed before the conquerors arrived.
Some Third World countries are poorer
today than they were when they were ruled
by Western countries, generations ago.
When millions of people believe those
theories, including people in high places,
with the fate of nations in their hands, that
is a serious and potentially disastrous fact
of life.
Despite a carefully choreographed image
of affability and cool, Obama’s decisions and
appointments as president betray an alien-
ation from the values and the people of this
country that are too disturbing to be an-
swered by showing his birth certificate.
Too many of his appointees exhibit a
similar alienation, including Attorney Gen-
eral Eric Holder, under whom the Depart-
ment of Justice could more accurately be
described as the Department of Payback.
Exploitation theories long on seduction, short on facts
Thomas Sowell is a senior fellow at the Hoover
Institution, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
94305. His website is www.tsowell.com.
COMMENTARY
T H O M A S S O W E L L
AMERICANS DON’T seem
bothered enough by the
country’s growing wealth
divide to do much about it,
according to a recent Har-
vard Business School sur-
vey. In part, that’s probably
because they vastly underestimate the gap,
believing the top 20 percent own 59 percent
of the nation’s wealth when they actually
own 84 percent.
But there’s another, less obvious reason
for our passivity – the hope and glory
pushed by an all-pervasive news, gossip and
star-driven celebrity culture.
The core of the American dream teaches
us that the formula for achieving wealth
involves hard work, determination and luck.
Celebrities, and the coverage of them, seem
to provide visible proof of this message
every day: If it can happen to Justin Bieber,
it can happen to me. So why change the
system?
The connection between stardom and
social mobility is as old as the first fan maga-
zines of a century ago. Silent-film star Ruth
Clifford was an orphan who peered through
a knothole at the Edison Studios lot in New
Jersey before getting her big break, accord-
ing to a 1919 issue of Photoplay.
The narrative persists like “once upon a
time.” Stories about contemporary celebri-
ties – in fan magazines such as “Us Weekly”
and on star-driven websites such as E Online
– typically highlight how much stars were
like us before making it big. We see their
embarrassing high school pictures and read
about their small hometowns, relationships,
babies, body fat, marriages and divorces.
Oprah Winfrey is at least as famous for
her rise from rural Mississippi to billionaire
media mogul as she is for her “Live your
best life” message. Teen sensation Bieber
personifies overnight success – from You-
Tube video to a recording deal and platinum
album. The very title of his remix album and
biopic, “Never Say Never,” echoes the Amer-
ican dream of limitless opportunities for
anyone who refuses to give up.
The rise of the Internet and reality TV,
which has made fame and fortune seem ever
more accessible, has further strengthened
the illusion that our class system is wide
open. That Nicole “Snooki” Polizzi of “Jersey
Shore” fame can command $32,000 for a
Rutgers University appearance – $2,000
more than Nobel- and Pulitzer Prize-winning
Toni Morrison received to deliver the uni-
versity’s commencement speech – is not just
a commentary on the value we place on
celebrity. It also reaffirms the possibility of
social mobility for those with few skills.
Celebrity culture sustains faith in our
economic system in another way. It tells us
whom to blame for failure – the individual.
During the Depression, silent-film director
D.W. Griffith’s career slide was portrayed in
a 1934 issue of Photoplay as the result of his
own poor business decisions. Never mind
the seismic shift that the rise of talkies
brought to the industry.
Celebrity culture’s focus on individual
determination and, to some degree, blind
luck as ingredients for success distracts us
from the roles power and privilege actually
play in upward mobility, even in Hollywood.
It makes it easy to forget that a percentage
of today’s A-list stars – Gwyneth Paltrow and
Kiefer Sutherland, for example – had A-list
parents whose connections likely opened
doors that for most remain closed.
Hollywood is perceived as a bastion of
liberalism with a wide variety of progressive
causes. The great irony is that the celebrity
on which it turns is among the most conser-
vative social forces at play in shaping public
attitudes about class and social mobility.
There’s nothing wrong with the dream,
except that it so rarely results in such spec-
tacular reality.
With celebrity success, we hold fast to American ‘dream’
Karen Sternheimer, a professor of sociology at
the University of Southern California, is the author,
most recently, of “Celebrity Culture and the Amer-
ican Dream: Stardom and Social Mobility.” She
wrote this for the Los Angeles Times.
COMMENTARY
K A R E N S T E R N H E I M E R
H
IGH SCHOOLS
throughout the area
are holding gradua-
tion ceremonies
marked by the traditional
pomp, ceremony and unfortu-
nately in too many cases, mis-
behavior.
The matriculation of stu-
dents was once a dignified and
respect-filled event. In recent
years, however, some people
have become comfortable
hooting, catcalling, texting,
cell phoning and conversing
throughout the observance.
And we’re not talking about
the graduating seniors but,
rather, a few bad apples in the
audience. Friends, supporters
and family members often are
the people who are out of or-
der.
The students deserve better.
They’ve done the hard work to
complete studies and wear the
cap and gown for graduation.
They have earned our admira-
tionandtheexpectationof are-
spectful ceremony.
Manyof theseyoungwomen
and men will move on to col-
lege. They eventually will cele-
brate other graduations. But
some of these young adults
plan to immediately enter the
work force or the military, and
this will be the only school
graduation ceremony they will
know.
Inanycase, whether this will
be the first of many gradua-
tions or the only one you at-
tend, mind your manners. Si-
lence your phones and your
conversations, and refrain
from outbursts of disruptive,
untimelyapplause. Dowithout
the air horns, too.
If the graduates want to tape
a message to the top of their
mortar boards or conjure up
the celebratory beach ball, let
them have their fun. Everyone
else needs to be content with
watching from the audience
rather than becoming a part of
the event.
Show some respect. Be a
good example. These young
people have earned that from
us.
OUR OPINION: ETIQUETTE
Show respect
at graduations
RICHARD L. CONNOR
Editor and Publisher
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President/Executive Editor
MARK E. JONES
Editorial Page Editor
PRASHANT SHITUT
President/
Wilkes-Barre Publishing Co.
Editorial Board
QUOTE OF THE DAY
RICHARD L. CONNOR
Editor and Publisher
PRASHANT SHITUT
President
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President/Executive Editor
RICHARD DEHAVEN
Vice President/Circulation
ALLISON UHRIN
Vice President/
Chief Financial Officer
P
RETEND veterans
make real veterans
mad – and most
Americans under-
stand their anger. When re-
spect must be earned, only au-
thentic service to the nation
will do. Courage, honor and
fortitude shouldn’t be put on
like a military surplus uni-
form.
But imitation being the sin-
cerest formof flattery, Richard
G. Strandlof, a drifter from
Colorado, was a pre-
tend veteran. Far
frombeinga hero, he
had never served in
the military.
Yet posing as Rick
Duncan, a wounded
Marine returned
fromIraq, he made a
name for himself
among veterans
groups, advocating
for their causes. Ac-
cording to a recent
NewYork Times story, he was
able to work his way into the
company of prominent politic-
ians and veterans.
The lie didn’t last. The FBI
arrested him and charged him
with violating the Stolen Valor
Act, a 2006 law that expanded
previous prohibitions against
wearing unearned military
decorations. The act of claim-
ing to have won medals be-
came a federal crime. Now
speech itself was an offense.
That, of course, is a problem
– and it comes with an irony,
because one of the constitu-
tional virtues that veterans are
said to fight for is freedom of
speech. But is lying coveredby
the First Amendment? It
seems a stretch, but if all lies
are going to be a crime, the
prisons are going to be even
more crowded.
Some lies are already illegal
– you can’t claimto be a police
officer, for example, and you
can’t lie to defraud others. But
those crimes usually cause
practical harm, unlike those al-
leged to have been committed
by the “Rick Duncans” of the
world who just pathetically
seek to make themselves look
good.
In two other prominent
cases, one from California and
another in Vir-
ginia, federal
judges split on
theconstitution-
ality of the Sto-
len Valor Act.
The charge in
Strandlof’s case
also was found
unconstitution-
al, but the prose-
cutors appealed
and oral argu-
ments were held
recently in Denver. Perhaps
the appeals court’s decision
will be a better guide towheth-
er the current lawcan survive.
Unheroic fakes have
cropped up around the coun-
try (including allegations in
Western Pennsylvania, as the
Post-Gazette has reported). As
the Stolen Valor Act shouldn’t
remotely resemble a Stolen
Constitution Act, perhaps it
can be revised along the lines
being proposed by a Nevada
congressmen who would
make false military claims a
fraud if they benefited the pre-
tender.
The tin soldiers of deceit
shouldn’t be allowed to march
on, but a better strategy to
stop them ought to be consid-
ered.
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
OTHER OPINION: MILITARY FAKES
Stolen Valor Act
requires revision
When respect must
be earned, only
authentic service to
the nation will do.
Courage, honor and
fortitude shouldn’t
be put on like a
military surplus
uniform.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 PAGE 3E
➛ F O R U M
AS THE sun
rises in the
east, the debt
ceiling will be
raised. Get-
ting there,
however, will
be harrowing.
Which is a good thing.
Treasury Secretary Tim
Geithner warns that failure to
raise the limit would be disas-
trous. In that he is correct. But
he is disingenuous when he
suggests that we must do so by
Aug. 2 or the sky falls.
There is no drop-dead date.
There is no overnight default.
Debt service amounts to about
6 percent of the federal budget
and only about 10 percent of
federal revenues. This means
that for every $1 of interest
payments, there are roughly $9
of revenue the government
spends elsewhere.
Move money around – and
you’ve covered the debt ser-
vice. Cover the debt service –
and there is no default. What
scares Geithner is not that we
won’t be able to pay our cred-
itors but that his Treasury
won’t be able to continue
spending the obscene amounts
of money (about $120 billion a
month) it doesn’t have and will
(temporarily) be unable to
borrow.
Good. The government will
(temporarily) be forced to
establish priorities. A salutary
exercise.
Equally salutary is the air of
crisis that will be generated by
the fear of default. We shall
have a preview of what hap-
pens when we hit the real debt
ceiling several years from now,
i.e., face real default. That’s our
current fiscal trajectory. Under
President Obama’s budgets,
debt service, now $214 billion a
year, climbs to $931 billion in a
decade.
The current debt-ceiling
showdown, therefore, is an
instructive dry run of an actual
Greek-like default, which
awaits if we don’t solve our
debt problem.
With one difference, of
course. During today’s debt-
ceiling fight, if the markets
start to get jittery, interest rates
on U.S. debt spike and the
economy begins to teeter, the
whole thing can be called off
with a push of a button – an act
of Congress hiking the debt
ceiling. When the real crisis
comes, however, there is no
button. There is no flight-sim-
ulator reset. We default and the
economy really does crash.
Which is why the current
debt-ceiling showdown is to be
welcomed. It creates leverage
to force fiscal sanity.
But it can be a dangerous
game. Republican demands
must therefore be well-crafted.
Fortunately, they are. Senate
Minority Leader Mitch McCon-
nell is pushing for budget cuts
in the next two years. The
effect would be real and mul-
tiplicative – when you cut the
baseline budget, the savings
get repeated year after year.
Spending caps are more
problematic. They have a bale-
ful history. Experience shows
that Congress can padlock the
refrigerator door but as long as
Congress can still access the
key, the gorging never stops.
I would suggest, therefore,
enacting spending caps that
could be overturned in future
years only by supermajority –
say, two-thirds of both houses.
Now, of course, a future Con-
gress could undo this whole
scheme by repealing the caps
through legislation that would
require only a simple majority
in both houses. But as long as
Republicans maintain the
House, they could block this
maneuver. The caps would be
essentially unrepealable.
In this spending-cut tug of
war, it is of paramount impor-
tance to frame your demands
in a way that the public sees as
reasonable. The side that can
command public opinion will
prevail – the other side will
ultimately cave for fear of being
blamed for whatever disloca-
tion occurs. Republicans
should not be asking for, say,
repeal of “Obamacare” as the
quid pro quo for raising the
debt limit. These are bridges
much too far for these negotia-
tions.
Which is why House Speaker
John Boehner’s offer of a dollar-
for-dollar deal – raise the debt
ceiling to match corresponding
spending cuts – is a thing of
beauty. It is eminently logical
and easy to understand. In a
country with a huge 47 percent
to 19 percent plurality opposed
to raising the debt ceiling, the
Boehner offer is difficult for the
president to refuse.
After all, it invites Obama to
choose how much to cut. For
example, $500 billion buys him
a $500 billion debt-limit hike –
and only a short-term exten-
sion.
Not wanting to go through
this process again, Obama
would like a $2 trillion debt-
limit hike to get him past Elec-
tion Day 2012. For that, he’ll
have to come up with $2 tril-
lion in spending cuts.
It might be blackmail. But it
is progress.
Current debt face-off
rehearsal for true crisis
COMMENTARY
C H A R L E S
K R A U T H A M M E R
Charles Krauthammer’s email
address is letters@charleskrauth-
ammer.com.
W
ith so many masks upon your shelf from which to choose, it can take half
a day to decide the one to wear. Our advice: Put on a happy face.
ANOTHER VIEW
A photograph by Pete G. Wilcox
and words by Mark E. Jones
IT’S THE first
question asked
when a baby is
about to arrive:
“Boy or
girl?”
And in the
case of a To-
ronto couple, the answer has
been, essentially, “Whatever.”
Kathy Witterick and David
Stocker have decided that their
third child, named Storm and
born on New Year’s Day, will
decide its gender when it is
ready. In the meantime, they are
keeping it secret, and making
their two other children, both
boys (at least as far as they’re
telling us), keep the secret as
well.
“If you really want to get to
know someone, you don’t ask
what’s between their legs,”
Stocker told the Toronto Star.
Added the mother in an email
to that paper: “Please can you
just let Storm discover for him/
herself what s(he) wants to
be?!”
Never mind that the question
can be answered with one peek
down the diaper. What I don’t
get is the motivation. The par-
ents, in their late 30s, seem to
feel a terrible injustice is done
by identifying something that
goes back to Adam and Eve,
namely, well, whether you’re an
Adam or an Eve.
“What we noticed is that
parents make so many choices
for their children,” Stocker told
the Star. “It’s obnoxious.”
Hmm.
Calling a boy a boy is not
making a choice for your child.
But calling a boy genderless is.
I wonder what other choices
these folks will leave to the
baby. For example, why not let
it decide to change its own
diaper? Why impose your view?
Maybe the kid likes sitting in
poo-poo – who are we to judge?
Why decide when to do a
feeding? Put the bottle on the
counter and let the kid go after
it. Schooling? The child can
decide. Go. Don’t go. Whatever.
What’s important, after all, is
that parents aren’t “obnoxious”
about it.
What you have here is a clas-
sic case of people saying one
thing and causing the opposite.
By trying to ignore gender, they
have made gender the most
important thing. There are now
online polls as to whether
Storm is a boy or a girl (most
say boy), and TV shows and talk
shows nationwide have been
buzzing with it.
Meanwhile, Storm’s two older
brothers – Jazz, 5, and Kio, 2 –
are being raised without formal
schooling and taught to choose
whatever behavior they like.
Jazz, according to the Star,
dresses in pink, paints his nails
and wears a stud in his ear.
This, we are to believe, is his
“choice.” Of course, Mom or
Dad made the choice to buy the
nail polish, the clothes and the
stud.
What happens if the child
points to a chain saw? They get
him that, too?
This is all part of a new self-
loathing that defines anything
traditional as bad, and any deci-
sion you might make as “judg-
mental” – even to a crying in-
fant.
I try to imagine telling my
parents, when I was in the crib,
that they were too judgmental.
My father would still be laugh-
ing.
The Toronto couple believe
they are giving their child a
“choice” – even though that
choice was made by nature and
was evident in the first pee-pee.
Meanwhile, it seems pretty
unfair to tell a 5- and a 2-year-
old to keep a secret. Isn’t that
imposing something on them?
Personally, I am all in favor of
a little imposition. It’s time to
eat. Time to sleep. Time to stop
crying. Time to go to school.
Don’t treat others that way.
Don’t say rude things.
It’s called parenting. If the
child, later in life, prefers foot-
ball to lipstick, or boxer shorts
to dresses, or one day asks a
doctor to mangle its private
parts in an effort to be some-
thing else, it still will be unable
to deny that it was born one
way.
It’s not a judgment. It’s a fact.
So is this. When your child
asks, “Am I a boy or a girl?” and
you answer, “Whatever you
want,” you’re not being wise,
hip, progressive or nonjudg-
mental, you’re just being a fool.
Good news! It’s a brand-new baby ... whatever
COMMENTARY
M I T C H A L B O M
Mitch Albom is a columnist for the
Detroit Free Press. Readers may
write to him at: Detroit Free Press,
600 W. Fort St., Detroit, MI 48226, or
via email at malbom@freepress.com.
What you have here is a classic
case of people saying one thing
and causing the opposite. By
trying to ignore gender, they
have made gender the most
important thing. There are now
online polls as to whether
Storm is a boy or a girl (most
say boy), and TV shows and talk
shows nationwide have been
buzzing with it.
Candidate hopes
to keep support
I
thank the residents of Prin-
gle for voting for me in the
primary election.
You had confidence that I
would be a voice for you. I will
not let you down.
I am president of our Crime
Watch, which I started more
than a year ago. There is a
rumor that I reported the
election workers inside the
borough building to the cour-
thouse; this is not true in any
way. They are workers, not
volunteers, and they are paid
for that day. The workers
should have been concentrat-
ing on their work, not watch-
ing what was going on out-
side.
Please consider voting for
me in November’s election. Do
not listen to any rumors. As
you know, there are people
who would say derogatory
remarks about a person they
do not like.
I am running for the people
of Pringle. If you have any
questions, feel free to contact
me.
Constance C. Kostelac
Pringle
Haas out to make
politics decent
I
am writing a heartfelt
thank-you to the Republican
voters of Luzerne County
who put their trust in me
during the primary election
for Luzerne County Council.
To Democratic and Inde-
pendent voters: I plan to earn
your confidence over the next
several months as I share my
vision for a government that
serves all the people regard-
less of party affiliation.
To marginalized voters who
feel that they don’t have a
voice: I plan to travel the
county – from Sweet Valley to
Conyngham Valley, from New
Columbus to Old Forge, and
from the smallest townships
to our larger boroughs and
cities – in order to meet with
you and hear about your area’s
needs. Luzerne County is the
best place to live; my vision is
to work alongside like-minded
candidates to help make our
politics as decent as the peo-
ple who live here.
Please access my platform
or contact the campaign at
www.harryhaas.com with any
questions or comments.
Harry Haas
Wilkes-Barre
Thanks to backers
of Salvation Army
W
e express our deep and
sincere gratitude to
Ginny and Bob Tambur
and Val and Gus Genetti,
honorees at the Salvation
Army’s 2011 Community
Award Dinner in recognition
of their ongoing and tireless
efforts to better our communi-
ty.
We also extend our thanks
and appreciation to the nearly
500 friends who attended the
dinner in their honor; the
Honorable Patrick J. Solano,
who served as dinner chair,
and his wonderful dinner
committee; our major spon-
sors (Geisinger, Frank and
Dottie Henry, Chuck and
Mary Parente, Luzerne Bank,
The Times Leader and FOX
56 WOLF-TV); multiple other
sponsors and in-kind contrib-
utors; and the staff and man-
agement of the Genetti Hotel
& Conference Center.
We are proud to announce
that this year’s dinner raised
much more than our goal of
$100,000 to support the ongo-
ing operation of the Salvation
Army’s Kirby Health Center
Family House in Wilkes-Barre.
A transitional housing pro-
gram for homeless families
with children, it is the only
program of its kind in Luzerne
County that provides the
means to guide homeless
families from crisis to stability
by giving them the necessary
skills and resources for self-
sufficiency.
We know that achievements
such as this in any given com-
munity begin with the people
who belong to it. We are hum-
bled but not surprised by this
community’s commitment to
giving back. We have been
blessed beyond measure by
your good deeds, and our lives
are all richer because you have
given so much.
May God bless you and may
your heart be filled with the
knowledge that others now
have hope because you care.
Capt. Doug Richwine
and
Capt. Patty Richwine
Commanding officers
Salvation Army
Wilkes-Barre Corps
Swetland car show
a great success
O
n behalf of the Luzerne
County Historical Society,
I thank everyone who
participated in the inaugural
Classic Car Show at The Swet-
land Homestead. The attend-
ance was beyond what I had
ever imagined! Through your
generosity and participation
we were able to raise much
needed funds that will allow
us to continue to preserve our
local history.
I especially thank Gary
Stack, our board president,
and Carl Rosencrance, Swet-
land Committee chairman, for
helping to get the event off the
ground, and the entire board
of directors, as well as our
crew of dedicated volunteers,
for all the generosity and
effort they put forth to make
the event happen. I also thank
our staff of Tony, Mary Ruth
and Amanda for helping me
every step of the way. And a
big thank-you to WNEP-TV
(Channel 16), WARM 590,
Magic 93, the Citizens’ Voice,
The Times Leader and the
Weekender for making this
one of our most promoted
events.
Finally, a huge thank-you to
everyone who brought their
cars, came for a tour or stop-
ped by to walk around. You
have helped to keep our histo-
ry alive and made our inaugu-
ral classic car show a day no
one will forget. You also took
the postponement in stride,
and many of you changed
plans in order to attend.
Thank you.
We have received much
feedback, and have several
suggestions for improvements
for next year. And yes, there
will be another one next year!
Hope to see you there.
Mark J. Riccetti Jr.
Operations manager
and volunteer coordinator
Luzerne County
Historical Society
Wilkes-Barre
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
Mountain Laurels is a regular series of letters fromreaders conveying
thanks to individuals or groups for their support, help or kindness.
MOUNTAIN LAURELS
C M Y K
PAGE 4E SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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U.S. troops need
better technology
A
s the United States inevi-
tably begins to withdraw
troops from Afghanistan,
Congress should invest in the
new intelligence technologies
that will increase the ability of
remaining forces to find and
capture, or kill, insurgents and
to come home safe.
Specifically, veterans who’ve
patrolled Afghanistan’s most
dangerous provinces say our
troops need next-generation
surveillance, reconnaissance,
intelligence and communi-
cations gear such as the Ar-
my’s Brigade Combat Team
Modernization system now
under development. BCTM
would provide troops on pa-
trol the ability to share real-
time intelligence, including
video and photos from recon-
naissance robots – highlight-
ing, for example, the location
of Taliban snipers or alerting
all American troops in the
area to a potential roadside
bomb.
Sadly, Congress seems
poised to cut the funding for
this life-saving technology by
drastically cutting the defense
budget, recalling the fatal
failure to provide adequate
body armor to soldiers in Iraq.
U.S. troops in Afghanistan
will continue to face a hostile
and elusive enemy in the
Taliban, who fight with am-
bushes and hidden explosives
rather than by conventional
means. To win and survive,
our soldiers need tools appro-
priate to the task.
Anthony T. Hawkins
National coordinator
Congressional Black Caucus
Veterans Braintrust
Washington, D.C.
Student protests
Pa. budget cuts
D
ue to Gov. Tom Corbett’s
proposed budget cuts,
local school districts are
forced to make cuts of their
own. I understand that diffi-
cult decisions have to be
made, but taking art out of
public schools should not be
one of them.
Not every student wants to
be a teacher, mathematician,
journalist or nurse. While
those students with conven-
tional aspirations are able to
take classes that will prepare
them for life after graduation,
school districts are not of-
fering the same opportunity to
students who want to go into
a creative field. These cuts,
specifically the cuts at Hanov-
er Area School District, are
affecting my future and the
future of many others.
To everyone who has the
same concerns as I do, please
attend your district’s board
meetings. Hanover Area’s next
meeting is Thursday; get out
and be an advocate for the
arts!
Shawna Rabbas
Hanover Township
Reader believes
Blaum off target
I
n Kevin Blaum’s recent
commentary “GOP should
keep hands off our Medi-
care,” May 29), he seemingly
attacked Republican Congress-
men Lou Barletta and Tom
Marino for working toward a
solution to Medicare’s prob-
lems.
Mr. Blaum glosses over the
simple fact that Medicare is
taking on water and sinking
fast. His approach of “keeping
your hands off Medicare” will
result in its insolvency by
2024. The Medicare trustees
confirmed that in early May.
The Democrats have not pro-
posed a single serious solution
to keep Medicare solvent, and
they apparently have no in-
tention to. Democratic Senate
Majority Leader Harry Reid
confirmed as much in a late
May press conference.
The Republicans are propos-
ing solutions. Whether or not
you like their proposals, they
are at least making them. If
Mr. Blaum is truly concerned
about Medicare, he should
have focused his opinion co-
lumn on calling out the do-
nothing Democrats for being
content with “Mediscaring”
seniors instead of proposing a
bill of their own to preserve
Medicare.
Mary Ann Haas
Scranton
W-B man seeking
crash witnesses
B
etween 2:30 and 3 p.m.
May 13 (a Friday), an
accident occurred at the
traffic light in front of Sheetz
on Wilkes-Barre Township
Boulevard.
My father-in-law was driving
my purple Dodge 1997 Intrep-
id. He was turning left on a
green arrow into the Sheetz
parking lot when a man in a
Dodge 2005 Ram truck, tow-
ing a trailer, smashed into the
rear of my car. The driver in
the truck was in the non-
turning lane, apparently
speeding and not paying atten-
tion.
We need anyone who wit-
nessed this accident to come
forward and call me.
My father-in-law was not
alone in the car. His passenger
was my 24-year-old stepdaugh-
ter, and she was injured. My
car was “totaled,” but the Ram
had very little damage.
Please, if you have any in-
formation, call me at 262-3645
at noon or after 4:30 p.m.
Benjamin Koprowski
Wilkes-Barre
Best & Brightest
still helps others
I
wanted to give The Times
Leader an update regarding
one of its Best & Brightest
recipients from a prior year.
This recipient was my
daughter, Erin E. Clemens.
She received the honor in
2007, during her senior year
at Berwick Area High School,
in the category of “Service to
the Community.” This is an
honor that she, as well as her
father and I, were very proud
of then and still are four years
later.
Since receiving this award
and graduating from high
school, Erin has continued to
provide “Service to the Com-
munity.” She completed pre-
pharmacy at Wilkes University
in Wilkes-Barre and is a phar-
macy student at Shenandoah
University in Winchester, Va.
In August 2007, Erin went
on her first mission trip to
Honduras. This is a weeklong
mission during which the
team ministers medically,
physically and spiritually to
the Honduran people. This
trip costs more than $1,500
per team member, and the
cost is the responsibility of the
team member. I say her “first
trip,” as she has gone each
year since and is preparing to
depart again Aug. 6.
In January of this year, Erin
spent one week of her winter
college break on a mission trip
to Mississippi to help re-build
a Hurricane Katrina-ravaged
area – paying $450 to cover
the cost of being part of this
team. She also has volun-
teered at a camp for children
with cancer. Erin also is active
at Shenandoah University,
helping to raise funds for the
Make-A-Wish Foundation and
for breast cancer research.
I just wanted to say that
“Service to the Community”
was not something Erin did
only during her high school
years to try to earn scholar-
ships; but, as it was then, it
continues to be a vital part of
her life. During the four years
since her graduation, Erin has
continued to be very involved
in her “hometown communi-
ty” (Berwick area) as well as
to her “college communities”
(both Wilkes and Shenan-
doah).
Lori E. Clemens
Berwick
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 PAGE 5E
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Reader blames
mess on Congress
Y
ou in Washington are
selling out America by
allowing corporations to
move jobs overseas and giving
them billions of our tax dol-
lars to relocate.
We have illegal immigrants
coming into this country,
getting college educations,
starting businesses and beat-
ing the system and the govern-
ment out of taxes.
Meanwhile, Congress wants
to lower the deficit by going
after the middle class, retirees,
disabled veterans, the poor
and needy by eliminating
Social Security, Medicare,
Medicaid, education and so-
cial programs and COLA for
retirees.
You bailed out corporations
and those greedy individuals
on Wall Street. Why did our
government and Congress let
this happen? Bailout money
should aid taxpayers facing
unemployment, the loss of
their homes or the high cost
of living.
How about paying back the
IOUs in Social Security that
our president and Congress
borrowed over the years? This
was money paid by working
people for retirement, and
Congress over the years failed
to pay it back. Could you call
this embezzlement? It seems
our government is just as bad
as these corporations and
CEOs.
We have a problem, and it
seems we need a stimulus
plan to bring us on solid
ground. By the same token,
Congress must lay down the
law to the fat cats and lobby-
ists who got us into this mess.
Government took prayer
out of schools, out of public
buildings and out of our lives.
Our U.S. currency says “In
God We Trust.” I believe it is
in money we trust.
How could God bless Amer-
ica given the way we act?
Charles Urban
Kingston
Resident decries
Crestwood cuts
I
am a proud parent and
educator, and a resident of
Mountain Top. A few years
ago, my wife and I made a
conscious decision to buy a
home in Mountain Top. One
of the main reasons we chose
to live here was because we
believed that Crestwood Area
was a progressive school dis-
trict and one of the best in the
area.
I find the recent actions of
the Crestwood school district
sickening and disheartening. I
believe the school board has
proposed the wrong decision
to furlough teachers, cut full-
time kindergarten and elim-
inate sports, language and
music at the middle school
level.
The furlough of teachers
will only increase the class
sizes in our already crowded
schools. As a teacher, I firmly
believe you can devote more
attention to your students if
you have a reasonable class
size to manage.
The cutting of the full-time
kindergarten program puts a
heavy financial burden on
parents who will have to make
arrangements for their chil-
dren during the day. I would
rather have a reasonable tax
increase than spend another
year’s worth of money on
daycare. Taking away full-time
kindergarten also will take
away a half of a school year’s
worth of education from the
children by giving them a
watered-down curriculum.
During my master’s degree
studies, I studied brain cogni-
tion and brain-based learning.
It is proven that physical activ-
ity and the participation in the
arts and music enhances the
learning process. Please ask
yourselves, what will these
children, who were involved in
extracurricular middle school
activities now do with all of
their time? I have been around
middle school and high school
students as a teacher for 13
years and as a football coach
for 10 years. Getting children
involved in sports and extra-
curricular activities will help
keep them focused, driven and
out of trouble.
I understand perfectly well
that Gov. Tom Corbett left a
terrible hardship on our local-
ities. One of his campaign
promises was to not raise
taxes. So what is he doing? He
is not asking the gas drilling
companies for funds, is he?
No, instead he wants tax-
payers to pay. He has pro-
posed cuts to several pro-
grams, grants and educational
funding, which leaves all of
the burden and difficult deci-
sion-making to our Pennsylva-
nia localities.
I feel that there are alterna-
tives to the proposed cuts that
Crestwood School Board
intends to make. Think about
the future of our children and
the effect that these cuts will
have on them.
I know I am.
Thomas Stavitzski Jr.
Wright Township
Mundy’s welfare
stance questioned
I
challenge state Rep. Phyllis
Mundy on a recently letter
to the editor she wrote
(“Mundy clarifies vote on
welfare,” April 24). She ques-
tioned the validity of state
Rep. Tarah Toohil’s bill to
address welfare fraud. Specifi-
cally, Mundy stated that she’s
willing to address welfare
fraud. I disagree.
To begin, the welfare sys-
tem, as a way of redistributing
wealth, is the fault of Demo-
cratic lawmakers. This has
been the campaign promise of
Democrats in the name of the
poor and disenfranchised, and
it seems everyone who sup-
ports these welfare programs
votes exclusively Democratic.
The Republicans always
promise to address it, but they
lie. This is because they sup-
port welfare for the rich and
cannot credibly address wel-
fare from the opposite end of
the spectrum.
No one in Harrisburg is
ignorant regarding welfare
programs in this common-
wealth. There is no desire to
eliminate welfare as it exists
from either end of the spec-
trum, since politicians from
both parties survive by its
existence. Ms. Mundy does
not try to stop this.
Between my wife and I, we
have at least 28 years (com-
bined) working with welfare
recipients. This includes work
for the federal government,
the Department of Public
Welfare and the Department
of Corrections. We have
opened our home and our
wallets to numerous individu-
als who were in need.
While there are individuals
in need of a safety net (my
own mother being one of
them, at a point in time), the
entire system is supporting a
population of substance abus-
ers who have no intention to
be anything more. The stories
I could tell would fill a book.
The fact is, most people who
work in the welfare system
also know this is going on. I
have heard many of them
relate to me the fraud and
abuse they know goes on.
They also relate how they are
told to keep quiet about it.
I have a challenge for Ms.
Mundy. If you believe Rep.
Toohil’s bill is wrong, let’s
have a public meeting on it.
Let’s open this discussion up
for any state employee, with-
out fear of reprisal, to share
with the public any concerns
they have about fraud and
abuse in the system.
This matter can be openly
debated by taxpayers whose
paychecks support the drug
users and sluggards. This is a
far better idea than the propa-
ganda put out by politicians
trying to avoid being held
accountable for the results
their policies have had.
Joseph Martin
Berwick
Voter says no to
more tax breaks
A
ccording to an article in
The Times Leader (May
17), U.S. Rep. Tom Marino
said in a town hall meeting
that the debt that we are in
did not happen overnight,
meaning in the last five to 10
years. “This is 40 years that
we have been spending be-
yond our means,” he said.
Well, he’s partly right. Go
back to the Reagan years and
you’ll find the tax breaks for
the rich, not the spending,
was what started the debt to
go up and go crazy.
Look it up; it’s true. Every-
thing went downhill: jobs,
wages, union jobs – and the
rich didn’t reinvest in their
companies any more for tax
breaks, they just kept the
money.
President Clinton came in
and raised the taxes on the
rich, created 22 million jobs,
balanced the budget – and the
economy went up. But when
President Bush came in, he
lowered the tax on the rich,
started two unfunded wars,
deregulated the banks, didn’t
create any new jobs in eight
years and gave the seniors an
expensive, unfunded drug
plan.
Now the Republicans blame
President Obama for the def-
icit. Get real, America.
In what America is it that
you take food out of a baby’s
mouth so that you can give
more tax breaks to the rich?
Not my America. The Repub-
licans won’t vote for anything
that is against the rich. They
blocked everything the Demo-
crats tried to do and then tell
you the Democrats don’t know
how to govern.
The working class better
wake up and quit complaining
about too much government.
We got bin Laden, not the
Republicans.
Dale Eastman
Meshoppen
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and
daytime phone number for verification. Letters should be no
more than 250 words. We reserve the right to edit and limit writ-
ers to one published letter every 30 days.
• E-mail: mailbag@timesleader.com
• Fax: 570-829-5537
• Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-
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SEND US YOUR OPINION
C M Y K
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destabilized nations and revolu-
tionized medical research. It con-
frontedcultural andsocial taboos
and rewrote the book on political
activism.
But even as 7,000 people
around the world become infect-
edwithHIVeachday, experts say
Americans who never knew the
terror of AIDS’ early days have
become complacent about pre-
vention due to life-extending
drug therapies that allowHIVpa-
tients to live relatively normal
lives.
“There has been incredible
progress over the last 30 years,
but we’re still in the thick of a ma-
jor public healthcrisis, andunfor-
tunately the sense of crisis in this
country has waned,” said Dr. Ri-
chard Wolitski, deputy director
for behavioral and social science
in CDC’s Division of HIV/AIDS
Prevention. “Today’s young peo-
ple have never known a time
without effective HIV treatment,
and we’re asking them to act
against a threat that seems re-
mote, but is still very real.”
One in five people in the U.S.
with HIV doesn’t even know it,
which helps explain why a third
of new HIV cases are revealed in
the later stages, often within a
year of developing full-blown
AIDS.
Unlikethegeneralizedepidem-
ics that have ravaged poorer
countries, the U.S. has a “series of
concentrated epidemics,” among
certain demographic groups and
in certain areas of the country,
said Jeffrey Crowley, director of
the White House Office of Na-
tional AIDS Policy. For example,
the District of Columbia’s 3 per-
cent HIV infection rate is one of
the highest in the nation and ri-
vals that of poor developing
countries.
Nationally, some 56,000 Amer-
icans are infected each year with
the HIV virus and nearly half are
African-American — blacks also
make up about half the nation’s
AIDS and HIV patients, Wolitski
said.
Men who have sex with men
account for more than half of the
nation’s new infections — and
they’re the only at-risk group ex-
periencing rising numbers of in-
fections.
“This is extremely concern-
ing,” Wolitski said. “We’re now
seeingnumbers of newinfections
among men who have sex with
menthat are higher thanthe ones
that we saw at the end of the
1980s.”
A series of medical break-
throughs inthe mid-1980s helped
stabilize and slow the spread of
the disease. As new modes of
transmission were discovered,
new guidelines to halt transmis-
sion were announced, followed
bythefirst anti-HIVdrug, AZT, in
1986.
One of the biggest break-
throughs in the fight against
AIDS came in1985 when the first
practical bloodtest for theHIVvi-
rus became available. Robert Gal-
lo and his team of researchers at
the National Institutes of Health
developed the blood test in 1984
after they co-discovered HIV in
1983.
Gallo, who now directs the In-
stitute of Human Virology at the
University of Maryland, recalled
meeting Curran in a Bethesda,
Md., restaurant in March 1984 to
see if the blood test had correctly
spotted the virus in dozens of
blood samples taken from both
infected and healthy people.
“I walked out of there smiling
that day,” Gallo said, recalling
how the test correctly identified
each infected sample. “This test
was, as I like to say, simple, sensi-
tive, very specific and rapid.”
The AIDS antibody test would
protect patients worldwide from
getting contaminated blood dur-
ing transfusions and allow re-
searchers to better track how the
virus spread.
“It’s the singular most impor-
tant advancement in the history
of the field,” Gallo said.
Gallo, Curran and others are
working to develop an HIV vac-
cine, and progress is being made.
“We have scientific evidence
that a safe and effective HIV vac-
cine is possible,” saida statement
by Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the di-
rector of the National Institute of
Allergy and Infectious Diseases
at NIH.
A 2009 clinical drug trial in
Thailand showed for the first
time ever that a vaccine could
stop HIV infections in a modest
share of participants. HIV re-
searchers are studying blood
samples fromthetrial toseewhat
made it successful andwhether it
can be made more effective.
Scientists funded by NIH are
also trying to design HIV vac-
cines based on the “protein struc-
ture of the surface spikes that
HIV uses to attach to and infect
human cells with the virus,” Fau-
ci’s statement said. Parts of the
spikes are vulnerable to antibod-
ies that have beenshowntoblock
human cell infection by more
than 90 percent of HIV strains
worldwide.
“Now the scientists are map-
pinga strategy tocreate a vaccine
that can stimulate a healthy per-
son to make such broadly neutra-
lizing antibodies,” Fauci said.
Fauci’s optimism reflects the
growing international commit-
ment to improve funding for
AIDS
Continued from Page 1E
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 PAGE 7E
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693.3600
code more efficient and promote
U.S. economic competitiveness
— and that makes it hard for Re-
publicans to reject his proposal
outright.
His approach meets the terms
of a tax pledge signed by more
than 230 GOP House members
and 41 Republican senators. In
signing the pledge, sponsored by
Americans for Tax Reform, a con-
servative lobby, lawmakers agree
to fight any efforts to cut or elim-
inate tax breaks unless they’re
matched by identical cuts in the
tax rate — which is exactly what
the Obama plan calls for.
But McIntyre and his fellow
liberal tax activists don’t like it.
They question why savings from
a reduction in corporate tax sub-
sidies should go right back to
businesses in the form of a tax
cut. Shouldn’t some, even most,
of the billions in new revenue go
toward reducing the deficit, they
ask? After all, that would provide
some relief to ordinary citizens
who otherwise will bear most of
the deficit-reduction burden
through cuts in government ser-
vices.
Business lobbyists see things
differently.
Caroline Harris, chief taxcoun-
sel for the U.S. Chamber of Com-
merce, said the federal deficit is
due to overspending, not under-
taxing (although that’s highly de-
batable, as statistics show the
overall federal tax burden is well
below historical norms.)
“If you have a spending prob-
lem, youneedtofixit withspend-
ing cuts,” Harris said. “If Con-
gress can’t show fiscal austerity
and make spending cuts, then
taxing or putting the weight of
deficit reduction on the backs of
businesses that create jobs is not
a good idea.”
Republicans in Congress
agree. However, an April Gallup
poll found that 2 out of 3 Amer-
icans think corporations pay too
little in taxes, while only 1 in 5
said businesses pay their fair
share.
In a letter to Congress, McIn-
tyre’s group and a host of labor
andliberal allies saythat lawmak-
ers, in their zeal to cut the federal
budget, have ignored corporate
tax subsidies, which deny the
Treasury revenues and thus in-
crease budget deficits the same
as direct program spending.
Why, they ask, aren’t those
breaks on the table in all the def-
icit-reduction talks?
The 10 largest corporate tax
breaks will cost the federal gov-
ernment more than $351 billion
from 2010 to 2014, according to
the nonpartisanJoint Committee
on Taxation.
“It makes no sense for Con-
gress to debate cuts in public ser-
vices that working families rely
on while ignoring the public
spending that benefits corpora-
tions and is hidden in the tax
code,” the letter reads. “We
stronglybelievemost, if not all, of
the revenue saved from eliminat-
ing corporate tax subsidies
should go toward deficit reduc-
tion and toward creating the
healthy, educated workforce and
sound infrastructure that will
make our nation more competi-
tive.”
The sentiment has struck a
note with liberal lawmakers such
as Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif.,
who says it’s time for revenue-
raising tax overhauls.
“It’s an opportunity to put into
place some fair tax policies that,
in fact, produce revenue fromthe
richest people inthis country and
the richest corporations that
should be paying,” Boxer said.
But getting any kind of tax-
code clean-up through Congress
is never easy, andintoday’s polar-
izedpolitics, it’s harder thanever.
Democratic Sen. Ron Wyden of
Oregon and former Republican
Sen. Judd Gregg of New Hamp-
shire sponsored the Bipartisan
Tax Fairness and Simplification
Act of 2010. It would have cou-
pled a corporate tax cut with the
rollback of tax breaks for individ-
uals and corporations.
The measure died in commit-
tee.
Until more details of Obama’s
tax plan are released, it’s unclear
how much support it could re-
ceive from Republicans and the
corporate sector.
What is clear is that there’s lit-
tle chance of passing legislation
aimedat increasingcorporate tax
revenue, said Senate Budget
Committee Chairman Kent Con-
rad, D-N.D.
“It’s very hard to be revenue-
neutral and reduce the (tax) rate,
so going even further than that is
a hard thing to do,” Conrad said.
“Hard in terms of the substance.
Hard in terms of the politics.
Hard to do.”
Even McIntyre concedes that
the fight will probably take sever-
al years. For inspiration, he re-
members the years of work it
took to pass the 1986 tax over-
haul under President Ronald Re-
agan, a Democratic House and a
Republican Senate.
“It was kind of a miracle, and
the stars had to be aligned. But
we can do it again,” McIntyre
said.
TAXES
Continued from Page 1E
MCT PHOTO
Even McIntyre concedes that the fight will probably take several years. For inspiration, he remem-
bers the years of work it took to pass the 1986 tax overhaul under President Ronald Reagan, a Dem-
ocratic House and a Republican Senate.
“It’s an opportunity to put into place some fair tax
policies that, in fact, produce revenue from the
richest people in this country and the richest
corporations that should be paying."
Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif.
C M Y K
PAGE 8E SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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In 1989, though, Perry sur-
prised voters and his party by
announcing he had joined the
Republican Party. That’s when
he ran against and beat Hight-
ower.
In 1998, he won the Repub-
lican nomination for lieutenant
governor, which in the govern-
mental hierarchy of Texas is an
important and influential posi-
tion. His opponent was a pop-
ular Democrat, John Sharp,
who resigned as state comp-
troller to run for lieutenant
governor.
Perry surprised everyone,
beating Sharp and a Libertarian
opponent, with 50.05 percent of
the vote.
The rest would be history, if
that were the end of the story
— but it is not. He succeeded
then-Gov. George W. Bush when
Bush decided to run for presi-
dent. Perry went on to be elect-
ed governor in his own right
and is now the longest-serving
governor in Texas history.
In his most recent election,
just last year, Perry faced a
primary challenge from Kay
Bailey Hutchison, who had
established a nationwide reputa-
tion and political following as a
U.S. senator. Hutchison gar-
nered support from some pow-
erful allies, including former
Vice President Dick Cheney,
real estate developer Ross Perot
Jr. and a Who’s Who list of
Dallas-area movers and shakers
who provided her with support,
advice and — most important
— cash.
Hutchison was at one time
thought to be a near shoo-in.
Make that “shoo-out.” Perry
prevailed in the primary and
was re-elected as governor.
My inclination would be to
suggest that Perry is not likely
to run for president and that,
even if he does, he’s not likely to
win. But I don’t dare make such
a suggestion. I can still hear the
voices of those good ol’ boys at
Hubbard Grain and Feed ring-
ing in my ears.
CONNOR
Continued from Page 1E
Richard L. Connor is editor and
publisher of The Times Leader. Reach
him at rconnor@timesleader.com
AIDS prevention, treatment and
research. Worldwide funding for
AIDS programming increased
from$1.6 billion in 2001to nearly
$16 billion in 2009, according to
UNAIDS, the Joint United Na-
tions Program on HIV/AIDS.
The extra money has provided
results. According to the World
Health Organization, AIDS-relat-
ed deaths fell 19 percent from
2004 to 2009, while new HIV in-
fections have fallen 19 percent
worldwide over the last decade.
And with the falling cost of an-
tiretroviral medications, poorer
countries can nowprovide a year
of drug therapy for about $137.
The price break helped more
than 5 million patients in low-
and middle-income nations get
AIDS medications in 2009, com-
pared with 400,000 in 2003. To-
day, 53 percent of HIV-infected
pregnant women have access to
drugs that prevent transmission
of the virus to their unborn chil-
dren, compared with just 45 per-
cent in 2008.
Curransaidthelackof AIDSre-
sources in poor nations contin-
ues to be a problem, but he’s opti-
mistic that advances in drug re-
search will provide an HIV vac-
cine to ease the suffering.
“We’ve been pessimistic about
HIV in the past, and the skeptics
have been proven wrong,” Cur-
ran said. “I hope the same thing
will be proven again.”
AIDS
Continued from Page 6E
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011
C M Y K
timesleader.com
etc.Entertainment Travel Culture S E C T I O N F
LOS ANGELES — Melissa McCar-
thy is a good friend. After all, for years
now, she’s been there for the likes of
Lauren Graham, Christina Applegate
and Katherine Heigl. On TVand in ro-
mantic comedies, McCarthy has been
quite happy to be the confidant to the
star, acharacteractorfrequentlycalled
upon for advice or comic relief.
“I’ve always kind of been the sup-
porting person or the friend, which is
perfectly fine and fun, but I always
want topushthat,”saidtheactress, 40,
whofor years playedsucha role onthe
long-running “Gilmore Girls” and in
the movies “Life as We Know It” and
“The Back-up Plan.” “Have I been up
for leads in movies? Not really. I don’t
think I had the opportunity before.”
If the success of her new film “Bri-
desmaids” is any indication, McCar-
thy’s movie prospects likely are about
to change. The Judd Apatow-pro-
duced R-rated comedy about the mis-
adventures of a maid of honor prepar-
ing for her best friend’s upscale wed-
ding raked in a surprisingly strong
$26.2 million at the box office on its
opening weekend, prompting Holly-
woodtodeclareaneedfor moresmart,
female-driven comedies.
The film stars “Saturday Night
Live’s” KristenWiig, andtheensemble
cast includes Rose Byrne, Maya Ru-
dolph and Ellie Kemper in addition to
McCarthy, who audiences also might
recognize from her hit CBS series
“Mike & Molly.” Critics have praised
her scene-stealing turn in “Brides-
maids” as the bawdy Megan, a heavy-
set woman with short-cropped hair
andnotimefor thegraceful femininity
her fellow bridesmaids display; she
wears her pearls with Dockers, thank
you very much.
She also burps in public and aggres-
sively flirts with strangers. She “turns
the underestimated beauty-chal-
lenged woman of the world into price-
less comic fodder,” said the Los An-
geles Times’ Betsy Sharkey in her re-
MCT PHOTO
Melissa McCarthy, shown in ‘Mike
and Molly,’ has long played the
friend to the star, but her role in
‘Bridesmaids’ may pave the way for
more leading roles.
Ready
to take
the lead
By AMY KAUFMAN
Los Angeles Times
See MCCARTHY, Page 4F
W
ith the Lady Gaga market reaching oversatura-
tion, it’s easy to get a sense of fatigue when
listening to her latest effort, “Born This Way,” re-
leased by Interscope.
Delivering her third studio album in just a three-year
span after a nonstop juggernaut that included a seem-
ingly endless tour, hit after hit, countless magazine
covers and even social activism, another Gaga offering
is a little bit tiring to those who aren’t part of her
army of “little monsters.”
It doesn’t help that the standard edition of the album
is 17 full-length tracks, clocking in at a little more than
two hours. A little less than a third of the way through,
a “what — there’s more?” feeling starts to sink in, and
finishing the album seems to be a daunting task.
But “Born This Way” de-
serves that listen — again
and again and again.
Though there are a few
songs that miss the mark —
the Madonna-rip-off title
track, for example — over-
all, the album, like Gaga, is
hard to get out of your con-
scious.
“I could be girl/ unless
you want to be man/ I could
be sex/ unless you want to
hold hands/ I could be any-
thing/ I could be every-
thing,” coos Gaga on “Gov-
ernment Hooker,” a wicked
electro-groove that manages
to be more naughty than Ri-
hanna’s “S&M” without be-
ing as explicit. It’s just part
of the provocation — both
sexual and religious — that
Gaga uses to push buttons
throughout the album.
Though there are song ti-
tles like “Bloody Mary,” “Ju-
das” and “Electric Chapel,”
and lyrics tweak conserva-
tive mindsets, at its core,
“Born This Way” is mostly
an album about themes that
have been written about
from the beginning of pop
music — love, lust and ac-
ceptance.
“Americano,” with its
flamenco-inspired melody,
is a love song — it just hap-
pens to be about two wom-
en. “We can marry, on the
West Coast, on a Wednes-
Gaga delivers the goods on new album
AP PHOTO
Lady Gaga’s newest CD, ’Born This Way,’ was recently released.
By NEKESA MUMBI MOODY AP Music Writer
See LADY GAGA, Page 4F
F
red and Audrey Kurz from
West Pittston are thrilled
with the light weight of
their newKindle electron-
ic readers.
Vince and Claudia Piczak of Larks-
ville want to learn more about the de-
vices before deciding what kind they
might buy.
And Sharlene Neyman of Hughes-
townexpectsher9-year-olddaughter,
Brooke, will be able to read “Ameri-
canGirl”and“MagicTreeHouse”sto-
ries on the iPod they share.
Avidreaders all, they attendeda re-
cent workshop at the West Pittston
Library, where library director Anne
Bramblett Barr toldthemshehas em-
braced electronic books.
“Some of my colleagues thinkI’ma
huge traitor, that I’ve gone tothe dark
side,” Bramblett Barr said with a
laugh. “I challenge that idea. If any-
one should be interested in newtech-
nology, it’s a library.”
While she hasn’t forsaken books
printed on paper and doesn’t believe
they’re going the way of the dinosaur,
Bramblett Barr is proud owner of a
Nook.
Thedevice, whichissoldbyBarnes
& Noble, enables her to store and
view potentially thousands of elec-
tronicbooks as well as magazines and
movies.
“I went to Florida and knew I’d be
doing a bunch of cooking,” she said,
explaining how convenient it was to
have the recipes on the e-reader.
It’s possible to download and read
library books for free on an e-reader –
or a computer – Bramblett Barr said.
Although the Luzerne County Li-
brary System doesn’t have enough
funding to offer this service, the Free
Libraryof Philadelphia is able tooffer
it to anyone who has a library card
froma Pennsylvania library.
You can visit the Philadelphia li-
brary’s website at www.freelibra-
ry.org and follow the directions for
gettingyour ownPhiladelphia library
By MARY THERESE BIEBEL mbiebel@timesleader.com
PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Anne Bramblett Barr, director of the West Pittston Library, has embraced
e-books but believes conventional books will not disappear.
Fred and Audrey Kurz of West
Pittston inspect books on their
Kindles, which they agree are
pleasantly lightweight.
See EBOOKS, Page 5F
C M Y K
PAGE 2F SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ D I V E R S I O N S
NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE
BONUS PUZZLE
DIAGRAMLESS
CRYPTOGRAMS
The Sunday Crossword
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
Puzzle Answers
on 3F
HOROSCOPE
HOROSCOPE
ARIES (March 21-April 19).
You’ll give a personal-
ized glimpse of your life
to one who doesn’t know
you very well. In doing so,
you’ll provide a very good
reason for this person to
want to know you better.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20).
You’re funny, and your
wit will encourage others
around you to be funny, as
well. You’re good for the
morale of a group, as long
as you direct your humor
in a harmless way.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21).
Usually, you try to make
your needs fit nicely into
the matrix of everyone
else’s needs. Not today.
That would be too com-
plicated, and you’re just
not in the mood. You’ll do
exactly as you please.
CANCER (June 22-July 22).
You have a way of sug-
gesting things without
directly stating them. This
is quite helpful now as you
test the waters of a rela-
tionship. You’ll dig around
and discover the true
intentions of others.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Slow
and steady is not usually
your style. You’d much
rather wave a magic wand
so that you can experience
instantaneous results. And
with the magic of technol-
ogy, you may get your
wish today!
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).
You have a certain system
in place to help others
learn how to treat you,
though you may not
realize what it is. You’ll
be objective now. You’ll
work out the flow of
how you want others to
behave when they enter
your world.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).
Problem solving is a
strength of yours, and
you have a secret trick
that makes you amazing
in this regard: You seldom
wait for something to
become a problem before
you handle it.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).
You might have forgot-
ten exactly what you told
someone, but the other
person hasn’t forgotten at
all. So ask a few questions,
and make sure everyone is
on the same page.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.
21). You have absolutely
zero proof that you can
succeed in a certain realm.
Yet you feel deep down in
your being that you can
and will do whatever it
takes to make it happen.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19). You treated someone
well, and now it’s your turn
to be on the receiving end.
And if it doesn’t happen,
note your tendency to give
too much to certain peo-
ple. It’s better to dedicate
your energy where it will
be appreciated.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18).
“Easy does it” is a phrase
that applies well now.
The difficult route is not
going to get you there at
all, so there’s no glory
in taking it. Go the easy
way, and you’ll reach your
destination.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20).
It’s nice to have friends
in powerful places. And
you’re careful not to brag
about this because you
don’t want to tempt others
to take advantage of your
connections.
TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (June
5). You have reached a
level of wisdom that allows
you to live in harmony.
You’ll invest your time in a
relationship that pays you
back in more joy than you
knew was possible. You’ll
get hot tips and excellent
advice in July. There’s an
addition to your family in
September. In April, you’ll
be tested and will do very
well. Aquarius and Pisces
people are your admirers.
Your lucky numbers are: 4,
1, 33, 22 and 19.
LOW AND BEHOLD
John Lampkin
6/5/11
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 PAGE 3F
➛ D I V E R S I O N S
For information about WonderWord volumes and Treasuries, call Universal Press Syndicate at 1-800-255-6734.
WONDERWORD
By David Ouellet
Cryptograms New York Times
Bonus Puzzle Diagramless
JUMBLE
GOREN BRIDGE
LAST WEEK’S PUZZLE ANSWERS
By Henri Arnold and
Mike Argirion
WITH OMAR SHARIF
& TANNAH HIRSCH
©1995 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
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PREVIOUS DAY’S SOLUTION
PREVIOUS SUNDAY’S SOLUTION
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Angeles,
CA 90069
6/5
6/5
6/5
6/5
6/5
1. Figure this out: how did a
ten-thousand-word legal document
come to be called a brief?
2. Vanity shows itself in numerous
subtle ways. Those people affected
by it are often me-deep in
conversation.
3. An archaeologist would be the
only person who could happily gab
about his career being in ruins.
4. Paradoxically, minimalism is the
artistic movement that demands the
very loftiest level of description and
explanation.
DEAR ABBY
Breadwinner is out of
patience for her family
Dear Abby:
I’m running
out of energy
to compas-
sionately
relate with
all the ad-
dicts and mentally ill people
in my family. My mother is
an alcoholic. My aunt is bi-
polar and schizophrenic. She
is addicted to and abusing
prescription painkillers and
anti-anxiety medicines.
My husband is an alcohol-
ic in denial who lies about
his alcohol consumption,
and my stepmother is men-
tally abusive and, I suspect,
also bipolar. These people
are all retired, while I work a
physically and mentally de-
manding full-time job.
I’m usually the one who
is blamed when things don’t
go right. Mother asked me
to remove all alcohol from
her home so she could stop
drinking. When I didn’t find
it all, it was MY fault she
drank. I escorted my aunt
on a cruise during which she
abused drugs to the point
she could barely walk, and I
had to find her wheelchairs
at every stop. Now I hear she
is blaming me for her illness.
When my husband drinks,
he runs up our credit card
to the tune of $20,000. My
job with medical benefits
allowed him to retire from
his job.
I’m exhausted! I don’t
think I can take much more.
I know you’ll tell me to see
a counselor, but I’m the one
who has the full-time job
and little vacation/sick time
I can use. Short of “divorc-
ing” all of them and starting
a new life in an undisclosed
location, what advice can
you offer?
— Nearly Sucked Dry
Dear Nearly: Since you can’t
get away to see a counselor
because of the demands of
your job, pick up a couple of
books on co-dependency and
read them cover-to-cover.
Then practice protecting
yourself by learning to say
“No!” when an alcoholic
makes you responsible for
clearing the booze out of her
house, or a drug-addicted
relative invites you to take a
“vacation” that guarantees
you’ll become her nurse.
Discuss with a lawyer how
to separate your finances
from your deadbeat husband
so he can’t dig you deeper
into debt the next time he
chooses to go on a bender.
P.S. Al-Anon can be
reached toll-free at (888)
4AL-ANON ((888) 425-
2666). There are meetings at
various times in many loca-
tions. Check it out.
To receive a collection of Abby’s
most memorable — and most fre-
quently requested — poems and
essays, send a business-sized, self-
addressed envelope, plus check
or money order for $3.95 ($4.50
in Canada) to: Dear Abby’s “Keep-
ers,” P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL
61054-0447. (Postage is included.)
A D V I C E
C M Y K
PAGE 4F SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ E T C .
2
6
6
3
5
2
WE SALUTE YOU.
JOSEPH G. WILDES,
BRANCH:
Army
RANK:
E8
YEARS SERVED:
26
WAR FOUGHT:
Iraq
HOMETOWN:
Ashley
JOSEPH G.
WILDES
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view.
McCarthy, who grew up in Illi-
nois, said she based Megan on
women she encountered there,
later developing the archetype at
Los Angeles-basedimprovisation-
al comedy troupe the Groun-
dlings.
“There’s just something about
that no-nonsense Midwestern
womanina sensibleshoethat I re-
ally love,” McCarthy said. “I like
having specificity in a character.
In the movie, I had long acrylic
nails with French tips. I like
strange little unexpected things,
because if you start to pull those
together, youhaveareallyspecific
interesting character as opposed
to a caricature.”
That was the draw for Wiig,
who suggested McCarthy to “Bri-
desmaids” director Paul Feig and
Apatow, both of whom had con-
sidered writing Megan out of the
script because they couldn’t find
the right actress for the role.
McCarthy commits to creating a
recognizable person out of a
broadlydrawncharacter“andnev-
er going out of it. You think, ‘Oh,
yeah, that’s howthis person really
acts,’ ” said Wiig, a former Groun-
dlings member herself, who co-
wrote the screenplay with Annie
Mumolo. But “Megan is a tad ag-
gressive, where Melissa has a soft-
spoken energy.”
“Megan was a total dark horse
at the end of the process,” Feig re-
called. “We’d seen a lot of people,
anddidn’t feel likewehadit. Then
Kristen and Annie were like, ‘We
have this friend from the Groun-
dlings, and people line up around
the block when she performs.”’
McCarthy did cultivate a fer-
vent fan base during her years at
the L.A. comedy venue. She
joined the troupe in 1997 after
movingfromNewYorktoLos An-
geles inthehopes of workinginlo-
cal theater.
“I spent seven or eight years in
New York doing very dramatic
plays, and I thought theater in
L.A. would be amazing,” she said,
rolling her eyes. “Then I got here,
and my sister sent me a little arti-
cle on the Groundlings. I didn’t
know where else to go, so I went,
and I saw Kathy Griffin and all of
these kind of amazing people. It
blew my head off. I couldn’t get
over that they were making it all
up andthat they were that funny.”
She spent the next 14 years at
the local haunt, retiring only re-
cently to focus on her sitcom
“Mike & Molly,” which was just
pickedupfor another season. The
series, which premiered last Sep-
tember, initially earned attention
withits premiseabout aheftycou-
ple whomeet at Overeaters Anon-
ymous.
Marie Claire writer Maura Kel-
ly claimed on the magazine’s web-
site that she would be “grossed
out if (she) hadtowatchtwochar-
acters with rolls and rolls of fat
kissing each other.” But McCar-
thy believes that critics have since
beenabletomovepast theissueof
the characters’ weight.
“I guess I was expecting it be-
cause people love to make a thing
out of everything,” she said. “We
always said, if people are still talk-
ing about weight at the end of the
season, we’d be in trouble. But
they’re not, so we’re on the right
track.”
Apatow said he thinks the pro-
gram’s success proves that audi-
ences respond well to the actress.
“She’s one of the most likable
people I’ve seen on screen,” the
filmmaker said. “Before she even
speaks, you get the sense that
she’s just really nice.”
McCarthy’s future in movies,
meanwhile, is already shifting in-
to high gear — recently, she and
Mumolo sold a script to Para-
mount Pictures about a group of
Midwestern women who set out
to steal the Stanley Cup.
And this time, McCarthy will
play the lead.
MCCARTHY
Continued from Page 1F
AP PHOTOS
Melissa McCarthy, left, Ellie Kemper, Rose Byrne, Wendi McLendon-Covey, Maya Rudolph and Kris-
ten Wiig make up the colorful cast of ‘Bridesmaids.’
Melissa McCarthy and Billy Gardell co-star in the television sit-
com ‘Mike & Molly.’
“I like having specifici-
ty in a character. In the
movie, I had long acryl-
ic nails with French
tips. I like strange little
unexpected things, be-
cause if you start to
pull those together, you
have a really specific
interesting character
as opposed to a car-
icature.”
day,” Gaga sings slyly.
“Hair,” like “Born This Way,”
is a plea for individual free-
dom via the follicles — “I
don’t want to change, I don’t
want to be ashamed, I’m the
spirit of my hair ... I am my
hair,” she declares on the
pop-rock groove, which
sounds as if it could have
emerged from the sound-
track to a 1980s teen flick.
Much of the music veers
from pulsating dance
grooves and the retro rock
that Gaga showcased on
“Fame Monster.” The al-
bum’s best track —“You and
I” — sounds as if it could be
the companion to “Speech-
less,” another ballad similar-
ly anchored by dominating
piano chords.
Gaga, who co-wrote every
tune on the record and again
worked with collaborators
such as RedOne and Fernan-
do Garibay, doesn’t show
particular musical growth
but establishes a consistency
of strong material through-
out most of the disc. Lyrical-
ly, at times she still perplex-
es — the whirring “ScheiBe”
starts off with German then
segues into a female-empo-
werment anthem — but it’s
those bizarre moments that
are part of the Gaga-intrigue.
“Born This Way” needs a
bit more editing. A smatter-
ing of tracks, like “Bad Kids”
or “Black Jesus,” could have
been left off for a tighter
disc. But it doesn’t take away
from its strength, and over-
all, it’s an album that should
add to Gaga’s growing status
as this generation’s cultural
icon.
LADY GAGA
Continued from Page 1F
AP PHOTO
Lady Gaga accepts the award for best pop vocal album at the
53rd annual Grammy Awards in February.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 PAGE 5F
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card.
Pressing a few keys, Bramblett
Barr demonstrated how Barbara
Kingsolver’s “The Poisonwood Bi-
ble”madeitswayfromTheFreeLi-
brary of Philadelphia into her
Nook.
“It took three seconds to down-
load this huge wonderful novel,”
shesaid.
E-readers allow you to manipu-
late the size of the text, if you’dlike
ittobelarger, forexample. Ifthey’re
backlit, youcanreadinbedwithout
turning on additional lights. And,
of course, theyarelighterthan, say,
aconventional volumeof “War and
Peace.”
“Oh, it’s less than a pound,” Au-
drey Kurz said, lifting her Kindle,
which weighs in, according to an
onlinedescription, at 8.7ounces.
Despite these advantages, the
readers who gathered at the West
PittstonLibrarysaidtheyenjoythe
tactilesensationof turningthepag-
es of anold-fashionedbook.
And, that’s not all.
“Part of the funis to come to the
library,” said Frank Bullock, 52, of
Exeter. “You see your neighbors,
andthekids get toseeother kids.”
Bullockrecentlypurchasedane-
reader from Kmart for his young
daughter yet predicted, “If every-
one stays home and downloads e-
books, it’s gonna becolder.”
“I think that’s very true,” Bram-
blett Barr said. “That’s why librar-
ies have to reimagine themselves.
We’ve got programs for little kids.
We’ve got knitting groups, and
we’vegot yoga classes.”
“Nature walks,” another woman
remindedher.
“Wine tasting,” someone else
mentioned.
“Don’t forget the kayak trip,”
saida third.
“We see ourselves as more of a
learning center,” Bramblett Barr
said.
While it can be a challenge to
learn newthings, Audrey Kurz, 61,
said after the workshop, “I enjoy
thechallenge.”
“We want to keep up with tech-
nology,” Fred Kurz, 68, said. “You
don’t want tofeel likeanoldfuddy-
duddy.”
EBOOKS
Continued from Page 1F
PETE G. WILCOX PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Anne Bramblett-Barr, right, shows Claudia Piczak of Larksville her e-reading device during an ebook
seminar at the West Pittston Library. Others at the table are Claudia’s husband, Vince Piczak, Shar-
lene Neyman of Hughestown and her daughter Brooke.
Audrey and Fred Kurz of West
Pittston get used to their new
Kindles.
Brooke Neyman of Hughestown
tries out Anne Bramblett Barr’s
Nook Color.
C M Y K
PAGE 6F SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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the old fort’s bombproofs, earth-
and grass-covered structures
designed to provide an under-
ground space for operations
during an attack. Signage leads
visitors to viewing platforms
that keep people off the fragile
earthwork walls.
The small museum is located
near the site’s entrance. Opened
in 1964 during the Civil War’s
centennial, the museum inter-
prets the fort’s role in the
Union’s occupation of Alexan-
dria, a vital crossroads town
dating back to Colonial times.
In addition to displays on the ev-
eryday life of Civil War soldiers,
the museum features an exhibit
on the “Ellsworth incident.”
The exhibit includes a lock of
his hair, a red kepi (cap) he
wore, photographs of the young
officer in uniform and contem-
porary published accounts of
his death at the hands of James
Jackson.
Most of a star from Jackson’s
secessionist flag, still stained
with Ellsworth’s blood, is on
display, along with the “O” from
the Marshall House sign, one of
the many pieces of the structure
torn off the building by souve-
nir-hunting Union soldiers seek-
ing a momento from the spot
where Ellsworth was slain.
“Col. Elmer Ellsworth and
The Marshall House Incident”
can be seen through February
2012 at the Fort Ward Museum
& Historic Site.
NEW YORK STATE MILI-
TARY MUSEUM: The Empire
State’s repository for its mili-
tary heritage is located in Sara-
toga Springs, just north of Mal-
ta, the town where Ellsworth
was born in1837. The museum’s
collection includes the uniform
coat Ellsworth was wearing
when Jackson fired a shotgun
into his chest as the 24-year-old
officer descended the stairs
leading to the Marshall House’s
roof. The coat, still showing the
hole where the slug entered, is
on display, along with one of
Ellsworth’s swords and a
Zouave drill manual.
Jackson’s flag — originally 14
feet by 24 feet — is among the
museum’s collection of more
than 800 Civil War battle flags,
the largest state collection in
the nation. Large swaths of the
banner were cut up for souve-
nirs after Ellsworth’s death;
about 55 percent of the original
flag survives. One of several
large stars on Jackson’s flag was
removed and saved by Ells-
worth’s uncle, who later donat-
ed the item to a local Civil War
veterans group. The neighbor-
ing Town of Saratoga came into
possession of the star, which
was donated to the museum in
August 2006, reuniting it with
the flag for the first time in more
than 140 years.
The flag is being worked on
by the state’s flag conservators
and is scheduled go on display
July12 as part of a Civil War bat-
tle flags exhibit at the state Cap-
itol in Albany.
Ellsworth’s death devastated
Lincoln, who had his protégé’s
funeral held in the White House
before the body was sent north,
where it lay in state in NewYork
City and Albany before being
buried in nearby Mechanicville,
where Ellsworth grew up.
On a rainy Sunday morning
earlier in May, more than 50
Civil War re-enactors joined
about 250 spectators for a re-en-
actment of Ellsworth’s funeral
at Hudson View Cemetery.
Signs lead visitors to his grave,
located in the Ellsworth family
plot ringed by a wrought-iron
fence.
The Ellsworth coat and Jack-
son flag are part of the collec-
tion of the New York State Mil-
itary Museum.
CIVIL WAR
Continued from Page 8F
AP PHOTOS
A cannon at the Fort Ward Museum in Alexandria, Va.
A bullet hole in the uniform
coat of Col. Elmer Ellsworth at
the New York State Military
Museum and Veterans Re-
search Center in Saratoga
Springs, N.Y.
What: Fort Ward Museum & His-
toric Site
Where: 4301 West Braddock Road,
Alexandria
Contact: www.fortward.org or
703-746-4848
Hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday
through Saturday and noon-5 p.m.
Sundays. Park open 9 a.m.-sunset
daily.
Admission: Free, but guided tours
are $2 per person.
•••
What: New York State Military
Museum
Where: 61 Lake Ave., Saratoga
Springs
Contact: dmna.state.ny.us/histor-
ic/mil-hist.htm or 518-581-5100
Hours: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday
through Saturday and noon-4 p.m.
Sundays.
Admission: Free
IF YOU GO
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 PAGE 7F
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Bay, $16.99
11. Something Borrowed. Emily
Giffin. St. Martin’s Griffin, $14.99
12. The Passage. Justin Cronin.
Ballantine, $16
◆ B E S T S E L L E R S
Is there anyone out there who
still wants areputationas ascholar
of the ancient classics — without
bothering to learn Latin and
Greek? It’s simple and easy. Just
read a consistently amusing but
quite serious book by a woman
known as one of Britain’s leading
broadcast comedians.
Thenjust quote.
Author Natalie Haynes was
struckinher preteens witha crush
on the old accounts. She pursued
aneducationinclassical languages
and literature that took her
through Cambridge University.
That’s a better way to become ex-
pert. It enables “The Ancient
GuidetoModernLife”tocoverhis-
tory fromthe oldest known Greek
philosophers to the collapse of the
Romanempire.
When she was 12, Haynes was
touched by the story of a couple
who enjoyed their house and gar-
den in Pompeii. The couple didn’t
know — as Natalie knew — what
the eruption of
Mount Vesuvius
inA.D. 79would
dotoall of them.
When she
read Virgil’s
“The Aeneid,”
she was hit by
another emo-
tion: indigna-
tion. Today’s stories for children
about the Trojan horse might have
beenjudgedbyTrojaneyesasover-
simplifiedandunfair.
They weren’t stupid about the
big wooden carving loaded with
Greek soldiers that they took into
their city. To them, sneaky Greeks
andsupernatural monsters sent by
Greek gods were just too much for
their kindnatures.
“I wasashookedasthepoor Tro-
jans,” she writes.
Describing an ancient event in
today’s terms brings it to life and
clarifies new thought that the de-
scriptionmay inspire.
She complains of today’s world
wheresomanypeoplerefusetoac-
knowledge anything but the pre-
sent. Soherbookcompilessomeof
what sheconsiders thebest stories
of the ancient world, stories about
people much like ourselves, from
whom we may have something to
learn.
“Myths are debunked — Julius
Caesar’s last words weren’t ‘Et tu,
Brute?”’ shewrites. That’sLatinfor
“Youtoo, Brutus?”
That’s debatable but worth de-
bating. She finds one ancient
source, knownfor gossip, whosug-
gestedthat Caesar’s words, as con-
spirators plunged their daggers in-
to him, were not Latin but Greek.
The Greekwords translate as “You
too, child?”
A possible explanation: Caesar
was known to have a long-termre-
lationship with a married woman,
and she had a son named Marcus
Junius Brutus.
Caesar might have been the fa-
ther.
Why the Greek language? The
author doesn’t explain. Many edu-
cated Romans spoke Greek. But
maybe Caesar’s last thought was
that the less educatedinthe crowd
would miss the implied insult to
the lady and her young son if he
avoided identifying them in the
language they understood.
British comedian reinterprets ancient events to reflect modern-day life
By CARL HARTMAN
For The Associated Press
“The Ancient Guide to Modern
Life” (The Overlook Press), by
Natalie Haynes:
A bracing return for Alex
McKnight
Although it was 2006 when
Steve Hamilton last published an
Alex McKnight novel, the author
hits the ground running in his ex-
cellent eighth thriller about his
reluctant private investigator
from upper Michigan.
Despite the five-year lag, Ha-
milton doesn’t miss a beat in re-
establishing Alex as a sturdy,
complex character more than ca-
pable of carrying a series. At the
same time,
Hamilton
makes his
character
seem fresh
and new —
as if we nev-
er met Alex
before —
with an in-
volving and
emotionally
charged plot
that skirts
the edge of
noir.
“Misery Bay” showcases Hamil-
ton’s dark vision and his talents as
a sturdy plotter. Although Alex
McKnight has been missing in ac-
tion for a few years, Hamilton
hasn’t exactly been idle. His 2010
“The Lock Artist” recently won
the 2010 Edgar Award.
“Misery Bay” is as bracing and
challenging as the cold wind that
blows off Lake Superior. “Misery
Bay” works equally well as a pri-
vate eye tale, a police procedural
and a character study. As the en-
grossing novel develops, Alex
learns that sometimes minor inci-
dents have major consequences.
Alex is as Hamilton last left
him. He’s getting over a tragedy,
tending to those visitors who rent
cabins from him in the ironically
named Paradise, Mich., and
spending his nights drinking at
his local pub run by his friend,
Jackie.
Alex is there at the Glasgow Inn
one cold night when his least fa-
vorite person, Sault Ste. Marie po-
lice chief Roy Maven, shows up
asking him to help a friend. Put-
ting aside his feelings, Alex, him-
self a former cop, agrees to meet
with Roy’s friend, U.S. Marshal
Charles “Raz” Razniewski. Raz
wants Alex to find out what drove
his only son to recently commit
suicide in an isolated area near
Misery Bay. But Alex uncovers an
insidious pattern of crimes that
targets former marshals and their
grown children.
The reluctantly growing friend-
ship between Alex and Roy be-
comes a cornerstone of the plot as
the two men put aside their differ-
ences for a greater good.
Hamilton’s view of the harsh,
bleak landscape of winter in Mi-
chigan’s Upper Peninsula will
have readers grabbing their coats
and gloves as the frigid air seems
to seep through the pages.
“Misery Bay” is like a visit with
an old friend with whom you can’t
wait to catch up.
A bracing
return for
a famed
character
By OLINE H. COGDILL
Sun Sentinel
“Misery Bay” by Steve Hamilton;
Minotaur (304 pages, $24.99)
T
he first album I fell in love with was Simon
and Garfunkel’s “Bridge Over Troubled Wa-
ter.” I was about 7 years old; the albumhad
beenout for eight years.
I didn’t knowit would be their
last album, and I wouldn’t have
cared. Onlythemusicmatteredto
me. It would be much later that I
wouldacquireaninterest inmusi-
cians as actual people withactual
lives and turn to journalists and
chroniclerstotellmetheirstories.
DavidBrowne’s “FireandRain:
TheBeatles, Simon&Garfunkel,
JamesTaylor, CSNY, andtheLost
Storyof1970”isaworthyaddition
toanyone’s collectionof suchmu-
sic histories. As the account of a
single year in music, Browne
weaves the narratives of four
bands and artists who each re-
leasedanalbumof lastinginfluen-
ce in 1970: The Beatles’ “Let It
Be;” Crosby, Stills, Nash &
Young’s “Déjàvu;” James Taylor’s
“Sweet Baby James;” and my fa-
vorite, Simon and Garfunkel’s
“Bridge Over TroubledWater.”
What emerges is a scrutiny of
asignificant yearof transition—
the ’60s counterculture is rapid-
ly receding inthe country’s rear-
view mirror, the singer-song-
writer focus of the’70s has yet to
take hold — that holds its own
against any other year in terms
of its dramatic tensions and cre-
ative output, not to mention in-
creasingly traumatic national
events liketheshootings at Kent
State Universityandthe govern-
ment’s response to a series of
bombings perpetrated by radi-
cal fringe anti-war groups.
The one problem with orga-
nizingsuchadetailedaccount is
there tends not to be extreme
personal changes over the
course of a single year. Bands
that are fighting in February are
still fighting in November and
over pretty much the same
things. But thenuancedaccount
of thestruggles inherent inmak-
ing music is more than enough
to satisfy, as are the delightful
surprise connections and asides
scattered throughout the book.
Browne’s detailing of Simon
and Garfunkel’s dissolution is
poignant, andwhilethesections
about CSNY verge on tabloid
gossip, I couldn’t helpbut beriv-
etedbytheaccount of thisgroup
of immensely talented people
who also, when they weren’t at
eachother’sthroats, seemedlike
they’d be cool to hang out with.
Andthat’s basicallywhyweread
books about musicians, right?
A detailed account of year of music
By MICHELLE WIENER
For The Associated Press
“Fire and Rain: The Beatles, Simon & Garfunkel, James Taylor,
CSNY, and the Lost Story of 1970” (Da Capo Press), by David
Browne:
C M Y K
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A
LEXANDRIA, Va. — Col. Elmer Ellsworth never
stepped foot in Fort Ward, but a lock of his hair and
his uniform cap have made it here to the grounds of
one of the dozens of Union strongholds built around the
Washington, D.C., area after the outbreak of the Civil War.
Ellsworth was the first Union officer killed in the conflict.
His death on May 24, 1861, while removing a flag from the
top of the Marshall House hotel in Alexandria caused a sen-
sation throughout the nation, prompting thousands of men
across the northern states to enlist for the Union cause and
go to war against the South. He was made a martyr in the
North, and his image appeared on stationery, sheet music,
pottery and memorial lithographs throughout the war.
Although Ellsworth’s death
preceded the construction of
Fort Ward and the 67 other Civil
War forts that guarded the na-
tion’s capital, he’s the focus of a
new exhibit at the Fort Ward
Museum and Historic Site in
Alexandria, just across the Po-
tomac River fromthe District of
Columbia.
“We are a Union fort,” said
Walton Owen, assistant direc-
tor and curator at Fort Ward,
“and he’s an important part of
our local history and the occu-
pation of Alexandria.”
The 150th anniversary of Ells-
worth’s death is also the subject
of an exhibit at the Smithso-
nian’s National Portrait Gallery
in Washington, D.C., and sever-
al of his artifacts — including
the uniform coat he was wear-
ing when he died — are on dis-
play at the New York State Mil-
itary Museum in Saratoga
Springs.
Forever linked with Ellsworth
is James Jackson, the Marshall
House proprietor and staunch
secessionist who shot the
Union officer in a stairway of
the hotel. Cpl. Francis Brown,
one of Ellsworth’s soldiers, shot
and killed Jackson, who was
hailed in the South as the “first
martyr” of the Confederate
States of America. While Ells-
worth is buried under a 40-foot-
tall obelisk at his gravesite in
upstate New York, there’s no
memorial in the South dedicat-
ed to Jackson, though his name
was added to Alexandria’s Con-
federate Statue 11 years after it
was unveiled on May 24, 1889.
Before the war, Ellsworth
gained national fame while
leading a military-style drill
teamcalled the Zouaves, known
for their distinct uniforms of
red pantaloons, red fezzes and
blue brocaded jackets. He also
became close friends with Abra-
ham Lincoln while clerking in
the future president’s law office
in Illinois, and he campaigned
for the Republican Party candi-
date during the 1860 election.
FORT WARD MUSEUM
AND HISTORIC SITE: Fort
Ward was named for Command-
er James Harmon Ward, the
first Union naval officer to be
killed in the Civil War. Con-
struction began in September
1861 and was completed in
about a month. The fort was the
fifth largest of the installations
collectively known as the De-
fenses of Washington. Traces of
about 24 of the fortifications
still exist, including Fort Ward,
considered the best-preserved
of the sites still accessible to the
public.
Operated by the city of Alex-
andria, the museum and adja-
cent park offer visitors a
glimpse of what a garrison sol-
dier’s life was like during the
Civil War. A reconstructed offi-
cers’ hut represents a typical
fort dwelling of the era, while
Fort Ward’s Northwest Bastion,
mounted by several cannons,
has been completely restored.
Other earthwork walls have
been preserved at the site, set
amid the lush landscape of a 40-
acre park located in a residen-
tial neighborhood. The park has
picnic facilities, restrooms and
an open-air amphitheater for
weekly summer concerts.
A road rings the site’s perim-
eter while a walking path passes
Civil War death explored in 3 exhibits
AP PHOTOS
The exterior of the Fort Ward Museum in Alexandria, Va. Although Col. Elmer Ellsworth’s death
preceded the construction of Fort Ward and the 67 other Civil War forts that guarded the nation’s
capital, he’s the focus of a new exhibit at the Fort Ward Museum and Historic Site in Alexandria, just
across the Potomac River from the District of Columbia.
Col. Elmer Ellsworth by the
Mathew Brady Studio. The
150th anniversary of Ells-
worth’s death is the subject of
an exhibit at the Smithsonian’s
National Portrait Gallery in
Washington, D.C.
By CHRIS CAROLA Associated Press
See CIVIL WAR, Page 6F
Col. Elmer Ellsworth’s death
preceded the construction of
Fort Ward and the 67 other
Civil War forts that guarded the
nation’s capital.
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 PAGE 1G
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Find Your
Garage Sales
On The Map!
Find Your
Garage Sales
On The Map!
Find Your
Garage Sales
On The Map!
at
timesleader.com
t
timesleader com
a
.
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
2
9
2
4
6
0
KEN
POLLOCK
SUPER CENTER
PRE-OWNED
Ken Pollock k AT
339 HWY 315, PITTSTON, PA
Hours
M-F 9-8pm
Sat 9-5pm
1-800-223-1111
www.kenpollocksuzuki.com
CLOSE TO EVERYWHERE
WE’RE EASY TO FIND
JUST OFF EXIT 175
RTE I-81 • PITTSTON
* Tax & Tags Additional. Artwork for illustration purposes only. Not responsible for typographical errors. ** See Salesperson for complete details. ***Based on 3 Month District Avg from Suzuki Survey Statistics.
KEN POLLOCK PRE-OWNED
SUPER CENTER
Ken Pollock Suzuki
339 Highway 315, Pittston
LOCATED AT
The power of engineering.
Number 1 in Service Customer Satisfaction***
AS TRADED SPECIALS
Stk#S1502A, Power Windows/Locks,
Auto, CD
$
2,950
*
1999 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA
4WD
Stk#S1510A, Automatic,
A/C, Dual Airbags
$
2,950
*
2000 FORD ESCORT ZX2
Stk# S1594A, Automatic, AM/FM/CD,
Air Conditioning
$
3,550
*
2003 FORD FOCUS SEDAN
Stk# S1447A, Sunroof, Automatic,
Power Windows/Locks
$
4,950
*
2003 CHEVROLET
CAVALIER SPORT COUPE
AS TRADED
SPECIAL
AS TRADED
SPECIAL
AS TRADED
SPECIAL
AS TRADED
SPECIAL
Value Vehicle Outlet
• 3 Day or 150 Mile Money Back Guarantee**
• 30 Day/1000 Mile Limited Warranty**
• All Value Vehicle Outlet Cars Pass
PA State Inspection**
Stk# S1584A, Power Windows/Locks,
5 Speed, A/C, Only 42K Miles!
$
7,950
*
2001 CHEVY EXPRESS
PASSENGER VAN
$
7,550
*
Stk# S1493A, 1500 Series, Automatic, V6,
Power Windows, Low Miles!
2004 SUZUKI XL7 SUV 4WD
Stk# S1575A, Power Windows/Locks, CD, A/C
$
6,850
*
2007 CHEVROLET HHR LT
Stk# P14253A, Alloy Wheels, Automatic,
CD, Power Windows/Locks
$
7,850
*
2004 HYUNDAI SONATA SEDAN
Stk# P14331, GLS Pkg,
Power Windows/Locks, Auto
$
6,950
*
2008 CHEVROLET COBALT LT SDN
Stk# P14241B, Power Windows/Locks, CD, Automatic
$
11,350
*
Stk# P14320, LT Package, Leather, Alloy Wheels, CD
$
9,950
*
2006 CHEVROLET COBALT
COUPE
Stk#S1561A, Automatic, CD, A/C, Power Locks
$
9,750
*
2010 HYUNDAI ACCENT GLS SEDAN
Stk# P14322, Automatic, A/C, AM/FM/CD
$
11,950
*
2004 FORD F150 SUPER CAB
4X4
Stk# P14306, STX Pkg, Automatic, V8, CD
$
12,950
*
2004 CHEVROLET AVALANCHE 4X4
Stk# S1566A, Z71 Pkg, Power Windows/Locks, Navigation
$
11,850
*
2010 KIA RIO LX SEDAN
Stk# P14311, Automatic, A/C, AM/FM/CD
$
11,950
*
2005 CHEVROLET EQUINOX AWD
GOLD CHECK CERTIFIED VEHICLES
2010 SUZUKI KIZASHI GTS
Sunroof, Power Memory Seats, Automatic, Rockford Fosgat Stereo
$
18,950
*
MANAGER’S SPECIAL
2004 NISSAN SENTRA
SEDAN
2010 KIA FORTE
EX SEDAN
Power Windows/Locks, CD, Automatic,
4 Cylinder, 2 To Choose From At...
$
13,950
*
2009 VOLKSWAGEN
BEETLE
Stk# P14314, Leather, Automatic, CD, Power
Windows/Locks
$
14,850
*
2010 CHEVROLET
COBALT SEDAN
Stk# P14315, 2LT Pkg, Alloy Wheels, Power
Windows/Locks, CD, Auto
$
14,950
*
2010 MAZDA 3 SEDAN
Stk# P14279, Alloy Wheels, Automatic,
Power Windows/Locks, CD
$
14,950
*
2010 CHRYSLER
SEBRING LIMITED SDN
Stk# P14277, Leather, Alloy Wheels, Power
Windows/Locks, CD
$
15,650
*
2009 SUBARU
FORESTER AWD
Stk# S1382A, Power Windows/Locks,
CD, Keyless, Auto
$
18,550
*
2008 HONDA ACCORD
EX-L SEDAN
Stk# P14312, Sunroof, Leaather, Auto,
4 Cylinder, Power Seat
$
18,950
*
2008 HONDA
PILOT 4X4
Stk# P14283, SE Pkg, Alloy Wheels,
Automatic, 3rd Row, CD
$
19,750
*
2009 KIA BORREGO LX
4X4 SUV
Stk# P13777, 3rd Row, Alloy Wheels, Power
Windows/Locks, CD
$
19,850
*
2009 JEEP
WRANGLER 4X4
Stk# P14334, Wheel Pkg, Power Windows/
Locks, Air Conditioning
$
20,950
*
2010 SUZUKI SX4
AWD CROSSOVER
Stk# S1469A, Automatic, CD, Power
Windows/Locks
$
14,950
*
2009 PONTIAC VIBE
Stk# S1389A, GT Pkg, Automatic,
18” Wheels, CD, A/C
$
14,650
*
2008 SUBARU
IMPREZA WAGON AWD
Stk# P14335, Automatic, CD, All Wheel
Drive, A/C, Power Windows/Locks
$
15,750
*
2010 HONDA CIVIC
EX COUPE
Stk# P14332, Sunroof, Auto, CD, Power
Windows/Locks, Alloys
$
17,950
*
2010 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE 4X4
Stk# P14266, Alloy Wheels, Power
Windows/Lcoks, CD, A/C
$
20,850
*
2010 JEEP
COMMANDER 4X4
Stk# P14251, Alloy Wheels, Power Windows/
Locks, CD, 3rd Row
$
20,950
*
2009 CHRYSLER
300C AWD
Stk# S1394A, Sunroof, Leather, 5.7L V8
Hemi, Navigation, DVD
$
25,750
*
2009 GMC ACADIA
4X4 SUV
Stk# P14271, 3rd Row, 2nd Row Bucket
Seats, Sunroof, Leather, Alloy Wheels
$
29,950
*
2011 SUZUKI
GRAND VITARA 4WD
Stk# S1390A, Navigation, Auto, CD, A/C,
Power Windows/Locks
$
19,750
*
2011 SUZUKI KIZASHI
GTS AWD
Stk#S1582A, Sunroof, Alloy Wheels,
All Wheel Drive, Auto, Power Seat
$
21,850
*
2009 NISSAN
MURANO SL AWD
Stk# P14329A, Skyview Sunroof, Heated Leather,
Power Seat, Rearview Mirror, and More!
$
22,350
*
WVON¡MO VALLEV
WHEN YOU FINANCE A VEHICLE
UP TO 36 MONTHS OF FREE GAS
415 Kidder Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
570.822.8870
steve@yourcarbank.com
www.wyomingvalleyautomart.com
See sales
representative
for details
FREE
GAS
ÐUV MEME º PAV MEME º ÐUV MEME
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
Home O f T h e L ifetime L ab orF ree W arranty
344-8558
3905 Birney Ave
M o o s ic, PA
w w w.gr on s k is .com
GRONSKI’S
Since 1951
CELEB R ATING 60 Y EAR S!
M O TO R C Y C LE INSP EC TIO N
$19.99
$
15
00
FAM ILY O W NED AND O P ER ATED SINCE 1951
A U TO INSP EC TIO N
M A Y -JU NE-JU LY
NO W DU E!
W ith T h is Coupon
SENIO R C ITIZEN SP EC IA L
$
10
99 Em is s io n s In s pe c tio n
W ith T h is Coupon
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
LOST DOG, male
Golden Doodle
named Cooper on
Thursday 6/2 in the
area of Keelersburg
Falls in Tunkhannock
If seen, please call
(570) 333-4139 or
(570) 406-2702
110 Lost
ALL JUNK CARS
WANTED!!
ŠCALL ANYTIME
ŠFREE REMOVAL
ŠCA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
110 Lost
LOST - Cat. White
with orange ears,
nose & tail, blue
eyes & friendly.
Honey Pot section
of Nanticoke. Miss-
ing since May 16.
REWARD.
570-735-5069
570-735-5905
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
110 Lost
LOST - June 2nd.
Black Standard
Poodle. Female.
Named Jadzia. In
Pittston on Hwy 315
near Turnpike and
I81 ramps. She is
our world. Reward.
Please call 352-
540-0640 or 276-
613-2556
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
110 Lost
ALL
JUNK
CAR &
TRUCKS
WANTED
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call V&G
Anytime
288-8995
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
Lost Black Motor
Cycle Saddle Bag.
Between Kingston
and Forty Fort on
Friday 5-27.Please
contact Charles at
570-287-5205
110 Lost
LOST: TAN MALE
POMERANIAN
vicinity of Huntsville
Reservoir, Dallas
Township. Brown
leather collar and
chipped tooth,
answers to “Tazz”.
If found please call
570-675-0385
135 Legals/
Public Notices
NOTICE OF
PUBLIC SALE
Bolus Truck Parts
and Towing Ser-
vices, Inc., 922
Sanderson Street,
Throop, PA 18512
will sell the hereun-
der described prop-
erty of Got Trash,
Inc. to satisfy liens:
2004
Kenworth Tractor
(Roll-off Tri-axle)
VIN # INKDXUTXX4
J065899
PA Reg. # YXR1730
Date: June 8, 2011
Time: 10:00AM
Find the car
you want
in your own
backyard.
t
i
m
e
s
l
e
a
d
e
r
a
u
t
o
s
.
c
o
m
230 Real Estate
Auction
230 Real Estate
Auction
16.9 ACRE
FARM
BENTON TOWNSHIP
COLUMBIA COUNTY, PA
Auction to be held on site
Sun., June 19, 2011, 2 PM
ª 17 Rocky Ho¡¡ow Road
ª S Bedroom Home
ª 1 S/4 Baths
ª 2 F¡rep¡aces ª Workshop
ª L¡vestock Barn
ª 12 Acres Fenced ª Pond
ª Gas and O¡¡ R¡ghts tnc¡uded
ª 2% Rea¡tor Part¡c¡pat¡on tnv¡ted
Call for terms and conditions.
Janice M. and Victor L.J. Felix
Home of 17 Years
R
E
A
L
E
S
T
A
T
E
A
U
C
T
I
O
N
Steve Letteer
Auctioneer - AU3170L
266 Derr Road, Benton, PA 17814
(570) 490-5795
www.letteer.com
bidonitnow@verizon.net
PAGE 2G SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
468 Auto Parts
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
468 Auto Parts
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
We Buy Scrap Metal
$$$$ ALL KINDS $$$$
PIPE - ROD - SHEET - BAR - TUBING - TURNINGS - BEAMS -
PUNCHINGS - OLD CARS -TRUCKS -
MACHINERY - FARM EQUIPMENT - METAL ROOFING -
ENGINES - TRANSMISSIONS -EXHAUST SYSTEM PARTS -
APPLIANCES - ANYAND ALL SCRAP METAL
FREE CONTAINER SERVICE
Small quantities to 1,000’s of tons accepted
HIGHEST PRICES PAID
FAST SETTLEMENTS
CALL DMS SHREDDING, INC
570-346-7673
570-819-3339
Your Scrap Metal is worth $$$
Call Today!
AS ALWAYS ****HIGHEST PRICES*****
PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED
VEHICLES!!!
DRIVE IN PRICES
Call for Details (570) 459-9901
Vehicles must be COMPLETE !!
Plus Enter to Win $500.00 Cash!!
DRAWING TO BE HELD JUNE 30
Harry’s U Pull It
www.wegotused.com
BUYING JUNK VEHICLES
$300 and Up
$125 extra if driven,
pulled or pushed in.
NOBODY Pays More
570-760-2035
Monday thru Saturday 6am-pm
Happy Trails!
AUTO
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
472 Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up 822-0995
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Like New
Tires
$15 & UP!
Like New
Batteries
$20 & UP!
Carry Out Price
288-8995
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Like New
Tires
$15 & UP!
Like New
Batteries
$20 & UP!
Carry Out Price
288-8995
WANTED
Cars & Full Size
Trucks. For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto
Parts 477-2562
LAW DIRECTORY
Don’t Keep Your Practice a Secret!
Call
829-7130
To Place Your Ad
310 Attorney
Services
ADOPTION
DIVORCE
CUSTODY
Estates, DUI
ATTORNEY
MATTHEW LOFTUS
570-255-5503
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
Divorce, Custody,
Support, PFA
FREE Consultation.
Atty. Josianne
Aboutanos
Wilkes-Barre
570-208-1118
310 Attorney
Services
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
FREE CONSULTATION
for all legal matters
Attorney Ron Wilson
570-822-2345
Joseph M. Blazosek
B A N K R U P T C Y
DUI - ARD
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY BENEFITS
WORKERS’ COMP
Free Consultation
25+ Years Experience
570-655-4410
570-822-9556
blazoseklaw.com
Attorney
Keith Hunter
Bankruptcies
MAHLER, LOHIN
& ASSOCIATES
(570) 718-1118
310 Attorney
Services
MARGIOTTI
LAW OFFICES
BANKRUPTCY
Free Consult
Payment Plans
(570) 970-9977
Wilkes-Barre
(570) 223-2536
Stroudsburg
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
DEADLINES
Saturday
12:30 on Friday
Sunday
4:00 pm on
Friday
Monday
4:30 pm on
Friday
Tuesday
4:00 pm on
Monday
Wednesday
4:00 pm on
Tuesday
Thursday
4:00 pm on
Wednesday
Friday
4:00 pm on
Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
You may email
your notices to
mpeznowski@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or
questions regard-
ing legal notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
at 570-970-7371
or 570-829-7130
150 Special Notices
ADOPT
Adoring couple
longs to share our
lives and give
your newborn
secure, endless
love.
Expenses paid
Mindy and Rob
888-736-7567
ADOPT: Adoring
Mom, Dad, Big
Brother would like
to share a lifetime
of hugs & kisses
in our loving home
with a newborn.
Please Call
Lynda & Dennis
888-688-1422
Expenses Paid
Adoption Adoption is a
choice you’ve
made out of love.
We dream of
giving your
newborn a safe,
secure lifetime of
love. Please call
Theresa & Steve
@ 1-877-801-7256
or visit
TheresaAndSteve
.shutterfly.com
The longest
train for a wed-
ding dress was
in Germany and
was 515 feet!
bridezella.net
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
ALL
JUNK
CAR &
TRUCKS
WANTED
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call V&G
Anytime
288-8995
MONTY MONTY SA SAYS YS
Marty B. and his
partner are a
class act. Great
effort so far.
Bringing it home
today. Thanks to
Dr. P.K. I could-
n't have done it
with out your
help. Big Larry
and Floyd had a
great weekend
so far...Keep it
up.
The key to
change is to let
go of fear!
150 Special Notices
P PA AYING $500 YING $500
MINIMUM
DRIVEN IN
Full size 4 wheel
drive trucks
ALSO PAYING TOP $$$
for heavy equip-
ment, backhoes,
dump trucks,
bull dozers
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm
310 Attorney
Services
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
360 Instruction &
Training
ATTEND COLLEGE
ONLINE from home.
*Medical *Business
*Paralegal* Comput-
ers *Criminal Jus-
tice. Job placement
assistance. Com-
puter available.
Financial Aid if quali-
fied. Call
888-220-3984
www .
CenturaOnline.com
TUTORING
AVAILABLE K-3
Offered At Jenny
Lynn Academy
131 E. Vaughn St
Kingston, PA
All Subjects
570-814-1316
380 Travel
BOOK OF MORMON
On Broadway
1-800-432-8069
CAMEO HOUSE
BUS TOURS
6/26 Brooklyn
Flea/Chinatown/
Little Italy
7/24 Alexander
McQueen Exhibit @
Metropolitan
Museum/14th St.
Showroom/Highline
11/12 The
Chocolate Show
(570) 655-3420
Erie Canal/Herkimer
Mine 6/18
Bronx Zoo 6/23
Culinary Inst/Vander
Mansion 6/29
Knoebels 6/29
Camden
Aquarium/Ferry 7/2
Seneca Wine
Tasting 7/6
Dome Train/Tioga
Downs 7/9
1-800-432-8069
JULY 4TH WEEKEND
N. MYRTLE BEACH
Adorable 3 bed-
room cottage with
amenities.
June 30-July 5
$1,750.
Call (570) 655-8820
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
SUZUKI`09
KING QUAD 750AXI
Hunter green. 214
miles. Excellent
condition. 50”
Moose plow with
manual lift included.
Asking $5,900
(570) 299-0560
TOMAHAWK`10
ATV, 125 CC. Brand
New Tomahawk mid
size 125cc 4 wheel-
er. Only $995 takes
it away!. Call
386-334-7448
Wilkes-Barre
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
YAMAHA`04 RHINO
Excellent condition,
200 hours. Priced
to sell. $6,500 or
best offer. Call
Keith 570-971-4520
409 Autos under
$5000
CADILLAC `94
DEVILLE SEDAN
94,000 miles,
automatic, front
wheel drive, 4
door, air condi-
tioning, air bags,
all power, cruise
control, leather
interior, $3,300.
570-394-9004
CHEVY ‘99
S-10 PICKUP
2WD, 5-speed
115,000 miles.
$3,295
DODGE `95 NEON
Nicely Equipped!
Automatic, white
2 door.
Only $999
(570) 301-7221
advertisinguy
@gmail.com
OLDS ‘89
CUTLASS SIERRA
72,000 miles.
New Inspection
AC Blows Cold
$2,195
PLYMOUTH 1995
VOYAGER
Great work van or
reliable 7 passen-
ger transportation.
Air & radio inopera-
ble. 120K miles.
Recently inspected.
Well maintained and
personally serviced
vehicle. $1,800 or
best reasonable
offer. Call
(570) 820-0677
412 Autos for Sale
AUDI `02 A4
1.8 Turbo, AWD,
Automatic, white
with beige leather
interior. 84,000
Miles. Very Good
Condition. $8,900
(570) 696-9809
(570) 690-4262
AUDI `02 A4
3.0, V6, AWD
automatic, tiptronic
transmission. Fully
loaded, leather
interior. 92,000
miles. Good condi-
tion. Asking $9,500.
Call (570) 417-3395
07 Impala LS $8,995
09JEEP PATRIOT $12,995
08Taurus SEL $12,495
08RAM 1500 $12,495
04 BLAZER 4X4 $7,995
06Suzuki Reno$6,995
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
BEN’S AUTO SALES
RT 309 W-BTwp.
Near Wegman’s
570-822-7359
BMW `01 X5
4.4i. Silver, fully
loaded, tan leather
interior. 1 owner.
103k miles. $12,999
or best offer. Call
570-814-3666
BMW `02 330
CONVERTIBLE
83K miles. Beautiful
condition. Newly
re-done interior
leather & carpeting.
$13,500.
570-313-3337
BMW `03 530 I
Beige with tan
leather interior.
Heated seats, sun-
roof, 30 MPG high-
way. Garage kept.
Excellent condition
86,000 miles.
Asking $11,500.
(570) 788-4007
412 Autos for Sale
ACME AUTO SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD
CREDIT, NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a
Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
08 CHEVY IMPALA LT
Dove grey, alloys,
V6
08 BUICK LACROSSE
CXL, Silver/grey
leather, sunroof
08 CHRYSLER SEBRING
Silver V6 auto
07 DODGE CALIBER
SXT,blue, 4 cyl auto
06 CHRYSLER 300
White V6
05 CHEVY AVEO LT
black, auto, 4 cyl
05 JAGUAR X-TYPE
3.0, hunter green,
tan leather (AWD)
03 HYUNDAI ACCENT
White, 4 door, 4cyl.
66,000 miles
04 MITSU GALLANT
gry, auto, 4cyl,55k
04 CHRYSLER PT
CRUISER GT, slvr,blk
lthr, auto, sunroof
01 AUDI S8 QUATRO
Burg./tan lthr.,
Nav., 360 HP, AWD
01 AUDI A8 L
cashmere beige,
tan lthr., nav., AWD
00 CADILLAC CATERA
silver/blk leather,
sunroof, 56K
00 NISSAN ALTIMA GXE
Blue/grey
leather, auto, 4cyl.
00 MERCEDES-BENZ
S-430 slvr/blck
lthr., 64,000 miles
98 HONDA CIVIC EX,
2 dr, auto, silver
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4’s
08 CADILLAC ESCALADE
Blk/Blk leather, 3rd
seat, Navgtn, 4x4
07 Dodge Grand
Caravan SXT Blue
grey leather, 7
passenger mini van
07 DODGE NITRO SXT,
garnet red, V6, 4x4
06 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN ES, red,
4dr, entrtnmt cntr,
7 pass mini van
06 JEEP COMMANDER
Slvr, 3rd seat, 4x4
06 DODGE RAM 1500
SLT, Quad cab, slvr,
5.7 hemi, auto, 4x4
06 DAKOTA QUAD CAB
SLT, silver, auto.,
V6, 4x4
06 JEEP LIBERTY
SPORT white, V6,
4x4
05 BUICK RANIER CXL
gold, tan, leather,
sunroof (AWD)
05 MAZDA TRIBUTE S,
green, auto, V6,
4x4
05 GMC SIERRA
X-Cab, blk, auto,
4x4 truck
05 MERCURY MOUNT-
AINEER PREMIUM,
Silver, black leather,
3rd seat, AWD
04 CHEVY SUBURBAN
LS, pewter silver,
3rd seat, 4x4
04 FORD F-150
Heritage, X-cab,
blk, auto, 4x4
04 CHEVY TRAILBLAZ
ER seafoam
grn/tan lthr., 4x4
04 NISSAN XTERRA SE
blue, auto, 4x4
04 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
gold, 4 dr., V6, 4x4
03 DODGE RAM 1500
reg cab, red, auto,
75K, 4x4
03 CHEVY 1500, V8,
X-cab, white, 4x4
02 DODGE RAM 1500
Quad Cab, SLT,
Red auto 4x4 truck
02 MERCURY MOUNT-
AINEER PREMIUM,
white, tan leather,
3rd seat, 4x4
02 MAZDA TRIBUTE
White, auto, 4x4
76,000 miles 4x4
01 VOLVO V70
AWD, station
wagon, blue grey
leather, 84k miles.
00 KIA SPORTAGE EX
White, auto,
4 cyl. 4x4
00 FORD EXPEDITION
XLT, gold, 3rd seat
4x4
98 FORD RANGER,
Flairside, reg cap
truck, 5 spd, 4x4
copper
97 MERCURY
MOUNTAINEER
Green, green
leather, AWD
BMW `04 325i
5 Speed. Like New!!
New Tires, tinted
windows, sun roof,
black leather
interior. Only
57,000 Miles!!!
PRICE REDUCED TO
$14,000!!
For more info,
call (570) 762-3714
BMW `07 328xi
Black with black
interior. Heated
seats. Back up &
navigation sys-
tems. New tires &
brakes. Sunroof.
Garage kept. Many
extras! 46,000
Miles.
Asking $19,500.
570-825-8888 or
626-297-0155
Call Anytime!
Selling your
Camper?
Place an ad and
find a new owner.
570-829-7130
BMW `93 325 IC
Convertible,
Metallic Green
Exterior & Tan
Interior, 5 Speed
Transmission,
Heated Seats. 2nd
Owner, 66k Miles.
Excellent Condition,
Garage Kept,
Excellent Gas
Mileage. Carfax
available. Price
reduced $7,995
or trade for SUV or
other. Beautiful /
Fun Car.
570-388-6669
412 Autos for Sale
BMW ‘02 M3
Convertible. SMG
equipped. Brand
new wheels & tires.
All service records.
Navigation, Harmon
Kardon, 6 disc
changer, back up
sensors, xenons,
heated seats,
Only 77,000 miles,
Fully Loaded
$19,999
(570) 301-7221
advertisinguy
@gmail.com
Rare, Exclusive
Opportunity To
Own...
2002 BMW 745i
The Flagship of
the Fleet
New - $87,000
Midnight Emerald
with beige leather
interior. 61K miles.
Mint condition.
Loaded. Garage
Kept. Navigation
Stunning,
Must Sell!
$20,000
$18,600
‘26 FORD
MODEL T
Panel Delivery
100 point
Concours quality
restoration. Red
with black fend-
ers. Never Driven.
0 miles on
restoration.
RARE!
$40,000
$38,000
$36,500
1954 MERCURY
MONTEREY
WOODY WAGON
100 point restora-
tion. $130,000
invested. 6.0
Vortec engine.
300 miles on
restoration. Cus-
tom paint by
Foose Automo-
tive. Power win-
dows, a/c, and
much more!
Gorgeous
Automobile!
$75,000
$71,000
$69,900
From an Exotic,
Private Collection
Call 570-650-0278
BUICK `05 LESABRE
3.8 V6, 20 city/29
highway. 42,000
miles. Last year
full size model.
Excellent condition
in & out. Roadster
cloth roof. Gold with
tan interior. $7,900.
(570) 822-8001
BUICK `98 LESABRE
4 door. All leather.
114,000 miles. Great
shape. $2,600. Call
570-819-3140 or
570-709-5677
BUICK ‘97
LESABRE
83,000 miles.
Cold Air. New
Inspection
$3,495
CHEVROLET `03
IMPALA
97,000 miles,
$3,300.
570-592-4522
570-592-4994
412 Autos for Sale
CADILLAC `04
SEVILLE SLS
Beige. Fully loaded
Excellent condition.
Runs great. New
rotors, new brakes.
Just serviced.
108,000 miles. Ask-
ing $8,000. (570)
709-8492
CADILLAC ‘06 STS
AWD, 6 cylinder, Sil-
ver, 52,600 miles,
sunroof, heated
seats, Bose sound
system, 6 CD
changer, satellite
radio, Onstar, park-
ing assist, remote
keyless entry, elec-
tronic keyless igni-
tion, & more!
$17,000
570-881-2775
CENTRAL CITY
MOTORS
319 W. Main St.
Plymouth, PA
HIGHEST QUALITY
VEHICLES
All Guaranteed
Bumper to
Bumper For
30 Days
570-779-3890
570-829-5596
CHEVROLET `05
TAHOE Z71
Silver birch with
grey leather interior,
3rd row seating,
rear A/C & heat,
4WD automatic with
traction control, 5.3l
engine, moonroof,
rear DVD player.
Bose stereo + many
more options. Imm-
aculate condition.
76,000 adult driven
miles. $15,600. Call
(570) 378-2886 &
ask for Joanne
CHEVROLET `86
CORVETTE
4x3 manual, 3 over-
drive, 350 engine
with aluminum
heads. LT-1 exhaust
system. White with
red pearls. Custom
flames in flake. New
tires & hubs. 1
owner. 61,000 origi-
nal miles. $8,500
(570) 359-3296
Ask for Les
CHEVROLET `88
MONTE CARLO SS
V8, automatic,
51,267 miles,
MUST SELL
$5,500
(570) 760-0511
CHEVROLET ‘06
CORVETTE
CONVERTIBLE
Silver beauty, 1
Owner, Museum
quality. 4,900
miles, 6 speed. All
possible options
including Naviga-
tion, Power top.
New, paid $62,000
Must sell $45,900
570-299-9370
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
CHEVY `06 COLORADO
Extended cab. Auto.
Power steering, a/c.
40k miles. 2 wheel
drive.
$12,600, negotiable.
570-678-5040
CHEVY `07 HHR
Great on Gas. Man-
ual, 5 speed trans.
75K miles. New
inspection. Bronze
with tan interior. Dri-
vetrain Warranty till
4/12. $7,500. Call
570-239-2746
CHEVY ‘04 CLASSIC
4 door sedan, all
power options
Great on gas!
$4,490
MARSH MOTORS
1218 Main St.
Swoyersville, PA
570-718-6992
Buy-Sell-Trade
412 Autos for Sale
CHRYSLER `02
PT CRUISER
Inferno Red, flame
design. Chrome
wheels. 47,000
miles, one owner.
Looks and runs
great. New inspec-
tion. $5,800
Call (570) 472-1854
CHRYSLER `05
SEBRING LX
Low mileage, blue,
2 door, automatic.
Excellent condition
$7,500
(570) 740-7446
CHRYSLER `92
LEBARON
CONVERTIBLE
Mechanic’s Special
Needs engine seals
56K Original Miles.
Radiant Red. Mint
condition, new
paint, automatic,
new battery, tune
up, brakes, top.
Runs well.
$2,500
(347) 452-3650
(In Mountain Top)
CHRYSLER ‘06
300C HEMI
Light green, 18,000
miles, loaded,
leather, wood trim,
$24,000.
570-222-4960
leave message
FORD `04 MUSTANG
Mach I, 40th
ANNIVERSARY EDITION
V8, Auto, 1,300
miles, all options,
show room condi-
tion. Call for info.
Asking $24,995
Serious inquiries
only. 570-636-3151
FORD `05 FREESTAR
LIMITED EDITION
Low mileage, fully
loaded, $10,999.
negotiable.
570-283-1691
FORD `05
TAURUS SE
Beige exterior/inte-
rior, automatic win-
dows & lock, alloy
wheels and nice
condition. $6,200
(570) 606-1146
FORD `07 MUSTANG
63,000 highway
miles, silver, runs
great, $11,500.
negotiable.
570-479-2482
FORD `90 MUSTANG GT
Must See. Sharp!
Black, new direc-
tional tires, excel-
lent inside / outside,
factory stock, very
clean, must see to
appreciate. $8,000
or best offer. Must
sell. 570-269-0042
Leave Message
FORD `98 TAURUS
Gold. Good condi-
tion Runs great.
87,000 miles, R-
title, Recently
inspected.
$2,700. Call
(570) 814-6198
FORD ‘02
FOCUS WAGON
Low mileage,
One owner
$6,995
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
FORD ‘02 MUSTANG
GT CONVERTIBLE
Red with black
top. 6,500 miles.
One Owner.
Excellent Condi-
tion. $18,500
570-760-5833
412 Autos for Sale
FORD ‘05 EXPLORER
SPORT TRAC XLT
1/2 Ton, 4WD,
automatic, V6
$15,992
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
HONDA `07 CIVIC
EX. 34k miles.
excellent condition,
sunroof, alloys, a/c,
cd, 1 owner, garage
kept. $13,000. Call
570-760-0612
412 Autos for Sale
HONDA `06 CIVIC EX
2 door, 5 speed, air,
power windows &
locks, sun roof, CD,
cruise & alloys.
Excellent condition,
very well main-
tained with service
records, remaining
Honda warranty.
65K, $10,500.
570-706-0921
HONDA `07 CIVIC
Sport SI. Red, with
black interior,
75,000 miles. 6
speed, spoiler and
body kit. Tinted win-
dows,
Reduced $11,900
(570) 714-0384
TOYOTA `10
Camry SE. 56,000
miles. Red, alloy
wheels, black cloth
interior. Will consid-
er trade. $14,200
(570) 793-9157
412 Autos for Sale
HONDA `08 CIVIC
Every option avail-
able. Sunroof,
leather, navigation
system, premium
sound system.
Must sell. $16,000
or best offer
(570) 301-7221
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
HONDAS
‘10 Accord LX.
7K miles. Black / tan
PriceReduced$19,595
‘09 Accord EX. V6
14K, White / Leather
PriceReduced$21,295
‘08 Accord LX
PREMIUM: 14K, Gray
Warranty $17,995
‘08 Civics Choose
from Two. Low
miles, Warranty.
Starting at $14,495
MAFFEI AUTO
SALES
570-288-6227
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
HYUNDAI ‘03
ELANTRA
4 cylinder,
automatic, cd,
1 owner.
Economy Car!
$4,495
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
HYUNDAI `04
TIBURON GT
Blue, 5 speed
manual, CD, Air,
factory alarm,
power windows &
locks. 38K.
$7,500 negotiable.
Call 570-540-6236
INFINITI `05 G35
Sports Coupe. Black
with slate leather.
Original owner. 69K
miles. Fully
equipped with navi-
gation, sunroof, etc.
Always maintained
by Infiniti dealer.
Very nice. $15,750.
570-339-1552
After 4pm
JEEP `04 GRAND
CHEROKEE LIMITED
4WD, 6 cylinder
auto. Moonroof.
Fully powered. New
brakes & tires.
94,000 highway
miles. $11,500
(570) 822-6334
KIA `08 RONDO
Maroon with beige
interior. All options.
78,000 miles. Still
under warranty.
Received 60,000
mile servicing. New
tires. KBB Value
$8,500. Asking only
$7,900. A Must See!
(570) 457-0553
KIA ‘08 RIO LX
Sedan, automatic,
low miles
$11,650
560 Pierce St.
Kingston, PA
www.wyoming
valleymotors.com
570-714-9924
CHEVY ‘99 LUMINA
4 door, 6 cylinder,
automatic, $1,850
FORD ‘89 BRONCO II
2 door, 6 cylinder,
automatic, 4x4,
$1,550
Current Inspection
on all vehicles
DEALER
570-825-8253
LEXUS `06 LS 430
19,900 one owner
pampered miles.
Impeccable crystal
white finish with
saddle leather
interior. Positively
none nicer.
$29,500.
See at Orloski’s
Wash & Lube
295 Mundy Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702
Purebred Animals?
Sell them here with a
classified ad!
570-829-7130
Find
that
new
job.
The
Times Leader
Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an
employment ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL L NNNNL LYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LE LE LEE LE LE LEE LE LE DER.
timesleader.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 PAGE 3G
P ER
M O.
**
2011 NISSAN FRONTIER SV 4X4 CREW CAB 2011 NISSAN FRONTIER SV 4X4 CREW CAB
M SR P $29,595
B U Y FOR
$
24,595
*
includes $3000 Rebate
+ TAX
P ER
M O.
$
28 9
*
OR
L EAS E FOR
*39 M o n th L ea s e; 12,000 M iles PerY ea r; Res id u a l= $18,940; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1;
$0 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity & regis tra tio n fees . $0 L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed . $529 d u e a td elivery in clu d es
1s tm o n th p ym ta n d regis tra tio n fees . S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs In clu d es $3000 Reb a te.
STK# N20358
M O DEL# 32411
V6, Au to , Prem iu m Utility
Pkg, A/ C, PW , PDL ,
Cru is e, T ilt, 4x4, Allo y
W heels , F lo o rM a ts
229M UN DY S TRE E T
W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .
1-8 66-70 4-0 672 K E N P OL L OCK
www.ke n polloc kn is s a n .c om
N IS S A N
Th e #1 N is s a n De a le rin N .E. PA
*Ta x a nd Ta g a d d itio na l. Prio rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib lefo rTypo gra phic a l Erro rs . All Lea s es 12 k M iles PerYea rw / 1s tpa ym ent, ta gs & fees d u ea td elivery.
All reb a tes & inc entives a pplied . **0 % APR in lieu o f reb a tes . As k fo rd eta ils . ***$5 0 0 N M AC Ca ptiveCa s h, $5 0 0 Cu s to m erCa s h. M u s tfina nc ethru N M AC. Offers end Ju ne3 0 , 2 0 11.
K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N
THE NUM BER 1NIS S AN DEAL ER IN
THE NE AND C ENTRAL PA REGIO N
S C AN HERE FO R
S ERVIC E S PEC IAL S
P ER
M O.
**
2011 NISSAN MAXIMA SV SEDAN 2011 NISSAN MAXIMA SV SEDAN
STK# N19836
M O DEL# 16211
V6, CVT , Hea ted S ea ts &
S teerin g W heel, Rea rCa m era ,
L ea ther, Bo s e S o u n d , S p la s h
Gu a rd s & F lo o rM a ts
M SR P $35,730
B U Y FOR
$
30 ,730
*
w / $1,000 Rebate & $500 Non-NaviBonus C ash
+ TAX
P ER
M O.
$
329
*
OR
L EAS E FOR
*39 M o n th L ea s e; 12,000 M iles PerY ea r; Res id u a l= $20,723; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1;
$0 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity & regis tra tio n fees . $1000 L ea s e Reb a te In clu d ed & $500 No n -Na vi
Bo n u s Ca s h. S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $1000 reb a te & $500 No n -Na vi Bo n u s Ca s h.
P ER
M O.
**
2011 NISSAN CUBE 1.8 SL 2011 NISSAN CUBE 1.8 SL
STK# N20295
M O DEL# 21211
4 Cyl, CVT , Na viga tio n ,
Ba ck-Up Ca m er, XM Ra d io , Allo y
W heels , Ro ckfo rd F o s ga te S o u n d
S ys tem , F lo o rM a ts !
M SR P $20,940
B U Y FOR
$
18 ,995
*
*S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $0 reb a te.
H U R R Y!ON LY
3 CU B E’S
L EFT!!
B
I
G
B
I
G
B
I
G
M
O
N
E
Y
O
F
F
!
C
O
U
N
T
D
O
W
N
S
T
A
R
T
S
N
O
W
!
W OW !
W OW ! W OW !
L e a s e For: L e a s e For: L e a s e For:
$
239
$
239
$
239
W OW !
W OW ! W OW !
Buy For: Buy For: Buy For:
$
4500
$
4500
$
4500
OFF
OFF OFF
A LL 2011 NEW A LTIM A ’S
IN STO C K! O NLY !
IT’S BA CK !!!
IT’S BA CK !!! IT’S BA CK !!!
A
L
T
I
M A
N
I
A
A
L
T
I
M A
N
I
A
A
L
T
I
M A
N
I
A
RE TURN S
44
2011N E W
N IS S A N A L TIM A ’S
“N oM on e yDown ”
PER
M O .
+T & T
W E W IL L S E L L
2011 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5 SDN SPECIAL EDITION 2011 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5 SDN SPECIAL EDITION
STK# N20200
M O DEL# 13111
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, S p o iler, F o g L ights ,
Allo yW heels , PW , PDL , F lo o rM a ts
$
19,390
*
B U Y
FOR
w / $1250 Rebate & $500 NM A C C ash
*39 M o n th L ea s e; 12,000 M iles PerY ea r; Res id u a l= $13,617; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $0 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity & regis tra tio n fees . $275 L ea s e
Reb a te in clu d ed . $478 d u e a td elivery in clu d es 1s tm o n th p ym ta n d regis tra tio n fees . S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $1250 reb a te & $500 NM AC Ca s h.
M SRP $23,890
P ER
M O.
**
2011 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5 COUPE 2011 NISSAN ALTIMA 2.5 COUPE
STK# N20129
M O DEL# 15111
4 Cyl, CVT , L ea ther,
M o o n ro o f, Bo s e S o u n d ,
F o g L ights , Allo yW heels ,
Co n v. Pkg, F lo o rM a ts
M SR P $29,990
B U Y FOR
$
25,490
*
w / $1,250 Rebate
+ TAX
P ER
M O.
$
329
*
OR
L EAS E FOR
*39 M o n th L ea s e; 12,000 M iles PerY ea r; Res id u a l= $16,194; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $570
ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity & regis tra tio n fees . $0 L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed . $570 d u e a td elivery in clu d es 1s t
m o n th p ym t& regis tra tio n fees . S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $1,250 Reb a te.
S AVE
$450 0
ON AL L N EW
20 11 ALTIM A
COU P ES !
S AVE
$50 0 0
OFF M S R P 4
AVAIL AB L E AT
TH IS P R ICE
P ER
M O.
**
2011 NISSAN ROGUE SV w/ SL PKG 2011 NISSAN ROGUE SV w/ SL PKG
STK# N20290
M O DEL# 22411
4 Cyl, CVT , L ea ther, Na viga tio n ,
M o o n ro o f, Allo ys , Bo s e S o u n d ,
Ba ck-Up Ca m era , Xen o n s ,
S p la s h Gu a rd s , M a ts
M SR P $29,695
B U Y FOR
$
26,695
*
w / $500 NM A C C ash
+ TAX
P ER
M O.
$
359
*
OR
L EAS E FOR
*39 M o n th L ea s e; 12,000 M iles PerY ea r; Res id u a l= $16,035; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $0 ca s h
d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity & regis tra tio n fees . $1,000 L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed . $630 d u e a td elivery in clu d es 1s t
m o n th p ym t& ta g fees . S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $500 NM AC Ca s h.
S AVE
$30 0 0
OFF M S R P
H U R R Y ON LY
5 R OGU E S L ’S
AVAIL AB L E!!
P ER
M O.
**
2011 NISSAN MURANO “S” AWD 2011 NISSAN MURANO “S” AWD
STK# N19771
M O DEL# 23211
V6, CVT , AW D, PW , PDL ,
Cru is e, T ilt, Allo ys , AM / F M / CD,
F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s
M SR P $31,540
B U Y FOR
$
27,540
*
w / $500 Rebate & $500 Non-NaviBonus C ash
+ TAX
P ER
M O.
$
329
*
OR
L EAS E FOR
*39 M o n th L ea s e; 12,000 M iles PerY ea r; Res id u a l= $17,347; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1;
$0 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity & regis tra tio n fees . $750 L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed & $500 No n -Na vi Bo n u s
Ca s h a p p lied . S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $500 Bo n u s Ca s h & $500 No n -Na vi Bo n u s Ca s h.
S AVE
$40 0 0
OR M OR E ON
AL L 20 0 1
M U R AN O’S IN
S TOCK !
P ER
M O.
**
2011 NISSAN PATHFINDER SV 4X4 2011 NISSAN PATHFINDER SV 4X4
STK# N20473
M O DEL# 25211
V6, Au to , PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt,
S tep Ba rs , Allo ys , AM / F M / CD,
F lo o rM a ts , Ca rgo M a ts !
M SR P $34,930
B U Y FOR
$
29,930
*
w / $2,000 Rebate
+ TAX
P ER
M O.
$
369
*
OR
L EAS E FOR
*39 M o n th L ea s e; 12,000 M iles PerY ea r; Res id u a l= $17,465; M u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1;
$0 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity & regis tra tio n fees . $1500 L ea s e Reb a te In clu d ed . $635 d u e a td elivery
in clu d es 1s tp a ym en t& regis tra tio n fees . S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es 2000 Reb a te.
S AVE
$50 0 0
OFF M S R P ON AL L
P ATH FIN D ER S V’S
5 AVAIL AB L E
S AVE
$50 0 0
OFF AL L FR ON TIER
S V & S L
CR EW CAB S
8 AVAIL AB L E
P ER
M O.
**
2011 NISSAN TITAN SV KC 4X4 2011 NISSAN TITAN SV KC 4X4
STK# N20187
M O DEL# 34411
V8, Au to , Va lu e T ru ck Pkg,
A/ C, AM / F M / CD, PW , PDL ,
Cru is e, T ilt, Bed lin er
M SR P $34,400
B U Y FOR
$
25,90 0
*
*S a le p rice p lu s ta x & ta gs in clu d es $3500 Reb a te & $1350 VT P Bo n u s Ca s h.
S AVE
$8 50 0
OFF M S R P !!
w / $3500 Rebate & $1350 V TP Bonus C ash
A Benson Family Dealership
HOURS:
Monday Thru Thursday
8:00am - 8:00pm
Friday & Saturday
8:00am - 5:00pm
A Benson Family Dealership
USED CARS
All Prices Plus Tax & Tags, Customer Must Qualify for All Rebates. See Salesperson for Details. See dealer for details. Some restrictions apply. Dealer may discontinue program at any time.
2003 CHEVY CORVETTE
Glass Top, Dealer Owned Since New, Hud, 5400 Miles,
Chrome Wheels, VelocityYellowAnniversary Edition
$
31,995
2010 CHRYSLER 300
TOURING
V6, 1 Owner, Leather Seating,
Priced For Fun
$
18,995
2005 JEEP LIBERTY
SPORT
Just Traded, 1 Owner,
Only 54K Miles, 4x4
$
11,995
2011 KIA
SORENTO
2 In Stock, AWD, 3rd Row Seating,
Alloy Wheels
$
23,995
2009 TOYOTA TACOMA
EXT CAB 4X4
6 Cyl, 5 Speed,
18K Local Trade
$
22,995
2005 CHEVY
EQUINOX 4X4
$
10,995
2011 NISSAN FRONTIER
CREW CAB 4X4
Just 12K Miles,
Power Galore
$
25,995
2005 CHEVY
TAHOE Z71
4X4, Leather, Moonroof,
Must See HardTo Find One Owner Unit
$
15,995
2011 CHEVY SILVERADO
1500 CREW CAB 4X4
Save Thousands Over A New One,
Only...
$
26,995
2010 JEEP
COMMANDER 4X4
Chrome Wheels, One Owner,
Stunning
$
23,995
2009 BUICK
LUCERNE CXL
Just 23K Miles,
Heated Leather Seating
$
22,995
2010 CHEVY HHR
One Owner, 4 Cyl,
Great On Gas, Stunning
$
14,995
2010 CHEVY
AVEO
VelocityYellow, Sharp,
1 Owner, 25K Miles
$
12,995
2010 HYUNDAI
ACCENT
One Owner, 4 Cyl,
Great On Gas, Only...
$
12,995
2010 TOYOTA
COROLLA
Great 4 Cyl Gas Car, Sharp Color,
Low Miles
$
16,995
2010 CHEVY
TAHOE 4X4
Take The Whole Family,
Only...
$
31,995
2010 JEEP
GRAND CHEROKEE
Only 13K One Owner Miles,
4x4
$
24,995
2011 CHEVY
SUBURBAN
1 Owner 14K Miles,
Don’t Miss This One Priced For Action
$
37,995
2010 DODGE DAKOTA
CREW CAB 4X4
Only 12K Miles
$
23,995
2010 CHEVY 2500
EXPRESS CARGO VANS
3 In Stock, All Low Miles,
Your Choice
$
19,995
Just Traded Beauty,
Low Miles, Only...
NEW CARS
NEW 2011 GMC SIERRA
1500 EXT CAB 4X4
SLE Package, Power Tech Package,
Z-71 Package
$
28,681
Sale
Price
SAVE
$6,629
0% FINANCING
AVAILABLE
NEW 2011 GMC SIERRA
1500 CREW CAB 4X4
SLE Pkg, Power Tech Pkg
$
30,569
Sale
Price
SAVE
$6,731
0% FINANCING
AVAILABLE
NEW 2011 GMC
ACADIA AWD’S
SL, SLT & Denali Packages,
Choose From 3
$
32,609
Priced
From
SAVE
$2,936
1.9% FINANCING
AVAILABLE
NEW 2011 GMC
TERRAIN AWD
Choose From 4,
SLE & SLT Packages
$
26,027
Priced
From
SAVE
$1,033
2.9% FINANCING
AVAILABLE
NEW 2011 GMC YUKON 4X4’S REG
+ XL’S, SLE, SLT & DENALI PKGS
$
39,391
Priced
From
2.9% FINANCING
AVAILABLE
NEW 2011 BUICK
REGAL CXL’S
Choose From 8,
4 Cyl &Turbo’s
$
26,591
Priced
From
1.9% FINANCING
AVAILABLE
NEW 2011 GMC SIERRA 2500
CREW CAB DENALI 4X4
Moonroof, Heated & Cooled Seats,
20”Wheels
$
46,030
Sale
Price
SAVE
$6,295
0% FINANCING
AVAILABLE
NEW 2011 GMC
CANYON 4X4
SLE Pkg, Auto,
Air, Black Beauty
$
21,224
Sale
Price
0% FINANCING
AVAILABLE SAVE
$2,476
SAVE
$4,564
SAVE
$2,474
PAGE 4G SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2011 PAGE 5G
The Times Leader has once again been
ranked among the highest in the United
States for newspaper print and online
audience gains. Ranking number nine in
the nation, and number two in the state,
we are the only local paper to achieve this
distinction. Why? Because we deliver.
only 1 at home
made the top ten.
TIMESLEADERCOM
over 1
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in the nation.
!!!
Subscribe today! 829.5000
Source: Audit Bureau of Circulations: October 1, 2010 - March 31, 2011. Subject to audit.
2011 DODGE AVENGER LUX
S tk#1182006
M S RP -$26,935
3.6L,6-Speed A uto,Leather,Pow er
Sunroof,Rem ote Start System ,Pow er
W indow s & Pow er Locks
N OW A S
L OW A S $21,933
*
OR
BUY FOR
72 M ON THS
$321
Includes $1,750 Rebate,$500 M ilitary,$1,000 Returning Lessee,$500 C ollege G rad
2011 DODGE DURANGO CREWAWD
S tk#1187005
M S RP -$37,135
3.6L,5-Spd A utom atic,Rear O bstacle
Detection System ,Navigation System ,
Traffic Inform ation,Rain Sensitive
W indshield W ipers,Sm artBeam
Headlights,Keyless Enter-N-G o,
Rem ote Start,Pow er Liftgate
N OW A S
L OW A S $33,149
*
OR
BUY FOR
72 M ON THS
$507
L E A S E FOR
39 M ON THS
$369
Includes $500 M ilitary,$1,000 Returning Lessee,$500 C ollege G rad
A L L