Você está na página 1de 38
Lighting Design + Application July 2002 Sports Lighting Bengal Bangle Miller Light Manchester Magic Singapore

Lighting Design + Application July 2002

Sports

Lighting

Lighting Design + Application July 2002 Sports Lighting Bengal Bangle Miller Light Manchester Magic Singapore Saddles

Bengal Bangle Miller Light Manchester Magic Singapore Saddles

CONTENTS

CONTENTS JULY 2002 VOL. 32/NO. 7 SPORTS LIGHTING Keeping Her Eye on the Ball 17 For

JULY 2002 VOL. 32/NO. 7

SPORTS LIGHTING

Keeping Her Eye on the Ball 17

For Bonny Ann Whitehouse, sports lighting is more than illuminance values and uniformity ratios. It’s a blend of architectural and theatrical techniques

Fanfare Off the Field 20

In every arena, the event is the star, but lighting also plays a key role in the wings

Daylight Savings Time 24

Maximizing daylight was key to Glumac Internationals design for the Washington State Universitys Student Recreation Center

An Odds-On Favorite 28

It was a photo finish for Ewing Coles design team, but deadlines were met for the tracks at the Singapore Turf Club, where lighting creates dramatic and compelling imagery within a tropical garden setting

FEATURES

IESNA Lighting Design Software Survey 2002 35

Computers are an integral part of modern lighting design. LD+A brings you the cream of the software crop.

Interpreting Outdoor Luminaire Cutoff Classification 44

LRCs John Bullough proposes a supplemental classification for quantifying a luminaire upward luminous flux

for quantifying a luminaire upward luminous flux 28 DEPARTMENTS 3 Beardsley’s Beat 6 Essay by

28

for quantifying a luminaire upward luminous flux 28 DEPARTMENTS 3 Beardsley’s Beat 6 Essay by

DEPARTMENTS

3

Beardsley’s Beat

6

Essay by Invitation

8

Energy Concerns

9

President’s Points

10

Scanning the Spectrum

13

IES News

47

Light Products

51

Scheduled Events

55

Classified Advertisements

55

Ad Offices

56

Ad Index

ON THE COVER: Bonny Ann Whitehouse's goal was to create a jewel within the Cincinnati skyline. The Paul Brown Stadium showcases the NFL's Cincinnati Bengals. The Flack + Kurtz Lighting Design Group was an integral part of the design team. Photo: Glenn Hartong/Cincinnatti Enquirer

2002-2003 Board of Directors IESNA President Randy Reid Senior Director Telemics, Inc. Past President Pamela

2002-2003

Board of Directors IESNA

President

Randy Reid

Senior Director

Telemics, Inc.

Past President Pamela K. Horner, LC Manager, Technical Training OSRAM SYLVANIA

Senior Vice-President Ronnie Farrar, LC Lighting Specialist Duke Power

Executive Vice-President William Hanley, CAE

Vice-President—-Design & Application John R. Selander, LC Regional Sales Manager The Kirlin Company

Vice-PresidentEducational Activities Fred Oberkircher, LC Director TCU Center for Lighting Education Texas Christian University

Vice-President-Member Activities Jeff Martin, LC Lighting Specialist Tampa Electric Company

Vice-President-Technical & Research Ronald Gibbons Lighting Research Scientist, Advanced Product Test and Evaluation Group Virginia Tech Transportation Institute

Treasurer

Boyd Corbett

Belfer Lighting

Directors Jean Black PPL Services Corp.

Anthony J. Denami, LC Gresham Smith & Partners

Donald Newquist, LC Professional Design Associates, Inc.

Earl Print, LC Lightolier

Joel Siegel, LC Edison Price Lighting

James Sultan, LC Studio Lux

RVP/Directors

Kevin Flynn Kiku Obata & Company

Russ Owens, LC West Coast Design Group

C omdex, the computer show held every fall in Las Vegas, was called the Computer

Dealer Expo. The chemical process show known as the Pittsburgh Conference hasn’t been held in Pittsburgh in years. What’s in a name? “Scanning the Spectrum,” the design column that debuted in LD+A last month was originally to be named Out of the Shadows.But we decided it implied many designs were still in a state of stygian darkness. (It also sounded like a bad soap opera.) SOMA, Engineering for the Hu- man Body, was a magazine I once

To move the cabin, push for wishing floor. If the cabin should enter more persons, each one should press a number of wishing floor.

edited. Soma, of Greek derivation, means body. Shortly after its debut, I discovered a nudist magazine with the same name, but its publisher had failed to register the name. Today, I believe SOMA refers to a district in San Francisco south of Market Street. Associations have it easy in the naming game compared with auto- makers. The poet Marianne Moore was asked by Ford Motor to pick a name for a then-experimental car. Her offerings included Silver Sword, Resilient Bullet, Andante con Moto, Varsity Stroke, and Utopian Turtle- top. Ford rejected her suggestions

and some 6000 others in favor of Edsel. The automotive name game offers other items of interest. The name Columbia was scrapped for Mercurys new minivan when con- sumer research suggested a link

BEARDSLEY’S

BEAT

with drugs. Taurus was the astro- logical sign of the wife of Fords vice president of product develop- ment. Even global communications can be misinterpreted. In Taiwan, Pepsi Cola bottlers used the come alive with Pepsislogan until marketers realized the phrase translated liter- ally as Pepsi brings your ancestors back to life.Tortured English translations abound. Please leave your values at the front desk,read a sign at a French hotel. In a Norwegian cocktail lounge, ladies were requested not to have children at the bar. In a Leipzig elevator: Dont enter the lift backwards and only when lit up.In a Belgrade elevator: To move the cabin, push for wishing floor. If the cabin should enter more per- sons, each one should press a num- ber of wishing floor. Driving is then going alphabetically by national order.As a kid, I won a bicycle from Rice Krispies by naming the two- wheeler Roama.I was recently looking for a contest in which I could recycle my prize-winning moniker. But now that Ive shared this name with the readers of LD+A, I will have to look for a new name and game. Gotta go. The engines idling in my Utopian Turtletop.

Gotta go. The engine ’ s idling in my Utopian Turtletop. Charles Beardsley, Editor www.iesna.org LD

Charles

Beardsley,

Editor

T his is my version of ‘Penny Wise and Dollar Foolish.’ It is frustrating when customers

use shortest payback or lowest ini- tial cost as their main criterion for retrofits, remodels or new construction. This frustration, teaching the

ESSAY

BY INVITATION

This frustration, teaching the ESSAY BY INVITATION Stan Walerczyk economics section for a local IESNA ED150

Stan

Walerczyk

economics section for a local IESNA ED150 class, and recently seeing a showcase remodel/expansion pro- ject with generic electronic ballasts and basic grade T8 lamps, motivat- ed me to write this. Basing decisions mainly on the shortest payback is very short sighted. It is a challenge getting people to realize that the logic behind policies, like a maximum two-year simple payback require- ment, is flawed. Often the shortest payback leaves substantial savings on the table. I put myself in the customer’s shoes and ask myself if it was my money, would I want the shortest payback? Or would I want to spend extra initial money to provide higher savings and better long term bene- fits, resulting in more money in my pocket in 5, 10 or 15 years? First of all let’s look at generic low-power electronic ballasts for T8s compared to the new-genera- tion extra-efficient low-power bal- lasts. For example, project X has 4000 hour annual burn time and blended $0.15 blended kilowatt- hour rate. The payback retrofitting the existing fixtures that have F40T12 lamps and magnetic bal- lasts with generic low-power bal- lasts and F32T8 lamps is 1.7 years. Each extra-efficient low power ballast may cost the end customer $2 to $6 more than the generic bal- lasts, so $4 is an average. Each extra-efficient ballast saves 3 to 6 W, to be conservative 3 W is used. That is an additional annual savings of $1.80, which provides a 2.2 year payback compared to the generic ballast. Electronic ballasts can eas-

ily last 15 years. Using first level analysis methods, over that span, each extra-efficient ballast will save $27 more than a generic low-power ballast. But there is a monetary cost. A dollar today is not equal to dollar a year from now, when interest rates are considered. The following equa- tion from Chapter 25 in the 9th Edition of the IESNA Handbook is very helpful in revealing present worth with regard to annual energy savings. It is my understanding that this equation is widely accepted in the financial community.

P = present worth, or amount of at present dollars

A = annual savings

y = number of years

i = opportunity or interest rate

(for this case we will use 6%)

P

= A x [(1+i) y -1]/[i(1+i) y ]

P

=

1.80 x[(1+.06) 15 -1]/[.06(1+.06) 15 ]

P

= $17.48

Based on this equation, the annu-

al

savings of $1.80 each year over

the next 15 years, based on an interest rate of 6 percent, is worth $17.48 in present dollars. So spending an extra $4 now pro- vides a 437 percent ROI (return on investment) over 15 years ($17.48/$4 x 100). Often an asset will not be held that long. The 10 year ROI would be 331 percent. For five years it would be a 190 percent ROI, and for three years, it would be 120 percent. The extra $4 now is a very good investment if the asset will be held at least three years or even if it will be sold before then, because of the increased value of the asset. It may not be a good investment for a ten- ant with a lease expiring in less than three years and the owner is unwilling to help to subsidize the lighting project. You can do ballast ROIs on your own projects based on your appro- priate burn time, kilowatthour rate, annual savings, number of years and opportunity or interest rate. Outside California most kilo- watthour rates are probably lower than $.15. You could compare generic and extra-efficient low- power ballasts or generic and extra-

extra-efficient low- power ballasts or generic and extra- Publisher William Hanley, CAE Editor Charles W. Beardsley

Publisher William Hanley, CAE

Editor Charles W. Beardsley

Assistant Editor

Roslyn Lowe

Associate Editor

John-Michael Kobes

Art Director Anthony S. Picco

Associate Art Director Samuel Fontanez

Columnists Emlyn G. Altman Li Huang Louis Erhardt Willard Warren

Book Review Editor

Paulette Hebert, Ph.D.

Marketing Manager

Sue Foley

Advertising Coordinator Michelle Rivera

Published by IESNA 120 Wall Street, 17th Floor

New York, NY 10005-4001 Phone: 212-248-5000 Fax: 212-248-5017/18

Website: http://www.iesna.org Email: iesna@iesna.org

LD+A is a magazine for professionals involved in the art, science, study, manufacture, teaching, and implementa- tion of lighting. LD+A is designed to enhance and improve the practice of lighting. Every issue of LD+A includes feature articles on design projects, technical articles on the science of illumination, new product devel- opments, industry trends, news of the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America, and vital informa- tion about the illuminating profession.

Statements and opinions expressed in articles and edito- rials in LD+A are the expressions of contributors and do not necessarily represent the policies or opinions of the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America. Advertisements appearing in this publication are the sole responsibility of the advertiser.

LD+A (ISSN 0360-6325) is published monthly in the United States of America by the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America, 120 Wall Street, 17th Floor, New York, NY. 10005, 212-248-5000. Copyright 2002 by the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America. Periodicals postage paid at New York, N.Y. 10005 and additional mailing offices. Nonmember sub- scriptions $44.00 per year. Additional $15.00 postage for subscriptions outside the United States. Member sub- scriptions $30.00 (not deductible from annual dues). Additional subscriptions $44.00. Single copies $4.00, except Lighting Equipment & Accessories Directory and Progress Report issues $10.00. Authorization to repro- duce articles for internal or personal use by specific clients is granted by IESNA to libraries and other users registered with the Copyright Clearance Center (CCC) Transactional Reporting Service, provided a fee of $2.00 per copy is paid directly to CCC, 21 Congress Street, Salem, MA 01970. IESNA fee code: 0360-6325/86 $2.00. This consent does not extend to other kinds of copying for purposes such as general distribution, advertising or promotion, creating new collective works, or resale.

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to LD+A, 120 Wall Street, 17th Floor, New York, NY 10005. Sub- scribers: For continuous service please notify LD+A of address changes at least 6 weeks in advance.

This publication is indexed regularly by Engineering Index, Inc. and Applied Science & Technology Index. LD+A is available on microfilm from Proquest Infor- mation and Learning, 800-521-0600, Ann Arbor, MI

efficient standard-power ballasts. Shortest payback vs. long term benefit analysis can also be done with T8 lamps. Typically the bene- fits of the more expensive extend- ed-life lamps are not included in pay- back, because the payback time occurs even before standard-life lamps burn out. Standard T8 lamps are rated for 20,000 hours. Extended-life lamps are rated for 24,000 hours, which is 20 percent longer. Each extended-life lamp costs about $.40 more than equiva- lent type standard-life lamp, which is about 20 percent more. So the cost/life pricing is about the same. The benefits of the longer life lamps follow. Maintenance labor is reduced, because lamps will not have to be replaced as often. In California and other states, all fluo- rescent lamps will have to be recy- cled which costs about $.40 for a 4 ft lamp. With longer life lamps, fewer lamps have to be recycled over time. Adding all of the benefits of the extended life lamps, they are typically a 30 percent better total value than equivalent type standard life lamps. As I stated in Why Should The Customer Have To Pay Twice?in LD+A, September 2001, high- lumen extended-life lamps save additional electricity because fewer lamps or lower ballast factor bal- lasts are required. Following is an example of how these lamps and extra-efficient ballasts can work together. Instead of simply recommending T8 group relamping we also provide an option with extra-efficient bal- lasts and high-lumen universal-type (24,000-hour-rated-life even based on instant start ballasts at three- hour starts) T8s. For example, con- sider an office building with 2x4 troffers that have two basic-grade 15,000-hour-rated-life (based on three-hour starts with instant start ballasts) T8s and generic standard- output instant start ballast. Each fixture consumes 58 W. Each fix- ture can be retrofitted with two pre- mium T8s and extra-efficient low- power ballast. Not only would there be a 10 W reduction, but the group relamping schedule would be increased from four to six years, and there would also be a brand new five to seven year parts and

labor ballast warranty. The retrofit option is often very cost effective when the parts and labor cost of the existing group relamping is deductedfrom the retrofit parts and labor cost. Pardon me, but it would not be one of my articles, if I did not state that additional savings may also be achieved by using scotopically enhanced lamps, especially high- lumen extended-life F32T8 850s. So far the before and after feedback from workers at PG&E facilities has been good with dimming down fur- ther with 850 lamps. It will be inter- esting to see the results of the ongoing and upcoming DOE re- search projects with scotopically enhanced lamps. Sometimes lighting retrofitters and end customers go too far trying to get a short payback or a high ROI. An example is retrofitting three lamp 18 cell parabolic 2x4s with a reflector and two lamps. The elec- trical savings can be substantial with a relatively low installation cost. But the repositioned lamps ruin proper cut-off angles, resulting in excess direct and indirect glare. Quantifying glare problems and other bad lighting problems to work- er productivity is very difficult. But check if office workers are wearing baseball hats, covering their mod- ules with cardboard or turning off the ceiling fixtures and bringing in their own floor or table fixtures. Two extra breaks per week, one extra sick day per year or frequent headaches or eyestrain may equate to reducing worker productivity just one half of 1 percent. That could total an annual loss of $250 for each worker making $50,000 per year. The comprehensive payback or ROI would be very bad with this type of retrofit. On the other hand a new suspended indirect lighting sys- tem may increase worker productiv- ity by .05 percent. Again this is dif- ficult to quantify, but check the number of sick days and talk with the workers. This $250 annual ben- efit plus electrical savings can pro- vide a very good payback and ROI even if the installed price in each office is $400. The people factor,which includes worker productivity in offices and retail sales volume, should be factored into the financial analysis of lighting projects.

These same life cycle and people factor issues also apply for new con- struction. Often in lighting, the products and systems that can save the most electricity tend to cost more initially. So the payback is often not the lowest. But after the payback period, the substantial yearly sav- ings, year after year, allows the extra initial cost option to provide the best total solution. Often a customer would like to have a very effective and efficient lighting system, but cannot afford it. There are several firms that pro- vide positive cash flow financing. The interest rates are usually very reasonable. With no out-of-pocket money the customers monthly sav- ings are greater than the monthly finance charge.

Afterword I highly recommend reading Energy Efficiency Boosts Property Valuesby Mark Jewell in the April 2002 edition of Energy User News. I read it right after I wrote my arti- cle and Mark Jewell discusses a much more sophisticated level of economics. If you do not get Energy User News, this article is avail- able on their website www. energyusernews.com Stan Walerczyk is director of lighting at Sun Industries, the lar- gest design and build lighting retrofit contractor in California, serving the western states. He is a member of IESNA’s Energy Man- agement Committee and chair of its Retrofit/Upgrade Subcommit- tee. For additional information please email swalerczyk@ sunindustriesinc.com

Visit

the

IESNA

bookstore

online

@

www.iesna.org

B y now, you’ve been to LIGHT-

FAIR INTERNATIONAL and

attended one or more of the

five sessions presented on energy conservation in lighting. The mys- tery of how the California energy supply shortage was manipulated by brokers like Enron to their advan- tage has been revealed. The presi-

ENERGY

CONCERNS

advan- tage has been revealed. The presi- ENERGY CONCERNS Willard L. Warren, PE, LC, FIESNA dent

Willard L.

Warren,

PE, LC,

FIESNA

dent has signed the energy bill and we have some indication that ener- gy conservation is back in the nation’s best interest. In the meantime, our focus should still be on providing more efficient autos and green buildings and reducing our dependence on Middle East oil. Missing from these obviously desirable goals is the human factor. How much more visually energy efficient can we become? There used to be an old rule of thumb that an increase of one per- cent in task contrast was worth a 15 percent increase in the task illu- mination level. After research done by Mark Rea and Michael Ouellette, we learned that the relationship between contrast and illuminance depends upon where you are on the curves of task performance vs. task contrast, illumination level and task size (and of course, how much time you have to perform a specific visu- al task). The visual task perfor- mance rises swiftly when the vari- ables of task contrast, task size and illuminance increase after starting from low levels, but when condi- tions improve so that the three fac- tors are much higher; increasing any one, or all of them, does not result in much improvement in visu- al task performance. At that point, the steep curves developed by Rea become plateaus. In short, more light does not help much when you’re reading headlines in dim light, but it does when you try to read small text at low levels of light. Even knowing all this, we face the problem of persuading building owners and managers to invest in

better quality lighting and controls. Last month I pointed out that salaries cost 10 times more per square foot than real estate costs.

A dollar per square foot improve-

ment in lighting quality and task

contrast is worth $10 per square foot in employee task performance-

or more, depending on where you

are on the Rea curves. We must be carefull not to take credit for all the increases in task performance if the tasks are not all visual. There are many products made by sightless persons that are on sale in Lighthouse for the Blind shops, and there are many sightless profes-

Owners can be convinced of the virtues of better lighting for their buildings

sionals such as doctors and law- yers, so it is important to filter out the mechanical aspects of task per- formance and only measure the visual component for our purposes and claims. Instinctively, we know that better lighting helps save workers’ time and effort, but how do we prove it to business owners? The biggest moti- vator in the real estate business is Return on Investment (ROI). Most buildings are owned by syndicates

of investors, with a principal owner

who controls the management of the property. The investors’ objec-

tive is to put up as little cash as pos- sible and still get an outrageous return, which in turn increases the value of the property, enabling them

to charge higher rents, increase the

mortgage, and take out some of their money, with which to invest in other new properties. Ten years ago when utilities were

strapped for peak capacity, they were throwing money around as incentives to reduce peak demand. They provided a rebate shopping list

for lamps, reflectors, electronic bal- lasts and occupancy sensors. Even with the cash incentives, many building owners still did not take

advantage of the programs. As I have repeatedly said, those retrofit measures didn’t do much to improve the quality of the lighting systems, because nobody did the retrofits for the right reason, namely, to improve visual performance rates and em- ployee comfort. Not only weren’t those lighting retros done with the help of a light- ing consultant, but many didn’t even comply with prevailing electric codes. Today, lighting retros are being done by ESCOs (Energy Service Companies) who are busier than ever, but the big challenge is not the public spaces (corridors, stair- ways and utility areas) in the build- ing which account for 20 percent of the space, but the tenant’s spaces, comprising 80 percent of the build- ing’s square footage. Mark Jewell of RealWinWin, Inc. insists that owners can be con- vinced of the virtues of better light- ing for their buildings, if it improves their Net Operating Income (NOI). What better way to do that, than to provide tenants with space that improves their employee’s produc- tivity? To hear that side of the story, I urge you to attend the August 6 session at the IESNA Annual Conference in Salt Lake City, when Terry McGowan of EPRI, Carol Jones of Battelle Laboratories, Guy Newsham of the Canadian Re- search Institute and Peter Boyce of LRC and co-editor of EPRI’s techni- cal report, “Lighting and Human Performance II,” present a panel discussion on visibility and worker

performance. Wouldn’t you like to approach a business owner and say that the lat- est research indicates that quality lighting and controls can improve the performance of your employees by 10 percent or more?. That’s the

future of lighting energy conserva- tion, more so than just green build- ings, though I do like buildings that are the same color as money.

I love IESNA; you love IESNA; we’re a happy family… OK, enough of Barney. The fact is, I do love the IESNA, but there are some things I do not like either. You probably love the Society as well, but there have to

be things you don’t like as well. We are one big family—

a very diverse, complex, yet interdependent family that

must find better ways and capitalize on our legacy to advance {expand or improve } the Society for ourselves and future generations. While the IESNA has grown significantly over the years, we may be victims of our own success. Because we have a strong membership coupled with a talented and efficient home office, occasionally certain areas of our Society run on autopilot. For many of our activities, we simply look at the prior document or the prior year’s plan, tweak it, and the process usually works. We have been lucky. It’s time for us to take a hard look at our Society. The

current recession, coupled with the trend of consolida- tions, demands that IESNA turn off the autopilot and real-

ly evaluate its documents, its educational programs, and

its events, to begin a real campaign to not only improve our society—but more importantly, improve our industry. In March, your Board approved a five year strategic plan that is posted on our site (www.iesna.org) under the Whats newsection. The plan is multi-faceted, and I will focus this article on two critical areas: the IESNA Annual Conference and education. The IESNA Annual Conference continues to be suc- cessful and is regarded by many as the dominant con- ference in our industry. The Progress Report is proba- bly the most informative two hours many of us spend each year. Stakeholders from presidents on down will make better decisions throughout the year having knowledge of the industries(and their competitors) newest products. In many cases, you can actually talk to the person who developed the product. With help from several members, we are trying to make next months conference even greater: 1) Wes- son Brown, Group VP of Hubbell Lighting is our keynote speaker. 2) The Papers Committee, Conference Committee, Conference Site Selection Committee, Educational Seminars Committee, and IIDA Committee have all done a superb job! 3) The Presidents banquet will focus more on you, the member, and less on speeches. 4) Marketing of the conference has been enhanced; you may have noticed the promotional flyers at LIGHTFAIR. 5) Salt Lake City is one of the nicest cities you will ever visit. Our hotel, the Great America, was home to NBC during the 2002 Olympics and is sim- ply world-class. Another area that has been on autopilot is education, one of our most important core competencies. It is who we are. We must never lose sight of this responsibility and we have an obligation to the industry to constant-

E-mail a Letter to the Editor

cbeardsley@iesna.org

www.iesna.org

ly enhance the quality and the delivery of that educa- tion. Last fall I had the privilege of teaching the ballast portion of ED-150 to my local section and found it in need of revision. The good news is that ED-150 has

PRESIDENT'S

POINTS

been totally re-engineered and will be available soon. Your leadership is considering utilizing different tools to deliver a more customer-friendly education package. However, as the quality and delivery are enhanced, it is imperative that we work closely with the local sections. While others can offer online education, they can only envy the strength and legacy of the IESNA sections. Our sections must always be involved with education. As we go forward this year, I ask you to step up and get involved in at least one activity. When you retire, make sure you can tell your children and grandchildren that you helped leave your industry a better place than you found it. If you have ideas of how we can improve, please send them to me at rreid@telemics.com Your help, your ideas, and your leadership will com- plete our plan and turn off the autopilot.

Your help, your ideas, and your leadership will com- plete our plan and turn off the

Randy Reid

• notes on lighting design Elliptical Stairway to the Stars Opened in 2000 with a

notes on lighting design

• notes on lighting design Elliptical Stairway to the Stars Opened in 2000 with a total

Elliptical Stairway to the Stars

Opened in 2000 with a total seating capacity of 1800, the Spartan Center is the Milton Hershey School’s new performance gymnasium. Located in Hershey, PA, the gymnasium has three full-length basketball courts and includes areas for physical education classes, recreation, athletic contests, and intramural games. The center features a three-story entrance stair tower that stands like a trophy case against the simple design of the facility. The design concept for this tall, transparent space was to create a lantern-like effect with- out weakening its bold external form, while offering visual comfort for its users and maintainability for its staff. The height of the space required extra care in locating fix- tures within easy access. These fixtures also had to be posi- tioned to eliminate offensive direct glare, or reflected glare from the many glass facets. The lighting design included a custom stainless steel structure mounted to a central column supporting the stair- case with twelve 100 W metal halide fixtures carefully aimed upward for indirect lighting. This structure locates the fixtures at a maintainable height above an intermediate stair landing. The exposed lighting and software complement the industrial appearance of the cables and pulleys that com- pose the stair railing. Limiting the design to 100 W metal halide sources allowed use of color-consistent high CRI lamps. Additional compact fluorescent downlights mounted within the stair structure were provided at landings for highlights and emer- gency purposes. The paper-thin exterior canopy, which cuts throught the façade and extends the industrial design to the outside, was uplighted from low-wattage, in-ground well lights to high- light the tower’s entrance. Lighting designers were Keith Yancey, IESNA, Larry Cronin, IESNA, and Shawn Good, IESNA, of Brinjac Engineering, Harrisburg, PA.

Shawn Good, IESNA, of Brinjac Engineering, Harrisburg, PA. PHOTOS: ANDREW R. HOFF 10 LD + A/July
Shawn Good, IESNA, of Brinjac Engineering, Harrisburg, PA. PHOTOS: ANDREW R. HOFF 10 LD + A/July
PHOTOS: ANDREW R. HOFF
PHOTOS: ANDREW R. HOFF
• notes on lighting design Harbor Lights Lighting for the Arena at Harbor Yard was

notes on lighting design

Harbor Lights

• notes on lighting design Harbor Lights Lighting for the Arena at Harbor Yard was a

Lighting for the Arena at Harbor Yard was a combined effort of the Kasper Group Bridgeport, CT, and Musco Engineering Associates, West Haven, CT. Patrick Rose, AIA and Michael V. Musco, P.E. led the design teams from the respective compa- nies. A close-knit team was developed, incorporating engineer- ing assistance and major input from Sterner Lighting to the structural engineering design team for specific mounting loca- tions for all arena lighting. The lighting design system, along with the dimming and control system, was over six months in development. The Arena at Harbor Yard project is the phase II development of a sports and entertainment district in the city of Bridgeport, CT. The Arena is the companion to the Ballpark at Harbor Yard (1998), home to the Bridgeport Bluefish of the Atlantic League. The Arena at Harbor Yard is located between the Ballpark and the intermodal transit Garage, allowing the garage to also serve the Arena and Ballpark for spectator parking. The arena is designed to house a minor league AHL Hockey team, the Bridgeport Sound Tigersand to serve as a multi-purpose sports and entertainment venue for Southeastern Connecticut. The Arena features a single tiered 24-row spectator bowl accessed via a Ushaped concourse and vomitories. Food outlets and toilet facilities are at this main level concourse under the seating bowl. Seating capacity of the arena is 8500 for hockey, 9000 for basketball or 10,500 for events/shows. The seating bowl is designed with a variable rise in the seating platforms resulting in excellent sight lines. Thirty-four suites, with space for an additional nine, and three hospitality suites are located at the upper level. The perimeter walkway at the top of the seating tiers allows for circulation to bars, concessions, restrooms, and exits and for standee positions. The flat end of the Ushaped bowl to the East contains the Goal Club Baron the second level with its own seating section, the Standing Room Only Baron the third level with bar seating, and the loges, small partitioned boxes for four to six persons, located on the Suite level. Lighting of the seating bowl is accomplished by sports event lighting hung at the catwalk running the length of the bowl on each side. The sports lighting has a shade and shutter system to go from com- plete blackout to event lighting with the flick of a switch. The third and fourth floor perimeter walkways and Suite lighting are fully dimmable. All lighting in the facility is controlled though computerized panels located in the lighting booth on the fourth floor and building control center on the ground floor. The walls and soffits are painted in three colors to emphasize the signage band from 8 to 12 ft above finish floor, de-empha- size the walls and ceiling above 12 ft and provide a color to accent the carpet and provide for easy maintenance below 8 ft. The concourse lights are hung at 12 ft, to visually cutting off the space above. Large areas of glass at the main entry on the west, and the clerestory area to the north provide views of the city. Signage is designed to integrate with the facility and the overall Harbor Yard complex. At the northeast end of the Ushaped concourse is the entry to the locker room facilities. The Hockey Team Locker room size and finishes rival most NHL facilities. At the Southeast end of the Ushaped concourse is the entry to the loading dock and staging area for events. Included within this Back of Housearea is a Storage Area, Catering Facility, Media Room, and Production Offices. George B. Webster, III senior vice-president of Sterner Lighting, stated, Given the difficulty of the existing site conditions I find this facility big leaguein every way. The Infranor Para II products by Sterner are equipped with 1000 W BT37 lamps which are fully serviceable from the catwalk and do not require re-aiming for main- tenance. The illumination levels certainly are major league providing 150 vertical footcandles tilted 15 degrees to the TV camera with a 1.3 to 1 max to min uniformity ratio for either ice hockey or basketball sporting events. The addition of our shade system pro- vides a full theatrical house with full on to light off in less than three seconds.—Michael V. Musco, P.E. and Patrick M. Rose, AIA

” —Michael V. Musco, P.E. and Patrick M. Rose, AIA 12 LD + A/July 2002 w
” —Michael V. Musco, P.E. and Patrick M. Rose, AIA 12 LD + A/July 2002 w
Section News Mid South Section A presentation on the 2002 Inter- national Illumination Design Award

Section News

Mid South Section

A presentation on the 2002 Inter-

national Illumination Design Award entries was given on April 1 at the Mikhails Northgate restaurant, Jack- son, MS. Guest speakers included Jesse Browning, CDFL; David Roed- erer, Oxford Lighting Consultants; and Cal Franco, JH&H, who provided exam- ples from individual projects, explain- ing how the lighting designs enhanced the interior design.

Miami Valley Section On May 20, the Miami Valley Section held its 2002 golf outing at the Sugar Isle Golf Course, New Carlisle, OH. Alabama Section

A presentation on low-voltage con-

trol panels was given on April 17 at the

Alabama Power Co. Building, Birming- ham, AL. Golden Gate Section David Finn, an international lighting designer explored theatrical lighting for architectural applications on May 14 at the Pacific Energy Center, San Francisco, CA.

Mother Lode Section Representatives from the Big Three(General Electric, OSRAM Syl- vania and Phillips Lighting) gave a pre- sentation on May 15 and provided lit- erature on lamp updates . Las Vegas Section Matt Bindel, MUSCO Lighting, gave a presentation on sports lighting on March 19. Los Angeles Section

A discussion on current issues re-

garding professional liability was given on March 21 at the TAIX French Restaurant, Los Angeles, CA. Guest speaker, Michael Zarrow of Brobeck, Phleger and Harrison, specialists in

construction law, discussed indemnifi- cation, paid when paid,what hap- pens when you get a contract, arbitra- tion versus litigation, ownership of documents and professional errors and omissions coverage. West Texas Section Lighting software was reviewed on

ILLUMINATING

ENGINEERING

SOCIETY

NEWS

VOLUME 32, NUMBER 7

JULY 2002

April 25 at the TCU Campus, Fort Worth, TX. Speakers Mark Tresp and Mill McCain provided a demonstration, showcasing the programs tools.

Member News

The Cooper Union, New York, NY, appointed alumnus and LD+A magazine columnist Willard L. Warren, P.E., to the

Cooper Union Research Foundation (CURF) board of directors. Joseph Consigli has joined Philips Lighting Company, Somerset, NJ, as the Washington DC and Northern Virginia I/C Sales Representative. He is respon- sible for lamp sales through distributors in this market. Joseph has been a mem- ber of the IESNA since 1995, has served on the Board of Managers for the North New Jersey Section, and has been an active and contributing partici- pant in IESNA functions and activities.

IESNA Calendar of Events

August 4-7, 2002

2002 IESNA Annual Conference Salt Lake City, UT Contact: Valerie Landers 212-248-5000, ext. 117 www.iesna.org

October 6-9, 2002

IESNA Street & Area Lighting Conference Scottsdale, AZ Contact: Valerie Landers 212-248-5000, ext. 117 www.iesna.org

October 20-24, 2002

IESNA Aviation Lighting Seminar Nashville, TN Contact: Wes Hazelton

207-775-3211

whazelton@dufresne-henry.com

www.iesalc.org

Melissa Conchilla has been named as associate in charge of the new Denver, CO, office for Robert Singer & Associates, Basalt, CO. Worldwide automated lighting manu- facturer High End Systems Inc, Austin,

continued on following page

NCQLP Offers Career Brochure

The National Council on Qualifications for the Lighting Professions (NCQLP) is pleased to announce the availability of information on careers in lighting in the building and construction industry. Careers in Lighting is available on www.ncqlp.org The web-based brochure covers some of the many areas in which lighting per-

sonnel work. The document stresses that the lighting industry offers careers for almost everyone, whatever one’s basic education and personal strengths. Joseph M. Good, III, IESNA, IALD, LC, president of NCQLP, stated that “the light- ing industry has needed this material for a long time; the NCQLP is appreciative of those who made it possible: James Benya for his initial draft, and the IESNA Golden Gate Section, Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. and the Nuckolls Fund for Lighting Education, who, through their financial contributions, underwrote the program.” The LC Candidate Handbook is now available from NCQLP (703-518-4370). The handbook provides important information and application forms for those who wish to sit for the November 2, 2002, LC examination. The deadline for early sub- mittal of the application is August 16; the deadline for final submittal is September 27.

Member News continued from previous page TX, announced the addition of two new key positions

Member News

continued from previous page

TX, announced the addition of two new key positions to its executive manage- ment team based in Austin, Texas. David Parks joins High End in the role of senior vice president product devel- opment and Mike Wood takes on a new role as chief technology officer, focusing on the strategic planning, advanced engineering and selection of all new products and technology plat- forms. W.A.C. Lighting Company, Garden City, NY, has appointed Dave Lobardo and John Pilato as the newest mem- bers of its product support department and customer sales and service.

Martin to Establish Asian Manufacturing Facility

Martin Professional continues to expand its production capability with

the establishment of a manufacturing facility in China. Production is expect- ed to begin by the start of the year

2003.

As an important part of the compa- nys strategy to maintain its competi- tiveness in the lower priced lighting segments, the new Martin facility will be geared toward the production of Martins DJ range of lighting products. The facility will be located in the Chinese city of Zhuhai in the southern part of the country.

Share Share

your your

news news with with us! us!

IES News

120 Wall Street 17th Floor New York, NY 10005 Fax:

(212) 248-5018

As of June 2002

As of June 2002

New Members Membership Committee Chair Jim Sultan announced the IESNA gained one Sus- taining Member

New Members

Membership Committee Chair Jim Sultan announced the IESNA gained one Sus- taining Member and 121 Members (M), associate and student members in May.

SUSTAINING MEMBER ETC Architectural, Middleton, WI

INDIVIDUAL MEMBERS Canadian Region Ellen Godson, H.H. Angus & Asso- ciates, Don Mills, ON Jeff J. Laurin, OSRAM SYLVANIA, Winnipeg, MB Rob Niess, McGregor Allsop Limited, Stouffville, ON Ken Smith, Litemor Distributors, Limited, Ottawa, ON Robert Villemaire (M), BPR Groupe- Conseil, Montreal, ON Concordia University Athanassios G. Tzempelikos

East Central Region Christipher Bentz, Alfred Benerch & Company, Pottorville, PA Daniel S. Berger (M), Solar Light Co., Inc., Philadelphia, PA Thomas C. Evans (M), PMH Associates, Inc., Moorestown, NJ Rachael S. Granico, SmithGroup, Inc., Washington, DC James R. Hawkins, E.T.Boggess, Architect, Inc., Princeton, WV Geralyn A. Jacobs, Diversified Light- ing Associates, Allentown, PA Michael L. Riebling, Hadco, Littlestown, PA Adam Serra, Spears/Votta & Associates, Baltimore, MD Walter Zaharchuk (M), Lutron Elec- tronics Co., Inc., Macungie, PA New Jersey Institute of Technology Craig DeFelice Pennsylvania State University Rebecca Ho

Great Lakes Region Roger M. Bresnahan (M), King Lighting, Inc., Oregon, OH Steve M. Clark, Holophane, Carmel, IN Patrick Davis, Graybar Electric Co., Inc., Rochester, NY Peter R. Gorman, King Luminaire Company, Inc., Jefferson, OH Aydan Ilter, Southfiels, NJ Amy L. Laughead, Federated Depart- ment Stores, Cincinnati, OH Brent J. Lehmkuhl (M), Mechanical Design Associates, Inc., Maumee, OH Daniel OBrien (M), Price Williams, Columbia City, IN Lawrence Poturalski (M), University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY Robert R. Rudolph, Saturn Electric, Inc., Dayton, OH Joe F. Ryan (M), Reliable Electric, Centerville, OH Gerrit Van Straten (M), WD Partners, Columbus, OH

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Aaron Leppanen

South Pacific Coast Region Chris Abrahamsen (M), PACE Civil, Inc., Redding, CA Randall D. Block (M), The Gamut Technology Group, Salt Lake City, UT Mike Bloomquist, St. Marks Hospital, Salt Lake City, UT Douglas Collinson, Architecture Design Studiom Honolulu, HI Lloyd P. Diehl (M), Weco Electrical Engineering, Concord, CA Randy Edwards (M), Arizona Public Service, Phoenix, AZ Mark J. Fosbury, HLA Lighting Sales, Concord, CA Fredrick Gregoryan, Southwest Elec- trical Supply, Inc., Glendale, CA Tim R. Guion, ETC Architectural, Hollywood, CA Rick Hunsaker (M), GC Wallace, Inc., Las Vegas, NV Philip E. Incikaya, Gammalux Systems, San Dimas, CA Gregory K. Lee, Integrated Design Associates, Santa Clara, CA Meenam Lee, Lumenworks, Inc., Oakland, CA Thomas K. Lew (M), RPM Engineers, Inc., Irvine, CA Chris Mortensen, Anytech Electric, Inc., Orem, UT Nancy Mui (M), Cupertino Electric, San Jose, CA Jet Patel (M), Varad Corporation, Carson, CA Jody C. Salsig, JS Nolan & Associates Lighting Design, San Francisco, CA Wade Schramm, Nevada Sources, Las Vegas, NV David G. Watson (M), SW Engineering, Inc., Tempe, AZ Randy R. Wepking, Marriott, Scottsdale, AZ Robert R. Willett, AZTEC Engineering, Phoenix, AZ Stephen K. Younger (M), Stichler Group, Phoenix, AZ City College of Long Beach Eric M. Wynkoop

Midwest Region Erik H. Caylor, Teng & Associates, Inc., Chicago, IL Michael T. Fitzpatrick, Bonestroo, Rosene, Anderlik & Associates, Inc., St. Paul, MN Ramesh C. Gupta (M), Illinois Department of Transportation, Schaumburg, IL Bill Layman (M), Ranken Technical College, St. Louis, MO Jerome F. Onik, Heartland Scenic Studio, Inc., Omaha, NE Jim M. Pederson, Illum A Nation Outdoor Architectural Lighting, Forest Lake, MN Mary Pelikan (M), Architectural Lighting Consultants, Wauwatosa, WI Don L. Provencher (M), MKEC Engineering Consultants, Inc., Wichita, KS

Brent Streck (M), Creative Lighting and Associated Systems, Inc., Elkhorn, NE Stephen G. Surratt, ETC Architectural, Middleton, WI Johnson County Community College Sally L. Williams Milwaukee School of Engineering Marie Rieger

Southeastern Region Scott C. Gilbert, OSRAM SYLVANIA, Jacksonville, FL Jean F. Hocquard (M), Luxam, Miami, FL Ravi Koil (M), Acuity Lighting Group, Inc., Conyers, GA Larry E. Law (M), Lorillard Tobacco Company, Greensboro, NC Frank T. Liles Jr., Yacht Lighting and Accessories, Inc., Beaufort, NC William G. Lundy (M), Raleigh, NC T. Jerry McDonell (M), EDI, Marietta, GA Timothy R. Moore, Advantage Lighting & Equipment Sales, Statesboro, GA Walter J. Qualmann, Illume Lighting Design, Inc., Naples, FL David Rainey, Navaid Lighting Asso- ciates, Inc., Olive Branch, MS Dedra Rainey, Navaid Lighting Asso- ciates, Inc., Olive Branch, MS Patrick Rose (M), Clark-Nexsen A&E, Charlotte, NC

Sharon M. Schutz, Neel-Schaffer, Inc., Nashville, TN Pedro L. Trevin (M), Post Buckley Schuh & Jernigan, Miami, FL University of Florida Eric R. Ketchum

Northeastern Region William Bissell (M), Jericho, VT Laura A. Black (M), Dufresne-Henry, North Springfield, VT Daniel W. Carroll, Specialty Store Lighting, Hoboken, NJ Andrew M. Gross, Pyramid Lighting Group, Inc., New York, NY Thomas Lapointe (M), Thomas J. La- pointe Associates, Westport, MA Larry M. Morehouse (M), URS Corporation, Rocky Hill, CT Joseph Rosa (M), Baker Engineer- ing, Elmsford, NY Brian Stacy (M), ArupLighting, New York, NY Myron Walter (M), Thomas Associates, Ithaca, NY Parsons School of Design John W. Newman Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Janani Ramanath

Northwest Region Kareem Greiss, Parsons Brinckerhoff, Seattle, WA

continued on following page

www.iesna.org

New Members continued from previous page M.T. MacPhee ( M ), Richard McDonald & Associates

New Members continued from previous page

M.T. MacPhee (M), Richard McDonald & Associates Ltd., Calgary, AB Mark W. Martin Jr., Interface Engineering, Milwaukie, OR Kenneth E. Murphy, R.J. Rouse Electric, Inc., Tualatin, OR Bahadurali K. Sarangi (M), SRC Engineering Consultants Ltd., Burnaby, BC Rick Thibault, City of Coquitlam, Coquitlam, BC Bellevue Community College Clara H. Simon

Southwestern Region Alberto C. Adame Sr., Electro- iluminacion de Occidente, Mexico Brent Arnold, Humphrey & Associates, Inc., Dallas, TX Tom Mendoza, HLM Design USA, Inc., Dallas, TX Antonio Mora Neave, Grupo Lite, Mexico Charles E. Nicholson, Wells-Keown Associates, Harahan, LA Mitzi Perritt (M), Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches, TX Mark Williams, Sempra Energy Solutions, Houston, TX

Joseph A. Way Jr., St. Tammany Par- ish Sheriffs Office, Covington, LA Chris Wyatt, High End Systems, Austin, TX Southwest Texas State University Deena R. Dail University of Colorado at Boulder Jared Britton, John Hamilton University of Houston Stephen R. Gist

Foreign Oskar O. Birgisson, Oxygen, Iceland Koh Kian Chuan (M), Urban Redevel- opment Authority, Singapore

Mario T. Fernandez Sr. (M), Dar Al-Raiyadh Consultants, Saudi Arabia Sungnam Park, Yooshin Engineering co., Seoul, Korea Alex D. Szterenlicht (M), Orot Architectural Lighting, Israel Alessio Urso, Iluminacion-X, Honduras Wilfredo Valentin Jr., Americal Distributors, Puerto Rico Escola Panamericana de Arte Fabio K. Nagata Kyung Hee University, Korea Ki Hoon Moon

Hicks, Dentist Who Ran Lamp Museum, Dies

Dr. Hugh Francis Hicks, the dentist whose office was home to what is thought

to

be the worlds foremost collection of electric light bulbs, died at the age of 79

in

May. Considered one of the largest collections in the world, the Incandescent

Lighting Museum was located in Baltimore, MD. The museum opened in 1964 and his collection would eventually grow to 75,000 total lamps. About 10,000 bulbs were labeled and on display in the base- ment museum of his office at 717 Washington Place. A subcategory of the col- lection includes lighting fixtures, from sconces to street lights and chandeliers. Over the years his collection would include a lamp from the original torch of the Statue of Liberty and headlamps from the Mercedes-Benz limousines of Nazi

leaders Adolf Hitler and Heinrich Himmler. Dr. Hicks regularly told visitors to his free, private museum that his was the only collection in the world containing an uninterrupted history of the light bulb, including 15 or 20 bulbs that Thomas Alva Edison probably held in his hands 122 years ago. The largest bulb in his collection dates to 1926 4 feet high and requires 50,000 watts of electricity to glow. The most diminutive is a pin light that was produced

in

the 1960s and used in missile wiring. It is only visible under a microscope. Other historical pieces include a 3-foot-long tubular bulb used during the 1930s

to

illuminate the ill-fated French liner Normandie; a dashboard light from the Enola

Gay, the plane that dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, in 1945; an Edison bulb from the now-demolished Vanderbilt mansion in New York; and a 15

W fluorescent bulb that illuminated the table on which the Japanese signed the

surrender in World War II aboard the USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay in 1945. In 2000, many lighting professionals who attended the IESNA annual conven- tion in Washington D.C. saw some of Dr. Hicksbulbs.

Don’t be caught on the outside looking in Exterior lighting techniques have undergone major changes,
Don’t be caught on the
outside looking in
Exterior lighting techniques have
undergone major changes, as shown in
Chapter 21 of the 9th Edition of the
IESNA Lighting Handbook.
To order your copy of the
9th Edition of the IESNA
Lighting Handbook, call
(212) 248-5000, ext. 112.

Philips Lighting Launches TradeLink Customer Web Portal

Philips Lighting Company recently launched TradeLink; an Internet based portal providing customers with real time, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year personalized self-service access to order/account management and in- stantaneous product availability infor- mation. In addition, an enhanced pub- licly available digitized online product catalog with advanced search features has been introduced. The new catalog includes high-resolution photos and product marketing information. The TradeLink site was piloted to 28 industrial customer branches in October 2001 and complete customer rollout is now underway. TradeLink customers will be able to determine status and tracking for cur- rent and past orders from the moment of placement. With this secure site, customers have 24 hour a day real- time access to detailed order status information, including credit status, applicable block information, and con- firmed ordered product quantities and delivery dates. Additionally, links to freight carriers are enabled for online shipment tracking. For customers with multiple branches, the site can deliver information down to the local branch level. Straightforward and easy to use, users with minimal web experience will not need training before accessing TradeLink, but online and customer service representative assistance is available for users with questions.

For Bonny Ann Whitehouse , sports lighting is more than illuminance values and uniformity ratios.

For Bonny Ann Whitehouse, sports lighting is more than illuminance values and uniformity ratios. It’s a blend of architectural and theatrical techniques

PHOTO: TIM GRIFFITH/COURTESY OF NBBJ
PHOTO: TIM GRIFFITH/COURTESY OF NBBJ

KEEPING HER EYEON THE BALL

B onny Ann Whitehouse is a senior lighting designer for Flack + Kurtz Inc., an international consulting engi- neering company based in New York City. In addition

to her rich background in architectural and theatrical light- ing, her experience includes an impressive list of major sports facilities—like Miller Park, Milwaukee, and American Airlines Center, Dallas. “I approach sports lighting as a multitude of diverse systems for event and architectural lighting that must be melded and

(top) F+K Lighting Group provided event lighting for 42,500-seat Miller Park with a fan-shaped retractable roof by integrating the location of the lighting structures using state-of-the-art technology for field illumination and control. (left) The designers accentuated the facade of Cincinnati's Paul Brown Stadium, providing sparkle to the surfaces of the building, highlighting an instant landmark along the Ohio River.

controlled as one, ” she told Chuck Beardsley, Editor of LD+A . “ It ’

controlled as one,she told Chuck Beardsley, Editor of LD+A. Its lighting for restaurants and clubs. Its television lighting for events. All of these areas add to the gameexperience. Event lighting should be designed with metal halide fix- tures1000 or 1500 Wbecause of their color temperature and color rendering index, both of which plays an important part in meeting both the leagues and television broadcastersrequirements.

Polk and Portland Perspectives

Polk County Iowa Events Centernow under construc- tionpresented significant design challenges for Bonny. The lighting design considered the needs of an arena and an exhi- bition hall, as well as a total building lighting control system. The arena caters to basketball, indoor football and hockey events. Aside from the main events, the design of the light- ing controls allows for the versatility required by events such as trade shows, car shows, gradua- tions, large-scale meetings and con- certs. Metal halide floodlights with instant onshades will permit instant blackouts for visual effects. The versa- tility required by the exhibit hall will be addressed with two lighting sys- tems: metal halide floods with stepped on-offdimming for flexibility and dimmable quartz to provide a more intimate setting for dining. Its more than event lighting,says

The challenges of lighting Seattle's Safeco Field were a combination of meeting the stringent requirements of both major league baseball and ESPN broadcast standards. An acceptable max/min ratio was achieved while maintaining a low glare level within the seating.

At the Portland, OR, Rose Garden arena, lighting design encompassed the suites, concourses, restaurant, and exterior facade, as well as illumination for the events.

Ms. Whitehouse. Its the total inte- gration of the lighting in the facility, including the suites, clubs, concours- es, restaurants, and exterior facades. The requirements of each facility need to be considered separately. Each has unique features that present new and different lighting challenges. For example, Flack+ Kurtzs Light- ing Design Group has implemented an indirect lighting approach at the Portland, OR, Rose Garden arena, home to the NBA Portland Trailblazers. By nature, arenas are energetic frenetic places,Ms. White- house observes. The lighting designer seeks a calming, sooth- ing and organized atmosphere to help with crowd control.At the Rose Garden, the main concourse general lighting is provided by illumination of the underside of the seating rake, offering subdued ambient lighting. The event lighting was designed to meet the needs of both the players and the NBA without causing glare to the spectator.

Manchester Magic

At the Manchester, NH, Verizon Wireless Arena, which opened in November 2001, F+K provided an integrated design solution for the event and architectural lighting. Manchester is located on the Merrimack River and a nau- tical influence can be found in most of its architecture. This

influence can be found in most of its architecture. This 18 LD + A/July 2002 w

theme was applied to the arena, which is located at a major intersection and set back from the curb. At the entry, four columns, shaped to resemble smoke- stacks from old ocean liners, are grazed with a tight beam metal halide downlight. The main entrance lobby has a front façade wall of 40-ft-tall glass structures with few mullions. The space is lighted with indirect metal halide fixtures reflect- ing off large mirrors suspended from the ceiling. The mirrors provide diffused downlighting, and the mirrorsshadows along the ceiling plane give a celestial appearance. The indi- rect metal halide fixtures graze various walls as they reach upward toward the ceiling mirrors, adding to the constella- tion appearance of the lobby. On the main concourse levels, along both sides of the arena, oversize indirect fixtures are mounted along the interior columns, uplighting the double-height space. The exterior is glass, offering passersby a view of the interior suite space. The arena lighting used ESPN design criteria to provide lighting levels for hockey and basketball. A building control system provides lighting controls from a central location, which allows one to easily adjust arena lighting levels for a vari- ety of events. Catwalk-mounted aisle lighting forms the egress stairs of the arena seating area.

Cincinnati Jewel

Built as a showcase for the NFLs Cincinnati Bengals, the Paul Brown Stadium features a European-style cantilevered roof over the upper seating. Quartz uplight fixtures accentuate the elegant flowing features of the roof. F+Ks goal was to create a jewel within the citys skyline. Metal halide floodlights add sparkle to the metal finishes of the exterior façade. High pressure sodium lamped fixtures flood the underside of the seating rake on all upper concourses, giv- ing a wash to the stadium that accented the façade. To meet the stringent requirements of ESPN broadcast stan- dards, over six hundred 200 W metal halide sports lights were used. The unique lighting concepts added sparkle to the facade of the building, highlighting an instant landmark along the Ohio River.

Miller Time

F+K designed the event lighting for Milwaukees Miller Park. Among the challenges of the design were stringent guidelines from major league baseball and the television networks, as well as the need to minimize lighting glare for the players. Baseball is a multi-directional aerial spot,notes Ms. White- house. So the possibility of lighting glare increases. Careful consideration to the playersperspectives is critical, as is mini- mizing glare to the spectators. At the same time, shadows of the players on the field must be minimized to not distract the tele- vision viewer.Miller Parkhome of the 2002 All-Star Gamewas partic- ularly challenging because the lighting levels had to be suffi- cient for indoor conditions, when the convertible roof is closed, and outdoor conditions, when the roof is retracted. The heights of the fixtures are fixed and the locations had to be closely coor- dinated around the mechanics of the roof.

Undoubtedly, Miller Parks most unique feature is the roof. The only fan-shaped convertible roof in North America, the 12,000 ton, seven-panel structure opens and closes silently in just 10 minutes. Metal halide floodlights were used for both event and emer- gency lighting. Hot restrike lamps were specified to overcome the long restrike time of standard metal halide lamps. My theatrical training helped in hands-on aiming of the fix- tures at Miller Park,says Ms. Whitehouse. Lighting was ini- tially skimming the scoreboard, creating a mammoth shadow. Working all night, for three consecutive nights, we re-aimed the adjacent fixtures to increase the lighting levels at the trou- ble spot without jeopardizing the vertical footcandle levels at the original aimed location of the fixtures. In arenas, banners and speaker clusters can also create shadows that can cause aiming challeneges.More than a decade of planning and four and a half years of construction went into building the $400 million park, home to the Milwaukee Brewers. From its statues of Hank Aaron and Robin Yount to its brick and stone façade and towering steel arches, the 42,500 seat stadium resembles the ballparks of the 20s and 30s.

URI Traditional

The University of Rhode Islands Convocation Center is a 7500 seat, 200,000 sq ft multi-use center with accommodations for basketball, concerts, and public shows. It contains all of the amenities of a professional arena, including six luxury boxes. F+K worked with the design team to maintain a traditional style with a modern undertone. Red brick with green tint metal trim was used, and large 400 W metal halide pendant fixtures with a green patina metal finish were specified for the con- courses. The main features of the lighting design include ener- gy efficient fixtures and a total building lighting control system, which uses occupancy sensors in all major pubic spaces. Compact fluorescent high-bay fixtures were used in the arena for house and emergency lighting. By tying the energy efficient emergency lighting into a separate generator, URI earned significant rebates from Narragansett Electric.

I sculpt with light,says Bonny. Multi-directional aerial sports like baseball demand critical vertical illuminance over the height of the playing area, as well as horizontal illuminance at ground level. But I also design for every other conceivable eventfrom dog shows to graduationsby carefully designing a flexible, user-friendly lighting control system. Theres no single way to best light these activities. Each multiuse sports facilitywhether an arena or a stadiumpresents unique design challenges.

or a stadium — presents unique design challenges. ” The designer: Bonny Ann Whitehouse, IESNA, IALD,

The designer: Bonny Ann Whitehouse, IESNA, IALD, has a wide range of lighting experience, both in archi- tecture and theater. Her theatrical background has led to a variety of different consulting opportunities with architectural firms and architectural lighting designers. She is a senior lighting designer at Flack + Kurtz, Inc., New York, and has been a member of the IESNA for three years.

F ANFARE O FF THE F IELD In every arena, the event is the star,

FANFARE OFF THE FIELD

In every arena, the event is the star, but lighting also plays a key role in the wings

A s designer Bonnie Whitehouse points out elsewhere in this issue, sports lighting is more than event lighting. It’s the suites,

parking lots, clubs, concourses, restaurants, and exterior facades of an arena as well. Here are three recent examples.

Key Club

The interior lighting for the Seattle Key Arena Courtside Club was designed by Denise Fong, LC, IALD, and Megan Strawn, LC, IALD, both of

Denise Fong, LC, IALD, and Megan Strawn, LC, IALD, both of 20 LD + A/July 2002
year-old structure to a baseball-only facility. The project was completed in time for the Anaheim

year-old structure to a baseball-only facility. The project was completed in time for the Anaheim Angels opening day. The entry plaza mimics a life-size baseball diamond, with green and brown pavers representing grass and dirt base paths. Bases, made of textured glass, are internally lit with long-life compact fluorescent sources. General lighting, provided by floodlight clusters atop 30-ft poles, mimics sports lighting. Ceramic metal halide was chosen for its high color rendering, energy efficiency, and long life. Elsewhere, 3000K metal halide illuminates 60-ft tall curving colonnades; 4000K metal halide accents green palm tree canopies. Floodlights mounted atop 30-ft poles wash exterior food court facades. Cutoff luminaires mounted just above ban- ner arms on these poles illuminate banners, seat walls, and condiment tables. All use ceramic metal halide sources to accu- rately render colorful graphics, pavers, food, and people. Our value engineering compromise was to change most tree uplights from metal halide to halogen PAR38,said designer Powell. Ground-mounted fixtures are easily accessed, so the

(right) At Anaheims Edison International Field, general lighting is provided by floodlight clusters atop 30-ft poles. Direct burial uplights illuminate 45-ft-long canopy structural supports shaped as giant baseball bats. (opposite, top) At Seattles Key Arena Courtside Club, creating a warm, rich atmosphere was a priority when a 7000-sq-ft storage room was converted to a high-end season-ticket-holdersclub. The owner requested a completely flexible lighting solution to work successfully with the complex AV component. The architect requested an unobtrusive, integrated installation. (opposite, bottom) At the Courtside Club, custom picture lights incorporate xenon lamps. Dimmable fluorescent strip fixtures illuminate art glass in the banquette dividers.

Candela Architectural Lighting, Seattle. The goal of the lighting design for the conver- sion of a storage room into a high-end season-tick- et holdersclub was to offer a completely flexible, integrated lighting solutionone that would work successfully with the facilitys complex audiovisual component. At the bar, sound and lighting is programmed with presets for pre game, half time, and post game. Two 7-ft-tall rear projection screens domi- nate the room, ensuring that fans never miss a minute of the action. Track-mounted halogen PAR30 lamps are used throughout. Track heads, integrated into the wood grid ceiling with egg crate louvers, eliminate glare and stray light while providing ambient light. Art glass at the entry to the bar is internally illuminated by dimmable linear wallwashers placed at top and bottom. Adjustable fixtures concealed behind the suspended wood grid ceiling illuminate walls and tabletops. In the bar area, 40-in. flat screen televisions suspended from a curved pipe supplement the main AV screens. Bar lighting was coordinated with screen locations to eliminate stray light- ing. Internally illuminated art glass in the center bar area uses low-voltage strip lighting with 20,000-hour xenon lamps for ease of maintenance. The design meets the Washington State Energy Code.

Angels’ Entry

Andrew Powell, IESNA, LC, of Lighting Design Alliance, Long Beach, CA, designed the exterior lighting for Edison International Field, Anaheim. Renovations restored the 30-

Milwaukee Harp luminaires from Holophane complement the retro look of Milwaukee ’ s Miller Park
Milwaukee Harp luminaires from Holophane complement the retro look of Milwaukee ’ s Miller Park

Milwaukee Harp luminaires from Holophane complement the retro look of Milwaukees Miller Park Stadium. When the $400 million park was designed, the owners wanted it to stir memories of the days when baseball was king.

shorter lamp life was deemed acceptable. These graze palm tree trunks, bringing out rich texture and color.The life-size statue of long-time Angelsowner Gene Autry is accented by metal halide spots mounted high in nearby palm trees. After sundown, lighting gives the sculpture added promi- nence in the open plaza.

Miller Light

At Milwaukees Miller Park, lighting for the stadiums plaza area had to complement the structures architecture. According to Robert D. Cooper, principal, Eppstein Uhen Architects, Inc., Milwaukee, when the stadium was designed, the owners want- ed a facility that would stir memories of the days when baseball was king. The stadium has a retro look,said Cooper. The architec- ture evokes images of the industrial of the industrial facilities that were once the heart of Milwaukees economy.For lighting designer Greg Sadowski, P.E., IESNA, the exte- rior lighting system had to look good and provide sufficient illumination so fans could see where they were going. The exterior lighting at the former stadium was laid out in a spo- radic pattern. Miller Park has a different configuration than fans were accustomed to with the old stadium,said Sadowki, president, Powrtek Engineering, Inc., Waukesha, WI. While we wanted

enough light to ensure safety and security, we also wanted to keep the area open and uncluttered.Milwaukee Harp luminaires from Holophane were installed in and along the concrete walkways that wrap around the sta- dium and extend into the parking lots. The prismatic glass luminaires resemble the first harp-shaped fixtures used to light Milwaukees streets at the turn of the century. They use 150-W pulse-start metal halide lamps. The units are mounted on 15-ft metal ornamental poles painted dark green to match the stadi- um. Spacing is 60 ft on center. Two pedestrian bridges link the plaza area with outlying parking lots. Harp luminaires were mounted on 11-ft poles along the bridge 4-ft walls. Illumination levels on the walk- ways and bridges average 2 fc, with a minimum of 0.9 fc. Esplanade luminairesalso from Holophaneilluminate the parking lots. Mounted on 40-ft concrete poles, the fixtures use 400-W metal halide lamps, with illumination levels aver- aging 2 fc.

D AYLIGHT S AVINGS T IME S tudents at Washington State University in Pullman had

DAYLIGHT

SAVINGS

TIME

S tudents at Washington State University in Pullman had sizeable aspirations for their Student Recreation Center. Their objective: to

change the culture of the 17,000-student campus by providing a world-class fitness facility dedicated to drop-in recreation for everyone. And as long as they were at it, to create a new model for sustainable design in higher education using daylighting, ener- gy efficiency and natural materials. Dedicated on February 22, 2001, the WSU Student Recreation Center provides 160,000 sq ft of space, making it the largest indoor community recreation center in Washington State and the largest student recreation center in the Pacific Northwest. The process of making the Student Recreation

(left and below) Diffuse skylights flood the natatorium with natural lighting from several locations. At night, the uplighting runs at full output; light levels are 30 fc at the pool edges.

Maximizing daylight was key to Glumac International’s design for the Washington State University’s Student Recreation Center

Washington State University’s Student Recreation Center 24 LD + A/July 2002 w w w . i
Center dates back to 1995, when the Associated Students of Washington State University (ASWSU) began

Center dates back to 1995, when the Associated Students of Washington State University (ASWSU) began generating inter- est for the building among the student body. In 1996, funds were allocated to a committee to officially research student demand and generate a detailed feasibility study. In April 1997, Washington State University students were asked by the Student Referendum Committee of ASWSU to vote on the con- struction of the WSU Student Recreation Center. Students stepped up to the plate, voting to impose a $100-per-semester fee increase for each student to cover the costs of design and construction. An exceptionally high turnout of student voters indicated over 63 percent approval for the project. No state funds were used in the construction of the project.

The Design Team

Following the successful student referendum, the campus set out to hire a design team to work closely with them to create the facility. WSU students selected our team, which was led by Yost Grube Hall Architecture of Portland, Oregon, because of the “chemistry factor.” Design team members responded to the students’ enthusiasm and demonstrated that they would be skilled at collaborating with the students to attain their lofty goals for an inspiring and sustainable building. Yost Grube Hall’s team included Rowley International (Aquatics Con- sultants), Glumac International (Mechanical, Electrical & Lighting Consultants) and KPFF (Structural Engineers).

(left)The open spaces in the weight machine area allow deep daylight penetration. (right) In the gyms, skylights, clerestories, and fenestration provide daylighting from the north, south, and top of the building. Direct sunbeams never reach the floor.

Cannon Design was also brought on board to provide equip- ment consulting and recreation expertise.

Something for Everyone

Nearly 25 different committees participated in the design process and more than 800 students gave direct input in open committee meetings, focus groups, interviews and telephone surveys. This high degree of participation meant that the build- ing had to provide the widest possible array of active spaces. The state-of-the-art building contains the largest student weight and cardio room in a recreational facility in the nation, with a total of 17,000 sq ft and more than 150 individual work- out stations. Seven courts in two gyms are lined for basketball, volleyball, badminton, and pickleball. Four racquetball courts are provided, two of which can easily be converted to squash courts. An elevated four-lane, eighth-mile track is also includ- ed. The natatorium accommodates a five-lane, 25-yard lap pool, and an adjoining leisure pool is equipped for water vol- leyball and basketball. A 10,000 gallon, 53-person spa, com- plete with re-circulating waterfall, is also included in the pool

with re-circulating waterfall, is also included in the pool w w w . i e s
(left) Gymnasiums are lighted with 8-lamp compact fluorescent sports lights. Controlled by photocells and low
(left) Gymnasiums are lighted with 8-lamp compact fluorescent sports lights. Controlled by photocells and low

(left) Gymnasiums are lighted with 8-lamp compact fluorescent sports lights. Controlled by photocells and low voltage relays, they offer four levels of lighting based upon the daylight available. (right) Lightshelves eliminate direct sunbeams in the gyms and natatorium. During the day, sports lights run at minimum output.

area. Three multipurpose rooms are designed for aerobics, mar- tial arts, yoga, and dance. A single classroom is used for meet- ings and wellness courses.

software packages as a comparison. Although I was very happy with Accurenders ease of use, it seemed that the radiosity cal- culations were more accurate in Lightscape. Calculations in AGI and conversations with other lighting designers confirmed this. The design team decided to calculate the daylighting at nine times throughout the year: morning, noon and evening for both solstices and the equinox. Calculations were made for the natatorium and gymnasia, resulting in long hours in front of the computer. The far north latitude of the project (46° 44') dic- tated careful attention to sun shading due to very flat solar angles in the winter and very steep angles in the summer.

the Natatorium

The architect, Yost Grube Hall developed a digital model of the natatorium, and the appropriate textures, surfaces and materials were added. Objects at the bottom of the digital poolappeared from different angles at various times of the day, showing their visibility under different conditions. The model was also calculated and rendered with several electric lighting scenarios. In the end, the team was satisfied with the results of both the daylighting simulations and the indirect electric light- ing scheme. In the actual space, photocells step the indirect lighting as the natural contribution changes. Final meter read- ings in the finished space varied by less than 5 percent com- pared to the predictions in the computer models in both daylit and electric-lit conditions.

Let the Sun Shine In…

Merely pleasing all the students wasnt enough. The WSU student body also wanted to create a new model for sustain- ability in recreation center design. Altogether, there are 25 spe- cific areas that make use of sustainable design principles, such as a seasonal on-site stormwater retention pond, natural venti- lation, and high recycled content interior materials. Maximizing daylight in the building was identified as a key design criterion because of the energy savings and because the students knew it would create a warm and inviting character for the building. But daylighting recreational spaces is easier said than done. Windows in gyms can put sun in the playerseyes. And, as any pool operator can tell you, windows and water dont mix: condensation, heat gain, reflection and glare are daily issues in most natatoriums. Some of these issues are merely annoying, such as the noise generated when voices ric- ochet off water and glass. Other issues create serious safety con- cerns, such as veiling reflections preventing a lifeguard from seeing someone in the pool. To make the daylighting strategies work, our team prepared a 3-D computer model that we could use to test light levels. At the time (June, 1998) we were evaluating both Lightscape and AccuRender, and decided to process the calculations in both

the Gymnasia

After the natatorium digital modeling was complete, we moved on to the gymnasia. The building included two large spaces with a modified sawtooth roof design that incorporated clerestories and skylights, with large open frame trusses to sup- port the roof above the courts. The smaller gym (three courts) was oriented parallel to the clerestories, while the larger gym (four courts and the elevated track) was perpendicular. Direct sunbeams were to be avoided to eliminate glare problems on the courts, so a large free-floating interior lightshelf was devel- oped to diffuse the light and bounce it off the ceiling. The light- shelf consists of steel framing and an extruded Lexan sheet. The Lexan sheet, which is very light, is a double-chamber design, is painted with 1/8th in. wide stripes on one side to dif- fuse harsh light. The lightshelves are held about 24 in. from the wall to allow for easier access to the clerestory windows for cleaning. Since the gyms were expected to have about 50-75fc with daylight contribution alone, compact-fluorescent high-bay sports fixtures with four ballasts were specified, allowing for stepped control. Naturally, we would have preferred dimming over step, but the budget wouldnt allow it. Digital photocells, each capable of 12 thresholds, controlled the lighting, based upon daylight contribution. At night, electric light provides about 40fc at the playing surface. Prismatic refractors provide extremely even lighting throughout the gyms and avoid a dark ceiling. Small MR-16 accent lights were installed below the track to highlight the structure, with custom shrouds fabricat- ed from steel pipe to protect them. Like the natatorium model, the gymnasium models proved to be very accurate. Overall light levels measured in the actual space matched the digital models very well, and the team was very satisfied with the performance of the digital process.

the Fitness Studio

Located along the side of the larger gym are two floors of fit- ness machines, freeweights, and aerobic machines. Like the natatorium and the gyms, this area is daylit and had its own challenges. The lower ceilings did not allow for the use of inte- rior lightshelves, so the design team put them on the building exterior instead. Since Pullman gets a wide range of weather, from hot, dry summers to cold, snowy winters, the exterior shades had to be durable and allow snow and leaves to pass through. Yost Grube Hall selected a composite material, origi- nally intended as a catwalk grating, which proved to be the per- fect material: light, strong and unpainted (the color is in the resin). Its low profile has a minimum visual impact on the buildings façade.

And Elsewhere

A decorative highbay fixture with four compact fluorescent lamps was selected for the lobbies, which made a nice transi- tion from the sports fixtures. Small, low voltage pendants were selected to match, looking like pocket-sized highbays over the equipment checkout counter. Photocells and timeclocks con- trol circulation fixtures to reduce the connected load whenever possible. The downlights specified for the circulation areas can incor-

porate a decorative glass disc to add a design element to the fix- ture. Major pathways throughout the space utilize the disc ver- sion of the fixture, while secondary areas use just the basic reflector. Universal ballasts were specified to allow a certain degree of lamp flexibility. Including the University-mandated high pressure sodium lamps in the parking and pedestrian area, only 11 lamp types were used in the entire facility, which thrilled the Universitys maintenance department. (In fact, until in-cabinet lighting at the equipment counter was added, I had won a bet and was looking forward to a nice steak dinner). Exterior lighting was studied carefully to reduce light pollu- tion for the adjacent residential neighborhood. The design team shifted from a glow-top pedestrian pole to a solid top ver- sion, which still incorporated campus standards for light levels and luminaires, but reduced the glow the building cast from its hilltop location. Limited uplights were used outside the nata- torium, in locations where the roof overhang would reduce any stray uplight past the building.

Energy Savings

More than a year after the building opened, the lighting loads for the Student Recreation Center have proven to be approxi- mately 25 percent below those mandated by the Washington State Energy Code. Mechanical loads have been reduced as well. Overall, the project has been very well received by both the University and the community, with an average usage of just over 3000 visitors daily. The project received two IIDA Awards of Merit: one for interior lighting, and one for energy use (EPRI Award). It has been named a Facility of Merit by Athletic Business Magazine and received an Outstanding Indoor Sports Facility Award from NIRSA, an international recreation- al sports association.

The designers: Aaron J. Hum- phrey, LC, was Glumac Inter- nationals lighting designer from 1998-2001. Currently, he is Senior Designer at Rising Sun Enterprises, in Basalt, CO. Aaron got his degree in theatre in order to fulfill a lifelong dream of wear- ing black and waiting on tables, but a tragic peppermill accident ended that, and he switched to architectural lighting. An avid skier and cyclist, he is also a ski coach in Aspen. He has won several awards for his lighting designs, and even a few awards for coaching, which is his real job. Kirk C. Davis, P.E., is electrical principal at Glumac International, a large M/E/P firm based in Portland, OR.

A graduate of the University of Colorado Illumination and Power program, he

has won numerous awards for projects throughout the west. Since moving to Oregon, Kirk has learned how to two-putt a wet green, but only on Thursdays. Robert Curry, AIA, has 21 years of experience as a project manager for educa- tional projects. He is a LEED certified designer and an expert in sustainable strategies with an emphasis on daylighting. Hes currently the project manager

for the North Mall Office Building, Oregons first sustainable public office build- ing, as well as Chairman of the Portland AIA Committee on the Environment and a member of the Oregon Sustainable Products Purchasing Board. He hopes

to find some time this summer to beat Kirk at golf.

He hopes to find some time this summer to beat Kirk at golf. w w w
He hopes to find some time this summer to beat Kirk at golf. w w w
He hopes to find some time this summer to beat Kirk at golf. w w w

AN ODDS-ON FAVORITE

(below) Photo-finish requirements of 4000 vertical lux are met at the finish line. A relay-based lighting control system controls all track lighting from the photo-finish line booth in the grandstand. (right) The Singapore Turf Club Racecourse is a premier horseracing facility, which includes a 2000 meter turf track, a 1800 meter all-weather track, a training track, stable facilities for 1,000 horses and grandstand for 30,000 patrons.

28

LD+A/July 2002

PHOTOS: ERHARD PFEIFFER

www.iesna.org

It was a photo finish for Ewing Cole’s design team, but deadlines were met for the tracks at the Singapore Turf Club, where lighting creates dramatic and compelling imagery within a tropical garden setting

and compelling imagery within a tropical garden setting w w w . i e s n

www.iesna.org

W hen the Singapore government proposed a new thor-

oughbred racecourse, it held an international design

competition and selected a United States firm with

international sports expertise, Ewing Cole Cherry Brott, paired with Indeco, a firm in Singapore. The $450,000,000 project, which opened in March of 2000 includes a 2000-meter turf track; an 1800-meter all-weather track; a 1200-meter turf training track; stable and training facilities for 1000 horses; and a grandstand for 30,000 patrons, with public amenities set within a tropical garden. Since opening day, the club has attracted on average 25,000 to 30,000 patrons on each race day. Ewing Cole Cherry Brott’s in-house lighting designers worked hand in hand with US and Singapore architects and engineers to design the exterior architectural, entrance and garden, and sports lighting for the facility, and were awarded an IIDA 2001 Award of Merit for the project. The overall “night-racing” lighting design provides state-of-the-art sports lighting for the track, dramatic site

lighting for a festive atmosphere at night racing events, and secu- rity lighting for pedestrian, vehicular and horse safety. The main site lighting goal determined at the start of the light- ing design process was to create a festive theatrical ambiance. Indirect bright white lighting systems are used as a common theme throughout the site to enhance perception of the spaces and forms. A series of major and minor focal points were deter- mined with the architects and served as a road-map to the site lighting design, being emphasized with bright white lighting. The main focal point of the site, only secondary to the sports lighting of the track, is the glowing parade ring canopy. In order to move the public through the site from focal point to focal point towards the parade ring canopy, transitional ‘theatrical’ lighting is provid- ed. Backdrops to the transitional areas and focal points are creat- ed with lower levels of lighting, which also enlarged the percep- tion of the site. Ambient lighting is provided in the non-event evening hours to attract attention to the site when the track is not

LD+A/July 2002

29

in use and energy saving security lighting is provided in the late night hours to

in use and energy saving security lighting is provided in the late night hours to provide for security systems.

Sports Lighting

The sports lighting for night racing at the racecourse includes over 2000 metal halide, 1800 W sport lighting lumi- naires totaling over 4.32 mega watts of power. The sports light- ing is designed and aimed for the 2000-meter turf track and 1800-meter all-weather track with additional accommodations for the 1200-meter turf-training track. All three tracks were lighted from a single row of poles along the track and from a custom designed frame structure along the entire trackside of the grandstand roof. There are 41 poles, 35 of which are 30-meter poles and six are 40-meter poles. The poles are located to light the race for the patrons and TV cam-

eras while minimizing obstructions to viewers. The pole- mounted luminaires are accessed for maintenance via portable motorized cages that attach to the poles and the grandstand luminaires are accessed via the roof. With the large power demand required for the sports light-

ing alone, an elaborate medium voltage power distribution sys- tem was designed. Included in this power distribution system

is an emergency power system consisting of on-lineuninter-

ruptible power supply (UPS) units with generator back up. Emergency lighting is critical in night horseracing for safe cessation of a race in the event of a power outage. A momen-

tary outage would be catastrophic during a race, and would put the horse and jockey in grave danger. The design incorporates

a substantial number of luminaires on emergency not only for

safety but to also ensure a race in progress will be able to fin-

(above) Metal halide floodlighting illuminates the grandstand profile, which derives form from a horse in motion. The glow of the parade ring is the focal point on the entrance façade. The MRT entrance can be seen in the forefront. (below) Over two thousand 1800 W metal halide sports lighting luminaires illuminate the tracks to international CIE standards. The luminaires are accessed via motorized cages integral to the poles.

are accessed via motorized cages integral to the poles. 30 LD + A/July 2002 w w

30

LD+A/July 2002

www.iesna.org

ish, thereby saving a large potential loss in revenue. Along with the elaborate power distribution system, an intri- cate lighting control and monitoring system was designed. At the base of each pole, an integrated power and control panel is provided. This panel provides local branch power circuits to each luminaire and includes multi-function power monitoring with digital communications, surge protection and solid state relays, and prewired ballast and branch circuits to each lighting pole. The system is controlled through a computer network with distributed intelligent microprocessor based digital con- trollers, with computer control workstations located in the main facilities office and in the grandstand photo finish booth. Stringent lighting design criteria for the horseracing were

high definition television. Glare shields were required on all luminaires to limit the sky glow effect and spill lighting to the surrounding areas. Calculations were performed by the design team to deter- mine the target design illumination levels, to limit the spill light at the property line and to limit the maximum glare ratings for observer positions around the track. The tender documents (construction documents) required the manufacturer to per- form extensive calculations to show compliance with all the target illumination levels and uniformity ratios as spelled out on the documents. The manufacturer-submitted calculations were reviewed by the designers at the tender review and dur- ing the submittal phase of the project.

review and dur- ing the submittal phase of the project. The parade ring canopy is up-lighted

The parade ring canopy is up-lighted with metal halide luminaires, and the illumination for the horse show is derived from metal halide sports lighting. The luminaires’ mountings are aesthetically integrated with the structure.

based on levels required not only for spectator viewing, but also for high definition television cameras and photo-finish requirements. The design criteria for the track illumination exceeded all published standards, including the international CIE standards, and as a result the racecourse has the highest illumination levels and strictest uniformity ratios designed for horseracing in the world to date. The illumination criteria of the track segments varies, due to the lighting distances involved and the relative importance of the track section to televised viewing. The Philips Arena Vision luminaire, with 1800 W metal halide lamp, was chosen because of its outstanding perfor- mance and the lamps high color rendering index of 90 and color temperature of 5600K, which is particularly suited for

www.iesna.org

Commissioning of the sports lighting system was an exten- sive process that took over a month to finalize with the quan- tity of luminaires involved. The commissioning process was necessary to ensure the track lighting system met the design criteria. Throughout the submittal, construction and commissioning phases, communications between the design team and the manufacturer/contractor was pivotal. Credit should be given to Tay-Hooi Seng of Philips for the success of this project in meet- ing and exceeding the lighting design goals.

Exterior Architectural Lighting

From the beginning, the design of the Grandstand was intended to embody the spirit of the new facilityhigh tech-

LD+A/July 2002

31

nology melded with the excitement of the race. The roof of the grandstand evolved into an assemblage of complex, sleek curv- ing forms symbolizing the thoroughbred racehorse in motion as it stretches to the finish. The bright stainless steel roof curves downward to the gar- den side of the grandstand where it terminates in a continuous covered parade ring terrace, extending across the entire garden side of the grandstandnearly 300 meters in lengthtrans- forming at the center into a grand amphitheater overlooking the pre-race parade ring. Here, nearly three thousand patrons directly overlook the horses and jockeys as they prepare for the race. The sharp, flat planes of the canopy and its bright yellow structure create a dramatic contrast to the taut curves of the stainless steel roof. The glow of the parade ring canopy is the focal point on the entrance façade, and the major focal point on the site, only sec- ond to the glow of the sports lighting beyond. The parade ring canopy is uplighted with metal halide luminaires, transforming the translucent canopy into a glowing element. Also, the indi- rect light from the flood luminaires provides the general light- ing for the terrace. The luminaire mountings are aesthetically

integrated with the structure. The illumination for horse show

is derived from 1000 W metal halide sports lighting luminaires.

To balance the glowing lighting effect of the parade ring canopy, and to complete the image of the grandstand at night,

a soft fill light was used on the side elevations to bring out the

building contour. Also, the front façade columns are softly illu- minated with fill light to complete the form of the front façade.

Site and Garden Lighting

The entrance areas and garden areas are the portion of the site, the public experiences pre and post racing, and the light- ing in these areas create a festive and exciting ambiance. The public enters the site from three main entrance areas; the main entrance drive to the taxi drop-off pavilion or parking areas, the VIP entrance drive, and the commuter rail line MRT (mass rail transit) pavilion. The lighting systems emphasize the points of arrival and build excitement from the entry points through to the grandstand and parade ring terrace areas.

Main Entrance Drive

Three roads bound the site of the racecourse. Both private automobiles and taxis arrive from the arterial road. A graciously wide entrance drive leads motorists through a bank of tollgates and onto the axis leading to the 5000 vehicle multistoried car park. The main entrance drive and open parking area lighting systems utilize a metal halide indirect concept, contin- uing the theme of indirect lighting systems throughout the site. A mod- ern indirect 250 W metal halide street luminaire was chosen to illuminate the drive and open parking areas. Colorful banners are mounted on the poles creating a festive atmosphere. Selected trees at significant areas along the general entrance drive are uplight- ed with metal halide luminaires to build excitement as one approaches the taxi drop-off pavilion and parking areas.

one approaches the taxi drop-off pavilion and parking areas. VIP Entrance An essential requirement for this

VIP Entrance

An essential requirement for this project was to provide separate and convenient access for the Committee of Overseers, their guests, and other VIPs. The site plan provides for a direct and exclusive route from the less traveled Woodlands Avenue to a cov- ered drop-off adjacent to the VIP entrance lobby at the second level of

Grandstand mounted luminaires are accessed via the roof. Fill illumination is provided on the standee.

32

LD+A/July 2002

www.iesna.org

the grandstand. This entrance drive is lined with palm trees and allows for views into the garden and the most dramatic views of the grandstand itself. This entrance does not cross any of the other patron routes; therefore, it creates an atmosphere more associated with a small club than a major public facility. The VIP entrance drive is elegantly illuminated with 100 W metal halide bullet uplights on the royal palm trees and with a decorative modern indirect 175 W metal halide street luminaire. The glaz- ing of the VIP entrance canopy is uplighted with 70 W metal halide well luminaires creating a glowing entrance pavilion.

MRT and Taxi Drop-off Pavilions

The hills allow the grandstand to be situated on a slight rise from the MRT entrance pavilion, which is connected with the commuter rail line, the MRT. The MRT pavilion signifies a major entrance to the racecourse while the evening illumina- tion scheme reflects the importance of the arrival event experi- enced by the public. Three large rain trees at the entry plaza are minor focal points at the entrance and are illuminated each by three 100 W metal halide well lights. Soft moonlighting is provided at the entry plaza from small 70 W metal halide bullet luminaires mounted within the rain trees, shining down on the plaza. The moon- lightingfrom the trees creates a fantasy mood, while the uplighting from the well lights creates drama. The pavilion façade is a major focal point in the composition. The façade clerestory windows will also provide a soft glow from the interior luminaires. The horse artwork is internally illuminated creating depth to the artwork. The taxi drop-off pavilion and the MRT pavilion are similar in architecture and scale and are treated similarly in lighting design concept to pro- duce the same entrance aesthetic at each pavilion.

Covered Walks and Gardens

From the MRT line station, the parking garage and the taxi drop-off pavilion, the patrons may walk under a canopy that protects them from the intense tropical sun or sudden rain showers, through the garden areas to the grandstand. Garden lighting is incorporated in the landscape, including pathway lighting and tree lighting, with the focal point being the glow- ing parade ring. The covered walkways are another transitional space, which

are evenly illuminated with a metal halide indirect lighting sys- tem, consistent with the indirect lighting theme of the site. Selected clusters of trees along the covered walks are uplight-

ed with 100W metal halide well lights to create drama. The

highlighted trees serve as minor focal points along the walk- ways guiding the public through the site to the major focal points. Background trees bordering the site are softly illumi- nated to create depth and for security purposes. The Forest Walkis a transitional path leading the public from the MRT pavilion to the parade ring and grandstand. A soft moonlighting effect, utilizing 35 to 50 W metal halide tree mounted bullet luminaires creates a theatrical mood and com- fortable environment for transition between focal points.

Selected clusters of trees along the path are uplighted with 100

W metal halide to create drama.

The garden paths are transitional paths leading from the

www.iesna.org

MRT pavilion to the parade ring and grandstand. Soft garden lighting is a vehicle for continuous movement along the paths. The star shaped flower and shrubbery beds are softly high- lighted with compact fluorescent garden luminaires to create depth and emphasize the colorful foliage and flowers.

Cultural Experience

While the late night and early morning conference calls and the 34-hour door to door travel time for site visits were at times difficult to manage, the Ewing Cole team really enjoyed the knowledge sharing and international cultural experience the project brought. The Singapore Turf Club portrays the design teams dream of dramatic and compelling imagery set within a tropical garden and the creation of a first class World Racing Facility.

The designers and authors: Mary Alcaraz, PE, LC (top, left) is cur- rently a project manager, lighting designer and electrical engineer at Ewing Cole Cherry Brott in Philadelphia. She specializes in lighting design and energy analysis with an emphasis on entertain- ment, site, landscape and exterior lighting. An IESNA member for the past 5 years, she has received numerous awards for her lighting design work on several of Ewing Coles projects, including an IESNA IIDA Regional Award of Merit in 1996 for the Veterans Stadium lighting (May 1997, LD+A) and in 2001 for the Singapore Turf Club. Ms. Alcaraz is currently the IESNA Philadelphia Section President. Robert Ghisu (top, right) is an electrical engineer for Ewing Cole Cherry Brott in Philadelphia, PA. Mr. Ghisu played a key role in the building infrastructure upgrades and elec- trical design associated with the ongoing exhibit renovations at Franklin Institute in Philadelphia. (April 2002, LD+A) In addition, his most recent pro- jects include; the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Mitchell Performing Arts Center in Bryn Athyn, Pennsylvania. Gary J. Golaszewski, PE, (middle, left) is a Project Engineer/Lighting Designer at Ballinger, Philadelphia. His previous experience included Project Engineering and Lighting Design at Ewing Cole Cherry Brott, Philadelphia. Gary has received an IESNA IIDA Regional Award of Merit. He has taught the architectural illumination course at Drexel University. Robert F. Cunningham (middle, right) is a lead electrical engineer at Ewing Cole Cherry Brott with 30 years of experience in electrical power, distribution systems engineering, and lighting design. He is responsible for developing per- formance specifications and planning documents for electrical systems. John F. Chase, AIA, (bottom, left) Director of Architecture, is a principal of Ewing Cole Cherry Brott. Mr. Chase served as the project designer and light- ing designer for the Singapore Turf Club for which it received the 2000 AIA Honor Award and 2001 IESNA IIDA Regional Award, both from the Philadelphia Section. Richard Garman, PE, (bottom, right) is an electrical engineer and lighting designer for Ewing Cole Cherry Brott in Philadelphia, PA. Other projects he has worked on include New York Presbyterian Hospital, Childrens Hospital of New York, LaSalle UniversityHayman Hall/Gola Arena and Veterans Stadium. Mr. Garman is currently a Project Engineer/Lighting Designer on the New Philadelphia Phillies Ballpark, responsible for the sports lighting design.

Designer on the New Philadelphia Phillies Ballpark, responsible for the sports lighting design. LD + A/July
Designer on the New Philadelphia Phillies Ballpark, responsible for the sports lighting design. LD + A/July
Designer on the New Philadelphia Phillies Ballpark, responsible for the sports lighting design. LD + A/July
Designer on the New Philadelphia Phillies Ballpark, responsible for the sports lighting design. LD + A/July
Designer on the New Philadelphia Phillies Ballpark, responsible for the sports lighting design. LD + A/July
Designer on the New Philadelphia Phillies Ballpark, responsible for the sports lighting design. LD + A/July

LD+A/July 2002

33

IESNA L IGHTING D E S I G N S OFTWARE S URVEY 2002 Computers

IESNA

LIGHTING DESIGN SOFTWARE SURVEY

2002

Computers are an integral part of modern lighting design. LD+A brings you the cream of the software crop.

design. LD+A brings you the cream of the software crop. A s members of the IESNA

A s members of the IESNA Computer Committee, we are often asked the

question: “What is the best lighting design program?” Our answer is simple and invariant: it depends on your needs and requirements. Choosing a lighting design program is not an easy task. You first need to deter- mine your lighting design requirements and establish a budget. Like any software product, the full cost of a lighting design program includes both training and expected productivity gains. Knowing what you want, you then need to determine which products meet your requirements and expectations. This is where the Web comes to the fore- front. All of the companies listed in this

survey have their own Web sites where you can download both current product literature and often (but not always) demo or evaluation programs. Lighting design software is an ever- changing industry. While we do our best to track the constant ebb and flow of new and improved products and companies around the world, it is a definite chal- lenge. Some of the information con- tained in this survey is already and

DISCLAIMER

Participation in this survey is voluntary, as is adherence to the rules of the survey. The authors and LD+A do not endorse or provide warranty as to the veracity of the material contained herein.

inevitably out of date. Nevertheless, we offer this printed sur- vey as a resource for answering the ques- tion: “What is the best lighting design program for you?”

LIGHTING DESIGN SOFTWARE SURVEY KEY

Price

Price (Base Package) Price of the standard software package. Technical Support User support is available via phone or fax. INCL included with purchase, and/or ADD additional service options available. Documentation An O - online or P - printed manual is provided. Demo Available A demo illustrating the program features is available either free of charge or at a nominal cost. I Interactive or N Non-Interactive

General

Interior The program performs analy- sis for indoor projects. Exterior The program performs analy- ses for outdoor projects. Roadway The program performs analyses for roadway projects. Flood/Sports Lighting The program performs analyses for floodlighting and sports lighting applications. Stage Lighting The program performs analyses for stage lighting applications.

Specifications

Network Compatible M Multi- User, D Data storage Max. Number of Calculation Areas The maximum number of areas that can be calculated during a specific analysis. Max. Luminaire Types per Run The maximum number of photometric tests for a specific analysis. Max. Luminaires per Run The max- imum number of luminaires the pro- gram allows in specific analysis. Units The program supports the fol- lowing units: E English, M Metric. Multilingual The program provides provisions for multi-lingual support. Additional Software Required The program operates inside of and requires another software package to function. If the program functions in this way, the other programs name will be indicated.

Types of Analysis

Average Illuminance Does the pro- gram provide an average illuminance value for indoor calculations using the Zonal Cavity Method or the Lumen Method. Point Illuminance Calculations The program can calculate illuminances for user specified points with the indicated orientations. H horizontal, V vertical, and/or S slanted (any orientation). Examples: H, HV, HVS. Plane Illuminance Calculations The program can calculate illuminance on planes with the indicated orientations. H horizontal, V vertical, and/or S slanted (flat surfaces with any orienta- tion), and/or C curved. Examples: H, HV, HVSC. Light Meters can be Tilted The user can rotate the light meters in directions other than perpendicular to the plane of analysis. Direct Calculations The program cal- culates direct illumination. Interreflected Calculations The pro- gram calculates interreflected illumina- tion. Non-Diffuse Calculations The pro- grams calculations can take into account non-diffuse reflective materials. Room Surface Luminance or Exit- ance The program provides the lumi- nance and or exitance values on room surfaces.

continued on page 41

Lighting Design Software Survey   Columbia Cooper Canlyte/ Genesys 11 Lighting Lighting LightPro 2.0

Lighting Design

Software Survey

 

Columbia

Cooper

Canlyte/Genesys 11

Lighting

Lighting

LightPro 2.0

Luxicon 2.3

Dial Gmbh

DiaLux 2.0

Lighting LightPro 2.0 Luxicon 2.3 Dial Gmbh DiaLux 2.0 Dial Gmbh DiaLux 2.5 (12/01) Dial Gmbh

Dial Gmbh

DiaLux 2.5

(12/01)

Dial Gmbh

DiaLux Ext

 

Independent

Independent

GE Lighting

Glamox

Testing

Testing

Aladan

OptiWin

Laboratories

Laboratories.

AutoLUX v6

AutoLUX v7

Integra

Inspire Lighting

Design

Juno Lighting

Lumen Essentials

 

Price (Base Package)

Consult Factory

$250

$200

CD Rom 15 Euro✦✦

CD Rom 15 Euro✦✦

CD Rom 15 Euro✦✦

Free

Free

$475.00

$799.00

$4,000.00

Free

 

Package

Technical Support

INCL

INCL

INCL

INCL

INCL

INCL

INCL

Free

INCL

INCL/ADD

INCL

INCL

Documentation

O

O/P

O

O

O

O

O

O/P

P

O

O

O/P

 

Demo Available

I

I

N

I

I

I/N

 

Interior

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Exterior

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

 

General

Roadway

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

 

Flood/Sports Lighting

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Stage Lighting

Y

Y

 

Network Compatible

D

M

D

M

M

M

D

D

Distributed calculations

Max. Number of Calculation Areas

Unlimited

100

Any

Any

Any

20

10

10

Any

4

Max. Luminaire Types per Run

Unlimited

100

Any

Any

Any

15

34

99

Any

4

Specifications

Max. Luminaires per Run

Unlimited

Unlimited

Any

Any

Any

750

2000

Unlimited

Any

Units

E/M

E/M

E/M

M

M

M

E/M

E/M

E/M

E/M

M

E/M

Multilingual

8

82

 

8

2

Additional Software Required

IE 5.5

IE 5.5

AutoCAD R14+

AutoCAD 2000+

Acrobat Reader3.0+

 

Average Illuminance

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

X

Point Illuminance Calculations

HVS

Y

Y

HVS

HVS

HVS

HVS

HS

HV

HVS

Plane Illuminance Calculations

HVS

Y

Y

HVS

HVS

HVS

HVS

HVS

HV

HVSC

HVSC

HV

Light Meters can be Tilted

Y

N

Y

N

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Direct Calculations

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Interreflected Calculations

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

 

Types of

Non-Diffuse Calculations

N

NNN

 

Y

Analysis

Room Surface Luminance or Exitance

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

 

Roadway Calculations

LUM

Y

N

Y

Y

LUM/TLUM

LUM

LUM

Daylighting

Y

Y

N

N

N

Y

VCP/RVP

VCP/RVP

Y

N

N

Economic Analysis

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

CIE Calculations

L

UGR

UGR

G/L/UO/UL

UGR

UL

Other Analyses

MF/UG/OPT/TV/PR/PP

UG/TV

CV

CV/UG/TV

 

Automatic Layout

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Generate Schedules

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

X

Import CAD Files

DXF/DWG

Y

Y

DXF

DXF

DXF

N

DXF/DWG

Direct

Direct

IGES/VRML

Export CAD Files

DXF/DWG

Y

Y

DXF

N

DXF/DWG

Direct

Direct

DXF/IGES/VRML

 

Special

Features

Obstruction Calculation

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Insertable Objects

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

 
 

Room Geometry (plan view)

ORTH

Y

RECT

Any

Any

Any (Area Shape)

ORTH

RECT/ORTH/CUR

RECT

Any

RECT/ORTH

Room Geometry (section view)

ORTH

Y

RECT

Any

Any

RECT/ORTH/CUR

RECT

Any

RECT/ORTH

Batch Processing

Y

Any

Any

Any

Y

Aiming Diagrams

Y

Any Shape Printout or Masking

Y

Y

Y

YYY

 
 

Tabular Entry/Edit

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

YYYY

 
 

User

Graphical Entry/Edit

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

YYYYY

 

Interaction

Input Device

D/K/M

D/K/M

K/M

K/M

K/M

K

K/M

D/K/M

D/K/M

K/M

K/M

Context Sensitive Help

Y

Y

N

Y

N

Y

Y

 

Point-by-Point

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

YYYYYY

 

Isocontours

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

3-D Model View

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

YYYY

 

Rendering

C

Y

Y

C

C

N

N

C/P

N

N

C/P

 

Types of

Rendering Presentation

ST

ST

G

WT

WT

N

N

ST

ST/WT

Output

Color Printing/Plotting

Y

Y

ST

Y

Y

Y

N

YYYYY

 
 

Scaled Output

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y

Y

Templates

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Other Output

Y

PDF

DWG/DXF

DWG/DXF

Plotter Output

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

 

Photometric Data Manager

N

N

N

N

Within

Within

Photometry

Photometric Graphic Viewer

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Photometric Formats

All

IESNA

IESNA

All

All

EU

IESNA/Other

IESNA/EULUM

IESNA

IESNA/CIE/CIBSE

IESNA

IESNA

36

LD+A/July 2002

✦✦ = free download

www.iesna.org

www.iesna.org

 

LD+A/July 2002

37

  Lighting Reality Lighting Lighting Lighting Lighting Lighting Lighting Lighting Optical
  Lighting Reality Lighting Lighting Lighting Lighting Lighting Lighting Lighting Optical
 

Lighting Reality

Lighting

Lighting

Lighting

Lighting

Lighting

Lighting

Lighting

Optical &

Lighting Design Software Survey

Lawrence Berkely

National

Laboratory

Desktop Radiance

Lighting

Analysts, Inc.

AGI32

Lighting Reality

Ltd.

REALity Outdoor

Ltd.

REALity Roadway

& Outdoor

Sciences, Inc.

LightTrespass

Software

Technologies

LumenMicro

2000

Technologies

Simply

Economics

Technologies

Simply

Indoor 2000

Technologies

Simply Outdoor

2000

Technologies

Simply

Photometrics

Technologies

Simply Roadway

2000

Lithonia Lighting

Group

Visual

Photometric

Technology

Pty Ltd

EasyLUX

 

Price (Base Package)

Free with Registration

$895.00

$490.00

$780.00

$150.00

$595.00

$199.00

$199.00

$199.00

$199.00

$199.00

$100.00

$3,500.00

Package

Technical Support

Y

INCL/ADD

INCL

INCL

INCL

INCL/ADD

INCL/ADD

INCL/ADD

INCL/ADD

INCL/ADD

INCL/ADD

INCL

INCL

Documentation

O/P

O/P

O

O

P

O

O

O

O

O

O

O

O/P

 

Demo Available

N

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

INI

 

Interior

Y

Y

YYY

 

Y

YY

Exterior

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

General

Roadway

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

YYYY

Flood/Sports Lighting

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Stage Lighting

Y

Y

Y

Y

 

Network Compatible

D

M/D

N/A

D

D

D

D

D

D

N

M/D

Max. Number of Calculation Areas

Unlimited

1

1

1

Unlimited

4

7

Unlimited

1

2

Unlimited

1

Max. Luminaire Types per Run

Unlimited

4

4

1

Unlimited

4

4

Unlimited

1

4

Unlimited

4

Specifications

Max. Luminaires per Run

Unlimited

200

200

1

Unlimited

Unlimited