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GWA IN STATES

Greater Wyoming Area


advances to the state
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Wednesday against the
Section 7 champion.
Sports, 1C
SPORTS
SHOWCASE
IL BASEBALL
YANKEES 5
CHIEFS 2
AMERICAN LEAGUE
AS 4
YANKEES 3
ORIOLES 3
ANGELS 2
NATIONAL LEAGUE
PHILLIES 8
PADRES 6
CARDINALS 9
PIRATES1
The Times Leader
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LENOX TWP. Jim Zick
leased some of his 500-acre farm
in Susquehanna County for $50
an acre to Cabot Oil & Gas back
in2007, but the nearby Mountain
View School District stands to
make considerably more from
the drilling that be-
gan in May.
The school is
hoping that theyll
be getting royalties
fromour well, said
Zick, who also is
the Mountain View
School Board president. School
property is located 5,600 feet
from the well.
Four of the six school districts
in Susquehanna County have
signed natural gas leases and one
has a well operatingonits proper-
ty.
Incontrast toasituationinDal-
las Township, where parents and
residents have objected to two
proposed natural gas metering
stations to be built adjacent to
NATURAL GAS BOOM
When drillers get As
BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
JimZick, owner of Zickview Farms in Kingsley, Susquehanna County, and president of the Mountain View School Board, sees promise
in drilling and says money schools could earn fromit would be a godsend.
Northern
districts
cashing in
By SARAH HITE
shite@timesleader.com
The Mountain View
School District is
profiting fromdrill-
ing on its property. It
leased 96 acres of
its land to Cabot in
2009 for $5,750 an
acre, or more than
$500,000. The
money is helpful to
Mountain View and
other districts that
have seen funding
cuts this year.
See DRILLERS, Page 14A
Though longtime con-
gressman Paul E. Kanjorski
has been out of office for six
months, his campaign com-
mittee has remained active
and is spending money free-
ly.
From Jan. 1 through June
30, Pennsylvanians for Kan-
jorski has reported $52,834
in expenditures. While that
is nowhere close to the
$112,425 the campaign was
at for the first half of 2009
the last non-congressional
election year its still a
healthy sum for someone
who has given no indica-
tion hes seeking another
run for Washington.
In fact, from April 1
through June 30, the Kan-
jorski campaign outspent
the reelection campaign
committee representing
freshman U.S. Rep. Tom
Kanjorskis campaign committee is still active
AIMEE DILGER FILE PHOTO/THE TIMES LEADER
Congressmen Paul Kanjorski speaks with The Times Leader
Editorial Board in 2010.
Pennsylvanians for
Kanjorski has reported
$52,834 in expenditures.
By ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
INSIDE: Former Congressman
Paul E. Kanjorski is keeping his
options open, Page 13A.
See CAMPAIGN, Page 12A
As natural gas companies
begin construction of gathering
lines from Susquehanna Coun-
ty, school districts
in Wyoming and
Luzerne counties
have already faced
decisions about
leasing land. But
failure to find mar-
ketable quantities
of gas in Luzerne
County has left
districts here with
no additional in-
come from the
booming industry.
To the north, Tunkhannock
Area, Lackawanna Trail and
Wyalusing Area school districts
have signed leases with natural
gas companies. Elk Lake, which
has Cabot Oil & Gas-drilled
wells on its property, is another
Wyoming County school dis-
trict to benefit from the drilling
boom.
The Tunkhannock Area
School District signed a lease
with Citrus Energy Corp. last
spring for two
properties, in-
cluding land sur-
rounding the Me-
hoopany Elemen-
tary School and
land in Washington
Township.
Superintendent
Michael Healey
said the district
received $5,750 an
acre for a combined
total of about 100
acres, with 20 percent royalties
in the three-year lease.
In 2009, the district consid-
ered cooperating with the
Wyoming County Landowners
Group to work out a joint gas
School districts in area
see little from gas boom
$360,000 a
year is not go-
ing to change a
$43 million bud-
get.
Michael Healey
Tunkhannock Area
superintendent
By SARAH HITE
shite@timesleader.com
See SCHOOLS, Page 14A
INSIDE
A NEWS: Local 3A
Nation & World 5A
Obituaries 2A, 7A
B PEOPLE: Birthdays 6B
C SPORTS: Scoreboard 2C
Outdoors 13C
D BUSINESS: Mutuals 6D
E VIEWS: Editorial 2E
F ETC.: Puzzles 2F
Books 5F
Travel 6F
G CLASSIFIED
WEATHER
Jack Swiderski
An isolated storm.
High 87. Low 70.
Details, Page 14C
K

PAGE 2A SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com


Amico, Sara
Beckley, Ross
Coughlin, Nellie
Cybulski, Robert Sr.
Farley, Virginia
Gartley, Kevin
Keefe, Tanya
Kochanski, Joseph
Lunny, Bradley
Matuza, Alexander
Onzik, Marie
Poulakos, Lysandros
Salata, Anne
Saroscek, Edward
Sheydwasser,
Annette
Shivell, Theresa
Snyder, Rev. Thomas
Taylor, Robert
Wasilewski, Anthony
OBITUARIES
Page 2A, 7A
BUILDING
TRUST
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correct errors, clarify stories
and update them promptly.
Corrections will appear in this
spot. If you have information
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thoroughly, call the newsroom
at 829-7242.
timesleader.com
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Issue No. 2011-205
A
nthony Sharkus Wasilewski, 19,
of Meadowland Avenue in King-
ston, died unexpectedly Wednes-
day, July 20, 2011, while in York. He
was a 2010 graduate of Wyoming
Valley West High School.
Anthony was born on December
29, 1991, in Williamsport. In June
2001, Tony and his Dads dream
came true when he became a mem-
ber of the Wasilewski family. Tony
had an amazing personality and ex-
celled at many sports, especially
baseball. He loved the New York
Yankees and was a huge Dave Mat-
thews fan.
Tony overcame many struggles
and obstacles in his short life and
brought so much happiness to his
Dad, family and all that knew him.
He will be greatly missed by those
that loved and believed in him.
Survivingarehis father, Scott Wa-
silewski, Kingston; paternal grand-
mother Elaine Salamon, Kingston;
paternal grandfather Thomas J. Wa-
silewski andhis wife, Jayne, Shaver-
town; aunt Tara Wasilewski, King-
ston; uncle Thomas Wasilewski and
his wife, Maureen, Kingston; cou-
sins, Lauren Wasilewski of Los An-
geles, Paige and Taylor Wasilewski,
Kingston; his girlfriend Amanda
Emery of York; as well as his mis-
chievous cat, Blanche.
Relatives and friends are invit-
ed to a Celebration of Tonys Life
witha Mass of ChristianBurial at 10
a.m. TuesdayinSt. Ignatius Church,
339 N. Maple Ave., Kingston, with
the Rev. Gregory Kelly officiating.
Interment will be at the conve-
nience of the family.
In lieu of flowers, the family re-
quests that memorial donations be
made to the S.P.C.A., 524 E. Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702; The
Commission on Economic Oppor-
tunity, 34 W. Union St., Kingston,
PA18704; or to the charity of the do-
nors choice.
Arrangements are being handled
by the Nat &Gawlas Funeral Home,
89 Park Ave., Wilkes-Barre.
Condolences may be sent online
to www.natandgawlasfuneralhome-
.com.
Anthony Sharkus Wasilewski
July 20, 2011
S
ara (Giunta) Amico, of Wyom-
ing, passed away Thursday, July
21, 2011, in Wilkes-Barre.
Born Friday, April 28, 1922, in
San Cataldo, Italy, she was a daugh-
ter of the late Grace (Sberna) Giun-
ta and Salvatore Giunta, and she
was the wife of the late Louis Am-
ico.
She graduated from Pittston
High School, class of 1940. Sara was
a loving mother, grandmother and
sister. She will be dearly missed by
her family.
Sara was preceded in death by
daughter Lucille Bruyneel in 2007;
and a sister, Michalena.
Surviving are her son Tom and
his wife, Leah Amico; sisters, Grace
Bentlage, Angeline and her hus-
band, Robert Staib, and Carmela
Kauffman; brother, Angelo and his
wife, Joann Giunta; grandchildren,
T.J. Amico and Stacia and her hus-
band, Kevin Arnaud, and LeighAnn;
as well as numerous nieces and ne-
phews.
Funeral serviceswill behandled
by Graziano Funeral Home Inc.,
Pittston Township. Viewing hours
will be held at the funeral home
from8 to 9:30 a.m. Monday. Funeral
services will begin at the funeral
home at 9:30 a.m. with a Mass of
Christian Burial at St. Josephs R.C.
Church (St. Monicas Parish) at 10
a.m. Monday, with Father Leo
McKernan officiating. Interment
will follow at Denison Cemetery,
Swoyersville.
In lieu of flowers, donations can
be made to Catherine McAuley
House, 121 Church St., Plymouth,
PA18651.
Sara Amico
July 21, 2011
More Obituaries, Page 7A
A
nne L. Salata, 93, formerly of
West 20th Street, Hazleton,
passedaway Saturday, July 23, 2011,
at Mountain Top Senior Care and
Rehabilitation Center, the former
Davis Manor.
Born in Freeland, she was a
daughter of the late AnthonyandEl-
izabeth (Poplaski) Koloski and was
a member of Queen of Heaven Par-
ish at Our Lady of Grace Church,
Hazleton.
She was a loving wife, mother
and grandmother. She enjoyed
cooking, sewing and caring for her
family.
Preceding her in death, in addi-
tion to her parents, were her hus-
band Andrew T. Salata in 1997; sis-
ters, Adele Luchi, Nancy Bangor,
Marion Crossin, Josephine Ranick
and Elizabeth Bohenak; and broth-
ers, Anthony, Stanley, Henry, Leo
and Edward Koloski.
Surviving are her son David Sala-
ta and his wife, Jodell, Bear Creek
Township; daughters, Judy Pecone
and her husband, Nicholas, Savan-
nah, Ga., and Audrey Bartol and her
husband, Michael, Conyngham;
grandsons, Mark Salata and his
wife, Mana, Christian Pecone and
his wife, Lesley, Brian Pecone and
his wife, Tracy, Andrew Bartol and
Matthew Bartol and fiance, Jaclyn
Tylkowski; great-grandchildren,
Jasmine Salata, Lauren and Alexan-
der Pecone; sisters, Stella Grozak,
Philadelphia, and Agnes Sarnoski,
West Hazleton; as well as numerous
nieces and nephews and grand-niec-
es and grand-nephews.
The family would like to extend
their sincere appreciation to the
compassionate staff and residents
of Mountain Top Senior Care and
Rehabilitation Center, the staff of
the Hospice of the Sacred Heart,
and to St. Judes Parish for attend-
ing to her spiritual needs.
Her funeral will be held at 9 a.m.
Wednesday from the Joseph A. Mo-
ran Funeral Home, 229 W. 12th St.,
Hazleton. A Mass of Christian Buri-
al will be celebrated at 9:30 a.m. in
Queen of Heaven Parish at Our La-
dy of Grace Church. Burial will be in
Calvary Cemetery, Drums. Friends
may call at the funeral home from 6
to 8 p.m. Tuesday.
Condolences can be sent through
www.moranfuneralhome.com.
Anne L. Salata
July 23, 2011
A
lexander Matuza, 25, of
Owego, N.Y., passed away
Monday, July 18, 2011, at
Lourdes Hospital, New York, as
a result of an automobile acci-
dent.
Born in Binghamton, N.Y.,
September 19, 1985, he was a
son of Elizabeth Kelly Matuza
and the late Joseph Matuza.
Alex was employed as an elec-
tronic specialist for Best Buy,
Vestal, N.Y.
Besides his mother, he is sur-
vived by a sister, Amy Matuza,
Syracuse, N.Y.; and paternal
grandmother Dorothy Matuza,
Plymouth.
The funeral will be held at 9
a.m. Monday from the Kizis-Lok-
uta Funeral Home, 134 Church
St., Pittston. A Mass of Chris-
tian Burial will be celebrated at
9:30 a.m. in St. John the Evange-
list Church, William Street, Pitt-
ston. Interment will be in St. Ca-
simirs Cemetery, Pittston.
Friends may call from 4 to 7
p.m. today at the funeral home.
Alexander Matuza
July 18, 2011
N
ellie Coughlin, 91, passed away
Thursday, July 21, 2011, at High-
land Manor, Exeter.
Born in Duryea, on August 25,
1919, she was a daughter of the late
Frank and Nellie Valvonis Andrew-
scavage.
She attended Duryea schools and
was a member of St. John the Evan-
gelist Church, Pittston. She was a
member of the Pittston Senior Cen-
ter and the Lithuanian Auxiliary,
Pittston.
Besides her parents, she was pre-
ceded in death by her husband, Ed-
ward Coughlin; sisters, Anna Walat-
kas and Frances Budzilek; and
brothers, Frank and John Andrews.
Surviving are sisters, Adele and
her husband, Edward Dawe, Pitt-
ston Township, and Ruth Rinkav-
age, Pittston; brother, Charles and
his wife, Rose Andrewscavage, Pitt-
ston; and nieces and nephews.
The funeral will be held at 9 a.m.
Tuesday from the Kizis-Lokuta Fu-
neral Home, 134 Church St., Pitt-
ston. AMass of ChristianBurial will
be celebratedat 9:30a.m. at St. John
the Evangelist Church, William
Street, Pittston. Interment will be
held in St. Casimirs Cemetery, Pitt-
ston. Friends may call from 5 to 8
p.m. Monday at the funeral home.
Nellie Coughlin
July 21, 2011
A
nnette Sheydwasser, lovingwife
and mother of David and Alan
Sheydwasser, passed away sudden-
ly Friday morning, July 22, 2011.
A counselor, teacher and psycho-
metrist, Annette brought her pas-
sion and her love into everything
she did. Born in Hollywood, Fla., in
1957, she graduated Summa Cum
Laude from the University of Flor-
ida and graduated Virginia Tech
with a Master of Arts degree in
counseling.
She relocated to the Wyoming
Valley more than 30 years ago. An-
nette worked over the years at the
Osterhout Free Library, United Re-
habilitation Services, both of
Wilkes-Barre, The University of
Scranton in Scranton, Keystone Job
Corps, Drums, and Wyoming Valley
Healthcare Systems, Kingston.
Annette was a member of the
Ambassadors Club of the Wilkes-
Barre Chamber of Commerce, Tem-
ple Bnai Brith, Temple Israels
Book Club and other civic and reli-
gious organizations.
Annette had a passion for yoga
and all things spiritual. She had a
love of the musical talents of a Jew-
ish composer named Debbie Freid-
manandrecently hosteda tribute to
Ms. Friedman in her memory. A
gentle soul, over her few short
years, she reached out and touched
many lives. She will be greatly mis-
sed.
Funeral services will be held at
11a.m. Monday fromthe Rosenberg
Funeral Chapel Inc., 348 S. River
St., Wilkes-Barre, with Rabbi Roger
Lerner officiating. Interment will be
in Temple Bnai Brith Cemetery,
Hanover Township. Shiva will be
observed at 57 Third Ave., King-
ston, from 7 to 9 p.m. Monday, and
from2to4p.m. and7to9p.m. Tues-
day and Wednesday.
Memorial contributions, if desir-
ed, may be made to the Temple
Bnai BrithMusic Fund, 408 Wyom-
ing Ave., Kingston, PA18704.
Condolences may be sent by vis-
iting Annettes obituary at www.ro-
senbergfuneralchapel.com.
Annette Sheydwasser
July 22, 2011
NANTICOKE Firefighters
from Nanticoke and several
surrounding communities were
called to Reilly Finishing Tech-
nologies on West Alden Road
around 9 p.m. Saturday for a
report of smoke coming from
the building.
There was no fire and what
appeared to be smoke was hot
air that built up inside escaping
from the building. The rooftop
dampers that vent the building
had been closed causing the
buildup.
Company officials were noti-
fied and the dampers were
opened.
PLAINS TWP. State police
said a man on bus trip to the
Mohegan Sun Casino at Pocono
Downs from the Chinatown
section of New York City took
$3,337 from a wallet dropped on
the casino floor by an 80-year-
old man from Laceyville.
Rong Chen, 51, of New York,
N.Y. was charged with theft
Friday afternoon.
State police said the victim
inadvertently dropped his wallet
around 1 p.m. and Chen imme-
diately tried to conceal it by
standing over it until there were
no patrons around. Chen took
the wallet to an area where he
thought he was out of view, put
the money in his pockets and
discarded the wallet in the
trash, state police said. The
wallet and all of the money were
recovered, state police said.
Chen was arraigned and com-
mitted to the Luzerne County
Correctional Facility for lack of
$50,000 bail.
PLAINS TWP. Township
police are investigating an
armed robbery at the Turkey
Hill convenience store Thursday
night.
Police said a suspect entered
the Maffett Street store and
shopped around for a few min-
utes before approaching the
clerk and demanding money.
Police said the suspect bran-
dished a knife, and the clerk
handed over an undetermined
amount of money before the
male fled. Police said no one
was injured in the robbery.
The suspect is described as a
white male, approximate 59,
and weighing about 200 pounds.
Anyone with information is
asked to call Plains Township
Police at 829-3432 or Luzerne
County 911.
LARKSVILLE Borough
police were called to a West
State Street home early Friday
morning after a truck drove into
a home.
Police said they were called to
the 405 West State Street home
just after midnight where they
found a Dodge Dakota that had
driven into the front porch of
the home.
Police said the driver, James
Scott Miller, 20, told police he
believed he fell asleep prior to
the accident because he had
been working a lot lately. Police
said Miller told them he did
have a beer earlier in the day,
and had a blood-alcohol content
below the legal limit of .08 per-
cent.
Police said no one was injured
and that they spoke to the
homeowner, Thaddeus J. Soley.
Police said the vehicle was
moved from the scene.
HANOVER TWP. Township
police reported the following:
Kristen Burrell said Thurs-
day that his dark blue, 1988 Ford
Crown Victoria was stolen. The
car has a Pennsylvania license
plate HVG1684. Anyone with
information about the theft is
asked to contact Hanover Town-
ship police at 570 825-1254.
Scott Gaetano of Oxford
Street said Thursday that the
rear window of his Hyundai
Elantra was smashed while it
was parked in front of his resi-
dence. Anyone with information
about the damage to the car is
asked to contact police.
Angel Miller of Rutter
Street said Thursday that her
credit union debit card was
stolen and unauthorized charges
were made with it. Police are
investigating the reported theft.
Theresa Chupka of South
Main Street in the Lee Park
section of the township said a
Jeep Cherokee drove onto her
property, through her yard and
into a neighbors yard before
coming out onto Vine Street
around 9:45 p.m. Thursday. The
Jeep was dark-colored, possibly
green, Chupka said. She last
saw it traveling north on South
Main Street toward Wilkes-
Barre. Anyone with information
about the vehicle is asked to
contact police.
HAZLE TWP. State police
reported the following:
Two 55-gallon drums were
left on a property in Hazle
Township owned by the PPL
Fire and Safety School between
Monday and Thursday.
Bradley Raymond Perkow-
ski, 22, of Glen Lyon, Newport
Township, will be issued a traf-
fic citation following a two-
vehicle crash Friday around
12:40 p.m. at the intersection of
state routes 93 and 424.
Perkowski was driving a
Chevrolet van when he turned
onto Route 424 from Route 93
and cut in front of a Chevrolet
Blazer driven by Charlene A.
Hornick, 46, of Hazleton. The
drivers and a passenger in Horn-
icks SUV Carlos Antonio Bacis-
ta, 31, of Hazleton were wearing
seatbelts and were not injured.
Hornicks vehicle was towed
from the scene.
Jennifer Maime Dorish, 41,
of Ebervale Road reported
Thursday that between 7:30
p.m. and 8:15 p.m. a guest in her
residence took her prescription
medication.
WILKES-BARRE City
police reported the following
incidents:
Police responded to the
Sherman Hills apartment com-
plex Thursday afternoon for a
report of harassment. Zsane
Owens, 23, told police her for-
mer boyfriend, Deominique
Wilson, 24, continues to call her
and threatens her. Police said
Wilson was cited with harass-
ment.
Brittany Geffert, 20, of Park
Avenue, reported to police that
someone broke the drivers side
mirror on her 2003 Nissan Sen-
tra while parked on South Han-
cock Street and Park Avenue
Thursday afternoon.
Police said a citation for dis-
orderly conduct was filed
against the 17-year-old.
Lauren Williams, of King-
ston, reported to police that
someone smashed a window on
her 2009 Volkswagen Jetta
while parked on South Franklin
Street and removed a purse. The
purse was recovered shortly
after with all of its contents
intact, Thursday evening.
Williams identified the sus-
pect as a white male, in his 30s,
about 5 feet, 10 inches, medium
to large build and wearing a
black cut-off shirt and shorts.
POLICE BLOTTER
Sunken sidewalk
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
The sidewalk outside the Labor Ready on South Main
Street, Wilkes-Barre, near Abes Hot Dogs has cracked and
fallen in. The hole is about 10 feet deep.
Lottery summary
Daily Number, Midday
Sunday: 5-3-8
Monday: 8-3-7
Tuesday: 2-2-2
Wednesday: 5-6-8
Thursday: 1-7-7
Friday: 6-1-3
Saturday: 3-7-9
Big Four, Midday
Sunday: 3-6-0-2
Monday: 0-0-8-1
Tuesday: 0-4-9-8
Wednesday: 5-6-5-4
Thursday: 4-3-6-9 (double draw,
6-0-7-4)
Friday: 4-6-9-1
Saturday: 4-9-8-2
Quinto, Midday
Sunday: 8-2-9-6-2
Monday: 7-0-5-5-1
Tuesday: 4-1-3-4-7
Wednesday: 3-2-5-9-1
Thursday: 1-0-1-3-5
Friday: 7-6-1-3-7
Saturday: 8-9-6-2-0
Treasure Hunt
Sunday: 06-07-11-13-15
Monday: 01-03-05-22-29
Tuesday: 15-17-18-21-30
Wednesday: 04-05-09-19-24
Thursday: 07-20-21-22-27
Friday: 07-15-19-21-22
Saturday: 12-15-25-27-30
Daily Number, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 1-2-8
Monday: 0-9-5
Tuesday: 3-0-3
Wednesday: 8-6-8
Thursday: 2-0-5
Friday: 4-1-1
Saturday: 8-5-6
Big Four, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 3-8-4-8
Monday: 8-1-4-2
Tuesday: 1-8-5-3
Wednesday: 9-0-5-5
Thursday: 0-7-5-3
Friday: 1-9-2-1
Saturday: 5-4-9-3
Quinto, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 0-0-4-0-5
Monday: 8-9-0-8-1
Tuesday: 5-3-3-5-0
Wednesday: 5-3-9-7-0
Thursday: 9-5-0-4-5
Friday: 9-8-0-0-8
Saturday: 1-9-7-1-7
Cash 5
Sunday: 08-09-16-24-38
Monday: 04-13-22-32-42
Tuesday: 03-08-32-37-38
Wednesday: 12-16-26-30-35
Thursday: 01-19-23-32-42
Friday: 04-15-18-24-31
Saturday: 08-14-19-20-32
Match 6 Lotto
Monday: 03-05-11-19-36-44
Thursday: 05-15-17-27-32-48
Powerball
Wednesday: 01-04-38-40-42
powerball: 17
powerplay: 04
Saturday:01-07-27-38-48
powerball: 30
powerplay: 03
Mega Millions
Tuesday: 02-09-10-16-35
Megaball: 40
Megaplier: 04
Friday: 23-31-32-39-56
Megaball: 38
Megaplier: 04
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 PAGE 3A
LOCAL
timesleader.com
HARRISBURG
Three licenses are revoked
Three local professionals have had
their state licenses revoked or suspend-
ed, the Department of State announced
this week.
Mark H. Bell, of Shavertown, who
had his medical license temporarily
suspended because of his continued
abuse of prescription drugs. According
to the state Board of Medicine, which
suspended the license, Bell worked for
Advanced Pain Management Special-
ists, which has offices in Plains Town-
ship, Peckville, and Clarks Summit.
The state suspended his license June
29.
John Mislan, of Exeter, had his
nursing license revoked because he
pleaded guilty to three misdemeanors
in Luzerne County court in 2009. He
was sentenced to 3 to 12 months in
county prison and one year probation
by Judge Hugh Mundy in June 2009.
Mislan, according to court records,
pleaded guilty to corruption of minors,
indecent aggravated assault of a person
less than 16 years old, and selling/
furnishing alcohol to minors. The
Board of Nursing viewed these acts as
crimes of moral turpitude.
Nghia D. Do, of Edwardsville, had
his cosmetologist license suspended
after Luzerne County Judge William
Amesbury ordered his license be re-
voked for failing to pay child support.
Amesburys order was made May 11
and the state Board of Cosmetology
followed suit.
PLYMOUTH TWP.
Draft of charter is on view
A draft of the proposed Home Rule
Charter will be available at a meeting
of the Plymouth Township Govern-
ment Study Commission at 6 p.m.
Tuesday. The meeting in the municipal
building, 925 W. Main St., is open to
the public.
Since May 2010 the commission has
been studying the townships form of
government and comparing to other
forms in the state in order to deter-
mine whether it should be changed.
The commission began drafting the
proposed charter in January and is
planning to have a recommended char-
ter ready for the Nov. 8 general elec-
tion.
Voters must approve any proposed
charter in order for it to take effect.
HARRISBURG
Firefighters in compliance
The state Auditor Generals office
said Friday that 11 Luzerne County
Volunteer Firefighters Relief Associ-
ations were determined to be in com-
pliance with laws and regulations.
Auditor General Jack Wagner said
the 11 departments are part of the
VFRA, which are nonprofit organiza-
tions established to afford financial
protection to volunteer firefighters who
suffer misfortune as a result of their
participation in the fire service.
The auditor generals office is respon-
sible for auditing VFRA funds.
The 11 local departments are: Hollen-
back Township; Shickshinny; Valley
Regional; West Pittston; Pond Hill, Lily
Lake; Dorrenceton; Hanover Township;
Harveys Lake; Kingston; Larksville;
and Plymouth.
I N B R I E F
BALANCING ACT
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Workers hang from ropes while
filling cracks in brickwork and
cleaning the windows of the old
Martz bus station building on
North Main Street in Wilkes-Barre
on Saturday morning.
WILKES-BARRE The large camou-
flaged Humvee parked at the entrance
announced the start of Military Appre-
ciation Day at the Wilkes-Barre YMCA
on Saturday. The event was held to hon-
or local men and women serving in the
armed forces and to encourage military
families to join the YMCA by offering a
varietyof special membershippackages.
The open house event featured an all-
ages swim session, Tai Chi and Zumba
classes, aswell asartsandcraftsandface
painting. Refreshments were served
throughout the day.
"We wanted to honor all branches of
military service and encourage them to
come out and join the YMCA through
our special memberships," said Kim
Greenip, YMCA Membership Assistant
Coordinator.
Today were actually offering a 15-
month membership for the price of a12-
month membership," Greenip added.
"Thats a substantial savings for fam-
ilies."
Greenip noted that the YMCAs 10-
week summer camp program is ex-
tremely popular with local families and
available space fills up fast.
Recruiters from the 109th Field Artil-
lery Unit of the Pennsylvania National
Guard were on hand to take to prospec-
MI LI TARY APPRECI ATI ON DAY YMCA offers activities and deals for servicemen and their families
Events aim to recruit members
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Mark Ku-
cewicz, 5,
plays a
game with
Staff Sgt.
Kevin Wal-
ters while
Sgt. 1st
Class Keith
Bowman
watches on
at Military
Apprecia-
tion Day. For
Click pho-
tos, see
Page 11A
By STEVEN FONDO
Times Leader Correspondent
See MILITARY , Page 8A
Following the release of Gov. TomCor-
betts Marcellus Shale Advisory Commis-
sions final report Friday, statewide
groups representing municipalities, the
gasindustryandenvironmental concerns
weighed in on the commissions recom-
mendations.
The County Commissioners Associ-
ation of Pennsylvania and the Pennsylva-
nia State Association of Township Super-
visors both applauded the commissions
recommendation of levying a local im-
pact fee tocompensate municipalities for
impacts on infrastructure, the environ-
ment, public safety and other areas
caused by the drilling industry.
The Township Supervisors Associ-
ation also agreed with the commissions
decision to leave land-use
control and decision mak-
ing to local communities.
Other groups were less
positive in their assess-
ments of the report.
Some of the harshest
criticism of the report
came from the Pennsylva-
nia Budget and Policy Center, whose di-
rector, Sharon Ward, called the report a
missedopportunitytoexaminethebroad
impacts of Marcellus Shale drilling, both
positive and negative.
Instead, it has made recommenda-
tions that read like an industry wish list,
Ward said in a statement.
Ward said the impact fees the report
recommends beassesseddrillers tolimit-
ed in focusing only on demonstrated im-
pacts, but failingtoaddressbroader state-
wide impacts to water and air quality, so-
cietal impacts and habitat disruption.
Without this discussion, the report is
incomplete, she said.
The four environmental consultants
appointed to the commission, represent-
ing the Chesapeake Bay Foundation,
Pennsylvania Environmental Council,
The Nature Conservancy and Western
Pennsylvania Conservancy also ex-
pressed concerns about several of the
panels recommendations, including:
the lack of explicit language prohib-
iting future surface drilling in state forest
land,
the lack of clear environmental or
surface impact reduction standards relat-
ing to the concept of pooling, and
the failure to specifically include
Growing Greener or the Environmental
Stewardship Fund in the local impact fee
provisions.
We consider the report to be a mea-
ningful first steptowardimprovingPenn-
sylvanias oversight of shale gas extrac-
tion, but additional improvements must
be accomplished as the debate shifts to
the General Assembly, the four environ-
mental representatives said in a joint
statement.
The Marcellus Shale Coalition, a gas-
industry group with several member
companies represented on the commis-
sion, did not discuss specific recommen-
dations of the commission.
Gas report
gets mixed
responses
The report was put together by Gov.
Corbetts Marcellus Shale advisory
commission.
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
PITTSTON TWP. Passengers on
the 9 a.m. American Airlines flight
from Wilkes-Barre/Scranton to Chica-
go Saturday got one heck of a horror
show.
What looked like
an aircraft not much
smaller than the jet
they sat in spewed
smoke on the cargo
pad next to the run-
way. Bodies covered
in burns with ex-
posed broken bones
dotted the adjacent
field, and as the
plane took off a red
line of fire trucks and ambulances
crossed the runway behind them.
The emergency call went out just af-
ter 9, while the Chicago-bound jet was
still preparing for takeoff.
Therewasnt a real planecrash, just a
portable simulator that looks like one
and a few dozen volunteers painted to
look like accident victims, but organiz-
ers made every effort to make it seem
as true-to-life as possible.
The mock plane crash was part of an
emergency response drill for airport
safety personnel, area first responders
and four Luzerne and Lackawanna
County hospitals hosted by the airport
Saturday.
AI RPORT DRI L L
Firefighters and medical response teams form area communities responded Saturday morning to Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton International Airport for a live major airport accident response exercise.
Simulation looks true-to-life
NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
A passenger is carried by firefighters to an ambulance during Saturdays
exercise at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International Airport.
The mock plane crash was part of
an emergency response drill for
personnel and hospitals.
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
See DRILL, Page 8A
This is
something
that really
fans out
for us.
George Bieber
Airport Public
Safety Director
EDWARDSVILLE When a devas-
tating fire destroyed Woody Meixsells
home and possessions in Nanticoke on
a cold January day, the Red Cross
stepped in and helped himget back on
his feet againthoroughtheresources of
their local relief fund.
On Saturday, Meixsell hosted a ben-
efit with proceeds going to repay the
Red Cross for their generosity.
Meixsell, 42, said the 2011fire litera-
lly destroyed "everything but the
clothes on my back" and the Red Cross
immediately provided him and his
brother William with temporary shel-
ter at a local hotel, andwithin24hours,
gave himwith a pre-paid credit card to
purchase much-needed clothing and
food.
"The Red Cross was unbelievable,"
explained Meixsell. "Within a few
Red Cross finds benefactor in local man it once helped
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Woody Meixsell
shows Martha Ka-
nellis, owner of the
Triple K Saloon, the
cake the Boulevard
Bakery donated.
Meixsell suffered a
devastating fire and
decided to repay
the Red Cross for
its help. For Click
photos, see Page 11A
See BENEFIT, Page 8A
Woody Meixsell shows his
gratitude by hosting a benefit.
By STEVEN FONDO
Times Leader Correspondent
C M Y K
PAGE 4A SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
BOTH LOCATIONS
7 GEORGE AVE.
(PARSONS SECTION)
WILKES-BARRE 270-3976
30 HANOVER ST.
WILKES-BARRE
970-4460
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Shurne
12 oz./12 pk. Cans
Assorted Varieties
$
3
98
$
8
88
4
for
lb.
$
2
22
ea.
ea.
KOOL AIDor
COUNTRYTIME DRINK MIX
8 qt.
$
1
88
Shurne
KETCHUP
24 oz.
ea. 98

ICEBERGHEAD
LETTUCE
Assorted Varieties
ea.
$
1
29
1/2 PINT GRAPE
TOMATOES
Assorted Varieties
ea. 99

$
4
99
lb.
Sahlens
HAMOFF
THE BONE
Shurne
REG. or JUMBO
HOT DOGS
ea. 99

Swiss
ICETEA&DRINKS
64 oz.
ea. 99

ea.
PEPSI
24 oz. bottles - 6 pks.
All Varieties
$
2
98
1 Lb. Pkg.
SAVE
AT LEAST
1.51
SAVE
AT LEAST
3.88
on 4
SAVE
AT LEAST
61
SAVE
AT LEAST
70
SAVE
AT LEAST
60
SAVE
AT LEAST
1.51
BULLS-EYE BARBEQUE SAUCE
Reg. only - 18 oz. btl.
ea. 88

Shurne
DELI GOURMET
AMERICANCHEESE
White Only
ANY
SIZE
PKG.!
with GOLD CARD
ANY
SIZE
PKG.!
SANGIORGIOPASTA
All Varieties (Excludes San Giorgio Lasagna &
Jumbo Shells) 12 - 16 oz. box
$
5 5
for
with GOLD CARD
RAGUSPAGHETTI SAUCE
All Varieties - 16 - 26 oz. jar
$
5 4
for SAVE
AT LEAST
3.46
on 4
HOLSUMMILANOITALIANBREAD
Plain or Seeded - 20 oz. loaf
with GOLD CARD
BUY I, GET 1
FREE FREE
SAVE
AT LEAST
3.19
KENS SALADDRESSINGS,
MARINADES or SWEET BABY RAYS
BARBECUE SAUCE
All Varieties - 16 - 18 oz. btl.
with GOLD CARD
BUY I, GET 1 OFTHE SAME
FREE FREE
HERRS POTATOCHIPS
All Varieties - 10.5 - 11 oz. bag
with GOLD CARD
BUY I, GET 1
FREE FREE
TURKEY HILL
ICE CREAMSANDWICHES
24 oz. pkg.
with GOLD CARD
BUY I, GET 1
FREE FREE
with GOLD CARD
GREENS ICE CREAMor KEMPS
FROZENYOGURT
All Varieties - 1.5 qt. cont.
$
6 3
for SAVE
AT LEAST
5.97
on 3
MUST BUY 3,
Lesser Quantities $2.50 Each
with GOLD CARD
KELLOGGS SPECIAL K CEREALS
12 oz. Original and Red Berries, 19.5 oz. Low Fat Granola, 11.4 oz. Blueberry,
12.5 oz. Cinnamon Pecan, 12.8 oz Fruit &Yogurt, 13.4 oz. Chocolatey Delight,
14 oz. Vanilla Almond, 13.5 oz. Protein or 13.6 oz. Oats & Honey
$
5 2
for SAVE
AT LEAST
5.77
on 3
with GOLD CARD
TROPICANAPURE PREMIUM
ORANGE JUICE or TROP50 JUICE
BEVERAGES
All Varieties - 59 oz. cont.
$
5 2
for
SAVE
AT LEAST
2.98
on 2
with GOLD CARD
NABISCOCHIPS AHOY
All Varieties - 9.5 - 15.25 oz.
$
4 2
for
CHARMINBASIC BATHTISSUE
or BOUNTY BASIC PRINT PAPER
TOWELS
12 ct. Big Roll Bath Tissue
or 8 ct. Paper Towels
with GOLD CARD
4
99
SAVE
AT LEAST
2.65
on 5
SAVE
AT LEAST
2.39
All Varieties
TURKEY HILL
ICE CREAM
16 oz. cont.
$
5 5
for
with GOLD CARD
SAVE
AT LEAST
3.99
SAVE
AT LEAST
2.98
MUST BUY 2,
Lesser Quantities $3.00 Each
SAVE
AT LEAST
3.58
on 2
Shursave Fresh
80%LEAN
GROUNDBEEF
ANY ANY AAN AN ANY ANY ANY NY NNY ANY NNY ANY ANY AAANY AANY A Y AAN ANY AN AAAAN AANY N AN AAAN ANY N ANY NY YY
SIZ SIZ SI SIZ IZ SIZ IIZ ZZ SIZ SSSSIZ SIZ SIZ SS Z SSSSSSSSI SI SIZ SSI IZ IIIIIIIIIIZ SIIIIIIZZZ II EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE
PK PKG PK PKG PK PK PKG PKG PKG KG KGG KG KG PKG KG KG KGG KG KG KGGG KGG KKG PKG PK PKG PPK KGGGG KG PKG PK KKGGG KKGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGG KGGGGG KGG KKGGGGGG KKGGGGGGGG !!! .! !! .! .! ! .! .! !!!!! .! .! .! ! .! .! ! .! .! !! .! ..! !! .......! !!!!!!!!!!!!!
with GOLD CARD
2
49
lb.
ANY
SIZE
PKG.!
Sanderson Farms GradeA
ALL NATURAL
SPLIT CHICKEN
BREASTS
with GOLD CARD
99

lb.
Shursave Fresh
BONE-IN
NEWYORK
STRIP STEAKS
with GOLD CARD
5
99
lb.
JENNI-O
HONEY MESQUITE
TURKEY BREAST or
HATFIELD
GOLDRIBBON
TAVERNHAM
with GOLD CARD
AAANY
SIIZE
PKKKG.!
Picked Fresh Daily!
DRISCOLL
BRAND
CALIFORNIA
STRAWBERRIES
with GOLD CARD
1
99
Pound
Container
Red, Ripe
SWEET SEEDLESS
WHOLE
WATERMELONS
with GOLD CARD
3
99
ea.
Top With Ice Cream!
8 INCH
APPLE PIE
with GOLD CARD
2
99
ea.
Juicy, Sweet
CALIFORNIA
NECTARINES or
EASTERNPEACHES
with GOLD CARD
1
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THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 PAGE 5A
BEIJING
32 dead in train accident
A
Chinese bullet train lost power
after being struck by lightning
Saturday and was hit from behind by
another train, knocking two of its car-
riages off a bridge in eastern China,
killing at least 32 people, state media
reported.
The official Xinhua News Agency
said four cars on the second train also
derailed, but it did not say how serious
that was.
The first train was traveling from the
Zhejiang provincial capital of Hangz-
hou when the accident occurred in
Wenzhou city at about 8:30 p.m., Xin-
hua said.
One carriage from the first train fell
about 65 to 100 feet from an elevated
section of track, Xinhua said.
Pictures on the Internet showed one
badly damaged car lying on its side by
the bridge and the second car leaning
against the bridge after landing on its
end.
BALI, INDONESIA
U.S. tough on Korea talks
Tentative steps by North and South
Korea to repair relations are not
enough to warrant renewed multina-
tion nuclear disarmament talks, the
U.S. said Saturday at an Asian security
conference where it also took a tough
line on resolving tensions in the South
China Sea.
Declaring the United States a resi-
dent power with vital strategic in-
terests throughout the Asia-Pacific,
U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham
Clinton said North Korea must do
more to improve ties with the South
before Washington will consider re-
suming talks aimed at getting Pyon-
gyang to abandon nuclear weapons in
return for concessions.
NEW ORLEANS
Hitlers wall at museum
The gray, concrete, heavily scarred
slabs that arrived at the National World
War II Museum this week are more
than just chunks of an old wall to histo-
rians.
The slabs are part of Nazi Germanys
Atlantic Wall, a string of defenses or-
dered by Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler in
1940.
The defenses, also known as Hitlers
wall, stretched 3,200 miles from
France to Norway and were designed
to stop, or at least slow, the Allies from
advancing inland during an invasion.
Allan Millette, a history professor
and director of the Eisenhower Center
at the University of New Orleans, said
the relic is a portal to studying what
happened in 1944 and 1945, when Al-
lied forces penetrated the wall and the
tide began to turn against Germany.
CAIRO
Knife attack on protesters
Groups of men armed with knives
and sticks attacked thousands of pro-
testers trying to march to the head-
quarters of Egypts military rulers Sat-
urday, setting off fierce street clashes
and leaving dozens injured, most light-
ly.
Security fired tear gas to disperse the
crowd.
The clashes come as tensions have
been rising between the military coun-
cil that took control of the country
after a popular uprising ousted ex-
President Hosni Mubarak and activists
who want them to move faster in bring-
ing former regime officials to justice
and setting a date for the transition to
civilian rule.
An estimated 10,000 people set out
from downtown Cairos Tahrir Square
but were stopped.
I N B R I E F
AP PHOTO
Blunt sings at open-air festival
In this picture taken late Friday, British
singer-songwriter James Blunt per-
forms on the main stage during the
36th Paleo Festival, in Nyon, Swit-
zerland.
OSLO, Norway Police arrived at an
island massacre about 1.5 hours after a
gunman first opened fire, slowed because
they didnt have quick access to a helicop-
ter and then couldnt find a boat to make
their waytothescenejust several hundred
yards offshore. The assailant surrendered
when police finally reached him, but 82
people died before that.
Survivors of the shootingspree have de-
scribed hiding and fleeing into the water
toescapethegunman, but apolicebriefing
Saturday detailed for the first time how
long the terror lasted
and how long vic-
tims waited for help.
The shooting came
onthe heels of what po-
lice told The Associat-
ed Press was an Okla-
homa city-type bomb-
ing in Oslos down-
town: It targeted a government building,
was allegedly perpetrated by a home-
grown assailant and used the same mix of
fertilizer and fuel that blew up a federal
building in the U.S. in1995.
In all, at least 92 people were killed in
thetwinattacks that policeareblamingon
the same suspect, 32-year-old Norwegian
Anders Behring Breivik.
ASWATteamwas dispatched to the is-
landmorethan50minutesafter peopleva-
cationingat acampgroundsaidtheyheard
shooting across the lake, according to Po-
lice Chief Sveinung Sponheim. The drive
to the lake took about 20 minutes, and
once there, the teamtook another 20 min-
utes to find a boat.
Footage filmed from a helicopter that
showed the gunman firing into the water
added to the impression that police were
slow to the scene. They chose to drive,
Sponheim said, because their helicopter
wasnt on standby.
Therewereproblems withtransport to
Utoya, wheretheyouth-wingof Norways
left-leaning Labor Party was holding a re-
treat, Sponheim said. It was difficult to
get a hold of boats.
At least 85 people were killed on the is-
land, but police said four or five people
were still missing.
Police late to Norway shooting
Gunman fired for 1.5 hours at island
before police could get helicopter
and boat to the scene.
Breivik
AP PHOTO
Norways Prime Minister Jens Stol-
tenberg, right, addresses the media.
The Associated Press
DADAAB, Kenya The World
FoodProgramcant reach2.2mil-
lion Somalis in desperate need of
aid in militant-controlled areas of
Somalia, WFPs director said Sat-
urday, meaning refugee camps in
nearby Kenya and Ethiopia are
likely to continue seeing thou-
sands of newrefugees eachweek.
Theneeds of thoseinSomalias
expanding famine zone are ex-
traordinary,
prompting par-
ents to sweep
up their small
children and
start a danger-
ous walk that
can last days or
weeks one
that many die
on. Livestock
have perished,
and crops no
longer grow after consecutive
rains failedtofall insouth-central
Somalia.
The journey is so long and so
perilous that few Somalis are ea-
ger to return to their war-torn
homeland.
So many people are in need in
Somalia because the militant
group al-Shabab wont let aid in.
The group, in fact, denies a fam-
ine is taking place, disputing the
U.N.s viewthat tens of thousands
of people have already died.
The drought has created a tri-
angle of hunger where the bor-
ders of Ethiopia, Kenya and So-
malia meet.
Militants
block aid
for 2.2M
Somalis
Refugee camps in Kenya and
Ethiopia are seeing thousands
of new refugees each week.
reached108, thehighesttemperatureever
recorded there. Reading, Pa., topped out
at 106 degrees. Airports near Washington
and Baltimore hit 105. Philadelphia reac-
hed103, Boston103, Portland, Maine, and
Concord, N.H., 101 and Providence, R.I.,
NEWYORKAheat wavethat spread
from the Midwest to the Northeast tor-
mented millions of people with blasts of
100-degree temperatures andbog-like hu-
midity as blackouts struck neighbor-
hoods anddeaths were blamedonthe hot
weather.
There was little hope that Saturday
wouldbringmuchrelief until theevening,
with the National Weather Service warn-
ing of excessive heat in several states, in-
cluding parts of Oklahoma, Indiana, New
York, NewJersey andConnecticut. It pre-
dicted oppressive heat with temper-
atures at least inthe 90s.
OnFriday, themercuryinNewark, N.J.,
100. NewYork City hit 104 degrees, just 2
short of its all-time high, and with the op-
pressive humidity, it felt like113.
In Baltimore, a homeless Dale Brown
said he buys a $3.50 day pass to ride the
commuter rail systemto stay cool and
sober.
InPhiladelphia, 50of the citys 70pools
operated on 45-minute cycles to give ev-
eryoneachancetoget in. SomeNewYork-
ers were unable to take dips to cool off at
some beaches in Brooklyn and Staten Is-
land after millions of gallons of raw sew-
age spilled from a wastewater treatment
plant.
In central Pennsylvania, a 63-year-old
man was found dead Friday night in a
third-floor apartment without ventilation
or air conditioning. The temperature in-
side was estimated at more than 110 de-
grees. A 94-year-old Carroll Township
man also died Friday after his air condi-
tioner stopped working because of a
trippedcircuit breaker.
HEAT WAVE
AP PHOTOS
People try to cool off Saturday on the Atlantic City beach on the second day of 100 degree weather. Dangerous-heat ad-
visories and air quality alerts were sent out for most of the Northeast.
No relief for Midwest, Northeast
A child plays in a sprinkler, Saturday, in
New York.
High temperatures are suspected or
confirmed cause in more than a
dozen deaths around the country.
By JIMFITZGERALD
Associated Press
WASHINGTON Presi-
dent Barack Obama met for
less thananhour Saturday with
congressional leaders in debt
crisis talks, and a leading Re-
publican said afterward that
top lawmakers were commit-
ted to working on new legisla-
tion to cut federal spending
and avert an unprecedented
U.S. default.
There were no immediate
signs of a breakthrough, howev-
er. The lawmakers and Obama
were unsmiling as the meeting
began, and most of themavoid-
ed reporters when they left the
White House.
In a statement released after-
ward, the White House said,
Congress should refrain from
playing reckless political
games with our economy. In-
stead, it should be responsible
and do its job, avoiding default
and cutting the deficit. Senate
Republican leader Mitch
McConnell issued a somewhat
more upbeat statement of his
own.
The president wanted to
know that there was a plan for
preventing national default,
he said. The bipartisan leader-
ship in Congress is committed
to working on new legislation
that will prevent default while
substantially reducing Wash-
ington spending.
No breakthrough at latest debt crisis meeting
AP PHOTO
House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, and President Barack
Obama at White House meeting Saturday.
By CHARLES BABINGTON
Associated Press
N A T I O N & W O R L D
3
0
1
3
0
1
Look in THE TIMES LEADERfor todays valuable inserts from these advertisers:
Some inserts, at the advertisers request, only appear in selected neighborhoods. If you would like to receive an insert that you do not currently receive, please call the advertiser.
HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS
By JASON STRAZIUSO
Associated Press
The drought
has created a
triangle of
hunger where
the borders of
Ethiopia, Ke-
nya and Soma-
lia meet.
C M Y K

PAGE 6A SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com


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WILKES-BARRE The Ko-
rean War Association of Wyom-
ing Valley commemorated the
58th anniversary of the end of
the Korean War on Saturday at
the Luzerne County Courthouse.
The courthouse rotunda was fil-
led with veter-
ans of the Ko-
rean War and
their families
honoring those
who had served
in the conflict.
Ceremony
Chairman Bob
Alper remind-
ed those in at-
tendance of the
sacrifices that
had been made
by those servi-
cemen who
fought and of
the 142 Lu-
zerne County
serviceman
who had lost
their lives dur-
ing the war.
Present at
the ceremony
was the family
of Army Pfc. Peter Kubic of La-
flin, who, the U.S. government
reported, died in captivity in
North Korea. His remains were
recently identified and returned
to his family. Kubic was buried
Thursday with full military hon-
ors in Arlington National Ceme-
tery.
We never gave up hope, said
Kubics sister, Rosalie Serafin,
noting that another sister, Anna
Kubic, now deceased, had faith-
fully kept in touch with the Army
over the years.
We did get Peters dog tags
back after the war, said Kubics
sister, Margie Giovagnoli, but it
was wonderful to get his remains
back and to put our brother to
rest.
Nick Fata, representing
Friends of the Forgotten, a group
that supports families of POWs
or MIAs, greeted the family and
reminded the crowd that "they
are not all home yet."
Dr. Jere Packard, principal
speaker of the event, asked the
question Was it worth it? refer-
ring to the sacrifices made dur-
ing the war. Packard cited cur-
rent industrialization and mod-
ernization of South Korea as a re-
sult of the intervention of the
U.S. military during the war.
"I am just happy that so many
people gathered to commemo-
rate the sacrifices of servicemen
during the Korean War," said
Frank Bernoski, a veteran of the
war.
Following the ceremony inside
the courthouse, flowered
wreaths were laid in front of the
Korean War Memorial in the
courthouse gardens.
Alper, who led the laying of
the wreaths, reminded the crowd
of the efforts of area servicemen.
The ceremony ended with the
playing of taps, during which Al-
per asked those gathered to re-
member their loved ones who
had served their country in the
various branches of the military.
Korean War veterans not forgotten
NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Veterans salute during the Korean War Veterans Association of Wyoming Valley commemoration of
the 58th anniversary of the end of the Korean War, Saturday at the Luzerne County Courthouse.
Association marks 58th
anniversary of the end of the
war and sacrifices made.
By GERI GIBBONS
Times Leader Correspondent
"I am just
happy that
so many
people
gathered
to com-
memorate
the sacri-
fices of
service-
men during
the Korean
War."
Frank Bernoski
Korean War
veteran
Divorces sought and filed in
the Luzerne County Prothono-
tarys Office from July 18
through 22, 2011:
Walter J. Zera III, Bear Creek,
and Dawn Zera, Forty Fort
Christine M. Gilroy, Dupont,
and Alan David Zurek, Dupont
Michael James Brogan,
Nanticoke, and Myroslava Brogan,
Kingston
Robert Bomboy, Warrior
Run, and Rosemary Bomboy,
Warrior Run
Joanne Slusser, Drums, and
William Slusser, Drums
Denise Steibing, Conyngham,
and Henry Steibing, Conyngham
Jenna Burdick, Wilkes-Barre,
and Christopher Burdick, Say-
reville, NY
Mark Gulla, Pittston, and
Lora Gulla, Avoca
Judith Seely, Drums, and
Eric Seely, Drums
Johanny Duran, Freeland,
and Anderson Duran, Freeland
Wayne Francis Sgroi, Shaver-
town, and Lori Sgroi, Wilkes-Barre
Matthew J. Newhart, Wyom-
ing, and Renee Newhart,
Swoyersville
Joseph Tarreto, Kingston,
and Melanie Lynn Tarreto, King-
ston
Michele Bullington, Laflin,
and Nate Bullington, Lacrosse,
Wis.
Margaret Monahan, Exeter,
and William Monahan, Larksville.
Marriage license applications
filed in the Luzerne County
Register of Wills Office from
July 18 through 22, 2011:
David Maynard and Linda A.
Winkler
Edward M. Dennis, Jr. and
Laura Bralczyk
Luis A. Colon, Jr. and Do-
rothy Marie McDowell
Justin Bennage and Crystal
Lee Lloyd
George A. Wanyo and Eileen
Marie Karnis
Mark Thomas Ward Boisey
and Lindsay Dunsmuir
David Leary Shotwell, Jr. and
Morgan Marie Fisher
Karl Streitel and Teriane R.
Johns
John Demko and Marybeth
Garbor
Neil Joseph Mussoline and
Jane Marie Lugo
Scott J. Wetterau and Karin
Preisel
Conroy M. Watt and Jasmen
Tiffany Gaines
Danny Harkenreader and
Mary Hartman
Michael Paul Heumann and
Sara Beth Cunningham
Christopher Joseph
Schwartz and Kimberly Mazaika
Jason William Henning and
Jennifer Lynn Green
Kenneth J. MacLeod and
Nicole Gertrude Smith
Jeffrey B. ODonnell and
Kimberly Megan Pleban
Eric Michael Crahall and
Christina Curcio
Demosthenes Petrakis and
Victoria Mendofik
Christopher David Foss and
Petrina Ann Wallen
Matthew Giambra and Rita
Kaluzavich
Joseph John Gibbons and
Kimbery Ann Liberaski
Stephen F. Stahl, Jr. and
Rosalie Marie Kalie
Jamie Johnson and
Adrienne Maxwell
Rafael Diaz and Rosaida
Baldemora
Paul E. Schweizer Jr. and
Laura Moss
William David Jenkins and
Diana Marie Mirro
Christopher M. Piatt and
Kacey M. Patterson
PUBLIC RECORDS
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 PAGE 7A
O B I T U A R I E S
The Times Leader publish-
es free obituaries, which
have a 27-line limit, and paid
obituaries, which can run
with a photograph. A funeral
home representative can call
the obituary desk at (570)
829-7224, send a fax to (570)
829-5537 or e-mail to tlo-
bits@timesleader.com. If you
fax or e-mail, please call to
confirm. Obituaries must be
submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday
through Thursday and 7:30
p.m. Friday and Saturday.
Obituaries must be sent by a
funeral home or crematory,
or must name who is hand-
ling arrangements, with
address and phone number.
We discourage handwritten
notices; they incur a $15
typing fee.
O B I T U A R Y P O L I C Y
ST.M ARYS
M ONUM ENTCO.
M onum ents-M arkers-Lettering
975 S.M AIN ST.HAN O VER TW P.
829-8138
N EXT TO SO LO M O N S CREEK
In Remembrance Of
STEPHEN RITSICK, JR.
1968-2006
Who loved every life he touched.
Love, Mom & Family
G enettis
AfterFu nera lLu ncheons
Sta rting a t$7.95 p erp erson
H otelBerea vem entRa tes
825.6477
BAUMAN Arlene, funeral at 9:30
a.m. Monday from the Louis V.
Ciuccio Funeral Home, 145 Moosic
Rd., Old Forge. Mass 10 a.m. at the
Prince of Peace Parish - St. Marys
Church, Old Forge. Friends may call
from 6 to 8 p.m. today.
BECKLEY Ross, military funeral at
9 a.m. Monday from the Lehman
Family Funeral Service, 689 Hazle
Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Mass of Chris-
tian Burial at 9:30 a.m. at St.
Leos/Holy Rosary Church, Wilkes-
Barre. Friends may call from 5 to 8
p.m. today at the funeral home.
CASTERLINE Donald, memorial
service at 2 p.m. August 13 from
Sheldon-Kukuchka Funeral Home
Inc., 73 W. Tioga St., Tunkhannock.
COLLACH Lucia, funeral at 10 a.m.
Tuesday from the S.J. Grontkowski
Funeral Home, 530 W. Main St.,
Plymouth. Mass of Christian Burial
at 10:30 a.m. in All Saints Parish,
Plymouth. Interment and Military
Service will immediately follow in
Holy Trinity Cemetery, Nanticoke.
Friends may call from 9 a.m. until
the time of service Tuesday.
DETTMORE Kelly Ann, memorial
service at 5 p.m. today at the Nat
& Gawlas Funeral Home, 89 Park
Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call
from 3 to 5 p.m. today at the
funeral home.
GRINDEL John, funeral at 6 p.m.
today in the Community Bible
Church, Tunkhannock. Relatives
and friends may pay respects at
the church from 3 to 6 p.m. today.
LOVE Blanche, funeral services at 11
a.m. Saturday in the Mehoopany
Methodist Church followed by a
luncheon in the church basement.
NAT Joan, funeral at 9 a.m. Mon-
day from the Bernard J. Piontek
Funeral Home Inc., 204 Main St.,
Duryea. Mass of Christian Burial at
9:30 a.m. in Holy Rosary Church,
Duryea. Friends may call from 5 to
8 p.m. today.
PASCALE Nancy, shiva will be
observed at the home of her
daughter and son-in-law, Gerri and
Rabbi Larry Kaplan, from 2 to 4
p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. today.
POWELL Margaret, funeral at 9:30
a.m. Monday from Davis-Dinelli
Funeral Home, 170 E. Broad St.,
Nanticoke. Mass of Christian Burial
at 10 a.m. in St. Faustina Kowalska
Parish/Holy Trinity Church, Nanti-
coke. Visitation will be from 5 to 8
p.m. today at the funeral home.
REDINSKI Marion, funeral at 9:30
a.m. Monday from the S.J. Gront-
kowski Funeral Home, 530 W. Main
St., Plymouth. Mass of Christian
Burial at 10 a.m. in Good Shepherd
Polish National Catholic Church of
Plymouth. Friends may call from 5
to 8 p.m. today. A Christian Wake
Service will be held at 6 p.m. today.
SNYDER The Rev. Thomas, funeral
at 11 a.m. Monday in the Shaver-
town United Methodist Church, 163
N. Pioneer Ave., Shavertown.
Friends may call from 4 to 7 p.m.
today at the Harold C. Snowdon
Funeral Home Inc., 140 N. Main St.,
Shavertown. A Masonic service will
be held at the funeral home at 7
p.m. today. The Snyder family will
also receive friends from10 a.m.
until the time of services Monday
at the church.
ZUBKOFF John Sr., funeral at 8:30
a.m. Monday from the George A.
Strish Inc. Funeral Home, 105 N.
Main St., Ashley. Mass of Christian
Burial at 9 a.m. from Holy Family
Church, Sugar Notch. Friends may
call from 7 to 9 p.m. today.
FUNERALS
R
obert Taylor, of Mountain
Top, passed away peacefully
at his home in the early morn-
ing hours of Thursday, July 21,
2011.
Born September 17, 1984,
Robert attended Crestwood
High School and went on to
work in distribution, most re-
cently at AEP in the Crestwood
Industrial Park, Mountain Top.
Robert Boob, as his family
remembers him, was an avid
outdoorsman who loved to also
spend time with family and
friends. Those who were
blessed with his heart know
how near and dear both family
and true friends were to him. At
the young age of 26 he will be
forever loved and missed.
He is survived by his mother,
Mary Taylor; brother, Keith Tay-
lor; and aunt Patricia Menichini.
Robert also has other aunts and
uncles; two nephews; a niece;
sister-in-law and, along with
many friends, are all saddened
by his passing. Robert has been
granted his wings and joins his
grandparents, as well as his late
sister, Christine Taylor.
A memorial service will be
held at 7 p.m. Tuesday at
McCune Funeral Home, 80 S.
Mountain Blvd., Mountain Top.
Relatives and friends are invited
to call from 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday
at the funeral home.
View obituaries online at
www.mccunefuneralserviceinc-
.com.
Robert Taylor
July 21, 2011
The Rev. Thomas J. Snyder, 82,
died Thursday, July 21, 2011, at the
United Methodist Homes Wesley
Village Campus, Jenkins Township,
where he hadbeena resident for the
past six years.
Born in Jermyn, Scott Township,
he was a son of the late Harold and
Emma Louise Taylor Snyder.
In his youth and in the early years
of his ministry, he worked his fam-
ilys dairy farm in Jermyn.
He was a graduate of Keystone
College, The University of Scranton
and Drew Theological University,
Madison, N.J.
Rev. Snyder entered the ministry
in 1948 and served numerous Unit-
ed Methodist churches throughout
his career. His ministry started at
the West Nicholson United Metho-
dist Church followed by United
Methodist churches in Gibson,
Providence, Court Street, Chinchil-
la, Nanticoke and West Nanticoke.
He retired from the Susquehanna
Conference of United Methodist
Churches in 1995 but continued his
ministry in St. Paul, Throop, Sche-
nevus and Loyalville United Metho-
dist churches.
He was a member of the Aurora
Masonic Lodge No. 523, Jermyn.
Preceding him in death, in addi-
tiontohis parents, was his first wife,
the former Elizabeth Rolls.
Surviving are his wife, the Rev.
M. Lynn Snyder, Shavertown; chil-
dren, Joyce Barrett and husband,
Jim, Scranton, the Rev. Joan Dod-
son and husband, Don, Lake Wino-
la, Judy Baker and husband, Terry,
Fleetville, Jane Bird and husband,
Ed, Berlin, Conn., and Marsley
Holderman and husband, Randall,
Accord, N.Y.; grandchildren, Joy
OMalley, Jimmy Barrett, Brandon
Dodson, Sara Dodson, Catie Baker,
Matthew Baker, Michael Bird, Jef-
frey Bird, Kayla Holderman, and Sa-
brina Holderman; six great-grand-
children; sister, BarbaraNichols and
husband, Arlton, Vestal, N.Y.; as
well as several nieces, nephews,
great-nieces and great-nephews.
Funeral services will be held at
11 a.m. Monday in the Shavertown
United Methodist Church, 163 N.
Pioneer Ave., Shavertown. The Rev.
Joyce Allen and the Rev. Dr. Charles
Gommer will officiate. Interment
will be made in Tompkinsville Cem-
etery. Friends may call from 4 to 7
p.m. today at the Harold C. Snow-
don Funeral Home Inc., 140 N. Main
St., Shavertown. A Masonic service
will be held at the funeral home at 7
p.m. today. The Snyder family will
also receive friends from10 a.m. un-
til time of services Monday at the
church.
Memorial donations, if desired,
may be made to the Shavertown
United Methodist Church, 163 N.
Pioneer Ave., Shavertown, PA
18708.
The Rev. Thomas J. Snyder
July 21, 2011
EDWARD SAROSCEK passed
away Tuesday, June 21, 2011. He
was preceded in death by parents,
Andrew and Ella Jaroscak Saros-
ick; first wife and mother of his
children, Phyllis Cook; second
wife, Norma; brothers, Michael
and Michaels birth twin brother.
Surviving are son Edward Saros-
cek and wife, Theresa; daughter
Lynn Kosloski and fianc, Bradley
Petroski; grandchildren, Melanie
(Saroscek) Smith, Edward P. Sa-
roscek, Ellyssa Saroscek and Joey
Kosloski; sister, Violet Barton and
husband, Francis; nieces; neph-
ews; and friend Michael Hudacek.
Calling hours will be from 10
a.m. to noon Saturday at the S.J.
Grontkowski Funeral Home, Ply-
mouth. Visit www.sjgrontkowski-
funerahome.comto submit condo-
lences.
M
arie Jean Onzik, 69, formerly of
North Wilkes-Barre, more re-
cently a resident of Bnai Brith
Apartments, Wilkes-Barre, passed
into Eternal Life Saturday morning,
July 23, 2011, in the Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital following an ill-
ness.
Born May 10, 1942, in Wilkes-
Barre, she was a daughter tothe late
Sigmund Kozielski and Mary (Go-
man) Onzik. She was educated in
the city schools and attended the
James M. Coughlin High School,
Wilkes-Barre.
Until her retirement, Marie was
employed as a sock liner for Carter
Footwear Co. in the Parsons section
of the city.
Marie was a member of the Par-
ish Community of Saint Andre Be-
ssette, having previously attended
Saint Stanislaus Kostka Roman Ca-
tholic Church, where she heldmem-
bership in the womens club.
She was preceded in death by a
brother, Robert Onzik; and a sister,
Marguerite Chorba.
Surviving are her daughter Lisa
Krommes; and the lights of her life,
her granddaughters, Kieran and
Kendall Krommes, of whom she
loved A Bushel and a Peck, all of
Greensboro, N.C. Also surviving are
her nieces, Barbara and Laraine
Chorba, both of Florida; and a neph-
ew David Chorba of California.
Memorial funeral services will
be announced at a later date by the
John V. Morris Funeral Home, 625
N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre.
To send her daughter and family
online words of comfort and friend-
ship, please visit our website at
www.JohnVMorrisFuneralHome-
s.com.
Marie Jean Onzik
July 23, 2011
T
anya Keefe, 35, of Nanticoke,
passed away Friday afternoon,
July 22, 2011, at the Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital.
Born March 26, 1976, in Scran-
ton, she was a daughter of Paul and
Sandra Pasternak Cimakasky.
She was a 1994 graduate of
Crestwood High School, Moun-
tain Top, and attended Wilkes Col-
lege.
Tanya was currently employed
as an Optometric Assistant at
Northeast Eye Care, Dallas. One of
her greatest joys was riding on the
Harley. She also had a love for her
special dogs, Daisy and Zoey; and
her cat Willow.
Her mother-in-law Janet Keefe
preceded her in death.
Surviving, inadditiontoher par-
ents, are her very loving husband,
Steve; brothers, Paul and Neil,
Nanticoke; and numerous nieces
and nephews.
Funeral serviceswill be heldat
8:15 p.m. Tuesday fromthe Earl W.
Lohman Funeral Home Inc., 14 W.
GreenSt., Nanticoke, withtheRev.
Thomas OMalley officiating.
Friends may call from 6 p.m. until
the time of service Tuesday. Inter-
ment will be in Alberts Cemetery,
Wright Township.
She will be greatly missed by
her husband, family and friends.
Tanya Keefe
July 22, 2011
K
evin Chico Gartley, 45, of the
Parsons section of Wilkes-
Barre, passed away Thursday, July
21, 2011, at the Wilkes-Barre Gener-
al Hospital following a sudden ill-
ness.
BorninWilkes-Barre, onSeptem-
ber 23, 1965, Kevinwas a sonof Barr
and Mary Ward Gartley.
Following his graduation from
Coughlin High School and college,
Kevin worked as a computer con-
sultant and a computer program-
mer. Most recently, he worked for
Dunn and Bradstreet. A bumper
sticker onall of Kevins trucks posed
a simple question, R U Kind? He
truly was, and as a result he will be
greatly missed by his family, his
countless friends, andhis dogLight-
ening.
Kevins love for life, lived without
regrets, was evident in everything
he did and was only overshadowed
by his love for his family, friends,
and especially his three nephews,
Shamus, Joshua and Ian Gartley.
Kevin was an avid sports fan and
closely followed the New York
Mets, Notre Dame football and golf.
He was also very passionate about
his music and, in particular, the
Grateful Dead.
In addition to his parents, Kevin
is survived by his siblings, Barr Gar-
tley and Lisa Gartley of Wilkes-
Barre, and Scott Gartley and his
wife, Tina Gartley; nephews, Sha-
mus, Joshua and Ian Gartley, all of
Plains Township. Also surviving is
his devoted and loving dog Lighten-
ing.
The funeral will be held at 9:30
a.m. Tuesday fromthe E. Blake Col-
lins Funeral Home, 159GeorgeAve.,
Wilkes-Barre, with a Mass of Chris-
tian Burial at 10 a.m. in St. Bene-
dicts Parish, Austin Avenue,
Wilkes-Barre. Interment will be in
Mount Greenwood Cemetery, Sha-
vertown. Friends may call from2 to
4 p.m. and 6 to 9 p.m. Monday.
In lieu of flowers, memorial con-
tributions may be made to the
S.P.C.A. of Luzerne County, 524 E.
Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18702.
Condolences can be sent to the
family at www.eblakecollins.com.
Kevin Chico Gartley
July 21, 2011
V
irginia R. Farley, 87, former resi-
dent of Wesley Village, Pittston,
and The Villages, Lady Lake, Fla.,
passed away Wednesday, July 20,
2011, at Hospice Community Care,
Geisinger South Wilkes-Barre.
She was born in Illinois City, Ill.,
on July 8, 1924, a daughter of Ma-
rion (Mayo) and the Rev. Arthur
Rostron. Ginny graduated from
Clayton High School, class of 1942,
and was employed as an X-ray tech-
nician during World War II. She
married the love of her life, Richard
C. Farley, in Savannah, Ga., on Au-
gust 23, 1945.
Ginny was a devoted wife, moth-
er, grandmother and great-grand-
mother. Her greatest joy in life was
her family, andshe will be sadlymis-
sed by all. She and Dick were active
members in their community, hav-
ing pioneered the Dallas High
School Booster Club. They were al-
so active members of the Couples
Club at the Shavertown Methodist
Church for many years, as well as
square dancers with the Circle
Eighters Square Dance Club. Ginny
and Dick owned and operated Far-
leys Sweet Valley Golf Course and
Pro Shop for 15 years before retiring
to The Villages, where they enjoyed
square-dancing, golfing, bowling
and bridge, and were active volun-
teers with Habitat for Humanity.
She was preceded in death by
Dick, her husband of 60 years; her
parents; her brother, Leslie Rostron;
and sister, Gladys Cookson.
Ginny is survived by children,
John R., Fairfield, Iowa, Jeffrey L.
and his wife, Charlotte, Sweet Val-
ley, and Joan E. Farley, Pompano
Beach, Fla.; grandchildren, Jennifer
Farley Dawes, Jeffery M. Farley and
Rachel E. Farley; and seven great-
grandchildren.
Gram was a generous and car-
ing personandcouldbe countedup-
on to liven up any event she attend-
ed. Her zest for lifewill liveoninour
hearts and keep us smiling.
Ginnys family would like to rec-
ognize and thank the administra-
tion and staff of both Wesley Village
and Hospice Community Care for
the loving, compassionate, quality
care Ginny received and the kind-
ness and compassion shown to her
family.
Amemorial service will be held
in the fall. Details will be published
at a later date.
At the request of the family, in
lieu of flowers, memorial contribu-
tions may be sent to Wesley Village,
209 Roberts Road, Pittston, PA
18640; or Hospice Community
Care, 601 Wyoming Ave., Kingston,
PA18704.
Arrangements are under the di-
rection of The Richard H. Disque
Funeral Home Inc., 672 Memorial
Highway, Dallas.
Virginia Ginny R. Farley
July 20, 2011
ROBERT H. CYBULSKI SR.,
75, of Wilkes-Barre, passed away
early Saturday morning, July 23,
2011, at his home.
Funeral arrangements are
pending and will be announced
from the Bednarski & Thomas Fu-
neral Home, 27 Park Ave., Wilkes-
Barre.
R
oss A. Beckley, PE/AART, hus-
band of Maureen D. Flanley
Beckley, passed away at home
Thursday, July 21, 2011, at 5:23 a.m.
Mr. Beckley and his wife, Mau-
reen, are residents of the Newtown
Section of Hanover Township. He
was a graduate of Hanover Town-
ship High School and Lyons Tech-
nical Institute, Newark, N.J.
A Korean War veteran, he served
as a Hospital Corpsman for both the
U.S. Navy and Marine Corps Re-
serve. He was a registered Profes-
sional Engineer and registered Ra-
diographic Technologist.
Ross is survived, in addition to
his wife, Maureen, by his daughter
Roberta Ann Beckley; grandchil-
dren, Jonathan Klingler, M.D., and
his wife, Amy, Matthew Klingler,
Maureen Klingler, Kathleen Le-
soine and her husband, Kevin, and
Michael Arnold and his wife, Dana;
son-in-lawRobert C. Klingler, M.D.;
andgreat-grandsonTanner Lesoine;
brother, George Beckley, New Jer-
sey; as well as several nieces and ne-
phews.
He was preceded in death by his
loving daughter Deborah Ann Klin-
gler; his parents, Charles and Loret-
ta Beckley; sisters, Aileen Martis,
Loretta Butterwick and Lorraine
Brunza; and brother, Charles Beck-
ley.
Mr. Beckley retired from PPL as
Supervisor of Nuclear Quality Con-
trol. Duringconstructionof the PPL
Nuclear Power Plant he was the
Resident Nuclear Quality Assur-
ance Engineer overseeing Quality
of Plant Construction. Following
completion of this project, he was
assigned the responsibility of sign-
ingthe owners Certification(ASME
N-1 Form) to the Nuclear Regulato-
ry Commission that attested to the
Quality of Construction and plant
readiness for operation. He also
served PPL as their representative
to the American Society for Non-de-
structive Testing located in Dublin,
Ohio, and after four years on the
Board of Directors was elected as
the Societys President and Chair-
man of the Board of Directors. He
representedthe Societyat the world
conference on Non-destructive
Testing in Amsterdam, Holland.
During his tenure on the Board, he
was responsible for the Societys ap-
proval of Visual Testing as a Viable
Testing method and seeking ap-
proval from the NRC for the Certifi-
cation of Industrial Radiographers.
Following his retirement from
PPL, he worked as a consultant to
the SteamGenerating Team, a Divi-
sionof URSCorporation. He andhis
wife traveled around the country
performing Nuclear Surveillances
of contractors doing work for nucle-
ar power facilities, eventually retir-
ing in 2010.
During his early career years, Mr.
Beckley served as Chief Electron
Microscopist for the National Lead
Corporation at their Research Cen-
ter located in Heightstown, N.J.
There, he would study microscopi-
cally, paint pigments and cellulose
fibers used in automobile batteries.
He provided the first 3-D presenta-
tion of paint pigments and fibers to
the Stock Holders and Board of Di-
rectors. He authored several profes-
sional publications, and his work
was exhibited at the New York Mu-
seum of Science and Art and the
Smithsonian Institute in Washing-
ton, D.C.
Mr. Beckley was Past Exalted
Ruler of Elks Lodge 2119 located in
Manville, N.J., and later demitted to
Elks Lodge 109 in Wilkes-Barre. He
is a life member of the Wilkes-Barre
Knights of Columbus, ThirdDegree
and a Fourth Degree Knights Mem-
ber of Assembly 925, and a member
of American Legion Post 132 in
Wilkes-Barre.
His guidance andlove for his fam-
ily will be sorely missed. Pop-pop
touched everyone who crossed his
path, and his life lessons will be in-
stilled in our memories and carried
on forever.
Military funeral services
will be conducted at 9 a.m.
Monday from the Lehman Family
Funeral Service, 689 Hazle Ave.,
Wilkes-Barre, with a Mass of Chris-
tian Burial held at St. Leos/Holy
Rosary Church, Ashley at 9:30 a.m.
The Rev. Thomas J. OMalley will
officiate. Entombment will followat
Mary Mother of God Mausoleumin
St. Marys Cemetery next to his lov-
ing daughter, Deborah. Family and
friends may call from 5 to 8 p.m. to-
day.
In lieu of flowers, family requests
memorial donations be made to
Saint Leos/HolyRosaryChurch, 33
Manhattan St., Ashley, PA18706.
Condolences may be sent to in-
fo@lehmanfuneralhome.com.
Ross A. Beckley
July 21, 2011
More Obituaries, Page 2A
JOSEPH JUSKIE KOCHAN-
SKI, of Wilkes-Barre, passed away
Friday, July 22, 2011, at Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical Center,
Plains Township.
Funeral arrangements will be
announced by the Jendrzejewski
Funeral Home, Wilkes-Barre.
BRADLEY JOSEPHLUNNY, 5,
of Hanover Township, passed
away Friday, July 22, 2011. He was
a student at Wyoming Valley Chil-
drens Association. Surviving are
parents, Jamey Hillard and Ri-
chard Lunny; brother, Jakob;
grandparents, James and Beverly
Blackwell Hillard and Debbie and
Richard Lunny Sr.; great-grandpar-
ents, Annabelle Blackwell, Charles
Blackwell, Fay Randazzo and Ro-
semary Lunny; uncles, Staff Sgt.
Christopher Hillard, USAF, and
Bob Lunny; aunts, Christine Lun-
ny and Karey Kovitch.
The funeral will be at 1 p.m.
Tuesday from the S. J. Grontkow-
ski Funeral Home, 530 W. Main
St., Plymouth. Interment will be
held in the Hanover Green Ceme-
tery. Friends may call from11 a.m.
until funeral time.
THERESA M. SHIVELL, 78, of
the Hudson section of Plains
Township, passed away peacefully
Saturday, July 23, 2011, in Hospice
Community Care Inpatient Unit of
Geisinger South Wilkes-Barre, fol-
lowing an illness.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from the Yanaitis Funeral
Home, 55 Stark St., Plains Town-
ship. A full obituary will appear in
tomorrows edition of The Times
Leader.
L
ysandros Poulakos, 81, of Net-
cong, N.J., passed away Wednes-
day, July 20, 2011, at St. Claire Hospi-
tal, Denville, N.J. He was the owner
of the Fireside Diner in Ledgewood,
N.J., for 40 years.
Lysandros was born in Sparta,
Greece, a son of Vasilious and Polati-
mi Poulakos.
He is survived by his wife, Sharon;
daughters, Paula and son-in-law, Jim,
New York, and Christina and Rose
Poulakos, Sugar Notch; grandchil-
dren, Michael, Christina and Aman-
da Balz; stepchildren, Pete, Jack,
Rich and Sheila; sisters, Stella and
Krissoula; and sister-in-law, Fifi, who
reside in Athens, Greece.
ViewingtobefromMorganFuner-
al Home, Main Street, Netcong, N.J.
Friends may call from2 to 4 p.m. and
7 to 9 p.m. today. Funeral services
will be fromSt. AndrewGreekOrtho-
dox Church, Randolph, N.J., at 10:30
a.m. Monday.
In lieu of flowers, the family is re-
questing donations to be made to St.
Andrew Greek Orthodox Church,
1447 Sussex Turnpike, Randolph, NJ
07869.
Lysandros
Poulakos
July 20, 2011
C M Y K
PAGE 8A SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Country musics version of
Waterworld came to town
Friday as Brad Paisley and the
H20II: Wetter & Wilder tour
took over the Toyota Pavilion
at Montage Mountain.
There were dunk tanks and a
variety of free water-themed
activities and games a great
way to beat the sweltering
heat, thanks,
Mr. Paisley
and a whole
host of coun-
try music art-
ists including
Country Mu-
sic Associ-
ation Enter-
tainer of the
Year Paisley,
CMA Male Vo-
calist of the
Year Blake
Shelton, and
rising star Jer-
rod Niemann,
plus three
more acts on a
second stage.
What a
night for a con-
cert, Paisley
said early in
his set. Were not afraid of a lit-
tle heat.
The main-stage performanc-
es got under way at 7:15 with a
fine 30-minute set by Niemann.
He scored early with his latest
single One More Drinkin
Song and Good Ride Cow-
boy, a song he co-wrote for
Garth Brooks in 2005.
Niemanns rocking band
played a blistering cover of Ste-
vie Ray Vaughans Pride and
Joy interlaced with a little bit
of Metallicas Enter Sand-
man before Niemann finished
up with his first No. 1 single
Lover, Lover.
Shelton was next, taking the
stage with a raucous version of
All About Tonight followed
by an equally fine Some
Beach.
Shelton then went into a
long rambling speech about
the songs he grew up listening
to through his brothers and
sisters locked doors before
surprising the crowd with a
medley of Play That Funky
Music (which was probably
more Vanilla Ice than Wild
Cherry), Centerfold and My
Prerogative.
He also mentioned how hap-
py he is to be back at his day
job after spending two months
in Los Angeles as a judge on
The Voice, before getting
back to business with fine ren-
ditions of the ballads Who Are
You When Im Not Looking,
She Wouldnt Be Gone and
his first hit Austin.
Shelton then capped his 50-
minute set with rocking ver-
sions of Hillbilly Bone (a
song he originally recorded
with Trace Adkins) and Hon-
ey Bee, his latest No. 1.
Paisley, wearing jeans, a
white cowboy hat and a black
T-shirt with Thats What She
Said emblazoned in white,
then took the stage for a very
short solo acoustic intro of
This Is Country Music before
his whole band known as the
Drama Kings kicked in on
Mud on the Tires.
Other early highlights of
Paisleys performance includ-
ed Ticks, the ballad Shes
Everything and a cool version
of Celebrity, complete with a
funny video featuring a big-
headed Paisley muppet and
Jimmy Kimmel.
Shelton joined Paisley for a
good rendition of Paisleys
Water (the song that inspired
the tours theme) and then
Paisley and his band played the
title track from his latest al-
bum, This Is Country Music,
as images of past superstars
such as Johnny Cash, Johnny
Paycheck and Merle Haggard
flashed across the giant video
screen.
Early arrivals could check
out the carnival-like water park
that took over the parking lot
and some music on the second
stage by Sunny Sweeney, Brett
Eldredge and Edens Edge.
Paisleys tour will be at the
Susquehanna Bank Center in
Camden, N.J., on Sept. 23.
Wet and wild at Paisley show
Country music star brings his
H20II tour to Montage
Mountain during heat wave.
R E V I E W
AMANDA HRYCYNA/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Brad Paisley performs Friday night at the Toyota Pavilion at Mon-
tage Mountain.
By BRAD PATTON
For The Times Leader
The next show at the Toyota Pavil-
ion is Motley Crue and Poison with
special guests New York Dolls on
July 31.
W H AT S N E X T ?
Paisley, wear-
ing jeans, a
white cowboy
hat and a
black T-shirt
with Thats
What She
Said embla-
zoned in
white, then
took the
stage for a
very short
solo acoustic
intro of This
Is Country
Music.
tive candidates and enjoy the
day.
"This is a great local event for
military families," said SSG Ke-
vin Walter, National Guard
Recruiter. "Mydaughteractually
attends day camp here and she
loves it."
Walter said with the current
economic conditions, the Na-
tional Guard provides a unique
opportunity for young men and
women to develop a sense of dis-
cipline and responsibility while
earning a substantial amount to-
wardcollege education.
"I used my money to pay for
muchof my ongoingeducation,"
continued Walters. "Im still en-
rolled in online classes. The ex-
perience and opportunity has
beeninvaluable to me.
For further informationonthe
Pennsylvania National Guard,
contact SSG Walter at 570-239-
5579.
For information about the
Wilkes-Barre YMCA, contact
membership director Lindsey
Landis at 570-823-2191ext 125.
MILITARY
Continued from Page 3A
Firefighters and EMS crews
had to sort through the 30 acci-
dent victims 26volunteers plus
four mannequins separating
the living from the dead and
marking the most seriously in-
jured victims for first treatment,
based on wounds and afflictions
simulatedwithmakeup.
He has a puncture wound to
the face with associated bleed-
ing, and Im giving him first de-
greeburns onhis arms andlegs,
Geisinger Life Flight medic Rob-
ert Sembrat said as he painted
volunteer accident victim Jack
Bourbeau with red stage make-
up. His face is a little bit gray,
some poor circulation going on,
maybe some smoke inhalation.
Id consider him a first priority;
depends on how much he wants
to play it up.
The volunteer victims were
then transported by emergency
crewstoareahospitalsGeisinger
WyomingValleyMedical Center,
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital,
Moses Taylor Hospital andCom-
munity Medical Center Scran-
ton, where the drill continued.
One volunteer was taken by Life
Flight helicopter to Geisinger in
Plains Township.
Following the triage exercise
the plane anda simulatedjet fuel
spill wereset alight, simulatinga
runway fire for responding fire
departments to extinguish.
This is something that really
fans out for us, saidairport Pub-
lic Safety Director George Bieb-
er. . It helps us maintainour cer-
tification with the (Federal Avia-
tion Administration,) the hospi-
tals use it for their state
Department of Health certifica-
tionandtheambulancesreport it
to the state Department of
Healthandit helpswiththeircer-
tification.
The FAA requires the airport
conduct a live major disaster ex-
ercise every three years, though
Bieber saidthe airport runs tab-
letop disaster simulation drills
annuallywithareaemergencyre-
sponse agencies.
AirportDirectorBarryCentini
said about an hour into the drill
he thought the response was go-
ing well. Airport fire crews were
on scene within 2 minutes and
firefighters within 5 minutes
were pulling victims from the
plane simulator. The first crews
from surrounding departments
arrivedwithin15 minutes.
The exercise made for a ma-
cabrescene, but it was alsoanec-
essary one.Weve had nothing
on the commercial end, but on
the private side weve had some
crashes, Centini said. We had
some fatalities here back in the
80s.
DRILL
Continued from Page 3A
NIKO J. KALLIANIOTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Robert Sembrat of Geisinger Life Flight applies colored powder
to Jack Bourneau, a potential injured passenger.
weeks, they helped us to get into
a newplace and assisted us with
furniture. I cant thank them
enough."
The event was held at the Tri-
ple K Saloon and tickets were
$25 per person. The four-hour
event featured a large array food
and drinks, a Chinese auction
and music by a local DJ. "We
came out today to support the
Meixsells," said Angela Fox of
Wilkes-Barre, who came with
several friends. "I actually work
at the bakery that donated the
cake for the benefit. The Red
cross came through for them so
we wantedtoshowour apprecia-
tion."
According to the Wyoming
Valley Red Cross website, "The
Wyoming Valley Chapter of the
AmericanRedCross responds to
local disasters in our area 24
hours a day, 7 days a week. Our
volunteers provide immediate
assistance with basic needs fol-
lowing fires, floods and other lo-
cal disasters. All in all our volun-
teers respond to over 70 disas-
ters each year."
"I honestly dont know what I
would have done if the Red
Cross hadnt been there," added
Meixsell. I hope I cangive a little
bit back to themtoday." "People
need to know that theres help
available in the time of need."
Meixsell thanked the owners
of Triple K Saloon and Boule-
vard Bakery in Wilkes-Barre and
everyone who volunteered to
make the benefit a success.
BENEFIT
Continued from Page 3A
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 PAGE 9A
N E W S
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LONDONAmy Winehouse,
the beehived soul-jazz diva
whose self-destructive habits
overshadoweda distinctive musi-
cal talent, was found dead Satur-
day in her London home, police
said. She was 27.
Winehouse shot to fame in
2006 with the album Back to
Black, whose blend of jazz, soul,
rock and classic pop was a global
hit. It won five Grammys and
made Winehouse with her
black beehive hairdo and old-
fashioned sailor tattoos one of
musics most recognizable stars.
But her personal life, with its
drug and alcohol abuse, eating
disorders and destructive rela-
tionships, soon took over her ca-
reer.
Police confirmed that a 27-
year-old female was pronounced
dead at the home in Camden
Square northern London; the
cause of death was not immedi-
ately known. London Ambulance
Services said Winehouse had
died before the two ambulance
crews it sent arrived at the scene.
Singer and actress Kelly Os-
bourne, who helped Winehouse
check into a drug addiction treat-
ment facility in 2008, was one of
many who grieved for the singer
on Twitter.
I cant even breath right now
im crying so hard i just lost 1 of
my best friends. i love youforever
Amy and will never forget the re-
al you! she tweeted.
The singers father, Mitch
Winehouse, had arrived in New
York this weekend to prepare for
his U.S. performing debut Mon-
day night at the Blue Note jazz
club, but upon receiving news of
his daughters death was heading
back home to London to be with
his family, his publicist Don Lu-
coff said.
An ambulance could be seen
parked beneath the trees outside
her London home, and the whole
street was cordoned off by police
tape. Officers kept onlookers
away from the scene.
AMY WI NEHOUSE 1 983 - 2011
AP PHOTOS
British singer Amy Winehouse poses for photographs after being interviewed by The Associated
Press at a studio in north London in 2007. She was found dead Saturday at the age of 27.
Troubled diva dead at 27
The singer shot to fame in
2006 with the album Back to
Black, which won 5 Grammys.
By JILL LAWLESS
Associated Press
Fans leave flow-
ers and notes at
the London home
of Amy Wine-
house, who died
Saturday. She
was last publicly
seen at a London
concert on
Wednesday.
C M Y K
PAGE 10A SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
N E W S
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Cuba Free Press
Saint James Press
Steelville Star
Coroners should not be
funeral home directors
Written by Rob Viehman
THURSDAY, 25 MARCH 2010 15:26
Missouri
News
Given the fact that Crawford
County Coroner Paul Hutson is
owed more than $1,000 in back
mileage, isnt provided office
space, cant drive his county
provided vehicle full time as he
needs to, doesnt get any county
health insurance and only makes
$1.71 per hour, why on earth
would he continue to do that job?
Everybody knows why. Its good
for his funeral home business.
Advertisement Advertisement
Until we hold Public Offcials in the
Coroners Offce accountable and
prohibit them from
1. Soliciting Funeral
Arrangements
2. Discussing Funeral
Arrangements
3. Accepting Funeral
Arrangements
while engaged in the public trust,
in an inherent confict with ones
private interests, we will NEVER
have an ethical foundation to build
the TRUST we deserve. To promote
ones self interest with people at their
most vulnerable time (not with a sales
pitch, but perhaps a hug when needed
most, a gentle reminder that they
can handle their funeral needs or to
discuss funeral/cemetery issues, while
acting in the capacity of LUZERNE
COUNTY CORONER/DEPUTY
CORONER) is unethical and
inappropriate. Patrick Lehman
HARRISBURG State law-
makers have a pile of work await-
ing their return to Harrisburg in
September, from redistricting
and Marcellus Shale regulations
and taxes to state liquor store
privatization, the next decade of
transportation projects and
school vouchers.
They also may finish rewriting
abortion clinic regulations, ban
texting or cell phones for drivers,
close Megans Law reporting
loopholes, make the unemploy-
ment compensation fund sol-
vent, allowschool districts to lay
off employees for economic rea-
sons and revise the Right-to-
Know Law.
Predictions are a bit easier this
year with the House, Senate and
governorship in Republican
hands after eight years of power
sharing under Democratic Gov.
Ed Rendell. But no one knows for
sure howmuchof that will get ac-
complished before Christmas, or
what other unforeseen topic
might arise in the Capitol.
The legislative agenda is al-
ways like a river, moving at differ-
ent rates, and
sometimes you
hit a period of
rapids where
things move
quickly, said
Senate Republi-
can spokesman
Erik Arneson.
Other times youre just (at) a
slow, meandering pace. Theres
certainly not a shortage of signif-
icant issues toget donethis year.
Harrisburgs legions of lobby-
ists, special interests and others
with a stake in the legislative
process are ready to supply sug-
gestions about what else might
get added onto the fall workload.
BethWinters, a lobbyist for the
state school boards association,
said one of the groups top prior-
ities is to rewrite the rules under
which districts reimburse cyber
charter schools, an issue that be-
camemoreacuteafter lawmakers
andGov. TomCorbett eliminated
the states $224 million subsidy.
Business groups would love to
see new limits regarding where
civil lawsuits can be filed, similar
to existing rules for medical mal-
practice actions.
David W. Patti, chief executive
of the Pennsylvania Business
Council, said that would build on
the newly enacted joint and sev-
eral law that means all defend-
ants are no longer automatically
on the hook for 100 percent of
damages.
I think that Gov. Corbett and
the legislative leaders who
pushed so hard for the Fair Share
Act understoodthat was Act1of a
three- or four-act play, that there
are other pieces of the puzzle that
have to come together, Patti
said.
Environmental organizations
are focusing on what PennEnvi-
ronment director David Masur
calls low-hanging fruit, many
proposals that have already been
passed by one chamber or the
other.
His wish-list includes estab-
lishing green buildings stan-
dards for energy efficiency innew
government buildings or larger
structures, passing a measure to
address nonfarm fertilizer pollu-
tion, revamping solar energy
credits and enacting legislation
regarding wind farms on Lake
Erie.
I think that for, especially,
members in the southeast or
members who want to look mod-
erate, theyre freebies, Masur
said.
The states prosecutors are
hoping to see Megans Law up-
dated to address out-of-state of-
fenders and registration rules for
the homeless, adequate funding
for the state police crime lab and
wiretapping law that better ad-
dresses modern technology, said
Richard Long, executive director
of the Pennsylvania District At-
torneys Association.
They are also monitoring ef-
forts to cut prison costs.
We just want to make sure
whatevers done does not jeopar-
dize public safety in any way,
Long said.
The American Civil Liberties
Union is largely playing defense
on such issues as new abortion
regulations, an identification
mandate for voters and immigra-
tion, said state legislative direc-
tor Andy Hoover. The organiza-
tion also supports passage of ju-
venile justice bills regarding ac-
cess to lawyers and how
underage defendants are shack-
led.
Its unfortunate that were in
the situation where we have a
Legislature that is hostile to civil
rights, Hoover said.
Joan Benso, president of Penn-
sylvania Partnerships for Chil-
dren, wants lawmakers to work
on teacher evaluation standards
that take student performance in-
to account and the health insur-
ance exchanges under the federal
health care law, and watch close-
ly as the Department of Public
Welfare begins to exercise the
broader power it was recently
granted.
If child-care subsidy eligibility
is cut, it will hurt many families
particularly those who live in
counties where the cost of living
is higher, Benso said.
County officials favor a bill that
allows all counties the ability to
eliminate the position of jury
commissioner, said Doug Hill
with the County Commissioners
Association of Pennsylvania.
The group also would like to
see increases inthe limit for man-
datory bidding on contracts, cur-
rently at $10,000 a figure that
dates back to the 1990s, he said.
The state AFL-CIO wants to
see funding for the newindustry
partnerships bill regarding
worker trainingandmore empha-
sis on job creation, said state
president Rick Bloomingdale. He
alsosees a needfor infrastructure
spending beyond transportation
projects.
Wed like to see them figure
out policies that help create jobs,
bring jobs to Pennsylvania, not to
steal jobs, not destroyjobs, Bloo-
mingdale said. Part of thats edu-
cation funding. I know thats cer-
tainly not on the agenda.
PENDI NG L EGI SL ATI ON Marcellus Shale, liquor privatization and Megans law on schedule
Some hope to add to Pa. lawmakers long agenda
By MARK SCOLFORO
Associated Press
Corbett
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 PAGE 11A
N E W S
2
6
6
6
9
3
News. Events. Captured Moments.
Reader submitted photos thats as easy as drag and drop or a simple click and upload.
Now you can create your own online photo gallery.
Start sharing your collection today at photos.timesleader.com. m.
RED CROSS BENEFIT
AT TRIPLE K SALOON
MILITARY
APPRECIATION DAY
UFBERG
MEMORIAL CONCERT
FRED ADAMS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Mendel Fermandes and Bruce Kruszka
AIMEE DILGER PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Carla Emel and 5-year-old Elijah Tatum
DON CAREY PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Cindy Levinson and Sandy Platsky
Joy Taylor and Angela Fox
Sharon Lynn and Kate Button
Charles and Janet Spar
John and Florence Gillis
Carole and Randy Greenip
Steve Libenson and Joe Mitchneck
Charlie Corker and Robert Schriefer
Dr. John Alaimo and Tara Norton
Connie Stern, Neta Ifrach and Morris Agami
Martha Kanellis and Forrest Meixsell
Staff Sgt. Kevin Walters, Lindsay Landis, Karel Zubris and Kim
Greenip with Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins mascot Tux
Steve and Sheila Seeherman with Harold Spatz
C M Y K
PAGE 12A SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
N E W S
WWW.GENETTI.COM
WWW.OYSTERRESTAURANT.COM
BED, BREAKFAST AND BIKE
Marino Marino for Congress
by $63.
Ed Mitchell, who had worked
as Kanjorskis campaign media
consultant, said he does not be-
lieve Kanjorski, now 74, will
run for a 14th termin Congress.
But Kanjorski has never told
him definitively.
And Kanjorski declined to
give a straightforward answer
that hes mounting a run when
he was interviewed by The
Times Leader last week.
I can honestly say I havent
given it any thought, he said.
Campaign spending
But his campaign finance re-
port for the second quarter of
2011 paints a different picture.
Since April 1, the campaign
has continued paying thou-
sands of dollars to various enti-
ties.
Payments to K & K Real Es-
tate, which had been written
about previously by The Times
Leader since the company is
jointly owned by the former
congressman and his brother
Peter, have increased.
The campaign had
paid the company
$500 per month for
rent of a building at
126 S. Franklin St., in
Wilkes-Barre,
throughout 2009 and
2010.
Starting this year,
the rent amount dou-
bled to $1,000, and
theres now a new ex-
penditure being sent
to K&K each month a $2,000
record storage fee.
Kanjorski said the increase in
rent, which includes utilities
costs, was necessary since the
$500 rate was probably too
low. He said the new rate is
within market value rates for a
building of that size.
Other campaign expenses
listed include:
Best Buy in Wilkes-Barre
Township, $148.38 for equip-
ment.
Staples, in Wilkes-Barre
Township, $433.41 for suppli-
es.
Home Depot in Wilkes-
Barre, $175.28 for supplies.
FedEx, of Pittsburgh,
$98.34 for shipping service.
U.S. Postal Service,
$204.86 for postage.
Verizon, of Lehigh Valley,
$1,319.18 for telephone service.
Also listed are increased pay-
ments made to Bria Battista
and K&KReal Estate since the
calendar changed to 2011.
Yet, there are no signs of a
Kanjorski run for 2012. The
campaigns website is not func-
tioning.
Typing in paulkanjorski.com
to a web
browser leads
to a website
that tells vis-
itors, This
site is current-
ly under con-
struction.
Please visit us
again soon.
The Federal
Election Com-
mission de-
clined to speak specifically on
the Pennsylvanians for Kanjor-
ski campaign.
Mary Brandenberger, a pub-
lic affairs specialist with the
FEC, said commission analysts
review each report when
theyre filed to look for irregu-
larities or to raise questions.
When asked whether any in-
vestigations are currently be-
ing made into the campaigns
report, she said without a spe-
cific name of someone who
may have filed a request for an
investigation, she could not
confirm or deny that any inves-
tigations are open.
As to the payments to K&K
Real Estate, she said as long as
market value is being paid,
theres nothing wrong with
such payments.
Brandenberger said that
while campaigns can wind
down, their accounts follow-
ing a loss at the polls or volun-
tary retirement, they are not
obligated to.
Theres no time saying
when they need to completely
dissolve the committee, she
said.
Payments can continue
Theoretically, the campaign
could continue paying Battista,
K&K Real Estate and any other
allowed expenses until its
out of money.
Battista, who is identified on
campaign finance documents
as computer operator, lives in
Moosic and has worked for the
campaign since 2009. Though
shes listed as computer oper-
ator, Kanjorski said her duties
are much more extensive, in-
cluding data entry, filing paper-
work and research.
Her first paycheck from the
campaign totaling $77 was re-
ceived on Feb. 24, 2009. Since
then, the pay has risen steadily
from $355 per week, which she
earned between April 1, 2009
and Feb. 2, 2010, to $382 per
week, which she collected from
Feb. 11, 2010 through Aug. 3,
2010. That amount rose to $412
beginning with an Aug. 19,
2010 paycheck and continuing
through Jan. 19, 2011.
Since that time, Battista,
who did not return a call seek-
ing comment for this story, has
earned $415.46 per week from
the campaign.
She does a great job, said
Kanjorski. Shes a great girl.
As of June 30, the campaign
had $81,006.13 cash on hand.
Do you know how long it
takes to wind down a 26-year
career? asked Karen Feather,
Kanjorskis long-time chief of
staff who has continued to
work with Kanjorski even after
he left office.
The campaign did make one
contribution this year to a po-
litical campaign, namely
$1,000 to the Patrick Murphy
for state Attorney General.
Kanjorski and Murphy were
members of Congress and both
lost re-election bids last year.
Murphy, who lives in suburban
Philadelphia, graduated from
Kings College and his brother
J.J. had been a Wilkes-Barre
city administrator.
Murphy, a Democrat who
lost his own re-election bid for
Congress last fall, closed out
his campaign committee last
month with no money in the
bank or debts owed.
PAC still active
While Kanjorskis campaign
committee has remained ac-
tive, the political action com-
mittee he formed that is oper-
ated by his nephew, Peter A.
Kanjorski, has not filed a report
this year.
Called Citizens for Action,
the PAC was busy in the 2009-
10 election cycle dolling out
$177,692 and raising $107,400.
One of the big benefactors from
the PAC in the last two years
was also K&K Real Estate,
which received $300 per month
for rent of the same South Fran-
klin Street building. Thats on
top of the $1,000 per month
rent the campaign also paid.
Also receiving payment was
Peter A. Kanjorski, who re-
ceived a $2,000 per month con-
sulting fee for the campaign. In
the two-year cycle that ended
Dec. 31, Kanjorskis nephew re-
ceived $50,000 and K&K re-
ceived $7,200.
In a 2007 interview, the then-
congressman said his nephews
responsibility to the campaign
was to raise funds.
CAMPAIGN
Continued from Page 1A
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Former Congressman Paul E.
Kanjorski
Do you know how long
it takes to wind down a
26-year career? asked
Karen Feather, Kanjor-
skis long-time chief of
staff who has continued
to work with Kanjorski
even after he left office.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 PAGE 13A
N E W S
Paul Kanjorski says he is a man
with many options. Hes been ap-
proached to join law firms and
think tanks, consult for various
businesses and interest groups,
andteachcollegecourses. Andhe
has plans to write a book.
Life has been anything but that
of someone whos contemplating
retirement.
While hes deciding which en-
deavor to embark on in his post-
congressional life, he must also
decide whether to put Congress
in his past.
The74-year-oldNanticokeresi-
dent sat down for a conversation
last week and each time he was
asked whether he would run
again, he would not flatly rule it
out.
He gave answers such as, I
cant say yes or no; I canhonest-
ly say I havent given it any
thought, and Im enjoying the
fresh air.
Rather than talk about the pos-
sibility hell try to regain the 11th
District House seat he held for 26
years until he was defeatedby Re-
publican Lou Barletta in Novem-
ber, the Democrat wanted to talk
about the other possibilities out
there.
Hesaidhowproudhewasof his
accomplishments andhowdisap-
pointed he is that he couldnt do
more to help the country and the
residentsof the11thCongression-
al District, which spans parts of
Lackawanna and Luzerne coun-
ties and all of Monroe, Columbia
and Carbon counties.
I drivefrommyhomeinNanti-
coke to here and pass eight or 10
different things that wouldnt be
here if it werent for my service,
hesaidwhilesittinginaroomat a
building at 126 S. Franklin St. in
Wilkes-Barre.
This 4,968-square-foot build-
ing, which he and his brother Pe-
ter own, has servedas acampaign
office, headquarters for Kanjor-
skis Political Action Committee:
Citizensfor America, andnowop-
erates as a storage area for what
he estimates are 60,000 pages of
documents and videos that serve
as a diary of his Congressional
life.
I guess I could just burn it all
andhave one hell of a bonfire, he
said with a chuckle.
Sorting documents
But insteadhe, his wife, Nancy,
his former chief of staff Karen
Feather and a campaign worker
namedBriaBattistameticulously
sort through the boxes deciding
what to keep, what to get rid of
and, if its kept, where it should
go.
Kanjorski said he believes his
records are a treasure trove for
historians and could aid colleges
in seeing how bills and projects
came to pass.
We have anobligation to doc-
ument everything and make it
available, he said.
It was a great 26 years, Kan-
jorski said between reminiscing
about playing hearts with Presi-
dent Bill ClintonaboardAir Force
One, being invited to a small
cocktail party in the second floor
residence of the White House by
George W. Bush and calling the
Armys deputy commander to
make sure his longtime friend
and colleague, Jack Murtha,
would get a plot in Arlington Na-
tional Ceremony following his
death.
His tales include his efforts to
fund hundreds of projects
throughout Northeastern Penn-
sylvania, including the Susque-
hanna River Levee System, the
terminal at the Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton International Airport
and keeping Tobyhanna Army
Depot operational.
Kanjorski, wearing a long-
sleeved blue dress shirt, gray
pants and a gray tie, says he mis-
ses the important work he did in
Washingtonbut not the70- or80-
hour work weeks.
He declined to offer a critique
of howhis successor is doing, but
noted that he made sure he sup-
plied Barletta with enough docu-
ments, phone numbers and con-
tacts and information about on-
going or upcoming projects that
he could hit the ground run-
ning.
Washington observer
He has been keeping an eye on
whats going in Washington and
makes frequent visits to the na-
tions capital.
When you spend 26 years do-
ing anything, it becomes part of
your life, Kanjorski said.
But his time since leaving the
halls of Congress has been spent
using a combination of his pre-
congressional days and the skills
heslearnedoverthepast twodec-
ades.
Ive been getting back to my
old habits as a lawyer, advising
and consulting in both law and
government, hesaid. But hesaid
as theoffers havepiledup, hes de-
clined many because hes not re-
ally interestedinany full-time po-
sitions.
I want to hunt and peck and
choose, Kanjorski said as he ran
his fingers through his thinning
gray hair.
Hes also been sought after by
multiple candidates, none of
whom hed identify, that he said
are looking to run against Barlet-
ta next year.
Thepeopleapproachedhim, he
claims, to make sure he wasnt
runningandtoseekguidanceand
adviceabout arun. Hesaidhetold
themall the same things, namely
that they should run to do some-
thing important, not just to be a
congressman, and he suggested
they wait until the state legisla-
ture redistricts the congressional
linestoseewhat district theymay
wind up in.
Redistricting factor
Every 10 years after the U.S.
Census, states are required to re-
define congressional districts.
Pennsylvania will lose one seat
in Congress, necessitating the re-
alignment.
The state currently has a Re-
publican majority in the state
House of Representatives and
Senate, andGov. TomCorbett is a
Republican. So its assumed that
the Republican-heavy districts
will be fortified.
And in districts like the 11th,
where Democrats are the majori-
typartywhenit comestoregistra-
tion, its likely boundaries will be
movedaroundtomaketheDemo-
craticleadsofteroreliminateit all
together by making a neighbor-
ing Democratic district even
more Democrat-heavy.
Christopher Borick, a political
science professor at Muhlenberg
College near Allentown, called
any possibility that Kanjorski
could run again a long shot.
The combination of his age
and his political liabilities that
helpedendhis tenure inoffice are
working against him, Borick
said.
While his political capital,
name recognition and loyalty
among long-time supporters
could mean something, he said it
would be a shocker if Kanjorski
entered the race in 2012.
Kanjorski leaves options open, including try for office
CLARK VAN ORDEN FILE PHOTO/THE TIMES LEADER
Paul E. Kanjorski, seen here in October after exiting a plane, was
en route to touring the levee system and River Common in Wilkes-
Barre.
The former congressman said
he believes his records are a
treasure trove for historians.
By ANDREWM. SEDER
aseder@timesleader.com
AIMEE DILGER FILE PHOTO/THE TIMES LEADER
Paul Kanjorski and Lou Barletta debate the issues last fall at
WVIA studios in Jenkins Township. Barletta defeated Kanjorski a
month later.
C M Y K
PAGE 14A SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
N E W S
lease, but Healey said the district had
to include several clauses in its lease
that the Wyoming County group didnt
have. He said the district has a non-
surface disturbance clause and main-
tains the right to reclaim the land for
any reason.
The school receives royalty checks
from wells producing on adjacent prop-
erties, but while the extra revenue
helps, Healey said its not enough to
cover state budget cuts.
The governors budget sideswiped
our budget, he said. We lost $2.1
million. Depending on gas prices, we
could receive $30,000 a month, but
$360,000 a year is not going to change a
$43 million budget.
Lackawanna Trail
Lackawanna Trail School District
offered 74 acres to Chesapeake Energy
Corp. for $5,750 an acre with 20 per-
cent royalties in a five-year lease signed
in 2009. The terms are similar to those
negotiated by the Wyoming County
Landowners Group, and the school also
includes a non-surface clause for its
property in Clinton Township, where
the high school is located.
Wyalusing School District, located in
the northwest part of the county, also
agreed to a natural gas lease with Che-
sapeake.
School districts in northern Luzerne
County, where natural gas companies
are looking to construct pipelines but
not well pads, have not agreed to any
leasing terms yet.
But that doesnt mean officials
havent considered the possibility.
Mark Kornoski, Lake-Lehman School
Board president, said the board in-
formally discussed whether the district
could lease its 103 acres around the
time Encana Oil & Gas USA Inc. began
drilling exploratory wells in Fairmount
and Lake townships.
Those conversations ended when
Encana could not find a commercial
amount of gas below the surface in
Luzerne County, but Kornoski said
anything is possible.
With the cuts made for education,
every school district has to look at
some way to get some revenue, he
said. It has its pros and its cons. The
money sounds good, but until they
know all the problems it could cause,
like what happened in Dimock and
Bradford County, is it really worth
putting students in danger like that?
Dallas School District Business Man-
ager Grant Palfey said he talked to
Healey when Tunkhannock Area was
first negotiating its lease terms, but
thats where his research ended.
Maybe were not even in a good spot
for that, Palfey said.
I dont know if its something we
would actively seek, but you never want
to rule anything out.
Metering stations
The district, which owns about 100
acres near Route 309, is currently the
subject of concern for residents and
parents as two natural gas companies
are working to build metering stations
within 1,800 feet of the four schools.
Unlike districts benefiting from drill-
ing, neither the school district nor the
township stands to gain any significant
income from the metering stations or
pipelines.
SCHOOLS
Continued from Page 1A
Dallas School District property,
schools in Susquehanna County
have embraced the Marcellus
Shale boom.
But there is a significant differ-
ence between the situations in
the two areas; districts to the
north are earning hundreds of
thousandsof dollarsayear inleas-
ing and royalty payments, which
theyareusingtooffset statefund-
ingcuts andtopayfor capital pro-
jects.
In Dallas, the construction of
metering stations and pipelines
comes with no meaningful boost
in revenue.
The Mountain View School
District leased96 acres of its land
to Cabot in 2009 for $5,750 an
acre, or more than $500,000. Ca-
bot is limited to subsurface activ-
ities on school property from a
well pad on an adjacent site and
the district will receive 20 per-
cent in royalties from the agree-
ment. Zick will receive 12 per-
cent in royalties from the oper-
ation.
A drilling rig on the Zick prop-
erty can be seen from the high
school parking lot off Route 106,
just above a rowof pine trees. Ca-
bot plans to drill a total of six
wells on the property, and is
working on the fourth.
Hydraulic fracturing, some-
times called fracking, when op-
erators use millions of gallons of
water and chemicals to free up
gas trapped in the Marcellus
Shale, hasnt begun on the Zick
site, but could start by August.
George Stark, a Cabot spokes-
man, estimates the Zick well will
begin flowing natural gas to the
Tennessee Gas interstate pipe-
line by the end of the year.
Strapped for cash
Schools are
strapped financially be-
cause of cuts from the
state, and if we could
get some funds from
something like this, it
would be a godsend,
Zick said.
Zick said the lease
money made it possible
toinstall anewPennsyl-
vania Interscholastic
Athletic Association-
approvedtracklast year
at the high school.
It paid for three-
quarters of the track,
which we would have
not been able to do oth-
erwise, Zick said. It
was badly needed. We
couldnt even have a
track meet there be-
cause PIAA wouldnt
let us.
Mountain View Su-
perintendent Andrew
Chichurra said the
money also was used
for anewroof ontheele-
mentary school and up-
grades to the high
school soccer field.
Public opinion said
we should have used
the money for teachers
salaries but wed al-
ready started on those
projects and couldnt
finish them without
that revenue, he said.
Drilling on school land
Twenty miles west, near Di-
mock, a school district is reaping
the benefits from a drilling oper-
ation on its own land.
William Bush, superintendent
of Elk Lake School District, said
the wells located on school prop-
erty that began production in
2009havehadasimilarlypositive
effect on the school community.
The district didnt get as lucra-
tiveadeal asMountainViewCa-
bot was able to conduct business
on 187 acres of district space for
just $500 an acre but the well is
producing natural
gas andthe district
receives monthly
royalty checks
from its two wells
and two wells on
neighboring prop-
erties.
Bush said the
district has re-
ceived more than
$700,000 to date, and the money
is being used for capital improve-
ment projects as they arise andto
keep taxes lowduring tough eco-
nomic times.
The district lost about $1 mil-
lion in state funding this year, but
theextramoneywas abletooffset
those shortfalls and keep the tax
rate steady for property owners
within Susquehanna County.
Those living in Wyoming County
saw a decrease in tax millage for
the 2011-12 school year.
Im thrilled there was no rise
in my property taxes, said Su-
zanne St. Pierre, parent of a re-
cent Elk Lake HighSchool gradu-
ate andresident of AuburnTown-
ship. This is bringing wealth to
the community.
According to state law, school
districts cannot use money from
property transactions to balance
the budget, but the royalties from
producing wells are considered a
consistent source of revenue.
No wells in sight
At Montrose Area, two proper-
ties owned by the district have
been leased at two different pric-
es to two different companies.
Superintendent Michael Og-
nosky said the district began ne-
gotiations with Alta Resources
LLCto lease a property inChoco-
nut Township in March 2009 for
$2,380anacre, andsevenmonths
later was able to nab a $5,750 an
acre deal with Cabot for property
in Bridgewater Township.
In seven months the market
just popped, he said.
Ognosky said the dis-
trict has received about
$1.2 million for its leases
onacombinedtotal of 161
acres, but the one-time
revenue hasnt been tou-
ched yet.
The district has a non-
surface clause inits lease,
like Mountain View, and
Stark said no wells have
beenplannedfor adjacent
properties for 2012 or
2013. Usingthemoneyfor
routine budget items is
off-limits, and until wells
aredrillednearby, thedis-
trict wont see any more
revenue fromthe deal.
This year the district
lost $1.2 million due to
state funding cuts and
kept tax rates steady by
not replacing 10 retiring
teachers. Because Ognos-
ky sees more cuts in the
future, the emergency
fund of lease money will
be carefully spent in the
future.
Weve been happy to
go for two years without
having to touch it, he
said. When we have to
use it, it will be for the
right reasons.
Bronson Stone, super-
intendent of Susquehan-
na Community School
District, saidsincealease
was signed with Chesa-
peake Energy in 2008, there
hasnt been any activity in the ar-
ea.
He said revenues from the
lease, whichwas negotiatedtoof-
fer 79 acres to Chesapeake for
$2,550anacre, havebeenusedfor
projects like replacing the high
school roof and installing a new
boiler in the elementary school.
Blue Ridge and Forest City Re-
gional are the two districts that
have not signed leases.
Safety at stake
Stone acknowledged the mon-
eywouldbehelpful for thesmall,
impoverished school, but main-
tained the district has the chil-
drens safety in mind. The lease
has 33 addendums, including a
non-surface clause, to control the
district land while still being able
tobringinsomeadditional funds.
Its a distant hope for this to
happen at a school where 50 per-
cent of the student body qualify
for free and reduced lunch, he
said. As longas there are nosafe-
ty concerns and the infrastruc-
ture of the campus and students
are safe, being a lifelong resident,
its a welcome opportunity for
Susquehanna County.
He also said anti-industry
groups have utilized the school
building for rallies and events,
and rumors periodically swirl
through the community about
theprogressof thedistrictswells.
During the outbreak of the
H1N1virus, or swine flu, in 2009,
the school board voted to offer
students bottled water instead of
allowingthemtodrinkfromfoun-
tains to prevent spreading the vi-
rus.
Rumors were rampant that
the schools water was bad, said
Bush. Somebody calledthe DEP
(state Department of Environ-
mental Protection) and they had
to investigate it.
Other rumors stemmed from
the replacement of the elemen-
tary schools water pump. Bush
said hes had people from New
York City call his office asking if
theswimmingpool was nolonger
usable due to water contamina-
tion fromthe wells.
Bush said Cabot has been ac-
commodating to the school on
certain issues, such as truck traf-
fic near the elementary school.
Stark said Cabot aims to work
with school districts just as the
company would a private land
owner.
Our take is we want to treat
them all equally and with the
same effort, whether its an indi-
vidual resident or a school dis-
trict, said Stark. We want to en-
sure anyquestions, needs, or con-
cerns are being met.
Limited benefits
But thebenefits arent equal for
a school district anda private lan-
downer. With huge cuts to educa-
tion funding this year, many su-
perintendents said the money
helps, but its not solving all their
problems.
Its not quite the same impact
as it is with families thats like
Jed Clampett (of The Beverly
Hillbillies), said Ognosky. For
us its not quiteas bigof animpact
with a $26 million budget.
Zick said he hopes royalties
from gas production on his land
will provide generations of per-
sonal financial security, despite
the low figure he received from
the initial lease.
(W)e didnt knowwhat was
going on and thats probably why
we signed for $50 an acre, Zick
said. Fifty years ago my father
signed for $a1 an acre with some
company and nothing ever hap-
pened, so we kind of thought
maybe nothing would happen
again. But it did.
A lifelong farmer, Zick owns
Zickview Farms, which raises
dairy replacement cows and
freezer beef cows. He said he also
raised and milked dairy cows un-
til about nine years ago when he
had two open-heart surgeries.
Drilling has been completed in
four of six planned wells, and a
compressor station, with three
1,500horsepower compressor en-
gines, is in the works to be built
this fall by Williams Field Servic-
es LLC on about 20 acres of his
500-acre property, about 1
miles fromthe schools.
In a place where farming and
quarry businesses are struggling,
Zick welcomes the opportunity
for hisfellowresidentstofindsus-
tainable work.
ThisisliketheCaliforniaGold
Rush, he said. This area needs
jobs very badly.
Cautious at home
On a drive from Susquehanna
County to Dallas Township, fresh
gravel roads every fewmiles lead-
ing to natural gas development
are replacedby signs withanti-in-
dustry messages, such as Pipe-
lines? No! andIts not worththe
risk.
Township zoning hearings
have been ongoing since Febru-
ary for Chief Gathering LLCs ap-
plication to build a natural gas
metering station about 1,300 feet
away fromthe Dallas schools.
Hundreds of parents and resi-
dents attended the first meeting
in February, when the company
had planned to build a compres-
sor station at its proposed loca-
tion. Sincethen, thecompanyhas
agreed to relocate its compressor
station and remove more contro-
versial aspects of its meteringsta-
tion, including an 8,000-gallon
mercaptan tank and a 100-foot
communications tower.
No township in Susquehanna
County has zoning laws, accord-
ing to county planner Bob Tem-
pleton, but Dallas Township
does. Officialsarecurrentlywork-
ing with two gas companies,
which plan to construct 30-plus
mile gathering lines fromwells in
Susquehanna County to connect
to the Transco interstate pipeline
that runs underground near the
Dallas schools, in deciding how
zoning laws apply to natural gas
facilities, including pipelines.
DRILLERS
Continued from Page 1A
BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Cows graze near the Zick gas well in Kingsley, Susquehanna County. The well is on the property of Jim Zick.
Signs posted near operations of Cabot Oil & Gas in Dimock Town-
ship claim dangers in the gas drilling.
Suzanne St. Pierre of Auburn Township, Susquehanna County,
says drilling money has held down property taxes.
Rumors
were ram-
pant that
the
schools
water was
bad. Some-
body called
the DEP
(state De-
partment
of Envi-
ronmental
Protection)
and they
had to in-
vestigate
it.
William Bush
Superintendent
of Elk Lake
School District
Jim Zick, owner of Zick-
view Farms in Kingsley,
Susquehanna County, and
president of the Mountain
View School Board, talks
about gas drilling oper-
ations at the Zick gas well
adjacent to his property.
He says the money drill-
ers pay to school districts
for use of their land en-
ables the districts to help
make up for state funding
losses and make neces-
sary purchases. He cites a
PIAA-approved track
recently installed at at
the high school, three
quarters of the cost of it
having been covered by
drilling cash.
To see
additional
photos, visit
www.times
leader.com
C M Y K
PEOPLE S E C T I O N B
timesleader.com
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011
F
rom time to time I receive a
query from a genealogist about
some mysterious-sounding orga-
nization to which an ancestor be-
longed.
The problem is that many of these
once-popular groups have faded into
history and now are just puzzling
names we come across in old obitu-
aries.
Take the Knights of the Mystic
Chain. An ancestor of yours who
joined this so-called secret society
with its elaborate rituals might have
left behind medallions or other arti-
facts. According to various sources, it
was founded in Reading, Pa. shortly
after the Civil War and spread through-
out Pennsylvania. By the turn of the
20th century there were six lodges in
Wilkes-Barre alone. But like many
other clubs, it died out during the
1930s Great Depression, when even
dues money could be hard to come by.
Other groups emphasized not ritual
but down-to-earth political and social
goals. At one time the Junior Order of
United American Mechanics had a
strong presence in Wyoming Valley
and elsewhere. Founded in the
mid-1800s when mechanic referred
to anyone in a skilled trade, the group
campaigned for limits on immigration
and for the protection of American
workers. It still exists, largely in the
Philadelphia area.
Women had their clubs, too. One
now-defunct national organization was
the Hancock Circle, the womens divi-
sion of the GAR, the veterans group
founded after the Civil War. These two
groups have been subsumed in the
modern-day Sons of Union Veterans of
the Civil War, which has a local chap-
ter.
How do you study up on a now-
unfamiliar organization when you find
a reference to it while youre doing
your genealogy? There are any number
of encyclopedic guides to American
clubs and societies on the reference
shelves at the larger public libraries.
You can also search online by putting
in the name of the specific group
youve discovered. To see what kind of
local presence they had, consult old
copies of the Wilkes-Barre City Direc-
tory.
Historical Question: An unsigned
email asks about the Heights section
of Wilkes-Barre in the pre-redevel-
opment years. I was wondering if you
remember there being a theatre on the
top of Market Street next to a post
office? I can remember my aunt taking
me there to see cowboy serials as a
very small child. My brothers and
sisters think I have a faulty memory.
Can you settle this debate?
Yes, unsigned, the ironically
named Palace Theatre, with just 223
seats and a storefront-type entrance
stood at 316 East Market St. for many
years. It was closed by the 1960s. Like
the other neighborhood movie houses
of its day, the Palace showed films that
had finished their runs in the larger
downtown theatres or that never
played there in the first place. It was
nicknamed (for reasons Ive never
learned) The Gick, and I sometimes
heard it called like some other theat-
res The Bucket of Blood.
There was a post office branch near-
by. Likewise, the other store names
you mentioned including a store
owned by my own parents existed
there in the first half of the 20th centu-
ry. I hope you made a sizeable bet with
your relatives, because you win.
For more on old movie theatres,
check out www.cinematreasures.org.
News Notes: If your church, club or
other organization has records youd
like to see preserved, contact the
Northeast Pennsylvania Genealogical
Society. The group has been micro-
filming and digitizing records for
years. Contact the society by email at
nepgsmail@gmail.com.
TOM MOONEY
O U T O N A L I M B
Researching
rich histories
of old clubs
Tom Mooney is a Times Leader genealogy
columnist. Reach him at tmooney2@ptd.net.
K
risten Rose is the president of the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees. She grew up in the
suburbs of Minneapolis and is a graduate of the University of Minnesota, where she
earneda degree inspeechcommunication. Rose, 47, has a daughter, Taylor, who will turn17 in
August. She lives in Clarks Summit.
Howdid you get involved in pro-
fessional sports? Out of college, I
was in radio and then television,
selling advertising. Im not a per-
son who dreamed of being in
sports, but rather a person who
sports found. I got acall fromthe
Minnesota Timberwolves, the
NBAteam, and they were creat-
inga positionthat the HRdirec-
tor, whom I knew, thought
wouldbeagreat fit. I sat down
and met with the people
there, and thought, This
could be fun for a couple of
years. And that was a long
time ago.
What did you do there? I
startedout inpremiumseating
andoversawthesuitesales andmar-
keting area. And I did a lot of differ-
ent things over the course of time. It
was one of those situations where
whenI got intoit, one thingledtoan-
other and it just continued to evolve,
and here we are some 20 odd years
later. Its been a great ride and no
two days have been alike.
Howdid youend up withthe Yan-
kees? I was with the Timberwolves
for 14 years and, after that, I co-
founded a company called Executive
League Group. I got a call from a
recruiter that the Yankees were do-
ing a national search for a president,
and for me, the opportunity to be a
part of Mandalay Baseball and the
New York Yankees was a no-brainer.
So here I am.
What do you enjoy most about
your work? Throughout my career,
its all about relationships. Its rela-
tionships with our staff, with our
fans, with our sponsors, with our
season ticket-holders ... its great to
meet so many different people and
beapart of what is afunpart of their
day.
Do you get to know any of the
players? Somewhat. The New York
Yankees handle all of the player as-
pect of things. I handle all of the day-
to-day business. But players are in-
volved in a number of charity events
that we do and client events that we
MEET KRISTEN ROSE
C
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V
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N
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D
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T
H
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I
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See MEET, Page 5B
P
HILADELPHIA Boatbuil-
der Brett Hart needed a letter
written by one of his young
workers for a YOUTHadelphia grant.
He chose Jeliel Bess, a quiet young
man who has worked in the Philadel-
phia Wooden Boat Factory for a year.
Usually, Bess doesnt say much as he
sands and helps construct the large
wooden boat flipped upside down in
the middle of the shop.
On a cold day in February, Bess sat in
the corner of the workroom to write.
Two hours later, he returned with two
pages filledwithscrawledhandwriting
and black scratches over his mistakes.
This place give you so much more to offer
than just building boats, he wrote. Even
though I learned new carpentry skills, I still
learned other things, like motivation to do
good at anything, because each day I feel more
better about myself.
After executive director Hart finished read-
ing the letter, he had to wipe tears away.
He never gave us much in terms of a verbal
response to what his experience is here, said
Hart, 35. We know he likes it because he
shows up all the time. Thats what we get. It
was astounding to see really what it meant to
him.
Boat, BuildandSail is a free, after-school, 13-
week program each semester in which groups
of 10 to 12 construct a wooden boat. Youths 12
to18 go to the factory in Frankford to learn car-
pentry, use professional tools, and work to-
gether to build nautical vessels.
But, as Bess wrote, the youths also learn life-
long lessons at the sawdust-filled shop on
Worth Street.
Thoughthefactoryis fairlynewtotheFrank-
ford area, Hart wants it to invest in long-term
relationships with youths and be a place where
they seek refuge.
The factory receives grants and donations
from corporate sponsors, individuals, and oth-
er private funders. In June, YOUTHadelphia,
AP PHOTOS
Alisha Rothwell, 14, displays a newly completed picture frame she made during free time at the Philadelphia Wooden Boat Factory in Philadelphia.
Boat, Build and Sail is a free, after-school, 13-week program each semester in which groups of 10 to 12 construct a wooden boat.
Boatbuilding in Philly
helps to steer youths
in the right direction
Members of the Boat, Build and Sail team work in the shop at the Philadelphia Wooden Boat
Factory in Philadelphia.
By ALIA CONLEY The Philadelphia Inquirer
See BOAT, Page 5B
This place give you so much more to offer than just building boats. Even though I learned
new carpentry skills, I still learned other things, like motivation to do good at anything,
because each day I feel more better about myself.
Jeliel Bess
Who has worked in the Philadelphia Wooden Boat Factory for a year and
was selected to write a letter to help obtain a YOUTHadelphia grant
C M Y K
PAGE 2B SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
O C C A S I O N S
L
ynn Dudeck, formerly of Warrior
Run, and Jeffrey Mohn, formerly of
Cherry Valley, are pleased to announce
their engagement.
The bride-to-be is a1979 graduate of
Hanover Area High School.
The prospective groomis a1979
graduate of Stroudsburg High School.
The couple has been employed by
Weis Markets Inc. for over 20 years.
Lynn has one daughter, Tara, and
two grandchildren and Jeff has one son,
Joshua.
The couple resides in Sunbury.
Awedding date is to be announced.
Dudeck, Mohn
M
s. Sharon Perry, Exton, Pa., and
Mr. Scott Loper, Manassas, Va., are
pleased to announce the engagement of
their daughter, Lacey Anne Loper, to
Richard Anthony Russo Jr., son of
Attorney Richard A. Russo, Dallas, Pa.,
and Ms. Cheryl Russo, Wyoming, Pa.
The bride-to-be is a graduate of Al-
gonquin College, Ontario, Canada, and
works as a paralegal in Radnor, Pa.
The prospective groomis a graduate
of Wyoming Valley West High School,
Villanova University and the Temple
University Beasley School of Law. He
practices lawin Radnor, Pa.
A November 2011 wedding is
planned in Villanova, Pa.
Loper, Russo
M
s. Geraldine T. Nesbitt, Dallas,
Pa., and Palm Beach, Fla., an-
nounces the engagement of her
daughter, Sara Turner Nesbitt, Wel-
lington, Fla., to Alberto Gomez, Lake
Worth, Fla.
The bride-to-be is the great-grand-
daughter of the late Mrs. Geraldine
Nesbitt-Orr and Mr. Abram Nesbitt II,
both formerly of Lake Catalpa, Pa.,
and Palm Beach, Fla. She is also the
granddaughter of the late Mr. and
Mrs. Abram Nesbitt III, formerly of
Dallas, Pa.
The prospective groom is the son
of Mr. and Mrs. Jose Antonio Gomez,
Madrid, Spain, and Lake Worth, Fla.
The bride-to-be is enrolled at Palm
Beach State College, where she is
pursuing an associates degree. She is
also involved in The Nesbitt Char-
itable Foundation of Dallas, Pa., the
Young Friends Committee at the
Hanley Center of West Palm Beach,
Fla., and with various local charities.
The prospective groom earned
both a bachelors and a masters de-
gree in exceptional student education
from Florida Atlantic University. He
works as a teacher in the Palm Beach
County Public School System.
Gomez, Nesbitt T
ogether with their families,
Talia Flanders and David Tkac-
zyk announce their engagement and
approaching marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Dan and Lisa Flanders, Dallas. She
is the granddaughter of Edward and
Evelyn Domzalski, Dallas.
The bride-to-be is a 2006 gradu-
ate of Dallas High School and a
2011 graduate of Luzerne County
Community College, where she
earned her associates degree of
science in nursing. She is employed
as a registered nurse in the emer-
gency department at Moses Taylor
Hospital.
The prospective groom is the son
of David and Catherine Tkaczyk,
Wyoming. He is the grandson of the
late Bernard and Laura Tkaczyk,
Swoyersville, and Emil and Laura
Schappert, Kingston.
The prospective groom is a 2005
graduate of Dallas High School and
a 2010 graduate of Luzerne County
Community College, where he
earned his associates degree of
science in computer systems tech-
nology. He is employed as an in-
formation technology specialist in
the Information Technology Depart-
ment at Benco Dental Company.
The couple will exchange vows
Aug. 5, 2011, at Huntsville Christian
Church, Dallas.
Tkaczyk, Flanders
A
my Rodano and Francis Crossin,
together with their families,
announce their engagement and
upcoming marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Frank and Nancy Rodano. She is the
granddaughter of Marie Rodano and
the late Joseph Rodano and William
and Clara Players.
Amy is a 1998 graduate of Wyom-
ing Valley West High School and 1999
graduate of Empire Beauty School.
Amy is a stylist and owner of Sta-
zione Salon in Old Forge.
The prospective groom is the son
of Frank and Donna Crossin, King-
ston. He is the grandson of the late
Francis Chink and Helen Crossin
and late Joseph and Eileen Schilling.
Francis is a 2001 graduate of
Wyoming Valley West High School
and a 2006 graduate of Kutztown
University. He is employed at the
Commission on Economic Opportu-
nity.
The couple will exchange vows on
Sept. 3, 2011, at the First United
Methodist Church, West Pittston.
Rodano, Crossin
B
onnie Thomas and David T.
Fitch, Dallas, will wed Aug. 13,
2011, in an intimate backyard luau
at the home of Ralph and Elizabeth
Fitch.
Bonnie is the proud mother of
Richelle J. Steele and her husband,
Joseph, Shavertown, and Amber J.
Wesley, Dallas.
David is the proud father of Da-
vid C. Fitch and his wife, Jaclyn,
Trucksville, and Sommer L. Fitch
and her husband, Bruce Bauman,
Dallas.
Together, they share six beautiful
grandchildren, Mackenzie and
Cameron Fleeger, Dallas; KaileeAn-
na and Abigail Steele, Shavertown;
Chloe Ann Fitch, Trucksville; and
Aaron Bauman, Scranton.
Thomas, Fitch
A
mber Lynn Vargo and Jason Allen
Miller, together with their fam-
ilies, are pleased to announce their
engagement and upcoming marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Charles and Lynne Vargo, West Pitt-
ston.
Amber is a 2001 graduate of Wyom-
ing Seminary College Preparatory
School. She earned her Bachelor of
Science degree from Georgetown
University in 2006 and is completing
a Master in Business Administration
degree at New York University. She is
employed by Morgan Stanley as a
risk manager.
The prospective groom is the son
of Pansy Gibson and James Miller Sr.,
Virginia.
Jason is a 2002 graduate of Poto-
mac Senior High School. He attended
Strayer University and is completing
a real estate program at Drexel Uni-
versity. He is the founder of Weekend
Oasis Vacation Rentals.
The couple resides in Shavertown
with their dogs, Oliver and Bernard.
The couple will exchange vows on
Sept. 10, 2011, at The Museum of the
Shenandoah Valley, Winchester, Va.,
and will be honeymooning in Ixtapa,
Mexico.
Miller, Vargo
S
arah Wiggins and David Saracino,
together with their families, an-
nounce their engagement and up-
coming marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Scott and Donna Wiggins, White-
sboro, N.Y. She is the granddaughter
of William and Mary Lou Barry,
Whitesboro, N.Y., and the late Ian
and Marion Wiggins.
She is a 2002 graduate of White-
sboro High School. She earned bach-
elors degrees in finance and account-
ing from Villanova University.
The prospective groom is the son
of Dave and Judy Saracino. He is the
grandson of Rita Caffrey and the late
Joseph Caffrey and Anthony and
Loris Saracino, Wilkes-Barre.
He is a 2001 graduate of Bishop
Hoban High School. He earned a
bachelors degree in accounting from
Penn State University.
They are both employed as manag-
ers at PricewaterhouseCoopers in
Philadelphia.
The couple will exchange vows on
Sept. 24, 2011, at St. Joseph-St. Pa-
tricks Church, Utica, N.Y.
Wiggins, Saracino
K
aryn Ann Pall and Sean McClin-
tick were married July 24, 2010,
at Holy Trinity Church, St. Faustinas
Parish, Nanticoke, by the Rev. James
Nash.
The bride is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Anthony Pall, Hunlock
Creek. She is the granddaughter of
the late Benedict and Mary Kuscav-
age and the late Anthony and Anna
Pall. She is also the great-niece of
Helen Bogdan.
The groom is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Bruce McClintick, Harrisburg.
He is the grandson of Norma McClin-
tick and the late William McClintick
and Blanche Gaudaen and the late
George Gaudaen.
The bride, given in marriage by her
father, chose her sister, Jodi Phillips,
as her matron of honor. Bridesmaids
were Colleen Day, sister of the
groom, and Katie Desiderio and
Lauren Letanski, friends of the cou-
ple.
Stephen Deitch and Chad Obaya,
friends of the couple, served as best
men. Groomsmen were Stephen
Kinsinger, Jonathan Rogalski, Jordan
Bock, Brian Lenker, Jonathan Yerkov
and James Martini, all friends of the
couple. Michael Anthony Phillips,
nephew and godson of the bride, was
ring bearer.
Tyler Kuscavage, cousin of the
bride, was the altar server. Betty Jane
Pall, aunt of the bride, and Jan Gau-
daen, aunt of the groom, presented
the offertory gifts. Scripture readings
were given by Jordan Kuscavage,
cousin of the bride, and Rob Berry,
friend of the couple.
The brides Something Old was
her grandmothers, Mary Kuscavage,
engagement ring, which was pinned
to the inside of her wedding gown.
Seans grandmother, Blanche Gau-
daens, rosary was wrapped through-
out Karyns bouquet. It was carried
by Blanche on her wedding day on
June 21, 1945, and was given to
Blanche by her mother, Marie
Tanghe. The stems of the brides
bouquet were wrapped in Belgium
lace which was hand-tooled by Seans
great-grandmother, Marie Tanghe.
Karyns Something Blue was a
charm engraved with the couples
names and their wedding date and
was a gift from her sister and matron
of honor. Karyns Something Bor-
rowed was Katies Nonis ring that
was worn on her wedding day in 1947
then passed down to Katie for her
wedding day in 2005. The ring signi-
fies an unconditional loving marriage
full of patience, laughter, mutual
respect and healthy children.
The male members of the wedding
party were attired in traditional Irish
kilts. At the conclusion of the cere-
mony, in true Irish tradition, Sean
presented Karyn with the McClintick
tartan representing the bride taking
the McClintick family name after
which the bridal party was escorted
from the church by a bagpiper.
Evening reception and cocktail
hour were held at the Appletree Ter-
race. A rehearsal dinner, hosted by
the parents of the groom was held at
Leggios. In honor of the brides heri-
tage, a traditional Polish poprawiny,
the follow-up party the day after the
wedding, was held at the home of the
brides parents. The bride was honor-
ed at a shower hosted by the mothers
of the bride and groom and the bri-
desmaids at the home of the brides
mother. A blessing ceremony by
Pastors Richard and Cathy Geib was
held at the home of the grooms par-
ents during a family picnic honoring
the couple.
Mrs. McClintick is a graduate of
Bishop Hoban High School. She
earned a Bachelor of Science degree
in psychology and sociology from
Wilkes University and a Master of Art
degree in elementary school counsel-
ing from Kutztown University. She is
employed by the Central Dauphin
School District as a school counselor.
Mr. McClintick is a graduate of
Susquehanna Township High School.
He earned a Bachelor of Science
degree in kinesiology with teacher
certification from West Chester Uni-
versity, and a Master of Science de-
gree in fitness and wellness from
California University of Pennsylvania.
He is employed by the Palmyra
School District as a physical educa-
tion and health teacher.
The couple resides in Harrisburg.
McClintick, Pall
K
athleen Collum and Dylan Jones
were united in the sacrament of
marriage on Dec. 4, 2010, in St. Ma-
rys Church of the Immaculate Con-
ception, Wilkes-Barre, by the Rev.
Monsignor Thomas V. Banick, pastor.
The bride is the daughter of Ed-
ward and Martie Collum, Wilkes-
Barre Township. She is the grand-
daughter of Martha Horan, Wilkes-
Barre; the late James Horan; and the
late Edward and Louise Collum,
Wilkes-Barre.
The groom is the son of Charles
and Susan Mayeski, Wilkes-Barre. He
is the grandson of William and Barba-
ra Boston, Kingston.
The bride was given away in mar-
riage by her father. She chose the
grooms sister, Tanya Jones, as her
maid of honor. Bridesmaids were
Becky Monahan and Cindy Bozek,
sisters of the bride, and Jessica Hurst
and Rachel Coffee, close friends of
the bride.
The groom chose his best friend,
Roy Henderson, as best man. Groom-
smen were Eddie Collum, brother of
the bride, and Kenny Seroka and Ben
Redclift, close friends of the groom.
The flower girl was Victoria Col-
lum, niece and goddaughter of the
bride. The ring bearer was Raymond
Bozek Jr., nephew of the bride.
Readings were given by Ed Rosser,
uncle of the groom, and Donna Schlu-
ter, godmother of the bride. Greeters
were Sandy Bender and Beth Rush-
ton, close friends of the bride.
An evening cocktail hour and re-
ception were held at the Ramada
Hotel, Wilkes-Barre. The bride was
honored at a bridal shower hosted by
her maid of honor and bridesmaids at
Andys Diner, Plains Township. A
rehearsal dinner, hosted by the par-
ents of the groom, was held at Ben-
tleys, Wilkes-Barre.
The couple honeymooned in Punta
Cana, Dominican Republic. They
reside in Wilkes-Barre.
Jones, Collum
J
uli Watson, daughter of Bonnie
Watson, Laflin, and John Watson,
Seattle, Wash., and Ryan Walsh, son
of Janet and Ned Walsh, Bear Creek,
celebrated their wedding ceremony
and reception at The Summer Cot-
tage at Hillside Farms, Shavertown,
on July 2, 2011.
The outdoor wedding ceremony
was officiated by Halleluyah Walcott,
New York, and a reading was given
by Rob Pomento, cousin of the
groom.
Bride attendants were Pamela
Watson Rivers, sister of the bride,
and Kathleen Reyes and Amy Walsh,
sisters of the groom.
Groomsmen were Vince Reyes and
Kevin Rivers, brothers-in-law of the
groom, and friends Sean Jones and
Dave DePolo.
The couple was honored at a lovely
bridal shower hosted by Janet Walsh
and Pamela Rivers and a garden
rehearsal party hosted by Janet and
Ned Walsh.
Juli is the granddaughter of Tho-
mas Flannelly, Laflin; the late Marie
Flannelly; and the late Gloria and
William Pidge Watson.
Ryan is the grandson of the late
Janet and Joseph Kane and the late
Edward and Nan Walsh.
Juli and Ryan, both graduates of
Penn State, State College, have re-
cently returned from Silverthorne,
Colo., and are now residing in Flour-
town, Pa., where Juli is studying at
Moore College of Art and Design and
Ryan is a Mid-Atlantic regional repre-
sentative for Nordica.
Walsh, Watson
M
r. and Mrs. John Malta, Moun-
tain Top, will celebrate their
30th wedding anniversary on July 25.
They were married in St Lucys
Church, Scranton, by the late Rev.
Paul P. Cottone.
Matron of honor was Susie Hun-
garter Gott and the best man was
Keigh Dwyer.
Mrs. Malta is the daughter of Rob-
ert and Margie Novak, Wilkes-Barre.
Mr. Malta is the son of Edward and
Peggy Malta, Wilkes-Barre.
The couple has two daughters,
Jonelle Kusminsky and her husband,
Matthew, Arlington, Mass., and Sara
Austin and her husband, Jason, East
Stroudsburg.
The Maltas
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 PAGE 3B
O C C A S I O N S
A
fton Nicole DeBarry and Kyle
Matthew Bonser were united in
marriage June 18, 2011, at the Effort
United Methodist Church by the Rev.
David Felker and the Rev. Robin
Fisher.
The bride is the daughter of Paul
A. and Diane D. DeBarry, Saylors-
burg. Afton is the granddaughter of
the late Stephen L. DeBarry Sr. and
the late Betty Reese DeBarry, Leh-
man, and the late Edward Pall and
Mildred Pall, Sweet Valley.
The groom is the son of Wanda and
LeRoy Bonser II, Brodheadsville.
Kyle is the grandson of LeRoy and
Mabel Bonser and Willard and Barba-
ra Snyder, all of Brodheadsville. He is
the great-grandson of Ruth Werk-
heiser, also of Brodheadsville.
The bride was given in marriage by
her father. She chose her friends,
Megan Callen, Maine, and Lauren
Finnochio, Saylorsburg, as her co-
maids of honor. Bridesmaids were
LeEtte Sadler, sister of the groom,
Effort, and Ashley Weber, North
Carolina, friend of the bride. Flower
girl was the brides neighbor and
friend, Hannah Akob, Saylorsburg.
The groom chose his brother, Le-
Roy Bonser III, Philadelphia, as best
man. Groomsmen were Zachary P.
DeBarry, brother of the bride, and
Chris Lalicata, Doylestown, and
Robert Dorshimer, Lancaster, friends
of the groom. Ring bearers were
Jaden Wilson, nephew of the groom,
and Tyler Akob, the brides neighbor
and friend.
The wedding reception was held at
the Inn at Pocono Manor. The bride
was also honored with a shower
hosted by parents of the bride and
groom and bridesmaids at the Cherry
Valley Vineyard, Saylorsburg. A re-
hearsal dinner was hosted by the
Bonser family the evening before the
wedding.
Afton is a graduate of Pleasant
Valley High School and earned a
bachelors degree in elementary edu-
cation from the Pennsylvania State
University. She is employed as direc-
tor of the day care at the Effort Unit-
ed Methodist Church Preschool/
Daycare Center.
Kyle is also a graduate of Pleasant
Valley High School and earned a
bachelors degree in health and phys-
ical education from East Stroudsburg
University. He is employed as a ma-
son for the Pocono Lake Supply Com-
pany.
The couple honeymooned in Ocho
Rios, Jamaica.
DeBarry, Bonser
B
rittany Effie Patts and Robert
Joseph Baker Jr. were united
in marriage May 14, 2011, at Holy
Family Church, Sugar Notch, by
the Rev. Joseph Kakareka.
The bride is the daughter of
Frank and Effie Patts, Sugar
Notch. She is the granddaughter
of Frank Patts, Dallas; the late
Joan Patts; and Alexander and
Mary Jane Januszewski, formerly
of Sugar Notch.
The groom is the son of Robert
and Denise Baker, Ashley. He is
the grandson of Richard Davidow-
ski, Sacramento, Calif.; Maureen
Roe, Harveys Lake; and the late
Herman and Barbara Baker.
The bride, escorted by her fa-
ther, chose Bonnie Ziomkowski as
her matron of honor. Bridesmaids
were Lisa Baker, sister of the
groom; Dayna Schall, friend of the
bride; and Kerri Garruba, cousin
of the bride. Juliana Paige Ziom-
kowski, niece of the bride, and
Carleigh Elizabeth Baker, niece of
the groom, served as flower girls.
The groom chose Stan Ziom-
kowski, brother-in-law of the
bride, to be his best man. Groom-
smen were Jim OReilly Jr. and
Jason Franklin, both friends of the
groom.
A shower was given by the
mother of the bride and aunt of
the bride at the Ramada Inn,
Wilkes-Barre. The rehearsal din-
ner was hosted by the parents of
the groom at their home. The
cocktail hour and reception were
held at the Alden Manor, Nanti-
coke.
The bride is a 2004 graduate of
Hanover Area High School and
attended Luzerne County Commu-
nity College. She also attended
The Academy of Creative Hair
Design and is a licensed cosmetol-
ogist. She is employed by Gen-
pact, Hanover Township, as a
mortgage client adviser.
The groom is a 1999 graduate of
Hanover Area High School. He
served five years in the U.S Army,
including a six-month tour in Iraq.
He is employed as a correctional
officer with the State Correctional
Institution, Dallas.
The couple honeymooned in
Riviera Maya, Mexico. They re-
side in Sugar Notch with their pit
bull/ beagle, Rocky.
Patts, Baker
S
arah Iacona and Robert Acquisto
were united in marriage on May 28,
2011, at The Highlands in Dallas by the
Rev. William McDonough.
The bride is the daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Salvatore Iacona, Harding. She is
the granddaughter of Ann Vassello and
the late Frank Vassello and the late
Cataldo and Adeline Iacona.
The groom is the son of Salvatore
Acquisto, Avoca, and Gail Acquisto. He
is the grandson of the late Jean and
Robert Eckenrode and the late Richard
and Helen Acquisto.
The bride was given in marriage by
her father. She chose her sister-in-law,
Rachel Iacona, as matron of honor.
Bridesmaids were Sandra Curry, friend;
Holly Vassello, cousin; and Sage Ac-
quisto, daughter of the groom. The
bride chose her cousin, Lily Vassello, as
the flower girl.
The groom chose Justin Iacona,
brother of the bride, as the best man.
The groomsmen were Joseph Iacona
and Jason Iacona, brothers of the bride,
and Jamie Lanunziata, friend. The ring
bearer was Justin Iacona Jr., nephew of
the bride.
An evening cocktail hour and recep-
tion were held immediately after the
ceremony at The Highlands in Dallas.
A rehearsal dinner was hosted by the
father of the groom at Fire and Ice in
Dallas the evening before the wedding.
The bride was honored at a bridal
shower hosted by her mother, Sue
Iacona; godmother of the bride, Cathy
Vassello; and bridesmaids at the Lang-
cliffe Church Hall in Avoca.
The couple honeymooned in the
Bahamas. They reside in West Pittston.
Iacona, Acquisto
F
rances Evans, a lifelong resident
of Kingston, celebrated her 90th
birthday on July 15, 2011.
Frances was one of eight children
and graduated from Kingston High
School, Class of 1939,
and worked for many
years with Meals on
Wheels of Wyoming
Valley before retiring
at the young age of
83.
She is a member of
the Church of Christ Uniting, King-
ston, and served for many years on
the Ladies Auxiliary of the Independ-
ent Fire Company.
She was married to the late Ernest
Evans for more than 35 years. Franc-
es family includes a son, David
Evans, and wife, Bonnie, Kingston;
and a daughter, Kathryn Detwiler,
and fianc, David Kovalchik, Wyom-
ing.
She also has four grandchildren,
Jessica Evans, Glenside; Jill Seitz,
and husband, Mark, New York City;
Justin Detwiler, Philadelphia; and
Sarah Detwiler, Kingston.
She has a brother, Elmer Mutz
Snyder, Enfield, Conn., and many
nieces, nephews and cousins.
Frances resides at Tiffany Court,
Northampton Street, Kingston, but
lived for more than 40 years on
Sharpe Street, Kingston.
She celebrated with a small family
party in her honor.
Frances Evans
celebrates 90th
birthday
M
r. and Mrs. John J. Hoover,
Plains Township, formerly of
West Pittston, celebrated their 60th
wedding anniversary on July 23, 2011.
The late Rev. Joseph OBrien married
them at the Immaculate Conception
Church in West Pittston, with their
wedding reception taking place at
Fox Hill Country Club.
Their attendants were the late
Rosemarie Dombroski, cousin of the
bride, maid of honor. Bridesmaids
were Dorothy Leyshon, sister of the
groom, Celestine Silipkowski and
Mary Lou Musto.
The best man was the late Leonard
Casella, cousin of the bride. Ushers
were the late Ross Mantione, brother
of the bride; Joseph Roche, cousin of
the groom; and James Musto.
Mrs. Hoover is the former Margue-
rite A. Mantione, daughter of the late
Dr. and Mrs. Rosario Mantione, West
Pittston. She was the former office
manager for Dr. Jane Hazlett.
Mr. Hoover is the son of the late
Joseph and Mary Hoover, Pittston.
He was the former comptroller and
acting dean of finance at Misericordia
University.
Their marriage was blessed with
four children, John Jr., Duryea; Cathy
Mericle, Swoyersville; Steve, Exeter;
and Deborah Wright, also of Exeter.
The have four grandchildren, Aman-
da and John-Paul Mericle and Nicole
and Matthew Wright.
Their children, son-in-law, daugh-
ters-in-law and grandchildren held a
family dinner at the couples favorite
New York City restaurant to honor
the special occasion.
The Hoovers
A
lfredandBettyHudak, Dallas,
celebratedtheir 50thwedding
anniversaryJuly22. Theyweremarried
at Maternityof theBVMChurch,
Wilkes-Barre, ina double-ringceremo-
nyperformedbythelateMonsignor
W.A. Losieniecki.
Mrs. Hudakis theformer BettyMro-
zoski, daughter of thelateJosephand
ElizabethMrozoski, Wilkes-Barre.
Mr. Hudakis thesonof thelateAn-
thonyandMaryHudak, Dallas.
Mrs. Hudakis employedat theLu-
zerneCountyHousingAuthority. Mr.
Hudakis retired. His band, TheMerry
Makers, playedfor manyyears andis
well-knownthroughout thearea.
Theyaretheparents of twochildren,
JaneTomkoandher husband, Ronald,
Blandon, andJames Hudak, Dallas.
Thecouplehas beenblessedwithfive
grandchildren, Anastasia, Ronaldand
Nicholas TomkoandSara andLauren
Hudak.
BettyandAl renewedtheir wedding
vows at St. Thereses Church, Shaver-
town, wheretheyhavebeenmembers
for 50years.
Thecouplemarkedtheoccasionwith
a grand, old-fashionedweddingcele-
brationwithfamilyandfriends.
The Hudaks
K
aydence Alexa
Miller, daughter
of Douglas and Tia
Miller, was bap-
tized at First Pres-
byterian Church of
Wilkes-Barre by the
Rev. Dr. Robert Zanicky on July
10, 2011.
Kaydence was born December
24, 2008, at Geisinger Wyoming
Valley Medical Center.
Godparents are Carolyn Rugh,
Moosic, great aunt, and Jared
Weaver, Wyoming, uncle.
Grandparents are Dean and
Darlene Weaver, Wyoming, and
David P. and Debra Miller, South
Abington Township.
Great-grandparents are Harold
and Doreen Rugh, Oil City; Shir-
ley Powell, Elizabethtown; and
Bert and Helen Miller, Harris-
burg.
A cookout and swimming party
was held in Kaydences honor at
the Weavers after the ceremony.
Kaydence A. Miller
baptized
Bloomsburg Hospital
Petroski, Susan, Red Rock, a son, July
13. Grandparents are Carol and Alvah
(Skip) Hoover, Shickshinny, and
Joanne and Richard Chesnet, Benton.
OUT-OF-TOWN BIRTHS
Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical
Center
Search, Brenda and Donald Miller, Brod-
headsville, a son, July 1.
Halat, Colleen and David, Alden, a
daughter, July 1.
Murphy-Blasi, Colleen and Michael
Blasi Jr., Mountain Top, twin daughter
and son, July 2.
Burridge, Alesia and Michael Zimmer-
man, Tunkhannock, a daughter, July 3.
Lynn, Bethany and Jeremy, Tunkhan-
nock, a son, July 3.
Pachick, Amanda, Wilkes-Barre, a son,
July 4.
Gregory, Olivia and Michael Scarlato,
Wilkes-Barre, a daughter, July 4.
Lawson, Ann Marie and Nina OBoyle,
Plymouth, a son, July 4.
Cleary, Jessica and Marcus Grzezd-
zinski, Edwardsville, a son, July 4.
Jackson, Laura, Wilkes-Barre, a son,
July 4.
Gomelko, Holly and David Smith, Wilkes-
Barre, a daughter, July 4.
Mullusky, Kimberly, Swiftwater, a son,
July 4.
Gerstemeier, Jennifer and Bruce, Tunk-
hannock, a son, July 5.
Bolton, Lyndora and Kevin Stevenson,
Glen Lyon, a son, July 5.
Thompson, Shelby, Larksville, a daugh-
ter, July 5.
Mayo, Ariadna and Felipe Velazquez,
Wilkes-Barre, a son, July 6.
Morio-Bennett, Shannon and Bryan
Bennett, Hanover Township, a son,
July 6.
Granteed, Camilla and Gary, Plains
Township, a daughter, July 6.
Skoronski, Stacey and David, Sweet
Valley, a daughter, July 6.
Rindock, Melissa and Tom, Dallas, a son,
July 6.
Budzilek, Renee and Stanley Budzilek II,
Kingston, a son, July 7.
Brady, Jacqueline, Tunkhannock, a
daughter, July 7.
Carpenter, Angela and David, Lehman, a
daughter, July 7.
Giarratano, Frances and Michael Wil-
liams, Pittston, a son, July 7.
Paff, Erin and Anthony Paff, Mountain
Top, a daughter, July 7.
Rooney, Melissa and Isaac Taylor Jr.,
Hunlock Creek, a son, July 7.
Buchman, Clarissa and Ray, Swoyers-
ville, a son, July 8.
Furgeson, Michelle and Orville, Wyalus-
ing, a son, July 7.
Gibbs, Kimberly and Eric Freeman, Glen
Lyon, a son, July 7.
Evans, Autumn and Angelo Sperlazzo,
Swoyersville, a daughter, July 7.
Haynes, Nicole and Mavis Edwards,
Wilkes-Barre, a son, July 8.
Tejada, Niurky and Felix, Hazleton, a son,
July 8.
Harrington, Laureen and Michael, Dal-
ton, a son, July 8.
Tomcho, Sabrina and Michael Wheaton,
Hanover Township, a son, July 8.
Martinez, Kristen, Hazleton, a daughter,
July 8.
Smith, Melanie and Matthew, Dupont, a
son, July 10.
Veneros, Taryn and Owen, Wilkes-Barre,
a son, July 1 1.
McRoy, Stephanie and James Hunlock,
Nanticoke, a son, July 1 1.
Munoz, Karen and Matthew Major, Ash-
ley, a son, July 1 1.
Wilbur, Brittany and Jason Knight, New
Milford, a son, July 12.
McKeel, Danielle and Robert Ball, Hun-
lock Creek, a son, July 12.
Napoli, Kristine and Nicholas Abuiso,
Tobyhanna, a daughter, July 12.
Gonzalez, Luz and William Diaz, Hazle-
ton, a son, July 13.
Pingol, Krystalline and Jose Mendez,
Saylorsburg, a son, July 13.
Kalmanowicz, Laura and Joe Kalama,
Tunkhannock, a daughter, July 13.
Territo, Mia and Jade Shotwell, Exeter, a
son, July 13.
Keller, Jessica and Richard Lloyd, Tunk-
hannock, a daughter, July 14.
Brennan, Gail and Mark Richards, Sugar
Notch, a son, July 14.
Tillman, Lynda and John, Pringle, a
daughter, July 14.
Reeves, Katie and Jeremy, West Pittston,
a son, July 15.
Mattocks, Lisa and David, Tunkhannock,
a son, July 15.
Smith, Daniela and Gary, Wilkes-Barre, a
daughter, July 15.
BIRTHS
Ryan Glenn and Kevin Moulton, both of
Mountain Top and recent graduates of
Kings College, were awarded the
Kings College Merit
Award for earning
the highest grade-
point average as
athletes of the col-
leges sports pro-
gram. Moulton start-
ed for the mens
soccer team for four
years and Glenn
participated on the
mens cross country
team. Moulton
earned a degree in
finance and account-
ing with the highest
honors, summa cum
laude. Glenn earned
a theology and
philosophy degree
summa cum laude and will continue
his studies at the University of Notre
Dame in the fall. Both men are also
graduates of Crestwood High School.
Daniel Krueger, Kingston, director of the
visual arts program, member of the
fine and performing arts faculty, direc-
tor of residential life
and assistant cross
country coach at
Wyoming Seminary
College Preparatory
School, received the
Frances and Louis
Maslow Upper
School Award for
excellence in teach-
ing during the schools commence-
ment ceremony. Krueger received the
honor in recognition of his effective
teaching, support of the academic
program and ideals of the school and
positive influence on the lives of the
students. Krueger, who joined the
school in 1994, teaches advanced
placement studio art, art history,
painting, advanced drawing, printmak-
ing, Creative Spirit and other elec-
tives. As program director he was
instrumental in developing the
schools visual arts program. He also
manages dormitory life as director of
residential life and previously served
as the associate dean of students. For
16 years he served as a Carpenter Hall
dorm parent and dorm head. He is a
former assistant tennis coach and
continues to coach the cross country
team. Krueger was awarded the Doris
Patrick Teaching Chair for the Arts in
2010. Prior to joining Seminary, he
taught art at The Winchendon School
in Massachusetts for six years. He
holds a Bachelor of Art degree in art
from Winona State University in Min-
nesota.
Joseph Russo was the
recipient of the
Greater Nanticoke
Area Elementary Art
Award. He recently
received the award
from Debbie Alba-
nese at the annual
Awards Day at the
school.
Sarah Borton, a recent Fairfield Uni-
versity graduate, has been awarded a
Fulbright Scholarship. Borton will
travel to Cyprus to study womens
roles in peace building. Borton is a
former field hockey player who gradu-
ated from the university in 2010. She
works at InsideNGO in Westport,
Conn., a professional organization
which works to train, network and
advocate for its members in the in-
ternational relief and development
community. Borton, originally from
Forty Fort, resides in Connecticut.
Kyle Kravetz, Dushore, was recently
inducted into Delta Mu Delta, an in-
ternational business honor society at
Elizabethtown College. Inductees must
be juniors or seniors and maintain a
grade point average of 3.25 or higher.
Membership in the society recognizes
academic excellence and affords
networking opportunities and scholar-
ships.
NAMES AND FACES
Glenn
Moulton
Krueger
Russo
C M Y K
PAGE 4B SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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Jack Judge said the group of car enthusiasts loved the gath-
erings. There, club members showoff their customcars and
they as well as the people who stop by, can see how others
have fixed up their rides.
Were like family, Judge said. Proceeds from the clubs
events go to one of several charities supported by the club,
such as Make -A-Wish or the Childrens Miracle Network.
CLICK: HI-LITES MOTOR CLUB CAR CRUISE
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C M Y K
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the youth advisory committee of
the Philadelphia Foundation
Fund for Children, awarded
$10,000 to the factory, thanks in
part to Bess.
In the summer, for three two-
week sessions, 24 youths with
various skill levels some from
previous programs, others newto
boatbuilding work in the shop
and plan to set sail on the Dela-
ware River and camp at their des-
tinations. While in the program,
students take sailing lessons, and
eventually they sail on day trips
in the boats they built.
The summer camps hours are
10 a.m. to 3 p.m., but youths
come early and stay late. One day
after returning from the Inde-
pendence Seaport Museum at 3
p.m., most of the youths stuck
around.
All the kids came back totally
jazzed to do more stuff, said pro-
gram director Leonard Bonarek,
36. I sat here and just watched. I
couldhear the sounds of tools go-
ing in the shop.
The organization started in
1996 in South Philadelphia and
moved to Frankford in 2009,
whenHart took over as executive
director. More than 3,000 young-
sters were involved in a canoe-
building project during the first
13 years, but in 2009, the focus
shifted to boatbuilding. The pro-
gram has since served 70 youths.
Hart, who grew up in Frank-
ford, said he wants to provide
sailing trips and other maritime
programs for the neighborhood
while focusing on helping youths
engage in a positive, educational
environment.
The factory serves all students,
but most of those coming to the
shop are from Frankford or near-
by areas. Its proximity to the
SEPTA Market-Frankford Line
helps expand its reach.
During the school year, two
groups of students work on alter-
nate days of the week. When one
group is working on boats, the
other group can be in the adja-
cent shop at a hangout spot, do-
ing homework.
Were trying to set up a place
thats quiet for students to come,
because they already want to be
here, Hart said. Our goal is to
be the organization that makes
the neighbors feel a real sense of
pride and ownership in their
community.
Hart and Bonarek interviewall
interested applicants with their
parents. Youngsters can come for
one or all of the summer sessions
or semester programs. The facto-
ry obtains permission from par-
ents and youths to see school re-
port cards.
To promote learning, youths
are asked to research a maritime
subject to present to the group at
the end of the summer session, a
component called Teach Your Fa-
vorite Subject. In the fall, Hart
hopes to create a blog where stu-
dents can write about their expe-
riences.
Bess is an example of the facto-
rys camaraderie. He graduated
from El Centro de Estudiantes in
June, but was denied admission
to the Williamson Free School of
Mechanical Trades because of lit-
eracy requirements. Hart offered
Bess a yearlong apprenticeship
taking him beyond the usual
graduation age of 18 while he
takes classes at Community Col-
lege of Philadelphia. Bess will ap-
ply to Williamson again for the
fall of 2012.
BOAT
Continued from Page 1B
AP PHOTO
Manny Colon, 17, works on his bird house at the Philadelphia
Wooden Boat Factory in Philadelphia.
do, soyoucertainlyget toknow
them. Weve got a good group
of guys.
Hobbies and interests?
Travel is No. 1. And I like to
read, and spend time with my
daughter and family and
friends. And I like to downhill
ski.
Its nice that youve got a
jobright at thebottomof aski
slope. Thats exactly right. Its
very handy.
Favorite color? Ocean
blue. Love the beach.
Music?Everything fromU2
to classical and, given my 17
year-old daughter, some con-
temporary things. It runs the
entire gamut.
Favorite city? Love New
York, San Francisco and Den-
ver. And Melbourne, Australia.
Favorite vacation spots?
Puerto Vallarta and the Rock-
ies.
Favorite food? Seafood.
Guilty pleasure? Choco-
late-chip cookies.
Always in the fridge?
Cheese.
Favorite movies? Its hard
to beat some of the classics,
whether its The Wizard of Oz
or The Sound of Music.
Favorite author? James
Patterson.
Most influential person?
My parents. I was raised be-
lieving that I could do and be
anything I wanted to be, and
theyve always been incredibly
supportive of whatever Imdo-
ing.
Favorite catchphrase? If
you think you cant, you cant.
And if you think you can, you
can. And Life is short, so you
better bemakingit count. Hav-
ing a positive attitude is a big
thing for me.
Proudest professional mo-
ment? Being named presi-
dent of the Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre Yankees, because I am
one of very few women that
are in the role, across all of the
leagues. Its certainly been an
exciting time and a terrific op-
portunity.
MEET
Continued from Page 1B
Alan K. Stout writes about area
people for the Meet feature. Reach
him at 970-7101.
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PAGE 6B SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Childrens birthdays (ages 1-16)
will be published free of charge.
Photographs and information
must be received two full weeks
before your childs birthday.
To ensure accurate publication,
your information must be typed
or computer-generated.
Include your childs name, age
and birthday, parents, grandpar-
ents and great-grandparents
names and their towns of resi-
dence, any siblings and their
ages.
Dont forget to include a day-
time contact phone number.
Send to: Times Leader Birth-
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Logan Owens, son of Thomas
and Debra Owens, is celebrating
his sixth birthday today, July 24.
Logan is a grandson of John and
Marion Hoffman, Factoryville,
and Christine Owens, Mountain
Top.
Logan Owens
Jayden Leon Knorr, son of Alexis
Knorr, Bear Creek, celebrated his
third birthday July 20. Jayden is
a grandson of John Knorr and
Shirley Spencer.
Jayden L. Knorr
Jaiden Dont Williams, son of
Ashley Simpson and Raheem
Williams, celebrated his first
birthday July 22. Jaiden has a
brother, Justus, 10.
Jaiden D. Williams
Kendra Ariel Rokitko, daughter
of Crystal Guard, Plymouth, and
Johnny Rokitko, Larksville,
celebrated her sixth birthday
July 19. Kendra is a granddaught-
er of Lori Vitack, Nanticoke;
Rose Rokitko, Wilkes- Barre; and
John Rokitko, Ashley. Kendra
has two brothers, Matthew, 9,
and Nicholas, 1 month, and a
sister, Riley, 1 month.
Kendra A. Rokitko
Jacob Martin Buczek, son of
Marty Buczek and Sarah Wargo,
Larksville, is celebrating his
second birthday today, July 24.
Jacob is a grandson of Larry and
Diane Wargo, Nanticoke. He is a
great-grandson of Joyce Craw-
ford, Kingston, and Rosemary
Etzle, Wilkes-Barre.
Jacob M. Buczek
Macie Yaworski, daughter of
Bryan and Jennifer Yaworski,
West Wyoming, is celebrating
her third birthday today, July 24.
Macie is a granddaughter of Jim
and Jane Jeffery, Wyoming, and
John and Karen Yaworski, West
Wyoming. She has two brothers,
Vegas and Toby.
Macie Yaworski
Olivia Caroline Besancon, daugh-
ter of Tracy and Karl Besancon
Jr., Wilkes-Barre, is celebrating
her second birthday today, July
24. Olivia is a granddaughter of
Debbie Besancon, Wilkes-Barre
Township; Karl Besancon Sr.,
Kingston; MaryBeth and Chester
Innamorati, Mountain Top; and
the late William Tosline. She is a
great-granddaughter of Anna
Tosline Sandt, Mountain Top.
Olivia C. Besancon
Sabrina Destiny Thompson,
daughter of Thomas Thompson,
Swoyersville, and Heather Adam-
ski, Pringle, is celebrating her
eighth birthday today, July 24.
Sabrina is a granddaughter of
Dale and Amy Adamski, Ed-
wardsville; Thomas Thompson,
Larksville; and Judy Thompson,
Bear Creek.
Sabrina D. Thompson
Coughlin High School Class of 1959 is planning a 70th birthday celebration on Aug. 6 at Konefals
Grove. Reservations should be made as soon as possible. Some of the committee members who recently
gathered to finalize the plans at the home of Bob and Pat Cole, from left, first row, are Michael Olsakow-
ski, Merritt Hughes, Florence Herzfeld Klapat, Mickie Timek Stella, Frances Lawrence Romanowski and
Bob Cole, chairman. Second row: Mary Ann Gola Magda, Patricia Kazanecki Grigaitis, Janie Fieseler Hen-
dershot, Kathleen Conwell Goldstein, Barbara Savitski Scavone, Rosemarie Smulowitz Kovaleski and Ann
Marie Zumchak Acacio. Third row: Cathy Carey Williams, Tom Young, Frank Stensney, Joe Moore and
Jack Macey.
Coughlin Class of 59 planning celebration
Nanticoke High School Class of 1965 recently held its 45th anniversary reunion at Konefals Grove. Attendees, from left, first row, are Lu-
cyle Sulewski Davis, Pat Wegosh McAndrew, Marion Saluta Maceiko, Regina Rominski Loftus, Joan Thomas Prestash, Jeannette Norczyk
Sherman, Patty Pizzarusso Cannon, Kathy Yeager Smith, Rita Kryzneski Collins, Monica Wall Lazarski, Jacqueline Leiby Domzalski, Carol
Womelsdorf and Jane Summerfield Weiss. Second row: Phil Roppa, Bernie Poremba, John Hischak, Joe Stabodzian, Teddy Wiatrowski, Joe
Stofko, J.P. Meck, Judith Ruminski Davis, Dorothy Livingston, Arnie Dudeck, Ray Poremba, Diane Gayeski Petrushka, Rich Kollar, George
Wolmelsdorf, Joe Wassel, Judy Galonoski Peters, Paul Merril, Francis Janitcki Liens and James Turley. Third row: Leonard Golemb, Walter
Orzechowski, Xavier Berzanski, Bernie Czeck, Joe Stigora, Paul Warchal, Tony Grigas, John Piontkowski, Stanley Jachimczak, Joe Timko,
Robert Sands, Lee Traher and Al Lohman.
Nanticoke High School Class of 1965 reunites at Konefals Grove
Twenty-six sixth-grade students at Dr. David W. Kistler Elementary School, Wilkes-Barre Area School
District, recently were honored with the Presidential Academic Award during ceremonies at the school.
The award is presented to all sixth-grade students who scored in the 95th percentile or higher on the
Pennsylvania System of School Assessment tests for fifth-grade math and reading and who have main-
tained at least a 90 percent average in grades four, five and six. Speakers at the awards ceremony in-
cluded Dr. David W. Kistler, school benefactor and namesake; Anthony Schwab, principal, E.L. Meyers
Junior-Senior High School; Robert Anthony, principal; and Kathy Drosey, guidance counselor. Some of
the participants, from left, first row, are David Burgerhoff, Anthony Kasper, Jacob Nargoski, Logan Do-
manski, Nicholas Campbell, Jeremy Bergold and Jonathan Teliha. Second row: Sydney Lonsdale, Forest
Nguyen, Rocco Rodano, David Nargoski, Kistler, Lauren Owca, Elise Fellerman, Christopher Pelchar and
Garrett Gagliardi. Third row: Amelia Hammond, Hannah Bolacker, Alex Kendra, Erica Manson, Brianna
Billingsley, Emily Cranston, Megan Cook, James Langan, Carson Kosloski and Ashley Chevez. Fourth row:
Drosey, Anthony and Schwab.
Kistler students receive Presidential Academic Awards
Colgate University, Hamilton,
N.Y.
Molly Gilligan, Dallas.
Mansfield University
Kevin Richardson, Benton; Dylan
Tyree, Stillwater; Michael
Babbish, Hazleton; Brenae
Edwards, Hazle Township;
Sally Reigle, Weatherly; Kelsey
Fish, Berwick; Kelley Dieffen-
bach, Dushore; Kristin Put-
nam, Dushore; Kristy Tutorow,
Shickshinny; Eric Atkinson,
Tunkhannock; Angela Bam-
berger, Tunkhannock; Torilyn
Grandinetti, Tunkhannock;
Taylor Sharp, Tunkhannock;
Ashley Valentine, Tunkhan-
nock; Angeline Abraham,
Wilkes-Barre; Ashlee Wielgo-
polski, Wilkes-Barre; Miranda
Stucker, Mountain Top; Kayla
Manahan, Laceyville; Ashley
Tewksbury, Laceyville; Eliza
Tewksbury, Laceyville; Kristin
Tiffany, Laceyville; Molly
Saravitz, Meshoppen; Joshua
Wood, Meshoppen; and Steven
Rezykowski, Dimock.
OUT-OF-TOWN
DEANS LISTS
Bowling Green State
University, Bowling Green,
Ohio
Arnold Berman, Wilkes-Barre, a
Master of Science degree in
criminal justice.
Fairfield University, Fairfield,
Conn.
Melanie A. Leo, Mountain Top,
Bachelor of Arts degree in
psychology.
Christina M. Brown, Shavertown,
Bachelor of Arts degree in
international studies.
Fairleigh Dickinson
Universitys College at
Florham, Madison, N.J.
Candice Duckworth, Drums, and
Ellen Siracuse, Kingston.
Penn State School of
Architecture and Landscape
Architecture, University
Park
Scott M. Grundowski, Dallas, a
bachelors degree in land-
scape architecture.
OUT-OF-TOWN
GRADUATES
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 PAGE 7B
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DALLAS: Misericordia University will
hold an open house for adult learners 4-7
p.m. Aug. 10 in Huntzinger Room 218 of
Sandy and Marlene Insalaco Hall on the
main campus.
The event is open to adults interested
in obtaining more information about the
universitys undergraduate and graduate
programs. It is also open to those who
have general questions about entering or
returning to college. Faculty members
and financial aid representatives will be
available for questions.
Appointments can be made for Adult
Learner Night, but registration is not
required. For more information, contact
the Admissions Office at 570-674-6791, or
go online at www.misericordia.edu/
adulted.
MOUNTAIN TOP: Crestwood High
School Class of 2001 will hold its 10th
anniversary reunion 6-10 p.m. Aug. 13 at
Kings Pizzeria, Mountain Top. Cost per
ticket is $25, which includes an appetizer,
salad, buffet-style entrees, soft drinks and
coffee. A cash bar will be available. Reser-
vations are due by Monday and can be
made by calling Charbi at 881-5317.
Checks must be made payable to Charbi
Anne Webby and must have CHS Re-
union written in the memo area. All pay-
ments should be sent to 13 Schmid Road,
Wapwallopen, Pa. 18660 by July 31. No
tickets will be sold at the door. For more
information contact Charbi at 881-5317.
IN BRIEF
Misericordia University
Misericordia University recently
announced the local students
who were named to the Deans
List for the spring 2011 semester:
Deans List: Rosalie Allan-Fufaro,
Dallas; Ambria Andrasi, Shick-
shinny; Alysia Ardo, Pittston;
Jennifer Ardoline, Courtdale;
Christopher Arnone, Wyoming;
Krista Artim, West Wyoming;
Sarah Ashford, Wapwallopen;
Autumn Aton, Mountain Top;
Wendy Aumick, Pittston; Amy
Austin, Sweet Valley; Rachael
Ayers, Monroe Township; David
Baker, Luzerne; Carrie Balla,
Harveys Lake; Robert Barna,
Dallas; Lee Bauer, Harveys Lake;
Brian Bechtold, Avoca; Catherine
Becker, Shickshinny; Justin
Behrens, Mountain Top; Stepha-
nie Bellino, Kingston; Stewart
Bender, Kingston; Matthew
Bevan, Dallas; Sean Bieski, Forty
Fort; Hannah Biskup, Wapwallo-
pen; Joseph Blakeslee, White
Haven; Katherine Blanchard,
Shavertown; Amanda Blank,
Nanticoke; Albert Blannett,
Wyoming; Alyssa Blauvelt, Pitt-
ston; Ashley Blazaskie, Shaver-
town; William Boice, Dallas; Lisa
Bolton, Trucksville; Abigail Bom-
boy, Dallas; Tracy Bonk, Wilkes-
Barre; David Booth, Exeter;
Lauren Bowalick, Nanticoke;
Amanda Branham, Pittston;
Therese Brdaric, Shavertown;
Marcy Bronsburg, Wilkes-Barre;
Brittani Brown, Hanover Town-
ship; Dino Brunetti, Mountain
Top; Katlin Bunton, Kingston;
Mike Butry, Wilkes-Barre; Amy
Buydos, Nanticoke; Leilani Ca-
brera, Wilkes-Barre; Michelle
Carey, Plains Township; Kylie
Carroll, Wilkes-Barre; Lisa Ca-
ruthers, West Pittston; Sara
Casterline, Hunlock Creek;
James Cerulli, Larksville; Kayla
Chappell, Hunlock Creek; Theo-
dore Chernyl, Larksville; Tamara
Chesneak, Duryea; Peter Ches-
ney, Hanover Township; Sarah
Church, West Wyoming; Melanie
Clabia, Weatherly; Sharon Clark,
Sweet Valley; Kaitlyn Clarke,
Swoyersville; Marisa Clarke,
Hanover Township; Jared Col-
lum, Sugar Notch; Allison Con-
nell, Forty Fort; Sharon Conway,
Plains Township; Misty Cook,
Dallas; Andrew Corbett, Forty
Fort; Kristopher Coughlin, Har-
veys Lake; Tara Coughlin, Har-
veys Lake; Kelly Cresci, Shick-
shinny; Annette Crilley, Mountain
Top; Jessica Cupano, Luzerne;
Rebecca Darling, Shavertown;
Bethany Daron, Shavertown;
Nathan Delmar, Shavertown;
Rosemarie Delucca, West Pitt-
ston; Jennifer Demaris, Shick-
shinny; Kristen Denion, Freeland;
Brianne Derhammer, Noxen;
Stephanie Do, Edwardsville;
Vitaliy Doboni, Plains Township;
Nichole Donnelly, Wapwallopen;
Andrea Dorak, Hanover Town-
ship; Karen Downs, Dallas; Mi-
chele Drago, Larksville; Shaelynn
Dragon, Inkerman; Elizabeth
Dudascik, Dallas; Jillian Dunn,
Ashley; Jillian Edwards, King-
ston; Jesse Edwards, Kingston;
Ethan Eichhorst, Drums; Erin
Evans, Kingston; Amanda Everitt,
Freeland; Bruce Fahey, Exeter;
Patricia Farrell, Hunlock Creek;
Marisa Ferenchick, Duryea;
Nicole Flaherty, Hanover; Kellie
Frazier, Hanover Township;
Katlyn Gabriele, Plains Township;
James Galliford, Wilkes-Barre;
Tracey Gavlick, Hanover Town-
ship; Colleen Gaza, Dupont;
Kristen Gazowski, Larksville;
Emily Ginocchetti, Wilkes-Barre;
Holly Goncheroski, Wilkes-Barre;
Sara Gravine, West Wyoming;
Auraleah Grega, Wapwallopen;
Andrew Gromelski, Duryea; Amy
Groner, Dallas; Elwood Groner III,
Dallas; Lois Gross, Trucksville;
Marianne Guarnieri, Pittston;
Amber Gulla, Plains Township;
Mary Gulotta, Trucksville; Kelly
Guyette, Kingston; Alexander
Harding, Kingston; Danielle
Harding, Dallas; Amy Hartman,
Dallas; Rachel Hasay, Shickshin-
ny; Sarah Hauze, Sweet Valley;
Donald Havard, Mountain Top;
Kathleen Hawk, Shavertown;
Kearston Healey, Avoca; Jacob
Hebda, Dallas; Brenda Heck,
Nanticoke; Michael Henahan,
Mountain Top; Lesley Herring,
Drums; Lisa Hill, Shickshinny;
Ellen Hoffman, Kingston; Sara
Hogan, Hanover Township; Kelly
Hooper, West Pittston; Hilary
Hoover, Trucksville; Lori Horvath,
Mountain Top; Eileen Houghtlin,
Duryea; Michael Hubley, Shick-
shinny; Shawn Hughes, Dallas;
Jody Hummel, Sweet Valley;
John Ignatovich, Forty Fort;
Michael Jacewicz, Plains Town-
ship; Amanda Jamieson, Hanov-
er Township; Melony Jones,
Hunlock Creek; Mark Jones,
Wilkes-Barre; Joshua Jones,
Wilkes-Barre; Shannon Joyce,
Avoca; Leah Kaiser, Dallas; Car-
olyn Kaminski, Kingston; Chris-
tine Karosa, Dupont; Carissa
Kasa, Pittston; April Kashuboski,
Freeland; Nicole Kazmerick,
Exeter; Rebekah Keller, Wap-
wallopen; Kayla Kendra, Moun-
tain Top; Bryan Kennedy, Ply-
mouth; Amanda Kinney, Wilkes-
Barre; Kimberly Kishel, Pittston;
Tammy Knell, Swoyersville;
Michael Kolody, Pittston; Jeff
Kowalek, Nanticoke; Sandra
Kozloski, Dallas; Joseph Kreitzer,
Plymouth; Scott Kresge, Wilkes-
Barre; Katie Kugler, Wyoming;
Marisa Lagana, Lattimer; Kaitlyn
Lane, Nanticoke; Jennifer Las-
kowski, Larksville; Jonelle Lasky,
Jenkins Township; Bernadette
Lawler, Harveys Lake; Taylor
Lawler, Harveys Lake; Ashley
Lazar, Conyngham; Joshua
Lesinski, Kingston; Candace
Levanavage, Pittston; Jessica
Lincoln, West Pittston; Lauren
Lokuta, Dupont; Nicholas Lom-
bard, Shavertown; Leigh Lough-
ran, Kingston; Kassandra Lutch-
ko, Wilkes-Barre; Maria Maas,
Dallas; January Macfarren,
Courtdale; Rachel Mancuso,
Kingston; Lisa Marso, Dallas;
Dana Martin, Dallas; Chelse
Martin, Exeter; Carol Martonick,
Drums; Lisa Matriccino, W. Ha-
zleton; Eden May, Dallas; Holly
Mayhue, Hanover Township;
Allison Mazonkey, Shickshinny;
Mark Mazur, Hanover Township;
Sharon Mazzeo, Wyoming; Col-
leen Mc Cue, Wilkes-Barre; Brit-
tany Mc Keown, Kingston; Brian-
na Mc Laughlin, Dallas; Joseph
Mccann, Plains Township; Alyssa
Mcentee, Dallas; Mark Mclaugh-
lin, Kingston; Travis Mcroy, West
Wyoming; Sarah Mellas, Moun-
tain Top; Louise Menendez,
Wilkes-Barre; Amanda Mericle,
Swoyersville; Tammy Merrifield,
Mountain Top; Mary Michael,
Sugar Loaf; Dana Middleton,
Dallas; Victoria Mihal, Wyoming;
Kevin Miller, Pittston; Michelle
Minegar, Hughestown; Sarah
Miner, West Pittston; Abbey
Mitchell, Hughestown; Alyssa
Mocion, Laflin; Nicole Monahan,
Kingston; Tammy Moore, Ne-
scopeck; Nick Morreale, Pittston
Township; Wendy Mowery, Ne-
scopeck; Kevin Murphy, West
Pittston; Nicole Najaka, Nanti-
coke; Denise Nerozzi, Dallas;
Teddy Newton, White Haven;
Cara Nolan, Shavertown; Megan
Novak, Nescopeck; Renee Novit-
ski, Dallas; Sarah Nowalis, Forty
Fort; Shaun OBrien, Glen Lyon;
Tracey ODay, Wilkes-Barre;
Kevin Odell, Dupont; Brittany
ONeill, Harveys Lake; Marina
Orrson, Shavertown; Alma Orte-
ga, Hazleton; Jonine Owens,
Wilkes-Barre; Jeannette Owens,
Plains Township; Melissa Pace,
Pittston; Maia Painter, Dallas;
Bryan Palmaioli, Plains Town-
ship; Krista Paluski, West Wyom-
ing; Susan Panaway, Hanover
Township; Andrea Pandya, Ha-
nover Township; Samantha
Panuski, Pittston Township;
Elizabeth Papciak, Wilkes-Barre;
Tammy Parise, Milnesville; Brei
Patience, West Pittston; Marissa
Patton, Harveys Lake; Lauren
Paulshock, Freeland; Amanda
Perlock, Pittston; Amanda Per-
not, Dupont; Stacey Perrins,
Dupont; Lisa Perugino, Dallas;
Sid Pesotine, Luzerne; Melissa
Petrillo, Hanover Township; Paul
Pierson, Glen Lyon; Anthony
Pirouz, Dallas; Yvette Ploskonka,
Mountain Top; Cynthia Polisky,
Mountain Top; Amelia Poplawski,
Wilkes-Barre; Joseph Pretko,
Dallas; Elizabeth Proietto, Ply-
mouth; Stephanie Pugh, Nanti-
coke; Colleen Ralston, Mountain
Top; Scott Rave, Jr., Dallas; Tho-
mas Redenski, Nanticoke; Frank
Redmond, Pittston; Jennifer
Reese, Forty Fort; Jennifer Rey-
nolds, West Pittston; Rachael
Richards, Nanticoke; Alissa
Richardson, Great Bend; Laura
Rinehimer, Hanover Township;
Rachel Rinkus, Drums; Jessica
Ritz, Wilkes-Barre; Tia Rodriguez,
Edwardsville; Andrew Roke,
Wilkes-Barre; Erica Rosentel,
Hughestown; Erin Rother, King-
ston; Caitlin Rowe, Wilkes-Barre;
Kaitlyn Rozanski, Forty Fort;
Alyssa Russick, Duryea; Joseph
Sakavage, Wilkes-Barre; Erik
Sandstrom, Harveys Lake; Hol-
lianne Sarnak, Nanticoke; Karen
Saukulyak, Kingston; Vincent
Savinelli, Larksville; Ashley
Scaffido, Swoyersville; Heather
Schlingman, Wilkes-Barre; Ar-
ianne Schott, Dallas; Kristin
Schraeder, Glen Lyon; Jennifer
Sciandra, Harding; Rose Scott,
Harveys Lake; Kathryn Sem-
cheski, Shavertown; Cara Sep-
coski, Bear Creek Township;
Heather Shaw, Swoyersville; Lisa
Sheckler, Nanticoke; Kori Shep-
herd, Larksville; Rita Shock,
Kingston; Justin Shuleski, Du-
ryea; Marya Siergiej, Nanticoke;
Suzanne Sikora, Sweet Valley;
Leigh Sipple, Mountain Top;
Robert Sitkowski, Jr., Wyoming;
Christi Skiro, Hanover Township;
Angela Smirne, Avoca; Jennifer
Smith, Shavertown; Victoria
Smith, Shavertown; Marykate
Smith, Pittston; Alayna Snyder,
Wilkes-Barre; Sarah Solano,
Harding; Rachel Soroka, Plains
Township; Kendra Spears,
Trucksville; Suzanne Spengler,
Dallas; Joseph Stager III, Dallas;
Catherine Stanski, Dallas; Brian
Stecker, Drums; Rachel Stitt,
Nescopeck; Ryan Stowinsky,
White Haven; Kimberly Suchoski,
Wilkes-Barre; Lindsay Sutkowski,
Pittston; Kerry Swiech, Wap-
wallopen; Matthew Swiontek,
Edwardsville; Marialena Tencza,
Wilkes-Barre; Barbara Thoma,
Mountain Top; Courtney Thomas,
Dallas; Stephanie Thomas,
Wilkes-Barre; Alyssa Timinski,
West Pittston; Cassie Tirpak,
Shavertown; Robert Tomascik,
Courtdale; Amanda Tomaselli,
Trucksville; Amber Traver, Dallas;
Rhonda Tronsue, Sweet Valley;
Brian Tupper, Wilkes-Barre;
Joshua Turner, Mountain Top;
Ann Turse, Drums; Alyssa Urban-
ski, Nanticoke; Abrielle Uritz,
Wilkes-Barre; Michael Vacula,
Exeter; Robyn Valentine, Dallas;
Brittany Vetrini, Shickshinny;
Kelly Vinnacombe, Dallas; Ange-
la Wagner, Sugarloaf; Paula
Walker, Pittston; Marcia Walsh,
Sweet Valley; Kimberly Walsh,
Laflin; Daniel Warakomski, Nanti-
coke; Ashlee Ward, Wilkes-Barre;
Patricia Warkevicz, Nanticoke;
Philip Wascavage, Mountain Top;
Jessica Washko, Plains Town-
ship; Caitlynn Watkins, Pittston;
Jessica Webber, Kingston; Shana
Weinstock, Dallas; Callie White-
sell, Hunlock Creek; Kristin
Whitmire, Sybertsville; Gloria
Williams, West Pittston; Maura
Williams, West Pittston; Laurel
Wolfe, Wilkes-Barre; Emily Wol-
ter, Harveys Lake; Kaytlin Ya-
chim, Dallas; Carl Yachim, Dallas;
Joan Yamrick, Dallas; Sandy
Yanchick, Noxen; Sarah Yanoski,
Drums; Scott Yarmel, Luzerne;
Eric Yashinski, Pittston; Chris-
topher Yashowitz, Mountain Top;
Charles Yavorski, Shavertown;
Gina Yocum, Hazleton; Brianna
Yonushka, Duryea; Joanne Yu-
has, Wilkes-Barre; Darnetta
Yusko, Plymouth; Jessica Za-
borny, Exeter; Jane Zak, King-
ston; Tina Zannetti, Bear Creek
Township; Steven Zielen, Larks-
ville; Stephen Zubko, Dallas; and
Adrienne Zulkoski, Courtdale.
DEANS LIST
Students from James M. Coughlin High School were recently inducted into the National Honor Society. At the ceremony, from left, first row, are Lynn Aguilar,
Michelle Diaz, Sierra Pinkney-Williams, Shahara Davis, Taylor Balucha, Dannah Hayward, Jenna Lutchko, Jessica Walsh, Shelby Flaherty, Andrea Grillini, Allison
Peck, Julie Barry, Heather Gaydos, Rosa Bartoletti, Alyssa Monaghan and Cayla Sebastian. Second row: Liana Meshko, Kara Pawloski, Cara Answini, Jordan Answi-
ni, Nicole Tirpak, Stephanie Milewski, Hannah Lukatchik, Bailey Novak, Kaitlyn Sypniewski, Kara Schneikart, Heather Pilcavage, Grace Fazzi, Madison Zamsky,
Ashley Ray and Amanda Sax. Third row: Dena Casterline, Megan Lamb, Kayla Eaton, Allison Townsend, Brittany Bella, Laura Evans, Stephanie Zedolik, Elizabeth
Long, Marissa Miller, Laphea Coleman, Ivy Nulton, Kirby Silliboy, Sara Blazejewski, Alexandra Szoke, Kayla Franckiewicz, Coreen Lingle, Erica Nanni, Brooke Ste-
panski, Kaitlin Rakowski, Julie Hughes, Summer Lentini and Ashley Austin. Fourth row: Ian Mercado, Christopher Cinti, Dominick Gulius, Jasvir Jacobs-Singh,
Kevin Zingaretti, Eric Hefffers, Matthew Miraglia, Jason Lepore, Kaushal Savalia, Jason Moskel, Eric Klemchak, Ryan Sypniewski, Logan Carroll, Troy Vannucchi,
Scott Hoffman, Anthony Panaway, Clifford Francis, Jeremy Evanko, Joseph Kubicki, Theodore Wampole, James Chmiola, Richard Poplawski, Kyle Poray, Trystin
Lamereaux, Gregory Stankiewicz, Zachery McNeill, Aldrin Soriano and John Skursky. Also inducted were Linda Obando-Wilson, Victoria Pando and Paul Scull.
Coughlin High School students inducted into National Honor Society
C M Y K
PAGE 8B SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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SPORTS S E C T I O N C
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011
timesleader.com
T
he thermometer read 94 degrees
when the game began a few
minutes past 7 p.m. Friday.
And that almost seemed cool by the
seventh inning, the way the humidity
was rising at PNC Field.
Throughout the stands, little boys
began furrowing brows beaded with
perspiration. Girls shifted around with
each passing pitch, trying desperately
to find a position in their seats that
seemed a little less uncomfortable.
Adults and kids alike tried to turn
anything they could find game pro-
grams, hats, pocketbooks into ma-
keshift fans.
Down on the field, it seemed players
werent even paying attention to the
oppressive atmosphere.
They looked to be an environment of
their own as they ran down fly balls,
charged around the bases at full speed
and never broke stride while snagging
ground balls.
Its a wonder some of them didnt
drop to the ground.
Their secret is simple.
Make sure you drink enough water,
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees out-
fielder Greg Golson said. You try to go
to the water jug as often as possible.
Or go to the shady area that runs
from the dugout to the dressing room.
Youll see a lot more guys go down
into the tunnel, for sure, said Yankees
outfielder Austin Krum, speaking of
the area that runs under the stands
between the dugout and the teams
dressing room. Guys will go down and
just cool off.
And if that doesnt do the trick, play-
ers say wrapping ice-cold towels
around their necks between innings is a
good way to prevent becoming over-
heated.
Its a wonder Jesus Montero doesnt
put ice cubes in his chest protector.
Hes Scranton/Wilkes-Barres main
catcher, meaning Montero has to spend
nine innings in brutal heat and humid-
ity wearing a mask and shin guards and
squatting behind the plate.
Its fine, Montero said.
His sopping wet uniform suggests
otherwise.
Sweat? Yeah, sure, Montero said. I
try to stay strong.
Even the strongest sometimes cant
stand up to strength-sapping heat.
Oppressive heat knows no mercy
Phillies ace pitcher Roy Halladay, a
well-conditioned workout fiend, found
himself getting sick in such heat and
had to be removed from a game last
week.
The SWB Yankees can understand
what he went through.
Some of them were taken aback by
the sky-rocketing temperatures that
greeted them recently in Columbus.
During batting practice, we were all
kind of taken aback by how hot and
humid it was, Krum said. That first
one (hot day of the season) can change
your thinking.
It can change your energy level, too.
Yeah, sometimes if its a little too
hot and you dont drink enough water,
it definitely slows you down a little
bit, Golson said.
And you thought the players really
were playing it cool.
These baseball games are three
hours long, Krum said. You do start
getting fatigued and feeling dehydrat-
ed.
Theres no way you can beat the
heat.
Actually, there is.
Having the resolve to play through it.
Thats really where the mental part
of this game is so powerful, Krum
said. If you can overcome what your
body is telling you, you can beat the
heat mentally.
Its the only way to keep going full-
speed through conditions that make
everyone else want to stop.
PAUL SOKOLOSKI
O P I N I O N
A cool head
when things
are heating up
Paul Sokoloski is a Times Leader sports
columnist. You may reach him at 970-7109 or
email him at psokoloski@timesleader.com.
Greater Wyoming Area and the
offense came to life for a 10-7
victory.
GWA advances to the state
tournament at Indiana Little
League and will open play at
5:30 p.m. Wednesday against
the Section 7 champion.
Megan Bresnahan got the
rally started with a single to
shallow center field before ad-
vancing to second base on a
wild pitch by Carbinos Morgan
Caselli. After working a 2-2
count at the plate, Lindsay Ca-
PLAINS TWP. Trailing 5-4
to begin the seventh inning of
Saturdays Little League Sec-
tion 5 junior softball champion-
ships, Greater Wyoming Area
needed to bear down and stay
calm at the plate if it had any
hope of defeating Carbino
Club.
After Drew Bednarski pop-
ped out to Carbino third base-
man Jess Regan for the first
out, something clicked for
rey dumped an RBI single into
center field to score Bresnahan
with the tying run.
Following two walks to load
the bases for GWA, Adrienne
Przybyla stroked a big three-
rundouble that hit off the fence
in right-center field. Emily
Wolfgang and Sara Coolbaugh
then batted in two insurance
runs to give Greater Wyoming
Area a 10-5 advantage that they
would not relinquish.
S E C T I O N 5 J U N I O R S O F T B A L L
GWA rallies to take section title
Six-run seventh sends team to states
By ZACH DOLEIDEN
For The Times Leader
See GWA, Page 5C
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
GWApitcher Nicole Cumbo is hugged by Nicole Turner as
Adrienne Przybyla races to join themto celebrate their win.
Tough economic times
could lead to tougher
sports schedules for some
local public school stu-
dents.
Tuesdays cost-cutting
move to eliminate sports at
West Side Career and Tech-
nology Center could mean
several sports programs in
four member districts get
bumped up a notch in the
Pennsylvania Interscholas-
tic Athletic Associations
complex classification sys-
tem.
The PIAA classifications
A, 2A, 3A and 4A are
designed to assure similar
sized schools play each
other. The classifications
are determined by enroll-
ment in grades nine
through 11 male enrol-
ment for boys sports and
female enrolment for girls.
While the same enrollment
figures are used in classify-
H I G H S C H O O L S P O R T S
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Wyoming Areas Nick OBrien, right, runs up the middle against a Pittston Area defender. Wyoming Areas classifications
in a few sports could change with West Side Career and Technology Center dropping all sports.
Decision could result in change
Other schools could be
affected if West Side CTC
eliminates sports.
By MARK GUYDISH
mguydish@timesleader.com
See CHANGE, Page 6C
NEW YORK As lawyers for
NFLplayersandownersspendthe
weekend trying to put the lockout
to rest, many fans wonder when
pro football will return. Andwhen
it does, just how ragged will the
preseason look?
Soraggedthat theleagueandits
32 teams are considering ways to
placate fans
once a labor
agreement is
completed.
The Broncos
said Saturday
they plan to
open Invesco
Field for prac-
tice on Aug. 6.
Vikings spokes-
man Jeff Ander-
son said the
team is consid-
ering a variety
of ideas.
The Hall of
Fame game on
Aug. 7is already
a casualty. Now,
the hall will
hold its annual
pregame tail-
gate party and
have Hall of
Famers on hand
for a meet and
greet. That is
one of 18 hall
events sched-
uled for the
weekend, in-
cluding the
Aug. 6 induc-
tions.
To be frank, theres isnt much
you can do other than to do what
we have, which is offer full re-
funds, Hall of Fame vice presi-
dent Joe Horrigan said. The
scheduleof eventsissofull, theres
no reason to add another event.
Theres no opportunity to use the
stadiumfor any other thing.
The players have yet to sched-
ule a vote on an owner-approved
proposal that would put the
league back in business. NFL
Commissioner Roger Goodell and
NFLPA executive director De-
Maurice Smith spoke Saturday,
and Smith has been directly in-
volved in work on the legal lan-
guage of the proposal.
The owners labor committee
held a conference call, mostly for
anupdate andtojuggle the league
calendar because Saturday was
N F L L O C K O U T
NFL says
new deal
will bring
creativity
The league will find solutions
to make up for lost time if
players approve agreement.
By BARRY WILNER
AP Pro Football Writer
See NFL, Page 6C
It would
be smart of
the league
and the
players to
do some-
thing spe-
cial for the
fans for the
first pre-
season
game or
two, at
least one
serving
each
teams
home
fans.
Marc Ganis
President of a
sports business
consulting firm
MOOSIC Hot weather appeared to be
a remedy for a cold Greg Smith Saturday
night at PNC Field.
The slumping Scranton/Wilkes-Barre
starter entered his start with an ERA of
9.00 in his last four outings.
With a game-time temperature of 90 de-
grees when Smith took the hill, he was as
hot as the weather all night.
The left-hander lasted six innings for
the first time since July 3andonly allowed
four hits and two runs as the Yankees de-
feated Syracuse 5-2 in front of 8,421 fans.
The 27-year-old, who was signed from an
independent league in June, picked up his
I L B A S E B A L L
Smith throws heat in SWB Yanks victory
5
YANKEES
2
CHIEFS
By DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
See YANKS, Page 5C
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Scranton/Wilkes-Barres Greg Smith delivers a pitch against
Syracuse at PNC Field in Moosic on Saturday night.
K
PAGE 2C SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S P O R T S
LEAGUES
Wyoming Valley Fall Baseball
League is seeking teams for
league play ages 12 through 14.
Play will start on Aug. 20. For more
information or to register, call Al at
287-1223 or 881-2626.
The All-American Girls Fast-Pitch
League will host its fourth annual
Fall League beginning August 27th
at the 17th Street Lighted Field in
Hazleton. All age groups (10u, 12u,
14u, 16, 18u, OPEN) are available,
including an open division for girls
over the age of 18.There will be
divisions for high school teams,
travel teams and recreation teams.
Players may also register as indi-
viduals and be placed on a team.
For an application or more in-
formation, contact Vince Triv-
elpiece at 570-233-3925 or 570-
788-7777 or email vince11@ptd.net.
MEETINGS
Wyoming Valley West Wrestling
Booster Club will have its meeting
on Monday, July 25 at 6 p.m., at
Kesters Bar on Miller Street in
Luzerne. All parents are encourag-
es to attend. Karaoke Night in-
formation has been mailed out,
tickets returns have been extend-
ed until August 2. If you have any
questions please contact any
board member or coach.
Swoyersville Little League will have
an emergency meeting at 7:30
p.m. Monday in the Rec Room. All
members need to attend.
Wyoming Valley West Field Hockey
Booster Club will meet at 7 p.m.
Aug. 2 in the middle school confer-
ence room. Final details for the
upcoming picnic will be discussed.
REGISTRATIONS/TRYOUTS
Holy Redeemer Junior High Golf is
beginning its fall program at Leh-
man Golf Club on Monday, August
15, at 9 a.m. Players must have a
physical form signed and returned
prior to beginning practice. In-
terested players may contact
Coach Spencer at 675-1686 for
further information. Players in 7th,
8th, and 9th grade must be en-
rolled in any one of the feeder
schools of the Holy Redeemer
system to be eligible.
Holy Redeemer Jr. High Soccer will
start conditioning Tuesday, August
2 through Thursday, August 4
from10-11:30 am. Conditioning will
also continue on Tuesday, August
9 through August 11 from10-11:30
am. Official practice will start
August 15 from 4-5:30 pm. Prac-
tice will be held at Coal Street in
Wilkes-Barre. Players are ask to
bring their own ball. A parents
meeting will be held August 15
following practice. All parents are
encouraged to attend. For more
information email npekar-
ski@gmail.com or call 570-690-
1029.
UPCOMING EVENTS
The Luzerne Merchants Associ-
ation is currently planning its 15th
annual Golf Tournament, to be
held Sunday, August 14, at Edge-
wood in the Pines Golf Course in
Drums. Registration will be noon,
and will be a captain and crew
format. The day will include prizes
for flight winners, refreshments,
golf and cart and dinner. The
organization is seeking hole spon-
sors, gifts, golfers, and teams.
Registration is requested by Au-
gust 5. For more information
contact Jim Keller at 570-288-
1004 or Dick Evans at 270-288-
8013.
Bulletin Board items will not be
accepted over the telephone. Items
may be faxed to 831-7319, emailed to
tlsports@timesleader.com or dropped
off at the Times Leader or mailed to
Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250.
BUL L E T I N BOARD
BASEBALL
Favorite Odds Underdog
American League
INDIANS -$130 White Sox
YANKEES -$162 As
ORIOLES -$115 Angels
RED SOX -$145 Mariners
Rays -$115 ROYALS
TWINS -$130 Tigers
RANGERS -$205 Blue Jays
National League
MARLINS -$130 Mets
Cards -$115 PIRATES
PHILLIES -$230 Padres
CUBS -$170 Astros
GIANTS -$115 Brewers
Rockies -$142 DBACKS
DODGER -$135 Nationals
Braves -$125 REDS
CFL
Favorite Points Underdog
MONTREAL 11.5 Saskatchewan
AME RI C A S L I NE
By Roxy Roxborough
NOTE: There will be no over/under run total (which would be the overnight total) for
all the Chicago Cubs home games due to the constantly changing weather reports
at Wrigley Field.
W H A T S O N T V
AUTO RACING
Noon
FOX Formula One, Grand Prix of Germany, at
Nuerburg, Germany (same-day tape)
1 p.m.
SPEED Rolex Sports Car Series, American Red
Cross 250 at Millville, N.J.
2 p.m.
VERSUS IRL, IndyCar, at Edmonton, Alberta
7 p.m.
ESPN2 NHRA, Mile-High Nationals, at Morrison,
Colo. (same-day tape)
10 p.m.
ESPN2 American Le Mans Series, Grand Prix of
Mosport, at Bowmanville, Ontario (same-day tape)
CYCLING
8 a.m.
VERSUS Tour de France, final stage, Creteil,
France to Paris
2 p.m.
CBS Tour de France, final stage, Creteil, France
to Paris (same-day tape)
EXTREME SPORTS
4:30 p.m.
NBC Dew Tour, Pantech Open, at Ocean City,
Md.
GOLF
7:30 a.m.
TGCEuropean PGATour, Nordea Masters, final
round, at Stockholm
Noon
ESPN The Senior British Open Championship,
final round, at Surrey, England
1 p.m.
TGCLPGA, Evian Masters, final round, at Evian-
les-Bains, France (same-day tape)
3 p.m.
CBS PGA Tour, Canadian Open, final round, at
Vancouver, British Columbia
7 p.m.
TGCNationwide Tour, Childrens Hospital Invita-
tional, final round, at Columbus, Ohio (same-day
tape)
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m.
YES Oakland at N.Y. Yankees
1:30 p.m.
TBS Seattle at Boston
ROOT St. Louis at Pittsburgh
WQMY San Diego at Philadelphia
2:10 p.m.
WGN Houston at Chicago Cubs
8 p.m.
ESPN Atlanta at Cincinnati
MOTORSPORTS
5 p.m.
SPEED MotoGP World Championship, U.S.
Grand Prix, at Salinas, Calif.
11 p.m.
SPEED AMA Pro Racing, at Salinas, Calif.
(same-day tape)
SOCCER
4 p.m.
ESPN MLS/Premier League, World Football
Challenge, Manchester City at Los Angeles
SOFTBALL
5 p.m.
ESPN2 Womens World Cup, round robin, Bri-
tain vs. U.S., at Oklahoma City
TENNIS
3 p.m.
ESPN2 ATP, Atlanta Championships, cham-
pionship match, at Norcross, Ga.
T R A N S A C T I O N S
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES Placed OF Luke Scott
on the 15-day DL. Recalled 3B Josh Bell from Nor-
folk (IL).
MINNESOTATWINSActivatedRHPScott Baker
from the 15-day DL.
TEXAS RANGERS Placed 3B Adrian Beltre on
the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Chris Davis from
Round Rock (PCL).
TORONTO BLUE JAYS Designated LHP Jo Jo
Reyes for assignment. Selected the contract of
LHP Wilfredo Ledezma from Las Vegas (PCL).
National League
FLORIDA MARLINS Optioned RHP Chris Vol-
stad to New Orleans (PCL).
Frontier League
FLORENCE FREEDOM Signed C Bobby Dom-
browski. Released RHP Andrew Chilcoat and RHP
Matt Carr.
JOLIET SLAMMERS Signed OF Tobi Adeyemi.
NORMAL CORNBELTERS Signed RHP Andy
Mee. Released RHP Wade Morrison.
WINDY CITY THUNDERBOLTS Signed RHP
Alex Thieroff.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS Signed F Vinny
Prospal to a one-year contract.
C Y C L I N G
Tour de France
At Grenoble, France
20th Stage
A 24.6-mile individual time trial beginning and
ending in Grenoble
1. Tony Martin, Germany, HTC-Highroad, 55 min-
utes, 33 seconds.
2. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC, 7 seconds behind.
3. Alberto Contador, Spain, Saxo Bank Sungard,
1:06.
4. Thomas De Gendt, Belgium, Vacansoleil-DCM,
1:29.
5. RichiePorte, Australia, SaxoBank Sungard, 1:30.
6. Jean-Christophe Peraud, France, AG2RLa Mon-
diale, 1:33.
7. Samuel Sanchez, Spain, Euskaltel-Euskadi,
1:37.
8. Fabian Cancellara, Switzerland, Leopard-Trek,
1:42.
9. Peter Velits, Slovakia, HTC-Highroad, 2:03.
10. Rein Taaramae, Estonia, Cofidis, same time.
11. TomDanielson, United States, Garmin-Cervelo,
2:08.
12. Edvald Boasson Hagen, Norway, Sky Procy-
cling, 2:10.
13. Thomas Voeckler, France, Europcar, 2:14.
14. Maxime Monfort, Belgium, Leopard-Trek, 2:36.
15. Kristjan Koren, Slovenia, Liquigas-Cannondale,
same time.
16. Adriano Malori, Italy, Lampre-ISD, 2:38.
17. Andy Schleck, Luxembourg, Leopard-Trek,
same time.
18. Lieuwe Westra, Netherlands, Vacansoleil-
DCM, 2:39.
19. Christophe Riblon, France, AG2RLa Mondiale,
same time.
20. Frank Schleck, Luxembourg, Leopard-Trek,
2:41.
Also
25. Christian Vande Velde, United States, Garmin-
Cervelo, 3:00.
29. Danny Pate, United States, HTC-Highroad,
3:30.
31. Damiano Cunego, Italy, Lampre-ISD, 3:38.
34. Ivan Basso, Italy, Liquigas-Cannondale, 3:47.
58. George Hincapie, United States, BMC, 4:49.
67. Tejay Van Garderen, United States, HTC-High-
road, 5:11.
78. Levi Leipheimer, United States, RadioShack,
5:38.
85. Brent Bookwalter, United States, BMC, 5:51.
142. Tyler Farrar, United States, Garmin-Cervelo,
7:44.
Overall Standings
(After 20 stages)
1. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC, 83 hours, 45 min-
utes, 20 seconds.
2. Andy Schleck, Luxembourg, Leopard-Trek, 1
minute, 34 seconds behind.
3. Frank Schleck, Luxembourg, Leopard-Trek,
2:30.
4. Thomas Voeckler, France, Europcar, 3:20.
5. Alberto Contador, Spain, Saxo Bank Sungard,
3:57.
6. Samuel Sanchez, Spain, Euskaltel-Euskadi,
4:55.
7. Damiano Cunego, Italy, Lampre-ISD, 6:05.
8. Ivan Basso, Italy, Liquigas-Cannondale, 7:23.
9. Tom Danielson, United States, Garmin-Cervelo,
8:15.
10. Jean-Christophe Peraud, France, AG2R La
Mondiale, 10:11.
11. Pierre Rolland, France, Europcar, 10:43.
12. Rein Taaramae, Estonia, Cofidis, 11:29.
13. Kevin De Weert, Belgium, Quick Step, 16:29.
14. Jerome Coppel, France, Saur-Sojasun, 18:36.
15. Arnold Jeannesson, France, Francaise des
Jeux, 21:20.
16. Haimar Zubeldia, Spain, RadioShack, 26:23.
17. Christian Vande Velde, United States, Garmin-
Cervelo, 27:12.
18. Ryder Hesjedal, Canada, Garmin-Cervelo,
27:14.
19. Peter Velits, Slovakia, HTC-Highroad, 28:54.
20. Jelle Vanendert, Belgium, Omega Pharma-Lot-
to, 31:42.
Also
32. Levi Leipheimer, United States, RadioShack,
1:03:58.
56. George Hincapie, United States, BMC, 1:45:16.
82. Tejay Van Garderen, United States, HTC-High-
road, 2:25:11.
114. Brent Bookwalter, United States, BMC,
3:03:47.
159. Tyler Farrar, United States, Garmin-Cervelo,
3:38:32.
165. Danny Pate, United States, HTC-Highroad,
3:45:26.
Jersey Leaders
Yellow (Overall) Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC,
83:45:20.
Green (Points) Mark Cavendish, Britain, HTC-
Highroad, 280 points.
Red Polka Dot (Climber) Samuel Sanchez,
Spain, Euskaltel-Euskadi, 108 points.
White (Youth) Pierre Rolland, France, Europcar,
83:56:03.
Yellow Bib (Team) Garmin-Cervelo, 250:57:43.
B A S E B A L L
International League
North Division
W L Pct. GB
Lehigh Valley (Phillies).......... 57 43 .570
Pawtucket (Red Sox) ............. 57 44 .564
1
2
Yankees.................................. 52 47 .525 4
1
2
Syracuse (Nationals) ............. 44 55 .444 12
1
2
Buffalo (Mets) ......................... 42 59 .416 15
1
2
Rochester (Twins).................. 37 62 .374 19
1
2
South Division
W L Pct. GB
Durham (Rays)......................... 57 43 .570
Gwinnett (Braves) ................... 56 44 .560 1
Charlotte (White Sox) ............. 50 52 .490 8
Norfolk (Orioles) ...................... 36 64 .360 21
West Division
W L Pct. GB
Columbus (Indians)................ 64 36 .640
Louisville (Reds) .................... 53 49 .520 12
Indianapolis (Pirates) ............. 52 49 .515 12
1
2
Toledo (Tigers)....................... 46 56 .451 19
Saturday's Games
Charlotte 7, Louisville 4
Columbus at Lehigh Valley, 6:35 p.m.
Yankees 5, Syracuse 2
Pawtucket 4, Buffalo 1
Durham 9, Toledo 2
Rochester at Indianapolis, 7:05 p.m.
Norfolk 0, Gwinnett 0, tie, 2 innings, susp.
Today's Games
Syracuse at Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Pawtucket at Buffalo, 1:05 p.m.
Rochester at Indianapolis, 2:05 p.m.
Columbus at Lehigh Valley, 5:35 p.m.
Charlotte at Louisville, 6:05 p.m.
Gwinnett at Norfolk, 6:15 p.m.
Toledo at Durham, 7:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Syracuse at Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Pawtucket at Buffalo, 7:05 p.m.
Columbus at Lehigh Valley, 7:05 p.m.
Toledo at Durham, 7:05 p.m.
Charlotte at Louisville, 7:05 p.m.
Rochester at Indianapolis, 7:05 p.m.
Gwinnett at Norfolk, 7:15 p.m.
Eastern League
Eastern Division
W L Pct. GB
New Hampshire (Blue Jays)... 55 44 .556
Reading (Phillies) .................... 53 47 .530 2
1
2
Trenton (Yankees)................... 52 48 .520 3
1
2
New Britain (Twins) ................. 50 48 .510 4
1
2
Portland (Red Sox).................. 40 59 .404 15
Binghamton (Mets).................. 40 61 .396 16
Western Division
W L Pct. GB
Harrisburg (Nationals) ........... 57 43 .570
Bowie (Orioles)....................... 55 43 .561 1
Akron (Indians) ....................... 54 47 .535 3
1
2
Richmond (Giants) ................. 53 46 .535 3
1
2
Erie (Tigers) ............................ 46 54 .460 11
Altoona (Pirates)..................... 42 57 .424 14
1
2
Saturday's Games
Richmond 5, Harrisburg 1, 1st game
Bowie 6, Trenton 4
Reading 3, Binghamton 2
Harrisburg at Richmond, 2nd game, ppd., rain
Altoona 7, New Britain 2
Akron 7, Erie 1
Portland 3, New Hampshire 2
Today's Games
Akron at Erie, 1:05 p.m.
Portland at New Hampshire, 1:35 p.m.
Harrisburg at Richmond, 5:05 p.m., 1st game
New Britain at Altoona, 6 p.m.
Binghamton at Reading, 6:05 p.m.
Trenton at Bowie, 6:05 p.m.
Harrisburg at Richmond, 7:35 p.m., 2nd game
Monday's Games
Portland at Binghamton, 6:35 p.m.
New Hampshire at New Britain, 7:05 p.m.
Richmond at Erie, 7:05 p.m.
Harrisburg at Bowie, 7:05 p.m.
Altoona at Reading, 7:05 p.m.
Trenton at Akron, 7:05 p.m.
New York - Penn League
McNamara Division
W L Pct. GB
Staten Island (Yankees).......... 27 8 .771
Brooklyn (Mets) ....................... 19 15 .559 7
1
2
Hudson Valley (Rays) ............. 17 18 .486 10
Aberdeen (Orioles).................. 10 25 .286 17
Pinckney Division
W L Pct. GB
Mahoning Valley (Indians) .... 21 15 .583
Jamestown (Marlins) ............. 20 16 .556 1
Batavia (Cardinals)................. 19 16 .543 1
1
2
Auburn (Nationals) ................. 19 17 .528 2
Williamsport (Phillies) ............ 18 18 .500 3
State College (Pirates)........... 10 25 .286 10
1
2
Stedler Division
W L Pct. GB
Vermont (Athletics) ................. 18 16 .529
Lowell (Red Sox) ..................... 18 18 .500 1
Connecticut (Tigers) ............... 16 18 .471 2
Tri-City (Astros) ....................... 14 21 .400 4
1
2
Saturday's Games
Lowell 7, Auburn 5
Vermont 3, Jamestown 2
Staten Island 6, Tri-City 1
Williamsport 2, Connecticut 0
Mahoning Valley 7, Hudson Valley 4
Batavia at Aberdeen, 7:05 p.m.
Brooklyn at State College, 7:05 p.m.
Today's Games
Jamestown at Vermont, 1:05 p.m.
Williamsport at Connecticut, 1:05 p.m.
Tri-City at Staten Island, 4 p.m.
Mahoning Valley at Hudson Valley, 5:05 p.m.
Auburn at Lowell, 5:05 p.m.
Batavia at Aberdeen, 5:35 p.m.
Brooklyn at State College, 6:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Tri-City at Staten Island, 12 p.m.
Williamsport at Connecticut, 12:05 p.m.
Brooklyn at State College, 7:05 p.m.
Auburn at Lowell, 7:05 p.m.
Batavia at Aberdeen, 7:05 p.m.
Jamestown at Vermont, 7:05 p.m.
Mahoning Valley at Hudson Valley, 7:05 p.m.
Pacific Coast League
American North Division
W L Pct. GB
Omaha (Royals) ...................... 54 45 .545
Memphis (Cardinals)............... 51 48 .515 3
Nashville (Brewers)................. 49 52 .485 6
Iowa (Cubs) .............................. 44 57 .436 11
American South Division
W L Pct. GB
Round Rock (Rangers) ........... 58 42 .580
Albuquerque (Dodgers) .......... 53 47 .530 5
New Orleans (Marlins) ............ 48 52 .480 10
Oklahoma City (Astros) .......... 43 57 .430 15
Pacific North Division
W L Pct. GB
Reno (Diamondbacks) ............ 60 38 .612
Tacoma (Mariners).................. 51 49 .510 10
Colorado Springs (Rockies)... 46 54 .460 15
Salt Lake (Angels) ................... 42 58 .420 19
Pacific South Division
W L Pct. GB
Sacramento (Athletics).......... 58 41 .586
Las Vegas (Blue Jays) .......... 51 49 .510 7
1
2
Tucson (Padres) .................... 47 52 .475 11
Fresno (Giants) ...................... 43 57 .430 15
1
2
Saturday's Games
Nashville 4, Iowa 1
Round Rock at Omaha, late
Memphis at Oklahoma City, late
Reno at Sacramento, late
New Orleans at Albuquerque, late
Tacoma at Salt Lake, late
Colorado Springs at Fresno, late
Tucson at Las Vegas, late
Reno at Sacramento, late
Today's Games
Round Rock at Omaha, 3:05 p.m.
Reno at Sacramento, 4:05 p.m.
Memphis at Oklahoma City, 5:05 p.m.
Iowa at Nashville, 7:35 p.m.
New Orleans at Albuquerque, 8:05 p.m.
Tacoma at Salt Lake, 9:05 p.m.
Colorado Springs at Fresno, 9:05 p.m.
Tucson at Las Vegas, 10:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
Round Rock at Omaha, 1:05 p.m.
New Orleans at Albuquerque, 2:05 p.m.
Iowa at Nashville, 8:05 p.m.
Memphis at Oklahoma City, 8:05 p.m.
Tacoma at Salt Lake, 9:05 p.m.
Reno at Sacramento, 10:05 p.m.
Colorado Springs at Fresno, 10:05 p.m.
Tucson at Las Vegas, 10:05 p.m.
Florida State League
North Division
W L Pct. GB
Tampa (Yankees) .................... 15 13 .536
Brevard County (Brewers) ..... 12 14 .462 2
x-Daytona (Cubs) .................... 13 16 .448 2
1
2
Dunedin (Blue Jays)................ 13 16 .448 2
1
2
Lakeland (Tigers)..................... 12 15 .444 2
1
2
Clearwater (Phillies) ................ 12 16 .429 3
South Division
W L Pct. GB
x-St. Lucie (Mets) .................... 17 10 .630
Bradenton (Pirates) ................. 17 12 .586 1
Charlotte (Rays)....................... 17 12 .586 1
Palm Beach (Cardinals) ......... 16 14 .533 2
1
2
Fort Myers (Twins) .................. 14 14 .500 3
1
2
Jupiter (Marlins)....................... 11 17 .393 6
1
2
x-clinched first half
Saturday's Games
Jupiter 5, Lakeland 4
Brevard County 14, St. Lucie 6
Charlotte 3, Dunedin 2
Fort Myers at Clearwater, late
Tampa at Bradenton, late
Palm Beach 3, Daytona 2, 10 innings
Today's Games
Brevard County at St. Lucie, 10:30 a.m., 1st game
Fort Myers at Clearwater, 1 p.m.
Brevard County at St. Lucie, 1 p.m., 2nd game
Lakeland at Jupiter, 5 p.m.
Tampa at Bradenton, 5 p.m.
Dunedin at Charlotte, 5:30 p.m.
Palm Beach at Daytona, 5:35 p.m.
S O C C E R
Major League Soccer
EASTERN CONFERENCE
.................................................. W L T Pts GF GA
Philadelphia............................ 8 4 7 31 24 16
New York ................................ 6 512 30 37 30
Columbus................................ 7 6 7 28 21 20
Houston................................... 5 6 9 24 24 23
Sporting Kansas City............. 5 6 8 23 24 25
D.C........................................... 5 6 8 23 24 30
New England.......................... 4 9 7 19 17 27
Chicago................................... 2 612 18 20 25
Toronto FC ............................. 310 9 18 17 37
WESTERN CONFERENCE
.................................................. W L T Pts GF GA
Los Angeles............................ 11 2 9 42 28 16
FC Dallas ................................ 11 5 6 39 29 21
Seattle...................................... 10 4 8 38 32 23
Real Salt Lake........................ 8 3 6 30 23 12
Colorado ................................. 7 6 9 30 29 28
San Jose ................................. 5 6 9 24 24 23
Chivas USA............................ 5 7 8 23 24 23
Portland................................... 6 9 3 21 22 31
Vancouver............................... 210 9 15 21 30
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
Wednesday's Games
New England 1, D.C. United 0
FC Dallas 1, Toronto FC 0
Colorado 4, New York 1
Los Angeles 1, Columbus 0
San Jose 2, Vancouver 2, tie
Saturday's Games
New York 2, FC Dallas 2, tie
Portland at Columbus, late
Toronto FC at Sporting Kansas City, late
New England at Colorado, late
San Jose at Real Salt Lake, late
Houston at Chivas USA, late
Wednesday, July 27
Manchester United at MLS All Stars, 8:30 p.m.
Friday, July 29
Colorado at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, July 30
Los Angeles at Vancouver, 7:30 p.m.
New England at Sporting Kansas City, 8:30 p.m.
Seattle FC at Houston, 8:30 p.m.
Columbus at Real Salt Lake, 9 p.m.
D.C. United at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Toronto FC at Portland, 11 p.m.
Sunday, July 31
Chivas USA at FC Dallas, 7 p.m.
Women's Professional Soccer
W L T Pts GF GA
Philadelphia ................. 8 3 3 27 26 15
Western New York...... 8 2 2 26 26 13
Sky Blue FC................. 4 5 4 16 18 18
magicJack.................... 5 5 2 16 17 22
Boston........................... 4 5 3 15 14 13
Atlanta........................... 1 10 4 7 7 27
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
Wednesday's Games
Western New York 3, magicJack 1
Saturday's Games
Atlanta 0, magicJack 0, tie
Sky Blue FC 2, Philadelphia 0
Today's Games
Western New York at Boston, 6 p.m.
Wednesday, July 27
Sky Blue FC at magicJack, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Boston, 7 p.m.
Saturday, July 30
G O L F
PGA Tour
RBC Canadian Open
Saturday
At Shaughnessy Golf and Country Club
Vancouver, British Columbia
Purse: $5.2 million
Yardage: 7,010; Par: 70
Third Round
a-amateur
Bo Van Pelt ........................................68-72-65205
Adam Hadwin....................................72-66-68206
Andres Romero.................................72-68-67207
Kris Blanks.........................................67-71-69207
Sean OHair .......................................69-73-66208
John Daly...........................................70-71-67208
Aron Price..........................................68-71-69208
Geoff Ogilvy.......................................70-68-70208
Bud Cauley ........................................69-72-68209
Ryan Moore .......................................73-69-67209
David Mathis ......................................71-69-69209
Scott Piercy .......................................70-70-70210
Keegan Bradley.................................70-70-70210
Jerry Kelly ..........................................71-67-72210
Chad Campbell .................................69-67-74210
Michael Thompson...........................70-66-74210
Matt Bettencourt ................................70-72-69211
Woody Austin ....................................68-75-68211
Spencer Levin ...................................73-66-72211
Cameron Tringale.............................73-66-72211
a-Patrick Cantlay ...............................72-71-68211
Scott McCarron.................................74-65-72211
Charl Schwartzel...............................71-67-73211
Tommy Gainey..................................77-65-70212
Paul Stankowski ................................72-70-70212
Lucas Glover .....................................69-70-73212
David Hearn.......................................70-68-74212
Rickie Fowler.....................................69-69-74212
Paul Goydos ......................................68-69-75212
Bill Lunde ...........................................68-74-71213
Scott Stallings ...................................71-71-71213
Morgan Hoffmann .............................70-70-73213
Colt Knost ..........................................72-68-73213
Lee Janzen ........................................69-68-76213
Ben Martin .........................................68-74-72214
Brett Quigley......................................68-74-72214
Chez Reavie......................................70-71-73214
Josh Teater ........................................74-67-73214
Greg Chalmers..................................72-70-72214
Charlie Wi ..........................................73-70-71214
Pat Perez............................................74-69-71214
Jarrod Lyle.........................................72-67-75214
Ben Crane..........................................69-70-75214
Kevin Streelman................................73-71-70214
Marc Turnesa....................................71-71-73215
Matt McQuillan...................................68-73-74215
Hunter Mahan....................................70-72-73215
Kevin Kisner ......................................68-72-75215
Kevin Chappell ..................................73-70-72215
Luke Donald ......................................70-73-72215
Chris DiMarco ...................................70-73-72215
Chris Stroud.......................................73-71-71215
Ernie Els.............................................68-74-74216
Kevin Na.............................................69-72-75216
Kevin Stadler .....................................72-69-75216
Bio Kim...............................................75-67-74216
Steve Flesch......................................72-68-76216
Jimmy Walker....................................68-75-73216
William McGirt ...................................74-69-73216
Peter Lonard......................................73-70-73216
Jim Furyk ...........................................74-70-72216
Alexandre Rocha ..............................76-68-72216
Joe Durant .........................................71-70-76217
Briny Baird..........................................72-71-74217
Brian Gay............................................73-71-73217
Justin Leonard...................................73-70-75218
Martin Piller........................................71-72-75218
D.J. Brigman......................................70-74-75219
Shane Bertsch...................................72-70-78220
Dustin Risdon....................................75-69-76220
Brad Fritsch .......................................71-70-80221
Frank Lickliter II .................................74-70-77221
Will MacKenzie .................................74-69-79222
Nathan Green ....................................70-74-78222
Chris Tidland......................................77-67-79223
Fabian Gomez...................................73-71-79223
Nordea Masters
At Bro Hof Slott Golf Club
Stockholm
Purse: $2.11 million
Yardage: 7,603; Par: 72
Third Round
Alexander Noren, Sweden ..............67-66-63196
Bubba Watson, United States..........71-67-69207
Christian Nilsson, Sweden ..............73-69-66208
Jaco Van Zyl, South Africa ..............67-71-70208
Jamie Donaldson, Wales.................73-70-67210
Scott Strange, Australia ...................71-71-68210
Jeev Milkha Singh, India..................70-71-69210
Pablo Martin, Spain..........................69-72-69210
Noh Seung-yul, South Korea..........73-68-69210
Niklas Lemke, Sweden ....................68-72-70210
Scott Hend, Australia........................69-70-71210
Scott Jamieson, Scotland ................73-71-67211
Dustin Johnson, United States........73-71-67211
Daniel Vancsik, Argentina................70-73-68211
John Parry, England.........................68-73-70211
Lorenzo Gagli, Italy ..........................68-73-70211
Tano Goya, Argentina......................71-70-70211
Richard Finch, England....................69-72-70211
Jeppe Huldahl, Denmark.................73-68-70211
Anthony Wall, England.....................69-70-72211
Robert Karlsson, Sweden ...............69-70-72211
Also
Scott Pinckney, United States.........73-72-70215
M L B
Baseball Hall of Fame
Year-by-Year Inductees
Year-by-year inductees to the Major League Base-
ball Hall of Fame (BBWAA: Elected by the Baseball
Writers Association of America; VC: Elected by the
Veterans Committee; NL: Elected by the Veterans
Committee based on Negro league career; SCNL:
Elected by the special committee on the Negro
Leagues and the Pre-Negro League):
2011 BBWAA: Roberto Alomar, Bert Blyleven.
VC: Pat Gillick.
2010 BBWAA: Andre Dawson. VC: Whitey Her-
zog, Doug Harvey.
2009 BBWAA: Rickey Henderson, JimRice. VC:
Joe Gordon.
2008 BBWAA: Goose Gossage. VC: Barney
Dreyfuss, Bowie Kuhn, Walter OMalley, Billy
Southworth, Dick Williams.
2007 BBWAA: Tony Gwynn, Cal Ripken Jr.
2006 BBWAA: Bruce Sutter. SCNL: Ray Brown,
WillardBrown, Andy Cooper, Frank Grant, PeteHill,
Biz Mackey, Effa Manley, Jose Mendez, Alex Pom-
pez, Cum Posey, Louis Santop, Mule Suttles, Ben
Taylor, Cristobal Torriente, Sol White, J.L. Wilkin-
son, Jud Wilson.
2005 BBWAA: Wade Boggs, Ryne Sandberg.
2004 BBWAA: Dennis Eckersley, Paul Molitor.
2003 BBWAA: Gary Carter, Eddie Murray.
2002 BBWAA: Ozzie Smith.
2001BBWAA: Kirby Puckett, Dave Winfield. VC:
Bill Mazeroski. NL: Hilton Smith.
2000 BBWAA: Carlton Fisk, Tony Perez. VC:
Sparky Anderson, Bid McPhee. NL: Turkey
Stearnes.
1999 BBWAA: George Brett, Nolan Ryan, Robin
Yount. VC: Orlando Cepeda, Nestor Chylak, Frank
Selee. NL: Smokey Joe Williams.
1998 BBWAA: Don Sutton. VC: George Davis,
Larry Doby, Lee MacPhail. NL: Bullet Joe Rogan.
1997 BBWAA: Phil Niekro. VC: Nellie Fox, Tom-
my Lasorda. NL: Willie Wells.
1996 VC: Jim Bunning, Ned Hanlon, Earl Weav-
er. NL: Bill Foster.
1995 BBWAA: Mike Schmidt. VC: Richie Ash-
burn, William Hulbert, Vic Willis. NL: Leon Day.
1994 BBWAA: Steve Carlton. VC: Leo Durocher,
Phil Rizzuto.
1993 BBWAA: Reggie Jackson.
1992 BBWAA: Rollie Fingers, Tom Seaver. VC:
Bill McGowan, Hal Newhouser.
1991 BBWAA: Rod Carew, Ferguson Jenkins,
Gaylord Perry. VC: Tony Lazzeri, Bill Veeck.
1990 BBWAA: Joe Morgan, Jim Palmer.
1989 BBWAA: Johnny Bench, Carl Yastrzemski.
VC: Al Barlick, Red Schoendienst.
1988 BBWAA: Willie Stargell.
1987 BBWAA: Catfish Hunter, Billy Williams. NL:
Ray Dandridge.
1986 BBWAA: Willie McCovey. VC: Bobby
Doerr, Ernie Lombardi.
1985 BBWAA: Lou Brock, Hoyt Wilhelm. VC:
Enos Slaughter, Arky Vaughan.
1984 BBWAA: Luis Aparicio, Don Drysdale, Har-
mon Killebrew. VC: Rick Ferrell, Pee Wee Reese.
1983 BBWAA: Juan Marichal, Brooks Robinson.
VC: Walter Alston, George Kell.
1982 BBWAA: Hank Aaron, Frank Robinson. VC:
Happy Chandler, Travis Jackson.
1981 BBWAA: Bob Gibson. VC: Rube Foster,
Johny Mize.
1980 BBWAA: Al Kaline, Duke Snider. VC:
Chuck Klein, Tom Yawkey.
1979 BBWAA: Willie Mays. VC: Warren Giles,
Hack Wilson.
1978 BBWAA: Eddie Mathews. VC: Addie Joss,
Larry MacPhail.
1977 BBWAA: Ernie Banks. VC: Al Lopez, Amos
Rusie, Joe Sewell. NL: Martin DiHigo, Pop Lloyd.
1976 BBWAA: Bob Lemon, Robin Roberts. VC:
Roger Connor, Cal Hubbard, Fred Lindstrom. NL:
Oscar Charleston.
1975 BBWAA: Ralph Kiner. VC: Earl Averill,
Bucky Harris, Billy Herman. NL: Judy Johnson.
1974 BBWAA: Whitey Ford, Mickey Mantle. VC:
JimBottomley, Jocko Conlan, SamThompson. NL:
Cool Papa Bell.
1973 BBWAA: Roberto Clemente, Warren
Spahn. VC: Billy Evans, George Kelly, Mickey
Welch. NL: Monte Irvin.
1972 BBWAA: Yogi Berra, Sandy Koufax, Early
Wynn. VC: Lefty Gomez, Will Harridge, Ross
Youngs. NL: Josh Gibson, Buck Leonard.
1971 VC: Dave Bancroft, Jake Beckley, Chick
Hafey, Harry Hooper, Joe Kelley, Rube Marquard,
George Weiss. NL: Satchel Paige.
1970 BBWAA: Lou Boudreau. VC: Earle Combs,
Ford Frick, Jesse Haines.
1969 BBWAA: Roy Campanella, Stan Musial.
VC: Stan Coveleski, Waite Hoyt.
1968 BBWAA: Joe Medwick. VC: Kiki Cuyler,
Goose Goslin.
1967 BBWAA: Red Ruffing. VC: Branch Rickey,
Lloyd Waner.
1966 BBWAA: Ted Williams. VC: Casey Stengel.
1965 VC: Pud Galvin.
1964 BBWAA: Luke Appling. VC: Red Faber,
Burleigh Grimes, Miller Huggins, TimKeefe, Heinie
Manush, John Montgomery Ward.
1963 VC: John Clarkson, Elmer Flick, SamRice,
Eppa Rixey.
1962 BBWAA: Bob Feller, Jackie Robinson. VC:
Bill McKechnie, Edd Roush.
1961 VC: Max Carey, Billy Hamilton.
1960 None.
1959 VC: Zack Wheat.
1958 None.
1957 VC: Sam Crawford, Joe McCarthy.
1956 BBWAA: Joe Cronin, Hank Greenberg.
1955 BBWAA: Joe DiMaggio, Gabby Hartnett,
Ted Lyons, Dazzy Vance. VC: Home Run Baker,
Ray Schalk.
1954 BBWAA: Bill Dickey, Rabbit Maranville, Bill
Terry.
1953 BBWAA: Dizzy Dean, Al Simmons. VC: Ed
Barrow, Chief Bender, Tom Connolly, Bill Klem,
Bobby Wallace, Harry Wright.
1952 None.
1951 BBWAA: Jimmie Foxx, Mel Ott, Harry Heil-
mann, Paul Waner.
1950 None.
1949 BBWAA: Charlie Gehringer. VC: Mordecai
Three Finger Brown, Kid Nichols.
1948 BBWAA: Herb Pennock, Pie Traynor.
1947 BBWAA: Mickey Cochrane, Frankie Frisch,
Lefty Grove, Carl Hubbell.
1946 VC: Jesse Burkett, Frank Chance, Jack
Chesbro, Johnny Evers, Clark Griffith, Tommy
McCarthy, Joe McGinnity, Eddie Plank, Joe Tinker,
Rube Waddell, Ed Walsh.
1945 VC: Roger Bresnahan, Dan Brouthers,
Fred Clarke, Jimmy Collins, Ed Delahanty, Hugh
Duffy, Hugh Jennings, King Kelly, Jim ORourke,
Wilbert Robinson.
1944 VC: Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis.
1943 None.
1942 BBWAA: Rogers Hornsby.
1941 None.
1940 None.
1939 BBWAA: Eddie Collins, Lou Gehrig, Willie
Keeler, GeorgeSisler. VC: CapAnson, CharlesCo-
miskey, Candy Cummings, Buck Ewing, Hoss Rad-
bourn, Albert Goodwill Spalding.
1938 BBWAA: Grover Cleveland Alexander. VC:
Alexander Joy Cartwright, Henry Chadwick.
1937 BBWAA: Nap Lajoie, Tris Speaker, Cy
Young. VC: MorganBulkeley, BanJohnson, Connie
Mack, John McGraw, George Wright.
1936 BBWAA: Ty Cobb, Walter Johnson, Christy
Mathewson, Babe Ruth, Honus Wagner.
2011 Hall of Fame Voting
581 votes cast, 436 needed
x-Roberto Alomar 523 (90.0%), x-Bert Blyleven
463 (79.7%), Barry Larkin 361(62.1%), Jack Morris
311 (53.5%), Lee Smith 263 (45.3%), Jeff Bagwell
242 (41.7%), TimRaines 218 (37.5%), Edgar Marti-
nez 191 (32.9%), Alan Trammell 141 (24.3%), Larry
Walker 118 (20.3%), Mark McGwire 115 (19.8%),
Fred McGriff 104 (17.9%), Dave Parker 89 (15.3%),
Don Mattingly 79 (13.6%), Dale Murphy 73 (12.6%),
Rafael Palmeiro 64 (11.0%), Juan Gonzalez 30
(5.2%), Harold Baines 28 (4.8%), John Franco 27
(4.6%), Kevin Brown 12 (2.1%), Tino Martinez 6
(1.0%), Marquis Grissom 4 (0.7%), Al Leiter 4
(0.7%), John Olerud 4 (0.7%), B.J. Surhoff 2
(0.3%), Bret Boone 1 (0.2%), Benito Santiago 1
(0.2%), Carlos Baerga 0, Lenny Harris 0, Bobby
Higginson 0, Charles Johnson 0, Raul Mondesi 0,
Kirk Rueter 0.
x-elected
Baseball Calendar
July 24 Hall of Fame induction, Cooperstown,
N.Y.
July 31 Last day to trade a player without securi-
ng waivers.
Aug. 15 Last day to sign selections from 2011
amateur draft who have not exhausted college eligi-
bility.
Aug. 17-18 Owners meetings, Cooperstown,
N.Y.
Sept. 1 Active rosters expand to 40 players.
Sept. 30 or Oct. 1 Playoffs begin.
Oct. 19 World Series begins, city of NL cham-
pion.
October-November Free agent period to sign
exclusively with former teams, first five days after
World Series ends.
Nov. 14-15 General managers meetings, Mil-
waukee.
N A S C A R
Nationwide
Federated Auto Parts 300
After Saturday qualifying;race Saturday
At Nashville Superspeedway
Lebanon, Tenn.
Lap length: 1.333 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (22) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 155.447 mph.
2. (66) Steve Wallace, Toyota, 155.185.
3. (60) Carl Edwards, Ford, 155.16.
4. (33) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 155.065.
5. (2) Elliott Sadler, Chevrolet, 154.84.
6. (6) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 154.615.
7. (16) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 154.476.
8. (12) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 154.431.
9. (09) Kenny Wallace, Toyota, 154.223.
10. (11) Brian Scott, Toyota, 154.109.
11. (32) Reed Sorenson, Chevrolet, 153.906.
12. (88) Aric Almirola, Chevrolet, 153.611.
13. (38) Jason Leffler, Chevrolet, 153.316.
14. (87) Scott Wimmer, Toyota, 152.745.
15. (62) Michael Annett, Toyota, 152.677.
16. (31) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 152.658.
17. (18) Drew Herring, Toyota, 152.464.
18. (19) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet, 152.44.
19. (30) Mikey Kile, Chevrolet, 152.319.
20. (7) Josh Wise, Chevrolet, 152.241.
21. (01) Mike Wallace, Chevrolet, 151.866.
22. (15) Timmy Hill, Ford, 151.808.
23. (70) David Stremme, Chevrolet, 151.803.
24. (28) Derrike Cope, Chevrolet, 151.65.
25. (42) Tim Andrews, Chevrolet, 151.539.
26. (39) Danny Efland, Ford, 151.344.
27. (51) Jeremy Clements, Chevrolet, 151.129.
28. (40) Chase Miller, Chevrolet, 150.986.
29. (81) Blake Koch, Dodge, 150.801.
30. (47) Charles Lewandoski, Chevrolet, 150.395.
31. (75) Johnny Chapman, Chevrolet, 150.052.
32. (14) Eric McClure, Chevrolet, 149.967.
33. (44) Jeff Green, Chevrolet, 149.953.
34. (41) Carl Long, Ford, 149.766.
35. (52) Kevin Lepage, Chevrolet, 149.593.
36. (71) Matthew Carter, Ford, 149.528.
37. (04) Danny OQuinn Jr., Ford, 149.444.
38. (49) Mark Green, Chevrolet, 149.416.
39. (03) Marc Davis, Chevrolet, 148.971.
40. (13) Jennifer Jo Cobb, Dodge, 148.846.
41. (23) Dennis Setzer, Dodge, owner points.
42. (89) Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolet, owner
points.
43. (74) Mike Harmon, Chevrolet, 148.694.
Failed to Qualify
44. (46) Brett Rowe, Chevrolet, 148.345.
T E N N I S
Atlanta Championships
At The Atlanta Athletic Club
Norcross, Ga.
Purse: $600,000 (WT250)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles
Semifinals
John Isner (3), United States, def. Gilles Muller,
Luxembourg, 7-5, 6-7 (3), 6-1.
Mardy Fish (1), United States, def. Ryan Harrison,
United States, 6-2, 6-4.
Doubles
Semifinals
Alex Bogomolov Jr., United States, and Matthew
Ebden, Australia, def. Richard Berankis, Lithuania,
and Xavier Malisse, Belgium, 6-1, 7-6 (3).
bet-at-home Open
Saturday
At Rothenbaum Sport GmbH
Hamburg, Germany
Purse: $1.58 million (WT500)
Surface: Clay-Outdoor
Singles
Semifinals
Gilles Simon (5), France, def. Mikhail Youzhny (4),
Russia, 3-6, 6-3, 6-1.
Nicolas Almagro (3), Spain, def. Fernando Verdas-
co (8), Spain, 6-4, 6-1.
Doubles
Semifinals
Oliver Marach and Alexander Peya (3), Austria, def.
Andreas Beck and Christopher Kas, Germany, 7-6
(3), 6-4.
Baku Cup
At Baki Tennis Akademiyasi
Baku, Azerbaijan
Purse: $220,000 (Intl.)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles
Semifinals
Vera Zvonareva (1), Russia, def. Mariya Koryttse-
va, Ukraine, 6-1, 6-2.
Ksenia Pervak (7), Russia, def. Galina Voskoboe-
va, Kazakhstan, 1-6, 6-0, 6-2.
Doubles
Semifinals
Mariya Koryttseva, Ukraine, and Tatiana Poutchek,
Belarus, def. Elena Bovina and Valeria Savinykh,
Russia, 6-1, 5-7, 10-7 tiebreak.
S W I M M I N G
FINA World Championships
Saturday
At Shanghai
Diving
Men
10-meter Platform
Preliminaries
Top 18 to semifinals
1. Qiu Bo, China, 562.20 points.
2. Zhou Luxin, China, 528.85.
3. Nick Mccrory, United States, 509.00.
4. Victor Minibaev, Russia, 507.00.
5. Sascha Klein, Germany, 498.95.
6. Ivan Garcia, Mexico, 475.85.
7. David Boudia, United States, 474.80.
8. Thomas Daley, Britain, 472.70.
9. Kazuki Murakami, Japan, 448.25.
10. Jeinkler Aguirre, Cuba, 443.55.
11. Riley Mccormick, Canada, 434.70.
12. Hugo Parisi, Brazil, 434.15.
13. Kostyantyn Milyaev, Ukraine, 428.75.
14. Oleksandr Bondar, Ukraine, 423.90.
15. Eric Sehn, Canada, 419.10.
16. Victor Ortega, Colombia, 416.35.
17. Peter Waterfield, Germany, 415.15.
18. Sebastian Villa, Colombia, 414.25.
19. Gleb Galperin, Russia, 413.10.
20. Martin Wolfram, Germany, 412.60.
Semifinals
Top 12 to final
1. Qiu Bo, China, 579.55 points.
2. Sascha Klein, Germany, 502.85.
3. Victor Minibaev, Russia, 493.55.
4. David Boudia, United States, 486.30.
5. Zhou Luxin, China, 473.75.
6. Thomas Daley, Britain, 467.80.
7. Nick McCrory, United States, 458.50.
8. Riley Mccormick, Canada, 453.30.
9. Peter Waterfield, Germany, 452.80.
10. Ivan Garcia, Mexico, 442.85.
11. Oleksandr Bondar, Ukraine, 435.60.
12. Kostyantyn Milyaev, Ukraine, 419.95.
13. Kazuki Murakami, Japan, 415.10.
14. Hugo Parisi, Brazil, 414.90.
15. Jeinkler Aguirre, Cuba, 411.10.
16. Sebastian Villa, Colombia, 409.35.
17. Victor Ortega, Colombia, 402.55.
18. Eric Sehn, Canada, 388.15.
Women
3-meter Springboard
Final
1. Wu Minxia, China, 380.85 points.
2. He Zi, China, 379.15 points.
3. Jennifer Abel, Canada, 365.10.
4. Christina Loukas, United States, 350.10.
5. Sharleen Stratton, Australia, 330.75.
6. Laura Sanchez, Mexico, 328.70.
7. Kelci Bryant, United States, 322.95.
8. Anna Pysmenska, Ukraine, 317.25.
9. Tania Cagnotto, Italy, 313.45.
10. Nadezda Bazhina, Russia, 305.60.
11. Uschi Freitag, Germany, 288.10.
12. Emilie Heymans, Canada, 270.00.
Open Water Swimming
Men
25k
1. Petar Stoychev, Bulgaria, 5 hours, 10 minutes,
39.8 seconds.
2. Vladimir Dyatchin, Russia, 5:11:15.6.
3. Csaba Gercsak, Hungary, 5:11:18.1.
4. Francisco Jose Hervas Jodar, Spain, 5:11:20.4.
5. Trent Grimsey, Australia, 5:11:28.2.
6. Allan Do Carmo, Brazil, 5:11:32.2.
7. Vasily Boykov, Russia, 5:11:36.3.
8. Joanes Hedel, France, 5:13:03.1.
9. Yuriy Kudinov, Kazakhstan, 5:13:08.6.
10. Libor Smolka, Czech Republic, 5:13:20.1.
11. Bertrand Venturi, France, 5:13:26.9.
12. Erwin Maldonado, Venezuela, 5:14:03.5.
13. Guillermo Bertola, Argentina, 5:14:29.9.
14. Simon Tobin, Canada, 5:19:43.1.
15. Xavier Desharnais, Canada, 5:20:44.2.
16. Samuel de Bona, Brazil, 5:27:38.1.
17. Han Lidu, China, 5:32:02.1.
18. Gabriel Villagoiz, Argentina, 5:37:25.9.
19. Weng Jingwei, China, 5:47:16.0.
Women
25k
1. Ana Marcela Cunha, Brazil, 5:29:22.9.
2. Angela Maurer, Germany, 5:29:25.0.
3. Alice Franco, Italy, 5:29:30.8.
4. Olga Beresnyeva, Ukraine, 5:29:35.6.
5. Martina Grimaldi, Italy, 5:29:36.2.
6. Anna Uvarova, Russia, 5:29:38.9.
7. Celia Barrot, France, 5:29:40.8.
8. Margarita Dominguez Cabezas, Spain,
5:29:42.0.
9. Silvie Rybarova, Czech Republic, 5:29:51.3.
10. Cecilia Biagioli, Argentina, 5:29:58.7.
11. Maria Bulakhova, Russia, 5:34.21.2.
12. Karla Sitic, Croatia, 5:37.49.8.
13. Ester Nunez Morera, Spain, 5:38:09.6.
14. Tash Harrison, Australia, 5:53:35.4.
15. Cao Shiyue, China, 5:54:21.9.
16. Sun Minjie, China, 5:55:16.3.
17. Nika Kozamernik, Slovakia, 6:00:43.8.
B O X I N G
Fight Schedule
July 23
At Oriley Events Center, Springfield, Mo., B.J.
Flores vs. Nick Iannuzzi, 10, cruiserweights.
At Mandalay Bay Events Center, Las Vegas (HBO),
Amir Khan vs. Zab Judah, 12, for Khans WBA and
Judahs IBF junior welterweight titles;Peter Quillin
vs. Jason LeHoulier, 10, middleweights.
At Ciudad Obregon, Mexico, Roman Gonzalez vs.
Omar Salado, 12, for Gonzalezs WBA flyweight ti-
tle.
At Guadalajara, Mexico, Ulises Solis vs. Omar Nino
Romero, 12, for Solis IBF light flyweight title and in-
terim WBA World super featherweight title.
At Hunts Point Produce Market, Bronx, N.Y., Joe
Hanks vs. Alfredo Escalera Jr., 10, for the IBA
heavyweight title.
July 29
At Homebush, Australia, Billy Dib vs. Jorge Lacie-
rva, 12, for the vacant IBF featherweight title;Junior
Talipeau vs. Zac Awad, 12, super middleweights.
At South Point Hotel Casino, Las Vegas, Beibut
Shumenov vs. Danny Santiago, 12, for Shumenovs
WBA World light heavyweight title.
At Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas (ESPN2), Victor
Cayo vs. Lamont Peterson, 12, IBF super light-
weight eliminator;Edison Miranda vs. Yordanis
Despaigne, 10, light heavyweights;Sergey Kovalev
vs. Douglas Otieno, 10, for the NABA light heavy-
weight title.
July 30
At Cibubur, Indonesia, Muhammad Rachman vs.
Porsanwan Porpramuk, 12, for Rachmans WBA
strawweight title;Ali Rochmad vs. Petchtrang Sor
Yuphinda, 12, super flyweights;Afrizal Cotto vs.
Frans Yarangga, 12, super featherweights.
At San Jose, Costa Rica, Brian Magee vs. Jaime
Barboza, 12, for the vacant WBA interimsuper mid-
dleweight title;Bryan Vazquez vs. Jose Manuel
Osorio, 10, super featherweights;Elvin Perez vs.
Juan Ruiz, 10, light welterweights.
At Mazatlan International Center, Mazatlan, Mexico,
Leo Santa Cruz, vs. Everth Briceno, 12, for Cruzs
WBCYouth bantamweight title;Manuel Jimenez vs.
Mario Rodriguez, 12, for the vacant NABF mini-
mumweight title.
Aug. 5
At Chumash Casino, Santa Ynez, Calif. (ESPN2),
Tim Coleman vs. Vernon Paris, 10, light welter-
weights.
Aug. 6
At Youngstown, Ohio (SHO), Kelly Pavlik vs. Darryl
Cunningham, 10, super middleweights.
Aug. 10
At Tokyo, Kazuto Ioka vs. Juan Hernandez, 12, for
Iokas WBC minimumweight title.
Aug. 13
At Hard Rock Hotel and Casino, Las Vegas (SHO),
Joseph Agbeko vs. Abner Mares, 12, for Agbekos
IBF bantamweight title.
At Broadbeach, Australia, Michael Katsidis vs. Mi-
chael Lozada, 12, lightweights.
Aug. 19
At Hammond, Ind. (ESPN2), Mauricio Herrera vs.
Ruslan Provonikov, 12, junior welterweights;David
Diaz vs. Hank Lundy, 10, lightweights.
Nov. 12
At MGMGrand, Las Vegas (PPV), Manny Pacquiao
vs. Juan Manuel Marquez, 12, for Pacquiaos WBO
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 PAGE 3C
YANKEES S UNDAY
Today
Syracuse
1:05 p.m.
Monday
Syracuse
7:05 p.m.
Tuesday
at Buffalo
7:05 p.m.
Wednesday
at Buffalo
1:05 p.m.
Saturday
Rochester
7:05 p.m.
Friday
at Buffalo
7:35 p.m.
Thursday
at Buffalo
7:05 p.m.
UPCOMI NG SCHEDUL E
1. Jesus Montero, catcher,
Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre: Montero is hitting
.281 with eight home runs
and 38 RBI for the Yankees.
2. Gary Sanchez, catcher,
Single-A Charleston: For the
RiverDogs, he has nine home
runs to go along with a .236
batting average and 35 RBI
in 68 games and 250 at-bats.
3. Manny Banuelos, start-
ing pitcher, Double-A Tren-
ton: The left-hander holds a
record of 3-4 with a 3.64
ERA, while fanning 86 in 89
innings.
4. Dellin Betances, starting
pitcher, Double-A Trenton: A
right-hander for the Thunder,
hes 4-4 with 93 strikeouts
and a 2.90 ERA in 80
2
3 in-
nings.
5. Austin Romine, catcher,
Double-A Trenton: The 21-
year-old backstop has nine
hits in his last five games to
raise his average to .299. He
has five home runs and 41
RBI.
6. Slade Heathcott, out-
fielder, Single-A Tampa: He
was promoted to Tampa and
hit the DL after playing just
one game, but still moved up
from No. 8 in last weeks
rankings. His minors totals
consist of a .279 average
with five home runs.
7. Adam Warren, pitcher,
Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre: Hes been the most
consistent, healthy pitcher
for the Yankees this season,
making 17 starts and going
6-3 with a 3.20 ERA and one
complete game. He moved
up from No. 9 last week. He
was pulled from his start
Friday night after throwing
one inning and may get
called up to New York for a
spot start in a doubleheader
later this week.
8. David Phelps, pitcher,
Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre: Although the right-
hander has been on the dis-
abled since last month, he
moved up the list from No.
10 last week. For SWB, he
has made 14 starts, going 4-6
with a 3.38 ERA and fanning
74 in 85
1
3 innings. 9. An-
drew Brackman, reliever,
Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre: The struggling righty
dropped down from No. 6 on
the list last week. His ERA is
still high, but falling. Its
currently at 7.51 to go with a
2-6 record. He has allowed
55 walks and 68 hits in 68
1
3
innings.
10. Cito Culver, shortstop,
Short Season Staten Island:
The switch-hitting first
round draft pick from 2010
(32nd overall) wont turn 19
until next month and is hit-
ting .306 with 21 RBI and
two stolen bases for the Yan-
kees.
YA N K E E S I N M I N O R S
Montero is still
N.Ys top prospect
Editors Note: The Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre Yankees have taken a page
from their parent club by winning
championships.
SWB has racked up four consecutive
International League North Division
titles and more could be on the way
because the minor league system is
stacked with top prospects that are
close to contributing at the Triple-A
or Major League level. Heres a look
at the organizations top 10 prospects
according to MLB.com, where they
are now and how they are faring:
By DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
The Scranton/Wilkes-Barre
franchise record for home runs
in a season is held by Shelley
Duncan when he shattered his
own record in 2009.
On July 25 of that year, Dun-
can hit a pair of homers in a loss
at Toledo. The two bombs were
his 24th and 25th of that season,
which at the time tied his own
season record of most home
runs in a season.
Duncan hit five more after
that day and finished the 2009
campaign with a franchise-
record 30 home runs.
On This Date
1. Jonathan Singleton, out-
fielder/infielder, Single-A Clear-
water: He has a .281batting
average with eight home runs
and 43 RBI in 86 games.
2. Jarred Cosart, starting
pitcher, Single-A Clearwater:
Hes put up a 7-8 record, 4.13
ERA and 72 strikeouts in18
games (17 starts) and 96 in-
nings.
3. Brody Colvin, starting
pitcher, Single-A Clearwater: He
has a 2-4 record in15 starts with
a 3.87 ERA and 52 strikeouts in
79 innings.
4. Sebastian Valle, catcher,
Single-A Clearwater: The 20-
year-old is batting .317 with
three home runs, 28 RBI and an
on-base percentage of .340 in
247 at-bats for the Threshers.
5. Jesse Biddle, starting pitch-
er, Low-A Lakewood: The left-
handed first-round pick from
2010 struck out eight for the
third straight start late last
week. He has a 5-6 record with a
3.10 ERA and102 strikeouts in
101
2
3 innings.
6. Trevor May, starting pitch-
er, Single-A Clearwater: A strike-
out machine, hes fanned140 in
106 innings, going 6-6 with a
3.65 ERA. Hes had three dou-
ble-digit strikeout games for the
Threshers, with his season-high
being14.
7. Aaron Altherr, outfielder,
Short Season Single-A William-
sport: For the Crosscutters, hes
batting .281in 32 games after
being demoted fromLakewood.
Overall in the minors this year,
hes hitting .244 with three
homers.
8. Cesar Hernandez, second
base, Single-A Clearwater: The
switch-hitting 21-year-old has
played in 81games for the
Threshers this year, posting a
.253 average with three home
runs, 25 RBI and11stolen bases.
9. Justin De Fratus, reliever,
Triple-A Lehigh Valley: A righty,
hes made 10 appearances for the
IronPigs this season, going 2-0
with a 5.21ERA after being
promoted fromReading. His
minor league totals this season
are 6-0 with a 3.21ERA, 65
strikeouts and nine saves in 53
1
3
innings.
10. Jiwan James, outfielder,
Single-A Clearwater: The 22-
year-old is batting .278 with
three homers, 18 RBI and19
stolen bases in 363 at-bats.
P H I L L I E S P R O S P E C T S
Clearwater home
to top 4 prospects
Editors Note: Heres a look at the
Phillies top 10 prospects, according
to MLB.com, how they are faring
and where they are currently
playing:
By DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
Russ Canzler: The Hazleton
Area grad, who is an outfielder
for Durham, the Triple-A affil-
iate of the Tampa Bay Rays, has
been playing exceptionally well.
The converted third baseman
has been on fire over his last 10
games, hitting .439 (18-for-41)
with nine extra-base hits in that
time. Hes closing in on a .300
batting average for the season,
currently hitting .296 with 12
home runs, 61 RBI, five stolen
bases and an on-base percentage
of .396 after Fridays action.
Cory Spangenberg: An Abing-
ton Heights grad and the 10th
overall draft pick by the Padres
last month got off to a stellar
start for the Short-Season Eu-
gene (Ore.) Emeralds and was
promoted to Class-A Fort Wayne
(Ind.) in the Midwest League.
After hitting .384 for the Em-
eralds, he has struggled early on
for the Tin Caps. Hes batting
.069 (2-for-29) with a pair of RBI
and two stolen bases in eight
games. Overall in the minors,
hes batting .304 (35-for-115)
with a home runs, 22 RBI and
12 stolen bases in 33 games.
L O C A L S I N T H E P R O S
Canzler closing in
on .300 average
By DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
Fearless, hard nosed and toughness
are all adjectives that are commonly
used to describe catchers. However,
regardless of what people think, they do
have fears.
Pretty big fears, too.
The catchers biggest fear is when the
opposing team has runners in scoring
position and their hitter hits it to right
field. The reason is while watching the
throw from right field, they give up their
vision of the base runner leaving them
vulnerable to get run over at the plate.
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre catcher P.J.
Pilittere has experienced just how dan-
gerous fielding a throw to the plate from
right field can be. He missed a month of
his 2006 season after injuring his shoul-
der on a collision at the plate.
I hung in there and moved up the
line and the guy hit me from behind. I
was out for a while, Pilittere said.
That was my fault. We were losing by
four in the first and I was just trying to
get an out and tried to make the play
instead of just being smart and coming
up and cutting it off and maybe redirect
it to another base.
You have to put your pride aside.
After the injury, Pilittere decided to
take a much safer approach to fielding a
throw from the right fielder.
You have to position yourself accord-
ingly, Pilittere said. When a throw
comes in from right, I like to hang out
behind the plate so I can read the throw,
get on a peak and get some momentum
going and make a tag.
Collisions at the plate can be serious.
Earlier in the season, San Francisco
superstar catcher Buster Posey broke his
leg after being run over by Scott Cou-
sins of the Florida Marlins. Posey will
miss the rest of the 2011 season. Cousins
was tagging from third base on a fly ball
to right field, the exact play Pilittere
fears most.
The play hit home for Pilittere and it
was a hot topic in the Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre clubhouse.
The thing of it was, that in our opin-
ion he was in front of the plate. Talking
to a lot of the guys as a base runner
there you know its a close game and its
a routine fly ball and as a base runner,
you know if youre taking him out as
soon as you leave from third, Pilittere
said. Its not like he decided five feet
before he got there that he was going to
take him out. He had his mind made up
and thats usually how it goes.
The most common occurrences of
catchers being run over at the plate are
when a base runner knows for sure he is
going to be out.
You never really see a guy get taken
out on a bang-bang play, Pilittere said.
If a guy is going to take you out at the
plate it is usually a last ditch effort. If
he has any chance of being safe he is
usually sliding.
Pilittere is not the only catcher who
fears the throw from right field. Gustavo
Molina has caught many games in his
career and he was quick to mention how
difficult the throw from right can be.
One time I got hit hard after taking a
throw from right. I felt dizzy and needed
a few minutes to get back into the
game. I never came out of the game,
Molina said with a smile. Thats why
you got all the gear on. A lot of catchers
tape their ribs because you got a lot of
contact at the plate.
There are many unwritten rules in the
game of baseball and among them is, if
you are a catcher, dont run over a fel-
low catcher.
I have never run anybody over, Pilit-
tere said. I think it is a common under-
standing between catchers because we
know it hurts.
Taking out the catcher at the plate has
been allowed since baseballs inception.
After the Posey collision many argued
Major League Baseball should alter its
rules, but Pilittere feels it is part of the
game.
The tough thing to wrap your head
around is whether a catcher has gear on
or how big we are, a guy coming in full
speed at you is going to hurt, he said.
Its part of the game and I dont think
its going to change.
Plays at the plate have SWB catchers wary
AP PHOTOS
Florida Marlins Scott Cousins, top, collides with San Francisco Giants catcher Buster Posey (28) on a fly ball from Emilio Bonifa-
cio during the 12th inning of a baseball game in San Francisco on May 25.
Fearing a collision course
By JOSH HORTON
For The Times Leader
San Francisco Giants catcher Buster Posey (28) is carried off the field after a colli-
sion with Florida Marlins Scott Cousins during the 12th inning of a baseball game in
San Francisco on May 25.
If a guy is going to take you out at the plate it is usually a last
ditch effort. If he has any chance of being safe he is usually slid-
ing.
P.J. Pilittere
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre catcher
C M Y K
PAGE 4C SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
M A J O R L E A G U E A B S E B A L L
PHILADELPHIA Michael
Martinez hit a tiebreaking
three-run homer, Chase Utley
connected twice and the Phila-
delphia Phillies beat the San
Diego Padres for the ninth
straight time, 8-6 on Saturday.
Pinch-hitter Ryan Howard
also went deep, hitting a tying
solo shot off Chad Qualls that
ignited a five-run seventh.
Michael Stutes (5-1) allowed
one run in 11-3 innings in relief
of Kyle Kendrick, and Ryan
Madson finished for his 17th
save in 18 chances.
Cameron Maybin and Chase
Headley hit homers for the
Padres, who havent beaten the
Phillies since last June 7. They
were swept by Philadelphia in
a four-game series in San Diego
in April. Qualls (4-5) allowed
just one homer this season in
48 1-3 innings before the Phil-
lies hit three against him.
Reds 11, Braves 2
CINCINNATI (AP) Edgar
Renteria replaced injured roo-
kie shortstop Zack Cozart and
drove in three runs Saturday,
rallying the Cincinnati Reds to
an 11-2 victory over the Atlanta
Braves.
Cozart hyperextended his
left elbow while trying to make
a tag in the fourth inning,
getting Renteria off the bench.
His two-run double off Derek
Lowe (6-8) started a three-run
rally in the sixth inning that
put the Reds ahead.
Brandon Phillips had a pair
of run-scoring doubles, and
Todd Frazier doubled with the
bases loaded as Cincinnati
pulled away.
Homer Bailey (5-4) threw 53
pitches in the first two innings,
but made it through six on a
92-degree afternoon. Lowes
bases-loaded double drove in a
pair in the second.
Cubs 5, Astros 1
CHICAGO Randy Wells
pitched six strong innings to
earn his first win since April 4
and Geovany Soto added a solo
shot and an RBI single in the
ninth to lead the Chicago Cubs
to a 5-1 victory over the major
league-worst Houston Astros
on Saturday afternoon.
Marlon Byrd also homered
for the Cubs, who will try to
win three in a row on Sunday
for the first time this season.
Cardinals 9, Pirates 1
PITTSBURGH Lance
Berkman and Yadier Molina
homered during St. Louis
five-run fifth inning, Jaime
Garcia won his 10th game and
the Cardinals beat the Pitts-
burgh Pirates for the second
consecutive night, 9-1 on Sat-
urday night.
A day after hitting three
homers in a 15-hit barrage, St.
Louis won its third straight by
collecting 12 hits in assuring
itself a win in what many in
Pittsburgh were calling the
biggest series in PNC Parks
11-year history.
Marlins 8, Mets 5
MIAMI Gaby Sanchez hit
a pair of two-run homers and
the Florida Marlins broke a
four-game losing streak by
rallying past the New York
Mets 8-5 Saturday night.
Sanchez hit his 15th homer
in the sixth inning to put the
Marlins ahead for the first time
since their homestand began
Tuesday. He added another
homer in the seventh and has
three in the past two games.
Diamondbacks 12, Rockies 3
PHOENIX Justin Upton
and Miguel Montero combined
to drive in 11 runs and the
Arizona Diamondbacks routed
the Colorado Rockies 12-3 on
Saturday night.
Josh Collmenter threw seven
strong innings, had a pair of
hits and added his first career
RBI for the Diamondbacks,
who have won two of their past
three.
N AT I O N A L L E A G U E R O U N D U P
Phils dig the
long ball in win
The Associated Press
NEWYORKHideki Matsui
homered against his former
team, Rich Harden earned his
second win of the season and the
Oakland Athletics snapped an
11-game losing streak to the New
York Yankees with a 4-3 victory
Saturday.
AndrewBailey barely held on
in the ninth inning, allowing a
run before retiring Robinson
Cano on an easy grounder with a
runner on third to end it.
Josh Willinghamhit a two-run
homer off A.J. Burnett and Je-
mile Weeks had an RBI single for
the As, who beat the Yankees for
the first time since April 22,
2010, in Oakland.
Red Sox 3, Mariners 1
BOSTONJosh Beckett
pitched seven strong innings,
Jacoby Ellsbury hit a go-ahead
two-run single in the seventh and
the Boston Red Sox beat Seattle
3-1on Saturday night, sending
the Mariners to their club record-
tying14th consecutive loss.
Terry Francona earned his
1,000th win as a major league
manager, the 57th to reach that
milestone, and the eighth still
active. Boston moved a season-
high three games ahead of the
NewYork Yankees for the lead in
the AL East.
Twins 4, Tigers 1
MINNEAPOLIS Scott
Baker pitched five scoreless
innings and the Twins bullpen
came through with four solid
innings of relief in a 4-1victory
over the Tigers on Saturday,
snapping Detroits 11-game win-
ning streak over Minnesota.
Baker (8-5) allowed three hits
and struck out five in his first
start since July 5. Anthony Swar-
zak, Phil Dumatrait and Glen
Perkins bridged the gap to Joe
Nathan, who picked up his sev-
enth save.
Orioles 3, Angels 2
BALTIMORE AdamJones
homered and drove in two runs
to back an effective pitching
performance by Brad Bergesen
and lead the Baltimore Orioles
over the Los Angeles Angels 3-2
Saturday night.
Jones hit a solo shot in the
fourth inning and put Baltimore
ahead 3-2 in the fifth with a
sacrifice fly.
Royals 5, Rays 4, 10 innings
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Joa-
kimSoria worked out of a bases-
loaded, no-out jamin the 10th
and Eric Hosmer doubled home
the winning run in the bottomof
the inning and the Kansas City
Royals rallied for a 5-4 victory
over the Tampa Bay Rays on
Saturday night.
Brandon Gomes (0-1) threw
two pitches in the 10th and took
the loss.
Rangers 5, Blue Jays 4
ARLINGTON, Texas Mi-
chael Young drove in the win-
ning run with a two-out single in
the bottomof the ninth inning as
the Texas Rangers rallied for a
5-4 victory over the Toronto Blue
Jays on Saturday night.
White Sox, Indians postponed
CLEVELANDRain at
Progressive Field postponed the
game between the Chicago
White Sox and Cleveland Indians
on Saturday night.
Amakeup date was not an-
nounced.
A M E R I C A N L E A G U E R O U N D U P
Matsui, Harden earn
As win over Yanks
The Associated Press
STANDINGS/STATS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Chicago White Sox 3, Cleveland 0
L.A. Angels 6, Baltimore 1
N.Y. Yankees 17, Oakland 7
Boston 7, Seattle 4
Texas 12, Toronto 2
Detroit 8, Minnesota 2
Kansas City 10, Tampa Bay 4
Saturday's Games
Oakland 4, N.Y. Yankees 3
Minnesota 4, Detroit 1
Baltimore 3, L.A. Angels 2
Chicago White Sox at Cleveland, ppd., rain
Boston 3, Seattle 1
Kansas City 5, Tampa Bay 4, 10 innings
Texas 5, Toronto 4
Sunday's Games
Chicago White Sox (Humber 8-6) at Cleveland
(Masterson 8-6), 1:05 p.m.
Oakland (G.Gonzalez 9-6) at N.Y. Yankees (Colon
6-6), 1:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Chatwood 5-6) at Baltimore (Guthrie
4-13), 1:35 p.m.
Seattle (Pineda 8-6) at Boston (Wakefield 5-3), 1:35
p.m.
Tampa Bay (Cobb 2-0) at Kansas City (F.Paulino
1-3), 2:10 p.m.
Detroit (Porcello 9-6) at Minnesota (Liriano 6-7),
4:10 p.m.
Toronto (Cecil 2-4) at Texas (Ogando 10-3), 8:05
p.m.
Monday's Games
L.A. Angels at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m.
Seattle at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Detroit at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Chicago Cubs 4, Houston 2
Philadelphia 3, San Diego 1
St. Louis 6, Pittsburgh 4
Atlanta 6, Cincinnati 4
N.Y. Mets 7, Florida 6
Colorado 8, Arizona 4
Washington 7, L.A. Dodgers 2
Milwaukee 4, San Francisco 2
Saturday's Games
Chicago Cubs 5, Houston 1
Cincinnati 11, Atlanta 2
Philadelphia 8, San Diego 6
St. Louis 9, Pittsburgh 1
Florida 8, N.Y. Mets 5
Arizona 12, Colorado 3
Milwaukee at San Francisco, 9:05 p.m.
Washington at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
Sunday's Games
N.Y. Mets (Gee 9-3) at Florida (Ani.Sanchez 6-3),
1:10 p.m.
San Diego (Stauffer 6-6) at Philadelphia (Halladay
11-4), 1:35 p.m.
St. Louis (Lohse 8-7) at Pittsburgh (Morton 8-5),
1:35 p.m.
Houston (Lyles 0-5) at Chicago Cubs (Garza 4-7),
2:20 p.m.
Milwaukee (Gallardo 11-6) at San Francisco (Bum-
garner 5-9), 4:05 p.m.
Colorado (Jimenez 6-8) at Arizona (Owings 3-0),
4:10 p.m.
Washington (Marquis 8-4) at L.A. Dodgers (Billing-
sley 8-8), 4:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Beachy 3-2) at Cincinnati (Willis 0-1), 8:05
p.m.
Monday's Games
San Diego at Philadelphia, 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m.
Houston at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m.
Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
N A T I O N A L
L E A G U E
Phillies 8, Padres 6
San Diego Philadelphia
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Maybin cf 5 1 2 3 Rollins ss 3 2 1 0
Bartlett ss 5 0 1 0 Mrtnz 3b 5 1 1 3
Headly 3b 4 1 1 1 Victorn cf 3 1 1 0
Ludwck lf 5 1 2 0 Utley 2b 3 2 3 4
Blanks 1b 5 0 1 0 Ibanez lf 4 0 0 0
Denorfi rf 3 1 1 0 DBrwn rf 4 0 1 0
Forsyth 2b 3 1 2 0 Schndr c 3 0 0 0
RJhnsn c 3 0 0 0 Ruiz ph-c 1 0 1 0
Latos p 2 1 1 0 Mayrry 1b 2 0 1 0
Guzmn ph 1 0 0 0
Howard
ph-1b 2 1 1 1
Qualls p 0 0 0 0 Kndrck p 1 0 0 0
Bass p 0 0 0 0 Stutes p 0 0 0 0
AlGnzlz ph 0 0 0 0 Gload ph 1 0 1 0
KPhlps ph 0 0 0 1 WValdz pr 0 1 0 0
Luebke pr 0 0 0 0 Bastrd p 0 0 0 0
Spence p 0 0 0 0 Herndn p 0 0 0 0
BFrncs ph 1 0 0 0
Madson p 0 0 0 0
Totals 36 611 5 Totals 33 811 8
San Diego.......................... 000 003 120 6
Philadelphia....................... 300 000 50x 8
DPPhiladelphia 2. LOBSan Diego 8, Philadel-
phia 6. 2BLudwick (17), Rollins (17), Do.Brown
(10), Ruiz (13), Gload (3). 3BForsythe (1). HR
Maybin (6), Headley (3), M.Martinez (2), Utley 2 (6),
Howard (19). SBMaybin (21), Rollins 2 (21). S
K.Kendrick.
IP H R ER BB SO
San Diego
Latos ......................... 6 5 3 3 2 7
Qualls L,4-5 BS,4-4
1
3 4 5 5 1 0
Bass..........................
2
3 1 0 0 0 1
Spence..................... 1 1 0 0 1 1
Philadelphia
K.Kendrick ............... 5
2
3 6 3 3 2 1
Stutes W,5-1............ 1
1
3 2 1 1 0 1
Bastardo...................
2
3 2 2 2 2 0
Herndon H,3............
1
3 0 0 0 1 0
Madson S,17-18 ..... 1 1 0 0 0 2
WPQualls, Bastardo.
UmpiresHome, Bruce Dreckman;First, Alan Por-
ter;Second, Rob Drake;Third, Gary Darling.
T3:14. A45,072 (43,651).
Reds 11, Braves 2
Atlanta Cincinnati
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Prado 3b 4 0 0 0 Stubbs cf 3 2 1 0
Heywrd rf 5 0 1 0 Cozart ss 0 0 0 0
McCnn c 4 0 0 0 Renteri ss 4 2 2 3
D.Ross c 0 0 0 0 Votto 1b 4 1 2 1
Fremn 1b 4 0 1 0 BPhllps 2b 5 1 3 2
Uggla 2b 3 1 1 0 FLewis rf-lf 3 1 0 0
Hinske lf 3 1 0 0 JGoms lf 2 0 0 0
AlGnzlz ss 4 0 1 0 Bray p 0 0 0 0
McLoth cf 3 0 1 0 Cairo ph 0 1 0 1
D.Lowe p 2 0 1 2 Ondrsk p 0 0 0 0
Sherrill p 0 0 0 0 Arrdnd p 0 0 0 0
Proctor p 0 0 0 0 Frazier 3b 4 0 1 3
CMrtnz p 0 0 0 0 Hanign c 4 1 2 0
Conrad ph 1 0 0 0 HBaily p 1 0 0 0
Bruce ph 1 0 1 0
Leake pr 0 1 0 0
Heisey rf 2 1 1 1
Totals 33 2 6 2 Totals 33111311
Atlanta.............................. 020 000 000 2
Cincinnati ......................... 100 003 70x 11
EF.Lewis (1). DPAtlanta 2. LOBAtlanta 9,
Cincinnati 6. 2BHeyward (14), D.Lowe (4), Rent-
eria (5), B.Phillips 2 (23), Frazier (1), Hanigan (5),
Bruce (17). SBStubbs (24). SD.Lowe, Stubbs,
Cozart.
IP H R ER BB SO
Atlanta
D.Lowe L,6-8........... 5 6 4 4 2 1
Sherrill ......................
1
3 0 0 0 0 0
Proctor...................... 1 3 4 4 1 1
C.Martinez ............... 1
2
3 4 3 3 2 0
Cincinnati
H.Bailey W,5-4 ........ 6 5 2 2 3 3
Bray H,12................. 1 0 0 0 0 1
Ondrusek ................. 1 1 0 0 0 2
Arredondo................ 1 0 0 0 0 1
D.Lowe pitched to 5 batters in the 6th.
HBPby D.Lowe (F.Lewis), by H.Bailey (Uggla).
WPC.Martinez.
UmpiresHome, Ed Rapuano;First, Lance Barks-
dale;Second, Alfonso Marquez;Third, Ed Hickox.
T2:59. A41,192 (42,319).
Cubs 5, Astros 1
Houston Chicago
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Bourn cf 4 0 1 0 RJhnsn rf-lf 3 1 0 0
AngSnc ss 4 1 1 0 SCastro ss 4 1 1 1
Pence rf 4 0 0 0 ArRmr 3b 4 0 0 0
Ca.Lee lf 4 0 3 1 JeBakr 1b 3 0 0 0
Bourgs pr-lf 0 0 0 0
C.Pena
ph-1b 0 0 0 0
CJhnsn 3b 4 0 1 0 Soto c 4 1 2 2
Wallac 1b 3 0 1 0 Byrd cf 3 1 2 1
MDwns
ph-1b 1 0 0 0 ASorin lf 3 0 0 0
Altuve 2b 4 0 1 0 Marshll p 0 0 0 0
Corprn c 3 0 0 0 Marml p 0 0 0 0
Quinter pr 0 0 0 0 Barney 2b 3 0 0 0
WRdrg p 3 0 1 0 R.Wells p 2 0 0 0
SEscln p 0 0 0 0 Smrdzj p 0 0 0 0
FRdrgz p 0 0 0 0 JRussll p 0 0 0 0
DelRsr p 0 0 0 0 Fukdm rf 1 1 1 0
Michals ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 35 1 9 1 Totals 30 5 6 4
Houston.............................. 000 001 000 1
Chicago.............................. 010 010 03x 5
EC.Johnson 2 (10). LOBHouston 10, Chicago
4. 3BFukudome (2). HRSoto (9), Byrd (5).
CSBourn (6).
IP H R ER BB SO
Houston
W.Rodriguez L,6-7 . 7 3 2 2 1 7
S.Escalona ..............
1
3 1 1 1 0 0
Fe.Rodriguez...........
1
3 2 2 1 2 0
Del Rosario..............
1
3 0 0 0 0 1
Chicago
R.Wells W,2-3......... 6 5 1 1 2 4
Samardzija H,6........
2
3 1 0 0 0 1
J.Russell H,2...........
1
3 0 0 0 0 0
Marshall H,18.......... 1 2 0 0 0 1
Marmol ..................... 1 1 0 0 0 1
HBPby Marmol (Corporan).
UmpiresHome, CBBucknor;First, DanIassogna-
;Second, Dale Scott;Third, Jerry Meals.
T2:49. A40,486 (41,159).
Marlins 8, Mets 5
New York Florida
ab r h bi ab r h bi
JosRys ss 5 3 3 1 Bonifac 3b 4 2 2 0
Turner 2b 4 1 3 0 Infante 2b 4 2 2 1
Beltran rf 2 0 1 1 GSnchz 1b 4 2 3 4
DWrght 3b 5 0 1 2 HRmrz ss 3 0 0 0
DnMrp 1b 4 0 0 0 Stanton rf 3 0 0 0
Pagan cf 4 0 0 0 Morrsn lf 4 1 2 1
Bay lf 4 0 0 0 LNunez p 0 0 0 0
Thole c 3 0 0 0 Camrn cf 2 0 0 0
RPauln ph-c 1 0 0 0 MDunn p 0 0 0 0
Capuan p 2 0 0 0 Wise ph-cf 1 1 1 0
Harris ph 1 0 0 0 J.Buck c 4 0 1 1
DCrrsc p 0 0 0 0 Hensly p 1 0 0 0
Igarash p 0 0 0 0 Helms ph 1 0 0 0
Duda ph 1 1 1 1 Badnhp p 0 0 0 0
Petersn cf-lf 2 0 0 0
Totals 36 5 9 5 Totals 33 811 7
New York ........................... 000 020 102 5
Florida ................................ 000 004 31x 8
ED.Wright (5). DPNew York 1. LOBNew
York 8, Florida 4. 2BTurner 2 (18), G.Sanchez
(24). 3BInfante (4). HRJos.Reyes (4), Duda
(1), G.Sanchez 2 (16), Morrison (14). SB
Jos.Reyes (31), Bonifacio (21), Wise (3). CS
Ha.Ramirez (7).
IP H R ER BB SO
New York
Capuano L,8-10 ...... 6 6 4 4 3 6
D.Carrasco .............. 1 3 3 3 0 3
Igarashi .................... 1 2 1 1 0 0
Florida
Hensley .................... 5 4 2 2 4 2
Badenhop W,2-1..... 1
2
3 3 1 1 0 2
M.Dunn H,10........... 1
1
3 0 0 0 0 3
L.Nunez.................... 1 2 2 2 0 0
UmpiresHome, Chris Guccione;First, Mike Mu-
chlinski;Second, Mike Winters;Third, Mike Everitt.
T3:00. A26,345 (38,560).
Cardinals 9, Pirates 1
St. Louis Pittsburgh
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Schmkr 2b-rf 5 1 2 0 dArnad 3b 4 0 2 0
Jay cf-lf 5 1 1 0 Cedeno ss 4 0 0 0
Pujols 1b 4 2 1 1 Walker 2b 4 0 1 0
T.Cruz c 0 0 0 0 AMcCt cf 3 0 0 0
Hollidy lf 4 1 1 0 Pearce rf 4 0 1 0
Rasms cf 0 0 0 0 Diaz lf 4 1 2 0
Brkmn rf 2 2 1 3 BrWod 1b 3 0 1 1
Punto ph-2b 0 1 0 0 McKnr c 3 0 1 0
Freese 3b 5 0 2 1 Correia p 1 0 0 0
YMolin c 4 1 2 2 DMcCt p 0 0 0 0
G.Laird ph-1b 1 0 0 1 Paul ph 1 0 0 0
Descals ss 3 0 2 1 Watson p 0 0 0 0
JGarci p 4 0 0 0 Overay ph 1 0 0 0
Motte p 1 0 0 0 Veras p 0 0 0 0
Walters p 0 0 0 0 Beimel p 0 0 0 0
Totals 38 912 9 Totals 32 1 8 1
St. Louis............................. 020 050 002 9
Pittsburgh .......................... 010 000 000 1
DPSt. Louis 3, Pittsburgh 1. LOBSt. Louis 9,
Pittsburgh 5. 2BHolliday (21), Freese (7), Walker
(18), Diaz (11). HRBerkman (27), Y.Molina (7).
SBdArnaud (7).
IP H R ER BB SO
St. Louis
J.Garcia W,10-4...... 7
1
3 8 1 1 1 5
Motte.........................
2
3 0 0 0 0 1
Walters..................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Pittsburgh
Correia L,11-8......... 4
2
3 8 7 7 3 2
D.McCutchen ..........
1
3 0 0 0 0 0
Watson ..................... 3 3 0 0 1 2
Veras ........................
2
3 1 2 2 3 1
Beimel ......................
1
3 0 0 0 0 1
WPJ.Garcia.
UmpiresHome, Wally Bell;First, John Hirsch-
beck;Second, Scott Barry;Third, Laz Diaz.
T2:53. A39,102 (38,362).
Diamondbacks 12, Rockies 3
Colorado Arizona
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Fowler cf 3 0 0 0 Blmqst ss 4 3 2 0
M.Ellis 2b 3 1 1 0 Brrghs 3b 0 0 0 0
EYong ph-2b 1 0 0 0 GParra lf 2 3 2 0
Helton 1b 3 1 1 0 ACastll p 0 0 0 0
Iannett ph-1b 1 0 1 0 HBlanc c 0 0 0 0
Tlwtzk ss 3 1 2 1 J.Upton rf 5 2 3 6
JHerrr ph-ss 1 0 0 0 CYoung cf 3 1 1 0
S.Smith rf 4 0 0 0 Monter c 4 2 2 5
Wggntn 3b 3 0 1 2 Patersn p 0 0 0 0
Stults p 0 0 0 0 RRorts 2b 4 0 0 0
Giambi ph 1 0 0 0 Allen 1b 5 0 1 0
Splrghs lf 4 0 0 0
Ransm
3b-ss 5 0 0 0
Alfonzo c 3 0 1 0 Cllmntr p 2 0 2 1
Hamml p 1 0 0 0 Nady ph-lf 1 1 1 0
IStewrt 3b 1 0 0 0
Totals 32 3 7 3 Totals 35121412
Colorado.......................... 010 200 000 3
Arizona............................. 520 001 40x 12
EAlfonzo (2). DPArizona 1. LOBColorado 4,
Arizona 8. 2BHelton (20), Iannetta (12), J.Upton
(26), Montero (23), Nady (11). HRTulowitzki (19),
J.Upton (17), Montero (12). CSG.Parra (1). S
Hammel, Collmenter.
IP H R ER BB SO
Colorado
Hammel L,5-10........ 5
2
3 12 8 8 4 7
Stults......................... 2
1
3 2 4 4 3 2
Arizona
Collmenter W,6-5.... 7 6 3 3 0 4
A.Castillo.................. 1 1 0 0 1 0
Paterson................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBPby Stults (G.Parra). WPHammel.
UmpiresHome, Derryl Cousins;First, Jim Rey-
nolds;Second, Jim Wolf;Third, Ron Kulpa.
T3:01. A34,849 (48,633).
A M E R I C A N
L E A G U E
Athletics 4, Yankees 3
Oakland New York
ab r h bi ab r h bi
JWeeks 2b 4 0 2 1 Gardnr lf 4 1 0 0
Pnngtn ss 5 0 1 0 Jeter ss 4 0 3 0
Matsui dh 5 2 2 1 Grndrs cf 4 0 0 0
Wlngh lf 4 1 2 2 Teixeir 1b 4 0 1 1
Crisp pr-cf 0 0 0 0 Cano dh-2b 5 1 2 0
DeJess rf 4 0 0 0 Swisher rf 2 1 1 1
SSizmr 3b 3 0 0 0 Martin c 4 0 2 1
Sweeny cf-lf 5 1 1 0
ENunez
2b-3b 2 0 0 0
CJcksn 1b 3 0 2 0 B.Laird 3b 3 0 0 0
Powell c 3 0 0 0 Posada ph 1 0 0 0
Roertsn p 0 0 0 0
Totals 36 410 4 Totals 33 3 9 3
Oakland.............................. 002 001 100 4
New York ........................... 010 001 001 3
DPOakland 1. LOBOakland 12, New York 11.
2BJ.Weeks (10), Pennington (12), C.Jackson
(12), Jeter (15), Cano (24). HRMatsui (8), Willing-
ham (13), Swisher (12). SBGardner (31), Jeter
(11). CSGranderson (9). SFTeixeira.
IP H R ER BB SO
Oakland
Harden W,2-1.......... 5
1
3 5 2 2 4 6
Ziegler H,6...............
2
3 0 0 0 1 1
Breslow H,7.............
2
3 1 0 0 0 1
Balfour H,17............. 1
1
3 2 0 0 1 0
A.Bailey S,11-13 ..... 1 1 1 1 1 1
New York
A.J.Burnett L,8-8..... 5
2
3 6 3 3 3 6
Wade........................
1
3 1 0 0 0 0
Logan........................ 2 2 1 1 0 1
Robertson................ 1 1 0 0 2 1
HBPby A.J.Burnett (Willingham, J.Weeks).
UmpiresHome, Bill Welke;First, Jeff Nelson;Se-
cond, Vic Carapazza;Third, Manny Gonzalez.
T3:42. A46,188 (50,291).
Twins 4, Tigers 1
Detroit Minnesota
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Dirks cf 3 0 0 0 Revere cf 3 1 1 0
Raburn ph-cf 1 0 1 0 ACasill 2b 3 0 0 0
Boesch lf 4 1 1 0 Mauer c 3 0 0 0
Ordonz rf 3 0 1 0 Cuddyr 1b 3 0 1 1
MiCarr 1b 4 0 2 1 Kubel dh 4 1 1 0
VMrtnz dh 4 0 0 0 Valenci 3b 3 2 1 1
JhPerlt ss 4 0 2 0 DYong lf 3 0 1 2
Guillen 2b 4 0 1 0 Plouffe rf 3 0 0 0
Avila c 3 0 0 0 Repko rf 0 0 0 0
Kelly 3b 2 0 0 0 Nishiok ss 3 0 2 0
Betemt ph-3b 1 0 0 0
Totals 33 1 8 1 Totals 28 4 7 4
Detroit................................. 000 001 000 1
Minnesota.......................... 110 200 00x 4
EJh.Peralta (6). DPDetroit 3, Minnesota 1.
LOBDetroit 7, Minnesota5. 2BRaburn(15), Mi-
.Cabrera (24), Jh.Peralta (19), D.Young (14). HR
Valencia (12). SBRevere (14). CSGuillen (1).
IP H R ER BB SO
Detroit
Penny L,7-7............. 7 7 4 4 3 4
Purcey ......................
2
3 0 0 0 2 1
Oliveros....................
1
3 0 0 0 0 0
Minnesota
S.Baker W,8-5......... 5 3 0 0 1 5
Swarzak ................... 1 3 1 1 0 0
Dumatrait H,4 .......... 1 0 0 0 1 1
Perkins H,14............ 1 1 0 0 0 2
Nathan S,7-10.......... 1 1 0 0 0 1
Swarzak pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
WPPenny.
UmpiresHome, Bill Miller;First, Gary Ceder-
strom;Second, Adrian Johnson;Third, Fieldin Cul-
breth.
T2:58. A40,764 (39,500).
Orioles 3, Angels 2
Los Angeles Baltimore
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Aybar ss 4 0 3 0 Hardy ss 4 0 3 0
TrHntr dh 3 0 0 0 Markks rf 4 0 1 1
Abreu rf 3 1 0 0 AdJons cf 3 1 1 2
V.Wells lf 4 1 1 2 MrRynl 3b 4 0 1 0
Callasp 3b 4 0 2 0 D.Lee 1b 4 0 1 0
Trout pr 0 0 0 0 Reimld lf 3 0 2 0
HKndrc 2b 4 0 2 0 J.Bell dh 3 0 0 0
Branyn 1b 3 0 0 0 Andino 2b 3 1 2 0
Bourjos cf 3 0 0 0 Tatum c 3 1 2 0
Mathis c 2 0 0 0
MIzturs ph 1 0 0 0
BoWlsn c 0 0 0 0
Totals 31 2 8 2 Totals 31 313 3
Los Angeles....................... 200 000 000 2
Baltimore............................ 000 120 00x 3
DPLos Angeles 4, Baltimore 2. LOBLos An-
geles 4, Baltimore 5. 2BAybar (21), Callaspo 2
(15), Reimold(3). HRV.Wells (16), Ad.Jones (17).
CSAybar (3), H.Kendrick (3). SFAd.Jones.
IP H R ER BB SO
Los Angeles
Pineiro L,5-5............ 5
1
3 11 3 3 0 0
R.Thompson............ 1 2 0 0 0 0
Ho.Ramirez..............
2
3 0 0 0 0 0
Rodney..................... 1 0 0 0 0 2
Baltimore
Bergesen W,2-6...... 6 6 2 2 2 3
Ji.Johnson H,14...... 1 1 0 0 0 0
Uehara H,12............ 1 0 0 0 0 1
Gregg S,16-20 ........ 1 1 0 0 0 1
UmpiresHome, Greg Gibson;First, Todd Tiche-
nor;Second, Lance Barrett;Third, Angel Hernan-
dez.
T2:21. A20,311 (45,438).
Red Sox 3, Mariners 1
Seattle Boston
ab r h bi ab r h bi
ISuzuki rf 4 0 1 0 Ellsury cf 4 1 2 2
Ryan ss 5 0 1 0 Pedroia 2b 4 0 2 0
Ackley 2b 5 0 3 0 AdGnzl 1b 3 0 1 0
Smoak 1b 3 0 0 0 Youkils 3b 4 0 0 0
Figgins pr-3b 0 0 0 0 D.Ortiz dh 4 0 1 0
AKndy 3b-1b 3 0 0 0 Crwfrd lf 4 0 1 0
Carp lf 4 1 1 1 Reddck rf 4 0 0 0
Cust dh 4 0 1 0 Varitek c 3 1 1 0
FGtrrz cf 4 0 1 0 Scutaro ss 3 1 2 0
J.Bard c 3 0 0 0
Olivo ph 1 0 1 0
Totals 36 1 9 1 Totals 33 310 2
Seattle ................................ 000 000 100 1
Boston................................ 000 000 30x 3
EJ.Bard (1), Carp (2). DPSeattle1. LOBSeat-
tle 11, Boston 7. 2BCust (15), Pedroia (23), Ad-
.Gonzalez (30), D.Ortiz (25), Scutaro (7). HR
Carp (2). SBF.Gutierrez (8), Olivo (4), Pedroia
(20). SA.Kennedy.
IP H R ER BB SO
Seattle
Beavan L,1-2........... 6
2
3 9 3 3 0 4
Pauley....................... 0 1 0 0 0 0
Laffey........................ 1
1
3 0 0 0 1 0
Boston
Beckett W,9-3.......... 7 7 1 1 1 7
D.Bard H,24............. 1 1 0 0 1 1
Papelbon S,23-24... 1 1 0 0 0 1
Pauley pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
WPLaffey, Beckett.
UmpiresHome, TimTimmons;First, Jeff Kellogg-
;Second, Mark Carlson;Third, Eric Cooper.
T3:15. A38,115 (37,493).
Royals 5, Rays 4, 10 innings
Tampa Bay Kansas City
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Jnnngs lf 3 2 2 1 AGordn lf 5 0 3 1
Damon dh 5 0 1 1 MeCarr cf 5 0 0 0
Zobrist rf-2b 5 1 2 1 Butler dh 5 1 1 0
Longori 3b 4 0 2 1 Aviles pr 0 1 0 0
BUpton cf 4 0 0 0 Hosmer 1b 5 2 3 1
SRdrgz 2b 3 0 0 0 Francr rf 3 0 1 0
Joyce ph-rf 1 0 1 0 Mostks 3b 3 0 2 3
Ktchm 1b 5 0 1 0 B.Pena c 3 0 0 0
Shppch c 4 0 1 0 Maier ph 1 0 0 0
Fuld ph 1 0 0 0 Treanr c 0 0 0 0
Chirins c 0 0 0 0 Getz 2b 3 0 0 0
EJhnsn ss 5 1 1 0 AEscor ss 4 1 0 0
Totals 40 411 4 Totals 37 510 5
Tampa Bay ................... 110 011 000 0 4
Kansas City.................. 000 201 001 1 5
No outs when winning run scored.
ELongoria (7), Jennings (1). DPKansas City 1.
LOBTampa Bay11, Kansas City 8. 2BJennings
(1), Damon (17), Zobrist (30), Longoria (18), A.Gor-
don (26), Hosmer (14), Francoeur (25), Moustakas
(4). 3BJennings (1), E.Johnson (2). SBJen-
nings (1), A.Gordon (9). SFMoustakas.
IP H R ER BB SO
Tampa Bay
Niemann................... 6 7 3 2 0 4
Jo.Peralta H,14....... 1
1
3 0 0 0 0 3
Howell H,4 ...............
2
3 0 0 0 0 1
Farnsworth
BS,4-23.................... 1 1 1 1 1 1
B.Gomes L,0-1........ 0 2 1 1 0 0
Kansas City
Francis...................... 5 9 3 3 2 6
G.Holland................. 3 1 1 1 1 6
Crow......................... 1 0 0 0 2 1
Soria W,5-3.............. 1 1 0 0 0 2
Crow pitched to 2 batters in the 10th.
B.Gomes pitched to 2 batters in the 10th.
HBPby Howell (Francoeur). WPNiemann.
BalkHowell.
UmpiresHome, Ted Barrett;First, Brian Runge-
;Second, Marvin Hudson;Third, Tim McClelland.
T3:25. A27,643 (37,903).
Rangers 5, Blue Jays 4
Toronto Texas
ab r h bi ab r h bi
YEscor ss 4 1 2 0 Kinsler 2b 4 1 1 0
EThms rf 4 2 2 1 Andrus ss 4 0 0 1
CPttrsn rf 0 0 0 0 JHmltn cf 4 1 3 1
Bautist dh 3 0 1 1 MiYong dh 5 0 2 1
Lind 1b 4 0 1 1 N.Cruz rf 4 0 1 1
Encrnc 3b 4 0 0 0 DvMrp lf 4 1 2 0
A.Hill 2b 4 0 1 0 Torreal c 4 0 0 0
Snider lf 4 0 0 0 C.Davis 3b 3 0 1 1
RDavis cf 3 0 1 0 Napoli ph 0 1 0 0
Arencii c 3 1 1 1 Morlnd 1b 3 0 2 0
Gentry pr 0 1 0 0
Totals 33 4 9 4 Totals 35 512 5
Toronto............................... 100 003 000 4
Texas.................................. 001 110 002 5
Two outs when winning run scored.
ERzepczynski (1), Andrus (18). DPToronto 1,
Texas 2. LOBToronto 3, Texas 9.
2BY.Escobar (17), E.Thames (12), Lind (10), Kin-
sler (24), N.Cruz (17). 3BE.Thames (3), J.Hamil-
ton (3). HRArencibia (15). SBJ.Hamilton (6),
Dav.Murphy (6). CSY.Escobar (2), R.Davis (10).
SKinsler, Andrus, Moreland.
IP H R ER BB SO
Toronto
C.Villanueva ............ 5
2
3 10 3 3 0 1
Dotel H,4..................
1
3 0 0 0 0 1
Frasor H,10.............. 2 1 0 0 0 2
Rzepczynski L,2-3.. 0 0 2 1 1 0
Rauch BS,4-11........
2
3 1 0 0 1 0
Texas
M.Harrison............... 6
2
3 8 4 4 0 8
Tateyama ................. 1
1
3 0 0 0 0 2
M.Lowe.....................
2
3 1 0 0 1 1
D.Oliver W,3-5 ........
1
3 0 0 0 0 0
Rzepczynski pitched to 2 batters in the 9th.
UmpiresHome, Tony Randazzo;First, Brian Gor-
man;Second, Dan Bellino;Third, Chris Conroy.
T3:08. A38,537 (49,170).
F R I D A Y S
L A T E B O X E S
Tigers 8, Twins 2
Detroit Minnesota
ab r h bi ab r h bi
AJcksn cf 5 1 1 0 Revere cf 4 0 0 0
Raburn lf 4 2 2 1 ACasill 2b 4 0 2 0
Ordonz rf 4 2 2 0 Mauer c 4 0 0 0
Kelly rf 1 0 0 0 Cuddyr 1b 4 1 1 0
MiCarr dh 5 0 1 0 Kubel rf 2 0 1 0
VMrtnz 1b 4 1 1 1 Repko pr 0 1 0 0
JhPerlt ss 5 2 3 4 Valenci 3b 4 0 1 1
Guillen 2b 4 0 1 2 Thome dh 4 0 2 1
RSantg 2b 1 0 0 0 LHughs pr 0 0 0 0
Avila c 3 0 1 0 DYong lf 3 0 0 0
Betemt 3b 4 0 1 0 Nishiok ss 3 0 0 0
Totals 40 813 8 Totals 32 2 7 2
Detroit................................. 112 031 000 8
Minnesota.......................... 010 000 001 2
DPDetroit 2. LOBDetroit 8, Minnesota 6.
2BJh.Peralta (18), A.Casilla (19). HRRaburn
(9), Jh.Peralta (16).
IP H R ER BB SO
Detroit
Scherzer W,11-5..... 7 4 1 1 1 4
Alburquerque........... 1 1 0 0 1 1
Oliveros....................
1
3 2 1 1 1 0
Valverde...................
2
3 0 0 0 0 0
Minnesota
Duensing L,7-8........ 4
2
3 9 7 7 1 7
Al.Burnett ................. 1
1
3 3 1 1 1 3
Mijares...................... 2 1 0 0 0 0
Perkins ..................... 1 0 0 0 0 0
HBPby Al.Burnett (Raburn).
UmpiresHome, Fieldin Culbreth;First, Bill Miller-
;Second, Gary Cederstrom;Third, Adrian Johnson.
T3:15. A40,691 (39,500).
Royals 10, Rays 4
Tampa Bay Kansas City
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Damon dh-lf 5 1 3 0 AGordn lf 5 1 2 0
Zobrist 2b 5 0 1 1 MeCarr cf 5 2 3 3
Ktchm 1b 2 1 0 0 Butler dh 4 2 2 2
Longori 3b 3 1 1 2 Hosmer 1b 5 1 2 2
Joyce rf 5 1 1 1 Francr rf 5 1 3 1
BUpton cf 4 0 1 0 Mostks 3b 5 0 1 1
McGee p 0 0 0 0 Treanr c 3 1 1 0
Fuld lf-cf 3 0 1 0 Getz 2b 4 2 1 0
Chirins c 4 0 1 0 AEscor ss 2 0 1 0
SRdrgz ss 4 0 0 0 Aviles ss 2 0 0 0
Totals 35 4 9 4 Totals 401016 9
Tampa Bay....................... 100 003 000 4
Kansas City ..................... 301 013 20x 10
EJoyce (2). DPTampa Bay 1, Kansas City 1.
LOBTampa Bay 10, Kansas City 10. 2BDamon
(16), Zobrist (29), A.Gordon (25), Me.Cabrera (25),
Hosmer (13), Francoeur (24). HRLongoria (13),
Joyce (14), Butler (7). SBB.Upton (23), Getz (18).
IP H R ER BB SO
Tampa Bay
W.Davis L,7-7.......... 5
1
3 11 6 5 0 3
Howell.......................
2
3 3 2 2 1 1
B.Gomes.................. 1 2 2 2 2 1
McGee...................... 1 0 0 0 1 0
Kansas City
Hochevar W,6-8...... 5
1
3 6 4 4 3 2
L.Coleman H,5 ........
2
3 0 0 0 0 1
Collins....................... 1 1 0 0 1 1
Bl.Wood ................... 1 1 0 0 0 1
Adcock ..................... 1 1 0 0 1 0
HBPby Hochevar (Fuld). WPHochevar.
UmpiresHome, Tim McClelland;First, Ted Bar-
rett;Second, Brian Runge;Third, Marvin Hudson.
T3:13. A27,824 (37,903).
Rockies 8, Diamondbacks 4
Colorado Arizona
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Fowler cf 5 2 3 1 Blmqst ss 5 0 2 1
M.Ellis 2b 4 2 3 1 KJhnsn 2b 2 0 0 0
Helton 1b 2 0 0 1 RRorts 2b 3 0 0 0
Tlwtzk ss 5 0 1 2 J.Upton rf 3 0 2 0
S.Smith rf 3 1 1 1 CYoung cf 4 0 0 0
Wggntn 3b 4 1 1 0 Monter c 4 2 2 0
IStewrt 3b 1 0 1 0 Blum 3b 4 1 1 2
Splrghs lf 5 0 1 1 Allen 1b 1 0 0 0
Iannett c 5 0 0 0 Nady ph-1b 1 0 0 0
A.Cook p 3 1 2 1 GParra lf 3 0 2 1
Belisle p 0 0 0 0 DHdsn p 3 1 0 0
EYong ph 0 1 0 0 Patersn p 0 0 0 0
Brothrs p 0 0 0 0 Demel p 0 0 0 0
RBtncr p 0 0 0 0 ACastll p 0 0 0 0
R.Cook p 0 0 0 0
Brrghs ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 37 813 8 Totals 34 4 9 4
Colorado ............................ 002 100 221 8
Arizona............................... 030 001 000 4
DPColorado 2, Arizona 2. LOBColorado 9, Ari-
zona7. 2BFowler (16), Tulowitzki (24), Wigginton
(16), J.Upton (25). 3BFowler (8), Bloomquist (1),
Montero (1). HRBlum (1). SBM.Ellis (2),
S.Smith (4), I.Stewart (2). CSBloomquist (6).
SFHelton, S.Smith.
IP H R ER BB SO
Colorado
A.Cook W,1-5.......... 6 8 4 4 2 1
Belisle H,8................ 1 1 0 0 1 1
Brothers H,6 ............ 1 0 0 0 0 2
R.Betancourt ........... 1 0 0 0 1 2
Arizona
D.Hudson L,10-6 .... 6
1
3 10 5 5 1 7
Paterson...................
1
3 0 0 0 0 0
Demel ....................... 1 2 2 2 1 1
A.Castillo..................
1
3 0 0 0 0 0
R.Cook ..................... 1 1 1 1 1 0
HBPby D.Hudson(M.Ellis, Helton). WPD.Hud-
son.
UmpiresHome, Ron Kulpa;First, Derryl Cousins-
;Second, Jim Reynolds;Third, Jim Wolf.
T3:13. A22,768 (48,633).
Nationals 7, Dodgers 2
Washington Los Angeles
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Berndn cf 3 0 0 0 GwynJ lf 3 0 0 0
HrstnJr
ph-cf-lf 2 1 1 4 Furcal ss 4 0 0 0
Espinos 2b 5 0 0 0 Ethier rf 4 0 1 0
Zmrmn 3b 5 1 2 0 Kemp cf 3 1 0 0
Morse 1b 4 0 1 1 JRiver 1b 3 1 1 0
Werth rf 4 0 1 0 MacDgl p 0 0 0 0
L.Nix lf 2 0 0 0 Kuo p 0 0 0 0
Ankiel cf 1 1 1 0 Guerrir p 0 0 0 0
WRams c 4 0 0 0 Uribe 3b 3 0 0 1
Dsmnd ss 1 2 1 0 Jansen p 0 0 0 0
Lannan p 3 1 2 2 Loney 1b 1 0 0 0
SBurntt p 0 0 0 0 Barajs c 3 0 0 0
Clipprd p 0 0 0 0 JCarrll 2b 4 0 0 0
Stairs ph 0 0 0 0 Kuroda p 1 0 0 0
Flores ph 0 1 0 0 Elbert p 0 0 0 0
Storen p 0 0 0 0 Miles 3b 1 0 1 0
Totals 34 7 9 7 Totals 30 2 3 1
Washington ....................... 120 000 004 7
Los Angeles....................... 000 200 000 2
EDesmond 2 (15). DPWashington 1. LOB
Washington 5, Los Angeles 6. 2BMorse (21), An-
kiel (10), J.Rivera (2), Miles (11). HRHairston Jr.
(4), Lannan (1). SBZimmerman (2). CSL.Nix
(2). SKuroda.
IP H R ER BB SO
Washington
Lannan W,7-6.......... 6
1
3 3 2 1 4 6
S.Burnett H,11 ........
2
3 0 0 0 0 1
Clippard H,25 .......... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Storen....................... 1 0 0 0 0 2
Los Angeles
Kuroda L,6-12 ......... 6
1
3 7 3 3 3 7
Elbert ........................
1
3 0 0 0 0 0
Jansen...................... 1
1
3 0 0 0 0 4
MacDougal ..............
1
3 1 2 2 1 0
Kuo ........................... 0 0 1 1 1 0
Guerrier ....................
2
3 1 1 1 0 0
Kuo pitched to 1 batter in the 9th.
UmpiresHome, Cory Blaser;First, Andy Fletcher-
;Second, Tim Welke;Third, Mike DiMuro.
T3:22. A39,839 (56,000).
Brewers 4, Giants 2
Milwaukee San Francisco
ab r h bi ab r h bi
C.Hart rf 4 0 1 0 AnTrrs cf 4 1 1 0
Morgan cf 4 0 0 0 Kppngr 2b 4 0 1 0
Kotsay lf 4 0 0 0 PSndvl 3b 4 0 0 1
Fielder 1b 4 1 1 0 A.Huff 1b 4 0 1 0
RWeks 2b 3 1 0 0 Schrhlt rf 3 0 0 0
McGeh 3b 4 1 1 0 C.Ross lf 3 0 0 0
YBtncr ss 4 1 2 2 BCrwfr ss 3 0 1 0
Lucroy c 4 0 2 2 Whitsd c 2 0 0 0
Marcm p 3 0 1 0 Fontent ph 1 0 0 0
FrRdrg p 0 0 0 0 CStwrt c 0 0 0 0
Counsll ph 1 0 0 0 Cain p 1 0 0 0
Axford p 0 0 0 0 Rownd ph 1 1 1 1
Mota p 0 0 0 0
Affeldt p 0 0 0 0
Belt ph 1 0 0 0
RRmrz p 0 0 0 0
Totals 35 4 8 4 Totals 31 2 5 2
Milwaukee.......................... 030 001 000 4
San Francisco.................... 100 001 000 2
EKeppinger (4). DPMilwaukee 1, San Francis-
co 1. LOBMilwaukee 5, San Francisco 2.
2BY.Betancourt (15), An.Torres (21). HRRow-
and (3).
IP H R ER BB SO
Milwaukee
Marcum W,9-3 ........ 7 4 2 2 0 5
Fr.Rodriguez H,2 .... 1 0 0 0 0 2
Axford S,27-29........ 1 1 0 0 0 1
San Francisco
Cain L,8-6 ................ 6 8 4 3 1 2
Mota.......................... 1 0 0 0 0 0
Affeldt ....................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
R.Ramirez................ 1 0 0 0 0 2
UmpiresHome, Joe West;First, Sam Holbrook-
;Second, Paul Schrieber;Third, Chad Fairchild.
T2:24. A42,297 (41,915).
S T A N D I N G S
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Boston .......................................... 61 37 .622 8-2 W-3 30-17 31-20
New York...................................... 58 40 .592 3 5-5 L-1 31-20 27-20
Tampa Bay ................................... 52 47 .525 9
1
2 6
1
2 3-7 L-2 24-25 28-22
Toronto......................................... 50 50 .500 12 9 7-3 L-1 24-24 26-26
Baltimore ...................................... 40 57 .412 20
1
2 17
1
2 4-6 W-1 26-27 14-30
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Detroit............................................. 53 47 .530 5-5 L-1 29-22 24-25
Cleveland....................................... 51 47 .520 1 7 4-6 L-3 27-19 24-28
Chicago.......................................... 48 51 .485 4
1
2 10
1
2 5-5 W-1 21-25 27-26
Minnesota...................................... 47 53 .470 6 12 5-5 W-1 26-24 21-29
Kansas City ................................... 42 58 .420 11 17 5-5 W-4 28-28 14-30
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Texas .......................................... 58 43 .574 8-2 W-2 33-18 25-25
Los Angeles ............................... 54 47 .535 4 5
1
2 5-5 L-1 28-23 26-24
Oakland ...................................... 44 56 .440 13
1
2 15 5-5 W-1 26-22 18-34
Seattle......................................... 43 57 .430 14
1
2 16 0-10 L-14 23-26 20-31
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Philadelphia................................. 63 36 .636 7-3 W-4 36-15 27-21
Atlanta........................................... 59 42 .584 5 5-5 L-1 30-19 29-23
New York...................................... 50 50 .500 13
1
2 8
1
2 4-6 L-1 22-26 28-24
Washington.................................. 49 50 .495 14 9 4-6 W-1 28-18 21-32
Florida........................................... 48 53 .475 16 11 5-5 W-1 23-32 25-21
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Milwaukee .................................... 54 47 .535 6-4 W-1 33-14 21-33
St. Louis ....................................... 53 47 .530
1
2 5
1
2 6-4 W-3 25-21 28-26
Pittsburgh..................................... 51 47 .520 1
1
2 6
1
2 5-5 L-3 25-25 26-22
Cincinnati...................................... 49 51 .490 4
1
2 9
1
2 5-5 W-1 26-23 23-28
Chicago ........................................ 41 60 .406 13 18 4-6 W-2 24-31 17-29
Houston........................................ 33 67 .330 20
1
2 25
1
2 3-7 L-2 17-36 16-31
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
San Francisco.............................. 57 43 .570 7-3 L-2 30-18 27-25
Arizona ......................................... 54 47 .535 3
1
2 5 5-5 W-1 28-23 26-24
Colorado....................................... 48 53 .475 9
1
2 11 5-5 L-1 26-26 22-27
San Diego..................................... 44 57 .436 13
1
2 15 4-6 L-2 20-30 24-27
Los Angeles................................. 43 56 .434 13
1
2 15 5-5 L-1 23-28 20-28
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 PAGE 5C
S P O R T S
OLD FORGE Back Moun-
tain American advanced to the
Little League Section 5 10-11
baseball title game with a 17-7
win over Wallenpaupack on
Saturday at the Old Forge
Little League.
American will face District
16 winner Mountain Top today
in Old Forge.
J.D. Barrett (4-for-4, double,
two home runs) and Josh Hold-
redge (5-for-5, double, home
run) led the way for Americans
offense. David Shuster and
Matt Mathers garnered three
hits, including a double. Carl
Markowski pitched in with a
home run.
Pete Trout batted 3-for-4
with a double for Wallenpau-
pack. Mac Pett had two hits
and a double.
Mountain Top 9,
Back Mountain American 8
Mountain Top moved on to
todays championship game in
Old Forge with a victory Friday
night.
Nick Andrews led the of-
fense with two homers and a
single. Brandon Brozena, Jus-
tin Darden and Sean Wills had
two hits each. Collin Macko,
Brett Calade, Evan Knapp and
Stephen Wegener added a
single each.
Devin Robbins had four hits
for Back Mountain. Dave
Schuster had three hits, and
Josh Holdredge homered.
EXETER CLASSIC
8-9 BASEBALL
Hanover 9, Swoyersville 7
Tory Metric and Zach Halen-
da each had hits and two RBI
to pace Hanovers offense.
Winning pitcher Max Menddr-
zycki struck out six over three
innings.
John Polachak and Jay Sarris
each had a hit and two RBI to
lead Swoyersville.
West Pittston No. 1 14,
North Wilkes-Barre 1
John Angelella struck out
eight and allowed just for hits
for West Pittston-1.
Angelella, F.J. Braccini and
Patrick Musinski all doubled
and had two singles. Dominic
Deluca had a double and sin-
gle, while Daniel Wiedl tripled.
Chad Regan, Josh Rhodes,
Hayden Krzywicki and Cam-
eron Krugell had a hit apiece
for North Wilkes-Barre.
Mountain Top Red 5,
Back Mountain Navy 4
Aiden Murphy, Bryce Zapu-
sek, Paul Ceicel and Stew Cala-
die each went 2-for-3 for Moun-
tain Top Red.
Back Mountain Navys Jack
Lukasazage tripled, and Mike
Starbuck and Mack Paczewski
each doubled.
LEGION DEVELOPMENTAL
STATE PLAYOFFS
Swoyersville 11,
West Chester 5
Ryan Hogan had a three-run
homer and three singles as
Swoyersville opened play in
Coopersburg with a victory.
Justin Montalvo was 3-for-5
with two doubles. Grant Powell
and L.J. Wesneski each dou-
bled and singles. Powell also
tossed five innings.
Swoyersville plays at 7 p.m.
today.
W-B REC
SENIOR BASEBALL
Hanover 16, Nanticoke 3
Jordan Choman struck out
eight batters to earn a win to
lead Hanover to a Wilkes-Barre
Rec championship. Choman
also recorded two hits.
Tyler Gavlick connected on a
three-run home run. Tony
Molitoris singled and homered.
Kyle Windt hit two singles and
a double.
Kyle Pokrinchak homered for
Nanticoke.
SENIOR SOFTBALL
STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS
Plains 8, DuBois 4
Plains moved to the state
championship game with a 4-0
record after defeating DuBois.
Sara Degnan and Marissa
Ross each singled and drove in
an RBI for Plains. Abby Stas-
kiel, Keighlyn Oliver and Casey
Miller all notched a single.
Plains takes on Worthington
today in the state champion-
ship game.
TOMMYS PIZZA CORNER
MINOR BASEBALL
Bob Horlacher 10,
Kingston/Forty Fort 3
Winning pitcher Tommy
Traver struck out five in 5 2/3
innings.
Cole Coolbaugh posted two
doubles, and Tyler Fox regis-
tered two hits and two runs.
For KFF, Nikko Simons had
two hits and scored one run.
L O C A L R O U N D U P
American will battle
Mountain Top for title
The Times Leader staff
Before this last inning, I told
the girls to just go out and do
what youve been doing through-
out the tournament, GWA head
coach Robert Bresnahan said.
Just stay relaxed and the game
will come to you.
GWA was the first to score on
Bree Bednarskis two-out RBI
double in the top of the third in-
ning. Nicole Turner then lined an
RBI triple over the outstretched
glove of Carbinos Paige Durkin.
Przybyla added another run with
an RBI double to deep center
field to give GWA an early 3-0
lead.
However, Carbino would not
go down without a fight, scoring
five runs inthe bottomof the fifth
inning on two-run doubles by
Kelly Mecca and Clare Sebastia-
nelli. Caselli added an RBI single
to complete the offensive barrage
andgive Carbino a 5-3 advantage.
GWA crawled back to within
one run and set the stage for its
seventh inning comeback victory
when Turner scored from third
on a safety squeeze by Lauren
Maloney in the sixth inning.
Following GWAs six-run top of
the seventh, Carbino began to
stage a late rally by scoring two
runs on an RBI single by Sebas-
tianelli and an RBI groundout by
Caselli to make the score 10-7.
However, the rally fell short as
Durkin grounded out to Turner
at shortstop to end the game.
They are a good hitting team
and theres nothing you can do
about that, Carbino head coach
KimMecca said. With the bases-
loaded and a 3-2 count, we had to
throw one in there to Przybyla
and she hit the fence.
I wish them luck and hope
they go far.
Nicole Cumbo was dominant
early on for GWA, which allowed
it to get out to an early lead and
kept the teamin the game. In her
complete game effort, Cumbo re-
cordedthree strikeouts andwalk-
ed three.
Nicole threw a very smart
game, Bresnahan said. She
made no mistakes on the mound
and thats what it takes to beat a
very good Carbino Club team.
Pacing GWA offensively were
Przybyla, who finished 2-for-4
with two doubles and four RBI,
and Turner, who went 2-for-4
with a double and a triple while
recording one RBI.
For Carbino, Sebastianelli was
2-for-4 at the plate with a double
and three RBI.
GWAs Lindsey Carey is all smiles as she scored a run in the sev-
enth inning against Carbino Club on Saturday.
Carbrino Clubs Kelly Mecca is safe at first as GWAs Heather
Nametko gets the throw late in the fourth inning on Saturday.
FRED ADAMS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
GWA pitcher Nicole Cumbo tags Carbino Clubs Griffen Jones out at home in the sixth inning on Saturday.
GWAs Jordan Kelly bunts in the fifth inning to get on base
against Carbino Club on Saturday.
GWA
Continued fromPage 1C
first victory since June 23. All
three of his wins this season have
come at PNC Field.
After allowing a pair of solo
home runs in the third inning to
Steve Lombardozzi and Chris
Marrero that gave Syracuse a 2-0
lead, Smith (3-2) didnt give up
anything else as he lasted six in-
nings, retired the final 10 batters
he faced and tied his season-high
with seven strikeouts.
The Yankees came right back
in the bottomof the third to even
the score at 2-2. Greg Golson tri-
pled to score Doug Bernier (2-
for-3, 2 runs scored) to cut the
lead to 2-1. Golson (1-for-3, 2
runs) then scored on a Jesus
Montero groundout to tie the
score.
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre got to
Syracuse left-hander TomMilone
again in the bottom of the fifth
andknockedSyracuses aceout of
the game as he lasted just 4
1
3 in-
nings.
Inthe frame, SWBscoredthree
runs with the big hit being a two-
run double down the left field
line by catcher Jesus Montero
that scored Bernier and Kevin
Russo (2-for-4). The third run of
the inning came across on an RBI
fielders choice by Jordan Parraz.
Milone (8-6), who started his
third game against the Yankees
this season, was tagged for five
runs in his outing. His record
against SWB dropped to 1-2. He
entered Saturdays start giving
up just four earned runs in 12 in-
nings.
Yankees reliever BuddyCarlyle
threw 1
1
3 scoreless innings, lefty
Randy Flores pitched
2
3 of an in-
ningandcloser KevinWhelanfin-
ished the game with a one-two-
three ninth for his International
League-leading 19th save.
Notes: Righty Andrew Brack-
man makes his return to the Yan-
kees rotation today after 11 relief
appearances. He will be opposed
by rehabbing Chien-Ming Wang,
who is expected to join the Na-
tionals sometime within the next
month. ... The time of the game
was 2 hours, 47 minutes.
HOWTHEY SCORED
CHIEFS THIRD: Steve Lombardozzi
homered. Brian Bixler grounded out.
Jesus Valdez groundedout. Chris Mar-
rero homered. Michael Aubrey struck
out. CHIEFS 2-0
YANKEES THIRD: Doug Bernier sin-
gled. KevinRussofouledout. GregGol-
son tripled to score Bernier. Jesus
Montero grounded out, scoring Gol-
son. Jorge Vazquez struck out. TIED
2-2
YANKEES FIFTH: Luis Nunez flied
out. DougBernier singled. KevinRusso
singled, Bernier moved to second.
Greg Golson walked to load the bases.
Jesus Montero doubled to score Ber-
nier and Russo. Jorge Vazquez walked
to load the bases. Jordan Parraz
grounded into fielders choice, Vaz-
quez out at second, Golson scored.
Mike Lamb struck out, but reached
base on a wild pitch, Parraz moved to
second to load the bases. P.J. Pilittere
flied out. YANKEES 5-2
SWB Yankees 5, Syracuse 2
SYRACUSE SWB YANKEES
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Lombrdzzi 2b 4 1 1 1 Russo lf 4 1 2 0
Bixler 3b 3 0 1 0 Golson cf 3 2 1 1
Valdez rf 4 0 1 0 Montero c 3 0 1 3
Marrero 1b 4 1 1 1 Vazquez 1b 3 0 0 0
Aubrey dh 4 0 0 0 Parraz rf 4 0 0 1
Bynum ss 3 0 0 0 Lamb 3b 4 0 0 0
Antonelli lf 3 0 1 0 Krum lf 0 0 0 0
Solano c 4 0 0 0 Pilittere dh 4 0 0 0
Brown cf 2 0 0 0 Nunez 2b 3 0 0 0
Bernier ss 3 2 2 0
Totals 31 2 5 2 Totals 31 5 6 5
Syracuse ............................. 002 000 000 2
SWB Yankees .................... 002 030 00x 5
DPSWBYankees1. LOBSyracuse6, SWBYan-
kees 5. 2B Russo (14), Montero (13). 3B Golson
(6). HR Lombardozzi (3), Marrero (10). SB Bixler
(3), Russo (9).
IP H R ER BB SO
Syracuse
Milone (L, 8-6).......... 4.1 6 5 5 2 5
Zinicola ...................... 1.2 0 0 0 1 3
Hyde .......................... 2.0 0 0 0 0 2
SWB Yankees
Smith, G (W, 3-2) .... 6.0 4 2 2 1 7
Carlyle (H, 5) ............ 1.1 1 0 0 3 1
Flores, R (H, 6) ........ 0.2 0 0 0 0 0
Whelan (S, 19) ......... 1.0 0 0 0 0 1
WP Zinicola.
Umpires HP: Kelvin Bultron. 1B: Craig Barron.
3B: Fran Burke.
T 2:47.
Att 8,421.
YANKS
Continued fromPage 1C
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre first baseman Jorge Vazquez, right, gets
the throw frompitcher Greg Smith as Syracuses Brian Bixler
dives back to the bag at PNC Field in Moosic on Saturday night.
Next Game: 1:05 p.m. today versus
Syracuse at PNC Field
Probable Pitchers: Chiefs RHP
Chien-Ming Wang (0-0, 4.76) vs.
Yankees RHP Andrew Brackman
(2-6, 7.51)
On Deck: The homestand con-
cludes Monday with a night game
against the Chiefs. The next game
at PNC Field after Monday is Aug.
1.
Radio: All games can be heard on
THE GAME (1340-AM) with Mike
Vander Woude
L O O K I N G A H E A D
ORANGE, N.J. The NEPA
Miners were shut out for the
second consecutive week, fall-
ing 22-0 to the New Jersey
Wolves.
The Miners (1-3) were led by
quarterback J.P. Antosh, who
completed 14-of-36 passes for
138 yards and an interception.
Dodson Watterton ran for 44
yards on seven carries and
caught four passes for 47
yards.
Ronald Grayson was the
teams leading receiver with
three catches for 68 yards.
Linebacker Reginald Moody
intercepted a pass at the goal
line.
F O O T B A L L
Punchless Miners thrown to the Wolves
The Times Leader staff
C M Y K
PAGE 6C SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S P O R T S
GRENOBLE, France Cadel
Evans seized the Tour de France
yellow jersey in the next-to-last
stage Saturday, all but giving
Australia its first victory in cy-
clings showpiece event andcap-
ping one of the most dramatic
races in years.
The two-time runner-up took
the overall lead by overcoming a
57-second deficit to Andy
Schleck of Luxembourg in the
time trial.
A red-eyed Evans choked up
on the victory podium, holding
back tears before hurling the
winners bouquet into the
crowd.
I really cant quite believe it
right now, the 34-year-old Aus-
sie said. I have beenconcentrat-
ing on one event for so long.
Although there is one more
stage todays ceremonial fin-
ish along the Champs-Elysees in
Paris theleader after thetime
trial is almost certain to be the
winner. Launching a successful
attack during that flat ride is vir-
tually impossible.
This years edition of the 108-
year-old race was tense all the
wayarivetingfinishandwith-
out a serious doping blight that
marred past Tours.
The Schleck brothers, know-
ingtheyhadlost, embracedafter
thefinishlineof the26-miletime
trial. Evans leads Andy Schleck
by 1:34, and Frank Schleck by
2:30.
The20thstagewaswonbyTo-
nyMartinof Germany. Evansfin-
ished second in the stage sev-
en seconds behind and was
2:31faster than Andy Schleck.
The riders set off inreverse or-
der of the standings. Andy
Schleck hadthe benefit of riding
last, and said beforehand hed
have the added inspiration of
wearing yellow.
Riders described the course
mostly flat featuring two
small hills as quite technical,
with a variety of tight turns. Af-
ter morning rains doused the
roads, sunshine dried them by
the time the leading contenders
left.
By the first intermediate time
check at the 9.3-mile mark,
Evans hadalready erased36 sec-
onds of his deficit to Andy
Schleck and was 34 seconds fas-
ter than the elder Schleck.
At the second, at 17.1 miles,
Andy Schlecks lead had van-
ished Evans was 1:32 faster.
The Luxembourg rider wasnt
even among the10 fastest riders
who had crossed that point.
Evans then kept gaining as the
stage progressed to the finish.
The looming victory for
Evans, the BMC team leader,
culminated a stellar and me-
thodical three weeks of riding.
Unlike defending champion Al-
berto Contador and other main
contenders, Evans was spared
crashes. His only real problem
was mechanical trouble Friday,
but he recovered without any
lost time.
Evans said he first saw the
Tour as a 14-year-old, watching
the successes of five-time cham-
pion Miguel Indurain. The Aus-
sie spoke movingly of former
coach Aldo Sassi, who often be-
lieved in me more than I did.
The Italian died in December.
For himtoday to see me now
would be quite something,
Evans said.
Evans won only one stage in
this Tour, the flat fourth stage.
But his triumphattests tohis dil-
igent preparation as he eyed a ti-
tle he has narrowly missed for
years.
Today, we went through the
process, like we had the plan ev-
erydayandtheplaneveryday
wasA, B, C, D, hesaid. Thekey
aspect to our Tour is consisten-
cy.
BMC also averted the many
crashes that wreaked havoc on
many teams, especially during
the first week.
Wewerecriticizedalot inthe
first 10 days for not going for-
ward enough, said John Lelan-
gue, BMCs sporting director.
But thats the strategy, to con-
sider every stage of the Tour de
France like it was the last.
Evans psychological tough-
ness had been questioned, but
he showed a veterans skill and
savvy to take cyclings greatest
prize.
This is the victory of a com-
plete rider, Tour director Chris-
tian Prudhomme said. Is the
consecration of a career.
Evans had been regarded as a
perennial underachiever until he
became a world champion two
years ago. Andheenjoyedasolid
build-up to the Tour, racing less
than usual so he would peak at
the right moment.
This wasnt Evans first come-
from-behindattempt. Inanother
next-to-last stage time trial in
2008, he trailed Carlos Sastre of
Spain by 1:34. Evans erased 29
seconds and finished second
overall. The previous year, he
wasonly23secondsbehindCon-
tador in second place.
Those were doping-marred
races. Leader Michael Rasmus-
sen of Denmark was kicked out
of the 2007 Tour for lying about
his training whereabouts when
he missed prerace doping tests.
The next year, third-place finish-
er BernardKohl of Germanywas
among several riders exposed as
cheats.
T O U R D E F R A N C E
AP PHOTO
New overall leader Cadel Evans of Australia celebrates on the podium during the 20th stage of
the Tour de France cycling race in Grenoble, Alps region, France, Saturday.
Evans on the verge of win
The 34-year-old Aussie
leads Andy Schleck by 1:34
entering todays final stage.
By JAMEY KEATEN
Associated Press
ing all sports, the ranges for each
classification vary from sport to
sport, so teams in one school can
beindifferent classifications for
example, the same school could
be 2Ain wrestling and 3Ain foot-
ball.
West Side students come pri-
marily from five districts, and as
long as the center has at least one
sports team, those students dont
count toward the sending dis-
tricts PIAAenrollment numbers.
Cut all West Side sports and, as
far as PIAA is concerned, those
students are added to enrollment
figures of their sending districts.
For districts already near the
upper limit of their current en-
rollment classification, the addi-
tion of even a handful of students
canpushthemintothe next level,
forcing them to compete against
a new list of larger schools.
The exact consequences cant
be known until all numbers are fi-
nal this fall. And PIAA is in the
middle of a two-year cycle regard-
ing classifications, so no changes
will be implemented this school
year regardless of the numbers;
the impact would hit in the 2012-
13 school year.
But a look at enrolment from
2010-11 shows the likely impact:
If Career Center students had
been included in their home dis-
trict enrolments last year, six
teams in four districts would
have been bumped up one classi-
fication.
At Lake-Lehman School Dis-
trict, the baseball and girls bas-
ketball teams would move from
2A to 3A. At Wyoming Area, the
cross country and football teams
would move from 2A to 3A. Dal-
las wrestling would move from
2A to 3A and Northwest girl bas-
ketball wouldmove fromAto 2A.
These changes would happen
even though none of those
schools send many students to
West Side. The sending districts
are already near their classifica-
tion ceilings, and a few students
from West Side are enough to tip
the scale.
Consider Lake-Lehman base-
ball. Last years male enrollment
in grades 9-11 at the high school
was 270, while another 14 boys
fromthe district were enrolled at
West Side. The PIAA enrolment
range for 2A classification is 154
to 274. As long as those 14 stu-
dents at West Side didnt count,
Lake-Lehman stayed in the 2A
range. Add West Side boys to
highschool enrolment, andLake-
Lehman baseball climbs to the
3A range: 275 to 471.
In a bit of irony, Wyoming Val-
ley West, which had 326 students
at West Side last year and thus
would see their PIAA enrolment
numbers jump the most, is im-
mune to classification changes.
All of the teams fielded by the
Spartans are already 4A, the clas-
sification with the highest enroll-
ments.
Another bit of irony: While
PIAAs two-year cycle assures
that no changes will occur in the
districts until next year, it also
means West Side cant get back
into the systembefore then, even
if the center decides to bring
sports backsomethingtheJoint
Operating Committee that runs
the center said it will consider as
early as February. Any teams
fieldedby West Side wouldbe un-
able tojoina PIAAconference un-
til the next two year cycle begins,
thus limiting them to exhibition
schedules.Theres one other
quirkinthe PIAArules that could
impact the already-complicated
equations: Cooperative sponsor-
ship. In an effort to give more
West Side students a chance to
play a given sport, one of the
member districts could set up
such a sponsorship in that sport,
but all West Side students would
only be eligible to play that sport
withthat district. PIAADistrict 2
Chairman Frank Majikes ex-
plained two key components of
such sponsorship with a hypo-
thetical: Wyoming Area setting
up a baseball cooperative with
West Side.
Under PIAA rules, that would
mean all West Side students who
want to play baseball would have
to do so with Wyoming Area, re-
gardless of whichdistrict theyare
from. It would also mean half of
West Sides male enrolment
would count towards Wyoming
Areas PIAA enrolment figures,
again regardless of what district
those students were from.
Majikes said no cooperative
sponsorships currently exist at
West Side.
CHANGE
Continued from Page 1C
supposed to be the day teamfacil-
itiesopened. Thosefacilitieswont
open before the NFLPAs execu-
tive committee approves the
agreement.
Exhibition games rarely feature
star players for more than cameo
appearances. Now, with no offsea-
son training at team facilities, no
minicamps and perhaps delayed
camp openings, the big names
couldbe onthe benchuntil ... Sep-
tember.
That would make many presea-
son games more like scrimmages,
although they would provide in-
creased opportunities for rookies
andfringeplayers. TheBradysand
Polamalus and Urlachers of the
leaguemight not seethefielduntil
the fourth and final exhibition,
games the regulars usually skip.
It wouldbe smart of the league
and the players to do something
special for thefans for thefirst pre-
season game or two, at least one
serving each teams home fans,
said Marc Ganis, president of Chi-
cago-based sports business con-
sultingfirmSportscorpLtd. That
could be free or discounted con-
cessions or merchandise, free
parking, photo and autograph op-
portunities with players espe-
cially those who will not be dress-
ing for the game and other fan
friendly marketing and interac-
tion.
Theres also enhanced concern
about injuries. Few players are
likely to be close to football shape
when they report whenever
that is.
The lack of offseason will seri-
ously affect those that have not
preparedontheir ownor at a facil-
ity, said Brian Martin, CEO of
TESTSports Clubs in Florida and
New Jersey, places where dozens
of NFL players train. Based on
working with over 60 active NFL
guys, I believe it is roughly 50-50
with those that are workers and
those who are not. Many rely on
natural giftsandtheywill beaffect-
edwiththelackof mandatorycon-
ditioning.
Trainers and coaching staffs,
therefore, will havetokeepasharp
eyeonwhichplayers werediligent
about workingout duringthelock-
out and which ones were not. If
anytopplayersarriveout of shape,
pushing themto get ready in such
short timethefirst full weekend
of preseason games is less than
three weeks away would be
problematic.
The most common injuries
will be pulled muscles, hamstr-
ings and groins primarily, due to
lack of preparation, Martin said.
Players need to lengthen and
strengthen muscles in the offsea-
sontobereadyfor therigors of the
NFL.
The concerns about physical
healtharemirroredbyconcerns of
financial health. The deeper the
lockout goes, the more costly it
will become for both sides seri-
ous financial losses that will
shrink the overall revenue pie.
NFL
Continued from Page 1C
PITTSBURGH Ben Roeth-
lisberger got the privacy he want-
edfor his weddingSaturday, with
police providing tight security
around the church in affluent
Ohio Township where he and
Ashley Harlan were married and
tinted windows on expensive
cars leavingmuchof theguest list
a mystery.
Still, the hope of a glimpse at
the Pittsburgh Steeler quarter-
back, his new bride and the doz-
ens of teamluminaries who turn-
ed out for the ceremony was
enough for Dolly Metz to sit in a
car complete with Steelers
covers on the headrests in a
nearby parking lot with the win-
dows down in 90 degree heat.
This is the best part of my
day, said Metz, who lives in
McKees Rocks. I know he was
supposed to send a limo for me
too, but it broke down.
Metz and friends Eugene and
Carol Lovely were among a small
group of Steeler fans who tried to
show their support for Roethlis-
berger.
The organization was well-rep-
resented too despite the NFLs
ongoing labor dispute.
Owner Dan Rooney waved to
security officials on his way in-
side and guests included line-
backer James Harrison and for-
mer Pittsburgh running back Je-
rome Bettis.
Harrison entered in a rare Mer-
cedes sedan, according to police,
his presence perhaps proof there
was no fallout from his criticism
of the quarterback in a Mens
Journal article released last
week.
N F L
Steelers Roethlisberger weds in private ceremony
The Associated Press
AP PHOTO
The Zierenberg family waits for Steelers QB Ben Roethlisberger
and his new wife to pass by after their wedding.
SANANTONIOThere were
the record number of first-time
WNBA All-Stars, and a halftime
ceremony honoring the best
players in WNBA history. Indi-
ana Fever guard Katie Douglas
didnt fit into either category.
So she made her mark another
way.
The four-time All-Star capped
one of the closest WNBAmidsea-
sonshowcases ever byhittingthe
go-ahead 3-pointer with 56.7 sec-
onds left, and the Eastern Con-
ference hung on for just its third
All-Star game victory over the
West 118-113 on Saturday.
We got together during prac-
tice and the first thing we said
was that we wanted to win, said
New York Liberty guard Cappie
Pondexter, who led the East with
17 points. Alongside of having
fun we wanted to be victorious
today and we accomplished that.
Good job.
At halftime, Pondexter was al-
so named one of the WNBAs Top
15 players of all-time, in celebra-
tion of this leagues 15th season.
Douglas finished with 15
points and helped the East win
just its third All-Star game in 10
tries but also third in the last
four. Connecticut Sun center Ti-
na Charles scored 15, and head-
lined a record group of 10 players
who made their All-Star debuts
in this years game.
SwinCashledthe West with21
points and 12 rebounds and was
named MVP for the second time.
Former WNBAstar Lisa Leslie is
the only other player with multi-
ple All-Star MVP awards.
Cash, the Seattle Storms four-
time All-Star, was also named
MVP in 2009. She is also the
leagues first All-Star MVP from
the losing team.
I thinksomanyplayers played
well. It couldve been anyone,
Cash said.
The four-time All-Star singled
out Rebekkah Brunson, who had
20 points and nine rebounds for
the West. Brunson started in
place of Los Angeles Sparks cen-
ter Candace Parker, who is out
due to a knee injury and still has
yet to play inanAll-Star game de-
spite ranking among the WNBAs
elite players since her 2008 roo-
kie year.
Parkers next chance may not
come until 2013. Next summer is
the Olympics, and the league
may cancel the game as it did
in 2008 while its biggest
names play for the U.S. national
team.
Were thrilled that its an
Olympic year, and well obvious-
ly build our schedule to accom-
modate that, WNBA president
Laurel Richie said before the
game.
Neither side led by more than
five points. The Wests last
chance came down to San Anto-
nios Becky Hammon scrambling
to shoot a 3-pointer, but she in-
stead found herself without an
open shot and nowhere to pass.
Her desperate bid to escape a
trap ended with her whistled for
traveling with 3.5 seconds left.
I think about midway through
the fourthquarter bothteams de-
cided they wanted to win, Ham-
mon said. We just came up a lit-
tle bit short today.
It was a disappointing end in
an otherwise humbling day for
Hammon, who was among the15
current and former WNBA play-
ers named as the leagues best ev-
er.
W N B A
Douglas
leads East
past West
The Associated Press
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 PAGE 7C
S P O R T S
310 Attorney
Services
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380 Travel
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506 Administrative/
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OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR
Christ United
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Church
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Knowledge of
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Resume & cover
letter sent to:
175 South Main Rd.
Mountain Top, PA
18707 or:
cumcsecretary@
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570-474-6060
512 Business/
Strategic
Management
Wilkes Barre, PA
18702
The Hilton Garden
Inn Wilkes-Barre is
seeking a House-
keeping Operations
Manager to join our
team. Prior experi-
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housekeeping
department is pre-
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Responsible for the
efficient operation
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areas of the hotel,
this position is
responsible to main-
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safety, security,
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satisfaction of hotel
guest rooms & pub-
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overall financial/
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housekeeping func-
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excellent organiza-
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cation skills are
required. Ability to
work weekends and
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required.
High School diploma
required; college
degree in hotel/
restaurant manage-
ment or culinary
school education
preferred. Success-
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have three years of
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supervisory experi-
ence.
Full Time Benefits
include: Employee
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Competitive Wage
Comprehensive
Benefits and 401(K).
Individuals with a
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Owned & operated
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Post-offer drug
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527 Food Services/
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COOK
Part Time
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Stable work history
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Apply online at:
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542 Logistics/
Transportation
Driver:
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a nationwide
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KMS FAB LLC
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MIAMI Johan Santana says
he might begin a minor-league
rehabilitation assignment next
week, which would be a big step
in his comeback from shoulder
surgery last September.
The New York Mets ace threw
batting practice to hitters for the
third time Friday at the team
complex in Port St. Lucie, Fla.
Hes scheduled to throw a bull-
pen session today at the Florida
Marlins stadium before the
Mets game there, and if that
workout goes well, hell likely be
headed to the minors.
Santana hopes to pitch for the
Mets this season, but he said
theres no timetable for his re-
turn to the majors. The left-
hander said hes still building up
strength in his shoulder.
Last season Santana went 11-9
with a 2.98 ERA in 29 starts for
New York before being side-
lined.
Baltimore Orioles
BALTIMORE Orioles left
fielder Luke Scott will miss the
remainder of the season with a
shoulder injury that severely
limited his effectiveness at the
plate.
Scott has a torn labrum in his
right arm. He was removed
from the 15-day disabled list
Friday, but didnt get through an
entire game against the Los
Angeles Angels before realizing
he could not hit as he did before
the injury.
Scott hit .284 with 27 homers
and 72 RBIs last year. This sea-
son, hes batting .220 with nine
homers and 22 RBIs.
He told reporters Saturday, I
battled through it the best I
could, but Im not helping the
team.
Baltimore placed Scott on the
15-day disabled list Saturday
and recalled third baseman Josh
Bell from Triple-A Norfolk.
Florida Marlins
MIAMI Florida Marlins
right-hander Chris Volstad has
been optioned to Triple-A New
Orleans in the wake of his latest
rocky outing.
Volstad lasted only five in-
nings and gave up four runs,
three earned, against the New
York Mets on Friday. That lifted
his ERA to 5.58, third-highest in
the major leagues.
Volstad 5-8 in 20 starts. Man-
ager Jack McKeon said he antic-
ipated Volstad would rejoin the
rotation later this season.
Cincinnati Reds
CINCINNATI Reds rookie
shortstop Zach Cozart hurt his
left elbow while trying to make
a tag in the fourth inning, forc-
ing him from the game Sat-
urday.
Atlanta pitcher Derek Lowe
bunted with Nate McLouth on
first base and no outs. First
baseman Joey Votto fielded and
threw to second, where Cozart
tried to catch the ball and tag
the sliding McLouth simultane-
ously. Cozarts left elbow ap-
peared to over-extend from the
impact.
He fell to the ground and
immediately grabbed the elbow.
He covered his face with his
right hand while a trainer exam-
ined it, then walked off the field
protecting the arm. Edgar Rent-
eria took his place.
Pittsburgh Pirates
PITTSBURGH Pittsburgh
Pirates rookie outfielder and
leadoff hitter Alex Presley was
scratched from the lineup for
Saturdays game against the St.
Louis Cardinals due to a left
thumb contusion.
Presley, who is hitting .333
and has hit safely in 15 of his 20
games, said he jammed the
thumb in Friday nights loss to
St. Louis and is having trouble
swinging. Presley said x-rays
were not scheduled to be taken.
Third baseman Chase dAr-
naud replaced Presley in the
lineup, creating a domino effect
of three other players switching
positions.
Santana
might start
rehabbing
in minors
The Associated Press
COOPERSTOWN, N.Y.
Bert Blyleven knows what took
him to where hes been and
where hes headed his heri-
tage.
Im Dutch, Im stubborn. I
think its the stubbornness, the
consistency. You take the good
with the bad, said the 60-year-
oldBlyleven, thefirst player born
in the Netherlands to earn Major
League Baseballs highest honor,
election to the Baseball Hall of
Fame. I came up at a young age.
I retired at an old age. I was one
of only three pitchers to win a
game before their 20th (birth-
day) and after their 40th. Its just
loving a game that you felt that
youcouldcompeteat thehighest
level.
Blyleven, who won 287 games
in a 22-year major league career,
will be inducted today with in-
fielder Roberto Alomar and
front-office guru Pat Gillick.
Imgoing to be in awe, Blyle-
ven said. We all have dreams as
kids. You dont know where its
going to head.
Though he lost 250 games,
Blyleven threw 60 shutouts
(ninth all time) and logged 242
complete games, finishinghis ca-
reer in1992with3,701strikeouts
(fifth all time). He also made 685
starts (11th all time), pitched
4,969
1
3 innings (14th all time),
and was 3-0 in League Cham-
pionship Series play and 2-1 in
World Series games.
His sojourn was longer than
most.
Born in 1951 in Zeist, Nether-
lands, his parents, Joe andJenny,
moved the family to Canada two
years later.
My dads eventual goal was
get to the United States, but it
was hard back in the early
1950s, Blyleven said. The Can-
adian government was looking
for strong men to work on farms.
Holland gave my parents $79
and we went to Canada.
The family stayed for four
years before moving to Southern
California, where Blylevens un-
cle had settled. The Blylevens
lived in the Los Angeles suburb
of Paramount, then moved to
Garden Grove when he was in
third grade.
The friends that I started
hanging out with played Little
League. I didnt know what it
was, Blyleven recalled. I start-
ed out as a catcher at about 10
years old. Mymanager I guess re-
alized that I was throwing the
ball back harder to the pitcher
than he was throwing to me, so
he said, Wouldyoulike topitch?
AndI said, Sure. SoI triedit and
fell in love with it.
It wasnt long before Joe Blyle-
ven built a pitchers mound in
the backyard, laying the founda-
tion for his sons Hall of Fame ca-
reer.
Although he didnt throw a
curveball until he was 14 My
dad understood that I shouldnt
throw a curve until I was a teen-
ager and he was a big, strong
man, so I listened. Blyleven
mastered the art better than
most. And he did it through the
art of visualization, watching
and listening to broadcaster Vin
Scully describe Dodgers star left-
hander Sandy Koufaxs drop.
I also learned that everything
keys off my fastball, Blyleven
said. People talk about my cur-
veball, but it was control of my
fastball (that made me effec-
tive). And I learned that fromsit-
ting on a bench with (former
Dodger great) Don Drysdale
when I was very young about
pitching inside, pitching both
sides of the plate and being a
bulldog on the mound.
Drafted by Minnesota in the
third round of the 1969 amateur
draft, Blyleven became youngest
pitcher in the majors when the
Twins called him up June 2,
1970, after just 21 minor league
starts.
Really, when I signed I didnt
know how high I could go, Bly-
leven said. I knew it was going
to be a long road.
That long road included stops
with the Texas Rangers, Pitts-
burgh Pirates, Cleveland Indians
and California Angels. Blyleven
also had a second stint with the
Twins beginning in 1985, and
two years later he formed an im-
posing duo at the top of the rota-
tion with lefty Frank Viola. The
teamscrapped its way to 85 wins
and a World Series title, the sec-
ond for Blyleven (he also was on
the champion 1979 Pirates).
Despite his considerable ac-
complishments on the field, Bly-
leven, whos also served 15 years
as an analyst for the Twins,
watched and waited for what
must have seemed like a lifetime
before he was selected. It took14
tries for him to finally cross the
75 percent threshold, receiving
votes on 79.7 percent of the bal-
lots in the results released in Ja-
nuary.
It was a longclimbafter receiv-
ing only 14.1 percent of the vote
in 1999, his second year of eligi-
bility, and the death of his dad in
2004 of Parkinsons disease only
heightened the hurt Blyleven
felt.
Alomar also had to bide his
time, but for a very different rea-
son and not nearly so long.
Born into a baseball family
Alomars father, Sandy, was an
infielder who played 15 years in
the major leagues and his older
brother, Sandy Jr., forged a 20-
year big-league career as a catch-
er Alomar grewupinthe pres-
ence of big leaguers. And instead
of horsing around in the dugout
as a kid, he absorbed everything
he sawand heard at the ballpark.
That paid off when he signed
in 1985 with the San Diego Pa-
dres as a17-year-old. Three years
later, on April 22, 1988, Alomar
made his major league debut
memorable when he singled off
future Hall of Famer Nolan Ryan
in his first at-bat in the majors.
Two years later, Alomar was
an All-Star for the first time, and
thats when Gillick, general man-
ager of the Toronto Blue Jays,
stepped in and made the signa-
ture trade of his standout career.
Gillick sent Tony Fernandez and
Fred McGriff to the Padres in ex-
change for Alomar and Joe Car-
ter in a blockbuster deal in De-
cember 1990.
With the switch-hitting Alo-
mar at the top of his game, the
Blue Jays reached the ALCS the
next season, then won consecu-
tive World Series titles in 1992
and 1993.
Alomar spent five seasons in
Toronto before finishing his ca-
reer instints withthe Orioles, In-
dians, Mets, White Sox and Dia-
mondbacks.
Alomars failure to become
just the fourth second baseman
and45thplayer tobea first-
ballot Hall of Famer was the re-
sult of aoneblemishonaremark-
able career.
A spray of saliva in a Septem-
ber 1996 game in Torontos Sky-
Dome tarnished Alomars stellar
reputation.
Called out on a third strike by
umpire John Hirschbeck on a
pitch that appeared to be out-
side, the two argued and Alomar
was ejected. Before he left the
plate, Alomar spit in Hirsch-
becks face and was suspended
for five games. Alomar said at
the time that he thought Hirsch-
beck was stressed because his 8-
year-old son had died in1993 of a
rare brain disease.
Alomar worked to repair his
image duringthe latter half of his
career, which ended in 2004.
B A S E B A L L H A L L O F FA M E I N D U C T I O N S
Blylevens long journey finally completed
Pitcher will be inducted into
hall today along with Roberto
Alomar and Pat Gillick.
By JOHN KEKIS
AP Sports Writer
AP PHOTO
Former Major League Baseball player Roberto Alomar, left, and
general manager Pat Gillick answer questions during a news
conference in Cooperstown, N.Y., on Saturday. Both men will be
inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame today.
C M Y K
PAGE 8C SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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For all Michael Phelps has ac-
complished and for all the world
records he has smashed, it has
still become a bit of a traditionfor
the swimming world to doubt
him on eve of the FINA World
Championships.
The World Championships,
which are held every two years
and regarded as the biggest non-
Olympic competition in swim-
ming, begin this morning in
Shanghai, China, and once again,
the world isnt sure what to ex-
pect from Phelps other than
hell be competing in four indi-
vidual events: the 200 meter
freestyle, the 200 meter individu-
al medley and the 100 and 200
meter butterfly.
The most decorated Olympian
in history hasnt exactly resem-
bled his old dominant self this
summer, and after Phelps con-
fessedthat his motivationandhis
training have been spotty during
the past year, speculation swirled
that his reign as the best swim-
mer in the world may come to a
definitive end. Ryan Lochte,
Phelps American teammate and
close friend, seems poised to
grab that unofficial title this
week.
After last year and kind of
messing around really for two
years its kindof hardto really tell
where we stand, Phelps told re-
porters prior to the start of world
championships.
But this isnt a newposition for
Phelps. Three previous times
in 2005, 2007 and 2009 he
faced real doubts about how well
he would perform prior to
worlds.
In 2005, they turned out to be
warranted, as he failed to make
the finals of the 400 meter frees-
tyle and got whipped by Ian
Crocker in the 100 meter butter-
fly. Phelps called the event a so-
bering wake up call, and said the
races were the most frustratingof
his career.
But inMelbourne in2007, with
much of the Australian media
writing prior to the competition
that Phelps would never surpass
Ian Thorpe as an all-time great,
Phelps stunned the world by win-
ning seven gold medals and
breaking four world records.
In Rome in 2009, he was still
struggling a bit to move beyond
the controversy of a photo that
surfaced of him presumably
smoking marijuana. Phelps also
made the difficult decision to
standbyhis sponsor, Speedo, and
refused to wear one the newest
high tech swimsuits, a decision
he knewwould put himat a com-
petitive disadvantage. When his
Serbianrival MiloradCavic broke
Phelps world record in the semi-
finals inthe100meter butterfly, it
seemed like Phelps reign as the
king of the pool was about to end.
But he again rose to the occasion
and became the first person to
breakthe 50secondbarrier inthe
event, recapturing the world re-
cord with a time of 49.82.
S W I M M I N G
World championships will be a big test for Olympic standout Phelps
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG
The Baltimore Sun
LONDON The London
Olympics will open just over a
year fromnow, amidthestunning
and historic backdrops of the
Houses of Parliament, the Tower
of London and Buckingham Pal-
ace all the monuments that
make this city one of the worlds
most popular destinations.
For that very reason, these
games will have a security pres-
ence like no other in the face of a
constant terrorist threat.
Wednesdaymarks the one-year
countdown to the opening cere-
mony on July 27, 2012.
For years, London has been
bracing for the Olympic on-
slaught:
10,500 athletes from more
than 200 countries;
5,000 coaches and team offi-
cials;
20,000 media personnel;
hundreds of thousands of vis-
itors.
All for an extravaganza in the
most memorable of settings, fea-
turing 26 sports in 32 venues. Its
atall order, evenfor aplacewhere
the flow of tourists never stops.
Andits that muchmorechalleng-
ing just seven years after a coor-
dinated, deadly attack on Lon-
dons transit system.
The message from Mayor Bo-
ris Johnson: Dont worry. Every-
thing is taken care of.
Witha year togowe cansafely
say we are ready to welcome the
world, he said.
Venue construction is largely
completed, tickets are almost
sold out, and the government
says the games will come in un-
der the 9.298 billion pound ($15
billion) budget. The Olympic
Park is changing the face of a pre-
viouslyrundownareaof east Lon-
don.
Athletes will be competing in
iconic venues and locations
across the capital.
Fans will see Usain Bolt sprint-
ing down the track in a new
80,000-seat Olympic Stadium,
beach volleyball players dueling
on the sand in Horse Guards Pa-
rade, triathletes splashing in
Hyde Parks Serpentine, Roger
Federer and Rafael Nadal step-
ping back onto Centre Court at
Wimbledon, archers firing their
arrows at Lords cricket ground
and showjumpers clearing fences
at Greenwich Park.
Underpinningthesports festiv-
al will be one of the biggest secu-
rity operations ever mounted.
Security at the Olympics has
beenacritical issueever sincethe
1972 Munich massacre, even
more so after the Sept. 11, 2001,
terror attacks. A day after Lon-
don was awarded the games in
2005, suicide bombers attacked
Londons transport network, kill-
ing 52 people.
The British government is
planning for the national terror
threat to be severe during the
Olympics, meaninganattempted
attack is highly likely. Security
screenings for spectators will be
tight and widespread, with air-
port-style checks at most venues.
Away fromthe competition sites,
protecting the Underground sub-
way network and public places
will be a major challenge.
Were already seeing chatter
from terror groups regarding the
2012 Games, but none of it seems
defined at the moment, said a
British security official, speaking
on condition of anonymity be-
cause of the sensitivity of his
work. This is to be expected,
though, with an event of this
magnitude.
About 12,000 police officers
will be onduty eachday of the Ju-
ly27-Aug. 12games, whichhavea
security budget of 475 million
pounds ($770 million).
Britishofficials say the country
has the experience and know-
how in dealing with terrorism.
I am as sure as you can possi-
bly be one year out from a games
that we have done everything
that we need to deliver a safe and
secure games, Olympics Minis-
ter Hugh Robertson said.
Extra surveillance cameras
will also be installed around the
Olympic Park Britain has
some of the most extensive sur-
veillance powers inthe worldand
has become a leader in what crit-
ics call Big Brother techniques
with its more than 4.3 million
closed-circuit cameras in oper-
ation.
All Olympics workers will be
put through a vigorous screen-
ing, including checks for terror
and other criminal offenses.
Organizers are determined to
keep security from being over-
whelming. They point to the suc-
cessful policing of the royal wed-
ding in April of Prince William
and Kate Middleton, when a mil-
lion people lined the procession
routefromWestminster Abbeyto
Buckingham Palace.
Were very good at policing in
a friendly and a discreet way, or-
ganizing committee leader Se-
bastian Coe said. The real chal-
lenge is to maintain security to
protect the athletes, protect peo-
ple, protect assets, but at the
same time having people leaving
your city feeling they havent
been pushed from pillar to post.
Despite the tight security, Lon-
don wants these games to be a
party.
While the Beijing Olympics
were marked by a sterile atmo-
sphere, London promises knowl-
edgeable fans, packed venues,
live sites with giant screens
around the city and a home
crowd of citizens from different
nationalities, cultures and back-
grounds. It will all kick off with
an opening ceremony created by
Slumdog Millionaire director
Danny Boyle.
It wont be the same as Beij-
ing, Johnson said. Ive always
said it would be different. It
would be splendid. It would be
brilliant. It would be brilliant in
an entirely different way.
Wait till you see that opening
ceremony. I think you will be
weeping tears of joy after that
opening ceremony. Thats my
confident prediction.
While Athens struggled to the
last minute to finish venues for
the 2004 Olympics, and Beijing
was battered for its record on Ti-
bet and human rights ahead of
the 2008 Games, London has en-
joyed a comparatively smooth
and crisis-free ride so far.
On the down side, the British
public has complained bitterly
about the ticket sales process,
and Londons strained public
transport system faces tough
challenges to keep the city mov-
ing smoothly during the games.
Coe, a two-time 1,500-meter
Olympic gold medalist and for-
mer 800-meter record-holder,
surveys the year ahead like a run-
ner entering the midway back
straight on the final lap.
I knowfrom800s thats where
its won and lost, Coe said in an
interview with The Associated
Press. I dont kid myself. This is
a crucial part of the race, andhow
you come out of that 500 to 600
(meters) often determines how
you come across the line.
On Wednesday, London will
mark the year-to-go milestone
with a televised ceremony from
Trafalgar Square, with Interna-
tional Olympic Committee Presi-
dent Jacques Rogge on hand to
formally invite the worlds ath-
letes to the games. Organizers
will present the design of the
Olympic medals.
O LY M P I C G A M E S
Host Britain gearing up for Olympics
Security remains at the
forefront of the planning for
next years summer games.
By STEPHEN WILSON
AP Sports Writer
AP PHOTO
In just over a year from now, London will be at the center of global attention when it hosts the open-
ing ceremony of what organizers call the "greatest show on earth" the 2012 Olympics.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 PAGE 9C
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27 Unique Holes
One Breathtaking Course
WALTON ON THE HILL,
England Mark Calcavecchia
surrendered a three-shot cush-
ion to end the third round of
the Senior British Open on
Saturday tied for the lead with
fellow American Russ Cochran
and South Africas David Frost.
Calcavecchia, the co-leader
after the first and second
rounds at Walton Heath, was in
cruise control at 10 under with
six holes remaining before
imploding when his accuracy
off the tee deserted him.
A disastrous triple-bogey 7 at
No. 13 after driving into the
heather beside the fairway
was followed by another drop-
ped shot on No. 16, although
the 1989 British Open cham-
pion salvaged something from
his round with a neat birdie at
the final hole.
Calcavecchia, bidding to
become the fourth player to
capture the British Open dou-
ble, shot 72 to put him at 7-
under 209. His stumble gave a
bunched-up field renewed hope
in the Champions Tours third
major of the year.
Frost shot a bogey-free 66,
tied for lowest round of the
week on the parkland course
just south of London, while
Cochrans 67 included a double-
bogey 6 on No. 14.
Corey Pavin, the United
States 2010 Ryder Cup captain,
and Englands Barry Lane each
shot 69 and were a shot off the
lead, with three more Amer-
icans Chip Beck, Mike Good-
es and Lee Rinker at 5 un-
der.
Three-time winner Tom
Watson was one of four players
a further stroke behind after a
69 in a third round played in
overcast conditions with a light
breeze.
Calcavecchia, who has been
in a three-way share of the lead
after every round this tourna-
ment, described his errant
driving on the back nine as
army golf because it alternat-
ed between going left and right
off the tee.
Today was exactly whats
been happening to me all year,
said Calcavecchia, who is with-
out a tournament victory in
2011. I drive it great for a while
and then I just lose it. Thats
what I was worried about
and then it happens to me. I
have to figure it out by tomor-
row.
Canadian Open
VANCOUVER, British Co-
lumbia Bo Van Pelt birdied
four of his last five holes, in-
cluding the final two, to finish
with 65 on Saturday and a one
stroke lead after three rounds at
the RBC Canadian Open.
Canadian Adam Hadwin,
playing on a sponsors exemp-
tion, missed a 12-foot birdie
putt on 18 to finish with a 68,
and alone in second at 4-under
206.
Andres Romero (67) and
first-round leader Kris Blanks
(69) are tied for third, two
shots back, after another tough
day in the thick rough along the
tight, tree-lined Shaugnessy
Golf and Country Club.
John Daly, who four-putted
No. 18 for triple-bogey Friday,
shot 67 and is in a group of four
at 2 under with Sean O Hair
(66), Aron Price (69) and Geoff
Ogilvy (70).
Evian Masters
EVIAN-LES-BAINS, France
Former champion Ai Miya-
zato of Japan shot a 5-under 67
on Saturday to take a two-shot
lead after the third round at the
Evian Masters.
Miyazato, who won her first
LPGA title at the Evian Masters
two years ago, made five birdies
for a 13-under total of 203. She
heads into Sundays fourth
round ahead of a group of four
players, including Kraft Nabisco
winner Stacy Lewis.
I hit the ball really well
today, and my putting was
really good as well, the 26-
year-old Miyazato said. I was
really calm out there, so thats
why I didnt have a bogey.
With the course lending itself
to aggressive golf and the pins
made for attacking, Miyazato is
expecting to come under heavy
pressure today as she bids for
her first title of the year, and
her second Evian Masters tro-
phy in three years.
She was sixth at the recent
U.S. Open, but her best result
this year was a tie for fifth at
the Sybase Match Play Cham-
pionship in May.
Two shots leading is still
nothing on this golf course, I
think. Still so many players can
shoot low score (today), Miya-
zato said. Its still wet on the
fairway, but the greens are
really receptive, you can still be
aggressive.
Overnight leader Miki Saiki
of Japan, Ran Hong of South
Korea and Angela Stanford are
also at 11 under.
I.K. Kim of South Korea
moved into contention after
shooting up the leaderboard
with a brilliant round of 64 to
sit three shots behind. Kim
made six birdies on the first
eight holes and had nine over-
all.
I had a great round, I have to
say. Everything was clicking,
Kim said. Once you get a good
feeling out there it kind of
builds up, you get a snowball
(effect). Im excited to see
myself on the leaderboard go-
ing into tomorrow.
Kims score would have been
even more impressive if not for
a bogey on the fifth hole, al-
though she hit three straight
birdies after that.
I was on the fairway and just
pulled it left, she said. It
could have been much better if
I hit it five feet right ... I hope I
can birdie (it today).
Kim is looking for her first
tournament win this year after
third-place finishes at the Kia
Classic and the LPGA Thailand
where she hit a round of 63,
her best of the year.
Hong matched Miyazatos
round, Stanford and Lewis had
69s and Saiki finished with a
70.
Lewis also expects to see
some very low scores today.
The course is so soft and so
scoreable you know somebodys
going to shoot 5 or 6 under,
she said.
Nordea Masters
STOCKHOLM Alexander
Noren of Sweden shot a course-
record 9-under 63 Saturday to
extend his lead to 11 shots after
the third round of the Nordea
Masters.
Noren held a three-shot over-
night lead and made seven
birdies and an eagle in a flaw-
less round on the Bro Hof Slott
course for a 20-under total of
196. He equaled the second
largest third-round lead ever on
the European Tour, behind
Retief Goosens 13-shot edge at
the 2002 Johnnie Walker Clas-
sic.
It was an amazing feeling,
Noren said. I never thought it
would be possible to shoot
these scores.
Bubba Watson shot a 69 to sit
in second place, one stroke
ahead of Christian Nilsson of
Sweden and Jaco Van Zyl of
South Africa.
P R O G O L F
Three tied at Senior British
The Associated Press
AP PHOTO
Mark Calcavecchia plays a shot on the eighth hole during the third round of Senior British Open
Championship at Walton Heath Golf Club in Walton On The Hill, England, Saturday.
OKLAHOMA CITY Jennif-
er Caira andCanada seemtohave
Americas number at the World
Cup of Softball.
Kaleigh Rafter homered and
droveinthreeruns, andtheCana-
dians beat the United States 4-3
on Saturday for their second
straight win over the once-dom-
inant Americans at the World
Cup.
Despite never having won the
title, Canada (3-1) is the only
team ever to beat the U.S. more
than once at the World Cup.
Before she became a two-time
national player of the year and
Womens College World Series
winner at Washington, Danielle
Lawrie beat the U.S. in the first
ever World Cup game in 2005.
The U.S. hadnt lost an interna-
tional game in three years before
that defeat.
The Canadians also beat the
U.S. in last years event, although
the Americans rebounded to win
their fourth straight champion-
ship.
Weve played well against the
U.S. national team here but we
havent really had much success
in the tournament itself, Rafter
said. So, getting to the cham-
pionship game would for sure be
big for us.
The Americans (2-1), featuring
no Olympic veterans on this
years squad, are nowin jeopardy
of missingthe WorldCupfinal for
the first time. They played 2008
Olympic gold medalist Japan lat-
er Saturday night and needed to
win to maintain any chance at re-
aching the championship game
Monday night.
Its a big game. Were in the
pressure cooker. Its on, said
Kaitlin Cochran, who hit a solo
home run in the second for the
U.S. We either get it done or we
dont. But thats how champions
rise, right?
Caira (2-0) beat the U.S. for the
second straight year at the World
Cup, givinguptworuns infive in-
nings. She pitched the first four
innings, then was replaced by
Jocelyn Cater for two innings, be-
fore re-entering in the seventh to
get out of a jam.
Keilani Ricketts hada pinchhit
RBI single inthe seventh, andthe
U.S. had the tying run on third
when Stacy May-Johnson
grounded back to Caira to end
the game.
They were gutty. I dont think
you can say much else, said Raf-
ter, the catcher. I dont know if
they had their best stuff, but they
were in there every pitch just gut-
ting it out and they threw awe-
some. They came through in the
clutch.
Melanie Matthews started the
game by smacking a ground-rule
double to the gap in right, and
Canada quickly got to Chelsea
Thomas (0-1). Victoria Hayward
drew a walk before Rafter lined a
two-run double to right. Thomas
let Rafter get to third on a wild
pitch, but then avoided any fur-
ther damage in the first.
Rafter answered Cochrans
homer with her own blast to cen-
ter in the third, and Canada ex-
tended its lead to 4-1 on Hay-
wards RBI groundout in the
fourth.
I was looking for one pitch on
that first one and I got it and I ac-
tually put a good swing on it, so
that was good for me. Then the
second time through, I figured
theyddosomethinga littlediffer-
ent, Rafter said.
Thomas, who got the save in
the Americans first two World
Cupgames, wasnt as sharpinher
first World Cup start.
I didnt feel like I had a lot of
pop on the ball today, Thomas
said. Sometimes you have those
days, and youve just got to learn
from the experience and see
where it can take you next time.
Cochran singled and scored on
Valerie Ariotos double in the
fourth. Cater snuffed out a U.S.
rally in the sixth by striking out
the side to leave two runners
stranded
W O R L D C U P O F S O F T B A L L
Canadians once again
send USA to defeat
Americans needed a victory
later Saturday vs. Japan to
have chance to defend title.
By JEFF LATZKE
AP Sports Writer
C M Y K
PAGE 10C SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Francisco, Alexis honored
Olivia Francisco and Peter Alexis were awarded the 2011 Holy Redeemer Athlete of the
Year award at the schools award banquet. Pictured, from left: coach Rich Nemetz, Brian
Francisco, Jane Francisco, Olivia Francisco, coach John Kablick, Janine Alexis, Peter Alex-
is, Frank Alexis, Coach Mark Belinski and athletic director Jim Higgins.
Geraghty Ryan honored
Dan Geraghty and Erin Ryan were named 2011 Holy Redeemer Scholar Athlete of the
Year at the schools awards banquet. Pictured, from left: coach Paul Gerrity, Kathleen Ge-
raghty, Daniel Geraghty, Dan Geraghty, Erin Ryan, Susan Ryan, coach Beth Mangan, princi-
pal Anita M. Sirak and coach Sal Leggio.
Capaci, Napkori honored
Holy Redeemers Allison Capaci and Michael Napkori were presented with the 2011 PIAA
Scholar Athlete Award at the schools awards banquet. Pictured, from left: coach Bob
Hughes, coach Rich Nemetz, Nick Capaci, Patti Capaci, Allison Capaci, Michael Napkori,
Robert Napkori, coach Art Brunn, coach Ed Roman and athletic director Jim Higgins.
Four students receive awards
Holy Redeemers Adam Dunsmuir and Mary Frank received the 2011 Army Scholar Athlete
Award. Mary Griseto, Tim Lambert and Alex Bedrin received the 2011 Teamwork in Christ
Award. The awards were presented at the schools awards banquet. Pictured, from left:
athletic director Jim Higgins, coach Ed Roman, coach Garfield McFarlane, Robert Duns-
muir, Ann Dunsmuir, Adam Dunsmuir, Mary Frank, Jane Frank, Carl Frank, coach Mark Be-
linski, coach Chris Ritsick, and assistant athletic director J.P. Aquilina
Marriggi, Ruch honored
Holy Redeemers Alex Marriggi and Stephen Ruch received the 2011 Royal Leadership in
Athletics Award at the schools awards banquet. Pictured are, first row, from left: principal
Anita M. Sirak, coach Bob Hughes, David Marriggi, Kelly Marriggi, Alex Marriggi, Stephen
Ruch, Diane Ruch, Theodore Ruch, coach Sal Leggio, athletic director Jim Higgins. Second
row: coach Mark Belinski, coach Chris Ritsick
Hanover Area softball alumni hold game
The inaugural Hanover Area softball alumni game was recently held. Pictured are partici-
pants. First row, from left: Alexis Shipula, Tami Thomas, Jen Paull, Jessalyn Peveltz, Da-
nielle Mendygral, Heather Sonnenberg Warman, Aimee Schappert. Second row: Melissa
Mendygral Dutrow, Renie Ogrodnick, Jill Bolesta, Kaci Birosik, Marley Chintalla, Amber
McCann, Jodi Maciejczak, Desiree Schappert Bannon, Frank "Tanky" Matthews, Nancy
Ziomek Ciavarella, Karen Kuklewicz and Jami Roback Simcox.
Magic win Whitewater Cup
Mountain Top Magic U-13 girls took second place in the
Memorial Day Whitewater Cup Classic soccer tournament
held in Forty Fort. The team is coached by Kim Kaminski,
Brian Hons, Tony Ellis and Amy Daiute. Pictured with their
silver medals are: First row, from left: Tatiana Kogoy and
Shyla Seesoltz. Second row: Grace Federo, Cassidy Eckert,
Julie Murphy, Ally Olszyk, Emily Hons and Gianna Uhl. Third
row: Shannon Keating, Maria Ellis, Gillian Barber, Kaitlin
Snipas, Emily Traficante and Autumn Kaminski.
Muprhy heads
to Stevenson
Wyoming Areas Chris Murphy has ac-
cepted an offer from Stevenson Uni-
versity to continue his academic and
athletic careers as a member of the
schools football program.Pictured are:
First row, left to right: Mary Ann Murphy,
Chris Murphy, Kevin Murphy. Second
row: Wyoming Area coach Randy Spen-
cer, Wyoming Area athletic director
Frank Parra, Ryan, Michael Murphy,
Wyoming Area assistant coach Joe Piza-
no, Wyoming Area superintendent Ray-
mond J. Bernardi.
Golden headed to Bucknell
Wyoming Area graduate and distance runner Michelle
Golden has elected to continue her academic and athletic
careers at Bucknell University where she will compete in
the cross country and track while majoring in biology.P-
ictured first row, left to right: Jim Golden, Michelle Golden
and Denise Golden. Second row: Frank Parra, Wyoming
Area athletic director; Joe Pizano, Wyoming Area head
track and field coach; and Vito Quaglia, Wyoming Area
Secondary Center principal.
BMX club competes in race
Local riders from Hazleton City View BMX participated in
the American Eagle 4th of July double point race at Trilogy
Park in Pottstown. Placing 1st in their main events were
Hunter Brink, 13, from Northhampton; James Lazar, 11, from
Beaver Meadows; Jason Lazar, 7, from Beaver Meadows;
Gavin Lippert, 11, from Harrisburg; Gavin Huey, 6, from
Drums. Placing 2nd in the main event was Olivia Longo, 16,
from Hazleton. Placing 3rd in their main events were Corey
Longo, 8, from Hazleton; Jacob Gerlach, 12, from Wapwallo-
pen; Steven Huey, 30+ Challenger, from Drums. Earning top
finishes in their Open Class were Corey Longo, 3rd place in
8/9 Open; Hunter Brink, 3rd place in 12/13 Open. For more
information about Hazleton City View BMX, contact us via
email at bmx@hazletoncityview.com, visit www.hazletonci-
tyview.com, or visit facebook.com/HazletonBMX. You can
contact Track Director, Jack Longo at 570-956-3747 or
President of Parents Association, Steven Huey at 570-436-
3373. Pictured are, from left: Olivia Longo, Jacob Gerlach,
James Lazar, Jason Lazar. Second row: Hunter Brink, Gavin
Lippert, Gavin Huey, Corey Longo. Missing from photo is
Steven Huey.
A T P L A Y
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 PAGE 11C
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina
A surprising Copa America will
end today with favored Uruguay
playing a Paraguayan team that
hasnt won a game at the tourna-
ment.
Uruguay is trying to become
thetournaments most successful
team. Paraguay is looking to
prove it deserves South Ameri-
cas most important soccer tro-
phy despite its poor play.
The final at Monumental Sta-
dium in Buenos Aires will cap a
tournament in which Argentina
and Brazil didnt even make it
past the quarterfinals. Venezuela
and Peru, the usual underdogs,
stayed longer than the power-
houses.
Uruguay, a World Cup semifi-
nalist last year, has a chance to
win a record 15th Copa America
title, one more than host Argenti-
na.
We know what we are after,
Uruguay coach Oscar Tabarez
said. We have a great opportuni-
ty and we are well prepared to
take advantage of it. This is a fi-
nal, not only the last match in a
tournament. It will determine
eachteams place inthe history of
this competition.
Uruguay is trying to win its
first Copa America title since
hosting the tournament in 1995.
It is the teams first final at a ma-
jor competition since 1999, when
it lost to Brazil at the Copa Amer-
ica in Paraguay.
The Uruguayans eliminated
Argentina in a penalty-kick shoo-
tout in the quarterfinals. They
then defeated Peru 2-0 in the
semifinals.
Paraguay, on the other hand,
has somehowfoundits waytothe
final.
Uruguay is in the process of
getting better, having played its
best match in the semifinals,
said Paraguay coach Gerardo
Martino. Paraguay is the com-
plete opposite. We are getting
worse.
Paraguay was badly outplayed
by defending champion Brazil in
the quarterfinals but held on to
win in a penalty shootout. The
team struggled again against Ve-
nezuela in the semifinals, win-
ning on penalties after being
saved by the woodwork three
times in regulation and extra
time.
Although the Paraguayans ac-
knowledge they have been lucky,
Uruguay is quick to downplay its
role as heavy favorite.
Paraguay has a lot of history
and tradition in football, Taba-
rez said. They are known for be-
ing able to fight against adversi-
ties. They are very physical.
Paraguay, which has played in
the past four World Cups, is try-
ing to win its third Copa America
title after victories in 1953 and
1979.
President Fernando Lugo sent
a support letter to the squad on
Saturday, saying that with faith,
everything is possible, even in
challenging times.
Martino will have problems se-
lecting his starting lineup be-
cause of key injuries. Star striker
Roque Santa Cruz and winger
Aureliano Torres will definitely
miss the final, and forward Nel-
son Haedo Valdez and midfielder
Edgar Barreto are not 100 per-
cent because of nagging ail-
ments.
Martino wont even be allowed
in the dugout. He was ejected
against Venezuela when he and
assistant Jorge Pautasso repeat-
edly argued with the referee.
The team will be anchored by
goalkeeper Justo Villar, who was
key for Paraguay bothinthe quar-
terfinals and semifinals.
Uruguay will be at full strength
and feature Diego Forlan, who
last year was voted the World
Cups best player. He scored five
times in South Africa but is going
through a bit of a slump, having
not scored in 12 matches.
Im fine, we are on the right
track, the Atletico de Madrid
player said. Ive been having
some opportunities but the ball
just doesnt want to go in. But the
teamis playingwell andthats the
most important thing.
Uruguay has a squad contain-
ing 20 of the 23 players at the
World Cup.
S O C C E R
AP PHOTO
Perus Adan Balbin, left, and Venezuelas Nicolas Fedor go for a header during the Copa America
third-place soccer match in La Plata, Argentina, Saturday.
Uruguay shooting for another
Country is seeking its 15th
Copa America title as it faces
struggling Paraguay today.
By TALES AZZONI
Associated Press
ZURICH Mohamed bin
Hammams downfall from being
one of soccers most powerful
men to a disgraced outcast was
completed Saturday when FIFA
banned the Qatari official for life
for his role in a bribery scandal.
FIFA found Bin Hammam
guilty of bribing presidential
election voters just months after
he helpedsecure 2022 WorldCup
hosting rights for his tiny Gulf
homeland. The scandal led to
him having to abandon his cam-
paign to unseat FIFA President
Sepp Blatter, and ultimately led
to the veteran executive commit-
tee member becoming the most
senior official convicted of cor-
ruption in the governing bodys
107-year history.
A FIFA ethics panel ruled that
the Qatari candidate conspiredto
pay Caribbean officials $40,000
cash bribes in May in exchange
for their support in the election.
The verdict after a two-day
hearing was in keeping with the
declared policy of the committee
to show zero tolerance of uneth-
ical behavior, panel chairman
Petrus Damaseb said.
Damaseb also called on FIFA
toconsider openingcases against
three more executive committee
members who joined bin Ham-
mam on a fateful campaign visit
to Trinidad.
Bin Hammams lawyer said he
maintained his innocence and re-
jected the findings based on so-
called circumstantial evidence.
He will continue to fight his
case throughthe legal routes that
are open to him, lead counsel
Eugene Gulland told reporters.
Bin Hammam can challenge
his life ban at the FIFA appeals
body and then the Court of Arbi-
tration for Sport.
We are confident of the
strength of our case and invite FI-
FA to make available now to the
media a full transcript of these
proceedings, Gulland said in a
prepared statement.
Bin Hammam has claimed the
case was politically motivated to
stop him challenging Blatter,
who was re-elected unopposed
last month three days after the
Asian Football Confederation
president withdrew his candida-
cy.
Bin Hammamdidnt cooperate
with a FIFA investigation or at-
tend the hearing. He wrote on his
website Friday, while the FIFA
panel sat in session, that he ex-
pected a guilty verdict.
FIFA also suspended two Ca-
ribbean Football Union staffers,
Debbie Minguell and Jason Syl-
vester, for one year for their part
in distributing the bribes at a
May10-11conference inTrinidad.
FIFAfaces further focus oncor-
ruptioninits ranks as Damaseb, a
judge from Namibia, called for a
second wave of investigations.
Damasebs five-man panel
asked FIFAs legal department to
prepare cases against officials
who attended bin Hammams
campaign stop at a Port of Spain
hotel.
Those present included execu-
tive committee members Worawi
Makudi of Thailand, Vernon Ma-
nilal Fernando of Sri Lanka and
Hany Abou Rida from Egypt.
Caribbean soccer leaders be-
lieved to have taken bin Ham-
mams bribes, and denying to FI-
FA investigators that any corrup-
tion took place, are also under
suspicion.
In a separate judgment, FIFA
issued a warning to executive
committee member Chuck Blaz-
er, who commissioned a dossier
of evidence including statements
from Caribbean whistleblowers
which sparked the explosive
case.
Damaseb said Blazer was
wrongtohavesuggestedat aMay
30 meeting in Zurich that CFU
members were under investiga-
tion at that time.
FIFAs panel dismissedanaddi-
tional CFU complaint that Blaz-
ers comment was racially moti-
vated.
Bin Hammams lawyer aimed a
further apparent barb at Blazer,
who has represented the United
States in FIFAs high command
since 1996.
Bin Hammamis the third serv-
ing FIFA executive committee
member banned from soccer for
ethics violations in the past nine
months.
A fourth, FIFA vice president
Jack Warner, dodged the panels
judgment by resigning.
FIFA bans bin Hammam for life
Qatari official was found
guilty of bribery after he
secured 2022 World Cup.
GRAHAMDUNBAR
AP Sports Writer
AP PHOTO
FIFA banned Mohamed bin
Hammam from football for life
on Saturday.
C M Y K
PAGE 12C SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 PAGE 13C
S P O R T S
OUTDOORS
THE FACTORYVILLE
SPORTSMENS CLUB
will hold its regular
monthly meeting at 7:30
p.m. on July 27 at the
clubhouse. Board presi-
dent Kevin Weisenfluh
will have a limited num-
ber of Supergun event
tickets remaining for
pick up.
THE U.S. ARMY CORPS
ENGINEERS PHILA-
DELPHIA DISTRICT
has announced it will
hold whitewater releases
Sept. 3-4 and increase
fisheries releases from
the Francis E. Walter
Dam.
The Corps updated the
recreation plan, which
states whitewater
events scheduled for the
first weekend in Septem-
ber will be held if ade-
quate water storage is
accumulated in the
reservoir. A rainy season
has enabled the Corps
to schedule the events.
The whitewater releases
will be 650 cubic feet
per second (cfs) plus
inflow up to a total of
800 cfs. They would
bring the total number
of whitewater events to
23 for 2011. The Corps
will also utilize available
storage for weekday and
weekend fisheries en-
hancement releases of
100 cubic feet per sec-
ond plus inflow up to
300 cfs through Aug. 19
and 50 cubic feet per
second plus inflow up to
300 cfs through Sept 11.
If sufficient water storage
is accumulated during
the remainder of the
season, additional
releases will be an-
nounced according to
the recreation plan. To
view the plan, visit the
Corps web site or Face-
book fan page:
http://www.nap.usace.ar-
my.mil/Projects/FEWal-
ter/index.htm
http://www.facebook.com/
fewalterdam
THE SUSQUEHANNA
RIVER BASIN COM-
MISSION (SRBC
www.srbc.net) an-
nounced that 36 sep-
arate water withdrawals
approved by SRBC are
temporarily suspended
due to localized stream
flow levels dropping at
many locations in the
Susquehanna basin,
especially in northern
Pennsylvania.
Under SRBCs passby flow
restrictions, when
streams drop to pre-
determined protected
low flow levels, project
sponsors who are re-
quired to meet the
agencys passby require-
ment must stop taking
water. They cannot
resume taking water
until streams have
recovered above the
protected level for at
least 48 hours.
SRBC and its regulated
project sponsors mon-
itor real-time stream
flow data generated by
stream gages main-
tained and operated by
the U.S. Geological
Survey.
Following is a list of compa-
nies and their water
withdrawal sources in
Northeastern Penn-
sylvania temporarily
suspended as of July
19:BRADFORD COUNTY
Chesapeake Appalachia,
Chemung River (Barrett)
and Sugar Creek (Isbell)
Healthy Properties, Sugar
Creek
Southwestern Energy
Production Company,
Wyalusing Creek (Fergu-
son)
Talisman Energy, Fall
Brook, Seeley Creek,
Sugar Creek, Towanda
Creek, Tributary to
North Branch Sugar
Creek, and Wyalusing
Creek
Tennessee Gas Pipeline,
Towanda Creek
Towanda Country Club,
Little Wysox Creek
LUZERNE COUNTY
Eagle Rock Community
Association, Abandoned
Quarry associated with
unnamed tributary to
Tomhicken Creek
SUSQUEHANNA COUNTY
Chesapeake Appalachia,
Elk Lake Stream
Leonard and Jean Marie
Azaravich, Meshoppen
Creek
Stone Energy Corp, Wya-
lusing Creek (Stang 1)
Tennessee Gas Pipeline,
Meshoppen Creek and
White Creek
Williams Production Appa-
lachia, Snake Creek
WYOMING COUNTY
Geary Enterprises, Butter-
milk Creek
Mountain Energy Services,
Tunkhannock Creek
Randy M. Wiernusz, Bow-
man Creek
Sugar Hollow Trout Park
and Hatchery, Hatchery
Effluent
Susquehanna Gas Field
Services, Meshoppen
Creek
BUL L E T I N
BOARD
A
pair of hemlock logs laidonthe
ramp infront of LeonMoyers
sawmill.
Afewweeks ago Moyer cut the hem-
lock tree, whichwas dead, andbrought
two logs back to his Dorrance Township
sawmill inanattempt to salvage the
wood.
The tree died, he said, as a result of
the woolly adelgidinfestation anin-
sect that pierces the base of the needles
andsucks out fluids.
Its a slow, lingering deathfor a tree
andthe two logs onMoyers ramp we-
rent the only victims.
Moyer motionedto the woods behind
his sawmill andsingledout a cluster of a
hemlocks that stoodbare andlifeless
against the blue July sky. At one time the
group of hemlocks were giants inthe
forest that surrounds Moyers sawmill.
Today, thanks to the woolly adelgid,
they are nothing but skeletons.
Chances are they wont be alone.
Muchof the mountainsurrounding
the sawmill is comprisedof hemlocks.
Moyer, who took the mill over fromhis
father decades ago, couldonly shake his
headas he ponderedthe likely devas-
tationthat couldspreadthroughthe
mountain.
The woolly adelgidwas discoveredin
Pennsylvania inthe late1960s. Its
spreadhas acceleratedandthe insect is
nowfoundin49 counties.
Andit has company, as far as forest
pests go.
The emeraldashborer recently turn-
edup insouthernWyoming County. It
was foundonone of those purple trian-
gle-shapedboxes that have become
commonplace throughout the area.
The boxes are coatedwitha sticky
substance kindof like a big fly tape. A
multitude of insects canbe foundstuck
onthe sides.
Unfortunately, the emeraldashborer
was foundstuck onone inWyoming
County this summer.
And, like the woolly adelgid, the
presence of the ashborer is badnews.
The Wyoming County discovery is
partularly badbecause, basedonwhere
the insect hadbeenknownto exist, it
leapfroggedfromLycoming County
over Sullivan. As of now, none of the
counties bordering Wyoming have a
documentedcase of the ashborer.
Chances are the insect reached
Wyoming County via somebody trans-
porting ashfirewoodthat harboredthe
pest. Thats a major concernbecause for
the last fewyears the state has been
adamant withits public message not to
transport firewoodacross the state.
Apparently, someone didnt listenand
nowthe Emeraldashborer has reached
northeasternPennsylvania.
One forester I spoke to saidits as-
sumedthat wherever the ashborer is
foundthat it has beeninthat area for
five years.
Evenworse, the forester saidthe state
has beenadvising forest owners to man-
age their woodlots as if the ashtrees
wont be here inthe future.
Unfortunately, thats probably good
advice.
The Emeraldashborer andwoolly
adelgidare just two of the threats to
Pennsylvanias forest. The extendedlist
includes the Americanchestnut blight,
beechscale, forest tent caterpillar and
the gypsy moth.
Another may evenbe onthe way as
the Asianlonghornbeetle, whichde-
stroys hardwoods, has beendiscovered
nearby inNewYork andNewJersey.
Chances are all of these threats will
have animpact to some degree onPenn-
sylvanias forest. No, there wont be a
voidinthe ecosystem natures goodat
preventing that. But things couldlook
drastically different inthe future.
Afuture where there may be no more
hemlock logs onthe ramp of Leon
Moyers sawmill.
TOM VENESKY
O U T D O O R S
Forest pests
having effect
on Pa.s trees
Tom Venesky covers the outdoors for The
Times Leader. Reach him at tvenesky@time-
sleader.com.
Ross Piazza is bothered by the fact
that pheasants hunting in Pennsylvania
isnt what it used to be.
He estimates that the number of
pheasant hunters in the state has drop-
ped by 80 percent since the 1970s, and
the decline will continue if something
isnt done soon.
But Piazza, who serves as habitat
chairman of the Northeast PA chapter of
Pheasants Forever, has a possible solu-
tion to enhance pheasant hunting: sim-
ply encourage more people to raise the
birds and release them into suitable
habitat that can be hunted.
To aid the cause, Piazza recently start-
ed a new organization Pheasants
Afield to work with landowners who
want to revive pheasant hunting and
also study ways to keep more pheasants
on the Pennsylvania landscape.
We know that pheasant hunting will
never be what it was years ago, Piazza
said. But our idea is to get areas with a
few hundred acres, release pheasants and
see what we can learn about things like
mortality and nesting success. From
that, we can make a template that oth-
ers can use.
Despite his new organization, Piazza
said he is still committed to Pheasants
Forever and added the two groups can
co-exist because their missions are differ-
ent.
Pheasants Forever is a habitat orga-
nization. Were a propagation organiza-
tion, Piazza said.
As part of the Pheasants Afield mis-
sion, Piazza and others in the group are
currently raising a few hundred birds
that they will release this fall. Some will
be let go for a youth pheasant hunt,
while others will be released into areas
to be studied.
Although there is a belief that pen-
reared pheasants cant survive in the
wild, Piazza isnt convinced.
Next spring Pheasants Afield will re-
lease pheasants into area to study as-
pects such as mortality and nesting suc-
cess.
The key to improving the odds that
the birds will establish in those areas is
to release them early so they can grow
in the habitat, Piazza said. Within the
first four to five weeks of the birds life
the imprinting takes place, and thats a
key time to get them in the habitat
where we want them to establish.
One piece of equipment that Piazza
feels may help with the imprinting proc-
ess is called the Surrogator, which is a
self-contained unit that provides pheas-
ant chicks with food, water, warmth and
protection for the first five weeks. The
Surrogator is placed in the area where
the pheasants are to be released, and
they become imprinted to that location
and remain.
The biggest problem with pen-raised
birds is when theyre stocked they dont
know to return to that area, Piazza
said, adding he hopes to get grant mon-
ey to use telemetry and study the move-
ments of released pheasants.
Piazza said a 10 percent survival rate
of the released birds would be an accept-
able goal. And if those 10 percent can
successfully nest, that next generation of
pheasants would essentially be wild.
Hes seen examples of pen-raised birds
that go on to nest in the wild and rear
young, and Piazza is optimistic it can
work on a larger scale throughout the
state.
I dont believe the science is settled
when it comes to pheasants in Penn-
sylvania, he said. We want to get the
birds out there in good habitat to en-
hance hunting and see if we can bring
them back.
Group hopes to increase pheasant population
BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Pheasants Afield President Ross Piazza, left, and secretary Mark Costello examine the growth of warm-season grasses in Bear
Creek Township. As the grasses mature they will serve as habitat for pheasants and other wildlife.
Working for a better hunt
A pheasant with a recently-applied blin-
der. The blinder prevents pen-raised game
birds from pecking each other. They are
removed before the birds are released.
Increase in allocation
Next year the Pennsylvania Game
Commission will increase its pheasant
allocation from100,000 to 200,000.
Piazza said the move is encouraging
because it puts more pheasants on the
landscape for hunters. It gives us a shot in
the arm because its going to revive an
interest in pheasant hunting with more
birds out there, he said.
For more information on Pheasants Afield,
call Piazza at 760-9342.
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
A pheasant comes across a cob of corn
and pieces of watermelon in its enclosure
in Bear Creek Township.
Habitat Field Day planned
SUBMITTED PHOTO
A Wildlife Habitat Field Day will be held on Aug. 6
at Sorber Mountain. The event, which is free, will
run from10 a.m. to noon and feature presentations
from groups such as Quality Deer Management
Association, Pheasants Forever, Pheasants Afield
and the National Wild Turkey Federation. Speakers
include Pennsylvania NWTF president Dale Butler,
Ross Piazza of Pheasants Afield and Chip Sorber of
QDMA, Jack Sorber of NWTF and QDMA, John
Piccotti of Pheasants Forever, Josh Miller of QDMA
and a representative from BigBucks.com. A free
wildlife habitat consultation will be given to all at-
tendees. Directions for the site: at the intersection
of routes 29 and 118, travel north on Route 29 for
four miles; turn left onto Sorber Mountain Road
and go two miles; turn left onto Sorber Mountain
West Road and go one-half mile to the dead end.
The event is sponsored by the South Mountain
Land Association. Snacks and beverages will be
provided. For information, call 477-2303.
C M Y K
PAGE 14C SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
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ALMANAC
REGIONAL FORECAST
NATIONAL FORECAST
For more weather
information go to:
www.timesleader.com
National Weather Service
607-729-1597
Forecasts, graphs
and data 2011
Weather Central, LP
Yesterday 91/76
Average 83/62
Record High 96 in 1933
Record Low 49 in 2000
Yesterday 19
Month to date 238
Year to date 446
Last year to date 532
Normal year to date 318
*Index of fuel consumption, how far the days
mean temperature was above 65 degrees.
Precipitation
Yesterday 0.00
Month to date 2.29
Normal month to date 2.87
Year to date 28.90
Normal year to date 21.04
Susquehanna Stage Chg. Fld. Stg
Wilkes-Barre 0.58 -0.05 22.0
Towanda 0.48 -0.06 21.0
Lehigh
Bethlehem 2.86 0.54 16.0
Delaware
Port Jervis 2.90 0.00 18.0
Todays high/
Tonights low
TODAYS SUMMARY
Highs: 82-88. Lows: 62-67. Chance of
thunderstorms today. Thunderstorms
possible tonight.
The Poconos
Highs: 84-93. Lows: 70-75. Chance of
thunderstorms today. Thunderstorms
possible tonight.
The Jersey Shore
Highs: 81-87. Lows: 61-69. Chance of thun-
derstorms today. Thunderstorms possi-
ble tonight.
The Finger Lakes
Highs: 92-94. Lows: 72-73. Chance of
thunderstorms today. Thunderstorms
possible tonight.
Brandywine Valley
Highs: 92-97. Lows: 72-77. Chance of thun-
derstorms today. Thunderstorms possi-
ble tonight.
Delmarva/Ocean City
Anchorage 67/55/.00 62/51/r 65/51/r
Atlanta 91/74/.00 92/75/pc 90/75/t
Baltimore 101/78/.06 96/75/t 92/71/t
Boston 92/72/.11 84/64/s 76/66/pc
Buffalo 86/77/.00 83/69/pc 81/63/pc
Charlotte 97/74/.00 98/74/t 94/73/t
Chicago 84/70/4.58 90/68/t 80/69/s
Cleveland 91/72/.35 85/72/t 81/70/t
Dallas 101/81/.00 101/81/t 103/81/t
Denver 93/64/.00 90/64/t 97/64/pc
Detroit 89/73/.01 90/71/t 84/67/s
Honolulu 84/75/.00 89/73/s 88/75/s
Houston 98/77/.00 98/78/t 98/78/t
Indianapolis 96/79/.00 94/75/t 88/66/pc
Las Vegas 103/81/.00 102/84/pc 104/84/pc
Los Angeles 71/63/.00 74/64/pc 73/63/pc
Miami 92/79/.00 91/81/t 92/81/t
Milwaukee 85/71/.31 88/64/t 76/66/s
Minneapolis 84/68/.04 81/62/s 84/66/s
Myrtle Beach 97/81/.00 91/80/t 91/78/t
Nashville 93/74/.00 93/75/t 92/72/t
New Orleans 88/78/.04 90/77/t 92/78/t
Norfolk 102/80/1.04 97/76/t 92/76/pc
Oklahoma City 100/77/.00 102/79/t 102/80/s
Omaha 92/79/.00 86/68/t 90/73/pc
Orlando 92/73/.27 95/76/t 94/77/pc
Phoenix 100/86/.00 105/85/pc 105/85/pc
Pittsburgh 90/71/.00 88/71/t 84/63/pc
Portland, Ore. 76/55/.00 85/59/s 74/58/pc
St. Louis 98/83/.00 97/74/t 90/71/pc
Salt Lake City 87/62/.00 94/71/s 93/71/pc
San Antonio 100/79/.00 100/77/pc 100/77/t
San Diego 71/64/.00 74/66/pc 74/65/s
San Francisco 69/55/.00 69/54/pc 70/54/pc
Seattle 74/54/.00 82/56/s 70/56/sh
Tampa 93/76/.00 93/79/t 91/80/pc
Tucson 95/79/.00 95/76/t 96/76/pc
Washington, DC 101/84/.00 97/77/t 94/72/t
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
Amsterdam 63/54/.00 63/57/r 64/55/sh
Baghdad 113/82/.00 113/88/s 115/85/s
Beijing 91/79/.00 85/75/t 84/74/t
Berlin 66/54/.00 64/54/pc 68/52/c
Buenos Aires 64/48/.00 67/53/s 71/44/t
Dublin 68/45/.00 66/43/pc 65/55/c
Frankfurt 68/54/.00 63/52/sh 64/54/sh
Hong Kong 91/82/.00 93/82/s 91/80/s
Jerusalem 86/68/.00 86/67/s 90/68/s
London 66/52/.00 72/50/pc 73/45/pc
Mexico City 79/54/.00 73/56/t 74/55/t
Montreal 90/73/.00 81/63/ 70/63/sh
Moscow 90/66/.00 90/64/t 88/68/c
Paris 66/55/.00 65/52/pc 68/48/c
Rio de Janeiro 75/68/.00 72/68/sh 71/65/s
Riyadh 108/81/.00 113/90/s 112/87/pc
Rome 77/70/.00 81/66/s 82/68/s
San Juan 88/78/.42 86/79/t 87/78/t
Tokyo 79/68/.00 85/75/pc 86/74/t
Warsaw 64/52/.00 70/54/t 72/50/pc
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
WORLD CITIES
River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snowurries, i-ice.
Philadelphia
94/74
Reading
90/69
Scranton
Wilkes-Barre
87/67
87/65
Harrisburg
92/71
Atlantic City
93/75
New York City
91/70
Syracuse
82/62
Pottsville
89/69
Albany
84/61
Binghamton
Towanda
82/63
86/63
State College
88/69
Poughkeepsie
86/63
101/81
90/68
90/64
93/76
81/62
74/64
64/54
94/74
92/60
82/56
91/70
90/71
92/75
91/81
98/78
89/73
63/52
62/51
97/77
Sun and Moon
Sunrise Sunset
Today 5:51a 8:28p
Tomorrow 5:52a 8:28p
Moonrise Moonset
Today 12:22a 3:13p
Tomorrow 12:58a 4:12p
New First Full Last
July 30 Aug. 6 Aug. 13 Aug. 21
Most of the heat-
waves we see in
our area typical-
ly end with a
bang. With a
strong thunder-
storm, our
region tends to
go from 90s and
sticky to 70s and
a comfortable
breeze in the
blink of an eye.
That's not in the
cards this go-
around. It will
take a couple of
days to ramp our
temperatures
down from some
of the warmest
readings we've
seen in over 15
years. A few
storms will be
possible today,
but the better
chance will be
tomorrow as
multiple cold
fronts pass
through the
region. By
Tuesday skies
should clear a
bit with highs in
the lower 80s
and lower
humidity levels.
The relief from
the heat will be
short-lived, how-
ever, as a
recharged ridge
of high pressure
takes us back to
the 90s by the
end of the week.
Early indications
do not point to
the same type of
heat as last
week: some
good news.
-Ryan Coyle
NATIONAL FORECAST: Hot and humid conditions will be widespread once again over much of the
Mid-Atlantic, the Southeast, and the central and southern Plains today. In the West, high pressure will
leave most locations dry, but with hot temperatures. A low pressure system will trigger thunder-
storms from the Northeast and the Great Lakes to the central Plains.
Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Intl Airport
Temperatures
Cooling Degree Days*
Precipitation
TODAY
Just an
isolated storm
MONDAY
Better
chance for
storms
84
65
WEDNESDAY
Mostly
sunny
85
59
THURSDAY
Mostly
sunny
88
65
FRIDAY
Partly
sunny, a
T-storm
92
67
SATURDAY
Partly
sunny, a
T-storm
90
70
TUESDAY
Partly
sunny,
shower
82
63
87

70

C M Y K
BUSINESS S E C T I O N D
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011
timesleader.com
R
egular readers of this column
know that Im a champion of
small business. Most of my
professional life has been spent work-
ing for entrepreneurs or running my
own small newspapers. Those experi-
ences have caused me to admire indi-
viduals and families who start or suc-
cessfully continue local restaurants,
specialty shops, used car lots and myr-
iad other businesses that provide them
a living while adding to the character
of our communities.
But theres one place where its hard
to argue against bigger being better
health care. And with last weeks an-
nouncement of further consolidation
among providers in this region, were
about to test whether that theory is
true, as Geisinger Health System and
Community Health Systems dominate
the market.
Im not talking about the bedside
manner of your family doctor, but
about acute and emergency care that
can and does save lives. Providing
top-flight responses to major events
like heart attack and cancer costs big
bucks, something the hospitals that
have been acquired simply didnt have.
And smart health care providers know
that getting more bang for those bucks
will be a priority in the future, because
the nation cannot afford to continue
the rapid escalation in health care
spending that has occurred in past
decades.
Thats why its important that these
companies invest wisely in their new
acquisitions. Combined, Geisinger and
CHS have pledged to spend $422 mil-
lion on enhancements to the four hos-
pital systems they have taken over in
the past two years, with Geisinger
adding another $60 million in upgrades
to its Wyoming Valley Medical Center.
Beyond brick and mortar, these im-
provements have brought new special-
ties and highly trained physicians to
the region.
We can use more of that. Blue Cross
of Northeastern Pennsylvania has esti-
mated that local health care consumers
leave the area to seek $750 million
worth of medical care each year, largely
because they believe quality is higher
in places like Philadelphia and New
York. Perhaps thats just another mani-
festation of the bigger is better percep-
tion, but its one the local systems now
have a chance to combat.
Spending millions foolishly wont cut
it, though. As much as they need to
compete, the systems and countless
patients will benefit if they avoid a
medical arms race fed by the addition
of expensive, sophisticated equipment
that makes for great marketing but
often is underutilized. While being
careful not to allow them to rig the
game, the state can help by closely
scrutinizing plans to add services and
equipment and pressing the hospitals
to limit unnecessary overlaps.
We are fortunate to have two of the
most-respected health care providers in
the nation serving this area. Though
the not-for-profit Geisinger and for-
profit CHS are exceedingly different in
many ways, each has a history of taking
a thoughtful approach to health care
delivery. And since both have said
there are enough patients in this region
to support two systems, it only makes
sense for them to aim for the kind of
fiscal efficiency that directs funds
where they can do the most good for
patients.

Score one for the Marcellus Shale


Coalition; its just-released rose-colored-
glasses report on natural gas drilling
was picked up by New York Gov. An-
drew Cuomo to support drilling in that
states Southern Tier. And in its usual
self-serving manner, the coalition sent
a press release about its own study,
repeating claims for job creation and
economic benefit that are at best ques-
tionable and at worst totally unsup-
portable by evidence.
RON BARTIZEK
B U S I N E S S L O C A L
Hoping bigger
is better in
health care
Ron Bartizek, Times Leader business editor,
may be reached at rbartizek@timeslead-
er.com or 570-970-7157.
WHENITCOMES to
eating out, I go where
there are deals. Asure
stop this week will be
the Cracker Barrel on
Highland Park Boule-
vard in Wilkes-Barre
Township.
Not only do I love perusing the items
in the country store and playing with
those peg puzzle games sitting on every
table, I thoroughly enjoy the food. The
restaurant nowoffers Country Dinner
Plates for $7.39. The meals include a
choice of any meat on the special menu
and two country vegetables. Plus
theyre served with homemade butter-
milk biscuits or corn muffins. To see the
full list of meat options, go to
www.crackerbarrel.com/restaurant/
lunch-and-dinner-menu/country-din-
ner-plates.
Hey, ladies, and men wishing to make
store purchase printed out on your
receipt.
Theres no coupon needed for these
great deals either:
Redners Warehouse Markets has
Breakstone100-calorie cottage cheese
doubles for 69 cents this week. Thats at
least 30 cents cheaper than at most
other places.
Get a 20-count box of Finish power-
ball tabs or gelpacs for $2.99 at CVS
when you use your ExtraCare card.
Rite Aid has plenty of deeply dis-
counted products including backpacks
and lunch bags, all 50 percent off, and
many summer-related items like out-
door chairs, solar lighting, coolers,
water guns and grills for 25 percent off.
including the best uses of coupons
found in todays newspaper with sales
taking place at area retailers. So here
are plenty to make up for that:
CVS has boxes of Pop Tarts on sale
for $1.79. Get three and use the $1-off-
three coupon and pay $4.37 for themall.
If you are visiting a Kmart pharma-
cist this week, be sure to clip the cou-
pon found on the bottomright corner of
page11of the stores circular. You can
get a free 8-ounce bottle of American
Fare instant hand sanitizer. They usu-
ally retail for $2.49.
Rite Aid has Irish Spring deodorant
buy-one, get-one free. Use the $1off
coupon and get two for less than the
price you would have paid for one.
No coupon needed for this deal, just
use your CVS ExtraCare card. Get an
8-pack of Paper Mate grip ink pens for
$1.99 and when you use your card,
youll get a coupon for $1.99 off a future
your ladies happy, head to Victorias
Secret today and spend $60. If you do,
the store will throwin a free travel
lingerie bag. Theres a limited supply, so
shop early, but not often. Theres a limit
of one bag per customer. Contact your
local store to see if it is participating in
the offer.
Book readers can find a little solace in
the sad news that Borders is closing its
bookstores. The retailer, with locations
in Dickson City and Stroudsburg, has
begun discounting all merchandise up
to 40 percent as part of its liquidation.
Books make great holiday gifts for
friends, family members and co-work-
ers. Stock up!
In recent weeks, I have been lax in
ANDREW M. SEDER
S T E A L S & D E A L S
Andrew M. Seder, a Times Leader staff
writer, may be reached at 570-829-7269. If
you know of any local steals or deals, send
them to aseder@timesleader.com.
Cracker Barrel offers fun and games plus deals on country cooking
HARTFORD, Conn. If youlike a crisp
whitewithchickenorfish, aheartyfull-bod-
ied red with beef, or perhaps something
fruitier with dessert, Rob Metz has some
suggestions, andnoneincludes alcohol.
Thats because Metz is the owner, flavor
developer and occasional bottle washer at
Avery Beverages, one of Connecticuts ol-
dest soda producers.
Youcouldalsocall himasodasommelier.
Maybe a lime rickey, a black cherry and
an orange cream, mused Metz, who
bought thebusiness13yearsago. Ourlime
rickeyismadewithlesssugar, soitsdryand
tart. The black cherry can stand up to a
burger. And our orange creamtastes like a
Creamsicle, soits a great way tofinishoff a
meal.
The company, which opened in 1904 in
NewBritain, Conn., still makesitsproducts
theold-fashionedway. Noaluminumcans.
Sodoes Hosmer MountainSodainWilli-
mantic, Conn., which opened in 1912, and
Foxon Park in East Haven, Conn., which
openedin1922.
Sodas at these vintage companies are
handcrafted in small batches using meth-
ods and recipes from generations ago and
sold in glass bottles packed into wooden
crates. For most, the biggest concession to
modern times is the addition of diet varie-
ties.
Our equipment is state-of-the-art
1950s, Metz said.
Averys product line includes 40 flavors
many of which, like sarsaparilla, have
beenaroundsincethecompanyopenedfor
By KORKY VANN
The Hartford Courant
Nostalgia in a bottle
Vintage soda makers keep refreshing,
tasty traditions alive
See SODA, Page 2D
WASHINGTON John Bry-
sons work life has bounced from
environmental activist to Califor-
niaregulatortoutilitycompanyex-
ecutive and now to nominee for
Commerce secretary. But his ca-
reer so far has
been defined by
the one stop he
never made
Bankruptcy
Court.
As chief execu-
tive of Edison In-
ternational, Bry-
son fought tirelessly to keep the
company from collapsing during
the California electricity crisis a
decade ago. He went on TVto beg
customerstoconserveenergy. And
he forged controversial deals with
stateofficialstoavoidthefateof fel-
low utility Pacific Gas & Electric
Co., drawing the wrathof consum-
er groups for locking in high elec-
tricity rates to keep Edison out of
bankruptcy.
Within months, the corporate
parent of Southern California Edi-
son returned to profitability. And,
unlike other key players in the cri-
sis, Bryson emerged with his repu-
tation burnished instead of tar-
nished.
At the end of the day, John got
most of what he wanted. The com-
pany did not have to go into bank-
ruptcy, said then-California Gov.
Gray Davis, who was involved in
lengthy negotiations with Bryson
overEdisonsfate. Hemadeitvery
clear he didnt want to go that
route. He saidthat a zilliontimes.
But such success isnt helping
Bryson win Senate confirmation.
Some Republicans arent im-
pressed with his business creden-
tials, branding him as an environ-
mental extremist and vowing to
blockhis confirmation.
Brysonssupporterscounterthat
his wide-ranging experience and
actionsguidingEdisonthroughthe
crisis highlighted the skills that
would come in handy as Com-
merce secretary determination,
diplomacy, an ability to quickly
grasp complex issues and steadin-
ess under fire.
There was anunflappable qual-
ity to him, cool under pressure,
saidRobert A. Iger, chief executive
of Walt Disney Co., where Bryson
served as a director at the time of
the crisis. I never got a sense that
John, at least outwardly, was feel-
ingthe stress.
In a Senate hearing last month,
Bryson, 67, who retired from Edi-
son in 2008 after 18 years as CEO,
said keeping Edison out of bank-
ruptcy was the single toughest
challenge Ive ever addressed.
We stucktogether as a company
and we kept the lights on under im-
possible circumstances for at least
twoyears, hetoldsenators. Andin
theend, I thinkwewereproud... for
what wewereabletodowithout go-
ingintobankruptcyas others did.
Administration officials declined
Commerce
nominee won
acclaim as
utility CEO
By JIMPUZZANGHERA
Los Angeles Times
Bryson
See BRYSON, Page 4D
Combining a unique product with sales-
manship, a local ethnic bakery has gone from
making spinach pies in a family kitchen to
supplying pita bread to chain supermarkets
as far away as Allentown.
Thebreadis madebyfamily-runAties Bak-
ery at a facility on Welles Street in Forty Fort.
Part owner Abdu Atie said that after selling
the bread locally for about 10 years he began to
seek grocery stores to carry the product.
Today, Aties provides pita bread to Weis
Markets, Thomas Family Market, Malacaris
Produce and Deli, Schiels Family Market,
Wegmans in Wilkes-Barre Township, and
three Wegmans in the Allentown area. The
bakeryalsomakes spinachpies andmeat pies
for the House of Nutrition in Luzerne.
Making the jump from a neighborhood
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Left: Abdu Atie
poses in the Forty
Fort bakery, where
his family makes
pita bread that is
sold in large super-
markets and at the
familys store on
Hazle Street in
Wilkes-Barre.
Below: Aties Bakery
pita bread is pack-
aged four to a bag.
By EILEEN GODIN Times Leader Correspondent
Family-run bakery supplies ethnic flavor to local grocery stores
See ATIES, Page 3D
C M Y K
PAGE 2D SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
B U S I N E S S
2
9
8
2
2
4
WILKES-BARRE CHAMBER
WOMEN IN BUSINESS LUN-
CHEON: Aug. 9, noon-1 p.m.,
Genettis, 77 E. Market St.,
Wilkes-Barre. $14.50 for Women
in Business Council Members,
$16.50 for non-council members.
Val Berzanski, of Tuckers Travel,
will discuss Rose Tuckers book,
The Junkmans Daughter. Reser-
vations required; call 823-2101,
ext. 1 13 or email jeankile@wilkes-
barre.org.
NETWORKING MIXER: Aug. 1 1, 5-7
p.m., Phoenix Rehab, 685 Carey
Ave., Wilkes-Barre. Free for
Chamber members. For reserva-
tions, call 823-2101, ext. 1 13 or
email jeankile@wilkes-barre.org.
WILKES-BARRE CHAMBER
HUMAN RESOURCES FORUM:
Aug. 12, 8:30 a.m., Chamber
Conference Room, 2 Public
Square, Wilkes-Barre. Topic is
Effective Methods for Intergen-
erational Training with speaker
Catherine Kline. Reservations
required; call 823-2101, ext. 133 or
email Karen@wilkes-barre.org.
WILKES-BARRE CHAMBER
GOLF TOURNAMENT: Aug. 26,
Blue Ridge Trail Golf Club, Moun-
tain Top. Registration at 10 a.m.;
shotgun start at 11 a.m. $125 per
person, $440 per foursome.
Reservations required; call 823-
2101, ext. 1 13 or email jean-
kile@wilkes-barre.org.
BUSINESS AGENDA
Mark T. Perry and Dominick J.
Georgetti, of The Perry Law
Firm, Scranton, were recently
named Pennsylvania Super
Lawyers by Super Lawyers
magazine. They are among the
5 percent of Pennsylvania
lawyers who have received
that designation. Perry has
been on the list for the past
seven years.
Cindy S. Serge, of The Perry Law
Firm, Scranton, was recently
named a Rising Star by Super
Lawyers magazine. Serge has
been on the list for the past
three years. Rising Stars rec-
ognizes the top up-and-coming
attorneys in the state who are
40 years of age or younger
and who have been practicing
for less than 10 years.
The Quandel Group Inc., a local
construction firm, recently
received a 2011 Award of Excel-
lence from ABC Keystone
Chapter for their work on the
Metro Bank Stadium project,
located on City Island in Har-
risburg. ABC Keystones Excel-
lence in Construction awards
program recognizes outstand-
ing construction projects
across the region.
Red Roof Inn, at 1035 Highway
315, Plains Township, has re-
ceived the TripAdvisor certif-
icate of excellence, which
honors top-rated travel busi-
nesses based on user reviews.
BUSINESS AWARDS
IMPRESSIONS MEDIA/
THE TIMES LEADER
Lisa B. Daris, Dallas, was recently
promoted to vice president of
human resources and adminis-
tration for Impressions Media,
which owns and operates mul-
tiple local
publications
and websites,
including The
Times Leader
and time-
sleader.com.
She will lead
the companys
efforts in a
variety of
functions on
an administrative level in addi-
tion to the traditional human
resources duties. Since joining
the company in 1979, Daris has
held various administrative
positions and served as controll-
er from1986 to 1993. She re-
joined the company in 2006 as
administrative assistant to the
publisher and was named human
resources director in 2009.
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR
JUSTICE
Matthew A. Cartwright was re-
cently re-elected to represent
the Section
Leadership
Council on the
board of gover-
nors. AAJ is a
national associ-
ation of cour-
troom attor-
neys repre-
senting con-
sumers and
injury victims. A partner in the
law firm of Munley, Munley &
Cartwright, P.C., Cartwright has
been a member of the associ-
ation since 1988 and has served
as chairman of its Section Lead-
ership Council and also its Busi-
ness Torts practice section.
THE WRIGHT CENTER FOR
GRADUATE MEDICAL
EDUCATION
Brian Ebersole was recently ap-
pointed as the education and
community relevance leader at
the Scranton-based medical
residency program. He will es-
tablish the
processes and
outcomes for
the five-year,
$4.5 million
Teaching
Health Center
Grant, which
was awarded
to the center
by the Health
Resources and Services Adminis-
tration. Ebersole was previously
director of the Chronic Care
Initiative for the Governors
Office of Health Care Reform in
Harrisburg. He holds a bache-
lors degree in politics with a
minor in education from Ursinus
College, Collegeville.
PNC BANK
Angela M. Ferri was recently pro-
moted to
officer status
in the banks
client and
community
relations
group. Ferri,
who joined
PNC in 2009
as a client and
community relations specialist,
holds a bachelors degree in
education from The University of
Scranton.
BORTON LAWSON
The local architectural engineering
and design firm recently an-
nounced an employee promotion
and several additions to its staff.
Rachel Murawski was promoted to
the position of director of in-
formation technology and sup-
port services. She joined the
firm earlier this year and holds a
bachelors degree in business
administration/computer science
from Wilkes University, Wilkes-
Barre.
Kenneth Perst is a senior CAD
technician. He has 1 1 years of
experience in drafting, civil
engineering, land development,
structural, architectural, waste-
water energy and landscape
design. Perst obtained his CAD
Technologies Certification from
the County College of Morris,
Randolph, N.J. and has also
received his OSHA certification.
Nicholas Argot joined the firms
Civil Business Unit. He has expe-
rience in land development,
water treatment and wastewater
treatment design. Argot holds a
bachelors degree in civil engi-
neering from Drexel University,
Philadelphia.
Gregory Duque is a survey coor-
dinator. He has extensive experi-
ence in planning, project man-
agement and completion of
large-scale land development
programs. Duque holds a bache-
lors degree in geomatics from
the University of Florida. He will
be working in the firms State
College office.
Neal Parker is a senior environ-
mental scientist with more than
30 years of experience. He holds
a bachelors degree in envi-
ronmental resource manage-
ment from The Pennsylvania
State University.
Karen Soifer is an associate CAD
operator. Her background in-
cludes land development permit-
ting, site planning, layout design,
landscape design, site grading,
cost estimates and quality con-
trol. She holds a bachelors
degree in landscape architecture
from The Pennsylvania State
University.
LACKAWANNA INSURANCE
GROUP
The Wilkes-Barre firm recently
named a new president and
chairperson of its Board of Di-
rectors.
Kenneth M. Weaver was named
president of
the company. A
certified public
accountant,
Weaver joined
the company in
1997 following
an extensive
career in the
financial ser-
vices field. He
previously
served as chief financial officer
and chief operating officer of the
group. He holds a degree in
accounting/information systems
from Kings
College, Wilkes-
Barre.
Michelene Ken-
nedy was
named chair-
person of the
companys
Board of Direc-
tors. She had
served as the
companys
president since 1996.
CORPORATE LADDER
Daris
Cartwright
Ebersole
Ferri
Weaver
Kennedy
business in1904. And while they
may be selling soda about
15,000 cases each year what
theyrereallybottlingisnostalgia.
Top sellers are two of the oldest
flavors red cream soda and
white birch beer. Avery sodas are
soldatthebottlingfacilityandinlit-
tlemom-and-popstores.Theresno
supermarket presence.
Marketing, on the other hand,
is more new millennium. Avery
has a Facebook page with more
than3,000followers.
Carbonated drinks are a multi-
billion-dollar industryintheU.S.,
but things are tough in the inde-
pendent fizz biz. Supermarket
shelf space is dominatedby Coke
and PepsiCo lines of bottled wa-
ter, vitamin drinks, juices, teas
andcarbonatedbeverages.
Metz says the locavore trend
andthepublicstasteforboutique
foods has helpedkeepsmall-label
sales fromgoingflat.
Willimantics Hosmer is mark-
ing its 100th anniversary this
summer. (The company actually
started in 1912, but Bill Potvin,
who owns the business with his
brothers, isnt waiting.)
When youre in a business like
ours,youdontputoffcelebrations,
hesaid. Wehopewell beherenext
year, but youneverknow.
The slogan for the festivities
echoes Potvins cautious outlook:
Founded the year the Titanic
went down, but werestill afloat.
Hosmer features about 36varie-
ties and sells about 75,000 cases
each year. Flavors include orange,
root beer, golden ginger ale (dark-
er, sweeter and spicier than the
companyspaledrygingerale)and
sarsaparilla, which Potvin de-
scribesasanadult soft drink.
Its got a bit of an anise note
and is a bit more sophisticated
than some of the other flavors,
Potvinsaid.
Hosmer Mountain and Avery
offer home deliveries. Thats
right. Home delivery, as in soda
routes.
Tolland, Conn., resident Kathy
Bach gets monthly deliveries of
Hosmer Mountain sodas and
seltzers (sometimes made by
owner Bill Potvin himself) and is
afanoftheconvenience, selection
and personal connection to a
longtimeNewEnglandcompany.
Whenthekidswerelittle, they
loved trying flavors they didnt
see in the supermarket, Bach
said. Now that my son is 31, he
says Hosmers ginger beer makes
the best dark-and-stormy a
cocktail made with dark rum,
limeandginger beer.
At each of these vintage soda
companies, production is up,
since summer is high season for
soda sales.
All of those picnics andfamily
get-togethers, Potvin said. Peo-
ple get sick of Coke, Diet Coke
and Sprite. They love the variety
and the nostalgia of the old-fash-
ioneddrinks.
SODA
Continued from Page 1D
MCT PHOTO
Bottles of fruit punch soda wait to be boxed up after being
bottled at Avery Soda in New Britain, Conn. The company has
existed for more than 100 years and continues to make and
bottle soda in-house.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 PAGE 3D
B U S I N E S S
7
0
0
6
9
2
PHILADELPHIA For the
record, summer intern Neal
Cook does make the coffee
and empty the trash.
But more significant, Cook,
a Temple University sports-
management major, and fel-
low intern David Twamley, a
business major at the Univer-
sity of Pennsylvanias Whar-
ton School, have other respon-
sibilities that might make
them the envy of their copy-
making, phone-answering
compatriots.
They are running their own
business at Front Rush
LLC, a company that develops
sports-team recruiting and
compliance software in an old
factory along a canal in Lam-
bertville, N.J.
On our first day, we were
building our own desks,
Twamley said. Two weeks lat-
er, we were running our own
company.
The business Cook and
Twamley are trying to bring to
market is called Online Sales
Board. Its an offshoot of inter-
nal-sales scorekeeping soft-
ware that Front Rushs foun-
ders developed to motivate
their sales staff.
We went from screwing in
desk legs to designing pricing
models, Twamley said.
Internship is a rite of pas-
sage for college students mak-
ing their way toward careers.
But in these hard times, when
unemployment in the 20-to-24
age range is running at 14.5
percent, an internship is more
than just a way to pass the
summer.
Employers routinely hire
their interns when they gradu-
ate, the National Association
of Colleges and Employers re-
ported recently, drawing from
a survey of 266 companies
conducted in January. In fact,
the companies said, four of the
10 new graduates hired from
the Class of 2010 had previous-
ly worked as interns.
That may happen to Cook,
who graduates in December,
but no ones making any com-
mitments yet. Twamley will
be a junior in September.
From our perspective, its a
great way to analyze talent,
said Front Rush co-founder
Brad Downs, 30. Theres no
better way to evaluate some-
one than to watch them work.
This is the first year Downs
and business partner Sean
Devlin, 30, have had interns.
The pair were childhood
friends who always dreamed
of starting a business.
Downs graduated from the
College of New Jersey with a
degree in business communi-
cations. He was living with
grad assistants who were as-
sistant coaches for the col-
leges baseball team when he
noticed that they struggled to
keep track of potential players
while also steering clear of vi-
olations of NCAA recruitment
rules.
Inspiration: Make that proc-
ess easier.
Downs immediately called
Devlin, then working for Mon-
ster.com. The next day, I put
in my resignation, he said.
They borrowed $3,000 from
family and friends, which en-
abled them to swing a $35,000
bank line of credit. Five years
later, they employ 12, pay
them benefits, and record
sales in the millions.
Our idea was that we would
have the interns do everything
we wished we could do but we
didnt have the time: research-
ing new markets; new verti-
cals; posting stuff on Face-
book, Downs said.
Meanwhile, Front Rush had
been using an online sales
board to motivate its staff. It
worked well but wasnt core to
the business.
Online Sales Board allows
each salesperson and that per-
sons managers to track how
they are doing against compa-
ny quotas, while also allowing
personal goals to be set. The
twist: Its all applied with a
customizable sense of humor
designed to goad rivals.
Intern challenges: Dress well, impress the boss, run a business
By JANE M. VON BERGEN
The Philadelphia Inquirer
MCT PHOTO
Interns Dave Twanley, left, and Neal Cook work in a relaxed atmosphere at Front Rush in Lambert-
ville, N.J.
bakery to a staple in supermar-
kets was not the only hurdle the
family had to master, Atie said.
The family came to the United
States in 1979 to escape a civil
war in Lebanon. Atie said they
lived in Beirut near St. Josephs
Hospital, where his mother
worked.
Atie was 15 when the family ar-
rived in Wilkes-Barre.
I could not speak English, he
said. All I could say was no En-
glish.
Through the repetitive view-
ing of television commercials,
Atie and his family learned to
speak English.
At first, the language barrier
prevented his parents from find-
ing work. So Atie said his mom,
Souad, started making spinach
pies from home and selling them
in 1982.
Atie remembers the stove in
his home constantly going when
he was a teenager.
When they sawthere was a de-
mand for the pies, his parents
purchased a bakery on Hazle
Street in 1986.
Atie recalled when his parents
were setting up the business, ov-
ens and fire bricks were ordered
from Lebanon.
When the equipment had to
pass through customs, it was re-
moved from the packaging and
thoroughly examined. Then cus-
tom agents could not get the
kitchen equipment back into the
boxes, andit arriveddamaged, he
said.
We purchased fire bricks, he
said. Customs actually drilled
holes in the bricks to make sure
nothing was hidden inside.
Today, the biggest challenge
for the family-run business is
keeping up with the demand
while seeking more grocery
stores to carry their freshly made
product.
The business is still a family af-
fair and Aties mother still over-
sees everything. His father, Ersa-
nos; brother, Tony and his wife
Diane; and Atie and his wife
Joanne meet from 7 a.m. to 8:30
a.m. everyMondayandThursday
morning at the Welles Street fa-
cility to bake bread. The family
can put out as many as1,500 bags
of bread, each containing four pi-
tas.
Then Atie makes a three-hour
delivery run to the grocery
stores.
Atie believes his pita breadsets
apart from the national brands
because of its thinness andnouse
of preservatives.
Most of the pita bread on the
market is a Greek style, thick, he
said. Ours is thin. You can use it
as a wrap or open it like a pita.
He said in Wegmans, his pitas
outsell some of the national
brands.
To make the leap into groce-
ry stores has sometimes re-
quired a meeting with the
store manager, the head of the
bakery department or a corpo-
rate buyer.
Atie said Wegmans wants to
carry locally made products. He
said he talked with the manager
and was allowed to start stocking
the shelves with his pitas. Securi-
ng the Weis Markets business re-
quired a visit to its headquarters
in Sunbury.
The family also continues to
operate a neighborhood bakery
at 400 Hazle Street, Wilkes-
Barre.
Through resourcefulness,
hard work and dedication, Aties
family formed a niche for them-
selves in their community and
in the grocery stores. He hopes
to continue the family tradition
and reach out to have more
stores carry their products.
ATIES
Continued from Page 1D
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Aties bakes up to 6,000 pita breads each Monday and Thursday.
When fresh from the oven they are puffed up by steam; as they
cool they flatten but leave a pocket in the center.
C M Y K
PAGE 4D SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
B U S I N E S S
WE SALUTE YOU.
PFC MICHAEL TOLODZIESKI,
BRANCH:
U.S. Air Force
RANK:
SMSGT
(Senior Master Sergeant)
War:
Vietnam 1968-1969
HOMETOWN:
Dallas.
Years Served:
23
GERALD F.
KAVANAGH
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SEND A PHOTO OF A VETERAN OR AN
ACTIVE DUTY MEMBER OF YOUR FAMILY.
Each Sunday, well run a photo with the persons name,
hometown, branch, rank, years served and if applicable, the
war or battle fought. Sub mit your 200 dpi digital photo to
promotions@timesleader.com or mail your photo and information
to us. The Times Leader 15 N. Main St. Wilkes-Barre, PA. 18711.
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BIRCHWOOD
REHABILITATION AND NURSING CENTER
invites you to attend
NO COST TO PLAY BINGO
on July 28, 2011 - 5:30 PM located at the center
This NO COST event features great prizes,
Food and Desserts
RSVP by July 25, 2011 (Seating is limited to 40 guests)
570-735-2973
Look for our series of free senior events to follow!
Mark your calendars!
395 Middle Road
Nanticoke, PA 18634
HACKENSACK, N.J. Sakhir
Khan, ownerof SaddleRiverHard-
ware, couldnt believe his eyes
whenhereturnedtoworkfromthe
eye doctor last month, and saw
that aflashfloodhaddumpedfour
feet of water around his store.
It was like an ocean, he said
fromthe parking lot of his store.
Khan and other business own-
ers in that floods path say there
was little warning, and therefore
preparation, during that natural
disaster. They lost thousands of
dollars of inventory and any
chance toturna profit for the year.
By its nature, this kind of disas-
ter is unexpected. But officials
from federal business and emer-
gencyresponseagencies sayapre-
disaster plan can be the difference
between a business surviving and
closing. A federal public aware-
ness campaign this month is pro-
moting low-tech planning steps,
such as collecting employee and
supplier contact numbers and up-
dating insurance policies, to help
businesses shorten their recovery
time.
Most businesses dont have a
disaster plan as an annex to their
business plan, said James Rivera,
associate administrator of the
Small Business Administrations
Office of Disaster Assistance. In
theory, if we have a business that
has a disaster plan, this will help
themwhen disaster comes.
Adisaster preparation plan will
ensure business owners carry ade-
quate insurance coverage; backup
crucial documents; designate
rolesforemployeesduringastorm
or fire; andprepare a disaster sur-
vival kit, withfirst aid, extrafood,
flashlights and batteries.
In Saddle River, heavy rains
caused the banks of the Pascack
Brook and the Saddle River to
overflowon June 24. The ensuing
flash flood swamped roadways
and bridges and deluged private
properties.
David Meeks, owner of Water-
ford Gardens in Saddle River, said
he is used to flooding. His 6-acre
green house and koi pond oper-
ation sits just off the Saddle River.
Theproblemlast month, however,
was the speed in which the water
arrived. There was no time to ele-
vate his products or even move ei-
ther of his delivery trucks, both of
which were flooded.
He says he probably lost
$100,000 fromthe disaster.
Wewont recover,hesaid. We
wont have a profitable year when
we lose that much.
Neither Meeksnor Khancarries
flood insurance because they say
the premiums are too expensive
for apolicythat still maynot cover
certain loses.
SMALL TALK
Disaster plan can assure small-business survival
By ALEXANDER MACINNES
The Record
MCT PHOTO
Aflash flood leaves Sakhir Khan, left, and Charlene Mabe stranded on the second floor of a building in
Saddle River, N.J. Here, emergency personnel use a truck to rescue themfromthe floodwater.
Q: Last week, one of my co-
workers handed me my an-
nual performance appraisal
and said my boss wanted me
to sign it. When I saw that he
had given me a below-aver-
age rating, I felt really hurt.
During my 10 years with this
corporation, I have previous-
ly received nothing but posi-
tive reviews.
I told my co-worker that I
would not sign the form be-
cause I did not understand
the reasons for my rating.
Apparently, my manager
doesnt think Im important
enough to spend five min-
utes explaining it to me. Do I
have a right to be angry
about this?
A: Yes, you have every
right to be angry, although
openly expressing that anger
might not be wise. Your cow-
ardly bosss behavior is abso-
lutely appalling. Only a thor-
oughly incompetent manag-
er would have a co-worker
deliver a performance re-
view.
Since most corporations
have specific guidelines for
conducting appraisals, you
might consider having a con-
fidential conversation with
human resources about your
recent experience. But if that
seems risky, you should at
least request some clear ex-
pectations from your manag-
er.
For example: I was sur-
prised by the low rating on
my performance appraisal,
because I thought I was do-
ing a good job. I want to be
sure that I understand how
to get a better review next
time. What can I do different-
ly to improve my rating?
Then ask for an interim ap-
praisal in six months to see
how things are going. By tak-
ing the initiative to broach
this subject in a calm, profes-
sional manner, you will be
demonstrating a lot more
courage and maturity than
your spineless boss.
Q: My co-worker, Brad,
has been calling massage
parlors several times a day
from his company phone. We
share a cubicle wall, so I can
hear everything he says. He
asks these women about
their location, appearance,
cleanliness and so forth.
The calls start shortly after
Brad arrives at work and con-
tinue throughout the day.
Should I tell our boss about
this or just mind my own
business? I dont want to be a
tattletale, but the whole
thing is rather gross.
A: If these phone calls are a
daily occurrence, then this
guy must be conducting a na-
tional survey of massage par-
lors. If youre tired of listen-
ing to his lascivious ex-
changes, but feel uncomfort-
able going to your manager,
you might consider talking
with Brad directly.
For example: Brad, you
may have noticed that our
cubicle walls dont block out
sound very well. Even if I try
not to listen, I can still hear
every word you say on the
phone. Lately, Ive been hear-
ing a lot more than I want to
about some very personal ac-
tivities, so I would appre-
ciate your making those calls
at another time.
Knowing that hes being
overheard may motivate
Brad to curb his phone fetish.
But if not, you might consid-
er encouraging your boss to
audit his telephone records.
OFFICE COACH
Gently insist on meeting
with spineless manager
By MARIE G. MCINTYRE
McClatchy-Tribune News Service
Marie G. McIntyre is a workplace
coach and the author of Secrets to
Winning at Office Politics. Send in
questions and get free coaching tips
at http://www.yourofficecoach.com.
an interview request for Bryson,
following standard policy of pre-
ventingnomineesfromspeakingto
themediauntil theyareconfirmed.
He would face new challenges
should he be confirmed to lead the
Commerce Department. With the
economystruggling,companieshes-
itanttohireandtheObamaadminis-
trationviewedas unfriendly to busi-
ness, the normally low-profile posi-
tionhastakenonaddedimportance.
But Brysonfaces a surprisingly
toughconfirmationfight.
Lastweek,Sen.JamesM.Inhofe,
R-Okla., placedaholdonthenomi-
nation, a procedural hurdle that
will take60votes fromBrysonsup-
porters toovercome.
Nearly all Senate Republicans al-
readyhadvowedtoblocktheconfir-
mation of any nominee for Com-
merce secretary in a dispute over
pending free-trade deals withSouth
Korea, Panama and Colombia.
Agreements, though, could be reac-
hedinthecomingdays.
Some conservatives have criti-
cized Bryson for his involvement
with companies that depend on
government regulation or subsi-
dies. ThoseincludeEdison, aregu-
lated utility, and BrightSource En-
ergy, a solar-energy firm whose
board Bryson chairs. AWall Street
Journal editorial dubbedhimSec-
retaryof Subsidy.
And some Republicans have re-
buked him for being one of six co-
founders in 1970 of the Natural Re-
sources Defense Council, anaggres-
siveorganizationthat oftenhassued
companiesforallegedlyviolatingen-
vironmental regulations. Bryson al-
so has come under fire for favorable
comments he made in2009 about a
DemocraticHousebill toaddresscli-
matechange.
His approach ... toward afforda-
ble energy is harmful to American
businesses, saidSen. JohnBarras-
so, R-Wyo., who called the NRDC
one of the nations most extreme
environmental organizations.
Brysondidagoodjobpromoting
energyefficiencyandelectrictrans-
portation, but the last thing you
could call himis an environmental
extremist, said V. John White, ex-
ecutive director of the Center for
Energy Efficiency and Renewable
TechnologiesinSacramento, Calif.
He bought coal plants. He suc-
cessfully blocked power plant con-
trols that should have been in-
stalled 10 years earlier. And he ac-
tivelyresistedrenewables until the
endof his career at Edison, White
said.
BRYSON
Continued from Page 1D
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 PAGE 5D
B U S I N E S S
MarketPulse
Stan Choe, Kristen Girard AP
NO MISSING THE SWISS
Whats safer than gold? Appar-
ently the Swiss franc. The Swiss
currency has climbed against
gold, the dollar and the euro in
2011 because investors are
looking for something safe to
own. Investors are worried
about possible defaults by either
the U.S. or a European country.
Of course, the Swiss francs rise
means some financial analysts
say it now looks expensive
against other currencies. Swiss
policymakers could also try to
weaken the currency to help
their exporters. But when Swit-
zerland tried that in 2009 and
2010, it didnt have much effect,
says Capital Economics.
EUROPEAN BRIGHT SPOT
Europe may be struggling,
but U.S. companies said
danke, merci and gracias a
lot more often last year. Rev-
enue from Europe for com-
panies in the S&P 500 rose
8 percent in 2010, according
to Standard & Poors. It was
the strongest area of foreign
growth. Exxon Mobil, for ex-
ample, got 18 percent more
revenue from Europe last
year. The strength comes
despite Europes slower
economic growth. The 27-
nation European Unions
economy grew 1.8 percent
last year, versus 2.9 percent
for the U.S.
NOT LEAVING LAS VEGAS
Finally, some signs that Vegas is
back. Las Vegas had been strug-
gling since the recession meant
fewer tourists. The weakness
meant casino operators were fo-
cusing more on their Asian prop-
erties, where the growth was
stronger. But Wynn Resorts said
last week that revenue at its Las
Vegas properties grew by more
than 20 percent for the second
straight quarter. Executives said
foreign tourists, particularly Chi-
nese ones, were filling Vegas
rooms. Credit Suisse analysts,
though, say Vegas rebound is
spotty: Business is better for
high-end casinos, but lower-end
ones arent improving as much.
COUNTING MORE ON THE CONTINENT
European revenue, 2009
European revenue, 2010 $35.3b
$29.9b
$16.7b
$14.6b
$15.7b
$11.5b
Source: Standard & Poors
Source: FactSet
J F M A A S O N D M J J J
0.90
1.00
1.10
1.20
1.30
1.22
Swiss
francs
per dollar
Source: the company
Wynn's growth in Las
Vegas revenue
0
10
20
30 percent
Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2
10 11
10 11
Philip Orlando, chief equity mar-
ket strategist for Federated Inves-
tors, expects the economy to re-
bound in the second half of the
year. He says continued growth in
corporate earnings could push the
S&P 500 to a record in 2012, sur-
passing its old peak of 1,565.15
set in October 2007.
Corporate
earnings
have been
strong, but
economic
reports have
been weak.
Wheres the
S&P 500
headed?
I agree that
earnings are
pretty good,
and that
stock prices
are pretty
cheap. Were sitting here (with the
S&P 500) trading at about 13
times (the expected total earnings
of S&P 500 companies over the
next year), yet with the 10-year
Treasury yield down around 3 per-
cent and (relatively low) core infla-
tion. Our view is that (the price-to-
earnings) multiple probably ought
to be closer to 16.
Were thinking that stocks, even
though theyve doubled over the last
two years, probably ought to end
this year at or near 1,450. And were
looking at a 1,600 kind of S&P num-
ber next year, which would be an
all-time record high.
That means you think Treasury
yields will stay around 3 percent?
No, were expecting Treasury
yields to back up to 5 percent over
the next two years. The target
price-earnings ratio on stocks is
roughly the inverse of the Treasury
yield. So with Treasury yields at 3
percent right now, I could justify a
30 (price-to-earnings) multiple
(because one divided by three is
close to 30). Im not going to, be-
cause I dont think a 3 percent
Treasury yield is appropriate.
The only rationalization you can
extend for Treasury yields being
where they are is that there is a
massive amount of fear out there,
and this is a flight-to-quality rally. If
investors were trying to price in
economic fundamentals, Treasury
yields would be 4 or 5 percent.
Im more than happy to price in
a 5 percent Treasury yield right
now. On that basis, it would get me
to 20 times (for a price-earnings
multiple because one divided by
five is 20). My expectation of a 16
multiple by next year is extraordi-
narily conservative given how be-
nign the inflation and interest rate
picture is.
The best performing stocks last
quarter were from the health
care, utility and other defen-
sive industries that do well
when the economy is weak. Can
they still rise?
We do like health care equipment
and services. We do like consumer
staples, specifically the food, bever-
age, tobacco names. But as the
economy reasserts itself from a
growth standpoint in the second half
of the year, were probably going to
fade that defensive trade and shift to
a more aggressive allocation, adding
to technology and industrials and
consumer discretionary.
What do you like in tech?
Software is the area that looks
best right now. Generally speak-
ing, we think there is going to be a
significant ramp in spending
based upon (companies upgrad-
ing their technology systems) be-
cause of the (changes to) the tax
code that the president signed in-
to law last year. (They provide in-
centives to companies to make
capital investments by the end of
2011). We think technology will be
a big beneficiary of that, and we
think that will happen particularly
in the fourth quarter.
Why do you prefer U.S. stocks
now over foreign ones when the
strongest growth is coming
from emerging markets?
The fact of the matter is that Brazil
and China and India have a lot of
growth, but thats also been re-
flected in valuation levels. We
neutralized our emerging bet in
the fourth quarter of last year. I
think thats more of a (short-term)
tactical call. We have every rea-
son to believe that those sectors
are going to work again. We just
need to see the valuation get a lit-
tle more normal.
A record 2012
Orlando
InsiderQ&A
Sandwiched between two of
the worlds biggest economic
powers, investors often overlook
South Korea. Those in search of
growth look to its west, at China.
To its east is Japan, a market
thats appealing because it has
been successful for decades. But
Korean stocks were among the
best in the world over the last
year. Why? Because Korea is be-
tween China and Japan, not just
in terms of geography but also in
growth and safety for its stocks.
You get Japanese-like quality
companies with higher growth,
says Michael Oh, portfolio man-
ager of the Matthews Korea fund.
Compared to Chinese compa-
nies, Samsung Electronics,
Hyundai Motor and other Korean
companies have better account-
ing standards. Thats a comfort to
investors. Meanwhile, Koreas
economy is expected to grow 4.2
percent next year, twice as fast
as Japans, the International
Monetary Fund says.
But Korea is dependent on ex-
ports. They made up 46 percent
of its economy last year. That
leaves it vulnerable if global
growth keeps slowing. U.S. in-
vestors sold more Korean stocks
in June than they bought for the
first time since 2009 on worries
that the global economy was
slowing. The U.S. job market
weakened and Greece looked
like it would default on its debt.
The selling may actually make
Korean stocks more attractive.
They are some of the cheapest in
Asia, Credit Suisse says.
Korea is also picking up some
of the manufacturing Japan lost
after its earthquake on March 11,
says Citi strategist Geoffrey Den-
nis. Korea is one of his top picks
among emerging markets.
S Choe K Girard AP SOURCE: FactSet Data through July 19
J F M A A S O N D M J J J
0%
South Korean stocks have been
some of the world's strongest
over the last year.
KIA MOTORS
HYUNDAI HEAVY INDUSTRIES
HYUNDAI MOTOR
LG CHEM
147%
83%
74%
49%
Big South Korean company
stocks have soared the last year.
Overlooked
in Asia
Korean stocks*
+23%
Chinese stocks*
+13%
Japanese stocks*
+5%
10 11
SOUTH
KOREA
*As measured by the Nikkei 225 Shanghai composite and Kospi indexes
Air Products APD 68.54 8 98.01 91.90 -2.39 -2.5 t t 1.0+31.34 2 10.4 18 2.5
Amer Water Works AWK 20.82 9 30.70 29.48 -0.05 -0.2 s s 16.6+42.00 216.9a 18 3.1
Amerigas Part LP APU 41.60 3 51.50 44.54 -0.05 -0.1 s t -8.7 +8.33 4 14.0 29 6.6
Aqua America Inc WTR 18.50 8 23.79 22.24 0.09 0.4 s s -1.1+18.09 3 2.9 23 2.8
Arch Dan Mid ADM 26.50 5 38.02 32.12 1.82 6.0 s t 6.8+19.27 3 -2.5 10 2.0
AutoZone Inc AZO 201.90 0302.00 295.85 -1.43 -0.5 s s 8.5+42.96 2 28.3 16 ...
Bank of America BAC 9.40 2 15.31 10.13 0.13 1.3 t t -24.125.55 5-20.4 ... 0.4
Bk of NY Mellon BK 23.78 3 32.50 25.76 0.66 2.6 s t -14.7 +1.79 4 -2.6 12 2.0
Bon Ton Store BONT 6.08 4 17.49 10.43 0.52 5.2 s t -17.6+31.79 2-14.0 80 1.9
CIGNA Corp CI 30.06 0 52.95 52.62 0.96 1.9 s s 43.5+67.07 1 9.2 10 0.1
CVS Caremark Corp CVS 26.84 9 39.50 37.35 0.66 1.8 s s 7.4+26.38 3 4.0 15 1.3
CocaCola KO 51.92 0 69.78 69.73 2.20 3.3 s s 6.0+31.87 2 12.1 14 2.7
Comcast Corp A CMCSA 16.76 8 27.16 24.85 0.72 3.0 s t 13.6+34.24 2 3.9 18 1.8
Community Bk Sys CBU 21.76 5 28.95 24.92 0.22 0.9 s s -10.3 +9.34 4 7.6 13 3.9
Community Hlth Sys CYH 22.33 3 42.50 27.00 1.51 5.9 s t -27.7 9.76 4 -6.1 9 ...
Entercom Comm ETM 4.97 5 13.63 8.70 0.45 5.5 s t -24.9 +7.81 4-14.0 7 ...
Fairchild Semicond FCS 7.71 8 21.02 17.10 0.60 3.6 s t 9.5+68.14 1 2.6 12 ...
Frontier Comm FTR 7.25 3 9.84 7.85 0.14 1.8 t t -19.3+17.17 3 0.3 56 9.6
Genpact Ltd G 13.09 8 18.71 17.51 -0.14 -0.8 s s 15.2+13.26 3 9.5a 25 1.0
Harte Hanks Inc HHS 7.59 2 13.74 8.52 -0.04 -0.5 s t -33.318.39 5-16.9 11 3.8
Heinz HNZ 44.35 0 55.00 53.99 0.55 1.0 s s 9.2+22.84 3 8.2 18 3.6
Hershey Company HSY 45.31 0 58.20 58.93 2.13 3.8 s s 25.0+26.20 3 3.0 26 2.3
Kraft Foods KFT 28.56 0 36.02 35.43 0.06 0.2 s s 12.4+24.97 3 6.5 21 3.3
Lowes Cos LOW 19.35 5 27.45 22.62 -0.10 -0.4 t t -9.8+10.85 3 -2.8 16 2.5
M&T Bank MTB 72.03 8 95.00 89.08 3.52 4.1 s s 2.3 +6.00 4 -2.9 13 3.1
McDonalds Corp MCD 68.59 0 87.04 88.56 3.08 3.6 s s 15.4+27.37 2 23.1 19 2.8
NBT Bncp NBTB 19.27 7 24.98 22.88 0.36 1.6 s s -5.3 +11.33 3 4.1 14 3.5
Nexstar Bdcstg Grp NXST 3.64 9 10.28 9.25 1.86 25.2 s s 54.4+88.78 1 16.8 ... ...
PNC Financial PNC 49.43 5 65.19 56.59 -0.23 -0.4 r t -6.8 3.83 4 -1.3 8 2.5
PPL Corp PPL 24.10 0 28.38 28.01 0.23 0.8 s s 6.4 +9.70 4 0.6 12 5.0
Penn Millers Hldg PMIC 11.98 8 17.72 16.20 -0.45 -2.7 t s 22.4+30.12 2 ... ... ...
Penna REIT PEI 10.03 9 17.34 16.08 0.15 0.9 s s 10.7+42.08 2 -9.3 ... 3.7
PepsiCo PEP 61.71 4 71.89 65.76 -2.77 -4.0 t t 0.7 +5.46 4 3.4 17 3.1
Philip Morris Intl PM 49.20 0 71.76 72.11 5.18 7.7 s s 23.2+46.87 215.0a 17 3.6
Procter & Gamble PG 59.17 6 67.72 64.25 -0.05 -0.1 s s -0.1 +7.97 4 5.3 17 3.3
Prudential Fncl PRU 48.56 7 67.52 60.93 0.17 0.3 s t 3.8+13.53 3 -3.4 9 1.9
SLM Corp SLM 10.24 0 17.11 16.71 0.66 4.1 s s 32.7+56.23 1-19.0 12 2.4
SLM Corp flt pfB SLMpB 32.41 9 60.00 56.69 0.19 0.3 t t 29.4 ... 0.0 ... 8.2
Southn Union Co SUG 22.02 0 44.65 44.25 0.86 2.0 s s 83.8+96.62 1 11.4 22 1.4
TJX Cos TJX 39.56 0 56.78 56.19 0.93 1.7 s s 26.6+34.51 2 19.8 18 1.4
UGI Corp UGI 26.28 8 33.53 31.96 0.08 0.3 s t 1.2+20.90 3 7.4 13 3.3
Verizon Comm VZ 26.41 9 38.95 36.74 -0.08 -0.2 s t 2.7+43.30 2 9.7 22 5.3
WalMart Strs WMT 49.09 7 57.90 54.52 0.89 1.7 s s 1.1 +9.82 4 6.4 13 2.7
Weis Mkts WMK 32.99 9 42.20 41.12 -0.45 -1.1 s s 2.0+22.55 3 3.6 16 2.8
52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG%CHG %CHG%RTN RANK %RTN
COMPANY TICKER LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD
Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns
annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quar-
ters. Rank classifies a stocks performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).
LocalStocks
SOURCE: FactSet
Beating bond yields
Stock
Screener
The volatility in the stock market this summer
has sent investors to the safety of bonds. That
has driven Treasury yields down. At 2.93 per-
cent, the yield on the 10-year Treasury note is
near its low for the year. Investors looking for a
bigger payout on their investments might want to
go back into the stock market where there are
plenty of dividends that can beat bond rates.
One-fifth of the stocks in the S&P 500, or 100,
have yields higher than the 10-year Treasury.
But dont choose a stock simply because it
has a dividend yield that looks good. A dividend
yield measures how much cash an investor gets
back for each dollar invested, so it rises when a
stock falls. Take Frontier Communications. Its
dividend yield is better than any other in the S&P
500, at 9.7 percent. But its stock is down 20 per-
cent this year because its earnings have fallen
short of Wall Streets expectations.
This screen, powered by FacSet, shows 10
S&P 500 stocks with a yield thats better than the
10-year Treasury. Five have yields that more
than double it.
Data through July 20
DIV.
YIELD CLOSE
52-WK
LOW
52-WK
HIGH
P/E
RATIO COMPANY TICKER
Frontier Communications Corp. FTR $7.80 $7.30 $9.84 9.7% 32.4%
VeriSign Inc. VRSN 33.70 27.80 37.73 8.9 7.3
Windstream Corp. WIN 12.60 10.97 14.40 7.9 19.1
CenturyLink Inc. CTL 37.90 35.10 46.87 7.6 12.1
Pitney Bowes Inc. PBI 22.20 19.06 26.36 6.7 15.8
Cincinnati Financial Corp. CINF 27.90 26.40 34.33 5.7 12.1
AT&T Inc. T 30.30 25.36 31.94 5.7 9.1
Altria Group Inc. MO 27.00 21.42 28.13 5.6 14.4
Pepco Holdings Inc. POM 19.20 16.50 20.36 5.6 137.4
Reynolds American Inc. RAI 38.00 27.14 39.87 5.6 20.0
Direx SOX Bull 3X SOXL 44.48 5.42 13.9 10.4 26.4
PwShs 3x Italian TBd ITLT 18.49 1.94 11.7 -8.6 ...
Direxion TechBull 3x TYH 50.23 4.96 11.0 30.3 65.7
CS VS InvVix STerm XIV 18.21 1.74 10.6 14.9 ...
Direxion DvMktBull3x DZK 72.15 6.70 10.2 15.6 72.2
Direxion EngyBull 3x ERX 86.50 8.00 10.2 39.7 212.1
Direx Agbiz Bull3x COWL 45.14 3.94 9.6 25.7 ...
Barc iPath Sugar SGG 106.00 9.22 9.5 22.2 105.6
ProShs UltraPro QQQ TQQQ 93.37 7.87 9.2 30.8 8.5
ProSh Ultra Semi USD 40.49 3.39 9.1 10.1 28.6
Direxion REst Bull3x DRN 83.49 6.74 8.8 24.5 125.8
Dirx Dly NG Bull2x GASL 78.12 6.13 8.5 25.1 107.2
Global X Uranium ETF URA 13.33 1.05 8.5 14.7 ...
iShare Spain EWP 40.85 3.09 8.2 4.9 17.2
Direxion FinBull 3x FAS 25.51 1.93 8.2 11.9 29.5
Direx Russia Bull3x RUSL 50.97 3.75 7.9 21.9 ...
iPath Beta Sugar SGAR 65.56 4.63 7.6 21.3 ...
ProSh Ultra Tech ROM 69.88 4.86 7.5 19.3 47.9
Fact SPBull USDBear FSU 28.14 1.82 6.9 10.3 ...
ProSh Ultra O&G DIG 61.52 3.93 6.8 25.6 122.1
ProShs Ult Europe UPV 38.92 2.46 6.7 9.3 52.7
ProShs Ultra S&P500 UPRO 82.75 5.16 6.7 18.7 -34.9
IQ Australia SmCap KROO 29.73 1.84 6.6 9.7 38.8
iShare Italy EWI 16.77 1.03 6.5 2.6 14.6
ProShs Ult MSCI EAFE EFO 91.49 5.59 6.5 10.5 47.4
Global X Lithium ETF LIT 20.86 1.26 6.4 9.2 ...
Fact S&PBullTBdBear FSE 22.89 1.35 6.3 15.3 ...
Direxion LCapBull 3x BGU 86.86 5.16 6.3 18.4 99.6
iShs Europe Fin EUFN 21.75 1.25 6.1 4.8 12.2
ProShs Ultra QQQ QLD 96.33 5.53 6.1 19.7 71.5
Direxion EmMktBull3x EDC 37.80 2.17 6.1 13.7 52.6
Internet Arch Hd Tr IAH 61.94 3.51 6.0 11.9 24.5
iShs Thailand THD 70.93 3.99 6.0 15.9 50.4
Alps Jeff WildcatEx WCAT 54.84 3.12 6.0 16.2 45.9
Mkt Vect UranNuclEn NLR 22.95 1.30 6.0 9.9 21.9
iPathInverse1-21Vix IVO 27.27 1.53 5.9 8.9 ...
WT Australia Div AUSE 61.66 3.39 5.8 5.3 29.8
JPM FstTr LgCap ETN JFT 37.94 2.09 5.8 10.7 35.1
Mkt Vectors China PEK 45.45 2.44 5.7 6.9 ...
ProSh Ultra Fincl UYG 63.59 3.42 5.7 8.6 24.3
iShares MSCI Peru EPU 42.63 2.28 5.7 13.0 30.9
SPDR Intl Fincl IPF 20.18 1.10 5.7 5.4 14.7
CS Elem GlobWarm GWO 9.20 0.49 5.6 16.9 47.6
ProSh Ultra RealEst URE 64.79 3.36 5.5 14.1 73.8
Glbl X Brazil Finan BRAF 16.67 0.86 5.4 2.3 ...
iPath LgExt S&P500 SFLA 71.10 3.58 5.3 16.3 ...
Global X Norway NORW 16.27 0.82 5.3 8.9 ...
ProShs Ult China25 XPP 72.42 3.67 5.3 3.6 12.8
SPDR Euro Stoxx 50 FEZ 39.09 1.95 5.3 3.9 23.7
ProSh Ult RusMCV UVU 40.85 2.02 5.2 7.8 64.3
Exchange-Traded Funds
FRIDAY CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN
NAME TICKER CLOSE WK 1WK 1MO 1YR
Dow industrials
+1.6%
+6.3%
Nasdaq
+2.5%
+7.8%
S&P 500
+2.2%
+6.0%
Russell 2000
+1.6%
+5.5%
LARGE-CAP
SMALL-CAP
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
p
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
+9.5%
+7.8%
+7.0%
+7.4%
Mortgage rates inch up
The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose slightly
last week, but it slipped back below 3 percent on Fri-
day. Higher Treasury yields can mean more expen-
sive rates for mortgages and other consumer loans.
The average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage was
4.52 percent last week, up slightly from 4.51 percent
a week earlier. Ayear ago, the average rate was
4.56 percent, Freddie Mac says.
InterestRates
MIN
Money market mutual funds YIELD INVEST PHONE
3.25
3.25
3.25
.13
.13
.13
PRIME
RATE
FED
FUNDS
Taxablenational avg 0.01
Flex-funds Money Market/Retail 0.10 $ 2,500 min (800) 325-3539
Tax-exemptnational avg 0.01
Invesco Tax-Exempt Cash Fund/Cl A0.11$ 1,000 min (800) 659-1005
Broad market Lehman 2.76 0.05 s t 0.03 3.29 2.35
Triple-A corporate Moodys 4.96 0.04 s t 0.35 5.31 4.24
Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman 3.70 0.06 s t -0.37 4.22 3.47
FRIDAY
6 MO AGO
1 YR AGO
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
U.S. BOND INDEXES YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
Municipal Bond Buyer 5.21 0.03 s t 0.09 5.95 4.86
U.S. high yield Barclays 7.14 -0.08 t s -1.52 8.68 6.61
Treasury Barclays 1.84 0.05 s t 0.07 2.46 1.35
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
TREASURYS YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
3-month T-Bill 0.03 0.02 s t -0.11 0.16
1-year T-Bill 0.19 0.03 s t -0.08 0.34 0.15
6-month T-Bill 0.07 0.03 s t -0.11 0.20 0.04
2-year T-Note 0.37 0.03 s t -0.18 0.83 0.31
5-year T-Note 1.50 0.07 s t -0.16 2.39 1.02
10-year T-Note 2.96 0.06 s t 0.03 3.72 2.38
30-year T-Bond 4.26 0.01 s t 0.31 4.77 3.53
Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.
AMF
ARM b +1.1 -1.1 7.51 7.38 7.42 ...
Acadian
EmgMkts d +3.1 +10.2 21.65 16.42 20.83 +.37
AdvisorOne
AmerigoN +5.9 +5.0 14.44 10.99 14.13 +.28
Alger Group
CapApInsI +10.4 +10.8 23.01 16.64 22.86 +.57
CapApprA m +10.3 +10.8 16.12 11.64 15.98 +.40
MdCpGInsI +10.8 +6.1 16.21 11.20 15.73 +.41
SmCpGrthO +10.3 +8.5 36.82 24.61 35.35 +.53
SmCpInstI +10.2 +7.8 31.94 21.32 30.69 +.46
Allegiant
UltShtBdI +.3 +3.2 10.05 10.00 10.00 -.01
Alliance Bernstein
BalShrA m +9.0 +3.7 16.02 13.29 15.99 +.23
BalShrB m +8.5 +2.9 15.00 12.46 14.99 +.22
BalWlthStrA m +4.8 +4.2 12.55 10.56 12.31 +.18
BalWlthStrC m +4.3 +3.5 12.49 10.52 12.26 +.18
CoreOppA m +13.1 +5.1 13.02 9.44 13.02 +.30
GlTmtcGA m +2.0 +8.9 81.41 60.78 78.72 +2.30
GlblBondA m +3.2 +8.0 8.58 8.27 8.46 -.01
GlblBondC m +2.8 +7.3 8.61 8.30 8.49 -.01
GrowA m +10.1 +4.9 40.29 29.65 40.29 +1.03
GrowIncA m +11.5 +2.3 3.69 2.78 3.68 +.08
HighIncA m +5.6 +11.6 9.31 8.65 9.19 +.05
HighIncC m +5.1 +10.7 9.41 8.75 9.29 +.05
IntGrA m +2.0 +2.9 16.42 12.99 15.67 +.39
IntlValA m +1.8 -3.3 14.78 11.76 13.90 +.49
IntlValAdv +1.9 -3.0 15.06 12.01 14.18 +.50
LgCapGrA m +9.5 +8.6 27.62 19.68 27.13 +.67
LgCapGrAd +9.6 +8.8 28.91 20.60 28.43 +.70
MuInCAA m +5.0 +4.1 11.09 10.14 10.68 +.01
MuInNYA m +4.8 +4.3 10.12 9.39 9.85 -.01
MuInNatlA m +5.4 +4.1 10.12 9.33 9.83 +.01
SMCpGrA m +14.9 +10.0 7.15 4.41 6.95 +.13
SmMidValA m +4.8 +7.4 19.24 13.75 18.50 +.33
TxMgdWlApStAd +4.7 +1.3 13.16 10.19 12.79 +.32
WlthApprStr +5.2 +2.3 13.09 9.97 12.68 +.29
WlthApprStrA m +5.1 +2.0 13.07 9.94 12.66 +.30
Allianz
NFJDivVlA m +7.7 +.8 12.40 9.73 12.06 +.16
NFJDivVlC m +7.3 0.0 12.44 9.76 12.10 +.16
NFJEqIncD b +7.8 +.8 12.42 9.75 12.09 +.17
NFJIntVlA m +4.3 +6.7 22.38 17.65 21.29 +.46
NFJSmCVlA m +10.0 +8.6 31.65 23.69 31.39 +.48
NFJSmCVlC m +9.5 +7.8 30.29 22.64 30.00 +.46
Alpine
DynDiv d +4.2 -1.3 5.14 3.92 4.76 +.09
InRelEstY d -1.0 -1.3 27.18 20.91 25.67 +.71
UlShTxAdv d +1.0 +3.0 10.06 10.03 10.05 ...
Amana
Growth m +5.0 +8.6 26.22 20.64 25.94 +.50
Income m +7.3 +8.1 34.50 27.11 33.85 +.33
American Beacon
BalAMR +4.3 +4.1 13.01 11.47 12.72 +.17
IntlEqAMR d +7.1 +3.0 18.52 14.44 17.63 +.58
IntlEqInv +6.7 +2.4 18.33 14.15 17.43 +.57
LgCpVlAMR +4.9 +2.3 20.86 16.29 20.22 +.43
LgCpVlInv +4.5 +1.7 20.02 15.64 19.37 +.41
SmCpVlInv +6.1 +5.7 21.35 15.00 20.60 +.39
American Cent
BalInv +7.2 +5.0 16.43 13.92 16.42 +.20
CAInTFBdIv +5.4 +4.5 11.56 10.73 11.28 +.01
DivBdInv +3.3 +6.9 11.16 10.61 10.92 -.02
EmgMktInv d +2.4 +9.1 9.64 7.18 9.20 +.14
EqGrowInv +9.9 +3.1 22.97 17.32 22.85 +.47
EqIncA m +5.0 +4.0 7.66 6.41 7.50 +.07
EqIncC m +4.5 +3.2 7.66 6.41 7.49 +.06
EqIncInv +5.1 +4.2 7.66 6.41 7.50 +.07
Gift +11.6 +11.2 31.42 21.84 31.37 +.82
GinMaeInv +3.6 +6.7 11.10 10.72 11.05 +.01
GlGold d -2.3 +13.9 27.26 18.88 25.48 +.48
GovBdInv +3.0 +6.5 11.50 10.96 11.30 -.01
GrowthAdv m +8.0 +7.5 27.66 20.46 27.49 +.59
GrowthInv +8.1 +7.8 28.11 20.80 27.93 +.60
HeritA m +10.9 +12.7 22.99 15.56 22.64 +.44
HeritInv +11.0 +12.9 23.65 15.97 23.29 +.46
InTTxFBInv +4.7 +4.8 11.39 10.63 11.12 +.01
IncGrInv +8.8 +2.1 26.22 19.96 25.97 +.50
IncGroA m +8.7 +1.9 26.19 19.93 25.94 +.49
InfAdjAdv m +7.2 +6.6 12.49 11.52 12.43 +.01
InfAdjI +7.4 +6.9 12.53 11.56 12.48 +.02
IntlBd +7.3 +6.1 15.24 13.40 14.81 +.18
IntlDisIv d +6.0 +5.2 11.78 8.31 11.35 +.24
IntlGrInv d +7.2 +5.0 12.19 9.19 11.76 +.31
LS2025Inv +6.2 +5.8 12.40 10.52 12.37 +.15
LgCoVlInv +5.5 +.2 5.95 4.68 5.78 +.11
MdCpValIv +4.1 +7.0 13.49 10.64 13.02 +.15
NTEqGrIns +9.8 +3.4 10.54 7.97 10.48 +.21
NTGrthIns +8.2 +8.1 12.93 9.57 12.84 +.27
NTLgCmVlI +5.4 +.2 9.09 7.14 8.83 +.17
OneChAgg +7.1 +6.1 13.01 10.39 12.92 +.21
OneChCon +5.8 +5.7 11.58 10.23 11.56 +.11
OneChMod +6.6 +5.9 12.34 10.33 12.26 +.16
RealEstIv +17.2 +1.7 21.50 15.56 21.50 +.64
SelectInv +12.4 +7.3 42.46 30.25 42.46 +1.21
ShTmGovIv +.9 +3.9 9.89 9.71 9.80 -.01
SmCpValAdv m +3.1 +7.6 9.59 7.06 9.26 +.13
SmCpValIv +3.2 +7.9 9.63 7.09 9.30 +.13
StrAlAgIv +7.0 +6.2 8.17 6.50 8.11 +.13
StrAlMd +6.3 +5.9 6.95 5.78 6.89 +.09
StrAlMd m +6.3 +5.7 6.94 5.78 6.89 +.10
UltraInv +11.7 +6.5 25.30 18.08 25.30 +.75
ValueInv +4.6 +2.9 6.14 4.92 5.94 +.10
VistaInv +9.3 +5.9 18.59 12.94 18.27 +.34
American Funds
AMCAPA m +8.1 +5.2 20.44 15.39 20.28 +.45
AMCAPB m +7.6 +4.4 19.52 14.76 19.38 +.43
BalA m +7.0 +5.1 19.07 16.03 18.97 +.32
BalB m +6.5 +4.3 18.99 15.97 18.90 +.31
BondA m +3.6 +3.9 12.56 12.05 12.39 -.01
BondAmerB m +3.1 +3.1 12.56 12.05 12.39 -.01
CapIncBuA m +5.9 +4.2 53.07 45.86 51.88 +.81
CapIncBuB m +5.4 +3.4 53.07 45.86 51.90 +.80
CapWldBdA m +5.6 +7.1 21.53 20.09 21.20 +.12
CpWldGrIA m +5.2 +5.0 38.88 31.02 37.01 +.91
CpWldGrIB m +4.7 +4.2 38.66 30.85 36.80 +.90
EurPacGrA m +4.6 +5.8 45.12 35.64 43.29 +.98
EurPacGrB m +4.2 +5.1 44.65 35.16 42.77 +.96
FnInvA m +7.1 +4.7 40.16 30.82 39.07 +.82
FnInvB m +6.7 +3.9 40.03 30.70 38.95 +.81
GlbBalA m NA NA 25.99 25.57 25.99 ...
GrthAmA m +6.7 +4.1 32.93 25.46 32.47 +.77
GrthAmB m +6.2 +3.3 31.89 24.58 31.38 +.74
HiIncA m +5.5 +7.4 11.61 10.82 11.43 +.03
HiIncMuA m +5.0 +2.4 14.26 13.10 13.77 +.02
IncAmerA m +6.8 +4.4 17.74 15.11 17.34 +.23
IncAmerB m +6.5 +3.6 17.60 15.00 17.22 +.24
IntBdAmA m +2.4 +4.0 13.74 13.30 13.57 -.01
IntlGrInA m +6.3 NA 34.29 27.10 32.54 +.83
InvCoAmA m +5.1 +2.7 30.12 23.97 29.34 +.67
InvCoAmB m +4.7 +1.9 29.99 23.85 29.21 +.66
LtdTmTxEA m +4.0 +4.3 16.04 15.29 15.82 +.01
MutualA m +7.1 +4.3 27.24 22.17 26.81 +.32
NewEconA m +7.9 +6.5 27.54 21.25 27.33 +.69
NewPerspA m +5.3 +6.5 31.04 24.00 30.15 +.60
NewPerspB m +4.9 +5.7 30.55 23.55 29.63 +.59
NwWrldA m +2.7 +10.3 57.43 47.23 56.09 +.91
STBdFdofAmA m +.9 NA 10.18 10.03 10.10 ...
SmCpWldA m +4.3 +7.4 41.61 31.89 40.55 +.82
TDR2010A m +5.3 NA 9.61 8.70 9.59 +.10
TDR2015A m +5.4 NA 9.70 8.60 9.64 +.12
TDR2020A m +5.7 NA 9.67 8.36 9.59 +.14
TDR2025A m +6.0 NA 9.84 8.16 9.71 +.16
TDR2030A m +6.2 NA 10.11 8.21 9.96 +.19
TaxEBdAmA m +5.1 +3.9 12.54 11.53 12.14 +.01
TaxECAA m +5.7 +3.7 16.63 15.19 16.10 +.02
USGovSecA m +2.8 +5.7 14.79 13.66 14.14 -.02
WAMutInvA m +9.4 +3.1 29.72 23.52 29.44 +.44
WAMutInvB m +8.9 +2.3 29.54 23.34 29.24 +.43
Aquila
HITaxFA m +3.3 +3.9 11.60 11.04 11.35 -.01
Arbitrage
ArbtrageR m +2.5 +4.5 12.93 12.58 12.92 -.01
Ariel
Apprec b +9.7 +7.8 47.12 33.37 46.50 +1.13
Ariel b +5.7 +4.9 53.61 37.35 51.32 +.88
Artio Global
GlobHiYldA b +5.8 +9.3 11.15 10.56 10.88 +.06
IntlEqA b +2.8 +1.9 31.51 25.20 30.24 +.63
IntlEqIIA b +3.1 +2.8 13.28 10.60 12.78 +.27
Artisan
IntSmCpIv d +5.0 +8.1 21.58 16.15 20.89 +.31
Intl d +7.2 +3.8 24.23 18.31 23.27 +.56
IntlVal d +4.0 +6.7 29.31 22.46 28.19 +.40
MdCpVal +9.9 +8.6 22.79 17.27 22.06 +.33
MidCap +11.8 +11.9 38.34 25.93 37.61 +.79
SmCapVal +8.3 +8.6 18.61 13.42 18.25 +.33
Aston Funds
MidCapN b +4.2 +11.3 34.58 25.11 33.28 +.75
MtgClGrN b +8.3 +6.8 26.14 20.54 26.14 +.57
TAMROSmCN b +9.0 +9.4 23.56 16.15 23.07 +.48
BBH
BrdMktFxI d +.9 +4.4 10.47 10.37 10.42 ...
IntlEqN d +7.4 +3.7 14.21 11.56 14.02 +.39
TaxEffEq d +9.7 +9.0 15.80 12.36 15.72 +.25
BNY Mellon
BalFd +4.8 +5.9 11.69 9.84 11.48 +.15
BondFd +3.4 +6.6 13.47 12.94 13.31 -.01
EmgMkts +.2 +11.0 12.40 9.73 11.86 +.17
IntlM +4.9 +.6 11.86 9.27 11.30 +.36
IntmBdM +2.6 +5.9 13.24 12.81 13.04 -.02
LgCpStkM +6.4 +3.7 9.48 7.13 9.18 +.18
MidCpStM +9.1 +7.5 13.72 9.26 13.37 +.24
NtlIntM +4.7 +4.8 13.75 12.73 13.31 +.01
NtlShTM +1.6 +3.1 13.01 12.85 12.96 +.01
PAIntMu +4.4 +4.2 12.96 12.13 12.63 ...
SmCpStkM +8.4 +4.2 12.97 8.84 12.70 +.24
Baird
AggrInst +4.2 +6.2 10.91 10.42 10.74 ...
CrPlBInst +4.6 +7.8 10.88 10.43 10.75 ...
IntBdInst +4.0 +6.5 11.31 10.80 11.11 -.02
IntMunIns +4.5 +5.5 11.79 11.21 11.66 +.01
ShTmBdIns +2.0 +4.3 9.81 9.65 9.76 ...
Barclays Global Inv
LP2020R m +6.1 +4.2 16.01 13.68 15.90 +.22
Baron
Asset b +9.7 +5.8 61.72 44.56 60.65 +1.01
Growth b +11.3 +7.1 57.95 40.23 57.02 +.68
Partners b +5.9 +5.3 22.80 15.47 21.78 +.50
SmCap b +14.1 +8.3 27.42 18.84 27.14 +.54
Bernstein
CAMuni +3.8 +4.4 14.96 14.09 14.49 ...
DiversMui +3.6 +4.5 14.84 14.14 14.52 +.01
EmgMkts +.2 +9.7 35.25 27.46 33.38 +.48
IntDur +4.0 +6.9 14.27 13.57 13.98 -.02
IntlPort +1.3 -2.3 16.62 13.34 15.83 +.53
NYMuni +3.5 +4.4 14.61 13.94 14.30 ...
ShDurDivr +1.4 +2.8 12.72 12.53 12.66 +.01
ShDurPlu +1.0 +2.7 11.96 11.86 11.93 ...
TxMIntl +1.3 -2.4 16.74 13.45 15.94 +.53
Berwyn
Income d +4.0 +8.9 13.71 12.96 13.59 +.09
BlackRock
BalCapA m +9.3 +4.0 23.51 18.95 23.08 +.04
BasicValA m +5.0 +3.0 27.93 21.38 26.85 +.66
BasicValC m +4.5 +2.2 26.17 20.00 25.11 +.61
Engy&ResA m +12.9 +9.8 44.83 26.77 44.36 +1.84
EqDivA m +8.3 +5.0 19.12 14.99 18.82 +.25
EqDivR b +8.1 +4.7 19.21 15.05 18.91 +.26
EquitDivC m +7.9 +4.3 18.74 14.69 18.44 +.27
GlbDynEqA m +5.5 +6.5 13.50 10.58 13.19 +.31
GlobAlcA m +5.4 +7.7 20.75 17.42 20.32 +.19
GlobAlcB m +5.0 +6.8 20.22 16.96 19.85 +.27
GlobAlcC m +5.0 +6.9 19.34 16.23 18.96 +.23
GlobAlcR m +5.2 +7.3 20.08 16.86 19.67 +.20
HiIncA m +5.7 +7.8 4.97 4.51 4.87 +.01
HiYldInvA m +5.4 +8.5 7.95 7.26 7.80 +.02
HthScOpA m +12.9 +10.3 32.53 25.82 32.01 +.32
InflPrBndA m +6.5 +7.0 11.60 10.54 11.16 +.01
InflPrBndC m +6.0 +6.2 11.58 10.53 11.14 ...
IntlOppA m +5.8 +6.2 36.24 27.89 35.45 +.96
LCCrInvA m +13.0 +2.6 12.53 8.95 12.29 +.23
LCCrInvC m +12.4 +1.7 11.57 8.28 11.34 +.21
LatinAmA m -6.8 +16.4 77.62 60.32 69.89 +1.58
LgCapValA m +10.3 +1.2 16.58 12.02 16.11 +.25
MidCpValEqA m +7.6 +5.6 12.57 9.30 12.31 +.24
NatMuniA m +5.3 +4.0 10.47 9.48 10.12 +.01
NatResD m +10.0 +9.5 72.62 48.60 70.65 +2.55
S&P500A b +7.8 +3.3 16.72 12.89 16.54 +.35
TotRtrnA m +2.8 NA 11.47 10.98 11.19 -.01
USOppInvC m +5.6 +9.0 38.87 28.55 37.80 +.78
USOppsIvA m +6.0 +9.8 42.71 31.27 41.60 +.85
ValOpptyA m +11.0 +3.6 21.41 14.40 21.19 +.38
Brandywine
BlueFd +3.7 +1.1 27.37 19.61 26.59 +.54
Brandywin +9.0 +2.2 30.08 19.53 28.96 +.54
Bridgeway
UltSmCoMk d +6.6 +1.8 16.00 11.20 15.75 +.18
Brown Advisory
GrowEq d +10.4 +10.4 14.14 10.14 14.11 +.37
Brown Cap Mgmt
SmCo Is d +13.1 +15.3 51.09 32.88 49.45 +.32
Buffalo
MidCap d +8.2 +9.1 18.56 13.40 18.30 +.47
SmallCap d +6.7 +7.6 28.58 20.78 27.96 +.76
USAGlob d +8.2 +8.4 27.30 20.01 27.16 +.60
CG Capital Markets
CrFixIn +3.4 +7.3 8.88 8.27 8.50 -.01
EmgMktEq +.9 +10.1 18.12 14.41 17.45 +.29
IntlEqInv +5.2 +2.9 11.61 8.90 11.12 +.33
LgCapGro +8.3 +6.4 16.09 11.76 15.99 +.37
LgCapVal +7.3 +1.2 9.64 7.52 9.41 +.20
CGM
Focus -4.5 +3.8 36.39 24.75 33.22 +.94
Mutual -2.9 +6.0 30.21 22.74 28.61 +.80
Realty +13.1 +10.4 30.53 21.42 30.25 +.73
Calamos
ConvC m +4.0 +5.8 20.92 18.20 20.20 +.23
ConvertA m +4.5 +6.6 21.03 18.29 20.30 +.24
GlbGrIncA m +4.8 +6.4 11.56 9.41 11.28 +.20
GrIncA m +7.2 +6.8 34.35 27.35 33.60 +.60
GrIncC m +6.7 +6.0 34.45 27.47 33.71 +.60
GrowA m +8.0 +6.6 58.70 42.58 57.65 +1.08
GrowB m +7.5 +5.8 58.21 42.44 57.07 +1.06
GrowC m +7.5 +5.8 53.27 38.84 52.23 +.97
MktNuInA m +3.5 +3.7 12.33 11.00 12.32 +.11
Calvert
BalancedA m +5.5 +3.2 28.83 24.56 28.64 +.35
BondA m +2.9 +4.9 16.05 15.37 15.76 ...
EquityA m +11.3 +7.0 40.25 29.16 39.83 +.76
IncomeA m +3.3 +4.2 16.32 15.77 16.17 +.01
ShDurIncA m +1.9 +5.0 16.71 16.00 16.52 +.01
Cambiar
OppInv +7.0 +4.0 20.38 14.34 19.63 +.69
Causeway
IntlVlInv d +7.7 +3.2 14.08 10.52 13.39 +.41
Champlain Investment
ChSmlComp b +10.8 +10.5 16.46 11.29 16.15 +.17
Clipper
Clipper +9.4 +.3 68.26 52.71 67.81 +1.47
Cohen & Steers
Realty +16.3 +4.4 67.46 49.56 67.46 +1.98
Colorado BondShares
COBdShrs f +3.0 +4.3 9.20 8.95 9.08 ...
Columbia
AcornA m +8.7 +7.7 32.30 23.29 31.45 +.55
AcornC m +8.2 +6.8 29.58 21.50 28.74 +.50
AcornIntA m +4.6 +8.3 43.72 33.69 41.70 +.99
AcornIntZ +4.8 +8.7 43.82 33.77 41.83 +1.00
AcornSelA m +.6 +6.3 29.34 21.31 27.69 +.55
AcornSelZ +.7 +6.6 30.20 21.89 28.45 +.57
AcornUSAZ +10.4 +6.4 32.32 21.74 31.52 +.59
AcornZ +8.9 +8.0 33.38 24.01 32.46 +.57
BondZ +3.3 +6.2 9.62 9.14 9.34 -.01
CATaxEA m +6.0 +4.2 7.73 6.75 7.24 +.01
CntrnCoreA m +8.1 +7.9 15.48 11.45 15.42 +.38
CntrnCoreZ +8.2 +8.2 15.56 11.52 15.50 +.38
ComInfoA m +4.9 +12.0 48.80 36.01 46.88 +1.61
ComInfoC m +4.4 +11.2 40.48 29.99 38.76 +1.33
DivBondA m +3.3 +5.8 5.12 4.94 5.08 ...
DivBondI +3.3 +6.1 5.13 4.95 5.08 -.01
DivIncA m +7.0 +4.9 14.06 11.30 13.83 +.22
DivIncZ +7.2 +5.1 14.07 11.31 13.84 +.22
DivOppA m +9.1 +5.1 8.58 6.62 8.35 +.15
DivrEqInA m +5.6 +2.8 10.96 8.22 10.59 +.21
EmMktOppA m -.3 +10.9 10.33 8.27 9.86 +.10
EnrNatRsZ +8.8 +9.0 26.05 17.32 25.17 +.82
EqValueA m +6.3 +3.0 11.35 8.44 11.01 +.23
FlRateA m +2.9 +3.5 9.11 8.47 8.98 ...
GlbEqA m +7.4 +4.0 8.08 6.12 7.94 +.17
GlblTechA m +3.3 +10.9 22.24 17.20 21.55 +.60
HYMuniZ +5.6 +2.3 10.11 9.18 9.69 +.03
HiYldBdA m +5.9 +8.2 2.88 2.66 2.84 +.01
IncBldA m +6.0 +6.3 10.95 9.97 10.94 +.09
IncOppA m +6.1 +8.2 10.16 9.45 9.77 +.05
IncomeZ +5.4 +7.0 9.96 9.55 9.93 ...
IntlOpZ +.3 +2.7 12.67 9.92 12.01 +.32
IntlVaZ +4.0 +1.5 15.39 12.66 14.63 +.43
IntmBdZ +3.4 +6.5 9.25 8.97 9.15 -.01
ItmMunBdZ +5.1 +4.5 10.72 10.02 10.49 ...
LarCaCorZ +6.8 +4.2 14.17 10.76 14.02 +.30
LfBalA m +6.3 +6.6 11.92 9.69 11.80 +.17
LfGrthA m +6.8 +5.7 12.62 9.48 12.40 +.26
LgCpGrowA m +9.7 +6.3 25.60 18.63 25.44 +.59
LgCpGrowZ +9.7 +6.6 26.18 19.07 26.02 +.60
LgCpIxA b +7.9 +3.4 26.37 20.30 26.05 +.57
LgCrQuantA m +10.7 +3.1 6.00 4.52 5.99 +.16
LtdDurCrdA m +2.9 +5.2 10.11 9.89 10.07 -.01
MAIntlEqA m +4.2 +1.5 12.97 10.25 12.53 +.39
MAIntlEqZ +4.3 +1.7 13.15 10.38 12.69 +.39
Mar21CA m +2.9 +3.3 14.61 10.74 13.98 +.23
Mar21CC m +2.4 +2.6 13.61 10.04 12.98 +.22
Mar21CZ +3.1 +3.6 14.94 10.97 14.31 +.25
MarFocEqA m +7.0 +5.4 24.39 17.95 24.32 +.54
MarFocEqZ +7.2 +5.6 24.94 18.35 24.88 +.55
MarGrIA m +8.6 +4.7 22.34 16.07 22.09 +.37
MarGrIZ +8.8 +5.0 22.76 16.35 22.51 +.38
MdCapGthZ +13.0 +10.3 30.76 20.61 30.09 +.42
MdCapIdxZ +9.9 +8.3 12.93 9.20 12.35 +.19
MdCpValOppA m +6.4 +5.0 8.63 6.19 8.37 +.16
MdCpValZ +7.5 +4.6 14.81 10.75 14.43 +.26
MdCpVlA m +7.3 +4.4 14.79 10.74 14.42 +.27
MidGrOppA m +3.8 +8.7 12.42 8.65 11.75 +.20
ORIntmMuniBdZ +4.5 +4.4 12.67 11.85 12.34 -.01
PBAggA m +6.6 +4.8 11.00 8.65 10.83 +.19
PBModA m +5.8 +5.9 11.22 9.56 11.10 +.14
PBModAggA m +6.2 +5.4 11.11 9.10 10.95 +.17
PBModConA m +5.2 +5.9 10.99 9.71 10.90 +.09
SIIncZ +1.7 +4.5 10.03 9.89 9.96 -.01
SelSmCapZ +2.4 +5.7 18.98 12.91 18.19 +.47
ShTmIncA m +1.7 +4.3 10.04 9.91 9.98 ...
ShTmMuZ +1.5 +3.4 10.60 10.46 10.54 ...
SmCaVaIIA m +9.0 +5.8 15.40 10.43 14.91 +.27
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
IntlIdxIn d +5.8 +2.5 38.58 30.33 37.10 +1.17
TotMktIdI d +8.3 +4.6 39.77 30.14 39.35 +.82
First American
RealA m +15.9 +5.4 20.65 15.19 20.65 +.59
First Eagle
FndofAmY b +9.0 +8.4 28.62 21.67 28.24 +.24
GlbA m +7.0 +8.7 49.61 39.95 49.61 +.84
Gold m +3.0 +16.9 35.84 26.19 34.98 +.37
OverseasA m +6.0 +7.9 24.05 19.78 24.01 +.33
USValueA m +7.8 +6.8 17.69 14.64 17.61 +.27
First Investors
BlChipA m +6.7 +2.4 22.89 18.08 22.49 +.43
GrowIncA m +9.4 +4.2 15.92 11.82 15.64 +.26
IncomeA m +5.1 +4.7 2.58 2.42 2.54 +.01
InvGradeA m +4.8 +6.0 9.92 9.37 9.73 -.02
OpportA m +11.6 +6.6 30.90 20.94 30.36 +.55
TaxEA m +5.0 +4.3 10.11 9.18 9.67 +.01
TotalRetA m +7.0 +5.7 15.99 13.48 15.87 +.15
FrankTemp-Franklin
AZ TF A m +5.1 +4.0 11.11 9.93 10.62 +.01
AdjUSA m +1.0 +3.5 8.91 8.84 8.85 ...
AdjUSC m +.7 +3.1 8.90 8.84 8.84 ...
BalInv m +3.0 +1.4 50.62 37.41 48.64 +.44
BioDis A m +15.8 +9.9 79.76 55.39 79.46 +1.26
CA TF A m +4.8 +3.7 7.25 6.48 6.86 -.03
CA TF C m +4.3 +3.1 7.24 6.47 6.84 -.04
CAHY A m +5.9 +3.2 9.73 8.68 9.25 +.08
CAInTF A m +5.4 +3.5 12.40 11.08 11.82 ...
CAInt A m +4.4 +4.1 11.81 10.93 11.39 +.02
CO TF A m +6.1 +3.9 12.01 10.65 11.50 ...
CaTxFrAdv +4.7 +3.8 7.22 6.47 6.84 -.04
China A m +3.7 +15.7 42.33 32.35 41.31 +.67
ChinaAdv +3.9 +16.0 42.61 32.56 41.61 +.67
CvtSc A m +6.1 +6.7 16.51 13.29 15.96 +.16
DynaTechA m +10.7 +9.9 33.69 24.22 33.38 +.71
EqIn A m +5.8 +1.9 17.94 14.30 17.60 +.31
FL TF A m +4.9 +4.1 11.69 10.75 11.36 ...
FLRtDAAdv +2.6 +3.3 9.26 8.90 9.16 ...
Fed TF A m +6.0 +4.2 12.16 10.93 11.74 +.02
Fed TF C m +5.8 +3.7 12.16 10.93 11.74 +.02
FedIntA m +4.8 +4.6 12.08 11.19 11.70 ...
FedLmtT/FIncA m +2.6 +3.9 10.49 10.25 10.47 +.01
FedTxFrIA +6.1 +4.3 12.16 10.94 11.75 +.02
FlRtDAC m +2.3 +2.7 9.25 8.90 9.16 ...
FlRtDAccA m +2.6 +3.1 9.25 8.90 9.16 ...
FlxCpGr A m +7.3 +6.7 52.75 38.97 51.72 +.80
FlxCpGrAd +7.4 +7.0 53.63 39.53 52.58 +.81
GoldPrAdv -5.2 +19.9 53.67 37.55 50.46 +1.02
GoldPrM A m -5.3 +19.6 51.50 36.07 48.35 +.98
GoldPrM C m -5.7 +18.7 49.28 34.62 46.04 +.92
GrowAdv +7.2 +6.7 48.48 37.19 47.85 +.73
GrowB m +6.6 +5.6 46.25 35.56 45.63 +.69
GrowC m +6.6 +5.6 45.75 35.18 45.15 +.69
Growth A m +7.0 +6.4 48.41 37.14 47.78 +.73
HY TF A m +6.6 +4.0 10.39 9.31 9.97 +.01
HY TF C m +6.4 +3.4 10.53 9.44 10.12 +.02
HighIncA m +6.3 +8.3 2.06 1.93 2.04 +.01
HighIncC m +5.9 +7.8 2.08 1.94 2.06 +.01
InSCGrAd -.6 +8.1 17.81 14.37 16.69 +.27
Income A m +7.0 +5.9 2.30 2.04 2.25 +.03
Income C m +6.6 +5.3 2.32 2.06 2.27 +.03
IncomeAdv +6.6 +6.0 2.29 2.03 2.23 +.03
IncomeB m +6.5 +5.0 2.29 2.03 2.24 +.03
IncomeR b +6.4 +5.5 2.27 2.02 2.22 +.03
InsTF A m +5.6 +3.8 12.19 10.93 11.72 ...
LoDurTReA m +2.4 +5.3 10.48 10.27 10.46 +.02
MATFA m +5.7 +3.7 11.95 10.64 11.40 +.01
MD TF A m +4.8 +3.8 11.73 10.58 11.24 +.03
MITFA m +5.3 +4.0 12.22 11.12 11.78 -.01
MNTFA m +5.3 +4.5 12.55 11.47 12.16 -.01
MO TF A m +5.7 +4.1 12.33 11.14 11.92 +.01
NC TF A m +5.4 +4.2 12.51 11.29 12.08 +.01
NJ TF A m +4.9 +4.3 12.36 11.13 11.87 +.02
NY TF A m +4.7 +4.3 12.01 10.72 11.47 ...
NY TF C m +4.4 +3.7 11.99 10.71 11.46 ...
NYIntTFA m +4.5 +4.4 11.57 10.72 11.18 -.01
NatResA m +12.3 +12.4 45.14 28.84 44.60 +1.54
OHTFA m +5.2 +4.1 12.78 11.50 12.26 -.02
OR TF A m +5.6 +4.6 12.22 11.08 11.81 ...
PA TF A m +5.5 +4.3 10.57 9.49 10.18 +.01
PR TF A m +5.0 +4.1 12.16 10.77 11.54 +.01
RealRetA m +4.8 +6.0 11.53 10.72 11.47 +.08
RisDivAdv +8.4 +4.5 36.06 28.34 35.55 +.26
RisDv A m +8.3 +4.2 36.09 28.37 35.57 +.26
RisDv C m +7.8 +3.4 35.55 28.00 35.03 +.25
SmCpGI C m +7.7 +7.2 37.10 25.92 36.02 +.51
SmCpValA m +3.2 +5.2 48.15 33.55 46.02 +.54
SmCpVlAd +3.4 +5.5 49.53 34.53 47.37 +.56
SmMCpGAdv +8.3 +8.3 42.73 29.67 41.59 +.60
SmMdCpGrA m +8.1 +8.0 41.47 28.84 40.34 +.58
StrInc A m +5.1 +7.8 10.71 10.13 10.68 +.05
StrIncAdv +5.3 +8.1 10.72 10.14 10.69 +.05
Strinc C m +4.8 +7.4 10.70 10.13 10.67 +.05
TotRetAdv +4.9 +6.9 10.42 9.99 10.36 +.01
TotalRetA m +4.9 +6.7 10.40 9.98 10.35 +.02
US Gov A m +3.4 +6.3 6.88 6.63 6.83 ...
US Gov C m +3.1 +5.8 6.84 6.59 6.79 ...
USGovtAdv +3.5 +6.5 6.90 6.65 6.85 ...
Utils A m +10.4 +5.8 12.72 10.84 12.59 +.15
Utils C m +10.1 +5.3 12.66 10.80 12.54 +.15
VA TF A m +5.5 +4.1 11.93 10.77 11.54 ...
FrankTemp-Mutual
Beacon A m +5.5 +1.4 13.16 10.97 12.91 +.23
Beacon C m +5.2 +.7 13.04 10.81 12.78 +.23
Beacon Z +5.8 +1.7 13.26 11.08 13.02 +.24
Discov A m +4.8 +5.8 31.31 26.49 30.58 +.66
Discov C m +4.4 +5.1 31.00 26.18 30.23 +.65
Discov Z +4.9 +6.2 31.71 26.84 30.99 +.67
DiscovR b +4.6 +5.6 31.01 26.23 30.27 +.65
Euro A m +3.1 +5.1 22.76 19.34 21.71 +.47
Euro Z +3.3 +5.4 23.22 19.74 22.17 +.48
QuestA m +5.1 +5.0 18.76 15.52 18.46 +.31
QuestC m +4.7 +4.3 18.53 15.41 18.21 +.31
QuestZ +5.3 +5.4 18.92 15.62 18.63 +.32
Shares A m +5.2 +1.9 22.28 18.52 21.72 +.34
Shares C m +4.9 +1.2 22.03 18.27 21.45 +.34
Shares Z +5.4 +2.2 22.47 18.68 21.92 +.35
FrankTemp-Templeton
BricA m -2.0 +9.5 15.97 12.34 14.89 +.26
DvMk A m +2.4 +8.9 26.96 20.91 26.13 +.33
EmgMktIs +2.2 +9.2 17.50 13.68 17.07 +.21
Fgn A m +8.0 +5.1 7.89 5.95 7.54 +.28
Frgn Adv +8.1 +5.4 7.80 5.89 7.47 +.28
Frgn C m +7.6 +4.3 7.71 5.80 7.36 +.27
GlBond A m +5.8 +12.2 14.08 12.93 14.01 +.13
GlBond C m +5.5 +11.8 14.10 12.96 14.04 +.14
GlBondAdv +5.8 +12.5 14.04 13.28 13.97 +.13
GlOp A m +6.9 +4.0 19.77 15.33 18.94 +.53
GlSmCo A m +2.6 +5.9 7.91 5.87 7.63 +.17
Growth A m +8.6 +.6 20.04 15.21 19.32 +.53
Growth Ad +8.8 +.9 20.05 15.22 19.34 +.54
Growth C m +8.2 -.1 19.54 14.79 18.81 +.52
IncomeA m +5.9 +7.5 3.01 2.50 2.94 +.06
IncomeC m +5.3 +7.0 3.01 2.50 2.93 +.06
World A m +7.2 +3.3 16.39 12.71 15.91 +.46
Franklin Templeton
ConAllcC m +3.6 +5.6 14.04 12.58 13.95 +.12
ConAllctA m +4.1 +6.4 14.27 12.77 14.18 +.13
CoreAll A m +7.0 +3.8 13.55 10.49 13.25 +.24
EmMktDtOp +6.4 +10.4 12.76 11.76 12.76 +.04
FndAllA m +6.7 +2.6 11.43 9.37 11.00 +.21
FndAllC m +6.3 +1.8 11.25 9.24 10.85 +.20
GrAllcA m +5.3 +6.5 16.21 13.34 15.99 +.25
HYldTFInA +6.8 +4.1 10.42 9.34 10.01 +.02
TemHdCurA m +6.0 +6.2 10.40 8.84 10.36 +.12
TemMdTaC m +4.2 +6.0 14.58 12.66 14.44 +.16
TemMdTarA m +4.7 +6.8 14.90 12.93 14.76 +.17
GE
ElfunTr +9.3 +5.6 45.85 35.97 45.21 +.76
ElfunTxE +5.0 +4.8 12.06 11.02 11.60 +.02
S&SInc +4.2 +5.7 11.56 11.14 11.52 -.01
S&SProg +6.6 +4.7 43.40 33.87 42.88 +.90
GMO
TxMdIEIII +8.7 +3.2 16.22 12.45 15.74 +.44
Gabelli
AssetAAA m +7.7 +7.4 53.83 40.32 52.70 +.78
EqIncomeAAA m +8.2 +5.6 22.30 17.17 21.96 +.38
GoldAAA m -1.0 +15.7 36.71 27.43 35.37 +.71
GrowthAAA m +5.5 +4.0 33.47 25.39 33.11 +.76
SmCpGrAAA m +6.8 +9.2 36.89 26.78 36.24 +.46
UtilA m +9.8 +6.6 6.71 6.03 6.61 +.10
UtilAAA m +9.7 +6.6 6.66 5.99 6.56 +.10
UtilC m +9.3 +5.8 6.00 5.47 5.89 +.09
Value m +9.6 +6.5 17.39 13.15 17.08 +.27
Gartmore
LrgCapA m +7.0 +3.7 16.07 12.60 15.81 +.24
Gateway
GatewayA m +3.3 +2.6 26.98 24.57 26.71 +.21
Goldman Sachs
BalStrA m +4.3 +4.0 10.76 9.53 10.61 +.12
CapGrA m +7.5 +4.8 22.87 17.68 22.78 +.53
G&IStrA m +5.5 +2.9 11.30 9.51 11.08 +.18
GovtIncA m +2.6 +5.5 15.90 14.78 15.26 -.03
GrIncA m +2.8 +.4 22.50 17.70 21.52 +.37
GrOppA m +5.1 +10.2 25.09 19.09 24.13 +.31
GrStrA m +6.3 +1.8 11.72 9.39 11.43 +.24
HiYieldA m +5.0 +7.0 7.47 7.00 7.34 +.03
LgCapValA m +3.6 +1.4 12.67 9.83 12.22 +.24
MidCapVaA m +5.9 +5.4 39.04 28.89 38.01 +.64
ShDuGovA m +.6 +4.6 10.50 10.20 10.28 -.01
SmCpValA m +9.0 +7.1 43.45 31.03 43.06 +.74
StrIntEqA m +4.5 +1.3 11.22 8.76 10.69 +.36
Greenspring
Greensprretl d +1.8 +5.5 25.20 22.62 24.24 +.09
GuideMark
CoFxIncSvc b +3.2 +5.5 9.62 9.30 9.56 -.01
GuideStone Funds
AggAllGS4 +7.5 +3.3 12.87 9.83 12.68 +.29
BlcAlloGS4 +5.5 +5.5 12.83 11.22 12.79 +.14
GrAlloGS4 +6.6 +4.5 13.20 10.86 13.09 +.22
GrEqGS4 +8.9 +5.4 20.70 14.98 20.58 +.45
IntEqGS4 +4.8 +3.0 14.65 11.55 14.08 +.37
LowDurGS4 +1.5 +4.5 13.49 13.20 13.35 -.01
MedDurGS4 +3.6 +7.0 14.48 13.51 14.02 -.02
SmCapGS4 +13.3 +6.2 16.69 11.02 16.38 +.25
ValEqGS4 +7.7 +1.3 15.59 11.69 15.05 +.30
Harbor
Bond +3.7 +8.2 12.45 11.89 12.39 +.03
CapApInst +12.3 +7.7 41.22 29.72 41.22 +1.01
CapAprAdm b +12.1 +7.4 40.99 29.56 40.99 +1.00
CapAprInv b +12.0 +7.3 40.71 29.39 40.71 +.99
HiYBdInst d +5.0 +7.8 11.33 10.69 11.13 +.06
IntlAdm m +6.0 +6.9 66.94 49.94 63.79 +1.59
IntlGr d +.2 +3.2 13.07 10.25 12.40 +.33
IntlInstl d +6.2 +7.2 67.42 50.32 64.29 +1.60
IntlInv m +6.0 +6.8 66.74 49.76 63.58 +1.58
SmCpGr +7.9 +9.0 14.38 9.97 13.89 +.13
SmCpVal +10.6 +4.5 22.13 15.62 21.67 +.18
Harding Loevner
EmgMkts d -1.7 +10.1 52.86 43.01 50.91 +.61
Hartford
AdvHLSFIB b +5.2 +4.5 20.77 17.26 20.56 +.32
AdvHLSIA +5.3 +4.8 20.55 17.09 20.35 +.32
AdviserA m +5.1 +4.4 15.65 12.98 15.43 +.24
BalAlA m +5.5 +5.2 12.07 10.11 11.88 +.16
CapAppIIA m +4.7 +6.5 15.27 11.13 14.61 +.31
CapApr C m -.5 +2.7 32.29 25.31 30.58 +.74
CapAprA m -.1 +3.4 36.47 28.46 34.60 +.84
CapAprB m -.6 +2.6 32.09 25.17 30.38 +.73
CapAprI ... NA 36.51 28.43 34.65 +.84
ChksBalsA m +3.1 NA 10.04 8.52 9.77 +.13
CpApHLSIA +3.0 +5.6 45.67 34.24 43.64 +.98
CpApHLSIB b +2.9 +5.3 45.25 33.89 43.21 +.96
SmCaVaIIZ +9.2 +6.1 15.51 10.50 15.03 +.28
SmCapCrZ +8.7 +7.7 17.49 11.95 17.29 +.31
SmCapIdxA b +9.2 +6.3 19.02 13.38 18.37 +.27
SmCapIdxZ +9.3 +6.5 19.08 13.43 18.44 +.28
SmCpGthIZ +12.6 +10.2 36.99 23.49 35.59 +.32
SmCpValIA m +4.9 +6.0 47.80 34.97 46.95 +.57
SmCpValIZ +5.0 +6.2 50.20 36.70 49.31 +.60
StLgCpGrA m +15.4 NA 14.32 9.78 14.24 +.31
StLgCpGrZ +15.6 +10.9 14.43 9.84 14.36 +.31
StrInvZ +6.4 +5.7 20.96 15.21 20.36 +.56
StratAllocA m +7.2 +3.8 10.04 8.46 9.99 +.15
StratIncA m +5.5 +7.5 6.28 5.95 6.15 +.01
StratIncZ +5.7 +7.7 6.21 5.88 6.08 +.01
TaxEA m +6.3 +4.3 13.79 12.35 13.22 +.01
TaxEBdA m +5.7 +4.1 3.89 3.51 3.75 ...
TaxEZ +6.4 +4.5 13.79 12.35 13.21 +.01
USGovMorA m +6.3 +6.9 5.49 5.18 5.49 +.01
ValRestrZ +4.7 +4.4 54.18 39.20 52.63 +1.03
ValueA m +4.4 +1.3 12.23 9.50 11.98 +.29
ValueZ +4.6 +1.6 12.25 9.52 12.00 +.29
Commerce
Bond +4.1 +7.8 20.44 19.73 20.22 -.03
Constellation
SndsSelGrII +12.8 +9.9 11.29 7.76 11.29 +.26
DFA
1YrFixInI +.6 +3.0 10.38 10.31 10.35 -.01
2YrGlbFII +.6 +3.2 10.30 10.13 10.21 -.01
5YearGovI +2.0 +4.7 11.17 10.69 10.92 -.04
5YrGlbFII +3.7 +5.0 11.75 10.78 11.28 -.02
EMktsSoCo +.9 NA 15.50 12.52 14.85 +.23
EmMkCrEqI +1.2 +15.0 23.21 18.01 22.31 +.33
EmMktValI -1.1 +15.0 38.10 30.52 35.58 +.57
EmMtSmCpI +1.9 +17.4 25.24 19.92 24.36 +.37
EmgMktI +1.9 +13.5 32.37 24.90 31.07 +.42
GlEqInst +6.6 +4.8 14.76 11.00 14.26 +.32
Glob6040I +5.7 +5.6 13.69 11.38 13.47 +.19
InfPrtScI +8.5 NA 12.00 11.09 11.96 +.02
IntGovFII +3.6 +7.2 12.91 12.09 12.55 -.04
IntRlEstI +9.4 NA 5.59 4.10 5.49 +.09
IntSmCapI +5.1 +4.8 18.94 13.97 17.87 +.50
IntlValu3 +4.8 +3.6 18.91 14.47 17.66 +.61
LgCapIntI +5.9 +3.2 21.80 16.92 20.71 +.63
RelEstScI +16.4 +3.0 25.04 18.48 25.04 +.74
STMuniBdI +1.8 +3.0 10.41 10.21 10.33 +.01
TMIntlVal +4.4 +3.8 16.56 12.59 15.41 +.54
TMMkWVal +7.7 +2.5 16.73 12.02 16.12 +.30
TMMkWVal2 +7.9 +2.7 16.11 11.57 15.52 +.29
TMUSEq +8.3 +4.2 14.81 11.18 14.59 +.30
TMUSTarVal +6.9 +3.4 23.61 16.23 22.93 +.32
TMUSmCp +9.3 +4.7 25.49 17.32 25.03 +.35
USCorEq1I +8.2 +5.0 12.09 8.90 11.84 +.23
USCorEq2I +7.7 +4.6 12.07 8.78 11.76 +.22
USLgCo +8.1 +3.9 10.76 8.29 10.62 +.23
Stock +6.3 +.6 118.20 88.26 113.60 +2.74
Domini Social Invmts
SocEqInv m +10.7 +4.6 32.94 24.62 32.75 +.70
Dreyfus
Apprecia +10.6 +4.7 42.23 32.54 42.23 +.90
AtvMdCpA f +9.4 +1.4 36.88 26.58 35.94 +.79
BasSP500 +8.0 +3.7 27.98 21.43 27.60 +.59
BondIdxIn b +3.3 +6.0 10.85 10.38 10.70 -.02
BstSMCpGI +14.3 +9.2 16.19 11.05 16.05 +.38
BstSmCpVl +4.7 +4.8 25.11 18.32 24.11 +.53
CAAMTBdZ +5.9 +3.9 14.90 13.35 14.30 +.01
DiscStkR b +6.5 +4.2 33.52 25.24 32.58 +.64
Dreyfus +7.0 +4.3 9.80 7.41 9.57 +.18
EmergMarI d -2.5 +10.6 13.95 11.34 13.21 +.23
EmgLead +2.8 -.2 22.39 15.36 ...
EmgMkts m -2.6 +10.4 13.87 11.26 13.12 +.22
GNMA Z b +3.8 +6.3 15.94 15.25 15.92 +.01
GrowInc +6.8 +4.5 15.40 11.52 15.03 +.26
GrtChinaA m -8.3 +17.3 55.00 40.35 46.04 +.71
HiYldI +5.8 +7.8 6.84 6.35 6.70 +.03
IntBndA f +5.5 +11.0 17.20 16.53 16.98 +.14
IntIncA f +4.1 +6.4 13.45 12.94 13.36 -.01
IntMuBd +5.1 +4.5 13.89 13.00 13.59 ...
IntlStkI +6.5 NA 14.75 11.74 14.59 +.36
IntlStkIx +5.4 +1.8 16.44 12.82 15.73 +.51
MidCapIdx +9.8 +8.0 31.27 22.47 30.61 +.48
MuniBd +5.1 +3.5 11.58 10.53 11.12 +.01
NJMuniA f +5.0 +3.8 13.10 11.86 12.56 +.01
NYTaxEBd +4.8 +4.3 15.22 13.92 14.66 +.01
OppMdCpVaA f +7.0 +9.8 38.37 26.60 36.57 +.80
SIMuBdD b +2.4 +3.8 13.33 13.02 13.23 +.01
SP500Idx +7.8 +3.4 37.66 29.69 37.28 +.81
SmCapIdx +9.4 +6.4 22.75 16.07 22.34 +.33
SmCoVal +3.4 +14.4 32.83 22.39 31.18 +.47
StratValA f +5.7 +3.8 30.96 23.18 30.12 +.60
TechGrA f +4.0 +10.1 35.24 25.31 33.79 +.34
WldwdeGrA f +12.3 +5.8 44.68 34.90 44.62 +1.17
Driehaus
ActiveInc +1.9 +6.2 11.35 10.93 11.10 +.01
EmMktGr d +4.2 +12.5 34.42 26.16 33.57 +.82
Dupree
KYTxFInc +5.0 +4.8 7.92 7.33 7.68 ...
Eagle
CapApprA m +6.3 +4.9 29.88 23.10 29.67 +.67
MidCpStA m +3.2 +5.5 29.41 21.74 28.46 +.55
SmCpGrthA m +13.7 +11.2 44.54 27.92 43.32 +.48
Eaton Vance
DivBldrA m +6.5 +3.7 10.68 8.55 10.49 +.21
FlRtHIA m +3.5 +4.2 9.50 8.98 9.42 +.01
Floating-Rate A m +2.8 +3.7 9.41 8.94 9.33 ...
FltRateC m +2.4 +2.9 9.09 8.64 9.01 ...
FltRtAdv b +2.9 +3.7 9.10 8.65 9.02 ...
GovOblA m +1.8 +5.8 7.65 7.39 7.46 ...
USLgVal3 +8.0 +2.6 17.21 12.50 16.53 +.32
USLgValI +8.0 +2.4 22.48 16.33 21.59 +.42
USMicroI +7.9 +5.2 15.13 10.37 14.83 +.20
USSmValI +7.1 +4.5 28.21 18.93 27.36 +.45
USSmallI +9.2 +7.3 23.76 16.07 23.27 +.34
USTgtValI +6.5 +5.2 18.31 12.59 17.69 +.26
USVecEqI +7.2 +4.3 12.00 8.51 11.61 +.20
DWS-Investments
DrSmCpVlA m +4.2 +6.5 39.85 29.21 38.36 +.56
LgCapValA m +6.2 +3.7 18.78 15.17 18.40 +.20
LgCapValS +6.3 +4.0 18.79 15.17 18.40 +.20
DWS-Scudder
BalA m +4.4 +3.5 9.59 8.15 9.42 +.14
CATFIncA m +5.7 +4.2 7.47 6.70 7.17 ...
CapGrA m +6.2 +5.6 58.29 43.67 57.86 +1.52
CapGrS +6.4 +5.9 58.70 44.02 58.31 +1.54
EnhEMFIS d +.7 +5.8 11.53 10.54 10.69 +.11
Eq500S +7.9 +3.7153.28 117.98 151.27 +3.27
GNMAS x +4.6 +6.8 15.66 15.04 15.54 -.05
GlbTS d +4.5 +3.0 25.90 20.11 24.92 +.73
GrIncS +10.2 +3.9 18.11 13.48 17.90 +.35
GvtSc x +3.8 +6.5 8.99 8.62 8.88 -.03
HiIncA x +5.7 +7.1 4.96 4.66 4.86 ...
HlthCareS d +15.5 +7.4 28.50 21.28 28.13 +.38
IntTFrS +4.8 +4.7 11.76 10.91 11.46 ...
IntlS d +3.5 +.3 49.01 39.15 46.88 +1.83
LAEqS d -7.4 +10.6 53.68 43.20 49.19 +.81
MATaxFrS +6.0 +4.8 14.87 13.29 14.22 +.01
MgdMuniA m +5.3 +4.7 9.25 8.39 8.89 +.01
MgdMuniS +5.4 +4.9 9.26 8.40 8.90 +.01
REstA m +17.1 +3.8 20.57 14.90 20.57 +.53
SPInxS +7.9 +3.5 18.13 13.95 17.90 +.39
ShDurPS x +1.6 +4.1 9.64 9.45 9.45 -.04
StrHiYldTxFA m +5.3 +3.8 12.52 11.18 11.94 +.01
StrHiYldTxFS +5.5 +4.1 12.53 11.19 11.96 +.02
StrValA m +4.5 -2.4 35.44 27.42 34.07 +.49
TechA m +6.5 +8.8 14.76 10.60 14.37 +.38
Davis
FinclA m +3.4 +1.1 33.73 27.47 32.85 +.72
NYVentA m +4.4 +2.2 36.90 28.84 35.84 +.93
NYVentB m +3.9 +1.3 35.33 27.55 34.24 +.89
NYVentC m +3.9 +1.4 35.60 27.77 34.52 +.89
Delaware Invest
CorpBdIs +5.4 +9.0 6.35 5.76 6.00 ...
DiverIncA m +4.6 +9.0 9.84 9.14 9.40 -.01
EmgMktA m -.8 +12.8 17.03 12.88 15.88 +.26
GrowOppA m +20.1 +11.6 26.18 17.32 25.64 +.26
LgValA m +9.1 +1.9 16.67 12.62 16.23 +.11
LtdDvIncA m +2.7 +6.1 9.06 8.83 9.02 -.04
OpFixIncI +4.7 +8.1 9.87 9.31 9.73 -.01
OptLgCpIs +9.0 +5.1 13.21 9.65 13.14 +.28
OptLgValI +9.2 +3.5 11.42 8.73 11.24 +.18
TaxFIntA m +4.0 +4.2 12.12 11.26 11.72 +.01
TaxFMNA m +5.6 +4.4 12.74 11.67 12.37 +.03
TaxFPAA m +4.8 +4.4 8.13 7.36 7.80 +.01
TaxFUSAA m +5.2 +4.2 11.64 10.62 11.24 +.02
Diamond Hill
LngShortA m +3.6 +1.0 17.32 14.93 16.84 +.14
LngShortI +3.8 +1.3 17.52 15.06 17.04 +.15
LrgCapI +7.1 +4.1 16.12 12.65 15.87 +.24
SmCapA m +5.0 +5.4 27.74 21.63 27.08 +.17
Dimensional Investme
IntCorEqI +5.2 +4.0 12.33 9.33 11.65 +.35
IntlSCoI +5.4 +5.8 18.73 13.84 17.91 +.45
IntlValuI +4.7 +3.5 20.21 15.46 18.88 +.66
Dodge & Cox
Bal +5.8 +2.7 75.65 60.85 73.49 +1.35
GlbStock +3.0 NA 9.72 7.42 9.17 +.22
Income +3.8 +7.1 13.60 13.15 13.45 -.01
IntlStk +2.2 +3.9 38.80 29.98 36.51 +.82
GtrIndiaA m -9.5 +9.4 29.97 23.65 25.48 +.11
HiIncOppA m +6.1 +6.7 4.52 4.17 4.46 +.01
HiIncOppB m +5.7 +5.9 4.52 4.18 4.47 +.02
IncBosA m +5.7 +7.6 6.00 5.61 5.92 +.02
LrgCpValA m +3.8 +1.8 19.26 15.43 18.82 +.39
LrgCpValC m +3.4 +1.1 19.25 15.41 18.82 +.39
NatlMuniA m +6.3 +.8 10.03 8.44 9.17 +.03
NatlMuniB m +5.8 +.1 10.03 8.44 9.17 +.03
NatlMuniC m +5.8 +.1 10.03 8.44 9.17 +.03
PAMuniA m +6.2 +2.5 9.25 8.22 8.85 +.01
PaTxMgEMI d +1.4 +13.0 53.81 42.61 51.83 +.52
StrIncA m +2.6 +7.3 8.26 8.10 8.20 ...
StratIncC m +2.4 +6.4 7.80 7.65 7.74 ...
TMG1.0 +6.8 +3.5574.45 448.64 566.40+11.30
TMG1.1A m +6.6 +3.1 25.66 20.07 25.39 +.51
TMGlbDivIncA m +7.7 +2.2 10.51 8.65 10.19 +.16
TMGlbDivIncC m +7.2 +1.4 10.49 8.64 10.17 +.16
TaxMgdVlA m +4.1 +1.5 17.94 14.40 17.60 +.37
WldwHealA m +14.9 +8.5 10.74 8.22 10.74 +.15
FAM
Value +5.6 +4.1 49.50 38.16 47.90 -.08
FBR
FBRFocus m +2.1 +7.4 51.90 39.53 50.89 +.86
FMI
CommStk +7.5 +10.0 27.67 20.91 26.97 +.23
Focus +10.2 +10.8 33.81 23.40 33.43 +.70
LgCap +7.2 +6.3 17.03 13.42 16.74 +.21
FPA
Capital m +12.1 +8.9 47.08 30.86 46.18 +.70
Cres d +5.3 +7.1 28.71 24.31 27.97 +.31
NewInc m +1.8 +4.1 11.05 10.79 10.81 ...
Fairholme Funds
Fairhome d -10.4 +6.5 36.53 29.21 31.87 +.73
Federated
CapAprA m +2.7 +3.8 20.00 15.93 19.53 +.38
ClvrValA m +7.7 +2.8 15.75 11.97 15.47 +.37
HiIncBdA m +5.4 +8.4 7.77 7.31 7.66 +.03
InterConA m +5.7 +4.9 55.09 40.19 52.76 +.98
KaufmanA m +3.5 +6.0 5.89 4.53 5.68 +.10
KaufmanB m +3.1 +5.4 5.56 4.28 5.36 +.09
KaufmanC m +3.1 +5.4 5.56 4.28 5.36 +.09
KaufmanR m +3.3 +6.0 5.89 4.53 5.68 +.10
KaufmnSCA m +3.6 +5.8 28.37 19.66 27.13 +.06
MuniSecsA f +5.4 +3.1 10.34 9.34 9.92 +.01
MuniUltA m +.9 +2.2 10.05 10.01 10.05 +.01
PrdntBr m -9.1 -2.6 5.49 4.23 4.30 -.09
StrValA m +9.6 +1.9 4.80 3.94 4.72 +.05
StratIncA f +5.0 +8.3 9.45 8.87 9.27 +.01
TotRetBdA m +3.3 +6.4 11.48 11.02 11.28 -.01
USGovSecA f +2.7 +5.4 7.93 7.66 7.83 ...
Fidelity
AstMgr20 +3.6 +5.1 13.17 12.17 13.13 +.06
AstMgr50 +4.8 +5.6 16.27 13.81 16.03 +.19
AstMgr85 +5.6 +5.2 14.51 11.22 14.15 +.30
Bal +6.3 +5.3 19.40 16.25 19.22 +.31
BlChGrow +10.3 +8.1 50.03 35.60 50.03 +1.40
BlChVal +5.5 -.2 11.88 9.16 11.40 +.24
CAMuInc d +5.5 +4.1 12.37 11.33 11.97 +.01
CASITxFre d +2.9 +4.4 10.81 10.49 10.70 ...
CTMuInc d +4.9 +4.8 11.84 11.01 11.54 ...
Canada d +7.1 +9.7 63.77 47.80 62.29 +1.35
CapApr +6.6 +4.7 27.45 20.53 27.00 +.45
CapInc d +6.3 +10.6 9.95 8.66 9.71 +.08
ChinaReg d -.3 +13.7 34.07 26.60 32.40 +.70
Contra +8.2 +6.7 73.22 56.08 73.22 +1.68
ConvSec +6.3 +7.6 27.62 21.65 26.70 +.29
DiscEq +7.8 +1.5 24.96 19.05 24.28 +.64
DivGrow +6.2 +5.4 31.04 22.29 30.19 +.81
DivStk +7.6 +4.5 16.30 12.27 16.09 +.43
DivrIntl d +4.9 +2.6 32.85 25.37 31.63 +.95
EmergAsia d +4.9 +11.3 32.86 25.24 32.13 +.70
EmgMkt d +2.0 +8.9 27.86 21.54 26.87 +.51
EqInc +5.0 +1.5 48.11 36.55 46.12 +.96
EqInc II +5.3 +1.2 19.84 15.10 19.07 +.41
EuCapApr d +4.9 +2.6 21.27 15.46 19.97 +.60
Europe d +5.1 +2.9 35.01 25.74 32.91 +.97
ExpMulNat d +6.3 +3.9 23.65 18.03 23.19 +.56
FF2015 +5.4 +5.2 12.05 10.32 11.91 +.14
FF2035 +6.2 +4.4 12.45 9.80 12.14 +.23
FF2040 +6.3 +4.2 8.71 6.83 8.48 +.16
Fidelity +9.4 +5.0 35.76 26.06 35.15 +.89
Fifty +9.2 +2.8 19.58 14.45 19.26 +.25
FltRtHiIn d +1.8 +4.6 9.91 9.45 9.82 ...
FocStk +11.2 +7.2 15.43 10.43 15.18 +.20
FocuHiInc d +5.3 +6.9 9.57 9.07 9.28 +.03
FourInOne +6.9 +4.4 29.24 23.40 28.84 +.57
Fr2045 +6.3 +4.3 10.33 8.06 10.05 +.19
Fr2050 +6.3 +4.0 10.23 7.89 9.94 +.20
Free2000 +3.8 +4.7 12.37 11.48 12.35 +.06
Free2005 +4.7 +4.9 11.38 9.99 11.28 +.11
Free2010 +5.3 +5.3 14.42 12.40 14.26 +.17
Free2020 +5.8 +5.0 14.75 12.28 14.53 +.20
Free2025 +6.0 +5.0 12.40 10.09 12.17 +.20
Free2030 +6.1 +4.4 14.86 11.94 14.55 +.25
FreeInc +3.7 +4.8 11.65 10.84 11.62 +.05
GNMA +4.2 +7.3 11.94 11.30 11.73 -.01
GlbCmtyStk d +4.7 NA 18.55 12.94 17.94 +.52
GlobBal d +6.7 +7.4 24.07 19.46 23.79 +.36
GovtInc +3.1 +6.3 10.97 10.26 10.62 -.02
GrDiscov +12.6 +7.0 15.40 10.72 15.40 +.36
GrStr d +9.0 +7.0 22.27 16.09 22.27 +.35
GrowCo +13.7 +9.8 94.85 66.63 94.57 +1.89
GrowInc +6.2 -3.1 19.75 14.82 19.30 +.41
HiInc d +5.5 +8.8 9.24 8.55 9.12 +.04
Indepndnc +8.5 +7.2 26.75 18.57 26.43 +.60
InfProtBd +7.4 +6.1 12.44 11.39 12.38 +.02
IntBond +3.7 +5.8 10.86 10.45 10.76 -.03
IntGovt +2.8 +5.9 11.21 10.58 10.92 -.02
IntMuniInc d +3.8 +4.6 10.48 9.89 10.20 ...
IntSmOpp d +5.5 +.7 11.28 8.45 10.96 +.24
IntlCptlAppr d +5.7 +3.1 14.03 10.52 13.62 +.36
IntlDisc d +3.8 +3.5 35.83 27.49 34.30 +.98
IntlSmCp d +7.5 +6.0 23.10 17.10 22.86 +.54
InvGrdBd +4.3 +5.5 7.60 7.31 7.57 -.01
Japan d -2.4 -3.0 11.87 9.69 10.91 +.17
LargeCap +5.9 +5.4 19.10 14.15 18.61 +.40
LatinAm d -1.9 +13.2 60.50 47.88 57.89 +.85
LevCoSt d +6.0 +5.3 31.59 21.51 30.13 +.58
LgCpVal +6.3 -.9 11.52 9.00 11.18 +.24
LowPriStk d +9.4 +7.1 42.57 31.56 41.99 +.35
MAMuInc d +4.8 +4.6 12.32 11.38 11.93 +.01
MIMuInc d +4.3 +4.6 12.24 11.45 11.89 ...
MNMuInc d +4.5 +4.6 11.79 11.08 11.52 ...
Magellan +4.9 +2.3 77.46 58.10 75.06 +2.21
MdCpVal d +6.6 +4.5 17.57 12.81 17.00 +.38
MeCpSto +6.9 +3.9 10.79 8.16 10.68 +.28
MidCap d +7.8 +6.0 29.58 10.26 29.58 +.45
MtgSec +3.7 +5.1 11.07 10.69 11.03 -.01
MuniInc d +5.1 +4.5 12.97 11.94 12.60 ...
NJMuInc d +4.3 +4.4 11.94 11.03 11.53 +.02
NYMuInc d +4.5 +4.6 13.36 12.28 12.89 ...
NewMille +9.5 +8.1 32.26 23.71 31.91 +.72
NewMktIn d +5.5 +9.6 16.63 15.34 16.02 +.08
Nordic d +1.5 +5.4 38.84 26.40 34.85 +1.01
OHMuInc d +4.6 +4.6 11.97 11.11 11.65 ...
OTC +12.2 +13.0 62.30 42.31 61.61 +1.34
Overseas d +5.8 +1.4 35.56 26.89 34.36 +1.03
PAMuInc d +4.6 +4.5 11.12 10.30 10.76 +.01
PacBasin d +4.4 +7.8 27.22 20.93 27.22 +.59
Puritan +6.7 +5.4 19.18 15.75 18.95 +.29
RealInv d +15.6 +3.0 29.71 21.77 29.71 +.83
RelEstInc d +6.2 +5.2 10.98 9.75 10.86 +.06
Series100Index +7.6 NA 9.45 7.42 9.40 +.23
ShIntMu d +2.6 +4.1 10.82 10.54 10.74 +.01
ShTmBond +1.6 +2.7 8.54 8.43 8.53 -.01
SmCapRetr d +7.6 +11.3 22.78 15.48 21.75 +.32
SmCapStk d +3.2 +8.2 21.72 14.87 20.22 +.32
SmCpGr d +11.9 +8.9 17.84 12.01 17.56 +.37
SmCpOpp +8.7 NA 12.24 8.12 11.79 +.19
SmCpVal d +4.0 +7.6 16.78 12.59 16.23 +.33
StkSelec +6.6 +4.1 28.16 20.64 27.45 +.63
StrDivInc +10.9 +3.4 11.67 9.44 11.56 +.17
StratInc +5.4 +8.6 11.67 11.00 11.36 +.04
StratRRet d +5.5 +4.8 10.11 8.61 9.97 +.05
StratRRnI d +5.6 +4.7 10.09 8.60 9.96 +.05
TaxFrB d +5.1 +4.7 11.19 10.27 10.82 +.01
Tel&Util +9.7 +4.1 17.66 14.18 17.28 +.19
TotalBd +4.3 +6.9 11.16 10.64 10.96 -.01
Trend +12.2 +7.9 75.57 53.44 75.57 +1.81
USBdIdxInv +3.5 +5.9 11.71 11.16 11.53 -.03
Value +5.2 +3.3 75.87 55.56 72.28 +1.66
ValueDis +6.8 +2.5 16.04 12.01 15.64 +.37
Worldwid d +7.6 +6.0 20.56 14.95 20.08 +.38
Fidelity Advisor
AstMgr70 +5.3 +5.3 17.52 14.13 17.20 +.30
BalT m +6.0 +4.5 15.99 13.38 15.84 +.25
CapDevO +10.4 +5.1 12.00 8.53 11.80 +.26
DivIntlA m +5.1 +1.1 17.47 13.42 16.86 +.51
DivIntlIs d +5.3 +1.4 17.75 13.65 17.14 +.52
DivIntlT m +5.0 +.9 17.31 13.30 16.70 +.51
EmMktIncI d +5.5 +9.6 13.89 12.85 13.42 +.08
EqGrowA m +12.2 +5.9 60.58 42.17 60.58 +1.47
EqGrowI +12.4 +6.3 64.58 44.94 64.58 +1.57
EqGrowT m +12.1 +5.7 60.28 41.98 60.28 +1.46
EqIncA m +7.1 +1.5 25.01 18.92 24.31 +.54
EqIncI +7.3 +1.7 25.77 19.49 25.05 +.56
EqIncT m +7.0 +1.3 25.37 19.19 24.67 +.55
FltRateA m +1.6 +4.3 9.92 9.46 9.83 ...
FltRateC m +1.2 +3.6 9.92 9.46 9.83 ...
FltRateI d +1.8 +4.6 9.90 9.45 9.82 +.01
Fr2010A m +4.9 +5.0 12.21 10.48 12.07 +.13
Fr2015A m +5.0 +5.0 12.17 10.40 12.03 +.14
Fr2020A m +5.3 +4.6 12.80 10.63 12.60 +.17
Fr2020I +5.5 +4.8 12.88 10.69 12.68 +.17
Fr2020T m +5.2 +4.3 12.79 10.62 12.59 +.17
Fr2025A m +5.6 +4.6 12.46 10.09 12.21 +.19
Fr2030A m +5.5 +4.0 13.11 10.49 12.82 +.21
Fr2035A m +5.6 +4.0 12.51 9.80 12.18 +.22
Fr2040A m +5.6 +3.8 13.38 10.44 13.02 +.24
GrowIncI +6.4 +3.1 18.69 13.97 18.36 +.39
GrowOppT m +13.8 +6.1 39.30 26.89 39.16 +.86
HiIncAdvA m +6.7 +8.5 10.50 9.19 10.34 +.08
HiIncAdvI d +6.8 +8.8 9.98 8.76 9.81 +.07
HiIncAdvT m +6.7 +8.5 10.55 9.23 10.38 +.07
IntrDiscA m +3.6 +3.2 35.58 27.28 34.03 +.96
LeverA m +6.4 +5.8 38.29 26.20 36.60 +.73
LeverC m +5.9 +5.0 36.42 25.00 34.76 +.69
LeverI +6.5 +6.1 38.73 26.53 37.05 +.74
LeverT m +6.2 +5.5 37.60 25.74 35.93 +.71
LrgCapI +6.0 +5.4 20.29 15.06 19.82 +.43
Mid-CpIIA m +3.2 +7.2 19.17 14.47 18.48 +.40
Mid-CpIII +3.4 +7.4 19.42 14.62 18.73 +.41
MidCapA m +7.0 +4.0 21.76 16.08 21.43 +.32
MidCapT m +6.9 +3.8 21.94 16.25 21.61 +.32
MidCpIIT m +3.1 +6.9 19.03 14.39 18.34 +.40
MuniIncI +5.1 +4.4 13.05 12.00 12.67 +.01
NewInsA m +7.7 +6.3 21.47 16.50 21.47 +.47
NewInsC m +7.4 +5.5 20.43 15.77 20.43 +.45
NewInsI +8.0 +6.6 21.71 16.68 21.71 +.48
NewInsT m +7.6 +6.0 21.21 16.33 21.21 +.47
OverseaI d +6.3 +3.7 20.39 15.11 19.68 +.56
ShFixInI +1.7 +3.0 9.30 9.18 9.29 -.01
SmCapA m +10.0 +8.7 27.83 20.98 27.13 +.42
SmCapC m +9.5 +7.9 24.75 18.88 24.09 +.37
SmCapI +10.2 +9.0 29.15 21.89 28.44 +.45
SmCapT m +9.9 +8.4 26.86 20.32 26.17 +.40
StSlctSmCp d +9.2 +5.5 20.94 13.83 20.22 +.34
StratIncA m +5.3 +8.4 13.09 12.30 12.69 +.03
StratIncC m +4.8 +7.6 13.06 12.28 12.67 +.04
StratIncI +5.3 +8.7 13.22 12.44 12.83 +.03
StratIncT m +5.3 +8.4 13.08 12.30 12.69 +.04
TechA m +4.9 +12.1 27.46 19.15 26.23 +.63
TotBondA m +4.0 +6.5 11.17 10.64 10.96 -.01
TotBondI +4.2 +6.8 11.15 10.62 10.94 -.01
ValStratT m +6.5 +5.0 28.43 20.37 27.57 +.44
Fidelity Select
Banking d -4.3 -8.2 19.65 14.67 17.71 +.63
Biotech d +22.0 +9.2 89.00 59.98 89.00 +1.78
BrokInv d -6.2 -.6 55.95 42.88 49.20 +2.06
Chemical d +13.8 +16.3 111.04 69.42 108.69 +1.87
CommEq d +.5 +8.9 30.20 20.70 26.63 +.13
Computer d +9.0 +14.7 62.42 42.57 61.52 +1.52
ConsStpl d +8.3 +9.6 73.98 60.55 73.33 +1.04
DefAero d +12.6 +7.3 84.35 60.46 82.32 +1.58
Electron d +5.5 +7.2 54.98 34.61 51.00 +2.73
Energy d +16.6 +7.9 62.56 37.87 60.86 +2.23
EnergySvc d +20.4 +8.9 89.52 50.46 89.52 +4.80
Gold d +.8 +16.6 55.28 40.37 51.50 +.81
HealtCar d +17.1 +8.4146.37 100.51 145.95 +2.69
Industr d +6.1 +9.1 26.12 18.32 24.68 +.36
Leisure d +10.8 +10.8100.86 72.53 100.86 +2.25
Materials d +7.9 +13.6 74.58 50.25 73.24 +1.38
MedDeliv d +23.0 +7.8 61.69 39.12 61.11 +2.17
MedEqSys d +14.0 +11.7 31.96 21.95 31.28 +.04
NatGas d +10.1 +3.7 37.23 26.42 36.55 +1.42
NatRes d +13.6 +10.9 40.76 25.15 39.47 +1.36
Pharm d +16.9 +10.1 14.14 10.57 14.13 +.16
SelctUtil d +10.1 +4.4 53.41 44.54 53.16 +.62
SoftwCom d +9.2 +13.6 90.51 66.14 89.38 +1.55
Tech d +5.2 +12.7105.02 73.15 100.57 +2.41
Telecom d +7.0 +6.0 51.78 38.86 49.65 +.06
Fidelity Spartan
500IdxInv +8.1 +3.8 48.31 37.17 47.64 +1.04
ExtMktIdI d +9.0 +7.7 41.87 29.80 41.08 +.67
FdSpIntIv +5.1 +7.6 11.39 10.00 11.02 -.04
PERCENT RETURN
SPECIALTY FUNDS YTD 1YR 3YR* 5YR*
BALANCED
INTERNATIONAL
BOND FUNDS
Mutual Fund Categories
Conservative Allocation (CA) 4.90 12.50 5.72 4.69
Moderate Allocation (MA) 5.54 17.28 4.83 4.53
Health (SH) 16.38 33.75 7.56 7.23
Natural Resources (SN) 6.38 35.54 0.18 9.07
Real Estate (SR) 14.72 30.40 5.17 2.57
Technology (ST) 5.64 27.32 10.15 9.80
Target-Date 2000-2010 (TA) 4.94 13.85 4.61 4.66
Target-Date 2011-2015 (TD) 5.49 16.34 4.01 4.47
Target-Date 2016-2020 (TE) 5.60 17.00 4.10 4.34
Divers. Emerging Mkt. (EM) 0.33 19.04 3.72 10.27
Europe Stock (ES) 5.78 22.64 -1.42 2.82
Foreign Small/Mid Val (FA) 5.20 27.91 4.03 5.11
Foreign Large Blend (FB) 4.75 21.78 -0.67 2.52
Foreign Large Growth (FG) 4.97 23.75 1.17 4.41
Foreign Small/Mid Gr. (FR) 4.91 28.95 4.46 5.64
Foreign Large Value (FV) 5.31 20.77 -1.26 1.69
World Allocation (IH) 5.17 17.82 3.97 5.44
World Stock (WS) 5.81 23.34 2.69 4.21
Interm-Term Bond (CI) 3.69 5.33 7.54 6.03
Interm. Government (GI) 3.17 3.22 6.40 5.80
High Yield Muni (HM) 5.53 3.22 3.31 1.52
High Yield Bond (HY) 5.41 13.44 10.07 7.17
Muni National Interm (MI) 4.32 2.85 4.80 4.17
Muni National Long (ML) 5.27 2.60 4.51 3.46
Muni Short (MS) 2.13 1.75 2.94 3.16
12.0
42.4
9.2
8.7
13.9
39.8
6.7
9.0
8.1
25.4
1.8
0.2
10.6
34.1
7.9
7.4
10.0
34.5
9.0
7.0
6.7
21.6
3.7
4.7
5.9
27.1
11.9
6.7
6.6
23.7
8.4
3.9
9.2
29.3
4.9
6.0
SV SB SG
MV MB MG
LV LB LG YTD
1YR
3YR
5YR
YTD
1YR
3YR
5YR
YTD
1YR
3YR
5YR
L
A
R
G
E
-
C
A
P
M
I
D
-
C
A
P
S
M
A
L
L
-
C
A
P
VALUE GROWTH BLEND
* Annualized
Brian Rogers has managed the fund since its 1985 inception.
Since then, the funds average annualized gain has been nearly
11 percent. The focus is on value-oriented, dividend-paying stocks.
FundFocus
Large Value CATEGORY
MORNINGSTAR
RATING
ASSETS
EXP RATIO
MANAGER
SINCE
RETURNS 3-MO
YTD
1-YR
3-YR ANNL
5-YR-ANNL
HHHHI
$20,372 million
-0.6
+5.5
+21.5
+4.0
+3.2
0.69%
Brian Rogers
1985-10-31
TOP 5 HOLDINGS PCT
Reserve Invt-SBI 4.97
Chevron Corporation 2.8
JP Morgan Chase & Co 2.79
General Electric Company 2.53
ExxonMobil Corporation 2.27
T Rowe Price EqtyInc PRFDX
Fund Focus
C M Y K
PAGE 6D SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
M U T U A L S
NORTH AMERICAN
WARHORSE
Exit 1 off Rt. 380
1000 DUNHAM DR.
DUNMORE, PA
www.nawarhorse.com
(570) 346-2453
OFFER ENDS JUNE 30TH
honda.com ALWAYS WEAR A HELMET, EYE PROTECTION AND PROTECTIVE CLOTHING. NEVER RIDE UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF DRUGS OR ALCOHOL, AND NEVER USE THE STREET AS A
RACETRACK. OBEY THE LAW AND READ YOUR OWNERS MANUAL THOROUGHLY. PROFESSIONAL RIDER SHOWN. *1.99% Fixed APR nancing available for customers who qualify for super
preferred credit tier for up to 36 months through Honda Financial Services. Payment example: 36 monthly payments of $28.64 for each $1,000 nanced. Offer good on all new and unregistered
CBR1000RR models. Not all buyers may qualify. Higher rates apply for buyers with lower credit ratings. **$800 Bonus Bucks valid on 2011, 2010 & 2009 CBR1000RR/RA models. Does not
include Repsol edition. Bonus Bucks redeemable only for purchase at dealer on purchase date. No cash value. Non-transferable. Redemption value not to exceed $800. Offer end 6/30/11.
Check with participating Honda Dealers for complete program details. CBR is a trademark of Honda Motor Co., Ltd. 2011 American Honda Motor Coo., Inc. (04/11) 11-1075
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 PAGE 7D
M U T U A L S
DivGrowA m +6.0 +4.6 20.65 16.15 20.02 +.37
DivGrowI +6.2 NA 20.59 16.10 19.96 +.38
DsEqHLSIA +9.5 +3.8 13.06 9.78 12.92 +.25
DvGrHLSIA +6.4 +5.0 21.31 16.69 20.75 +.40
DvGrHLSIB b +6.2 +4.7 21.25 16.62 20.67 +.39
EqIncA m +7.2 +4.4 13.87 10.93 13.56 +.21
FloatRtA m +2.6 +3.3 9.01 8.54 8.87 ...
FloatRtC m +2.2 +2.5 9.00 8.53 8.86 ...
FloatRtI +2.8 NA 9.01 8.55 8.88 ...
GlbAllAstA m +2.4 NA 11.83 10.49 11.54 +.18
GlbGrthIA +5.4 +2.5 17.09 12.33 16.46 +.42
GrAlA m +5.5 +5.0 12.45 9.81 12.18 +.20
GrOpHLSIA +8.9 +6.7 28.94 20.52 28.16 +.67
GrOppA m +8.4 +6.2 29.88 21.25 29.01 +.68
GrOppL m +8.4 +6.4 30.70 21.83 29.82 +.71
HiYdHLSIA +6.6 +9.1 9.76 8.50 9.76 +.04
InOpHLSIA +2.8 +6.6 13.31 10.40 12.81 +.35
IndHLSIA +7.9 +3.6 28.54 22.02 28.28 +.62
InflPlC m +6.8 +6.2 12.20 10.95 11.72 +.02
InflPlusA m +7.3 +7.0 12.32 11.08 11.86 +.03
MCVlHLSIA +3.8 +6.0 11.26 8.12 10.71 +.15
MdCpHLSIA +6.8 +8.2 28.80 20.79 27.78 +.36
MidCapA m +6.5 +7.5 24.30 17.61 23.43 +.30
MidCapC m +6.1 +6.8 21.25 15.47 20.45 +.26
Sm-CpGrHLSIA +16.2 +9.1 25.48 15.79 24.82 +.39
SmCoHLSIA +14.2 +7.7 20.69 13.42 20.17 +.35
StkHLSIA +6.2 +4.0 44.46 33.53 43.51 +1.02
TRBdHLSIA +3.5 +5.3 11.54 10.81 11.28 ...
TRBdHLSIA b +3.4 +5.1 11.46 10.76 11.21 ...
TotRetBdA m +3.1 +4.9 10.76 10.36 10.61 -.01
USHLSIA +2.2 +3.3 11.17 10.36 10.69 +.01
ValHLSIA +5.0 +4.1 11.68 9.00 11.31 +.25
Heartland
SelectVal m +4.9 +7.1 31.69 23.64 30.62 +.42
Value m +12.3 +6.2 49.29 34.06 49.19 +1.51
ValuePlus m +7.9 +12.5 32.45 22.65 32.19 +.54
Henderson
IntlOppA m +6.3 +4.8 23.63 17.97 22.41 +.48
IntlOppC m +5.8 +4.0 22.36 16.98 21.17 +.45
Homestead
Value d +8.6 +2.6 34.22 25.78 33.11 +.42
Hussman
StrTotRet d +3.0 +7.5 12.86 12.04 12.45 +.03
StratGrth d -1.5 -1.1 13.47 11.84 12.10 -.20
ICON
Energy +13.6 +10.2 23.11 14.91 22.76 +.73
ING
CorpLeadB +12.3 +6.8 23.25 16.72 22.61 +.34
GNMAIncA m +4.1 +6.4 9.01 8.71 9.00 +.01
GlREstA m +9.1 +2.6 17.57 13.83 17.56 +.42
IntlVal A m +4.4 +.9 12.72 10.42 12.14 +.39
RussiaA m +7.3 +9.3 46.06 31.81 43.70 +.94
TRPGrEqI +8.8 +6.0 59.45 43.35 59.26 +1.38
INVESCO
AmerValA m +6.9 +6.6 30.05 22.12 29.03 +.31
AsPacGrA m +6.3 +14.9 32.41 25.14 32.03 +.79
CapDevA m +9.5 +4.6 18.51 12.87 17.95 +.28
CharterA m +7.5 +6.1 17.60 13.91 17.38 +.33
ComstockA m +6.6 +2.6 17.20 13.14 16.65 +.37
ComstockB m +6.6 +2.4 17.20 13.14 16.65 +.37
ComstockC m +6.1 +1.9 17.20 13.13 16.65 +.37
ConstellA m +8.0 +1.8 25.19 18.73 25.15 +.63
ConstellB m +7.5 +1.1 22.55 16.87 22.51 +.57
CorpBondA m +4.3 +6.6 6.95 6.62 6.85 -.02
DevMkt A m +1.5 +13.0 34.78 28.27 33.61 +.59
DivDivA m +5.9 +4.8 13.18 10.51 12.88 +.17
DivDivInv b +5.9 +4.9 13.18 10.51 12.88 +.17
DynInv b +11.9 +6.5 25.54 17.24 24.90 +.37
EnergyA m +14.9 +10.6 47.82 30.18 47.56 +1.93
EnergyInv b +14.8 +10.6 47.65 30.07 47.39 +1.92
EqIncomeA m +4.6 +4.5 9.17 7.51 8.91 +.12
EqIncomeB m +4.7 +4.3 9.00 7.37 8.75 +.12
EqIncomeC m +4.3 +3.8 9.04 7.40 8.79 +.12
EqWSP500A m +8.6 +5.9 33.96 25.22 33.37 +.62
EuroGrA m +8.4 +4.5 34.74 26.52 33.30 +.71
FloatRtA m +2.8 +3.0 7.88 7.39 7.76 ...
GlHlthCrA m +16.3 +6.2 31.40 23.28 31.08 +.44
GlHlthCrI m +16.4 +6.2 31.41 23.28 31.09 +.44
GlS&MGrA m +7.1 +6.3 21.01 16.02 20.39 +.40
GlbCEqtyA m +3.9 +.6 14.16 11.24 13.57 +.35
GlobEqA m +9.9 +1.6 11.88 8.99 11.80 +.29
GrowIncA m +5.2 +3.1 20.86 15.99 20.11 +.39
GrwthAllA m +6.0 +3.0 11.66 9.75 11.58 +.18
HiYldA m +4.6 +8.5 4.35 4.09 4.27 +.02
HiYldMuA m +5.5 +2.4 9.67 8.64 9.15 +.02
HiYldMuC m +5.1 +1.6 9.65 8.63 9.13 +.02
IntlGrA m +7.2 +6.2 30.19 23.43 29.54 +.68
MidCapGrA m +7.8 +9.8 33.16 23.43 32.08 +.49
MidCpCrA m +5.7 +6.9 25.34 19.97 24.48 +.27
ModAllA m +5.5 +4.2 10.93 9.65 10.91 +.12
MuniIncA m +5.1 +2.7 13.56 12.23 12.89 +.01
PacGrowB m +1.6 +6.2 22.83 18.64 22.68 +.45
RealEstA m +14.5 +3.2 24.43 18.55 24.43 +.68
SP500IdxA m +7.8 +3.4 14.74 11.33 14.59 +.32
SmCapEqA m +12.7 +7.7 14.05 9.25 13.80 +.23
SmCapGrA m +12.8 +8.9 33.17 22.26 32.26 +.48
SmCapValA m +3.6 +8.7 19.72 14.03 18.67 +.34
SmCpGrA m +12.0 +7.6 12.71 8.67 12.42 +.19
Summit b +8.0 +4.1 12.89 9.65 12.77 +.27
TechInv b +9.0 +8.5 36.18 24.46 35.33 +.92
TxFrInmA3 m +4.7 +5.0 11.59 10.92 11.41 +.01
USGovtA m +2.3 +5.6 9.26 8.82 9.02 -.02
USMortA m +3.5 +4.7 13.25 12.84 13.15 ...
Ivy
AssetSTrB m +11.0 +10.0 26.21 20.40 26.21 +.64
AssetStrA m +11.5 +11.0 27.22 21.06 27.22 +.67
AssetStrC m +11.0 +10.1 26.34 20.50 26.34 +.64
AssetStrY m +11.5 +11.0 27.27 21.10 27.27 +.68
GlNatResA m +8.4 +6.5 24.76 15.83 23.42 +.73
GlNatResC m +7.9 +5.8 21.47 13.80 20.27 +.62
GlNatResI d +8.5 NA 25.26 16.11 23.91 +.74
GlbNatrlY m +8.4 +6.7 25.06 16.00 23.72 +.74
HiIncA m +6.0 +9.7 8.69 8.23 8.43 +.02
HiIncC m +5.6 +8.9 8.69 8.23 8.43 +.02
IntlCrEqI d +3.7 NA 18.08 13.82 17.26 +.48
IntlValA m +3.4 +6.9 17.98 13.75 17.15 +.47
LgCpGrA m +9.9 +6.4 14.27 10.54 14.27 +.38
LtdTmBdA m +2.1 +5.5 11.37 11.00 11.18 -.02
MdCpGrA m +8.8 +10.6 19.15 13.23 18.53 +.28
MdCpGrthI d +9.0 NA 19.91 18.01 19.27 +.30
PacOppA m +4.4 +12.2 17.89 14.38 17.44 +.39
ScTechA m +9.8 +11.4 35.64 26.39 34.60 +.85
ScTechY m +9.8 +11.5 37.12 27.46 36.04 +.89
JPMorgan
CoreBondA m +3.6 +6.9 11.75 11.35 11.67 -.01
CoreBondC m +3.2 +6.2 11.81 11.41 11.72 -.01
DiversMidCapGrA m+8.7 +8.0 24.04 16.58 23.37 +.27
EqIdxA m +7.8 +3.4 30.96 23.83 30.54 +.66
GovtBdA m +4.3 +6.6 11.32 10.65 11.12 -.02
HighStatA m +2.1 +.9 15.38 14.95 15.33 +.04
HighYldA m +5.0 +8.5 8.39 7.81 8.24 +.04
InvBalA m +5.1 +5.7 12.83 11.19 12.73 +.15
InvBalC m +4.8 +5.1 12.68 11.06 12.58 +.15
InvConGrA m +4.1 +5.5 11.53 10.61 11.50 +.08
InvConGrC m +3.8 +4.9 11.50 10.57 11.46 +.08
InvGrInA m +5.9 +5.2 13.60 11.23 13.45 +.20
InvGrowA m +6.7 +4.6 14.55 11.38 14.34 +.29
MidCapVal m +7.6 +5.2 25.38 19.05 24.89 +.30
SmCapEqA m +10.4 +10.1 37.83 27.41 37.30 +.64
SmCapEqR5 +10.7 +10.6 41.25 29.81 40.69 +.71
USEquityA m +6.3 +6.1 10.99 8.42 10.84 +.23
Janus
BalC m +6.3 NA 26.68 22.89 26.45 +.38
BalJ +6.8 +8.2 26.72 23.87 26.50 +.39
BalS b +6.6 NA 26.72 22.91 26.50 +.38
ContrJ -3.4 +2.8 15.36 12.78 14.13 +.13
EntrprsJ +6.8 +9.4 65.02 46.30 63.14 +1.11
FlxBdJ +4.1 +8.2 11.06 10.34 10.62 -.02
FortyA m +5.7 +7.1 35.77 28.29 35.67 +1.31
FortyS b +5.6 +6.9 35.28 27.93 35.17 +1.29
Gr&IncJ +9.3 +2.9 33.64 26.10 33.25 +.84
HiYldJ d +5.4 +8.6 9.35 8.41 9.22 +.04
J +6.3 +5.3 31.19 24.48 30.97 +.82
OrionJ d -.3 +7.4 12.81 9.73 11.84 +.28
OverseasJ d -8.2 +9.5 53.66 42.85 46.49 +1.09
PerkinsMCVJ +6.6 +7.4 24.66 19.09 24.06 +.43
PerkinsSCVJ +5.9 +9.8 25.96 20.63 25.39 +.31
RsrchJ +7.4 +8.5 31.84 23.63 31.61 +.82
ShTmBdJ +1.5 +5.2 3.14 3.07 3.09 -.01
TwentyJ +4.7 +7.8 68.99 54.56 68.82 +2.52
WorldwideJ d +2.4 +3.9 49.99 39.95 47.67 +1.37
Janus Aspen
Bal Is +7.1 +8.6 30.37 26.10 28.36 +.42
FortyIs +6.1 +7.9 37.85 29.71 37.85 +1.49
IntlGrIs -8.8 +10.7 59.90 46.98 51.34 +1.05
JanusI +6.6 +5.9 26.02 20.38 25.76 +.68
MidCpIs +7.1 +9.6 42.69 30.36 41.48 +.78
WldWGrIs +2.6 +4.2 32.36 25.76 30.84 +.88
Jensen
J b +5.1 +5.8 29.42 23.00 28.32 -.02
John Hancock
BalA m +3.0 +7.5 16.07 13.86 15.72 +.26
BondA m +4.4 +7.9 15.91 15.22 15.74 -.01
ClsscValA m +5.0 -2.6 18.18 13.66 17.50 +.34
HiYldA m -.4 +4.4 4.08 3.00 3.76 -.02
IntlCoreA m +7.8 +1.9 32.28 24.64 31.42 +.91
LgCpEqA m +2.9 +8.8 27.84 21.85 26.75 +.74
LgCpEqC m +2.4 +8.0 25.76 20.19 24.70 +.67
LifAg1 b +6.3 +4.2 13.36 10.19 13.05 +.26
LifBa1 b +5.7 +5.5 13.73 11.66 13.53 +.18
LifCo1 b +4.8 +6.4 13.24 12.36 13.16 +.07
LifGr1 b +6.0 +5.0 13.85 11.16 13.61 +.24
LifMo1 b +5.4 +6.1 13.24 11.81 13.13 +.12
RegBankA m -2.1 -4.8 15.50 12.04 14.33 +.41
SmCapEqA m +8.3 +6.5 27.78 17.16 26.72 +.32
SovInvA m +7.2 +3.6 17.12 13.44 16.76 +.32
StrIncA m +5.3 +8.8 6.88 6.35 6.83 +.02
StrIncC m +4.9 +8.0 6.88 6.35 6.83 +.02
TaxFBdA m +5.1 +4.1 10.19 9.28 9.78 ...
Keeley
SmCapVal m +9.5 +4.5 27.77 18.76 27.35 +.58
Kinetics
Paradigm d +4.6 +3.1 25.22 18.78 24.38 +.43
LKCM
SmCpEqI d +18.0 +7.6 25.71 15.92 25.35 +.42
Laudus
GrInvUSLCGr d +12.1 +10.8 14.13 10.09 14.10 +.26
InMktMstS d +5.4 +7.2 20.78 15.82 20.27 +.42
IntlFxInc d +6.7 NA 12.48 11.25 12.48 +.11
IntlMstrI d +5.3 +7.1 20.78 15.80 20.27 +.42
Lazard
EmgMktEqO m ... +12.8 22.82 18.53 22.20 +.39
Legg Mason/Western
AggGrowA m +12.2 +4.2126.28 87.14 124.45 +1.96
AggGrowB m +11.7 +3.3108.07 75.18 106.46 +1.65
AggrsvGrC m +11.9 +3.6 110.13 76.39 108.51 +1.70
ApprecA m +7.1 +5.2 14.82 11.80 14.69 +.25
CAMncpA m +5.9 +4.2 16.41 14.85 15.92 +.01
EqIncBldA m +7.1 +2.6 13.71 11.33 13.46 +.19
EquityO +4.9 +3.7 13.34 10.28 12.96 +.28
FdmACValA m +2.9 +2.5 14.87 11.12 14.09 +.30
GovtSecsA m +5.2 +6.7 10.72 10.25 10.69 -.02
LSAllc70A m +6.0 +4.3 13.61 11.00 13.38 +.20
LSAllc85A m +6.6 +3.5 14.05 10.87 13.78 +.25
LgCpGrA m +6.1 +4.8 25.95 20.08 25.73 +.53
MdCpCoA m +8.5 +7.2 23.57 16.88 23.11 +.49
MgdMuniA m +6.1 +4.9 16.13 14.47 15.60 +.02
MgdMuniC m +5.8 +4.4 16.14 14.48 15.61 +.02
MuBdLtdA m +5.3 +4.3 6.55 6.00 6.34 ...
MuBdLtdC b +5.1 +3.7 6.56 6.01 6.35 ...
MuBdNYA m +5.3 +4.9 13.87 12.49 13.40 +.01
MuHiIncA m +5.6 +3.7 14.24 12.82 13.61 +.08
OpportntC m -13.8 -5.0 11.81 8.61 9.50 -.14
ShDrMuInA m +2.5 +3.7 5.18 5.08 5.17 ...
SmCpGrA m +10.0 +8.7 19.35 13.21 18.89 +.24
SpecInvC m +1.1 +2.5 34.33 25.34 32.02 +.18
ValueC m +2.8 -5.5 42.42 32.81 39.95 +.92
Leuthold
AssetAl m +5.7 +4.5 11.35 9.35 11.07 +.15
CoreInv d +7.9 +6.0 18.39 15.04 18.16 +.29
Longleaf Partners
Intl +3.5 +3.3 16.21 12.97 15.88 +.36
LongPart +10.7 +3.2 31.74 23.60 31.29 +.40
SmCap +15.5 +8.1 31.17 21.65 30.63 +.37
Loomis Sayles
BondR b +7.6 +8.5 14.95 13.66 14.93 +.14
GlbBdR b +6.5 +7.6 17.25 15.90 17.24 +.13
SmCpVaR b +9.2 +7.2 29.18 20.20 28.80 +.47
Lord Abbett
AffiliatA m +3.5 +.8 12.45 9.44 11.93 +.28
AffiliatC m +3.1 +.1 12.44 9.43 11.92 +.27
AlphaA m +8.8 +9.0 26.82 18.40 26.25 +.48
BalA m +5.3 +5.2 11.31 9.47 11.01 +.19
BondDebA m +6.1 +7.9 8.12 7.42 8.02 +.03
BondDebC m +5.8 +7.2 8.14 7.43 8.04 +.03
ClsscStckA m +2.6 +4.4 31.31 24.01 30.36 +.83
CptStrcA m +6.5 +5.2 12.63 10.26 12.39 +.18
DevGrowA m +14.6 +13.3 24.83 15.45 24.40 +.25
FdmtlEqtyA m +7.2 +6.4 14.05 10.43 13.85 +.31
FdmtlEqtyC m +6.9 +5.8 13.34 9.92 13.14 +.29
FltRateF b +2.6 NA 9.44 9.29 9.31 ...
GrOpportA m +8.6 +10.6 25.24 17.10 24.57 +.44
HYMuniBdA m +4.5 -.7 11.88 10.64 11.12 +.05
HiYldA m +6.2 +8.9 8.04 7.46 7.93 +.04
IncmA m +5.5 +8.6 2.93 2.79 2.91 ...
IntlCorEqA m +6.4 +3.3 13.57 10.38 12.99 +.34
MidCpValA m +9.6 +4.4 18.23 13.02 18.02 +.40
NatlTaxFA m +6.2 +3.2 10.89 9.71 10.40 +.03
ShDurIncA m +2.4 +6.5 4.68 4.59 4.60 ...
ShDurIncC m +2.0 +5.7 4.71 4.62 4.63 ...
SmCpBlnA m +14.2 +6.1 17.59 11.71 17.33 +.37
SmCpValA m +7.8 +8.9 34.93 24.03 33.88 +.76
TotRetA m +4.0 +7.1 11.45 10.58 10.88 -.01
MFS
AggGrAlA m +6.8 +5.4 15.49 11.83 15.23 +.29
BondA m +4.9 +8.0 13.76 13.17 13.62 ...
ConAlocA m +5.3 +6.7 13.18 11.82 13.17 +.11
CoreEqA m +7.7 +5.7 19.20 14.58 19.10 +.42
CoreGrA m +8.0 +4.8 19.01 14.48 19.00 +.49
GlTotRtA m +6.8 +5.9 14.26 12.27 14.11 +.20
GovtSecA m +2.9 +6.2 10.46 9.99 10.28 -.01
GrAllocA m +6.6 +6.0 14.99 12.03 14.84 +.24
GrAllocB m +6.2 +5.2 14.80 11.86 14.64 +.24
GrAllocC m +6.1 +5.2 14.76 11.83 14.59 +.23
GrowA m +8.0 +8.6 45.26 33.38 45.23 +1.19
HiYLDOpA m +6.1 +6.8 6.60 6.08 6.51 +.04
HighIncA m +5.4 +6.9 3.56 3.30 3.51 +.01
HighIncI +5.5 +7.2 3.56 3.30 3.51 +.01
IntDivA m +5.7 +5.3 14.66 11.41 14.29 +.31
IntlNDisA m +6.2 +7.7 23.72 18.11 23.22 +.45
IntlNDisI +6.3 +8.0 24.37 18.60 23.86 +.46
IntlValA m +7.6 +4.7 26.76 21.45 26.47 +.56
LtdMatA m +1.6 +3.7 6.27 6.10 6.18 -.01
MAInvA m +7.7 +5.5 20.83 16.09 20.61 +.47
MAInvC m +7.3 +4.8 20.11 15.53 19.91 +.46
MAInvGrA m +8.9 +6.9 16.76 12.17 16.62 +.33
MdCpValI +9.4 +5.9 14.80 10.73 14.58 +.26
MidCapGrI +6.8 +3.5 10.26 7.29 10.04 +.18
ModAllocA m +6.1 +6.5 14.23 12.06 14.14 +.18
ModAllocC m +5.6 +5.8 14.06 11.89 13.97 +.17
MuHiIncA f +5.8 +3.3 7.78 7.03 7.44 +.03
MuIncA m +5.1 +4.4 8.59 7.79 8.22 +.02
MuLtdMtA m +3.1 +4.1 8.10 7.84 8.03 +.01
NewDiscA m +10.6 +12.6 27.29 17.79 26.37 -.07
NewDiscI +10.7 +13.0 28.66 18.64 27.69 -.07
ResBdA m +3.9 +6.7 10.68 10.31 10.62 ...
ResBondI +4.0 +6.9 10.69 10.32 10.62 -.01
ResIntlA m +6.8 +3.7 16.73 12.79 16.26 +.43
ResIntlI +7.0 +4.0 17.27 13.20 16.79 +.44
ResearchA m +7.1 +5.9 26.90 20.44 26.73 +.60
ResearchI +7.2 +6.2 27.41 20.83 27.24 +.60
TotRetA m +5.1 +4.2 14.85 12.87 14.66 +.16
TotRetB m +4.6 +3.5 14.85 12.87 14.66 +.15
TotRetC m +4.6 +3.5 14.92 12.93 14.72 +.15
UtilA m +11.0 +10.2 18.25 14.36 18.00 +.36
UtilC m +10.6 +9.4 18.19 14.31 17.94 +.37
ValueA m +6.0 +3.5 24.78 19.42 24.02 +.40
ValueC m +5.6 +2.7 24.55 19.23 23.80 +.39
ValueI +6.2 +3.8 24.89 19.51 24.13 +.40
MainStay
ConvertA m +6.4 +8.5 17.35 13.64 16.94 +.22
FltgRateA m +2.1 +3.9 9.55 9.18 9.47 ...
HiYldCorA m +5.3 +7.1 6.04 5.73 5.99 +.02
HiYldCorC m +4.8 +6.2 6.01 5.71 5.96 +.02
LgCapGrA m +10.5 +8.5 7.84 5.68 7.79 +.18
Mairs & Power
GrthInv +5.5 +5.1 78.14 61.14 75.69 +.76
Managers
AMGFQGlAA m -2.4 +.9 10.73 9.23 9.35 +.09
Bond +6.2 +7.9 26.67 25.28 26.57 ...
MgrsPIMCOBd +4.0 +8.2 10.76 10.26 10.65 +.02
Manning & Napier
Internati +8.0 +7.0 9.82 7.51 9.56 +.24
PBConTrmS +4.2 +6.5 13.55 12.64 13.34 +.06
PBExtTrmS +5.9 +6.3 16.56 13.86 16.36 +.23
PBMaxTrmS +4.4 +5.4 17.76 13.77 17.16 +.32
PBModTrmS +5.2 +6.1 13.59 12.03 13.46 +.14
WrldOppA +6.6 +6.4 9.62 7.42 9.18 +.26
Marshall
SmCpGrInv d +8.2 +11.2 21.58 13.84 20.56 +.49
Marsico
21stCent m +2.9 +3.1 15.35 11.26 14.67 +.25
FlexCap m +4.5 NA 14.70 10.61 14.23 +.25
Focus m +7.0 +5.0 19.41 14.24 19.36 +.43
Grow m +9.1 +4.7 21.37 15.33 21.12 +.34
MassMutual
PremIntlEqtyS +7.8 +6.7 16.02 12.10 15.55 +.34
SelBRGlAlcS +5.3 NA 11.51 9.64 11.36 +.20
SelFundmtlValS +5.1 +3.8 11.36 8.69 11.02 +.24
SelIndxEqS +7.9 +3.4 12.75 9.80 12.63 +.28
SelIndxEqZ +7.9 +3.6 12.75 9.80 12.63 +.28
SelMdCpGrEqIIA m+8.0 +9.0 16.64 11.77 16.15 +.31
SelMdCpGrEqIIL +8.1 +9.2 17.11 12.08 16.62 +.32
SelMdCpGrEqIIS +8.2 +9.5 17.56 12.38 17.06 +.32
SlSmGrEqS +10.0 +7.2 19.91 13.53 18.98 +.33
MassMutual Inst
PremCoreBndS +4.1 +6.9 11.43 10.81 11.41 -.01
Masters Select
IntlIntl d +4.5 +5.4 16.61 12.42 15.73 +.43
Matthews Asian
China d ... +19.9 31.71 25.53 29.37 +.50
GrInc d +3.0 +10.9 18.68 16.16 18.31 +.39
India d -3.8 +17.8 23.02 18.03 20.67 -.13
PacEqInc d +3.0 NA 14.60 12.85 14.54 +.32
PacTiger d +6.7 +15.8 25.02 19.86 25.02 +.49
Merger
Merger m +2.5 +3.9 16.29 15.65 16.18 +.04
Meridian
MeridnGr d +6.0 +10.2 48.86 34.57 47.26 +.45
Value d +4.0 +5.4 30.70 23.08 30.07 +.76
Merk
HrdCurInv b +6.9 +7.7 13.17 11.30 12.98 +.19
Metropolitan West
Hi-YldBdM b +4.7 +9.6 11.02 10.29 10.73 +.05
LowDurBd b +2.0 +3.3 8.68 8.38 8.63 ...
TotRtBd b +3.4 +8.4 10.79 10.27 10.48 -.01
Morgan Stanley
FocGrA m +13.1 +10.6 40.34 27.57 40.34 +1.01
StrategiA m +5.3 +5.0 17.31 14.41 16.99 +.28
USGovSecB m +4.1 +3.5 9.58 8.43 8.76 -.01
Muhlenkamp
Muhlenkmp +3.7 -2.4 58.49 46.64 55.81 +.90
Munder Funds
MdCpCrGrA m +11.1 +7.2 31.44 22.35 30.99 +.62
Nations
LgCpIxZ +8.0 +3.7 26.48 20.39 26.16 +.57
Nationwide
DesModSvc b +5.4 +4.5 9.98 8.46 9.84 +.13
FundD m +7.2 +2.1 14.84 11.34 14.49 +.22
IDAggSrv b +6.9 +3.8 9.35 7.17 9.12 +.19
IDModAgSv b +6.4 +4.3 9.86 7.90 9.66 +.18
IntlIdxA m +5.3 +1.8 8.11 6.32 7.74 +.24
S&P500Svc m +7.8 +3.2 11.38 8.78 11.23 +.25
Natixis
CGMTgtEqA m -1.3 +5.3 11.46 8.79 10.97 +.32
InvBndA m +5.9 +8.9 12.76 11.98 12.54 +.06
InvBndC m +5.6 +8.1 12.68 11.90 12.45 +.07
StratIncA m +8.2 +8.8 15.59 14.15 15.58 +.17
StratIncC m +7.7 +7.9 15.68 14.22 15.65 +.16
Neuberger Berman
FocusInv +6.2 +1.8 21.34 16.07 20.83 +.52
GenesAdv b +12.1 +9.2 31.21 21.93 30.96 +.46
GenesisInv +12.4 +9.6 37.62 26.35 37.33 +.56
GenesisTr +12.3 +9.5 53.91 37.80 53.50 +.80
GuardnInv +6.9 +5.3 16.40 11.98 15.85 +.16
PartnerTr b +4.4 +3.3 22.96 16.81 22.09 +.56
PartnrAdv b +4.4 +3.2 19.80 14.51 19.05 +.49
PartnrInv +4.5 +3.5 29.93 21.90 28.81 +.74
SmCpGrInv +13.9 +7.2 20.82 13.49 20.37 +.19
SocRespInv +6.9 +5.9 28.13 20.57 27.23 +.35
SocRespTr b +6.9 +5.7 19.27 14.11 18.65 +.25
New Covenant
Growth +6.3 +2.7 33.62 25.62 32.83 +.63
Income +2.9 +3.0 23.20 22.35 22.90 -.01
Nicholas
Nichol +8.8 +6.5 49.59 37.98 47.32 +.29
Northeast Investors
Northeast +4.9 +4.1 6.42 5.84 6.29 +.05
Northern
BdIndx +3.3 NA 10.88 10.35 10.68 -.02
FixedIn +3.7 +6.0 10.72 10.02 10.34 -.01
GlbREIdx d +7.1 NA 8.91 7.01 8.81 +.22
HYFixInc d +5.9 +7.3 7.55 6.99 7.43 +.03
HiYMuni +5.4 +1.0 8.46 7.64 8.12 +.02
IncomeEq +6.7 +6.7 13.24 10.46 12.84 +.16
IntTaxE +4.7 +4.3 10.74 9.76 10.28 ...
IntlIndex d +5.4 +2.0 11.58 10.10 11.13 +.34
MMIntlEq d +3.0 +2.5 10.60 8.43 10.24 +.24
MMMidCap +9.7 +7.1 13.04 9.32 12.78 +.21
MMSmCp +8.1 +4.5 11.40 7.76 11.16 +.21
MdCapIndx +9.9 +8.1 13.43 12.31 13.15 +.21
ShIntUSGv +1.3 +4.4 10.73 10.24 10.45 -.01
SmCapIdx +7.9 +5.7 9.52 6.57 9.29 +.15
SmCapVal +7.8 +5.1 16.57 11.87 16.35 +.25
StkIdx +7.9 +3.6 16.89 13.00 16.66 +.36
TaxE +6.0 +4.6 10.95 9.68 10.38 ...
Nuveen
HiYldMunA m +7.0 -1.4 16.07 13.77 14.94 +.04
HiYldMunC m +6.7 -1.9 16.06 13.76 14.93 +.04
IntlValA m +.4 +4.1 27.27 22.60 26.17 +.62
LtdTmMuA m +3.7 +4.3 11.09 10.68 11.02 +.01
LtdTmMuC m +3.5 +3.9 11.05 10.64 10.98 +.01
NWQVlOppA m +3.6 +10.9 36.81 30.06 36.32 +.45
NWQVlOppC m +3.1 +10.1 35.93 29.34 35.39 +.43
Oakmark
EqIncI +6.8 +7.3 29.81 24.53 29.62 +.36
GlSelI d +7.6 NA 12.39 9.26 11.91 +.24
Global I d +2.6 +5.7 23.93 18.55 23.06 +.47
Intl I d +3.3 +5.5 21.01 16.49 20.05 +.52
IntlSmCpI d +.5 +4.9 15.20 11.76 14.44 +.26
Oakmark I d +7.7 +6.0 45.29 34.94 44.50 +.76
Select I d +9.5 +3.8 30.73 23.20 30.07 +.44
Old Mutual Advisor F
FocusedZ d +6.7 +5.5 22.80 17.87 22.50 +.44
Old Westbury
FixedInc +2.9 +6.5 12.00 11.47 11.75 -.02
GlbSmMdCp +7.6 +11.1 16.95 12.69 16.33 +.30
LgCapEq +4.1 +1.8 13.05 10.18 12.68 +.32
MuniBd +2.9 +4.7 12.43 11.56 11.88 +.01
NonUSLgCp +3.1 +2.2 11.63 8.48 10.95 +.30
RealRet +1.2 +5.8 11.60 8.93 10.83 +.05
Olstein
AllCpVlC m +3.3 +1.3 13.43 10.19 12.98 +.11
Oppenheimer
AMTFrMunA m +9.2 -2.7 6.64 5.63 6.26 +.03
AMTFrMunC m +8.6 -3.5 6.60 5.60 6.22 +.02
ActAllocA m +5.2 +1.7 10.29 8.31 10.09 +.15
ActAllocC m +4.8 +1.0 10.08 8.13 9.87 +.15
AmtFrNYA m +5.2 +2.3 12.06 10.25 10.95 +.02
BalA m +4.6 -1.2 10.69 9.06 10.49 +.06
CAMuniA m +7.9 -1.1 8.31 7.11 7.76 +.02
CapApA m +8.4 +3.7 47.30 35.63 47.25 +1.01
CapApB m +7.9 +2.8 41.60 31.57 41.54 +.89
CapApC m +7.9 +2.9 41.32 31.33 41.25 +.87
CapApprY +8.7 +4.1 49.53 37.18 49.48 +1.06
CapIncA m +6.7 -.4 9.02 8.05 8.96 +.07
ChampIncA m +5.4 -19.9 2.02 1.83 1.96 ...
CmdtStTRA m +6.8 -8.9 4.25 3.00 3.91 +.05
CmdtStTRY +7.1 -8.5 4.26 3.02 3.93 +.05
CoreBondY +4.7 -2.3 6.62 6.39 6.57 ...
DevMktA m -1.9 +15.4 37.42 29.06 35.77 +.64
DevMktN m -2.2 +14.9 36.17 28.13 34.54 +.61
DevMktY -1.8 +15.7 37.05 28.77 35.43 +.63
DevMktsC m -2.3 +14.6 35.91 28.00 34.27 +.60
DiscoverA m +18.2 +10.6 68.32 41.91 66.64 +.74
EqIncA m +5.6 +6.4 26.53 20.39 25.65 +.36
EquityA m +7.1 +3.7 9.59 7.25 9.46 +.17
GlobA m +6.9 +5.0 67.42 50.89 64.56 +1.37
GlobC m +6.5 +4.2 63.28 47.72 60.50 +1.28
GlobOpprA m +6.0 +7.4 32.57 25.04 31.51 +1.08
GlobOpprC m +5.6 +6.6 30.08 23.10 29.06 +1.00
GlobY +7.1 +5.4 67.57 51.06 64.74 +1.38
GoldMinA m -.2 +21.9 51.45 33.84 49.72 +.69
GoldMinC m -.6 +20.9 48.74 32.22 47.00 +.64
IntlBondA m +5.4 +9.3 7.04 6.37 6.77 +.08
IntlBondC m +5.0 +8.5 7.01 6.34 6.75 +.08
IntlBondY +5.5 +9.7 7.04 6.37 6.77 +.08
IntlDivA m +2.1 +6.8 13.03 10.34 12.53 +.27
IntlDivC m +1.7 +6.0 12.75 10.12 12.25 +.27
IntlGrY +7.7 +7.4 30.92 23.33 30.05 +.66
IntlGrowA m +7.4 +6.9 31.05 23.40 30.15 +.66
IntlSmCoA m -4.7 +9.5 24.84 17.15 23.49 +.43
IntlSmCoY -4.5 +9.9 24.68 17.00 23.39 +.43
LmtTmMunA m +4.7 +3.2 14.70 13.88 14.45 ...
LmtTmMunC m +4.2 +2.4 14.64 13.82 14.40 +.01
LtdTmGovA m +1.4 +3.3 9.47 9.30 9.39 +.01
LtdTmGovY +1.5 +3.5 9.46 9.30 9.38 +.01
LtdTmNY m +3.9 +3.9 3.34 3.14 3.26 ...
LtdTmNY m +3.1 +3.1 3.32 3.13 3.24 ...
MainSSMCA m +8.9 +5.2 22.74 15.99 22.24 +.37
MainSSMCC m +8.4 +4.4 20.52 14.52 20.06 +.33
MainSSMCY +9.0 +5.6 23.92 16.82 23.39 +.39
MainStSelA m +1.8 +2.6 13.18 10.63 13.00 +.31
MainStrA m +4.6 +2.6 34.21 27.06 33.89 +.72
MainStrC m +4.2 +1.8 33.00 26.10 32.65 +.70
ModInvA m +5.4 +.5 9.27 7.88 9.17 +.11
PAMuniA m +5.9 +2.1 11.37 9.89 10.58 +.02
QuBalA m +5.2 +3.4 16.43 13.50 16.18 +.25
QuOpportA m +3.2 +5.5 28.00 24.17 27.23 +.14
RisDivA m +9.1 +5.4 16.91 13.15 16.82 +.39
RisDivY +9.3 +5.8 17.30 13.45 17.21 +.40
RocMuniA m +5.7 +2.6 16.91 14.49 15.55 +.02
RocMuniC m +5.2 +1.7 16.88 14.47 15.52 +.02
RochNtlMC m +8.1 -4.9 7.36 6.25 6.88 +.01
RochNtlMu m +8.5 -4.1 7.37 6.27 6.90 +.01
SmMidValA m +7.1 +4.0 35.48 25.48 34.33 +.39
SrFltRatA m +3.6 +4.4 8.42 8.05 8.35 ...
SrFltRatC m +3.2 +3.9 8.43 8.00 8.35 ...
StrIncA m +5.4 +7.8 4.45 4.12 4.37 +.02
StrIncY +5.7 +8.1 4.44 4.12 4.37 +.03
StratIncC m +4.9 +6.9 4.44 4.11 4.36 +.02
USGovtA m +3.3 +5.3 9.65 9.23 9.47 -.01
ValueA m +5.8 +2.9 24.01 17.94 23.09 +.35
ValueY +6.0 +3.3 24.49 18.33 23.58 +.36
Osterweis
OsterStrInc d +3.6 +7.9 11.92 11.48 11.78 +.02
Osterweis d +4.7 +5.4 29.59 23.67 28.38 +.42
PIMCO
AllAssetA m +5.5 +6.8 12.77 11.82 12.47 +.06
AllAssetC m +5.1 +6.1 12.63 11.70 12.33 +.06
AllAssetsD b +5.7 +7.0 12.79 11.84 12.50 +.06
AllAuthA m +5.3 +7.7 11.28 10.43 10.90 +.03
AllAuthC m +4.8 +6.9 11.19 10.34 10.80 +.03
CmRlRtStA m +7.4 +4.7 9.54 6.96 9.10 +.06
CmRlRtStC m +7.0 +3.9 9.35 6.84 8.91 +.06
CmRlRtStD b +7.4 +4.7 9.57 6.98 9.12 +.05
DevLocMktD b +5.2 +7.0 11.27 9.98 11.07 +.09
EmgMktA m +4.9 +8.3 11.66 10.87 11.32 +.05
ForUnhgA m +7.5 +9.4 11.62 10.29 11.21 +.06
ForUnhgD b +7.5 +9.4 11.62 10.29 11.21 +.06
GNMAA m +3.8 +7.4 11.79 11.25 11.73 -.01
Hi-YldD b +5.4 +7.7 9.54 8.98 9.44 +.05
HiYldA m +5.4 +7.7 9.54 8.98 9.44 +.05
HiYldC m +5.0 +6.9 9.54 8.98 9.44 +.05
LowDrA m +2.2 +5.5 10.77 10.27 10.51 +.01
LowDrC m +2.1 +5.0 10.77 10.27 10.51 +.01
LowDurD b +2.3 +5.6 10.77 10.27 10.51 +.01
RealRetD b +6.8 +7.2 11.91 11.06 11.84 +.02
RealRtnA m +6.8 +7.2 11.91 11.06 11.84 +.02
RealRtnC m +6.5 +6.7 11.91 11.06 11.84 +.02
ShtTermA m +.8 +3.2 9.95 9.85 9.89 -.01
ShtTermD b +.8 +3.2 9.95 9.85 9.89 -.01
TotRetA m +3.5 +8.4 11.77 10.69 11.05 +.01
TotRetB m +3.1 +7.5 11.77 10.69 11.05 +.01
TotRetC m +3.1 +7.5 11.77 10.69 11.05 +.01
TotRetrnD b +3.6 +8.5 11.77 10.69 11.05 +.01
PRIMECAP Odyssey
AggGr d +12.8 +11.0 18.79 13.61 18.58 +.36
Growth d +9.4 +7.2 17.24 12.44 16.84 +.31
Stock d +6.5 +5.5 15.48 11.95 15.09 +.20
Pacific
PortOptCA m +5.7 +5.6 12.21 10.33 12.12 +.18
Parnassus
EqIncInv +7.8 +8.5 28.61 22.51 28.18 +.54
Parnassus +2.8 +8.4 45.09 32.51 41.60 +1.59
Pax World
Bal b +6.4 +3.9 24.21 19.32 23.62 +.28
Payden
CoreBd +3.3 +5.7 10.75 10.36 10.61 +.02
EmMktBd d +6.1 +9.3 15.02 14.02 14.74 +.12
GNMA +4.0 +7.1 10.60 10.14 10.49 ...
HighInc d +5.3 +6.4 7.43 7.03 7.35 +.04
ShortBd +1.7 +4.3 10.25 10.11 10.16 +.01
Permanent
Portfolio +8.9 +11.3 49.87 39.69 49.87 +.53
Perritt
MicroCap d +2.0 +4.1 29.58 21.28 27.98 +.20
Pioneer
Bond A m +4.0 +7.2 9.76 9.47 9.69 -.01
CulValA m +4.4 +2.3 19.73 15.59 18.94 +.26
CulValC m +3.9 +1.5 19.53 15.39 18.71 +.26
EqInc A m +10.3 +3.3 28.07 21.35 27.74 +.46
GlobHiYA m +4.9 +7.6 10.95 9.88 10.64 +.05
GlobHiYC m +4.5 +6.8 10.91 9.84 10.60 +.05
GrOppA m +12.4 +7.0 31.21 21.40 30.66 +.20
HiIncMunA m +5.5 NA 8.02 7.16 7.61 +.03
HiYldA m +6.6 +8.3 10.82 9.05 10.55 +.10
HiYldC m +6.1 +7.6 11.00 9.20 10.72 +.10
IndependA m +11.0 +3.5 12.46 8.86 12.46 +.30
MidCpValA m +6.3 +4.8 23.06 17.35 22.46 +.43
MuniA m +6.6 +3.9 13.69 12.07 13.03 +.04
PioneerA m +5.2 +3.5 43.93 33.29 42.93 +.67
SmCapEq m +13.8 +9.9 33.14 22.08 32.98 +.90
StratIncA m +4.1 +8.3 11.17 10.65 11.08 +.03
StratIncC m +3.6 +7.6 10.93 10.43 10.84 +.03
ValueA m +3.5 -1.6 12.26 9.65 11.73 +.24
Principal
BdMtgInst +4.6 +5.2 10.69 10.22 10.61 -.01
CaptApprtnA m +6.8 +5.4 41.71 32.77 41.18 +.82
DivIntI +5.6 +2.5 11.00 8.34 10.69 +.26
EqIncA m +6.8 +3.1 18.88 15.27 18.38 +.31
HiYldA m +5.6 +9.0 8.24 7.83 8.08 +.02
HiYldC m +5.1 +8.2 8.30 7.88 8.13 +.01
HiYldII +5.6 +10.1 11.77 10.63 11.32 +.06
InfProI +6.8 +1.5 8.31 7.78 8.28 ...
IntIInst +5.8 +2.3 12.63 9.69 12.21 +.39
IntlGrthI +6.2 +.4 9.76 7.42 9.54 +.21
L/T2010I +6.0 +3.7 11.92 10.19 11.84 +.13
L/T2020I +6.9 +4.1 12.56 10.37 12.47 +.20
L/T2020J m +6.7 +3.7 12.51 10.32 12.41 +.20
L/T2030I +7.2 +4.1 12.53 10.07 12.40 +.22
L/T2030J m +7.0 +3.6 12.51 10.04 12.37 +.22
L/T2040I +7.2 +4.0 12.79 10.05 12.62 +.25
L/T2050I +7.4 +3.9 12.31 9.53 12.13 +.25
L/TSIInst +5.2 +3.2 11.14 10.20 11.14 +.06
LCBIIInst +6.5 +4.0 10.36 7.96 10.19 +.22
LCGIIInst +8.8 +6.8 9.03 6.87 9.01 +.20
LCGrIInst +9.8 +8.3 10.21 7.36 10.18 +.25
LCIIIInst +5.8 -1.1 11.15 8.61 10.79 +.20
LCVlIInst +6.7 +.2 11.53 8.98 11.32 +.20
LgCGrInst +6.1 +5.3 8.82 6.55 8.69 +.16
LgCSP500I +8.0 +3.6 9.58 7.37 9.49 +.20
LgCValI +8.9 +1.3 10.37 7.86 10.15 +.22
MCVlIInst +6.8 +6.0 14.30 10.62 13.94 +.24
MGIIIInst +11.7 +8.4 12.11 8.13 11.87 +.22
MidCapBleA m +12.7 +8.9 15.14 11.53 14.94 +.15
MortSecA m +3.0 +6.0 11.34 10.91 11.16 ...
PrSecInst +5.8 +6.5 10.32 9.42 10.14 -.02
ReEstSecI +16.7 +4.3 18.74 13.91 18.74 +.54
SAMBalA m +5.7 +5.7 13.54 11.43 13.37 +.16
SAMBalC m +5.3 +4.9 13.40 11.31 13.24 +.16
SAMConGrA m +6.3 +4.7 14.65 11.75 14.43 +.23
SAMConGrB m +5.9 +3.9 14.12 11.29 13.89 +.22
SAMConGrC m +6.0 +3.9 13.93 11.15 13.70 +.22
SAMFleIncA m +4.6 +6.1 11.70 10.79 11.65 +.06
SAMStrGrA m +6.9 +4.2 16.18 12.51 15.89 +.30
SCGrIInst +12.5 +9.7 12.54 7.90 12.15 +.20
SCValIII +6.8 +4.0 10.63 7.41 10.32 +.15
Prudential Investmen
2020FocA m +10.4 +7.7 17.54 12.79 17.54 +.50
2020FocC m +9.9 +6.9 15.71 11.53 15.71 +.44
2020FocZ +10.6 +8.0 18.17 13.21 18.17 +.52
BlendA m +9.5 +6.2 19.01 13.90 18.85 +.44
EqIncC m +7.0 +7.7 13.79 10.94 13.38 +.26
EqOppA m +7.6 +5.3 15.19 11.34 14.93 +.30
GblRealEstZ +8.5 +2.5 20.61 16.21 20.51 +.54
GovtIncA m +3.1 +6.0 9.83 9.44 9.74 -.01
HiYieldA m +5.9 +8.7 5.65 5.30 5.60 +.02
HlthSciA m +20.0 +11.7 27.93 18.90 27.93 +.33
IntlEqtyA m +7.4 -.1 6.85 5.30 6.65 +.21
IntlValA m +5.6 +2.8 22.79 17.62 21.75 +.61
JenMidCapGrA m+10.7 +9.6 30.80 22.31 30.32 +.37
JenMidCapGrZ +11.0 +9.9 31.96 23.09 31.47 +.39
JennGrA m +12.1 +7.3 20.23 14.59 20.23 +.50
JennGrZ +12.2 +7.6 21.02 15.13 21.02 +.51
NatlMuniA m +5.4 +3.9 15.05 13.73 14.56 +.01
NaturResA m +4.9 +12.5 62.22 41.62 59.88 +1.98
ShTmCoBdA m +2.7 +6.1 11.72 11.42 11.52 -.02
SmallCoA m +10.1 +8.1 22.83 15.68 22.36 +.33
SmallCoZ +10.3 +8.3 23.86 16.38 23.38 +.35
StkIndexI +8.1 +3.7 30.18 23.29 29.90 +.65
TotRetBdA m +5.2 +8.0 14.36 13.67 14.22 +.01
UtilityA m +9.5 +3.5 11.30 9.02 11.09 +.15
ValueA m +7.0 +2.8 16.32 12.22 15.76 +.40
ValueZ +7.2 +3.1 16.34 12.25 15.79 +.40
Purisima
TotReturn b +6.1 +3.8 21.99 16.06 21.51 +.43
Putnam
AmGovtInA m +4.2 +8.0 9.88 9.44 9.67 -.05
AstAlBalA m +5.9 +4.3 11.69 9.87 11.47 +.15
AstAlConA m +4.6 +4.6 9.57 8.79 9.50 +.06
AstAlGrA m +6.2 +4.0 13.36 10.76 13.06 +.23
CATxEIncA m +5.0 +3.6 8.12 7.22 7.65 +.03
ConvInGrA m +5.2 +6.5 21.47 17.61 20.96 +.22
DivIncTrC m +2.2 +4.1 8.17 7.83 7.87 +.02
DivrInA m +2.7 +4.9 8.28 7.92 7.98 +.02
EqIncomeA m +7.8 +4.8 16.67 12.65 16.09 +.25
EqIncomeY +8.0 +5.1 16.67 12.65 16.09 +.25
GeoPutA m +5.6 -.2 12.69 10.83 12.50 +.14
GlbEqA m +12.5 +2.4 9.94 7.29 9.82 +.26
GlbHltCrA m +11.7 +4.6 51.85 39.44 50.03 +.30
GrowIncA m +4.6 +.5 14.68 11.17 14.10 +.29
GrowIncB m +4.2 -.3 14.41 10.96 13.85 +.29
HiYldA m +5.7 +8.2 8.00 7.39 7.86 +.01
HiYldAdvA m +5.5 +8.3 6.16 5.73 6.05 ...
IncomeA m +5.0 +7.7 6.97 6.68 6.87 -.03
IntlCpOpA m +4.3 +6.1 38.57 27.92 37.19 +1.22
IntlEqA m +6.2 +1.2 21.83 16.70 21.29 +.81
InvestorA m +7.1 +1.4 13.95 10.55 13.67 +.29
MultiCapGrA m +7.9 +5.0 55.49 40.00 54.91 +1.30
MultiCapVal m +5.0 +3.8 13.49 9.71 13.04 +.20
NYTxEIncA m +4.3 +4.0 8.74 7.98 8.40 +.01
TaxEIncA m +5.1 +4.0 8.73 7.29 8.42 +.01
TaxFHYldA m +5.4 +3.2 12.07 10.96 11.56 +.06
USGovtInA m +4.3 +8.4 14.44 13.94 14.30 -.02
VoyagerA m +.8 +9.0 25.49 18.99 23.90 +.61
VoyagerY +.9 +9.3 26.54 19.80 24.91 +.63
RS
GlNatResA m +9.4 +8.7 41.60 28.69 41.13 +1.12
PartnersA m +3.8 +4.5 36.00 25.54 34.34 +.12
SmCpGrthA m +15.0 +9.6 49.04 31.64 47.94 +.34
ValueA m +2.0 +4.2 27.62 20.74 26.42 +.49
RS Funds
CoreEqA m +2.4 +7.2 45.58 35.20 43.52 +.64
EmgMktsA m -2.2 +12.3 27.44 22.46 26.16 +.43
Rainier
CoreEq b +7.0 +3.6 27.05 20.17 26.73 +.67
SmMidCap b +12.3 +5.6 37.20 25.11 36.67 +.69
RidgeWorth
CapAprI +12.0 +7.3 12.14 8.45 12.14 +.38
HiIncI +7.4 +10.6 7.41 6.58 7.32 +.03
HighYI +6.4 +7.6 10.19 9.38 10.04 +.02
IntlEIxI +6.9 +1.2 14.44 11.26 13.72 +.50
IntmBndI +3.3 +6.7 11.03 10.27 10.57 -.03
InvGrBdI +4.4 +5.4 12.56 11.51 12.03 ...
LgCpVaEqI +5.1 +4.6 13.79 10.60 13.40 +.22
MdCpVlEqI +5.6 +9.8 13.15 9.21 12.45 +.24
SmCapEqI +7.9 +8.3 15.12 11.04 14.74 +.20
SmCapGrI +13.6 +6.4 17.87 11.51 17.49 +.26
TtlRetBndI +3.9 +7.2 11.17 10.28 10.61 -.01
USGovBndI +.9 +3.9 10.11 10.05 10.10 ...
RiverNorth
CoreOpp m +5.8 NA 12.99 11.85 12.89 +.17
Royce
LowStkSer m +7.1 +10.9 19.92 13.46 19.56 +.40
MicrCapIv d +6.3 +9.9 19.30 13.50 18.68 +.28
OpportInv d +2.7 +6.8 13.10 8.83 12.41 +.14
PAMutCnslt m +8.1 +6.5 11.80 8.24 11.47 +.17
PAMutInv d +8.8 +7.6 13.00 9.06 12.67 +.20
PremierInv d +11.4 +11.3 22.95 15.84 22.67 +.44
SpecEqInv d +4.8 +9.7 22.54 16.68 21.87 +.32
TotRetInv d +6.9 +6.2 14.28 10.72 14.02 +.17
ValPlSvc m +6.4 +5.3 14.72 10.56 14.28 +.20
ValueSvc m +8.2 +9.8 14.21 9.61 13.69 +.28
Russell
EmgMktsS +1.4 +12.5 21.93 17.32 21.12 +.31
GlRelEstS +8.2 +1.7 38.69 31.49 38.50 +.96
GlbEqtyS +6.6 NA 9.68 7.32 9.47 +.24
InvGrdBdS +3.5 NA 22.89 21.41 22.10 +.01
ItlDvMktS +4.3 NA 34.64 26.91 33.04 +.97
ShDurBdS +1.7 +4.6 19.51 19.12 19.35 +.02
StratBdS +3.7 NA 11.32 10.68 10.99 ...
TaxExBdS +3.7 +4.5 22.80 21.61 22.29 +.02
TxMgdLgCS +8.8 +4.3 21.54 15.88 21.35 +.45
USCoreEqS +6.0 NA 30.16 22.72 29.48 +.56
USQntvEqS +11.4 NA 32.13 23.94 31.83 +.61
USSmMdCpS +7.9 NA 25.30 17.46 24.64 +.37
Russell LifePoints
BalStrA m +5.2 +4.7 11.09 9.46 10.91 +.15
BalStrC b +4.8 +3.9 11.00 9.40 10.82 +.15
BalStrS +5.3 +5.0 11.18 9.53 11.00 +.16
BlStrR3 b +5.2 +4.5 11.12 9.49 10.94 +.15
EqGrStrC b +5.5 +1.9 9.39 7.31 9.14 +.19
GrStrA m +5.7 +3.9 10.69 8.65 10.46 +.19
GrStrC b +5.3 +3.1 10.55 8.57 10.31 +.18
GrStrR3 b +5.7 +3.6 10.73 8.69 10.49 +.19
Rydex
Nsdq100Iv +9.3 +10.4 15.82 11.56 15.82 +.47
Rydex/SGI
MCapValA m +6.9 +7.7 35.77 26.94 34.59 +.77
MgFtrStrH b -2.3 NA 26.76 23.75 25.19 +.14
SEI
DlyShDurA +1.4 +4.7 10.72 10.53 10.67 ...
SSGA
EmgMkts b +2.3 +10.1 23.98 18.68 23.09 +.41
EmgMktsSel b +2.4 +10.3 24.06 18.76 23.19 +.42
IntlStkSl b +5.5 +1.1 11.17 8.68 10.64 +.35
S&P500Idx b +7.9 +3.7 22.42 17.27 22.11 +.48
Schwab
1000Inv d +8.1 +4.1 40.64 31.49 40.20 +.85
CoreEqInv d +8.6 +3.5 18.63 13.81 18.27 +.35
DivEqSel d +8.7 +3.3 14.09 10.87 13.85 +.23
FUSLgCInl d +6.5 NA 10.51 8.02 10.27 +.19
FUSSMCIns d +7.4 NA 11.78 8.11 11.53 +.16
GNMA +4.0 +6.7 10.48 10.04 10.44 ...
HlthCFoc d +16.6 +6.5 18.58 13.71 18.50 +.20
IntlIndex d +6.4 +2.5 19.10 14.97 18.34 +.57
MktTrAlEq d +7.7 +4.0 13.06 9.86 12.72 +.30
MktTrBal d +5.8 +4.2 16.16 13.76 16.07 +.22
PremInc d +3.1 NA 10.54 10.16 10.40 -.02
S&P500Sel d +8.0 +3.8 21.33 16.50 21.14 +.46
SmCapIdx d +9.4 +7.7 23.55 16.26 23.09 +.37
TaxFreeBd +5.0 +5.0 11.72 10.95 11.46 +.01
TotBdMkt +3.2 +3.6 9.45 9.05 9.34 -.01
TotStkMSl d +8.5 +4.7 24.91 18.93 24.68 +.52
Trgt2030 d +7.6 +5.2 12.32 9.88 12.24 +.21
Scout
Interntl d +4.5 +6.7 35.42 27.24 33.66 +.72
Selected
AmerShS b +4.3 +2.3 44.52 34.76 43.22 +1.11
American D +4.5 +2.7 44.53 34.80 43.27 +1.12
Sentinel
CmnStkA m +7.9 +5.2 34.23 26.03 33.72 +.70
GovtSecA m +3.0 +6.8 11.24 10.34 10.63 -.02
ShMatGovA m +1.5 +4.5 9.38 9.17 9.25 -.03
SmallCoA m +14.2 +9.2 8.96 6.17 8.85 +.13
Sequoia
Sequoia +13.9 +6.9147.36 114.29 147.25 +2.29
Sit
USGovSec +2.2 +6.1 11.39 11.19 11.35 -.03
Sound Shore
SoundShor +3.6 +2.6 34.47 26.44 32.84 +.60
Spectra
Spectra A m +11.0 +13.3 13.59 9.71 13.52 +.35
Stadion
MgdPortA m -5.5 NA 11.00 9.41 9.72 -.01
State Farm
Balanced +5.1 +5.8 57.34 50.11 56.07 +.54
Growth +6.3 +5.0 57.76 45.34 55.80 +.88
MuniBond +4.7 +5.3 8.91 8.35 8.67 -.01
Stratton
SmCapVal d +12.6 +5.7 55.88 38.59 55.86 +1.19
T Rowe Price
Balanced +6.7 +5.8 20.55 17.14 20.37 +.33
BlChpGAdv b +10.2 +6.3 42.05 30.34 41.99 +.95
BlChpGr +10.4 +6.5 42.14 30.36 42.08 +.96
CapApprec +7.0 +6.8 21.83 18.05 21.73 +.32
CorpInc +5.0 +6.8 10.11 9.48 9.85 -.02
DivGrow +7.7 +4.8 24.86 19.18 24.47 +.38
DivrSmCap d +13.8 +10.5 18.37 11.80 18.01 +.33
EmEurMed d -.7 +4.3 24.84 18.17 23.27 +.21
EmMktBd d +5.4 +8.9 13.86 12.93 13.48 +.07
EmMktStk d +1.0 +10.5 36.99 29.23 35.62 +.47
EqIndex d +7.9 +3.6 36.77 28.29 36.26 +.78
EqtyInc +5.5 +3.2 25.53 20.00 24.78 +.47
EqtyIncAd b +5.3 +3.0 25.49 19.95 24.73 +.47
EurStock d +8.8 +5.4 17.41 12.35 16.32 +.44
ExtMktIdx d +9.3 +7.4 18.09 12.61 17.74 +.31
FinSer -2.2 -2.9 15.40 11.94 13.86 +.37
GNMA +3.4 +6.5 10.10 9.76 10.05 ...
GlbTech +11.6 +14.0 10.79 7.21 10.51 +.28
GloStk d +5.3 +3.3 19.20 15.07 19.02 +.52
GrStkAdv b +8.7 +6.1 34.77 25.39 34.67 +.81
GrStkR b +8.6 +5.8 34.34 25.13 34.24 +.81
GrowInc +7.3 +4.4 21.84 16.74 21.54 +.40
GrowStk +8.9 +6.3 35.09 25.59 35.00 +.83
HealthSci +22.3 +12.5 37.03 24.70 37.03 +.68
HiYield d +5.6 +8.5 7.00 6.50 6.88 +.03
HiYldAdv m +5.4 +8.3 6.99 6.49 6.87 +.03
InflPrtBd +7.0 +6.7 12.79 11.71 12.74 +.02
IntlBnd d +6.7 +7.2 10.66 9.65 10.47 +.12
IntlBndAd m +6.7 +6.9 10.65 9.64 10.46 +.12
IntlDisc d +6.4 +7.4 47.45 36.25 46.69 +.96
IntlEqIdx d +6.4 +2.9 13.08 10.19 12.56 +.37
IntlGrInc d +7.4 +3.0 14.86 11.37 14.30 +.43
IntlStk d +4.4 +5.3 15.35 12.00 14.86 +.35
IntlStkAd m +4.4 +5.1 15.29 11.98 14.80 +.34
LatinAm d -7.1 +15.5 57.59 45.71 52.69 +1.07
MDTaxFBd +4.7 +4.4 10.77 9.89 10.38 +.01
MdCpVlAdv b +7.0 +7.0 25.58 19.80 25.26 +.61
MediaTele +11.3 +14.3 58.18 41.30 57.59 +.96
MidCapVa +7.1 +7.3 25.71 19.92 25.40 +.62
MidCpGr +8.3 +10.2 65.35 47.74 63.39 +1.25
MidCpGrAd b +8.2 +9.9 64.12 46.94 62.16 +1.22
NewAmGro +8.2 +9.4 36.02 26.47 35.68 +.55
NewAsia d +5.2 +17.9 20.17 16.56 20.17 +.38
NewEra +6.7 +8.3 58.14 39.38 55.66 +1.92
NewHoriz +14.1 +10.3 39.08 25.75 38.21 +.63
NewIncome +3.1 +6.9 9.81 9.36 9.60 -.01
OrseaStk d +7.1 NA 9.24 7.10 8.93 +.25
PerStrBal +6.8 +6.6 20.30 16.79 20.13 +.33
PerStrGr +7.6 +5.6 24.84 19.49 24.66 +.50
PerStrInc +5.6 +6.7 16.86 14.70 16.76 +.20
R2015 +6.3 +6.0 12.72 10.61 12.64 +.20
R2025 +6.8 +5.8 12.99 10.37 12.86 +.24
R2035 +7.2 +5.6 13.28 10.26 13.11 +.28
Real d +16.0 +3.0 20.10 14.78 20.10 +.55
Ret2020R b +6.2 +5.3 17.43 14.18 17.26 +.29
Ret2050 +7.1 NA 10.58 8.17 10.43 +.22
RetInc +5.2 +5.9 13.71 12.17 13.60 +.14
Retir2005 +5.6 +6.2 12.00 10.55 11.98 +.14
Rtmt2010 +5.9 +6.0 16.31 14.00 16.24 +.21
Rtmt2020 +6.6 +5.9 17.67 14.38 17.52 +.31
Rtmt2030 +7.0 +5.7 18.71 14.67 18.49 +.37
Rtmt2040 +7.1 +5.6 18.92 14.60 18.66 +.40
Rtmt2045 +7.1 +5.6 12.60 9.73 12.43 +.26
SciTecAdv b +9.0 +11.7 29.88 20.88 29.12 +.79
SciTech +9.1 +11.7 30.02 20.95 29.26 +.80
ShTmBond +1.5 +4.6 4.91 4.83 4.86 ...
SmCpStk +10.8 +8.7 38.74 26.97 38.16 +.62
SmCpVal d +7.8 +6.8 39.53 28.50 38.94 +.71
SmCpValAd m +7.6 +6.6 39.27 28.31 38.66 +.71
SpecGrow +7.5 +5.7 19.27 14.55 19.02 +.43
SpecInc +4.6 +7.2 12.70 11.98 12.64 +.06
SpecIntl d +6.1 +5.8 11.78 9.10 11.41 +.27
SumMuInc +5.1 +4.4 11.40 10.39 10.98 +.01
SumMuInt +4.7 +4.9 11.64 10.91 11.39 ...
TaxFHiYld +5.5 +3.1 11.09 10.04 10.65 +.02
TaxFInc +4.8 +4.4 10.17 9.29 9.80 +.01
TaxFShInt +2.7 +4.2 5.66 5.51 5.62 ...
TotMktIdx d +8.0 +4.4 15.50 11.75 15.32 +.32
TrRt2010Ad b +5.8 +5.8 16.23 13.93 16.16 +.22
TrRt2010R b +5.6 +5.5 16.14 13.84 16.06 +.21
TrRt2020Ad b +6.4 +5.6 17.56 14.29 17.40 +.30
TrRt2030Ad b +6.9 +5.4 18.59 14.57 18.36 +.37
TrRt2030R b +6.7 +5.2 18.49 14.48 18.25 +.37
TrRt2040Ad b +7.0 +5.4 18.79 14.49 18.53 +.40
TrRt2040R b +6.8 +5.1 18.70 14.42 18.43 +.39
TxFIncAdv b +4.5 +4.0 10.18 9.29 9.80 +.01
USBdEnIdx d +3.4 +6.6 11.43 10.95 11.29 -.01
USTrInt +4.4 +7.4 6.26 5.74 6.02 -.02
VATaxFBd +5.6 +4.5 11.91 10.87 11.53 +.01
Value +6.7 +3.6 25.63 19.58 24.90 +.60
ValueAd b +6.5 +3.5 25.36 19.40 24.62 +.59
TCW
DivFocN b +6.5 +2.2 11.63 8.57 11.22 +.23
EmgIncI +7.5 +12.8 8.99 8.24 8.97 +.08
RltvVlLCI +6.4 +1.9 14.92 10.93 14.38 +.32
SelEqI +11.7 +8.0 19.34 13.93 19.34 +.52
SmCapGrI +6.1 +12.3 33.27 22.57 31.13 -.03
TotRetBdI +3.6 +9.2 10.44 9.86 9.94 +.01
TotRetBdN b +3.5 +8.8 10.79 10.20 10.28 +.01
TFS
MktNeut d +5.0 +8.5 15.66 13.77 15.46 +.01
TIAA-CREF
EqIxRtl b +8.2 +4.3 10.62 8.05 10.50 +.22
Gr&IncRmt +10.3 +7.2 10.11 7.60 10.08 +.26
Gr&IncRtl b +10.3 +7.3 12.13 9.09 12.08 +.31
IntEqIdxRet d +5.8 +2.1 18.45 14.44 17.76 +.55
IntlEqRmt d +1.7 +3.0 11.12 8.05 10.39 +.16
LgGrRet b +9.9 +6.6 11.32 8.48 11.32 +.28
Life2010 b +5.7 +5.0 11.66 10.18 11.65 +.12
Life2015 b +6.1 +4.9 11.75 10.04 11.71 +.15
Life2020 b +6.3 +4.5 11.71 9.78 11.64 +.17
Life2025 b +6.7 +4.2 11.64 9.50 11.54 +.19
Life2030 b +6.9 +3.8 11.55 9.20 11.41 +.20
Life2035 b +7.3 +3.9 11.68 9.09 11.51 +.23
Life2040 b +7.2 +4.2 11.91 9.25 11.73 +.23
LrgeCapVal +4.4 +2.3 14.16 10.81 13.61 +.29
MdgAllRtl b +6.3 +5.0 10.47 8.87 10.39 +.15
MidCapGrwthRe +11.4 +8.9 21.53 14.69 21.07 +.31
MidValRmt +8.4 +5.5 18.75 13.90 18.41 +.34
ScChEqR +6.6 +4.3 11.77 9.06 11.59 +.18
SmCapEqRe d +10.2 +5.4 15.99 10.89 15.73 +.23
SmCpBlIdxRet d +7.9 +5.8 15.30 10.58 14.92 +.23
Target
SmCapVal +9.1 +7.5 22.86 16.52 22.46 +.31
Templeton
InFEqSeS +5.5 +4.7 22.33 17.59 21.15 +.68
Thomas White
ThmsWIntl d +5.6 +5.3 18.61 14.72 18.19 +.46
Thompson Plumb
Bond +4.0 +8.4 11.71 11.28 11.62 ...
Thornburg
IncBldA m +5.8 +7.8 20.23 17.32 19.56 +.42
IncBldC m +5.4 +7.1 20.23 17.32 19.56 +.42
IntlValA m +5.6 +6.5 30.95 23.52 29.42 +.64
IntlValC m +5.2 +5.8 29.10 22.18 27.67 +.61
LtdTMuA m +3.8 +4.6 14.34 13.83 14.27 +.01
LtdTMuC m +3.7 +4.3 14.37 13.85 14.30 +.01
LtdTmIncA m +4.1 +6.3 13.51 13.02 13.38 -.03
Value A m +6.9 +4.5 37.64 28.16 36.19 +.81
Thrivent
HiYieldA m +5.8 +8.1 4.97 4.62 4.91 +.02
IncomeA m +4.4 +6.2 8.88 8.48 8.81 -.01
LgCapStkA m +5.9 +2.1 23.91 18.25 23.54 +.52
MidCapA m +6.7 +6.0 16.67 11.47 16.01 +.31
MuniBdA m +5.1 +4.4 11.53 10.57 11.12 ...
Tocqueville
Gold m +4.3 +21.3 91.56 62.97 90.19 +1.48
Tocquevil m +6.2 +4.7 24.34 19.24 23.97 +.50
Touchstone
MdCpGrA m +8.2 +7.2 25.74 18.08 24.87 +.38
Transamerica
AssAllCvA m +5.0 +5.4 11.79 10.51 11.69 +.10
AssAllCvC m +4.7 +4.8 11.71 10.45 11.62 +.10
AssAllGrA m +6.4 +3.5 13.00 9.94 12.76 +.26
AssAllGrC m +6.1 +2.9 12.71 9.71 12.46 +.25
AstAlMdGrA m +5.5 +4.5 12.77 10.45 12.56 +.21
AstAlMdGrC m +5.2 +3.8 12.72 10.38 12.49 +.20
AstAlModA m +5.5 +5.2 12.40 10.65 12.30 +.15
AstAlModC m +5.2 +4.6 12.35 10.59 12.23 +.15
SysSMCpVA m +10.9 +11.5 24.22 15.52 23.68 +.42
TransEqA m +7.1 +2.9 10.36 7.50 10.22 +.25
Transamerica Partner
CoreBd b +3.2 +6.2 11.17 10.68 10.93 -.01
CrBond b +3.1 +5.9 13.19 12.69 12.95 -.01
StockIdx b +8.0 +3.6 9.12 7.02 9.00 +.20
Trust for Credit Un
TCUShDur +.9 +3.8 9.79 9.69 9.76 -.01
TCUUltrShGov +.4 +3.1 9.62 9.59 9.61 ...
Turner
MidGrInv +10.4 +8.5 39.79 26.53 38.88 +.77
Tweedy Browne
GlobVal d +3.3 +4.5 25.26 21.18 24.61 +.50
Tweedy, Browne
Value +4.2 +4.4 20.15 16.46 19.72 +.37
UBS
GlobAllA m +4.1 +3.3 10.59 8.99 10.39 +.21
UBS PACE
AltStrP d +.7 +.8 9.91 9.03 9.49 +.06
GlFxIP d +6.9 +7.3 12.43 11.21 12.38 +.12
GvtSecP d +3.2 +6.8 13.84 12.94 13.26 -.04
IntlEqP d +7.0 +.9 14.17 11.16 13.67 +.35
LgCoVlP d +5.6 +2.1 18.21 13.94 17.68 +.32
LrCoGrP d +8.7 +5.7 19.85 14.45 19.66 +.41
PcIntFIP d +2.9 +5.4 12.24 11.82 12.10 -.04
SmMdGrP d +13.3 +9.2 18.48 11.79 18.10 +.38
SmMdVlP d +6.1 +5.4 18.95 13.34 18.33 +.22
StrFInP d +4.7 +8.9 15.06 13.94 14.42 -.07
US Global Investors
GlobRes m +3.5 +6.8 13.01 8.22 12.33 +.33
WrldPrcMnr m -10.6 +10.1 22.94 14.75 19.92 +.36
USAA
AggGrow +9.0 +4.6 36.19 26.14 35.97 +.85
BalStrat +6.8 +4.9 14.37 12.10 14.09 +.14
CABond +6.6 +3.2 10.51 9.13 9.91 +.02
CapGrowth +6.0 +2.1 7.30 5.63 7.12 +.17
Cornerst +5.9 +5.0 24.31 20.48 23.95 +.27
EmergMkt -1.8 +10.3 22.33 17.84 21.23 +.35
ExtMktIdx +8.8 +7.1 14.01 10.10 13.74 +.22
GNMA +3.2 +6.4 10.35 10.03 10.30 +.01
Grow +6.9 +3.4 15.94 11.73 15.73 +.31
GrowInc +6.3 +3.6 16.29 12.31 15.92 +.34
HYOpp +6.4 +8.5 8.80 8.00 8.65 +.02
Income +4.1 +7.0 13.09 12.64 13.02 -.01
IncomeStk +9.5 +.6 13.29 10.09 13.02 +.18
IntermBd +5.5 +7.5 10.66 10.02 10.56 -.02
Intl +6.8 +5.2 26.98 20.53 25.97 +.77
PrcMtlMin +.3 +21.4 43.83 31.88 43.02 +.75
S&P500M +7.9 +3.6 20.43 15.74 20.15 +.44
ShTmBond +1.8 +5.2 9.27 9.15 9.20 ...
SmCapStk +9.0 +5.6 15.18 10.56 14.93 +.20
TaxEInt +5.4 +4.6 13.28 12.34 12.97 +.01
TaxELgTm +6.4 +3.8 13.32 11.87 12.76 +.02
TaxEShTm +2.9 +3.9 10.77 10.57 10.75 +.01
TgtRt2030 +6.1 NA 12.17 10.20 12.06 +.15
TgtRt2040 +6.2 NA 11.89 9.46 11.69 +.20
VABond +6.1 +3.8 11.21 10.20 10.93 +.02
Value +7.1 +3.7 14.82 11.10 14.39 +.23
WorldGro +8.1 +6.0 20.62 15.60 20.22 +.40
Unified
Wntergrn m +7.8 +8.2 15.10 11.91 15.10 +.28
VALIC Co I
ForgnVal +7.3 +4.1 10.37 7.95 9.91 +.37
GlobStrat +8.2 +8.4 12.31 10.25 12.17 +.26
IGrowth +9.0 +7.1 12.06 8.86 11.99 +.25
IntlEq +5.1 +1.6 7.04 5.55 6.76 +.19
IntlGrI +7.4 +5.6 12.34 9.38 11.95 +.31
LgCapGr +8.4 +5.7 12.52 9.34 12.52 +.33
MdCpIdx +9.9 +8.1 23.03 16.34 22.56 +.36
Scie&Tech +7.9 +11.3 17.81 12.57 17.29 +.37
SmCpIdx +8.0 +5.8 15.90 10.96 15.51 +.24
StockIdx +7.9 +3.5 27.02 21.16 26.77 +.58
VALIC Co II
CoreBond +3.7 +6.4 10.94 10.36 10.84 ...
IntSmCpEq +3.7 +3.0 14.60 11.06 14.12 +.34
MdCpVal +3.5 +4.7 18.23 13.50 17.47 +.29
SmCpVal +8.4 +5.1 14.93 10.17 14.52 +.19
SocResp +8.6 +3.8 12.14 9.31 12.04 +.27
StratBd +4.9 +6.9 11.48 10.36 11.47 +.04
Van Eck
GloHardA m +8.7 +13.9 57.73 37.37 56.86 +1.77
IntlGoldA m +.3 +21.8 25.83 17.34 24.78 +.37
Vanguard
500Adml +8.1 +3.8125.74 96.73 124.02 +2.70
500Inv +8.0 +3.7125.72 96.71 124.01 +2.70
AssetA +7.5 +2.7 26.44 21.62 26.13 +.55
AssetAdml +7.6 +2.8 59.37 48.53 58.66 +1.24
BalIdx +6.4 +5.8 22.62 19.23 22.52 +.27
BalIdxAdm +6.5 +5.9 22.62 19.23 22.52 +.27
CAIT +5.3 +4.3 11.33 10.51 11.04 ...
CAITAdml +5.3 +4.4 11.33 10.51 11.04 ...
CALT +5.7 +3.7 11.48 10.40 11.06 +.01
CALTAdml +5.8 +3.8 11.48 10.40 11.06 +.01
CapOp d +3.9 +7.1 36.17 26.59 34.52 +.73
CapOpAdml d +3.9 +7.1 83.55 61.44 79.75 +1.67
CapVal +2.5 +4.9 12.21 8.56 11.30 +.23
Convrt d +3.9 +8.2 14.20 11.61 13.72 +.14
DevMktIdx d +5.6 +2.5 11.03 8.70 10.62 +.33
DivAppInv +8.6 +5.3 23.00 18.08 22.65 +.16
DivEqInv +8.3 +4.3 22.43 16.59 22.09 +.48
DivGr +8.5 +6.2 15.71 12.45 15.45 +.12
EmMktIAdm d +1.5 +12.0 42.03 33.03 40.45 +.56
EmerMktId d +1.4 +11.8 31.97 25.10 30.76 +.43
EnergyAdm d +15.1 +9.0141.63 97.32 139.23 +4.96
EnergyInv d +15.1 +8.9 75.42 51.81 74.13 +2.64
EqInc +9.8 +4.1 22.40 17.63 22.06 +.31
EqIncAdml +9.8 +4.2 46.95 36.95 46.24 +.64
EurIdxAdm d +8.0 +2.7 70.05 54.09 65.92 +2.21
EuropeIdx d +7.9 +2.6 30.06 23.04 28.27 +.94
ExMktIdSig +9.5 NA 39.55 27.63 38.81 +.69
ExplAdml +10.9 +7.0 77.12 52.08 75.23 +.86
Explr +10.8 +6.8 82.81 55.92 80.78 +.93
ExtdIdAdm +9.5 +7.5 46.03 32.16 45.18 +.80
ExtndIdx +9.4 +7.3 45.99 32.13 45.13 +.81
FAWeUSInv d +4.5 NA 20.32 15.94 19.57 +.51
FLLTAdml +5.7 +4.7 11.74 10.74 11.41 +.01
GNMA +3.9 +7.0 11.16 10.57 10.96 -.01
GNMAAdml +4.0 +7.1 11.16 10.57 10.96 -.01
GlbEq +7.0 +2.9 19.58 15.02 19.11 +.40
GrIncAdml +9.2 +2.6 47.06 35.89 46.53 +1.20
GroInc +9.2 +2.5 28.82 21.99 28.50 +.74
GrowthEq +10.0 +4.7 11.93 8.84 11.87 +.26
GrowthIdx +9.2 +6.9 34.36 25.63 34.33 +.85
GrthIdAdm +9.3 +7.0 34.35 25.63 34.33 +.85
GrthIstSg +9.3 NA 31.81 23.74 31.79 +.79
HYCor d +6.2 +7.3 5.88 5.54 5.82 +.01
HYCorAdml d +6.3 +7.4 5.88 5.54 5.82 +.01
HYT/E +5.6 +4.2 10.76 9.82 10.39 +.02
HltCrAdml d +15.8 +6.2 59.75 47.30 59.34 +.45
HlthCare d +15.7 +6.1141.57 112.06 140.59 +1.06
ITBond +5.2 +7.8 11.87 10.98 11.50 -.04
ITBondAdm +5.2 +7.9 11.87 10.98 11.50 -.04
ITGradeAd +4.8 +7.4 10.51 9.79 10.04 -.03
ITIGrade +4.7 +7.3 10.51 9.79 10.04 -.03
ITTsry +4.3 +7.3 12.08 11.11 11.66 -.04
ITrsyAdml +4.3 +7.5 12.08 11.11 11.66 -.04
InfPrtAdm +7.4 +6.9 27.00 25.02 26.88 +.05
InflaPro +7.4 +6.8 13.75 12.74 13.69 +.03
IntlExpIn d +2.8 +4.9 17.92 13.43 17.14 +.50
IntlGr d +5.3 +5.6 21.17 16.09 20.37 +.47
IntlGrAdm d +5.4 +5.8 67.38 51.23 64.84 +1.49
IntlStkIdxAdm d +4.5 NA 28.57 25.19 27.54 +.71
IntlStkIdxISgn d +4.5 NA 34.29 30.22 33.05 +.85
IntlVal d +3.3 +3.0 34.50 27.52 33.22 +.91
ItBdIdxSl +5.2 NA 11.87 10.98 11.50 -.04
LTBond +5.5 +7.9 13.22 11.53 12.36 ...
LTGradeAd +5.9 +7.9 10.04 8.99 9.58 -.01
LTInvGr +5.8 +7.8 10.04 8.99 9.58 -.01
LTTsry +4.5 +7.2 12.80 10.46 11.33 -.02
LTsryAdml +4.5 +7.3 12.80 10.46 11.33 -.02
LgCpIdxAdm +8.2 +4.4 31.62 24.16 31.20 +.67
LgCpIdxSg +8.2 NA 27.58 21.07 27.21 +.58
LifeCon +4.9 +5.2 17.10 15.28 17.00 +.17
LifeGro +6.7 +4.5 23.83 19.06 23.39 +.46
LifeInc +4.2 +5.5 14.52 13.62 14.48 +.09
LifeMod +6.0 +5.1 20.85 17.66 20.58 +.31
MATxEx +5.0 +4.5 10.56 9.72 10.23 ...
MdGrIxInv +11.2 NA 27.56 18.92 27.19 +.52
MdPDisInv +7.2 NA 17.34 14.96 17.06 +.12
MdVlIxInv +7.3 NA 23.09 17.37 22.38 +.36
MidCapGr +11.9 +9.2 21.74 14.96 21.27 +.48
MidCp +9.3 +6.5 22.57 16.28 22.19 +.39
MidCpAdml +9.4 +6.6102.47 73.90 100.81 +1.80
MidCpIst +9.4 +6.7 22.64 16.33 22.27 +.40
MidCpSgl +9.4 NA 32.34 23.33 31.81 +.56
Morg +9.1 +5.9 19.82 14.36 19.67 +.44
MorgAdml +9.2 +6.1 61.49 44.55 61.02 +1.36
MuHYAdml +5.6 +4.3 10.76 9.82 10.39 +.02
MuInt +4.9 +4.8 13.99 13.04 13.63 +.01
MuIntAdml +4.9 +4.9 13.99 13.04 13.63 +.01
MuLTAdml +5.4 +4.5 11.37 10.39 10.98 +.01
MuLong +5.4 +4.4 11.37 10.39 10.98 +.01
MuLtd +2.3 +3.8 11.20 10.95 11.11 +.01
MuLtdAdml +2.3 +3.9 11.20 10.95 11.11 +.01
MuSht +1.1 +3.0 15.98 15.84 15.92 ...
MuShtAdml +1.1 +3.0 15.98 15.84 15.92 ...
NJLTAdml +4.7 +4.4 12.03 11.05 11.56 +.02
NYLT +4.7 +4.3 11.43 10.52 11.08 ...
NYLTAdml +4.8 +4.4 11.43 10.52 11.08 ...
OHLTte +5.0 +4.6 12.34 11.27 11.91 +.02
PALT +5.0 +4.3 11.38 10.48 11.03 +.01
PALTAdml +5.0 +4.4 11.38 10.48 11.03 +.01
PacIdxAdm d +1.7 +2.4 73.70 60.51 71.78 +1.93
PacificId d +1.7 +2.3 11.35 9.25 11.05 +.30
PrecMtls d +2.0 +11.1 28.35 19.34 27.24 +.89
Prmcp d +6.2 +6.7 71.63 55.28 69.88 +1.10
PrmcpAdml d +6.2 +6.8 74.34 57.38 72.53 +1.13
PrmcpCorI d +6.9 +6.9 15.02 11.35 14.72 +.26
REITIdx d +16.0 +3.8 21.00 15.77 21.00 +.62
REITIdxAd d +16.1 +3.9 89.61 67.31 89.61 +2.63
STBond +2.1 +5.2 10.77 10.48 10.65 -.01
STBondAdm +2.2 +5.3 10.77 10.48 10.65 -.01
STBondSgl +2.2 NA 10.77 10.48 10.65 -.01
STCor +2.0 +4.9 10.91 10.72 10.77 -.01
STFed +1.6 +5.0 11.03 10.69 10.87 -.01
STFedAdml +1.7 +5.1 11.03 10.69 10.87 -.01
STGradeAd +2.0 +5.1 10.91 10.72 10.77 -.01
STTsry +1.4 +4.5 10.95 10.62 10.79 -.01
STsryAdml +1.5 +4.6 10.95 10.62 10.79 -.01
SelValu d +7.1 +5.7 20.68 15.69 20.10 +.33
SmCapIdx +9.5 +7.4 38.92 26.88 38.04 +.65
SmCpIdAdm +9.6 +7.6 38.97 26.91 38.10 +.65
SmCpIndxSgnl +9.6 NA 35.11 24.26 34.33 +.59
SmGthIdx +12.4 +9.8 25.10 16.39 24.63 +.45
SmGthIst +12.5 +10.0 25.15 16.43 24.70 +.46
SmValIdx +6.5 +4.9 17.52 12.82 17.05 +.27
Star +5.8 +5.7 20.35 17.22 20.00 +.26
StratgcEq +13.3 +3.7 21.15 14.58 20.76 +.38
TgtRe2005 +5.5 +6.0 12.37 11.19 12.37 +.09
TgtRe2010 +5.8 +5.9 23.61 20.74 23.61 +.25
TgtRe2015 +5.9 +5.7 13.18 11.36 13.15 +.17
TgtRe2020 +6.1 +5.5 23.57 19.84 23.44 +.34
TgtRe2030 +6.6 +5.0 23.37 18.82 23.11 +.41
TgtRe2035 +6.9 +5.0 14.18 11.22 13.99 +.28
TgtRe2040 +6.9 +5.0 23.31 18.38 22.98 +.46
TgtRe2045 +6.9 +5.0 14.64 11.60 14.43 +.29
TgtRe2050 +6.9 +5.0 23.21 18.44 22.87 +.46
TgtRetInc +5.2 +6.3 11.73 10.72 11.73 +.08
Tgtet2025 +6.3 +5.3 13.53 11.14 13.42 +.22
TotBdAdml +3.5 +6.6 10.94 10.43 10.77 -.01
TotBdMkInv +3.4 +6.5 10.94 10.43 10.77 -.01
TotBdMkSig +3.5 NA 10.94 10.43 10.77 -.01
TotIntl d +4.5 +4.2 17.08 13.37 16.47 +.43
TotStIAdm +8.4 +4.7 34.44 26.02 33.93 +.70
TotStISig +8.4 NA 33.24 25.11 32.75 +.68
TotStIdx +8.3 +4.6 34.43 26.01 33.92 +.70
TxMBalAdm +6.6 +5.4 21.03 18.62 21.02 +.23
TxMCapAdm +8.6 +4.5 68.52 51.95 67.90 +1.48
TxMGIAdm +8.0 +3.8 61.13 47.04 60.30 +1.31
TxMIntlAdm d +5.6 +2.6 12.70 9.97 12.23 +.38
TxMSCAdm +9.6 +6.7 30.32 21.04 29.78 +.45
USGro +10.0 +5.3 20.27 14.70 20.07 +.45
USGroAdml +10.1 +5.5 52.51 38.09 52.00 +1.16
USValue +9.7 +1.4 11.27 8.57 11.08 +.24
ValIdxAdm +7.2 +1.7 22.78 17.69 22.03 +.39
ValIdxSig +7.2 NA 23.70 18.41 22.92 +.41
ValueIdx +7.1 +1.6 22.78 17.69 22.02 +.39
VdHiDivIx +9.4 NA 18.28 14.43 18.03 +.22
WellsI +6.2 +7.0 22.85 20.67 22.63 +.10
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Welltn +6.0 +6.2 33.11 28.27 32.51 +.41
WelltnAdm +6.1 +6.3 57.18 48.83 56.16 +.71
WndsIIAdm +7.8 +2.3 50.09 38.41 48.57 +.98
Wndsr +4.4 +1.8 14.68 10.99 14.01 +.32
WndsrAdml +4.4 +1.9 49.54 37.07 47.28 +1.10
WndsrII +7.7 +2.2 28.22 21.64 27.37 +.56
Vantagepoint
AggrOpp +4.5 +6.5 12.34 9.27 11.85 +.13
AllEqGr +7.1 +4.6 21.64 16.45 21.22 +.41
BrMktIx +8.3 +4.5 11.21 8.53 11.12 +.24
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CorBdIxI +3.4 +6.1 10.40 9.95 10.26 -.01
EqInc +8.3 +3.9 9.53 7.33 9.36 +.14
GrInc +7.1 +4.1 10.50 8.07 10.36 +.20
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InfltnPrt +6.5 +6.9 11.64 10.75 11.44 +.01
Intl +8.1 +2.8 10.32 8.08 10.10 +.28
LgTmGro +6.1 +5.1 23.01 18.76 22.72 +.35
LoDurBd +1.2 +4.3 10.18 10.02 10.06 -.01
Mlst2015 +5.6 +5.1 10.98 9.42 10.93 +.13
Mlst2020 +5.8 +4.9 11.03 9.26 10.94 +.14
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Victory
DivrStkA f +3.5 +4.0 16.59 12.83 16.10 +.43
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MulSStA m +4.1 +6.6 4.91 4.67 4.88 +.01
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Waddell & Reed
DivOppsA m +6.7 +3.7 16.11 11.85 15.77 +.41
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UlSTMInA f +1.0 +3.2 4.82 4.80 4.82 ...
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William Blair
IntlGrN m +2.6 +3.8 22.99 18.48 22.41 +.43
Yacktman
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Yacktman d +8.3 +11.0 18.21 15.01 17.92 +.18
YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
FUND %RTN %RTN HI LOW NAV CHG
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YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
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YTD 5-YR 52-WEEK WK
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C M Y K
PAGE 8D SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
B U S I N E S S
Attention
Lo.iouorro c Lu:.rr. Court Ho. Our.rs
FHA Title I is now available through approved lenders
to oualitied applicants tor home repairs up to
$
25,000
No Monev Down* No Eouitv Reouired*
Attro:.c otti:.ot:ors u:ii oo:. uori .oti.t.c
o o ouoi:t .r.u tro::c.c o:
Homeowner Resource Center
R.tio...rt V:rcous H.ot:r. Sst.
V:ri S:c:r. Roo/:r. Irsuiot:or Arc Mor..
*All applications will be numbered and processed on a frst come frst serve basis.
Sorry, No Exceptions
www.hrchelp.com
For More Information Call: 1-866-465-4620
contractor #: PA001581
For More Information Call: 1-877-917-8844
2
9
8
5
4
4
Sendusyour best colorful drawingof your favoritefair memory
for your chancetowinticketstotheLuzerneCounty Fair!
Must be 5 -12 years old to enter.
Therewill be10lucky winners!
Three winners will be chosen each week for three weeks to win
2 fair tickets. Winners will be published on August 5, 12 and 19.
ONE GRAND PRIZE WINNER
will receive 4 fair tickets, a limousine ride to and from the fair and $100
spending cash! The grand prize winner will be published on August 26.
Childs name: ______________________________________
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Address: __________________________________________
City: _____________________ State: ____ Zip: ___________
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C
OUNTY
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UZERNE
C M Y K
VIEWS S E C T I O N E
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011
timesleader.com
THIRTY MILES west
of Washington, D.C.,
the city of Manassas,
Va., will today con-
clude its weekend
commemoration of
events 150 years ago
that focused the at-
tention of a somber nation on the
hallowed ground north of the city.
As the United States recognizes the
sesquicentennial anniversary of its
Civil War, states, cities, towns and
villages, from Rhode Island to Louisia-
na, will in the next four years be high-
lighting the hundreds of historic bat-
tles and the thousands of brave sol-
diers, Blue and Gray, who valiantly
fought and gave their lives.
However, following the April 1861
pummeling and surrender of Fort
Sumter at the hands of Confederate
forces in South Carolinas Charleston
harbor, the First Battle of Manassas
(July 21, 1861), or the First Battle of
Bull Run as it is known north of the
Charles Mason-Jeremiah Dixon line, is
considered the first great engagement
of the Civil War.
Gen. Pierre Gustave Toutant Beaure-
gard who in April commanded the
Confederate forces at Charleston also
was in charge of the southern armies
amassing in July 1861 near Manassas.
Also present were Confederate States
of America generals James Longstreet,
who would distinguished himself two
years later at Gettysburg; Thomas
Jackson, who that day earned a nick-
name near Bull Run Creek; and Joseph
Johnston, whose troops were the first
to be repositioned in combat via rail-
road.
Union soldier William Sprague IV
made the trip from Rhode Island. Like
the American president he supported,
the 30-year-old Sprague, believing the
war would be short-lived, followed his
Rhode Island militia to Washington
and the Manassas fields beyond.
The First Battle of Bull Run was a
Confederate rout and a disaster for the
Union Army. Having participated in
what was then the largest and blood-
iest battle in American history, the
defeated remnants of Northern forces
made their way back into Washington.
It was then that President Abraham
Lincoln, Gov. William Sprague of
Rhode Island and much of the country
came to understand what a long and
tragic conflict lay ahead.Gov. Spragues
2nd Rhode Island volunteers appear to
have departed Providence on June 19,
arriving in Washington three days
later. In less than a month these raw
troops under the command of Col.
John Slocum would perform a danger-
ous flanking maneuver across Bull Run
and suffer heavy losses in the face of
the enemy.
Eight months later Gov. Sprague
returned to the field to retrieve the
bodies and belongings of Col. Slocum
and Maj. Sullivan Ballou. Ballous body
had been disinterred and desecrated
by Confederate troops, but remains of
both men were returned to Providen-
ce, R.I., and a heros funeral.
Gov. Sprague also recovered and
delivered to Ballous wife a letter the
major had written her but never
mailed. Dated: July 14, 1861 Camp
Clark, Washington, Ballous compell-
ing love letter was featured in the 1990
Emmy Award-winning documentary
The Civil War by Ken Burns.
During this sesquicentennial anni-
versary of the conflict that preserved
the union, it is all worth viewing and
reading again. (See www.pbs.org/
civilwar/war/ballou_letter.html.)
Never forget how much I love you,
and when my last breath escapes me
on the battle field, it will whisper your
name.
But, O Sarah! If the dead can come
back to this earth and flit unseen
around those they loved, I shall always
be near you; in the gladdest days and
in the darkest nights always, always,
and if there be a soft breeze upon your
cheek, it shall be my breath, as the
cool air fans your throbbing temple, it
shall be my spirit passing by. Sarah do
not mourn me dead; think I am gone
and wait for thee, for we shall meet
again.
KEVIN BLAUM
I N T H E A R E N A
A fond farewell
that shouldnt
be forgotten
Kevin Blaums column on government, life
and politics appears every Sunday. Contact
him at kblaum@timesleader.com.
A WHOOPIE PIE
almost made me sick
last week.
Well, not the pie but
an editorial about the
ubiquitous staple of
Maine desserts. Thats
right, I said, Maine
desserts.
What drove the dagger deeper was
that the editorial making light of
Maines claim that its the birthplace of
the whoopie pie appeared in our own
Times Leader.
I have dual citizenship in Pennsylva-
nia and Maine, my birthplace. I love the
Phillies and admire Penn State football
and the fervor of its fans. Cheesesteaks
have no equal outside of Pennsylvania.
Add pizza and virtually all Italian
food in Northeastern Pennsylvania to a
list of foods that bring us pride.
I love Pennsylvania and in fact have
made the best friends of my life here,
but Fridays editorial went too far. It
pushed my loyalty to the limit.
I read every Times Leader editorial
before it is published and our principal
writer, Mark Jones, is one of the finest
editorial writers in our business, at any
paper, large or small. His voice in ex-
pressing our institutional assessment of
issues, individuals and institutions is
consistently steady,
well-reasoned and
fair.
So be it on such
substantive mat-
ters. Last week
Jones showed he
knows absolutely
nothing about
whoopie pies. His
editorial was so off
base I was tempted
to squish and
squash it the way
you might chomp
down on a soft, fresh whoopie pie, or
the way you might crush one if you left
it on the car seat and accidentally sat
on it.
Rarely would the latter be a possibil-
ity for me. I buy them and eat them
before I start the car. That is when I am
in Maine.
Maine is dotted throughout its 16
counties with general stores that make
their own whoopie pies and also carry
state-made commercial ones. All of
them are good: Firm but moist, some-
times with a balance of sweetness and a
slightly bitter chocolate taste.
Im a sucker for whoopie pies labeled
homemade.
I know a woman in Maine who has
been making me homemade whoopie
pies for more than 60 years and she set
the standard.
When I try a new one I first give it
the squeeze test, which can be done
with the wrapping still on and without
putting a permanent dent in the pie. It
must be squishy and fresh-feeling.
Editorials, by the way, should not be
squishy.
Anyway, on a vacation day along the
Maine coast, I had just found a new
homemade whoopie pie. As I sank my
teeth into it, I glanced at my email and
saw that Jones had sent me this smart
aleck, wise-cracking editorial.
In case you missed it, Ill let you read
a snippet of it. But first an observation.
I have lived in Pennsylvania on and off
for more than 30 years and in all that
time I have seen only one dessert pre-
tending to be a whoopie pie in the
Keystone State. It was at a campground
near Harrisburg. The camp store of-
fered customers a choice for starting
grills: either the pie or charcoal.
I was born in Maine. I know who
invented the whoopie pie: Maine.
Heres a sampling of Jones attempt
at humor and parochialism.
We tried to let it go, but by gosh,
Maine lawmakers, you overstepped
your bounds this year when you brazen-
ly claimed a rich Pennsylvania culinary
tradition the whoopie pie as your
own.
Pennsylvania is no pushover, its 12.7
million residents not cream puffs. So, in
the strongest terms possible, hear this:
You can have our whoopie pie when
you pry it from our sticky dead fingers.
At first, your illegitimate claim to
establish the chocolate wonder with
marshmallowy-like midsection as
RICHARD L CONNOR
O P I N I O N
Claim about
whoopie pie
gets squashed
To read Mark
Jones editorial on
whoopie pies in its
entirety, go to
http://tlgets.me/
pie
See CONNOR, Page 6E
C
HICAGOWhat doSarahPalin, the
Federal Election Commission, the Unit-
ed FarmWorkers of America, Wikipedia, U.S. Speed-
skating, pop singer Rebecca Black and Northwestern
University have in common?
The Colbert Bump.
Some know its influence, some crave its generosity. But each has
seen its power.
For instance, U.S. Speedskating cravedthe Bump. Aweek before the start
of its 2009 World Cup season, Paul Brabants, director of the team, received a
call from a producer with The Colbert Report, the satirical Comedy Central
news showhostedbythe mock-egomaniacal StephenColbert. Wordhadreached
the Colbert campof the teams troubles, which, toBrabants, seemedinsurmount-
able: The World Cup was starting, the Winter Olympics were just around the cor-
ner and the teamwas facing a massive financial shortfall.
DutchbankDSBhadgoneunder, andwithit the$300,000sponsorshipthebank
hadpledgedto the team. So The Colbert Report offeredto stepin, raise the nec-
essarymoneyandbecometheofficial sponsor of U.S. Speedskating. Tobehon-
est, I didnt thinkabout it that long, Brabants said. I dont want tosaytherewere
no reservations. It is a comedy show; we didnt know how this would be per-
ceived. But right out of the blue, Colbert proposed rallying Colbert Nation to
our cause and that is not a gift you turn down.
Demographicallyspeaking, its adreamaudience: TheColbert Report
has a nightly viewership of 1.5 million, and with The Daily Show, its
companion fake newscast, beats both Leno and Letterman in the
coveted 18-to-34-year-old viewing segment. Then theres its
knack for altruism: Our conservative estimate of how
much The Colbert Report has raised for various
charitiessince2005, largelythroughmodest view-
See COLBERT, Page 6E
MCT PHOTOS
Comedian Stephen Colbert performs at the Rally To Restore
Sanity and/or Fear on the National Mall on Oct. 30, 2010, in
Washington, D.C. Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert held the
rally, which tens of thousands of people attended.
By CHRISTOPHER BORRELLI
Chicago Tribune
K
PAGE 2E SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
S E RV I NG T HE P UB L I C T RUS T S I NC E 1 8 81
Editorial
All I want is for justice to be
served and for him to be held
accountable for what he did.
Sandy Fonzo
The mother who garnered national attention for
her emotional confrontation with former Luzerne County judge Mark
Ciavarella said shes looking forward to his scheduled Aug. 11
sentencing. Shes continued to advocate for a stiff sentence and
changes to juvenile justice laws in Pennsylvania.
LIFE HAS many good
things. The problem is that
most of these good things
can be gotten only by sacri-
ficing other good things. We
all recognize this in our
daily lives. It is only in poli-
tics that this simple, common-sense fact is
routinely ignored.
In politics, there are not simply good
things but some special Good Things with
a capital G and capital T that always are
considered better to have more of.
Many of the things advocated by envi-
ronmental extremists, for example, are things
that most of us might think of as good things.
But, in politics, they become Good Things
whose repercussions and costs are brushed
aside as unworthy considerations.
Nobody wants to breathe dirty air or drink
dirty water. But, if either becomes 98 percent
pure, 99 percent pure or 99.9 percent pure,
there is some point beyond which the costs
skyrocket and the benefits become meager or
non-existent.
If the slightest trace of any impurity were
fatal, the human race would have become
extinct thousands of years ago.
Not only does the body have defenses to
neutralize small amounts of some impurities,
some things that are dangerous, or even fatal,
in substantial amounts can become harmless
or even beneficial in extremely minute
amounts, arsenic being one example. As an
old adage put it: It is the dose that makes
the poison.
In other words, removing arsenic from our
drinking water should obviously be a very
high priority but not after we have gotten it
down to some extremely minute trace. There
is never going to be 100 percent clean water
or air and, the closer we get to that, the more
costly it is to remove extremely minute trac-
es of anything. But none of this matters to
those who see ever higher standards of
clean water or clean air as a Good Thing.
One of the things that has ruined our econ-
omy is the notion that both Democrats and
Republicans in Washington pushed for years:
that a higher rate of homeownership is a
Good Thing.
There is no question that there are benefits
to homeownership. And there should be no
question that there are costs as well. But
costs get lost in the shuffle.
Among the things that Washington politic-
ians of both parties did for years was come
up with more and more laws, rules and pres-
sures on private lenders to lower the qual-
ifications standards required for people to get
a mortgage to buy a home.
It was a full-court press from congressional
legislation to regulations and policies created
by the Department of Housing and Urban
Development and the Federal Reserve, not to
mention the buying of the resulting risky
mortgages by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac
from the original lenders and even threats
of prosecution by the Department of Justice
if the racial mixture of people who were
approved for mortgages didnt match their
expectations.
The news media chimed in with expres-
sions of outrage when data showed that black
applicants for mortgage loans were turned
down more often than white applicants.
Seldom was it even mentioned that white
applicants were turned down more often
than Asian-American applicants.
Such distracting details would have spoiled
the story that racial discrimination was the
reason why some people did not get the
Good Thing of homeownership as often as
others.
Even after the risky mortgages that were
made under government pressure led to huge
bankruptcies and bailouts, as well as disas-
ters for homeowners in general and black
homeowners in particular, homeownership
remains a Good Thing. The Justice Depart-
ment is again threatening lenders who dont
lower their standards to let more minority
applicants get mortgage loans.
Higher miles per gallon for cars is a Good
Thing in politics, even if it leads to cars too
lightly built to protect occupants when there
is a crash. More students going to college is
another Good Thing, even if lowering stan-
dards to get them admitted results in lower
educational quality for others.
Too much of a Good Thing is bad.
Sometimes too much of a Good Thing can be bad
Thomas Sowell is a senior fellow at the Hoover
Institution, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
94305. His website is www.tsowell.com.
COMMENTARY
T H O M A S S O W E L L
DEMOCRACY IN America is under attack.
Politicians in dozens of states are turning back
the clock by denying the vote to citizens.
Photo ID requirements, shortened early
voting periods, limits on poll worker assist-
ance, proof of citizenship requirements, re-
strictions on same-day registration and dis-
enfranchisement of former felons all dis-
proportionately deny voting rights to people
of color, people with disabilities, students,
low-income workers and seniors.
Proponents of voter ID laws claim that
voter fraud is commonplace, yet multiple
studies have shown that the problem is essen-
tially nonexistent. And anecdotal evidence
held up by these politicians is consistently
debunked as myth.
Voter identification is a convenient eu-
phemism for voter suppression. A full 11
percent of voters currently do not have ID.
Most of them are seniors, people of color,
people with disabilities, the poor and stu-
dents. In fact, about one out of five nonwhite
citizens and citizens over age 64 do not have
government-issued ID. This is not about re-
ducing fraud but part of a coordinated cam-
paign of subtle intimidation intended to sup-
press the political will and empowerment of
millions of Americans.
Election reform is desperately needed, but
instead of restricting the right to vote, we
should be expanding it by implementing a
modern and accessible system for holding
elections.
There are more than 30 million Americans
with disabilities of voting age, yet the Federal
Election Commission reports that there are
more than 20,000 inaccessible polling places.
Some are located in basements or buildings
without ramps, and others only offer ma-
chines that are outdated and unworkable for a
person who is blind, deaf or physically im-
paired. Too many citizens with disabilities can
only cast their vote curbside, or are denied
the right to a secret ballot when they have to
speak their vote out loud for someone else to
mark down. If impediments were removed
and people with disabilities began voting in
the same proportion as other Americans, fully
3.2 million more people would be casting
ballots.
It is the duty of our policymakers to remove
the barriers to participation for all citizens,
including those with disabilities.
Modernizing the system with automated
registration, online access to records and
accessible voting machines would allow more
than 65 million eligible Americans to partici-
pate. Investing in a uniform, simplified proc-
ess for voters would eliminate unnecessary
bureaucratic processes, save states money and
save election officials time. Right now, state
legislators are instead committed to doing the
opposite.
Requiring photo ID and imposing other
restrictions on the right to vote will not
strengthen our democracy. It will serve only
to exclude many American from participating
in the important decisions that face us all as
we work to create an America that is as good
as its ideals.
Voter identification laws undermine our democracy
Wade Henderson is the president of the Lead-
ership Conference on Civil and Human Rights.
Mark Perriello is the president of the American
Association of People with Disabilities. They wrote
this for Progressive Media Project, a source of
liberal commentary on domestic and international
issues; it is affiliated with The Progressive maga-
zine.
COMMENTARY
W A D E H E N D E R S O N
A N D
M A R K P E R R I E L L O
Election reform is desperately needed, but
instead of restricting the right to vote, we
should be expanding it by implementing a
modern and accessible system for holding
elections.
P
ENNSYLVANIA is-
suedits first blueprint
for handling the
states rip-roaring
Marcellus Shale natural gas in-
dustry on Friday, a belated re-
action not unlike slamming
shut the barn door after the
horse already has bolted, bred,
been adopted and retrained to
steeplechase, broken its leg
and gone to the glue factory.
That is to say, its unbeliev-
ably late.
Companies in pursuit of the
covetedfuel drilled1,446wells
in the state last year, and 795
the year before that. In the
rush toward riches, lawmak-
ers already had thrown open
the gates for gas explorationin
state forests and stood by as
private landowners flocked to
signleases, too, insome cases,
getting fleeced in the process.
Town hall meetings erupt-
ed. Wells blew. Chemicals
spilled. Methane might, or
might not, havemigrated. And
lawsuits ensued.
Now, at last, the state has a
strategy. Almost.
Lt. Gov. Jim Cawley and 29
others on the Governors Mar-
cellus Shale Advisory Com-
mission issued a report late
last week containing recom-
mendations to develop a com-
prehensive, strategic proposal
for the responsible and envi-
ronmentally sound develop-
ment of Marcellus Shale.
Those 96 policy recommen-
dations dont address the cen-
tral question on many peoples
minds: Should we even allow
drilling in the Keystone State?
Instead, they call for capitaliz-
ing on the industrys explosive
potential (by, for instance,
training state residents for
jobs in the field and encourag-
ing the use of natural gas-pow-
ered vehicles) and for adjust-
ing regulations widely consid-
ered to be lax. For example,
the minimum distance be-
tween a natural gas operation
and a private water well
should be increased from 200
feet to 500 feet, according to
the report.
Gov. TomCorbett, an ally of
the industry, presumably will
champion the recommenda-
tions put forth by the advisory
commission, which he estab-
lished and whose members he
chose. It remains to be seen if
the Legislature supports the
plan.
One of the reports more in-
triguing recommendations is
to create a permanent adviso-
ry panel, whose members
would stay up to date on mat-
ters suchas changes inMarcel-
lus drilling technology, new
safety data and emerging
health studies. The group,
likewise, would help the state
grapple with controversies in-
volving other natural gas de-
posits yet to be tapped.
Pennsylvania will continue
to deal with natural gas issues
for decades. Lawmakers cant
afford to let the states policies
environmental and econom-
ic lagbehindwhile the indus-
try charges ahead.
OUR OPINION: OVERSIGHT
Get up to speed
on drilling policy
To see a copy of the Governors
Marcellus Shale Advisory Com-
mission report, visit www.por-
tal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/
community/Marcellusshale
advisorycommission/20074.
R E A D T H E R E P O R T
RICHARD L. CONNOR
Editor and Publisher
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President/Executive Editor
MARK E. JONES
Editorial Page Editor
PRASHANT SHITUT
President/Impressions Media
Editorial Board
QUOTE OF THE DAY
RICHARD L. CONNOR
Editor and Publisher
PRASHANT SHITUT
President
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President/Executive Editor
RICHARD DEHAVEN
Vice President/Circulation
ALLISON UHRIN
Vice President/
Chief Financial Officer
Y
OU DONT NEED to
watch Mad Men to
know that the 1950s
and 60s fell short of
being a Golden Age for every-
one except that it was the era
of Americas greatest inven-
tion: the vast middle class.
On Monday, Bob Herbert
the former New York Times
columnist nowa senior fellow
at Demos, a national policy
center introduced a report
that suggested that Americas
greatest invention is breaking
down.
The middle class is more
than an income bracket, Herb-
ert said. Its a grand bargain
among government, business
and ordinary workers that if
you work hard and play by the
rules, you will earn a decent
life for your family, and that
will be good for the entire
country.
But for the first time in
many decades, more people
are falling out of the middle
class than are moving up into
it. At the same time, the rich-
est 1 percent of Americans
have higher incomes than the
entire middle class combined.
Pennsylvanias leaders are
making foolhardy decisions
that could make the slide per-
manent.
For example, what used to
be the passport to a comfort-
ablelifea bachelors degree
is no longer the bedrock insur-
ance that it used to be. Three
out of four Pennsylvania grad-
uates start out their careers
with big debts $27,066, the
seventh highest in the coun-
try.
Rebuilding the middle class
requires rebuilding the infras-
tructure that made it possible,
especially an affordable public
university system. Its a multi-
year project that should start
now with a pledge to restore
the cuts in state university
funding.
Philadelphia Daily News
OTHER OPINION: U.S. ECONOMY
No moving up
for middle class
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 PAGE 3E
F O R U M
THE DEBT
ceiling looms.
Confusion
reigns.
Schemes
abound. We
are deep in a
hole with, as
of now, only three ways out: the
McConnell plan, the G6 plan
and the Half-Trillion plan.
The McConnell essentially
punts the issue until after Elec-
tion Day 2012. A good last resort
if nothing else works.
The G6, proposed by the
bipartisan Gang of Six senators,
reduces 10-year debt by roughly
$4 trillion. It has some advantag-
es, even larger flaws.
The Half-Trillion raises the
debt ceiling by that amount in
return for an equal amount of
spending cuts. At the current
obscene rate of deficit spending
about $100 billion a month it
yields about five months respite
before the debt ceiling is reached
again.
In my view, the Half-Trillion is
best: It is clean, straightforward,
yields real cuts, averts the cur-
rent crisis and provides until
year-end to negotiate a bigger
deal. At the same time, it punc-
tures President Obamas thus far
politically successful strategy of
proposing nothing in public,
nothing in writing, nothing with
numbers, while leaking through
a pliant press supposed offers of
surpassing scope and reasonable-
ness.
As part of this pose, Obama
had threatened to veto any
short-term debt-ceiling hike.
Which has become Obamas
most vulnerable point. Is the
catastrophe of default preferable
to a deal that gives us, say, five
months to negotiate something
more significant because it
doesnt get Obama through
Election Day?
Which is why Obama is al-
ready in retreat. On Wednesday,
press secretary Jay Carney
showed the first crack by saying
the president would accept an
extension of a few days if needed
to complete an already agreed
upon long-term deal.
Let the House pass the Half-
Trillion. Dare him to put the
United States into default be-
cause he deems a short-term
deal insufficiently grand. After
all, it dovetails perfectly with
parts of the G6, for which the
president has expressed support.
The G6 conveniently comes in
two parts. Part One puts imme-
diately into effect, yes, a half-
trillion dollars in cuts, including
a more accurate inflation mea-
sure (that over time greatly
reduces Social Security costs)
and repeal of the CLASS Act
(the lesser-known of the two
new Obamacare entitlements,
a fiscally ruinous, long-term care
Ponzi scheme).
Part Two of the G6 is far more
problematic. It mandates six
months of committee negotia-
tions over the big ones Medi-
care, Social Security, discretion-
ary spending caps and tax re-
form. Unfortunately, the Medi-
care and Social Security parts
are exceptionally weak no
mention of any structural
change, such as raising the eligi-
bility age to match longevity. As
for the spending caps, I wouldnt
bet my dogs food bowl on their
durability.
On tax reform, the G6 calls for
eliminating deductions, credits,
exclusions and exemptions to
reduce rates across the board.
The new tax rates top individ-
ual rate between 23 percent and
29 percent would bring us
back to Reagan levels (28 per-
cent). This would be a good
outcome, but the numbers thus
far are fuzzy and some are con-
tradictory.
In principle, however, if the
vast majority of the revenue
raised by closing loopholes goes
to rate reduction, and if the vast
majority of the net revenue
raised comes from the increased
economic activity spurred by
lowering rates and eliminating
inefficiency-inducing loopholes,
the trade-off would be justified.
What to do now? The House
should immediately pass the
Half-Trillion plan, thereby put-
ting something eminently rea-
sonable on the table that the
president will have to address
with a serious counterproposal
using actual numbers. If the
counterproposal is the G6, Re-
publicans should accept Part
One with its half-trillion dollars
in cuts, CPI change and repeal of
the CLASS Act, i.e., the part of
the G6 that is enacted immedi-
ately and that is real. Accompa-
ny this with a dollar-for-dollar
hike in the debt ceiling, yielding
almost exactly the time envi-
sioned in the G6 to work out
grander spending and revenue
changes and defer any action
on Part Two until precisely that
time.
The Half-Trillion with or with-
out the G6 Part One: ceiling
raised, crisis deferred, cuts en-
acted and time granted to work
out any Grand Compromise. You
cant get more reasonable than
that.
Do it. And dare the president
to veto it.
Force Obamas hand
with Half-Trillion plan
COMMENTARY
C H A R L E S
K R A U T H A M M E R
Charles Krauthammers email
address is letters@charleskrauth-
ammer.com.
S
ummer afternoons and ice cream cones: So much sweeter when shared
with someone you know.
ANOTHER VIEW
A photograph by Aimee Dilger
and words by Mark E. Jones
I STILL re-
member walk-
ing into the
original Bor-
ders bookstore
in Ann Arbor,
Mich. It
seemed to take
up the entire block.
You gotta see this place! a
friend had gushed, and when we
pulled open the doors, I knew
what he meant. A symphony
exploded in my head. This was
1985, a little more than a decade
after Tom and Louis Borders,
two brothers who were students
at the University of Michigan,
slapped together a used-book
operation on the second floor of
a building.
Now, here on State Street,
was this massive pantheon to
the written works of the world.
New books. Used books. Local
authors. International authors.
The classics. The arts. Politics.
History. Miles of paperbacks.
Endless aisles. As a young writ-
er, you wandered through the
place and said, One day, maybe
me ...
It was magic.
Magic fades.
Earlier this month I read that
Borders was on the brink of
liquidation. The company that
grew from one Ann Arbor outlet
to more than 1,200 stores world-
wide will be reduced to scraps,
sold in pieces like the bargain-
bin books that once sat outside
its entrance.
Of all the words I formed
when I first walked through
those doors, extinction was
the furthest from my mind.
What has happened to the
American bookstore? The cozy
yet slightly musty place where a
reader could wander among the
great storytellers of our time
and faintly hear them calling
from the shelves, Read me! Im
a heartbreaking love story! Read
me, Ill tell you the history of
the Great War! ...
It grew from a dimly lit space
to a high-ceilinged warehouse to
a coffee-smelling, couch-laden
superstore to a multipurpose
entertainment outlet. The old
bookstores were swallowed by
chains. Packaging, bundling,
synergizing and the tantaliza-
tion of profits became the prin-
ciples. Actual books in these
places seemed to be an after-
thought, nudged aside by vid-
eos, calendars, music and elec-
tronics.
But Borders? Surely Borders
was safe, right? Didnt we have a
soft spot for them? Anyone who
ever made that pilgrimage to
Ann Arbor on a Sunday after-
noon, anyone who ever lost
track of the hours while cooing
at the sheer enormity of the
written word, would insist,
absolutely and without hes-
itation, that Borders, like man-
kind, would somehow survive.
Instead, we are once again
reminded that no matter how
lovely the casing, how beautiful
the print, how fetching the
binding or how stunning the
cover, business is still business.
And books are a tough busi-
ness.
The original Borders oper-
ation sold to Kmart in 1992. I
guess that was the start of the
end. It was somewhat merged
with Waldenbooks, was expand-
ed, massaged, made internation-
al. It multiplied, went electron-
ic, grew a Web presence, devel-
oped an e-reader. It became part
of the very expansion that
would jeopardize the industry.
But for all the maneuvers,
Borders hasnt made a profit in
five years, and it keeps getting
smaller, losing people, closing
doors and praying for a savior. It
has been in bankruptcy since
February, and its last best
chance might have faded this
month when a private equity
investor deal collapsed.
The problem is people dont
love books the way they once
did, nor do they read them the
same way. Cheaper electronic
versions undermine the need for
shelf-space. Younger audiences
who havent grown up with
rainy afternoons spent inside
book pages, dont snap up the
latest great read unless theres
a certain vampire or wizard
attached. The backlists of mid-
level authors are not lucrative
for the balance sheet. And the
pressure for profits to keep the
stock price high runs diametri-
cally opposite to the slow, mean-
dering, long-term customer
approach that used to define
bookstores.
I have shopped in Borders,
spoken in Borders, done Web
programs with Borders, even
met a series of Borders CEOs.
These are good people who still,
for the most part, love books.
And for years, we in Michigan
always considered it our back-
yard chain.
But the world has changed.
The printed word is gasping. A
symphony doesnt play anymore
when you pull open a Borders
door. And soon, sadly, the doors
might not be there, either.
As Borders fades, so does bookstore magic
COMMENTARY
M I T C H A L B O M
Mitch Albom is a columnist for the
Detroit Free Press. Readers may
write to him at: Detroit Free Press,
600 W. Fort St., Detroit, MI 48226, or
via email at malbom@freepress.com.
The problem is people dont
love books the way they once
did, nor do they read them the
same way. Cheaper electronic
versions undermine the need
for shelf-space.
W-B Twp. woman
proud of town
I
thank Wilkes-Barre Town-
ship Mayor Carl Kuren,
council, the road crew
(whose members worked
diligently for two weeks) and
all other individuals who
made the Fourth of July festiv-
ities possible at Kennedy Park.
Again, it was an awesome
family-oriented party, with
three bands, vendors and the
most spectacular display of
fireworks.
The residents also have
many more amenities/events
to enjoy throughout the year,
such as our prized possession
the beautiful, serene George-
town Settlement Camp
Christmas and Easter parties
(egg hunts), the fish derby,
the senior center and many
more.
Also, much too important to
forget are our brave volunteer
fire company and Wilkes-Barre
Township Police Department
members. May God bless and
protect you as you risk your
lives every day to protect ours.
Thank you to all individuals
who make Wilkes-Barre Town-
ship a safe and great town in
which to reside.
Let us all appreciate and
continue to care for our home-
town of Wilkes-Barre Town-
ship.
Dianna Chintalla
Wilkes-Barre Township
A fond farewell
to Crisman Street
B
efore leaving our beautiful
home on Crisman Street
in Forty Fort we want to
make some observations and
offer some comments.
A note of appreciation for
all their efforts to Don Neely,
Chooch Churnosky and John
Rossick, the maintenance
crew at Wyoming Valley
Wests Durkee School build-
ing. Even though the building
can use a bit of dressing up,
the lawn, shrubs and flowers
always are kept in tiptop con-
dition. Thanks, guys.
Their actions along with
all the residents on the street
help to make Crisman one of
the finest streets in Forty Fort.
Sincere gratitude to Gary
Fronzoni, Terry Paul, Bob
Downs and our son Don for
always being available when
we needed them. Were sure
that our border collie Holly
will miss all the wonderful
people we met on our daily
walks, especially the stops
that always had treats. To Bea,
Bill, Billy, Pam and Peg, we
send much appreciation.
In 55 years weve had our
share of ups and downs and
surely leave with many won-
derful memories. We really
have been blessed with won-
derful, caring neighbors, and
we will miss you all.
Our parting wish is that all
the neighbors will stop by and
greet the new owners, wel-
coming them to the Crisman
Street family.
Joan and Tom Hudak
Forty Fort
Blues festival
gets gold star
I
thank the Briggs Farm of
Nescopeck for a show of
hospitality at its 14th annual
blues festival.
The security personnel were
outstanding in helping me
maneuver, as I am hand-
icapped.
Thanks again to all of the
great people who put together
a blues extravaganza that
surpasses all others.
Brenda Gittens
Plymouth
Recycling event
a great success
O
n behalf of the Luzerne
County commissioners
and the Luzerne County
Solid Waste Management
Department, I thank you for
your important contribution
that made our 2011 electronics
recycling program a huge
success.
This year, our June electron-
ics collections in Butler and
Hanover townships resulted in
541,609 pounds of electronic
equipment collected from
residents of 64 municipalities,
seven schools and 16 entities
that otherwise would have
entered the waste stream,
filling our landfills.
The nine-year total of more
than 3,681,000 pounds of
electronics recycled by the
people of Luzerne County is
truly an environmental suc-
cess!
The department would not
have been able to conduct this
successful program without
financial support from com-
missioners and the state De-
partment of Environmental
Protection.
Collaborating with the
county to ensure the collec-
tions success were the Hanov-
er Area School Board, admin-
istrators and maintenance
supervisor, along with the
Butler Township Board of
Supervisors and fire depart-
ment. The Luzerne County
Association of Pennsylvania
State Constables provided
important traffic control.
Participants in the Luzerne
County Community Service
Program and employees from
Luzerne County Buildings and
Grounds Department provid-
ed assistance that helped the
program to succeed.
The efforts of recycling are
not limited to only our special
collections. We remind every-
one to do their part to reduce,
reuse, recycle and buy recy-
cled products.
Our tire recycling collection
will be held in October. Regis-
tration begins in September;
registration information is
mandatory prior to visiting
the collection sites. In Decem-
ber we will be offering our
annual telephone book recy-
cling collection program.
Beth DeNardi
Luzerne County recycling
coordinator
Wilkes-Barre
Former mayor
a Good Samaritan
I
recently was run off the
road and forced to jump a
curb. In doing so, I bent my
vehicles front wheel, which
caused the tire to blow out.
I pulled to the roadside and
for 20 minutes tried to get the
spare tire down from under
the car. A Good Samaritan
stopped to help but realized
the cable was rusted, prevent-
ing us from getting the spare
off.
Rather than leave me, he
took the spare from his car
and put it on mine.
He gave me a card with his
cell phone number and said to
call him when I was able to
get a new tire.
He would not accept any
payment, so I would like to
publicly thank who I later
found out was the former
mayor of Pittston, Mike Lom-
bardo. What a great person.
Frank Massara
Wyoming
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
Mountain Laurels is a regular series of letters fromreaders conveying
thanks to individuals or groups for their support, help or kindness.
MOUNTAIN LAURELS
C M Y K
PAGE 4E SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
P E R S P E C T I V E S
THURSDAY
JULY 28
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Ex-congressman
disputes letter
A
s a former member of the
U.S. Congress, I was as-
tonished to read the letter
to the editor in The Times
Leader from Al Kozlofski Jr.,
on July 13, which informed me
that I should be getting free
health care for life.
So tell me, Al. Why am I
paying nearly $9,000 a year for
health insurance premiums for
my wife and myself?
Obviously, Mr. Kozlofskis
veracity falls far short of im-
maculate.
Jim Nelligan
Harveys Lake
ADA compliance
remains lacking
T
he news media report
stories about people and
organizations that break
rules. Resolutions are reached;
the guilty are punished. But
what about those who consis-
tently violate federal law with-
out repercussions?
These arent thugs or white-
collar criminals. They are
business owners who ignore
the Americans with Disabil-
ities Act of 1990.
Tuesday will mark the 21st
anniversary of the laws pas-
sage, yet Northeastern Penn-
sylvania still has many coffee
shops, restaurants, bars, stores
and other businesses that are
not accessible to people with
disabilities.
The ADA requires them to
remove barriers when readily
achievable, meaning easily
accomplished without much
difficulty or expense. Exam-
ples include installing a ramp,
creating accessible parking
spaces and widening restroom
doorways.
The Northeast Pennsylvania
Center for Independent Living
advocates for barrier removal
with businesses in 10 counties.
We explain the law, provide
technical assistance and point
out that tax credits are avail-
able for those who create
accessibility.
This process results in
sound business sense by en-
abling new customers to pur-
chase goods and services.
If you own the place every-
ones been talking about, look
at the premises to determine if
a potential customer with a
disability could access your
food, merchandise or services.
If not, contact the center.
Compliance is the law and the
right thing to do.
Keith Williams
Community organizer
Northeast Pennsylvania Center
for Independent Living
Scranton
Budget process
painfully taxing
O
n Tuesday, the U.S. House
of Representatives passed
its Cut, Cap and Balance
Plan.
This plan imposes a cap on
federal spending and allows
for an increase in the debt
ceiling by $2.4 trillion on the
condition that the House and
Senate approve a balanced
budget amendment and send
it to the states. To date, this is
the only plan to raise the debt
limit that has passed either
chamber, and it is the only
plan whose actual details have
seen the light of day.
With their claims of finan-
cial apocalypse approaching
on Aug. 2, President Obama
and the Democrats in both the
House and the Senate have
not published and publicly
released a single plan. Instead,
they have offered empty rheto-
ric.
Most recently, they invoked
President Reagan and his calls
to increase the debt ceiling in
the 1980s. This is nothing
more than recasting history in
a way that I believe is de-
signed to distract the Amer-
ican people from the modern
reality.
Todays situation is far dif-
ferent from the 1980s. The
U.S. government has piled up
$14 trillion in debt. For more
than 800 days, the Senate has
failed to pass a budget. Presi-
dent Obama continues his
calls for compromise and
shared sacrifice, all while
insisting on tax increases to
fund spending a philosophy
that was roundly rejected at
the polls last November and a
manner of governance that
President Reagan would not
have endorsed.
If we are going to invoke
history, lets at least get it
right. Reagan only agreed to
increase the debt in that in-
stance provided the Demo-
crats would agree to lower
taxes. They agreed to do so,
but reneged in the 11th hour,
raising taxes anyway.
Today, the sticking point for
Democrats in both the budget
and the debt ceiling deals is
again raising taxes on the
American people. Simply
stated, the Democrats will not
agree to any Republican plan
that doesnt raise taxes.
It seems the more things
change, the more they stay the
same.
David A. Dzorek
Swoyersville
Reader laments
waste of shuttle
T
hank God that there is
going to be no more space
shuttle. It was a waste of
money. We need to spend our
money wisely.
Alex S. Partika
Wilkes-Barre
Sunday hunting
plan questioned
T
he majority of Pennsylva-
nians who hike, bike, jog
through the woods, watch
wildlife, photograph and con-
nect with nature do so on
Sundays. We deserve one day
per week when we can enjoy
the outdoors in relative quiet
without having to worry about
our safety.
A bill to make it legal to
hunt on Sundays, H.B. 1760,
will be considered in the Leg-
islature and be voted on soon.
More than 90 percent of
Pennsylvanians do not hunt,
yet hunters can monopolize
outdoor opportunities dis-
proportionate to their num-
bers. H.B. 1760 will create
even greater imbalance among
outdoor users.
Traditionally, Sundays are a
time for families to be togeth-
er, relax at home, visit neigh-
bors or attend religious/spiri-
tual services, all while unin-
terrupted by gunshots or
hunters seeking to track/
retrieve wounded or dead
animals that crossed posted
property lines. There is no
reason to disrupt this custom.
The state House Game and
Fisheries Committee will hold
hearings, limiting testimony
only to groups and organiza-
tions, which will most likely
be pro-hunting groups. Hence
these hearings will become
farces.
Please ask you state repre-
sentative to vote no on H.B.
1760.
Silvie Pomicter
Chinchilla
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 PAGE 5E
P E R S P E C T I V E S
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THE BACK-TO-SCHOOL & FALL PREVIEW SALE
Dallas schools
need evac plan
I
have questions for first
responders, school adminis-
trators, school board mem-
bers and parents of children
attending the Dallas schools:
Do you believe regular fire
drills are necessary prep-
aration for any kind of fire
emergency in our schools? Do
you believe in being prepared
for other emergencies? For
instance, do you read the
emergency card when you are
seated in an airplane?
If your answer is yes to
any of these, do you think our
schools and community
should be prepared for any
kind of natural gas-related
emergency? We are not pre-
pared. Look in your phone
book. There are instructions
for where to go, what to take
and which route to travel for
an emergency at the Berwick-
area nuclear plant. If you look
for anything similar for our
schools, you will realize that
for three of the four schools
on the Dallas campus there is
one, two-lane road in and out
of the campus.
Can you picture the chaos
that would ensue if parents
were frightened for their chil-
dren and rushed to school?
There is a Girl Scout rule
that tells us to be prepared.
What would that mean for
such an emergency? It would
mean, first, building a one-way
loop road out of the campus.
The second step would be to
plan an evacuation procedure
of where to meet children to
remove them from danger
without hindering emergency
vehicles. The third step would
be to have regular evacuation
drills so that the children and
their parents would not be
panicked, but would know
where to go and what to do.
That sort of planning would
show true leadership and
foresight. There should be no
cost except for building that
exit road, and that could be
part of what gets done when
those gas companies start
building their metering sta-
tions.
A lot of people might be a
little less nervous about what
is proposed within a third of a
mile of the Dallas school cam-
pus if we knew that the chil-
dren could be evacuated safely
in the event of the emergency
they assure us wont happen.
Eleanor Kandler Rodda
Shavertown
Reader calls for
increasing COLA
R
ecently I sent emails to
U.S. Rep. Lou Barletta and
U.S. Sen. Bob Casey ask-
ing them for their support to
help correct the injustices that
have been done to senior
citizens and the needy for the
past two years regarding cost-
of-living adjustments.
We dont need any more
excuses about why there
hasnt been an increase due to
the outdated formula for cal-
culating the COLA. During
the first two years of President
Obamas administration, with
the Democratic-controlled
House and Senate, they could
have passed any bill without
the input of the Republicans,
and they did: Wall Street bai-
louts, automotive industry
financial packages and, of
course, ObamaCare.
Why wasnt the formula
changed when the opportunity
existed to help take care of the
very citizens who needed help
the most?
Recently, President Obama
said that he couldnt guaran-
tee payment to Social Security
recipients, Medicare, Med-
icaid and the vets if the nation
goes into default. This is a
new low even for President
Obama, but should not come
as a surprise considering that
this president, in his State of
the Union address two years
ago, looked straight into the
television cameras and told
the nation, I will not forget
you ... with regards to COLA.
After two years, he finally
has remembered the Amer-
ican senior citizens, but only
to be used as pawns for his
scare tactics.
Now that Obama has re-
membered that there are still
American senior citizens and
the needy, maybe, just maybe,
hell remember his promise.
With the new Congress and
new speaker of the House,
maybe Obama wont have as
much of a problem remember-
ing the American elderly and
their needs.
Louis Kern
Pittston
Climate change
column disputed
W
illiam A. Levinsons
commentary is full of
crap when it asserts that
manmade global warming is
not real (Carbon agenda
siphons resources from real
dangers, July 16), and any
concern about it is dismissed
as alarmism.
Denial of anthropogenic
global warming is a propagan-
da scam orchestrated by free
market (read corporatist)
think tanks funded by the
fossil fuel industry working in
coordination with conserva-
tive media outlets such as Fox
News and most talk radio.
And there are politicians who
toe the skeptic line due to
campaign contributions from
Big Oil and King Coal, and
they sometimes also own
stock in those companies.
Assuming that since climate
has changed before due to
natural causes, therefore the
current warming must be
natural is fallacious, because
climate reacts to whatever it is
forcing it to react in this
case, human activities are the
dominant force.
For starters, the sun is not
responsible for the warming
over the last 35 years because
satellite measurements show a
rather slight dimming.
Levinson apparently has an
ideological ax to grind with a
basic fact of physics: that
carbon dioxide is a heat-trap-
ping gas that stays in the at-
mosphere for lengthy periods
and builds up due to mans
constant burning of fossil
fuels.
And to continue with busi-
ness as usual is suicidal mad-
ness. Despite the brandishing
of bogus petitions by deniers,
about 97 percent of climate
scientists and 84 percent of
scientists overall accept the
reality of anthropogenic cli-
mate change. Dogmatic de-
niers of climate change, and
their financial and political
backers such as the Koch
brothers, can go on playing
with fire in the hope that they
will not get burned. But in the
end, they will burn with the
rest of us as a result of the hell
on Earth they created by their
reckless disregard of the plan-
et in their greedy, short-term
pursuit of profits.
Jerome N. Cragle
Mifflinville
Visas granted
despite economy
T
he government of the
United States was once
run by the people. That is
how it was intended. Today,
the national government is so
big, and the leaders are so
brash, that in many ways they
do whatever they want, and
we the people can go to
well, you know where.
Why would the U.S. govern-
ment grant more than 1.1
million temporary work visas
last year to foreign nationals
with more than that scheduled
for this year? Why would the
government grant more than a
million permanent residence
documents (green cards) last
year with even more to come?
A green card is an official
document issued by the U.S.
government to aliens, allow-
ing them to have residency
and to work legally in the
United States.
During a debilitating eco-
nomic downturn, why would a
government of the people,
with almost 20 percent of its
citizens unemployed, grant
more than 2 million work
permits to foreign nationals
each year?
In more than two years, the
White House can credit with-
out dispute something less
than 800,000 new jobs. What
if we simply did not give the 2
million foreigners each year
the jobs that once were held
by Americans? Clearly that
would help our employment
picture.
However, the employees of
this government do not work
for the people. They work for
the politicians whose only
goal is re-election.
Brian W. Kelly
Wilkes-Barre
Homeless need
hand, not handout
I
wanted to respond to Mark
Guydishs commentary The
word on the street: The
Valley has lost its heart (July
11).
I thought at first Guydish
was being serious. I was pre-
pared to write a rebuttal until,
of course, I reached the end of
the commentary. Very pro-
found, to say the least, and
perfectly written.
I have been employed by a
homeless shelter for nearly six
years. My primary duties
include housing homeless
families and modeling for
them the skills necessary to be
productive members of society
with the goal of obtaining
and maintaining permanent
housing and greater self-deter-
mination.
While these families reside
in our program, it is their
responsibility to maintain
sobriety with the proper as-
sistance (if sobriety previously
had been an issue), obtain and
maintain employment or
further education, save 70
percent of any and all income,
pass room inspections, partici-
pate in classes we offer (class-
es such as parenting, budget-
ing, nutrition), and seek and
maintain counseling services
for any help with barriers the
families face.
Our program is very struc-
tured and demanding, and our
success rate is fortunately
rather high. We meet families
every day who wake up and
want to address their issues
and succeed in this life.
I understand the tongue-in-
cheek remarks in the com-
mentary. I understand that,
unfortunately in this society, it
seems to be the mindset that
homeless people are similar to
what was described in the
commentary: inadequate
beggars who chose to be on
the streets.
In my years of experience as
a case worker, I beg to differ.
Each person has a story and,
pragmatically, some stories
have led the storytellers to
places they did not choose to
be. I have sat on the other side
of the desk for six years and I
have heard some things that
truly have changed my life
stories that include mental
illness, rape, addiction, loss,
deep sorrow and pain that
cannot be explained or erased
with words. Not every home-
less person you see is where
he or she is by choice.
In fact, I might go one step
further to say none of them is
where they are by choice.
Some people might imply
that I am an enabler or a
Band-Aid for the population I
serve. However, what is far
more imperative to me is that
because I was awarded health,
sound mind, vigor, common
sense, toughness, prudence
and everything else that might
be found necessary by anyone
wandering along the path of
life, I shall share these gifts as
well as my heart with others
who can use a hand, rather
than a hand out.
Lisa Caruthers
West Pittston
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
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daytime phone number for verification. Letters should be no
more than 250 words. We reserve the right to edit and limit writ-
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Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-
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er donations, is $3.5 million.
Simply defined, though, the
Colbert Bump is a megaphone of
influence, shoutedbya comedian
with a keen ethical compass who
plays a blowhard with no ethical
compass and hopes the audience
gets the difference.
It began as a kind of joke in
the sense that Colbert, the host,
would bluster on about the
bump his show gave anyone or
anything appearing onit. Howev-
er, the Bump has become any-
thing but a joke in the sense
that the political, philanthropic
and social ramifications of Col-
bert and his sway over his audi-
ence have grown remarkable,
touching on a dizzying range of
subjects both silly and serious. I
love my brother, but I probably
wouldnt have drivenout here if it
wasnt for (Colbert) being here,
Sam Engstrom, of Washington,
D.C., said last month at North-
western University, where Col-
bert, an alum, delivered the com-
mencement speech.
In the spring, Colbert and Jim-
my Fallon promised to perform
Blacks infamous hit, Friday, if
the Colbert Nation raised at least
$26,000 for the charity Donors
Choose. Done. In June, Colbert
asked the FEC if he could create
an organization to solicit funds
for campaignadvertising. All Im
tryingtodois affect the2012elec-
tion, he told Trevor Potter, a for-
mer FEC chairman (now Col-
berts lawyer), during an episode
of the show. Its not like Im try-
ing to install iTunes. Done.
When Colbert broke his wrist
in 2007 and began selling $5 rub-
ber Wriststrong bracelets (in
recognition of wrist violence),
proceeds went to the Yellow Rib-
bon Fund, which assists injured
service members. The show
raised $171,000 in a few months
and through eBay auctions of
props fromthe set and additional
sources (includingproceeds from
AmeriCone Dream, the Col-
bert-branded flavor of Ben & Jer-
rys ice cream) since has brought
the total to $350,000 for the orga-
nization. AsMarkRobbins, thedi-
rector of Yellow Ribbon, said:
People dont realize (Colbert) is
like a conduit to money for char-
ities. Hes raised our visibility be-
yond anything we had expected.
Now I get random checks from
people Heres $10 in honor of
Stephens birthday. No kidding.
Indeed, afewdaysafter Colbert
asked viewers to donate to U.S.
Speedskating, the show raised
$202,000 through its website;
soon after, its logo was stitched
onto the teams uniforms. By Ja-
nuary, it had raised $300,000.
That one man can have so
much influence over an audience
is fascinating, said Katherine
Reutter, the speedskater who
went on to win two medals at the
2010 Winter Olympics. She said
that the Colbert Nation is not re-
ally supporting speedskating
anymore, but theboost hegaveus
helped us create Speedskater Na-
tion (a website to solicit dona-
tions). None of us even knewSte-
phen. You wouldnt necessarily
expect that hes out to do good in
this world. But I felt that. When
yougo onthe show, they give you
a basket backstage and inside is a
$100 gift card to the charity of
your choice. Thats real decency.
The Bump, however, is not
solely warm and fuzzy. In fact,
though it has been a good sum-
mer for the Bump, the Bump is
not necessarily something you
want. Afewweeks ago, after Col-
bert mockedTerrytheFracosau-
rus, the hard hat-wearing, pro-
drilling dinosaur mascot of Cana-
da-basednatural gas provider Tal-
isman Energy, the character dis-
appeared from the companys
website. And in June, after Sarah
Palin supporters reportedly al-
tered a Wikipedia page for Paul
Revere to reflect her widely quot-
ed remarks about the Revolution-
ary War figure, Colbert asked his
viewers tochange Wikipedias en-
try for bell to also reflect her
comments. A minute later, it
read: Used by Paul Revere to
warn the British that hey, youre
not goingtosucceedintakingour
guns.
On the political side, there are
the many implications of the Col-
bert SuperPAC, the organization
that the FEC approved and Col-
bert plans to use to promote or
oppose political candidates dur-
ingthe2012presidential election.
Its specific implications are de-
batable, though thats probably
Colberts intention.
Regardless of what his PAC
means, however, thelinebetween
Colbert the satirist and Colbert
the advocate has grown increas-
ingly thin, said Sophia McClen-
nen, a professor of comparative
literature at PennState who has a
book about Colberts influence,
America According To Colbert,
comingthis fall. Someonewitha
massive fan base who can get
themto do whatever they want is
not what anyone wants to see ina
healthydemocracy. But I thinkhe
has a knack for choosing causes
that are meaningful and causes
that are silly, and, more impor-
tantly, he has the faithinthe audi-
ence tounderstandthe difference
and the larger lesson.
I thinkhis playingaright-wing
blowhard character, balancing it
with a reality thats not new,
she added. But Colbert is offer-
ing us a new definition of what it
means to be a public intellectual,
whichis about amusingourselves
to activism.
Dick Gregory, the legendary
political activist and comedian,
couldnt agree more: He works
for this generation because he
knows its cadences, its lingo. If I
wanted young people to read the
Bible, Id want a rap group to de-
liver it, then kids would know it
better than preachers. Colbert
getsthis, but I wonder if heknows
how powerful he is, that (he and
JonStewart) are inpositiontode-
termine policy! I think I first real-
ized that when they did that ral-
ly.
He was referringtothe Rally to
Restore Sanity and/or Fear,
whichdrewanestimated250,000
to the Mall in Washington in Oc-
tober. It was activism without a
cause. Or, as a sign there read:
Vague But Awesome.
Said Jonathan Alter, a former
Newsweek columnist who is
good friends with Colbert (and
whose wife is a Colbert Report
producer): I think Stephen
doesnt really believe in ever be-
ing explicit about his intentions.
... He kind of had to be explicit at
theendof his Congressional testi-
mony in support of farmworkers
(conducted in character, before a
House subcommittee on immi-
gration). That didnt go the way
he wanted. He was ironic and the
committee was not laughing.
Hes left of center andadmits this,
but hes not init toadvanceanide-
ology. Hes a fake newsman, but
he shows how things work and
the way things dont work, and I
think hes turned into a real jour-
nalist.
Also, to say he doesnt resem-
ble his character in real life is a
gross understatement. Satire al-
ways comes out of idealism, and
to be a great satirist, you need to
be an idealist. One does not work
without the other.
COLBERT
Continued from Page 1E
Maines official state dessert
amused us. Then, you had the
audacity to actually bestow that
distinction on blueberry pie,
while surreptitiously declaring
whoopie pie your official state
treat.
Heresy, plain and simple.
The Amish of Pennsylvania
concocted the recipe for gobs,
or whoopie pies, as assuredly as
Ben Franklin invented the Fran-
klin stove. We call on good
Americans everywhere to flatly
reject Maines revisionist confec-
tionary history.
There was more but you get
the idea. Sarcastic. Condescen-
ding. After bragging a bit about
several people and things with
Pennsylvania
roots, Jones
dropped the
curtain with a
classic cheap
shot based on
an old and
popular Maine joke:
For those of us in the north-
eastern corner of our marvelous
commonwealth, its an expe-
dient and enjoyable trip into the
cradle of the Keystone State.
And, unlike traveling in
Maine, you always can get there
from here.
Very funny, but lets turn it
around. You can get to Maine
from here but if its you, Mark
Jones, the state police have been
alerted to your blasphemy.
CONNOR
Continued from Page 1E
Richard L. Connor is editor and
publisher of The Times Leader. Reach
him at rconnor@timesleader.com.
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011
C M Y K
timesleader.com
etc.Entertainment Travel Culture S E C T I O N F
TV viewers can be forgiven for
dragging their feet about commit-
ting to a new series. These days,
thats simply self-protection; most
newshows dont evenlast a full sea-
son, andgettingattachedtoone on-
ly to have it disappear never stops
being frustrating.
But what if you held back from
sampling a showthat sounded in-
teresting, even while others talk-
ed it up, and now that show has
been renewed for fall? Or what if
several shows you wanted to
watch all aired in the same time
slot, and you couldnt keep up
with themall?
Summer is your chance to
catchup, evenif that might not be
as easyas sittingbackandwaiting
for reruns.
With an abundance of first-run
shows on the air this summer, re-
runs dont have the built-in audi-
ence they did just two decades
ago. CBS still reliably repeats
most of its shows, because its
brandof comediesandprocedural
dramas do well in second airings.
TheCWsmartlystartedall itsdra-
mas over from the beginning this
summer.
Some shows will air in reruns
on the other broadcast networks,
but others either wont be repeat-
ed at all or arent on the air now
but might come back in repeats
later. Adding to the summer con-
fusion is the fact that some can-
celed shows are still airing in re-
peats.
Heresalookat someshowsyou
might have missed during the TV
season that just ended, all of
which will return with new epi-
sodesinthefall, andsomereasons
to start watching themnow.
Hawaii Five-0, CBS
Airs this fall: 10 p.m. Mondays
Watch now: At 10 p.m. Mon-
days, at CBS.comor at Hulu.com
(five episodes)
CBS top-rated new drama of
last seasonis alsoaninternational
hit and already has been sold into
syndication on TNT for 2014, so
expect it to be around a while. If
its mixof over-the-topactionwith
banter and beaches seemed a bit
much for fall, maybe the pretty
people (Alex OLoughlin, Scott
Caan, Daniel Dae Kim) and even
prettier scenery will make it a bet-
ter fit for summer.
Raising Hope, Fox
Airs this fall: 9:30 p.m. Tues-
days
Watchnow: At 9p.m. Tuesdays,
at Fox.com or at Hulu.com (full
season)
Howdidyoumiss this adorable
and genuinely funny comedy
from Greg Garcia (My Name Is
Earl)? BabyHopealoneis reason
enough to watch, but so is the ri-
diculous but somehow very real
family dynamic surrounding
young Jimmy (Lucas Neff), rais-
ing his baby daughter with the
dysfunctional help of his parents
(Martha Plimpton and Garrett
Dillahunt), the very people who
messed up with him.
Nikita, CW
Airs this fall: 8 p.m. Fridays
Watch now: At 9 p.m. Thurs-
days, at CWTV.com (six epi-
sodes) or at Hulu.com (six epi-
sodes)
Couldbeyoudont watchmuch
on the CW, the network of Gos-
sip Girl and 90210 and women
Summer lets you catch up on TV you missed
By GAIL PENNINGTON
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
See TV, Page 4F
AP PHOTO
Scott Caan plays Detective
Danny Danno Williams in
Hawaii Five-0.
NEW YORK Heres my ad-
vice: If you trek to New York and
shell out for a ticket to Spider-
Man: Turn Off the Dark, grab a
seat in the dress circle.
Sometimes thats called the
mezzanine and sometimes the
first balcony. For this show its
calledtheFlyingCirclefor thesim-
ple reason that it offers the best
viewof the trulyspectacular flying
effects, including the climactic air-
borne battle between Spidey and
the Green Goblin.
The final
confronta-
tion was im-
pressive
enough for a
near-capaci-
ty audience
toroaritsap-
proval re-
cently at the
Foxwoods
Theatre. But
then this
crowd
roareditsap-
proval for a
lot of what
went on in
this already legendary show.
To put it mildly, Ive never seen
anything like it, in a Broadway
houseor anywhereelse. Theshow,
whose troubled history has been
exhaustively documented by the
NewYorkpress, isastrangehybrid
that combines elements of conven-
tional Broadway musicals, theme-
parkridesandCirqueduSoleil raz-
zle-dazzle.
The creators pursue serious art-
istic ambitions while dishing up
spectacledesignedtoget thesame
sort of response as if you woke up
one morning and sawa mastodon
grazing in your backyard. At first
glance you wouldnt believe your
eyes, but you couldnt wait to tell
your friends about it.
This is a series of impressions, a
gut reaction, an accounting of
what I sawandheardfrommyseat
at the biggest, fattest and most ex-
pensive Broadway musical of all
time.
We dont really need to go over
the shows troubled history the
cast injuries, technical problems
and the departure of director Julie
Taymor, who helped write the
bookanddevelopedthepiecefrom
its inception. What matters nowis
what the showis.
Muchtomyamazement, what it
is is vastly entertaining. Yes, its an
example of bloated excess and in-
sists on seeking meaning in the
fantasy adventures of a character
created almost 50 years ago for
comic books printed on cheap
pulp. But theshowinperformance
answers a question Ive heard re-
peatedly: How on earth could you
spend $65 million on a Broadway
musical?
The answer is simple: By doing
things in a theater that nobody in
his or her right mind has ever at-
tempted.
Like all the flying. Like having
maybe a half-dozen performers
play the title character at different
times. Like George Tsypins bril-
liant, forced-perspective scenic de-
sign that emulates the art of Mar-
vel comic books. And Eiko Ishio-
kas mind-blowing costumes that
seem to bring the Sinister Six
Carnage, Electro, Swiss Miss, et al
tolifeinthreedimensions. This
is a showwith a thousand moving
parts.
All of which might suggest that
this is ashowswallowedupbyspe-
cial effects. But strangely enough,
it also happens to be an actors
show.
Reeve Carney, who plays Peter
Parker (a.k.a. Spider-Man) is a
charmingperformer witha terrific
rock voice. But the real star of the
show is Patrick Page, who seems
to be having the time of his life as
scientist Norman Osborn, who be-
comes the Green Goblin.
Page is an accomplished stage
actor he appeared at what was
Spider-Man
casts magical
web on stage
By ROBERT TRUSSELL
McClatchy Newspapers
See SPIDERMAN, Page 4F
What: Spider-
Man: Turn Off the
Dark
Where: Foxwoods
Theatre in New
York
Tickets: $76.50 to
$314 at Ticketmas-
ter.com or 800-
745-3000
Note: Spider-
Man was a hot
ticket from its
previews and ap-
parently will re-
main so.
IF YOU GO
P
inkclouds float across a blue sky. Apinkrobe,
pinned to a clothesline, billows in the breeze.
Poppies bloom, tomatoes grace a table, and a
boat with a rainbow-hued sail skims along
the water.
You might admire these images as you stroll
through the Pink Ribbon Exhibit at Luzerne County
Community Colleges Schulman Gallery.
Then, when you pause before a picture of a person
with a book and notice its called Interrupted Read-
ing, it might make you think about how cancer can
disrupt a persons life.
When you hear that word, you are so scared. You
said as she mingled with guests during the exhibits
recent opening reception.
A survivor of uterine cancer, Jones is enthusiastic
about takingpart intheshowat theSchulmanGallery,
where 30 percent of any sale will be donated to The
Center for Cancer Wellness, Candys Place. Candys
Place is a resource center for people with cancer and
their loved ones.
Jones also wants people to take comfort from her
close-up photos of pink morning glories, a pink rose,
pink phlox and other flowers from her garden as well
as the message she inscribed on one of them: Feed
your faith and your fears will starve to death.
feel its like a death sentence, said Gail Jones, 53, of
Wilkes-Barre, one of two dozen artists whose work is
on display at the exhibit.
But then you move ahead and look for hope, she
DON CAREY PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Kelly Olszyk, curator of the Pink Ribbon exhibit at the Schulman Gallery,
puts the finishing touches on the display in time for the opening reception.
Bernadette Harrisons Tomato (top right) and Jenna Bauers Still Life With Or-
anges (bottom right) are two of close to 60 pieces in the exhibit.
Gail Jones Pink Series includes close-up photographs of flowers she grew in her garden.
By MARY THERESE BIEBEL
mbiebel@timesleader.com
What: Pink Ribbon Exhibit, a juried, mixed-media show
in recognition of breast-cancer awareness.
When: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays
through Aug. 6. Evenings and weekends by appoint-
ment.
Where: Schulman Gallery, Luzerne County Community
College, 1333 S. Prospect St., Nanticoke
Proceeds of sales: Benefit Candys Place
Info: 740-0732
IF YOU GO
See PINK, Page 4F
C M Y K
PAGE 2F SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
D I V E R S I O N S
NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE
BONUS PUZZLE
DIAGRAMLESS
CRYPTOGRAMS
The Sunday Crossword
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
Puzzle Answers
on 3F
HOROSCOPE
HOROSCOPE
ARIES (March 21-April 19). It
is difficult to follow a map
if you do not know which
way is north. You have
to orient yourself first in
order to correctly follow
the directions. Today is
for getting emotionally
oriented and ready for the
week to come.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20).
Even the mild mannered
people around you will
have an edge to them
now. And while there may
be negative aspects to
your dealings, the positive
aspects will far outweigh
them.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21).
You will become more fully
aware of the freedoms
your society allows. This
awareness could come
about as you learn of
those far less fortunate
and significantly more
restricted.
CANCER (June 22-July 22).
Your self-improvement will
occur naturally. Therefore,
you neednt make a special
effort to overcome nega-
tive habits and refine your
character. As you move
toward what you enjoy,
the transformation will be
automatic.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). There
is such a thing as pre-
mature organization. It
happens when you make
a plan before you have all
the information. So hold
off. There will be more rel-
evant factors to take into
account tonight.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).
Loved ones need you to
help them solve prob-
lems. You bring a flexible
approach to the situation.
You will be intuitive, spon-
taneous and playful to
a point then you get
suddenly serious and
thorough.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).
Life indoors will be man-
ageable and predictable,
which is precisely why
you need to get outside.
Besides, like other living
things, you need sunshine
to grow.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).
Resolve to keep going
until you arrive at the
destination. You will make
mistakes in your quest, but
dont put too much focus
on them. When you head
in the wrong direction,
make a U-turn.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.
21). You have nothing
against the ones who
sleep and watch TV while
you work. To each his own.
But as for you, you never
tire of being useful. You
will keep producing well
into the night.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19). You are a rebel at
heart and will see many
reasons not to go along
with the program. And
though people around
you may seem to have no
problem with compliance,
as soon as you rebel, oth-
ers will do the same.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18). You may feel limited
in your ability to express
yourself or further your
purposes. Exercise your
freedom of thought, and
your environment will
shift to externally liberate
you, as well.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20).
There is no benefit to bul-
lying yourself. So instead
of being upset and angry
that you dont always
do as you mean to do,
breathe and relax. Try to
be inwardly gentle, sup-
portive and friendly.
TODAYS BIRTHDAY (July
24). There will be many
sights you will see for
the first time. Your enjoy-
ment will be enhanced by
the presence of younger
people. Youll speak your
mind in August and set
a record straight. A fes-
tive event in November
is a chance to share your
talent. Youll earn more
than you planned to in
December and will share
the wealth. Libra and Virgo
people adore you. Your
lucky numbers are: 6, 25,
42, 30 and 15.
AN AUTHOR THING COMING
Caleb Rasmussen
7/24/11
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 PAGE 3F
D I V E R S I O N S
For information about WonderWord volumes and Treasuries, call Universal Press Syndicate at 1-800-255-6734.
WONDERWORD
By David Ouellet
Cryptograms New York Times
Bonus Puzzle Diagramless
JUMBLE
GOREN BRIDGE
LAST WEEKS PUZZLE ANSWERS
By Henri Arnold and
Mike Argirion
WITH OMAR SHARIF
& TANNAH HIRSCH
1995 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU
UNIVERSAL SUDOKU KIDS
MINUTE MAZE
PREVIOUS DAYS SOLUTION
PREVIOUS SUNDAYS SOLUTION
For more Sudoku go to www.timesleader.com
O N T H E W E B
HOW TO CONTACT:
Dear Abby: PO Box 69440, Los Angeles,
CA 90069
7/24
7/24
7/24
7/24
7/24
1. I come from a very musical family.
I found out that almost everyone has
a record.
2. His civic life has been full of trials.
But so far no convictions.
3. Before the recession, he made
some interesting investments in
paper towels and revolving doors.
He was wiped out before he could
turn around.
4. I found a great investment in
taxes an excellent pick. They are
fully backed by the government and
sure to go up!
DEAR ABBY
Moms open door policies
make her an easy target
Dear Abby:
At age 60
my mother
ignores basic
safety rules.
She drives
her older
model car with the doors un-
locked. I have tried explain-
ing that shes making it easy
for a carjacker to gain entry,
but she insists that wont
happen to me.
Mom walks her dog alone
at night and leaves her front
door unlocked, claiming, If
anyone tried to get in, Id see
them. Not true. She goes
for long walks, and while
shes walking, she chats on
her cell phone, completely
oblivious to whats going on
around her.
She nailed a key ring with
the key to her back door (la-
beled as such) outside next
to the door. Anyone could
scale the short fence and
walk right in. She also leaves
the key to her front door
under the mat on her front
porch for anyone to find.
Mom makes me crazy
with worry. I dont know if
shes aware of the risks shes
taking. I have begged her to
lock her door and hide the
keys, but she says I am para-
noid and that nothing could
ever happen.
Now she has bought a
gun and claims it will keep
her safe. I say its better to
exercise common sense and
prevent the break-in and
possible assault in the first
place.
Am I being unreasonable?
Worried Sick in Dallas
Dear Worried Sick: Your
mother appears to be incred-
ibly naive and in a state of
complete denial. The first
rule of personal safety is to
remember that criminals
seek easy targets.
Contact your police de-
partment and ask if they
have any personal safety
literature you can give your
mother. The life you save
may be her own.
Dear Abby: My daughter
watches TV sitcoms along
with her 4-year-old son who
is being exposed to many
adult themes, terms and
politically incorrect infrac-
tions. She doesnt see the
harm. Do you?
Not a TV Fan
Dear Not A TV Fan: Yes, I
do. Your daughters parent-
ing skills leave something to
be desired. At a time when
she should be entertaining
and enriching her son, shes
entertaining herself.
Will this harm the boy?
Maybe not. But shes not
helping her son grow either.
To receive a collection of Abbys
most memorable and most fre-
quently requested poems and
essays, send a business-sized, self-
addressed envelope, plus check
or money order for $3.95 ($4.50
in Canada) to: Dear Abbys Keep-
ers, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL
61054-0447. (Postage is included.)
A D V I C E
C M Y K
PAGE 4F SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
E T C .
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timesleader.com
Get news
when it
happens.
18-34. But this dark drama
about ayoungwoman(MaggieQ)
forced to train as an assassin who
escapedandturnedonher captors
drewabroader followingfor its
slam-bang action scenes and twis-
ty plots, plus a lead character
worth rooting for.
Harrys Law, NBC
Airsthisfall: 9p.m. Wednesdays
Watchnow: At NBC.com, at Hu-
lu.com (three episodes) or Cable
On Demand
NBC didnt renew any of last
falls new shows but will bring
backthis DavidE. Kelleylegal dra-
medy, which debuted at midsea-
son to mixed response. Why
shouldyouwatch?Althoughsome
viewers will find Kelleys trade-
markmixof comedyandmelodra-
maannoyinglyoverthetop, just as
many will appreciate the oddball
legal cases, oftenputtinga spinon
current events. And almost every-
one can admire star Kathy Bates
take-no-prisoners performance.
Body of Proof, ABC
Airs this fall: 10 p.m. Tuesdays
Watch now: At 10 p.m. Tues-
days, at ABC.com, at Hulu.com
(nine episodes) or Cable On De-
mand
Dana Delanys medical-examin-
er drama didnt arrive until late
March and was barely getting
started when the season ended.
Beyond its procedural storylines,
which sometimes seemed to be
trying too hard, the series offered
an interestingly flawed character
in Delanys Dr. Megan Hunt,
whose problems include a trou-
bled relationship with her daugh-
ter and injuries that forced her to
give up neurosurgery.
Blue Bloods, CBS
Airs this fall: 10 p.m. Fridays on
CBS
Watch now: At 10 p.m. Fridays,
at CBS.com, at Hulu.com (epi-
sodes1, 12 and13)
Maybeyouwereout onFridays?
The drama about a family of cops,
headedbyTomSelleck, built asol-
id fan base with its mix of police
work and family interplay. But if
you didnt get hooked, this sum-
mers repeats will help you get to
knowtheReaganfamilyandcatch
upontheongoingBlueTemplar
story.
TV
Continued from Page 1F
Kathy Bates, plays a lawyer in David E. Kelleys legal dramedy
Harrys Law.
thenMissouri RepertoryTheat-
retwiceinthe1990s, inRomeo
and Juliet and The Deputy
who chews this shows for-
midablescenerywithgustoand
finesse. Its tough for any actor
to relax into a show as laden
with special effects as this one,
but Page looks like he belongs
there.
He has some of the shows
funniest lines, including an
aside about the productions
gargantuancost, andhemakesthe
most of a bit in which the Goblin
tries by telephone to get through
to the editor of the Daily Bugle,
only to be frustrated at every turn
by a labyrinthine menu.
The showalsohas funat the ex-
pense of the Fourth Estate. Mi-
chael Mulheren registers a nice
comic performance as Bugle edi-
torJ. JonahJameson, whoat every
turn is just wrong, wrong, wrong
in his assumptions about the big-
gest storyinhislifeasuperhero
defendinghis cityagainst ahost of
supervillains.
At one point he even utters the
words so often spoken by real
newspaper journalists in the age
of the Internet and the 24/7 news
cycle: Were dinosaurs!
Philip Wm. McKinley was cho-
sen to take over the show after
Taymors departure. She now re-
ceives credit for the original di-
rection, and McKinley is identi-
fied as a creative consultant.
Andthentheres themusic. The
songs by Bono and the Edge took
their knocks fromsomeof thecrit-
ics who reviewed the show early,
but I have to say this score in-
cludes some of the most effective
songs Ive encountered in a rock
musical. There are times when
Carneyis infull voice that youcan
closeyour eyes andeasilyimagine
Bono singing these tunes.
I cansaythis: All themusic, pro-
jections, lighting effects, aerial
stunts, trap doors and elevators
conspired to create images in this
writers memory that wont fade
away anytime soon.
SPIDERMAN
Continued from Page 1F
Noting one image of a rain-
drop-studded flower is especial-
ly striking, she said, It reminds
me of the tears of women who
are facing this shocking news (of
a cancer diagnosis), and the
tears of children who lose their
mothers or grandmothers to this
horrible disease.
But it also reminds me of the
tears of refreshing rain, and the
hope that you can be cleansed.
One womanwhoappears tobe
celebratingthat kindof victoryis
the joyful figure depicted in Im
Free Nowin Blue, a print by Ali-
son Schmidt.
Actually, Schmidt said, her
model was a woman who had
battled a drug addiction. She
was a recovering person. This is
a celebration of her freedomand
her newfound life.
But a woman who battles can-
cer might experience a similar
celebration, the artist said.
A couple women in my life
have had breast cancer and as
devastating as the disease is, it
reveals such character, said
Schmidt, 30, of Dunmore. Ive
seen them still be able to be in-
credible mothers and wives and
friends while dealing with this
disease.
While most of the artists who
contributed to the exhibit are
women, there are a few men, in-
cluding sculptor David Green,
62, of Harveys Lake, who put
several three-dimensional repre-
sentations of the female formon
display.
Does he have any message for
women who might be struggling
with the reality of losing a breast
to cancer?
As far as a womans energy,
power and the respect she de-
serves in the world, it doesnt
have anything to do with having
one breast or two, he said.
That has nothing to do with her
power as a person.
PINK
Continued from Page 1F
Nina Davidowitzs image of
clouds is part of the Pink Ex-
hibit at the Schulman Gallery.
DON CAREY PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Amanda and Nina Davidowitz check out Leigh Pawlings painting
of red poppies at the Schulman Gallery.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 24, 2011 PAGE 5F
BOOKS
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9. One Summer. David Baldacci.
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HARDCOVER NONFICTION
1. A Stolen Life. Jaycee Dugard.
Simon & Schuster, $24.99
2. Go the F**k to Sleep. Adam
Mansbach, illus. by Ricardo
Cortes. Akashic,$14.95
3. Unbroken. Laura Hillenbrand.
Random House, $27
4. In the Garden of Beasts. Erik
Larson. Crown, $26
5. The 17 Day Diet. Dr. Mike More-
no. Free Press, $25
6. Of Thee I Zing. Laura Ingraham
with Raymond Arroyo. Thresh-
old, $25
7. Bossypants. Tina Fey. LB/Re-
agan Arthur, $26.99
8. The 4-Hour Body. Timothy
Ferriss. Crown, $27
9. The Greater Journey. David
McCullough. Simon & Schuster,
$37.50
10. The Dukan Diet. Dr. Pierre
Dukan. Crown, $26
11. Seal TeamSix. Howard E. Was-
din & Stephen Templin. St. Mar-
tins, $26.99
12. Love Wins. Rob Bell. Harpe-
rOne, $22.99
13. Lies That Chelsea Handler
Told Me. Chelseas Family,
Friends & Other Victims. Grand
Central, $24.99
14. Through My Eyes. Tim Tebow
with Nathan Whitaker. Harper,
$26.99
15. Sex on the Moon. Ben Mezrich.
Doubleday, $26.95
MASS MARKET
1. Game of Thrones. George R.R.
Martin. Bantam, $8.99
2. A Clash of Kings. George R.R.
Martin. Bantam, $8.99
3. Hells Corner. David Baldacci.
Vision, $9.99
4. Whiplash. Catherine Coulter.
Jove, $9.99
5. A Stormof Swords. George R.R.
Martin. Bantam, $8.99
6. Sizzling Sixteen. Janet Evanov-
ich. St. Martins, $8.99
7. Tough Customer. Sandra Brown.
Pocket Star, $9.99
8. A Feast for Crows. George R.R.
Martin. Bantam, $8.99
9. Family Ties. Danielle Steel. Dell,
$7.99
10. The Rembrandt Affair. Daniel
Silva. Signet, $9.99
11. The Creed Legacy. Linda Lael
Miller. HQN, $7.99
12. Betrayal. Fern Michaels. Zebra,
$7.99
13. Irish Hearts. Nora Roberts.
Silhouette, $7.99
14. Worst Case. James Patterson &
Michael Ledwidge. Vision, $9.99
15. The Girl with the Dragon Tat-
too. Stieg Larsson. Vintage,
$7.99
TRADE
1. The Help. Kathryn Stockett.
Berkley, $16
2. Heaven Is for Real. Todd Burpo
with Lynn Vincent. Thomas
Nelson, $16.99
3. Room. Emma Donoghue. LB/
Back Bay, $14.99
4. Water for Elephants. Sara
Gruen. Algonquin, $14.95
5. The Immortal Life of Henrietta
Lacks. Rebecca Skloot. Broad-
way, $16
6. One Day. David Nicholls. Vin-
tage, $14.95
7. Outliers. Malcolm Gladwell.
LB/Back Bay, $16.99
8. Cutting for Stone. Abraham
Verghese. Vintage, $15.95
9. Game of Thrones. George R.R.
Martin. Bantam, $17
10. A Visit fromthe Goon Squad.
Jennifer Egan. Anchor, $14.95
11. The Original Argument. Glenn
Beck. Threshold Editions, $16
12. The Glass Castle. Jeannette
Walls. Scribner, $15
13. Empire of the Summer Moon.
S.C. Gwynne. Bloomsbury, $15
14. The Postcard Killers. James
Patterson & Liza Marklund.
Grand Central, $14.99
15. Sarahs Key. Tatiana de Rosnay.
St. Martins Griffin, $13.95
BEST SELLERS
PHILADELPHIA Weary of
sex scandals that have rocked all
portions of our government in re-
cent years, theres a lot of talk on
the campaign trail about getting
back to the principles of our na-
tions Founding Fathers.
That sent