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Noise
11.1 Existing Environmental Aspects 11.1.1 Potential noise sensitive receptors 11.2 Sources of Potential Environmental Impact 11.2.1 11.2.2 11.2.3 Existing airport activities Surrounding Land Use Potential Impacts of Master Plan Developments 11.3 Measures to Prevent, Control or Reduce Environmental Impact 11.3.1 11.3.2 EMS Inspections, audits and investigations 11.3.3 11.3.4 Environmental Monitoring Airport Noise Abatement Consultative Committee 11.4 Objective and Targets 11.4.1 11.4.2 11.4.3 Objective Achievements from last 5 years Targets for next 5 years 61 60 60 60

11.1 Existing Environmental Aspects


It is important to note in any discussion regarding noise management at Gold Coast Airport that the Airports (Environment Protection) Regulations (AEPR) do not apply to noise generated by aircraft while flying, landing, taking off or taxiing. These matters are controlled under the Commonwealth Air Services Act 1995. This environmental strategy therefore excludes matters relating to noise resulting from aircraft operations other than ground running.

noise will be included in the background noise levels surrounding the airport.

11.2.3 Potential Impacts of Master Plan Developments


The major developments planned for Gold Coast Airport are detailed in the GCAL Master Plan (2001). There are potential impacts to noise if these developments are not managed correctly. During the construction phase, potential noise impacts may include: Increased truck and vehicle activity Construction and demolition activity

11.1.1 Potential noise sensitive receptors


Gold Coast Airport is bounded on the south by the Cobaki Broadwater and on the south-west by natural vegetation growing on coastal lowland. To the north and east, the airport is bounded by residential housing, commercial developments and the Gold Coast Highway. Located to the west is a sewage treatment plant and refuse dump. The most significant noise sensitive receptors are the residential houses located to the north and east of the airport, where noise generated by the Gold Coast Highway is a significant contributor to background noise levels in the area.

During the operations phase, potential noise impacts may include: Increased aircraft and vehicle noise due to increased movements Increased noise from associated activities and operations Changed aircraft and vehicle noise locations due to new operations and developments

11.2 Sources of Potential Environmental Impact 11.2.1 Existing airport activities


Typical airport activities that have the potential to impact on noise generation: Aircraft ground running operations, including operation of auxiliary power units and test-bed running of an aircraft engine removed from the air frame Aircraft maintenance Vehicle maintenance, including car rental operations Noise from stand-by generators Pavement maintenance (eg rubber removal)

11.3 Measures to Prevent, Control or Reduce Environmental Impact 11.3.1 EMS


GCALs EMS has systems and procedures in place to prevent, control or reduce potential environmental impacts. Refer to Section 3.0 Environmental Management System.

11.3.2 Inspections, audits and investigations


Informal, visual inspections are undertaken on a daily basis by the GCAL Safety Officers, who assess the site for safety, security and environmental issues. More formal inspections are undertaken, usually on a monthly basis, by the GCAL Environment Department and the AEO. The AEO provides notification of any action items arising from these inspections. Any environmental incidents are reported to GCAL through the incident reporting system, and followed up to prevent reoccurrence where possible. GCAL also undertakes investigations of any reported, inappropriate noise generation on the airport.

11.2.2 Surrounding Land Use


Gold Coast Airport has residential and industrial neighbours on all sides except the south-western boundary, which backs onto the Cobaki Broadwater. GCALs surrounding neighbours include residents, fuel stations, a landfill, sewage treatment plants, a hospital, a quarry and the Pacific Motorway / Gold Coast highway. Activities from surrounding land users which create

11.3.3 Environmental Monitoring


GCALs environmental monitoring program is detailed in Section 15.0 - Environmental Monitoring.

Additionally, noise impacts will be minimised through resourceful management initiatives and in consultation with relevant community groups (predominantly through the Airport Noise Abatement Consultative Committee - ANACC).

11.3.4 Airport Noise Abatement Consultative Committee


The Airport Noise Abatement Consultative Committee (ANACC) is facilitated by GCAL to enable residents to voice their concerns about community issues regarding airport noise, flight paths and airport activity, and to allow community input into noise abatement procedures. The ANACC is made up of five community representatives from Queensland and five from New South Wales. Their role is to faithfully represent the views of the constituents from their respective areas. Other committee members include representatives from Air Services Australia, the Federal Department of Transport and Regional Services, Qantas, Tweed Shire Council, local elected representatives and GCAL. ANACC meetings are currently held quarterly.

11.4.2 Achievements from last 5 years:


Some significant GCAL achievements in noise management from the period of the 1999 Environment Strategy include: Development and implementation of EMS procedures (see Section 3.0 - EMS) Fly Neighbourly Policy Instigation and ongoing implementation of ANACC meetings Airport Environment Management Committee meetings Implementation of environmental incident reporting and corrective action procedures Reduction in noise complaints from 666 in 1999 to 89 in 2003.

11.4 Objective and Targets 11.4.1 Objective:


To ensure noise management at the airport meets or exceeds applicable legislation, standards and guidelines, as identified in GCALs Legal Register EMS Document Number 6.0022 .

11.4.3 Targets for next 5 years:


For the next five years, GCAL has set the following targets for noise management (Table 15).

Table 15.0 GCAL Noise Management Targets


TARGET Ensure offensive noise does not occur from specified sources in excess of the levels set in Schedule 4 of the Regulations AEMC meetings conducted regularly and include noise issues as required Timely investigation of any reported, inappropriate noise generation VERIFIED BY As required noise monitoring results Meeting records Documented initial report and investigation findings TARGET DATE As required RESPONSIBILITY GM Aviation

As required As required

Environment Manager Environment Manager

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12

Waste Management
12.1 12.2 Existing Environmental Aspects Sources of Potential Environmental Impact 12.2.1 12.2.2 12.2.3 12.2.4 12.2.5 12.2.6 12.2.7 Existing airport activities Solid Wastes Liquid Wastes Hazardous Wastes Recyclable Wastes Surrounding Land Use Potential Impacts of Master Plan Developments 12.3 Measures to Prevent, Control or Reduce Environmental Impact 12.3.1 12.3.2 EMS Inspections, audits and investigations 12.3.3 12.4 Environmental Monitoring 66 65 64 64

Objective and Targets 12.4.1 12.4.2 12.4.3 Objective

Achievements from last 5 years Targets for next 5 years

12.1 Existing Environmental Aspects


Gold Coast Airport is Commonwealth land, and as such, state legislation only applies in the absence of relevant Federal legislation. Although not legally binding, Queensland legislation is used as a template for waste management systems on the airport. The Queensland Environment Protection Act 1994 says that waste can be a gas, liquid, solid or energy, or any combination of these. It defines waste as anything that is: left over, or an unwanted by-product, from an industrial, commercial, domestic or other activity, or surplus to the industrial, commercial, domestic or other activity generating the waste

12.2.2 Solid Wastes


The main solid waste streams generated on site include: food packaging and food waste office waste including paper and cardboard garden / green waste scrap metals from workshops plastic / glass building demolition waste

General waste that is not suitable for recycling is to be disposed in the general waste bin provided on site for collection by a licensed waste collection operator. GCAL contract a major waste management company to remove standard waste from the site. The contractor is required to meet satisfactory standards through quality assurance and comply with relevant legislation. Information regarding the actual volumes and types of solid waste generated at the airport is collected by the waste contractor. The current average volume of waste collection from the airport is 110m3 per week. No waste is currently being disposed of on site, however on site landfills have previously been operated by the airport. This issue has been further discussed in Section 4.0 - Land.

The operations at Gold Coast Airport produce a wide assortment of waste streams. Management of these materials on site is in compliance with the Queensland Environment Protection (Waste Management) Policy 2000, the Airport Act 1996 and Airport (Environmental Protection) Regulations 1997. Waste management practices at the Gold Coast Airport should have regard for the following Waste Management Hierarchy, with waste management practices listed in the preferred order of adoption: Waste avoidance Waste re-use Waste recycling Energy recovery from waste Waste disposal

12.2.3 Liquid Wastes


Liquid wastes streams generated at the airport include: domestic sewage cleaning waters from washing of hangars and workshop areas cleaning water from vehicle and aircraft washdown waste from commercial kitchens toilet waste from aircraft terminal operations

The waste management hierarchy is a framework for prioritising waste management practices to achieve the best environmental outcome. Currently, waste products are managed separately by GCAL and the individual tenants. GCALs standard waste management practices are detailed below, and may not be adhered to by all tenants. The targets and objectives outlined in this section aim to bring about a co-ordinated waste management system.

12.2 Sources of Potential Environmental Impact 12.2.1 Existing Airport Activities


Airport activities create a wide variety of waste types which can be divided into the following categories, as further described below: solid wastes liquid wastes hazardous wastes recyclables

All washdown water from the vehicle and aircraft washdown bay - provided beside the general aviation area - goes through a Clearmake oil/water separator system, before being directed through a single-sump interceptor and finally to a Humeceptor, prior to release to Coolangatta Creek. Domestic sewage, toilet waste from aircraft and waste from commercial kitchens all go directly to sewer. Trade waste licences are held by all tenants releasing waste to sewer.

12.2.4 Hazardous Wastes


Hazardous or regulated wastes generated at the airport include: waste oil and fuel (if not recycled) oily rags used chemicals including solvents, thinners, glycol, pesticides and insecticides

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solids from interceptor traps asbestos and waste building materials empty plastic and steel chemical drums eg from poisons and paints batteries (if not recycled) oil filters (if not recycled)

contamination as a result of leachate extracted from the tip overflowing onto airport property.

12.2.7 Potential Impacts of Master Plan Developments


The major developments planned for Gold Coast Airport are detailed in the GCAL Master Plan (2001). Any new developments at the airport will be constructed and operated in compliance with relevant legislation and site standards relating to waste management. Any new waste streams that are produced on site will be assessed and incorporated into the site waste management strategy.

Where regulated waste is removed off-site, the waste must only be transported by an operator licensed under the EP Act (1994) to transport regulated wastes. Where regulated waste is removed off-site, the waste must only be transported to a facility licensed under the EP Act (1994) to accept, store, recycle or dispose of regulated waste. A five docket waste tracking system has been introduced by the Queensland Environment Protection Agency to facilitate uniformity in the waste tracking process. The waste tracking documentation is to be completed upon despatch of the waste off site. No quarantine hazardous waste streams are handled by the airport, however a quarantine box for fruit disposal is located within the main terminal. All quarantine waste, including galley wastes from the airlines, are handled by Australian Quarantine Inspection Services (AQIS).

12.3 Measures to Prevent, Control or Reduce Environmental Impact 12.3.1 EMS


GCALs EMS has systems and procedures in place to prevent, control or reduce potential environmental impacts. Refer to Section 3.0 Environmental Management System.

12.2.5 Recyclable Wastes


Recyclable wastes at the airport include: glass plastic aluminium paper / cardboard waste oil oil filters batteries tyres

12.3.2 Inspections, audits and investigations


Informal, visual inspections are undertaken on a daily basis by the GCAL Safety Officers, who assess the site for safety, security and environmental issues. More formal inspections are undertaken, usually on a monthly basis, by the GCAL Environment Department and the AEO. The AEO provides notification of any action items arising from these inspections. Any inappropriate waste handling, storage or disposal is reported to GCAL through the incident reporting system, and followed up to prevent reoccurrence where possible. GCAL also undertakes investigations of any reported, inappropriate waste management that occurs on the airport.

Recyclable waste are placed in the appropriate recycling bins or stored at known collection points in the GCAL compound. Large items for disposal which may have some re-use value are stockpiled until there is sufficient material to warrant a truck load being taken to the GECKO recycle facility located adjacent to the Tugun Soccer grounds, north of the airport.

12.3.3 Environmental Monitoring 12.2.6 Surrounding Land Use


Gold Coast Airport has residential and industrial neighbours on all sides excepting the south-western boundary, which backs onto the Cobaki Broadwater. GCALs surrounding neighbours include residents, fuel stations, a landfill, sewage treatment plants, a hospital, a quarry and the Pacific Motorway / Gold Coast highway. The Tugun Landfill Facility, located adjacent to the northwest boundary of Gold Coast Airport, is a major, potential contamination source. Firstly the landfill is unlined and secondly, previous investigations (GCAL. 1998), have indicated operations at the landfill have caused 65 GCALs environmental monitoring program is detailed in Section 15.0 Environmental Monitoring.

12.4 Objective and Targets 12.4.3 Targets for next 5 years: 12.4.1 Objective:
To ensure compliance with applicable legislation, standards and guidelines, as identified in GCALs Legal Register EMS Document Number 6.0022 (Appendix 6.0). Additionally, waste minimisation is encouraged through resourceful management initiatives. For the next five years, GCAL has set the following targets for waste management (Table 16):

12.4.2 Achievements from last 5 years:


Some significant GCAL achievements in waste management from the period of the 1999 Environment Strategy include: Development and implementation of EMS procedures (see Section 3.0 - EMS) Implementation of Environmentally Sustainable Development guidelines, particularly waste management requirements during construction Bunding of chemicals on site to AS:1940 Trade waste agreements in place with Gold Coast City Council Additional gross pollutant interceptors installed at relevant locations

Table 16.0 GCAL Waste Management Targets


TARGET Waste Audit to detail waste streams and current disposal methods Implementation of all viable waste recycling programs Reduction of waste to landfill VERIFIED BY Waste Audit Report Annual AEO audit Waste volumes from contractor TARGET DATE December 2004 December 2006 Reporting December 2004, Reduction December 2008 December 2008 Commence December 2005 then monthly As required RESPONSIBILITY Environment Technician Environment Manager Senior Management Team GM Finance & Administration Environment Technician Environment Manager Manager Planning and Engineering

All waste to green landfills (eg lined, collection of gases /leachate and reuse - where possible) Quantify and report on various waste stream volumes Timely investigation of any reported, inappropriate waste management Develop Total Waste Management and Recycling Program

Waste contractor landfill records Monthly reports

Documented initial report and investigation findings Program in place and operational

December 2005

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13

Hazardous Materials
13.1 13.2 Existing Environmental Aspects Sources of Potential Environmental Impact 13.2.1 13.2.2 13.2.3 Existing airport activities Fuel and Oil Toxic and Hazardous Chemical Storage 13.2.4 13.2.5 13.2.6 Asbestos Surrounding Land Use Potential Impacts of Master Plan Developments 13.3 Measures to Prevent, Control or Reduce Environmental Impact 13.3.1 EMS 13.3.2 Inspections, audits and investigations 13.3.3 Environmental Monitoring 13.4 Objective and Targets 13.4.1 Objective 13.4.2 13.4.3 Achievements from last 5 years Targets for next 5 years 69 69 68 68

13.1 Existing Environmental Aspects


Gold Coast Airport is Commonwealth land, and as such, state legislation only applies in the absence of Federal legislation. Although not legally binding, Queensland legislation is used as a template for hazardous material management systems on the airport. The Queensland Dangerous Goods Safety Management Act 2001 defines hazardous materials as a substance with potential to cause harm to persons, property or the environment because of one or more of the following: The chemical properties of the substance The physical properties of the substance The biological properties of the substance

Polychlorinated biphenols (PCBs) which had previously been identified in electrical transformers on site, have been removed. No PCBs are currently stored or used at the airport.

13.2.2 Fuel and Oil


Fuels and oils are stored in both underground and above ground storage facilities. The main types of fuels and oils stored within the airport include: aviation gasoline oil jet fuel diesel super and unleaded fuel

Any goods which are classified dangerous goods or combustible liquids or chemicals in the Dangerous Goods Safety Management Act 2001, are also classified as hazardous materials. The NSW Environmentally Hazardous Chemicals Act 1985, applies to the fire training area on the NSW side of the border. The operations at Gold Coast Airport require the use of a variety of hazardous materials. Management of these materials on site is in compliance with the Dangerous Goods Safety Management Act 2001, Australian Standard 1940: The Storage and Handling of Flammable and Combustible Liquids, and the Airport (Environmental Protection) Regulations 1997 .

The fuels and oils stored on the airport are typically used for aircraft and ground vehicles, as well as fire training exercises. The major fuel storages on site are the JUHI, the general aviation fuel tank and the fire training area.

13.2.3 Toxic and Hazardous Chemical Storage


The main types of chemicals stored at the airport typically include: cleaning chemicals including detergents used for cleaning of vehicles and aircraft paints and thinners used for painting aircraft and linemarking pesticides and herbicides solvents and phenolic substances for maintenance works and cleaning batteries

13.2 Sources of Potential Environmental Impact 13.2.1 Existing Airport Activities


The main activities conducted at Gold Coast Airport that involve the storage and handling of hazardous materials include: Repairs and maintenance conducted at mechanical and electrical workshops Fuel storage and handling areas including vehicle and aircraft refuelling Ground service activities including cleaning, line marking, maintenance, weed and pest control Washdown facilities including vehicle and aircraft wash bays Fire training Tenants individual maintenance, cleaning activities and pest control

A hazardous substance risk assessment for GCALs operations at the airport was undertaken in 1998 and has been reviewed and updated in 2000 and 2003/4. The initial risk assessment produced a hazardous substance register for all chemicals on the airport and their associated material safety data sheets. Subsequent reviews have ensured these documents remain current.

13.2.4 Asbestos
An asbestos audit conducted by Douglas & Parmers (1996c) identified the location of asbestos sheeting at various locations on the airport. An asbestos register based on the audits findings was then developed. This register is reviewed prior to any construction or demolition works, and updated at the completion of these works. As no new asbestos materials are being introduced to the site, the only updates to the asbestos register are when old buildings are demolished and the asbestos is removed

The main hazardous materials used and stored at the site have been categorised into the following areas: 68 Fuels and oils Toxic and hazardous chemicals Asbestos

and disposed of in accordance with relevant standards. Once the site has been tested free from asbestos, their inclusion on the register is removed.

13.3.3 Environmental Monitoring


GCALs environmental monitoring program is detailed in Section 15.0 Environmental Monitoring.

13.2.5 Surrounding Land Use


Gold Coast Airport has residential and industrial neighbours on all sides excepting the south-western boundary, which backs onto the Cobaki Broadwater. GCALs surrounding neighbours include residents, fuel stations, a landfill, sewage treatment plants, a hospital, a quarry and the Pacific Motorway / Gold Coast highway. The surrounding land users store and handle a variety of hazardous materials. The standard to which they control their hazardous materials is unknown, but is assumed to be in compliance with local and state legislation. Environmental impacts from hazardous materials causing land, surface water or groundwater contamination are covered in Sections 4.0, 5.0 and 6.0 respectively.

13.4 Objective and Targets 12.4.1 Objective:


To ensure compliance with applicable legislation, standards and guidelines, as identified in GCALs Legal Register EMS Document Number 6.0022. Additionally, to minimise the use and impact of hazardous materials on site.

13.4.2 Achievements from last 5 years:


Some significant GCAL achievements in surface water management from the period of the 1999 Environment Strategy include: Development and implementation of EMS procedures (see Section 3.0 - EMS) Implementation and upkeep of the Chemical substance register Implementation of Environmentally Sustainable Development guidelines, particularly regarding management of hazardous substances Bunding of chemicals on site to AS:1940 Positioning of spill kits in relevant locations Implementation of spill response trailer and procedures Implementation of environmental incident reporting and corrective action procedures Procedure for interceptor management, including regular inspections and maintenance Development of sampling program for JUHI runoff water Re-development of the fire training area to include: complete bunding of the major fire training facility installation of oil/water separation equipment for drainage from the bunded area implementation of procedures and recognised staff to operate oil/water separation equipment back-up system for drainage to go to sewer

13.2.6 Potential Impacts of Master Plan Developments


The major developments planned for Gold Coast Airport are detailed in the GCAL Master Plan (2001). Any new developments at the airport will be constructed and operated in compliance with relevant legislation and standards relating to hazardous materials storage and handling.

13.3 Measures to Prevent, Control or Reduce Environmental Impact 13.3.1 EMS


GCALs EMS has systems and procedures in place to prevent, control or reduce potential environmental impacts. Refer to Section 3.0 Environmental Management System.

13.3.2 Inspections, audits and investigations


Informal, visual inspections are undertaken on a daily basis by the GCAL Safety Officers, who assess the site for safety, security and environmental issues. More formal inspections are undertaken, usually on a monthly basis, by the GCAL Environment Department and the AEO. The AEO provides notification of any action items arising from these inspections. Hazardous materials storage and handling issues are reported to GCAL through the incident reporting system, and followed up to prevent reoccurrence where possible. GCAL also undertakes investigations of any inappropriate hazardous material storage and/or handling.

13.4.3 Targets for next 5 years:


For the next five years, GCAL has set the following targets for hazardous materials management (Table 17.0 over page):

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Table 17.0 GCAL Hazardous Materials Management Targets


TARGET Procedures for hazardous material waste management and disposal to be implemented across site All construction, demolition and maintenance contracts to have clauses relating to hazardous material management Compliance with AS1940 Integrity testing for all tenant and GCAL USTs every two years (as a minimum) Update chemical register Rationalise and minimise the number of hazardous materials used on site No unauthorised disturbance of asbestos sites Implementation of new chemical approval forms for all chemicals on site Specific spill response training for selected staff Timely investigation of any reported, inappropriate handling or storage of hazardous materials Annual Tenant Audits Develop program to implement environment friendly chemicals No new approvals of underground storage tanks VERIFIED BY Procedure and waste tracking documents Contract conditions Annual audits by AEO Testing results TARGET DATE December 2005 RESPONSIBILITY Senior Management Team GM Development

December 2006

Annually Commence immediately then every 2 years Annually December 2007 As required December 2006 December 2005 As required

Environment Manager Environment Manager Environment Technician Environment Manager Manager Planning and Engineering Environment Manager Manager Planning and Engineering Environment Manager

Chemical register review date Chemical register Work approvals New chemical forms Training Records Documented initial report and investigation findings Audit Findings letter to tenants Chemical Database Development approvals

Annually December 2005 (then annually) Commence immediately then ongoing

Environment Manager Environment Manager GM Development

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14

Resource Usage
14.1 14.2 Existing Environmental Aspects Sources of Potential Environmental Impact 14.2.1 14.2.2 Existing airport activities Potential Impacts of Master Plan Developments 14.3 Measures to Prevent, Control or Reduce Environmental Impact 14.3.1 EMS 14.3.2 Inspections, audits and investigations 14.3.3 Environmental Monitoring 14.4 Objective and Targets 14.4.1 Objective 14.4.2 14.4.3 Achievements from last 5 years Targets for next 5 years 72 72 72 72

14.1 Existing Environmental Aspects


The consumption of natural resources as a result of airport activities may impact the environment in a number of ways. Electricity and fuel consumption lead to an increase in greenhouse gases, in addition to the actual consumption of our finite mineral reserves Water usage depletes an already limited water supply throughout the majority of Australia Consumption of non-recyclable materials firstly utilises these natural resources, and secondly produces a waste product whereby appropriate disposal becomes a separate environmental issue.

During the operations phase, potential resource usage issues may include: Increased greenhouse gas emissions through increased energy usage Increased greenhouse gas emissions through increased vehicle usage Depletion of water resources through increased water usage Increased quantity of waste disposed Increased consumption of non-renewable resources

14.3 Measures to Prevent, Control or Reduce Environmental Impact 14.3.1 EMS


GCALs EMS has systems and procedures in place to prevent, control or reduce potential environmental impacts. Refer to Section 3.0 Environmental Management System.

14.2 Sources of Potential Environmental Impact 14.2.1 Existing Airport Activities


Typical airport activities involving resource usage that have the potential to impact on the environment include: Aircraft movement Lighting internal and external Airconditioning and heating of airport facilities Petrol, diesel, LPG and oil consumption Consumption of natural materials and generation of waste through normal operations Water consumption through fire fighting, garden maintenance, aircraft and vehicle washing, washroom and kitchen facilities All other electricity usage

14.3.2 Inspections, audits and investigations


Informal, visual inspections are undertaken on a daily basis by the GCAL Safety Officers, who assess the site for safety, security and environmental issues. More formal inspections are undertaken, usually on a monthly basis, by the GCAL Environment Department and the AEO. The AEO provides notification of any action items arising from these inspections. Hazardous materials storage and handling issues are reported to GCAL through the incident reporting system, and followed up to prevent reoccurrence where possible. GCAL also undertakes investigations of any inappropriate hazardous material storage and/or handling.

14.2.2 Potential Impacts of Master Plan Developments


The major developments planned for Gold Coast Airport are detailed in the GCAL Master Plan (2001). There are potential issues relating to resource usage if these developments are not managed correctly. During the construction phase, potential resource usage issues may include: Increased greenhouse gas emissions through increased energy usage Increased greenhouse gas emissions through increased vehicle usage Depletion of water resources through increased water usage Improper waste management and recycling leading to re-usable items being disposed as waste Increased consumption of non-renewable resources

14.3.3

Environmental Monitoring

GCALs environmental monitoring program is detailed in Section 15.0 Environmental Monitoring.

14.4 Objective and Targets 14.4.1 Objective:


To ensure compliance with applicable legislation, standards and guidelines, as identified in GCALs Legal Register EMS Document Number 6.0022. Additionally, to ensure natural resources are used efficiently and resource usage is minimised wherever possible.

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14.4.2 Achievements from last 5 years:


Some significant GCAL achievements in resource management from the period of the 1999 Environment Strategy include: Development and implementation of EMS procedures (see Section 3.0 - EMS) Installation of groundwater spear pump for grounds maintenance activities Installation of Building Management System at the GCAL operated terminal GCAL became a signatory to the Greenhouse Challenge in 2003 GCAL awarded by Gold Coast Cite Council in 2003 for water management initiatives Implementation of Environmentally Sustainable Development guidelines, particularly regarding efficient resource management during construction Trade waste agreements in place with Gold Coast City Council

14.4.3 Targets for next 5 years:


For the next five years, GCAL has set the following targets for resource management: Gold Coast Airport installed a spear pump in 2003 which is used for maintenance of gardens and landscaping in order to minimise raw water usage.

Table 18.0 GCAL Resource Management Targets


TARGET Implementat initiatives from Greenhouse Challenge Co-operative Agreement No increase in water usage levels (L/employee and L/pax) 10% increase in volume of waste recycling VERIFIED BY Greenhouse Challenge annual report Water usage invoices Waste disposal records Waste disposal records GCAL standard contract Visual building inspection TARGET DATE Annually RESPONSIBILITY Environment Manager Senior Management Team Senior Management Team Senior Management Team GM Development GM Development

Commence 2005

Commence 2005

No increase in waste to landfill volumes (t/ employee and t/pax) Waste recycling a requirement included in all GCAL contracts Implement green building standards for developments

Commence 2005

December 2005 December 2009

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Environmental Monitoring
15.1 Existing Environmental Aspects 15.1.1 Environment Monitoring Program 15.1.2 Analysis and reporting of monitoring results 15.1.3 15.1.4 15.1.6 Environment Research Program EMS Inspections, audits and investigations 15.2 Objective and Targets 15.2.1 15.2.2 15.2.3 Objective Achievements from last 5 years Targets for next 5 years 78 76

15.1 Existing Environmental Aspects


Environmental monitoring is undertaken at Gold Coast Airport for a number of reasons. Firstly to demonstrate compliance with legislative standards such as water quality standards in the Airport (Environment Protection) Regulations 1997; secondly to trend monitoring results to show if environmental conditions are changing over time, either improving or getting worse; and thirdly to highlight areas requiring increased management attention and to allow for budgetary considerations.

Figure 17.0 shows the regular surface water, groundwater and interceptor trap monitoring locations. Other environmental monitoring is undertaken on an as required basis. Table 19.0 below shows the frequency of environmental monitoring. GCAL will implement pre/post lease environmental assessments which will ensure that lessees leaving a site remediate any environmental contamination resulting from their occupation of the site, thereby ensuring a clean site for the new lessee.

15.1.1 Environment Monitoring Program


GCALs environmental monitoring program includes: surface water groundwater interceptor traps noise air quality soil contamination acid sulphate soils waste volumes meteorological data water and electricity usage

Table 19.0 GCAL Environmental Monitoring Program


TYPE Surface Water Groundwater Interceptor traps Noise Air Quality Soil Contamination LOCATION Monitoring stations 1 to 11 3 x landfill, RPT and Tugun Bypass bores See Figure 17.0 As required As required As required FREQUENCY Quarterly Quarterly Twice yearly As required As required As required NORMAL ANALYTES pH, EC, TPH, BTEX, pH, EC, TPH, BTEX, Visual inspection As required As required As required based on suspected contamination source Total volume Volume Kilowatt hours

Waste volumes Water usage Electricity usage

As required GCAL lease GCAL and tenants

Monthly or as per collection frequency Quarterly Quarterly

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15.1.2 Analysis and reporting of monitoring results


GCAL will analyse results from environmental monitoring to determine emerging trends or specific non-compliances against AEPR or Australian Standards. A summary of analysis results will be included in the Annual Environment Report. If a non-compliance or a declining trend in performance is identified through environmental monitoring and assessments undertaken, corrective actions will be initiated to either achieve compliance or improve performance. The AEO will receive copies of all monitoring results and analysis of results as required.

15.1.3 Environment Research Program


A co-operative agreement was signed with Griffith University in 2001 to allow honours students to undertake relevant environmental research on the airport. The range of fauna and flora species on the airport provides the students with a selection of potential honours projects. Previous honours research projects that have occurred on site include: Temporal and spatial distribution of breeding activity in an acid frog community A study of a rare plant species Acacia baueri, in the western management precinct of Gold Coast Airport land

Photograph of Common Planigale (Planigale maculata) captured during ecological monitoring along Coolangatta Creek.

Honours research projects underway for 2004 are: Aspects of the ecology of coastal planigales (Planigale maculata) Ongoing research into the acid frog communities

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The increased understanding of the environmentally significant species on the airport is a benefit to the scientific community, and provides GCAL with the latest information to implement best management practices. Proposed assessments and investigations at GCAL for the next 5 years include:

TYPE OF ASSESSMENT / INVESTIGATION Detailed environmental assessments to complement existing information Specific investigations into suspected environmental contamination or degradation Waste audit and identification of management options Verification of specific endangered species management options Whole-of-catchment environmental assessments to complement airport initiatives Pre and post lease land contamination assessments Honours projects approved by Griffith University and GCAL

LOCATION Cobaki Environmental Precinct, Business Park and Western Enterprise Precinct As required Total airport audit, including tenants Totally or partially within airport boundaries As identified through liaison with relevant catchment environmental groups Upon expiry and non-renewal of any airport lease Totally or partially within airport boundaries

15.1.4 EMS
GCALs EMS has systems and procedures in place to ensure environmental monitoring is undertaken to relevant standards. Refer to Section 3.0 Environmental Management System. Sample analysis will be by NATA accredited laboratories only.

the airport in compliance with applicable legislation, standards and guidelines, as identified in GCALs Legal Register EMS Document Number 6.0022 (Appendix 6.0). Additionally, environmental monitoring will be used to justify environmental objectives and targets, quantify the success of management strategies, highlight noncompliances that require specific action and provide proof of compliance with AEPR.

15.1.5 Inspections, audits and investigations


Informal, visual inspections are undertaken on a daily basis by the GCAL Safety Officers, who assess the site for safety, security and environmental issues. More formal inspections are undertaken, usually on a monthly basis, by the GCAL Environment Department and the AEO. The AEO provides notification of any action items arising from these inspections. Any environmental incidents are reported to GCAL through the incident reporting system, and followed up to prevent reoccurrence where possible. GCAL also undertakes investigations and monitoring of any reported, suspected environmental contamination on the airport.

15.2.2 Achievements from last 5 years:


Some significant GCAL achievements in environmental monitoring from the period of the 1999 Environment Strategy include: Development and implementation of EMS procedures (see Section 3.0 - EMS) Rationalisation of surface water monitoring program in 2001 Implementation and ongoing interceptor trap monitoring Implementation and ongoing Coolangatta Ck ecological monitoring Implementation and ongoing relationship with Griffith University for environmental research initiatives Implementation and requirement for ongoing groundwater monitoring by JUHI operators

15.2 Objective and Targets 15.2.1 Objective:


To ensure environmental monitoring is undertaken at

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15.2.3 Targets for next 5 years:


For the next five years, GCAL has set the following targets for environmental monitoring:

Table 20.0 GCAL Resource Management Targets


TARGET Quarterly monitoring of surface water sampling points Quarterly analysis of surface water monitoring results Written sampling procedure to be used on site Samples by NATA laboratory only Timely analysis of monitoring results VERIFIED BY NATA registered laboratory Trending against indicators Procedure document Laboratory results Analysis results TARGET DATE Quarterly Quarterly December 2005 As required Within 1 month of results RESPONSIBILITY Environment Technician Environment Technician Environment Manager Environment Manager Environment Manager

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Appendices
APPENDIX 1.0 82

Contractor Environmental Management Guidelines APPENDIX 2.0 GCAL Environmental Aspects and Impacts APPENDIX 3.0 Previous Studies and Reports APPENDIX 4.0 GCAL Flora List APPENDIX 5.0 GCAL Fauna List APPENDIX 6.0 GCAL Legal Register 101 98 92 89 85

APPENDIX 1.0
CONTRACTOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES Environmental Management Guidelines Introduction
All employees, contractors or agents working at Gold Coast Airport must comply with the Airports (Environment Protection) Regulations. The regulations deal with issues such as protection of water quality, soil, ecology, cultural heritage, air quality and the prevention of excessive noise. Activities that contravene the regulations and pose a risk or cause harm to these environmental qualities may be subject to actions including prosecution. These environmental management guidelines provide general information, which will assist those involved in construction, demolition and maintenance activities at Gold Coast Airport to comply with the legal requirements. Many works at the Airport require approval under the Airports (Building Control) Regulations, and additional environmental management requirements (over and above those detailed in this guidance note) may be included in the works approval issued by the Building Controller. For specific advice in relation to your proposed activities or for further information please contact the Airport Environment Officer, Claire Richardson on 07 3341 1811 or 07 5589 1146.

possible excavations, building and maintenance activities should not take place in close proximity to stormwater drains. If this cannot be avoided, temporary covers should be placed over the drains, or temporary bunds should be provided to prevent runoff and contaminants entering the drain. The following are examples of some contaminants that are not to be discharged, or placed in a position where they could lead to a discharge, to the stormwater system: concrete slurry or concrete mixer washout; cutting saw slurry; paint, paintstripper and paint brush washdown water; oil, fuel or other hydrocarbon contaminants; vehicle or plant washdown water including detergents; trade wastes; sewage effluent; and chemicals or hazardous liquids.

Management of soil erosion is also a major concern, particularly given the sandy soils encountered at the airport, which may be difficult to stabilise after earthworks. Suspended and deposited sediment in the creek and open drain system as a result of runoff is also an environmental concern. To minimise risks of erosion and sedimentation during works to the open drain system, appropriate control measures shall be implemented. Temporary bunding to restrict the escape of sediments shall be installed and stockpiling shall be minimised or protected with bunding to prevent the release of sediments. Other measures to minimise the risk of soil erosion and sediment loss include: minimise the area of excavation open at any one time; utilise erosion and sediment control measures such as silt fences, hay bales or geo-textile matting; maintain sediment and erosion control measures during all site and weather conditions; close the excavation as soon as possible and assist the regeneration of vegetation by seeding the area with appropriate grass and plant species following consultation with the Gold Coast Airport and the Airport Environment Officer.

General
All employees, contractors or agents working on Commonwealth leased airport land have a legal duty not to undertake activities that cause, or have the potential to cause, environmental harm. When undertaking works at the airport, please be aware of the environmental impacts that could result from your actions and ensure that the appropriate control measures are in place. If you identify a situation or activity that may cause environmental harm, notify the Airport Environment Officer immediately. You should use your best judgement to recognise environmental harm and always contact the Airport Environment Officer for guidance if you are unsure about the environmental risks posed by a particular activity.

These measures, or alternative appropriate management techniques, shall be adopted where appropriate.

Acid Sulphate Soils


Coolangatta Airport is in a low-lying coastal area and, like much of the surrounding coastal land, has potential acid sulphate soils present. Acid sulphate soils are the common name given to soils containing iron sulphides. The iron sulphide layer is generally grey and wet in appearance, and when exposed to air may produce sulphuric acid. Release of sulphuric acid can acidify

Water Quality and Erosion Control


The potential for contamination of Coolangatta Creek and, ultimately, the beach at North Kirra and Cobaki Broadwater is a major risk for all external activities undertaken at the airport. To minimise this risk, where 82

soil water, groundwater and surface waters impacting greatly on coastal ecosystems. The sulphuric acid can also mobilise heavy metals in the soil such as aluminium, manganese and cadmium creating a mixture that is toxic to most plants, fish and organisms. It corrodes concrete, iron, steel and certain aluminium alloys having the potential to weaken concrete structures, building foundations and underground concrete water and sewer pipes etc. The indicators of an acid sulphate problem include iron stains and yellow jarosite coatings in drains, crystal clear water, poor grass growth, the lack or absence of freshwater insects, fish kills or an odorous rotten egg smell from the soil when exposed to air. Please notify the Airport Environment Officer immediately if you suspect an acid sulphate soil exists at the site of the works. In most cases, if work is to be undertaken in a part of the airport with suspected acid sulphate soils, investigations will be required prior to commencement of works.

whether solid, sludge residue or liquid (eg, paint, paint stripper, thinners etc) must be disposed of off the airport in accordance with local regulations. In some instances Gold Coast Airport may give permission to dispose of small quantities of liquid waste to sewer, or solid waste to a general waste bin. It should be noted that clean spoil is not to be removed from the Airport without the permission of Gold Coast Airport.

Air Quality and Dust


Odour and visible contaminants such as dust, smoke and fumes shall not be released to the environment unless authorised. Immediate dust control action must be taken where dust is causing visible dust deposition on cars and buildings, or visible dust clouds. If dust control measures cannot be implemented, works should cease until the situation improves or management measures can be adopted. The incident should be reported to the Airport Environment Officer immediately. Dust contaminated with paint, paint scrapings, paint stripper or other contaminants must be swept into a closed container and disposed of off-site in accordance with local waste disposal requirements unless Gold Coast Airport has approved disposal in an on-site industrial waste bin. Any vehicles leaving the work area must not carry excessive dirt, mud etc. outside the site boundary. Access roads should be kept free of dust and mud at all times. It is essential that dust, scrapings and mud does not enter the stormwater system.

Cultural Artifacts
Some areas of the Airport, particularly to the west of the main runway, are known to contain cultural artifacts associated with former Aboriginal activities in the area surrounding the Cobaki Broadwater. Therefore, it is possible that cultural artifacts may be encountered during earthworks on the airport. It is a requirement of the Airports (Environment Protection) Regulations that in the event of an operator or contractor making a discovery of cultural heritage significance, written notice of the discovery must be given to the Airport Environment Officer and Gold Coast Airport. The objects most likely to be found are shaped stones (smooth stones used in food preparation, or sharpened stones used in hunting or as cutting tools). More significant artifacts may include scarred trees, shell middens, stone axe heads and wooden items such as boomerang and digging sticks.

If asbestos is encountered, or suspected to be present, Gold Coast Airport must be contacted for guidance in relation to asbestos management.

Noise
Ground based noise emissions must comply with the limits defined in the Airports (Environmental Protection) Regulations. If your activities are likely to cause a noticeable increase in the background noise levels at commercial or residential properties on or in the vicinity of the airport, contact the Airport Environment Officer for further guidance in relation to legal requirements.

Protection of Habitat and Species


Habitats, flora and fauna shall be protected during works at the airport. This includes aquatic, land and riparian (along a watercourse) habitats and species. Some areas of the airport support potentially significant areas of habitat and species. The area identified as having the most significance lies to the west of the main runway. The less disturbed sections of Coolangatta Creek also support aquatic and riparian species, and impacts on these areas to the east of the main runway should be avoided.

Fuel & Chemicals


All chemicals and fuels used during the works shall be stored in spill trays or bunded areas capable of retaining the contents of the tanks or drums in the event of a spill or leak occurring. It is essential that there is no risk of spilled liquids causing ground contamination or stormwater pollution. Contractors are responsible for ensuring that spills are managed and remediated appropriately, and shall have appropriate spill control kits available on site at all times.

Solid, Sludge Resides and Liquid Waste


With the exception of clean spoil, all waste materials,

83

Contaminated Soils
If activities are to take place where contaminated soils may be present (eg, in the vicinity of existing or disused fuel storage, handling or delivery lines and tanks) it may be necessary to undertake investigations prior to or during the works. In most cases, prior to commencement of works in a potentially contaminated area, the Airport Environment Officer will provide guidance in relation to the contamination investigation methods that would be employed. If you are working in an area that is not suspected to contain contaminated soil, but you encounter fuel type odours or visual indications of fuel, contamination may be present. Please notify the Airport Environment Officer immediately in such instances. Please note that this information sheet only provides an introduction to the requirements of the new environmental laws at airports. It cannot be relied upon as legal advice, nor as a complete guide to requirements of the new laws. For guidance in relation to specific activities, refer to the Airports (Environment Protection) Regulations or contact the Gold Coast Airport Environment Officer on 07 3341 1811 or 07 5589 1146 for further information.

84

APPENDIX 2.0
GCAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS AND IMPACTS Environmental Management System Register of Environmental Aspects & Impacts by Department
REF
(ACTIVITY)

ASPECT

IMPACT SOIL & WATER: Contamination of surrounding soil or water bodies through the accidental release of chemicals. GROUND & SURFACE WATER: Ground water contamination through inappropriate discharge of wash waters SOIL & SURFACE WATER: Potential contamination of surrounding soils and surface waters from an accidental release of fuels, oils or chemicals. SURFACE WATER: Possible surface water contamination. AIR: Release of hydrocarbons and chemical vapours from tank vents and uncontrolled releases.

CONSEQUENCE
(BASED ON EXISTING CONTROLS)

LIKELIHOOD
(BASED ON EXISTING CONTROLS)

RISK RANKING Medium

CONTROL MECHANISMS EMP 15

MANAGER RESPONSIBLE ENG

1.

Use of hazardous chemicals on site

2.

Vehicle/aircraft washdown

Acceptable

PROCEDURE

ENG

3.

Fuel and Chemical Storage - JUHI Fuel and Chemical Storage Fuel and Chemical Storage Water Usage (vehicle and aircraft washing, cleaning, gardening, fire fighting activities (including drills)) Electricity Usage (heating, lighting, air conditioning) Operation of compressors Use of pesticides / herbicides Painting & Paint Stripping Refrigerated and Reverse cycle air conditioning Operation of grease traps from catering facilities Vehicle track construction / maintenance Presence of PCB containing equipment

High

EMP 6 & TENANT EMP EMP6 EMP 15 EMP 14

ENV- Tenant

4. 5.

3 1

D A

Medium Acceptable

ENV ENV

6.

RESOURCE USE: Depletion of water resources

Acceptable

EMP 1

ENG

7.

GREENHOUSE GASES: Increase in greenhouse gases emitted to atmosphere SOIL & SURFACE WATER: Condensate discharge to land or surface water drains. FLORA & FAUNA: Destruction of areas identified as being environmentally or culturally significant. AIR: Reduction in air quality through the release of VOCs into the surrounding environment. AIR: Potential for reduction in air quality through an accidental release of ODSs and CFCs into atmosphere. SURFACE WATER: Possible contamination of surface water through spills/accidental release. FLORA & FAUNA: Destruction of areas identified as being environmentally or culturally significant. SOIL & SURFACE WATER: Contamination of surrounding soil and water bodies from an accidental release of PCB contaminated material.

Acceptable

EMP 4

ENG

8.

Acceptable

9.

Medium

PROCEDURE

ENV

10.

Acceptable

EMP 14

ENG

11.

Acceptable

EMP 14

ENG

12.

Medium

PROCEDURE

ENG

13.

Medium

EMP 11 EMP 18

ENVI/ENG

14.

Acceptable

EMP 8

ENG

85

REF 15.

(ACTIVITY)

ASPECT

IMPACT SOIL & SURFACE WATER: Residual substances washed off equipment on to ground. AIR: Reduction in air quality through the release of VOCs into the surrounding environment. GREENHOUSE GASES / AIR: Increase in greenhouse gases, air pollution. WATER: Contamination of water through general operations.

CONSEQUENCE
(BASED ON EXISTING CONTROLS)

LIKELIHOOD
(BASED ON EXISTING CONTROLS)

RISK RANKING Acceptable

CONTROL MECHANISMS -

MANAGER RESPONSIBLE -

Storage of equipment and machinery in open areas. Degreasing/Cleaning

16.

Acceptable

EMP 14

ENG

17.

Consumption of petrol, diesel and LPG fuel through ground vehicles. Workshop and grounds maintenance activities. Operation of standby generator Grounds maintenance activities Underground fuel storage tanks (UST) Ground running and maintenance of aircraft Take off and landing of aircraft, including freight operations

Acceptable

EMP 4

ENG /OPS

18.

Acceptable

EMP 13

ENG

19.

GREENHOUSE GASES: Potential for release of greenhouse gas emissions. SURFACE WATER: Possible surface water contamination with pesticides, herbicides and fertiliser. GROUNDWATER: Groundwater contamination as a result of leakage. NOISE: Potential for annoyance of surrounding neighbourhood from noise levels. NOISE: Potential for annoyance of surrounding neighbourhood from noise levels.

Acceptable

EMP 4 EMP 13 & Procedure EMP 6

ENG

20.

Medium

ENG

21.

High

ENV

22.

Medium

EMP 10

OPS / ENV

23.

Medium

EMP 10

OPS / ENV

24.

Aircraft Emissions AIR / GREENHOUSE GASES: Increase from engine start-up of ground level pollutant levels and and idling on aprons greenhouse gas emissions. Emptying sewage from aircraft Access to areas by staff and general public. Ground vehicle emissions (including car park) Activities of small shops in terminal buildings Consumption of paper SURFACE WATER: Possible contamination of surface water through spills/accidental release. FLORA & FAUNA: Destruction of areas identified as being environmentally or culturally significant. GREENHOUSE GASES: Increase in greenhouse gas emissions. RESOURCE USE: Use of resources and generation of waste. RESOURCE USE: Use of natural resources.

Medium

TENANT EMP

OPS - Tenant

25.

Acceptable

TENANT EMP

ENV- Tenant

26.

Medium

EMP 11

ENV

27.

Acceptable

EMP 4 TENANT EMP EMP 2 EMP 2

ENV

28.

1 1

A A

Acceptable Acceptable

COM/ENV IT

29.

86

REF

(ACTIVITY)

ASPECT

IMPACT Potential impacts of dust, noise, sediment, waste, and resource use. SURFACE WATER: Possible surface water contamination from oil and fuel leaks from vehicles. Incorrect disposal of rubbish from residential areas. SOIL & WATER: Contamination of surrounding soil or water bodies through poor chemical storage practices. SURFACE WATER: Possible surface water contamination. RESOURCE USE: Resource use through downstream treatment and subsequent discharge to environment. SURFACE WATER: Possible surface water contamination with sediments from exposed areas SURFACE WATER: Possible surface water contamination by hydrocarbons. SURFACE WATER: Possible surface water contamination with iron, aluminium and a decreased pH. AIR: Release of airborne asbestos, potentially affecting human health. WASTE / RESOURCE USE: Increased quantity of waste disposed at site and increased consumption of natural resources. SURFACE WATER: Possible surface water contamination from oil and fuel leaks from vehicles. Possible lead, zinc, copper, cadmium and nickel contamination. SURFACE WATER: Possible surface water contamination from aviation fuel, other oils and greases and residue from tyres. SURFACE WATER: Possible surface water contamination with synthetic and organic lubricating oils, chemicals from paint stripping, solvents, degreasers and glycol.

CONSEQUENCE
(BASED ON EXISTING CONTROLS)

LIKELIHOOD
(BASED ON EXISTING CONTROLS)

RISK RANKING Medium

CONTROL MECHANISMS EMP 5

MANAGER RESPONSIBLE PRO & PLG

30.

Development, Construction & Demolition activity Stormwater runoff from off airport (mainly residential) Storage of hazardous chemicals on site including corrosives, solvents, toxins. Incorrect disposal of wastes Discharge to sewer from washbays, catering operations and fire service training exercises. Stormwater runoff from exposed (unvegetated) areas Accidental pollution interceptor trap discharge Stormwater drainage from acid sulphate soils Presence of, and removal of asbestos. Consumption of non-recyclable materials through general on site operations Stormwater runoff from roads, carparks and paved areas Stormwater runoff from runways and aprons Aircraft and vehicle maintenance workshops

31.

Medium

EMP 13

ENV

32.

Medium

EMP 15 Procedure

ENG / ENV

33.

Medium

EMP 13

ENG

34.

Acceptable

EMP 12

ENV

35.

Medium

EMP 13 EMP 7 Procedure EMP 13 EMP 16

ENV

36.

High

ENG

37. 38.

3 4

C E

High High

ENG / ENV ENV

39.

Acceptable

EMP 2

ENG

40.

Medium

EMP 13

ENG

41.

Medium

EMP 13

ENG

42.

Medium

TENANT EMP

ENV- Tenant

87

REF

(ACTIVITY)

ASPECT

IMPACT SURFACE WATER: Possible surface water contamination with oil, grease, detergent and suspended solids. SOIL & SURFACE WATER: Potential contamination of surrounding soils and surface waters from an accidental release of fuels and oils. SOIL & SURFACE WATER: Inappropriate disposal of hazardous chemicals. Disposal of large quantities of waste to landfill. Soil and water contamination from inappropriate waste storage techniques. SOIL & SURFACE WATER: Possible surface & groundwater contamination from fuels and synthetic foam residues. SURFACE WATER: Pollution of waterways.

CONSEQUENCE
(BASED ON EXISTING CONTROLS)

LIKELIHOOD
(BASED ON EXISTING CONTROLS)

RISK RANKING

CONTROL MECHANISMS

MANAGER RESPONSIBLE

Vehicle and aircraft washing

EMP 13 TENANT EMP Emergency Response Proc. TENANT EMP EMP 2

ENG

44.

Aircraft and vehicle refuelling

Medium

ENV- Tenant

45.

Generation of solid waste (including batteries) from general on-site activities.

Medium

ENG

46.

Fire training activities

High

TENANT EMP

ENV- Tenant

47.

Fire water run-off from responding to emergency situations. Open air burning as part of fire training Impacts of emergency fire drills Consumption of aviation fuel by aircraft. Environmental Commitments made in Environment Strategy approved by Minister

Medium

Emergency response Proc / Ops Procedures TENANT EMP

ENV

48.

GREENHOUSE GASES: Increased levels of greenhouse gas emissions, smoke, visible plume. SURFACE WATER: Possible pollution of waterways. AIR & GREENHOUSE GASES: Increase in greenhouse gases, air pollution. NON-COMPLIANCE with environmental commitments made in the Environment Strategy

2 3 1

A D A

Medium Medium Acceptable

ENV- Tenant ENV- Tenant ENV- Tenant

49. 50.

TENANT EMP TENANT EMP

51.

Medium

EMP 19

ENV

88

APPENDIX 3.0
PREVIOUS STUDIES AND REPORTS
TITLE GCAL Future Development Study - Review of Constraints Fauna Assessment Report - GCAL Runway Extension Inspection and Assessment of a newly discovered Archaeologicla site on airport grounds Tenant Review Report, Broshurst Hill Sand Dredging Operations Environmental Management Plan Stage 1 Airport Environment Review Coolangatta Airport Site Contamination Assessment Coolangatta Airport Environmental Audit of Operations at Coolangatta Airport Site Contamination Assessment - Stage 2, Coolangatta Airport Hydraulic Assessment Coolangatta Airport Environmental Investigation Coolangatta Airport Environmental Audit of Operations at Coolangatta Airport Further Environmental Investigations Coolangatta Airport Environmental Investigation Commuter Apron Baseline Environmental Survey Avis at Coolangatta Airport Environmental Audit - Hertz Car Rental, Coolangatta Airport Environmental Audit, Budget Rent-a-Car, Coolangatta Airport Asbestos Audit and Register at Coolangatta Airport Fauna of Coolangatta Creek Gold Coast Airport - a baseline study Hazardous Substances Risk Assessment GCAL Coolangatta Creek Fauna Monitoring Program 2002 GCAL Coolangatta Creek Fauna Monitoring Program 2003 Gold Coast Airport - Energy Audit Coolangatta Airport - Planning for Tomorrow Surface Water Quality Monitoring - Coolangatta Creek, Cobaki Broadwater and Open, Unlined Drain Notice of Intention for Coolangatta Airport Master Plan Site Contaminiation Asessment - Shell Airport Fuel Depot, Coolangatta Airport Assessment of Aboriginal Sites at the Coolangatta Airport Pacific Highway bypass Route Determination Study Report Amelioration and monitoring measures for the conservation of herpetofauna along the proposed Tugun by-pass Survey for Reptiles, Amphibians and Mammals inhabitating coastal lowland areas associated with the proposed Tugun Bypass AUTHOR/DATE ARUP (2002) Biodiversity Assessment (2004) Bonhomme Craib (2001) Brix (1993a) Brix (1993b) CMPS&F (1996a) CMPS&F (1996b) CMPS&F (1996c) Connell Wagner (2000) Douglas & Partners (1994) Douglas & Partners (1996a) Douglas & Partners (1996b) Douglas & Partners (1996c) Douglas & Partners (1997a) Douglas & Partners (1997b) Douglas & Partners (1997c) Douglas & Partners (1996d) Duffy and Shaw (2001) Dullaway (1998) EcoSure (2002) EcoSure (2003) Energex (2002) FAC (1994) GCAL (1998) GHD (1992B) Groundwater Technology (1993) Hall (1990) Hall (1992) Hero et al (2001a)

Hero et al (2001b)

89

TITLE Supplementary Surveys of Planigales, Eastern Long-eared Bat and Wallum Sedge Frogs - Tugun Bypass Preliminary Noise Level Impact Assessment of Intrusive Noise from Detailing and Cleaning Works at Hertz Rentals Preliminary Environmental Site Assessment Airport Fuel Depot, Coolangatta Preliminary Environmental Assessment Joint User Hydrant Installation (JUHI) Fuel Depot, Coolangatta Preliminary Environmental Site Assessment Airport Fuel Depot, Coolangatta Temporal and spatial distribution of breeding activity in acid frog community at Tugun, SEQ. Review of Land Contamination Issues Vegetation Survey Report - Coolangatta Airport Report on Remnant Bushland at South-eastern End of Runway at Coolangatta Airport Noise Monitoring - Gold Coast Airport BP Aviation Facility Coolangatta - Underground Storage Tank (UST) Closure Report Targetted Groundwater Monitoring Event, and Soil and Groundwater Characterisation, JUHI Facility, Coolangatta Airport Groundwater Monitoring Well Installation and Groundwater Monitoring Event, JUHI Facility, GCAL Groundwater Contaminant Assessment Assessment of Former Landfill Sites, Gold Coast Airport A study of rare plant species - the Tiny Wattle (Acacia baueri) in the western management precinct of Gold Coast Airport PCB Screening Test Report Further Environmental Site Assessment - JUHI Facility Further Environmental Site Assessment - JUHI Facility A Cultural Heritage Assessment of Two Proposed Optical Fibre Cable Installations in Ulmarra Shire NSW and Gold Coast City Queensland Tugun Bypass Proposal EIS studies including: Flora and fauna; Soils; Surface and Groundwater, Noise and Air Quality, Geotechnical and hydrogeology Environment Protection and Endangered Species and Heritage Review of the Coolangatta Airport Sand and Clay Analysis, Brodhurst Hills Sand Fill and Silt Pits Coolangatta Airport ENM&C Program Background Noise Logging PCB Screening Test Report Coolangatta Airport constraints to Development Vegetation Studies Coolangatta Airport constraints to Development Vegetation Studies Comparison of Western By-Pass Route Options Ecological Studies

AUTHOR/DATE Hero et al (2001c) Hill C (1998) Hollingsworth, Dames & Moore (1993a) Hollingsworth, Dames & Moore (1993b) Hollingsworth, Dames & Moore (1993c) Hopkins (2003) Lane & Synot (1998) Leiper (2001) Leiper (2002) Maunsell (2004) OTEK Australia (1993) PB (2003a) PB (2003b) PB (2004a) PB (2004b) Pereoglou (2003) Powerline Queensland (1997) PPK (2000) PPK (2001) Pragnall (1997) QDMR (1999 - 2004) Rust PPK (1997) Simmonds & Bristow (1998) Vipac Engineers & Scientists (1997) Westinghouse Industry Services (1994) Winders, Barlow and Morrison (1990a) Winders, Barlow and Morrison (1990b) Winders, Barlow and Morrison (1991)

90

APPENDIX 4
GCAL FLORA LIST
COMMON NAME SCIENTIFIC NAME Abildgardia ovata Scrub Ironbark Wattle Acacia aulacocarpa Acacia aulacocarpa var. aulacocarpa Little Wattle Acacia baueri subsp. baueri Acacia concurrens Sickle Wattle Fringed Wattle Sally Wattle Blunt-leaved Wattle Hickory Wattle Coast Wattle Sweet Wattle Prickly Mosses Lilly Pilly Coastal Aspen Mangrove Fern Red Cluster Heath River Mangrove Crofton Weed Acacia falcata Acacia fimbriata Acacia melanoxylon Acacia obtusifolia Acacia penninervis Acacia sophorae Acacia suaveolens Acacia ulicifolia Acmena smithii Acronychia imperforata Acrostichum speciosum Acrotriche aggregate Aegiceras corniculatum Ageratina adenophora Ageratina riparia Blue Billy Goat Weed Black She-oak Ageratum houstonianum Allocasuarina littoralis Alphitonia excelsa Ambrosia artemisiifolia Anagallis arvensis Whiskey Grass Common Aotus Andropogon virginicus Aotus ericoides Aotus lanigera White Lace Flower Bangalow Palm Archidendron hendersonii Archontophoenix cunninghamiana Aristida queenslandica Arthropodium milleflorum Asclepiad curassavica Birds-nest Fern Asplenium australsicum Aster subulatus Daphne Heath Drawfs Apples Variable Bossiaea Slender Twigrush Cobblers Peg Christmas Bells Bungwal Fern Hard Water Fern Sickle Boronia Dwarf Restio Feather Plant Wallum Banksia Coast Banksia Swamp Banksia large Leaf Banksia Bauera River Rose Bamboo Reed Bare Twig Rush Weeking Baekea Drosma Myrtle Heath Groundsel Bush COMMON NAME Star Hair Plant Midgenberry Grey Mangrove Carpet Grass

SCIENTIFIC NAME
Asterotricha longifolia (Tweed Heads form) Austromyrtus dulcis Avicennia marina Axonopus compressus Babingtonia virgata Baccharis halimifolia Bacopa monnieri Baeckea diosmifolia Baeckea sp Baeckea stenophylla Baloskion complanatus Baloskion pallens Baloskion tenuiculmis Baloskion tetraphyllus Banksia aemula Banksia integrifolia Banksia oblongifolia Banksia robur Bauera capitata Bauera rubioides Baumea articulata Baumea juncea Baumea muelleri Baumea rubiginosa Baumea teretifolia Bidens pilosa Blandfordia grandiflora Blechnum indicum Blechnum wattsii Boronia falcifolia Boronia rosmarinifolia Bossiaea heterophylla Brachiaria mutica Brachyloma daphnoides Breynia oblongifolia

91

COMMON NAME

SCIENTIFIC NAME Bromus catharticus

COMMON NAME Brush Kurrajong Cone Seeds Fleabane

SCIENTIFIC NAME Commersonia bartramia Conospermum taxifolium Conyza bonariensis Conyza canadensis Conyza parva Conyza sumatrensis

Large Leafed Orange Mangrove Native Stattrus Corky Prickle Vine

Bruguiera gymnorrhiza Burmannia disticha Caesalpinia subtropica Caesia parviflora Caladenia carnea

Christmas Orchid Willow Leaf Bottle Brush Heath Bottlebrush Common Ground Fern Fringe Myrtle

Calanthe triplicata Calistemon salignun Callistemon pachyphyllus Calochlaena dubia Calytrix tetragona Capsella bursapastoris

Coast Palm Lily

Cordyline congesta Coronopus didymus

Red Bloodwood Cadaghi

Corymbia gummifera Corymbia torelliana Crassocephalum crepidioides

Swamp Lily

Crinum pedunculatum Crotalaria lanceolata

Tall Sedge

Carex appressa Cassytha glabella Stinking Cryptocarya Tuckeroo

Cryptocarya foetida Cupaniopsis anacardiodes Cuphea carthagenesis

Devils Twine Swamp She-oak Grand Fathers Whiskers

Cassytha pubescens Casuarina glauca Caustis recurvata Celtis sinensis Cenchrus echinatus

Straw Tree Fern

Cyathea cooperi Cyclosorus interruptus Cynanchum carnosum

Buffel Grass Pennywort

Cenchrus pennisetiformis Centella asiatica Chamaesyce drummondii Chorizandra cymbaria Chorizandra sphaerocephala Chorizema parviflora

Common Couch Grass Rice Weed

Cynodon dactylon Cyperus difformis Cyperus eragrostis Cyperus haspan Cyperus haspan subsp. Juncoides Cyperus lucidus

Binung Bitou Buch

Christella dentata Chrysanthemoides monilifera Ciclospermum leptophyllum

Bunchy Sedge Mullimbimby Couch

Cyperus polystachyos Cyperus sesquiflorus Cyperus sphaeroideus Cyperus stradbrokensis

Camphor Laurel Fine-Leaved Water Vine

Cinnamomum camphora Cissus hypoglauca Cissus opaca Denhamia

Denhamia celastroides Desmodium intortum Desmodium tortuosum Dianella brevipedunculata

Tall Cladium leafless Comesperma Match Sticks Love Creeper Wandering Dew

Cladium procerum Comesperma defoliatum Comesperma ericinum Comesperma volubile Commelina cyanea Commelina diffusa Rough Flax Lily Flowery Parrot Pea Twisted Parrot Pea Native Yam

Dianella caerulea Dillwynia floribunda Dillwynia retorta Dioscorea transversa

92

COMMON NAME

SCIENTIFIC NAME Diplachne uninervia

COMMON NAME Bolwarra Ribbonwood Wombat Berry

SCIENTIFIC NAME Euphomatia laurina Euroschinus falcata Eustrephus latifolius Eutaxia microphylla

Hop Bush

Dodonaea triquetra Drosera burmanni

Pale Sundew Small Sundew Red Sundew

Drosera peltata Drosera pygmaea Drosera spatulata Drymaria cordata Milky Mangrove Creek Sandpaper Fig Moreton Bay Fig Small-leaved Fig

Exoecaria agallocha Ficus cornata Ficus macropylla Ficus obliqua Fimbristylis cinnamometrum

Soft Corkwood

Duboisia myoporoides Durringtonia paludosa

Swamp Barnyard Grass

Echinochloa telmatophila Eclipta prostrata

Common Fringe Rush

Fimbristylis dichotoma Fimbristylis nutans Fimbristylis pauciflora Fimbristylis polytrichoides

Water Hyacinth Blue Quandong Grey Carabeen Blueberry Ash Sag Spikerush

Eichhornia crassipes Elaeocarpus grandis Elaeocarpus obovatus Elaeocarpus reticulates Eleocharis equisetina Emilia sonchifolia Red-fruit Sawsedge Coastal Sawsedge Saw Sedge Scrambling Lily Whip Vine

Flagellaria indica Fuirena ciliaris Gahnia aspera Gahnia clarkei Gahnia sieberiana Geitonoplesium cymosum Geodorum densiflorum

Spreading Rope Rush Hard Corkwood Entolasia

Empodisma minus Endiandra sieberi Entolasia stricta Enydra fluctuans

Alpine Coral Fern Cheese Tree Umbrella Cheese Tree Twining Glycine Balloon Plant

Gleichenia dicarpa Glochidion ferdinandi Glochidion sumatranum Glycine clandestina Gomphocarpus fruticosus Gomphocarpus physocarpus

Coral Heath Blunt Leaf Heath Pink Coral Heath

Epacris microphylla Epacris obtusifolia Epacris pulchella Epaltes australis Epaltes cunninghamii Eragrostis cilianensis

Pinnate Wedge Pea Leafy Wedge Pea

Gompholobium pinnatum Gompholobium virgatum Gonocarpus chinensis Gonocarpus micranthus

Clustered Love Grass Love Grass

Eragrostis elongata Eragrostis sororia Eragrostis spartinoides Eragrostis tenuifolia Erechtites valerianifolia Eriachne glabrata

Rocket Goodenia Branched Goodenia

Goodenia bellidifolia Goodenia paniculata Goodenia rotundifolia

Common Pipewort Scribbly Gum Red Mahogany Swamp Mahogany Forest Red Gum

Eriocaulon scariosum Eucalyptus racemosa Eucalyptus resinferea Eucalyptus robusta Eucalyptus tereticornis Euchiton americanum

Spike Goodenia Guioa

Goodenia stelligera Guioa semiglauca Haemodorum austroqueenslandicum

Narrow leaf Hibbertia

Hibbertia linearis Hibbertia riparia Hibbertia salicifolia

93

COMMON NAME Twining Guinea Flower

SCIENTIFIC NAME Hibbertia scandens Hibbertia stricta Hibiscus diversifolius

COMMON NAME

SCIENTIFIC NAME Lepyrodia interrupta

Pink Beard Heath Beard Heath Tea-Tree Beard Heath Pearl Beard Heath

Leucopogon ericoides Leucopogon lanceolatus var.gracilis Leucopogon leptospermoides Leucopogon margarodes Leucopogon pedicellatus Leucopogon pimeleoides

Bats Wing Fern

Histiopteris incisa Homoranthus virgatus

Lance Leaf Hovea

Hovea lanceolata Hydrocotyle acutiloba Hyparrhenia rufa Hypericum gramineum Common Beard Heath Screw Fern

Leucopogon virgatus Lindsaea linearis Lissanthe sp. A

Bears Ear

Hypochaeris radicata Hypolaena fastigiata Brown Bolly Gum Swamp Lobelia Trailing Lobelia

Litsea australis Lobelia alata Lobelia gracilis Lobelia purpurascens Lomandra elongata

Harsh Ground Fern Ruddy Ground Fern Blady Grass Fine-Leaf Morning Glory

Hypolepis muelleri Hypolepis rugosula Imperata cylindrica Ipomea cairica Isachne globosa Ischaemum australe Ischaemum fragile Isolepis inundatus Jacksonia stackhousii

Spiny Mat Rush Brushbox Swamp Brushbox

Lomandra longifolia Lophostemon confertus Lophostemon suaveolens Lotononis bainesii Lycopodiella cernua

Foambark Tree

Jagera pseudorhus Juncus continuus

Climbing Maidenhair Macaranga Orange Thorn Siratro

Lygodium microphyllum Macaranga tanarius Maclura cochinchinensis Macroptilium atropurpureum Macroptilium lathyroides

Sea Rush

Juncus kraussii Juncus prismatocarpus

Common Rush Dusky Coral Pea Lantana Wire Lily Swamp Rice Grass

Juncus usitatus Kennedia rubicunda Lantana camara Laxmannia gracilis Leersia hexandra Lepironia articulata Leptocarpus tenax Red Kamala Milk Vine Snow-in-Summer Ball Honey Myrtle Broad-leaved paperbark Thyme Honey Myrtle Native Lasiandra Pink Euodia Malassus Grass

Mallotus philippensis Marsdenia rostrata Melaleuca linariifolia Melaleuca nodosa Melaleuca quinquenervia Melalueca thymifolia Melastoma affine Melicope elleryana Melinis minutiflora Melinis repens Microlaena stipoides Microtis unifolia

Native Currant Prickly Tea-Tree Coastal Tea-Tree Lemon-scented Tea-Tree Common Tea-tree Soft-fruited Tea-Tree Shaggy Tea-Tree Tea-Tree

Leptomeria drupacea Leptospermum juniperinum Leptospermum laevigatum Leptospermum liversidgei Leptospermum polygalifolium ssp. polygalif Leptospermum semibaccatum Leptospermum trinervium Leptospermum whitei

Heath Land Mirbelia Swamp Mite-Wort

Mirbelia rubifolia Mitrasacme paludosa

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COMMON NAME Bishops Mitre Tree Broom Heath Prickly Broom Heath

SCIENTIFIC NAME Mitrasacme polymorpha Monotoca elliptica Monotoca scoparia Monotoca sp.

COMMON NAME Geebung Geebung Swamp Orchid Satinwood Scaly Phebalium Frogsmouth

SCIENTIFIC NAME Persoonia stradbrokensis Persoonia virgata Phaius australis Phebalium sqameum Phebalium squamulosum Philydrum lanuginosum Phragmites australis

Morinda Mulberry Candelabra Vine Coast Mistletoe Fishbone Fern Oleander Mock Olive

Morinda jasminoides Morus alba Mucuna gigantea Muellerina celastroides Nephrolepis cordifolia Nerium oleander Notelaea longifolia Nymphaea caerulea Ochna serrulata

Common Reed

Phragmites communis Phytolacca octandra Pimelea linifolia

Slash Pine Thin-leaved Coondoo

Pinus elliottii Planchonella chartacea Plantago lanceolata

Lemon-scented Baekea

Ochrosperma citriodora Ochrosperma diosmifolius

Heath Platysace Pomax Sprengeri Fern Sand Hill Pseudanthus Pastel Flower

Platysace ericoides Pomax umbellata Protoasparagus aethiopicus Pseudanthus orientalis Pseuderanthemum variabile Pseudognaphalium luteoalbum

Sand Baekea

Ochrosperma lineare Oenothera indecora Omalanthus nutans

Bleeding Heart

Omalanthus populifolius Ottochloa gracillima Bracken Fern Chaffy Pea-Bush

Pteridium esculentum Pultenaea paleacea Pultenaea retusa Pyllanthus virgata

Golden Shaggy Pea Bower Vine

Oxylobium robustum Pandorea jasminoides Panicum maximum Panicum simile

Pyllota

Pyllota phylicoides Ranunculus innudatus Rapanea variabilis

Twining Silkpod

Parsonia straminea Paspalidium distans Paspalidium sp Paspalum conjugatum Red Mangrove

Rhizophora stylosa Rhynchospora corymbosa Richardia brasiliensis

Paspalum

Paspalum dilatatum Paspalum scrobiculatum Wedding Bush Hairy Supplejack Wild Rasperry

Ricinocarpos pinifolius Ripogonum elseyanum Rubus hill Rubus moluccanus

Vasey Grass Common Passionflower Corky Passionflower

Paspalum urvillei Passiflora edulis Passiflora suberosa Passiflora subpeltata

Native Rasperry Common Dock Indian Cup Grass Umbrella Tree Broad-leaved Pepper Tree Fluke Bogrush

Rubus rosifolius Rumex crispus Sacciolepis indica Schefflera actinophylla Schinus terebinthifolia Schoenus apogon

Little Purple Flag

Patersonia fragilis Patersonia sericea Periscaria strigosa Persicaria lapathifolia Persoonia adenantha

95

COMMON NAME Small Bogrush Bogrush Rifle Grass

SCIENTIFIC NAME Schoenus brevifolius Schoenus ericetorum Schoenus melanostachys Schoenus pachylepis

COMMON NAME

SCIENTIFIC NAME Trachymene procumbens

Poison Peach

Trema aspera Trifolium repens

Streaked Arrowgrass Tripladenia Chinese Burr

Triglochin striatum Tripladenia cunninghamii Triumfetta rhomboidea Typha domingensis

Moss Fireweed Winter Senna

Selaginella uliginosa Senecio madagascariensis Senna coluteoides Senna pendula

Bullrush

Typha orientialis Urena lobata Utricularia lateriflora Utricularia sp. Velleia paradoxa Velleia spathulata

South African Pigeon Grass

Setaria sphacelata Sida cordifolia

Paddys Lucerne Prickly Supplejack Native Sarsparilla

Sida rhombifolia Smilax australis Smilax glyciphylla Solanum americanum Verbena Yellow Marsh Flower Blue Bell

Verbena bonariensis Villarsia exaltata Wahlenbergia gracilis Xanthorrhoea fulva Xanthorrhoea johnsonii

Devils Apple Furry Nightshade Tobacco Bush

Solanum capsicoides Solanum densevestitum Solanum mauritianum Sonchus asper Sonchus oleraceus Sowerbaea juncea

Grass Tree

Xanthorrhoea latifolia Xyris complanata Xyris juncea

Ladies Tresses White Swamp Heath

Spiranthes sinensis Sprengelia sprengelioides Stackhousia nuda Xyris Coastal Ziera

Xyris operculate Ziera laevigata Ziera laxiflora

Swamp Stackhousia Snake Vine

Stackhousia viminea Stephania japonica Strangea linearis Stunkwood

Ziera smithii

Trigger Plant

Stylidium graminifolium Stylidium ornatum

Nodding Blue Lily

Stypandra glauca Styphelia viridis

White Hazelwood Buff Hazelwood Blue Lilly Pilly

Symplocos stawellii Symplocos thwaitesii Syzygium oleosum Syzygium uniflorum Taraxacum officinale Thelymitra pauciflora

Kangaroo Grass

Themeda australis Themeda triandra

King Fern

Todea barbera

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APPENDIX 5.0
GCAL FAUNA LIST
AQUATIC FAUNA COMMON NAME Short-headed Sabre-tooth Blenny Smooth Flutmouth Luderick Goby Yellow-finned leatherjacket Tarwhine Hairy Pipefish Trumpter Striped Gudgeon Empire Gudgeon Bullrout Mosquito Fish Yabbie Bay Prawn SCIENTIFIC NAME Petroscirtes breviceps Fistularia commersonii Girella tricuspidata Bathygobius sp. Meuschenia trachylepis Rhabdosargus sarba Urocampus carinirostris Pelates quadrilineatus Gobiomorphys australis Hypseliotris compressa Centrapogon marmoratus Gambusia affinis Cherax sp. Metapenaeus bennettae TERRESTRIAL VERTEBRATE FAUNA - BIRDS COMMON NAME TERRESTRIAL VERTEBRATE FAUNA - FROGS COMMON NAME Cane Toad Plains Froglet Common Eastern Froglet Wallum Froglet Ornate Burrowing Frog Striped Marsh Frog Northen Banjo Frog Green Tree Frog Bleating Tree Frog Eastern Dwarf Tree Frog Dainty Green Tree Frog Rocket Frog Wallum Sedge Frog Perons Tree Frog Desert Tree Frog Tylers Tree Frog SCIENTIFIC NAME Bufo marinus Crinia parinsignifera Crinia signifera Crinia tinnula Limnodynastes ornates Limnodynastes peronii Limnodynastes terraereginae Litoria caerulea Litoria dentata Litoria fallax Litoria gracilenta Litoria nasuta Litoria olongburensis Litoria peronii Litoria rubella Litoria tyleri Yellow Thornbill Brown Thornbill Eastern Spinebill Brown Goshawk Clamorous Reed-Warbler Common Sandpiper Australian Owlet Nightjar Azure Kingfisher Australian Brush Turkey Bush-Hen Grey Teal Pacific Black Duck Darter Little Wattlebird Grey Teal Pacific Black Duck Darter Little Wattlebird SCIENTIFIC NAME Acanthiza nana Acanthiza pusila Acanthorhynchus tenuirostris Accipiter fasciatus Acrocephalus stentoreus Actitus hypoleucos Aegotheles cristatus Alcedo azurea Alectura lathami Amaurornis olivaceus Anas gracilis Anas superciliosa Anhinger melanogoaster Anthochaera chrysoptera Anas gracilis Anas superciliosa Anhinger melanogoaster Anthochaera chrysoptera Striped Skink Yellow-face Whip Snake Green Tree Snake Grass Skink Easter Water Dragon Bearded Dragon Common Scaly-foot Eastern Small-eyed Snake Three-toed Skink Rough-scaled snake Lace Monitor TERRESTRIAL VERTEBRATE FAUNA - REPTILES COMMON NAME Wall Lizard SCIENTIFIC NAME Cryptoblepharus vigatus Ctenotus arcanus Ctenotus robustus Demansia psammophis Dendrelaphis punctulata Lampropholis delicata Physignathus lesuerii Pogona barbata Pygopus lepidopodus Rhinoplocephalus nigrescens Saiphos equalis Tropidechis carinatus Varanus varius

97

TERRESTRIAL VERTEBRATE FAUNA - BIRDS COMMON NAME Richards Pipit Great Egret Cattle Egret White-breasted Woodswallow Striated Heron Sulphur Crested Cockatoo Galah Fan-tailed Cuckoo Brush Cuckoo Glossy Black Cockatoo Pheasant Coucal Emerald Dove Australian Wood Duck Shinning Bronze Cuckoo Little Bronze Cuckoo Grey Shrike Thrush Little Shrike Thrush White-Headed Pigeon Feral Pigeon Black-Faced Cuckoo Shrike Cicadabird White-Throated Treecreeper Terresian Crow King Quail Stubble Quail Brown Quail Pied Butcherbird Grey Butcherbird Golden-headed Cisticola Pallid Cuckoo Laughing Kookaburra Varied Sitella Wandering Whistling Duck Mistletoebird Spangled Drongo Little Egret White-faced Heron SCIENTIFIC NAME Anthus novaeseelandiae Ardea alba Ardea ibis Artamus leucorynchus Butorides striatus Cacatua galerity Cacatua roseicapilla Cacomantis flabellformis Cacomantis variolosus Calyptorhynchus lathami Centropus phasianinus Chalcophaps indica Chenonetta jubata Chrysococcyx lucidus Chrysococcyx minutillus Colluricincla harmonica Colluricincla megarhyncha Columba leucomela Columba livia Coracina novaehollandiae Coracina tenuirostris Cormobates leucophaeus Corvus orru Coturnix chinensis Coturnix pectoralis Coturnix ypsilophara Cracticus nigrogularis Cracticus torquatus Cristicola exilis Cuculus pallidus Dacelo novaeguineae Daphoenositta chrysoptera Dendroygna arcuata Dicaeum hirundinaceum Dicrurus bracteatus Egretta gazetta Egretta novaehollandiae

TERRESTRIAL VERTEBRATE FAUNA - BIRDS COMMON NAME Black-shouldered Kite Black-fronted Dotterel Blue-faced Honeyeater Eastern Yellow Robin Common Koel White-throated Nightjar Dollarbird Australian Hobby Peregrine Falcon Eurasian Coot Lathams Snipe Dusky Moorhen Buff-banded Rail Bar Shouldered Dove Peaceful Dove Mangrove Gerygone Brown Gerygone White-throated Gerygone Little Lorikeet Magpie Lark Brolga Australian Magpie White-bellied Sea Eagle Brahminy Kite Whistling Kite Grey-tailed Tattler Black-winged Stilt White-Throated Needletail Fairy Martin Welcome Swallow Tree Martin Black Bittern Varied Triller Silver Gull Yellow-faced Honeyeater Mangrove Honeyeater Brown Honeyeater SCIENTIFIC NAME Elanus axillaris Elseyornis melanops Entomyzon cyanotis Eopsaltria australis Eudynamys scolopacea Eurostopodus mystacalis Eurystomus orientalis Falco longipennis Falco peregrinus Fulica atra Galliago hardwickii Gallinula tenebrosa Gallirallus philippensis Geopelia humeralis Geopelia striata Cerygone levigaster Gerygone mouki Gerygone olivacea Glossopsitta pusilla Grallina cyanoleuca Grus rubicunda Gymnorhina tibicen Haliaeetus leucogaster Haliaster indus Haliaster sphenurus Heteroscelis brevipes Himantopus himantopus Hirundapus caudactus Hirundo ariel Hirundo neoxena Hirundo nigicans Ixobrychus flavicollis Lalage leucomela Larus novaehollandiae Lichenostomus chrysops Lichenostomus fasciogularis Lichmera indistincta

98

TERRESTRIAL VERTEBRATE FAUNA - BIRDS COMMON NAME Bar-tailed Godwit Chestnut-breasted Mannikin Topknot Pigeon Brown Cuckoo-Dove Superb Fairy Wren Varigated Fair Wren Red-backed Fairy Wren Noisy Miner Little Grassbird Tawny Grassbird Lewins Honeyeater White-naped Honeyeater Rainbow Bee-eater Black-faced Monarch Spectacled Monarch Retless Flycatcher Leaden Flycatcher Dusky Honeyeater Scarlet Honeyeater Red-browed Finch Southern Boobook Eastern Curlew Whimbrel Nankeen Night Heron Crested Pigeon Olive Backed Oriole Golden Whistler Rufous Whistler Osprey Spotted Pardalote Striated Pardalote House Sparrow Australian Pelican Rose Robin Great Cormorant Little Pied Cormorant Little Black Cormorant SCIENTIFIC NAME Limosa lapponica Lonchura castaneothorax Lopholaimus antarcticus Macropygia aboinensis Malurus cyaneus Malurus lamberti Malurus melanocephalus Manorina melanocpehala Megalurus gramineus Megalurus timoriensis Meliphaga lewinii Melithreptus lunatus Merops ornatus Monarcha melanopsis Monarcha trivirgatus Myiagra inquieta Myiagra rubecula Myzomela obscura Myzomela sanguinolenta Neochima temporalis Ninox novaeseelandiae Numenius madagascariensis Numenius phaeopus Nycticorax caledonicus Ocyphaps lophotes Oriolus sagittatus Pachycephala pectoralis Pachycephala rufiventris Pandion haliaetus Pardalotus punctatus Pardalotus striatus Passer domesticus Pelecanus conspicillatus Petroica rosea Phalacrocorax carbo Phalacrocorax melanoeleucos Phalacrocorax sulcirostris

TERRESTRIAL VERTEBRATE FAUNA - BIRDS COMMON NAME Pied Cormorant Little Friarbird Noisy Friarbird White-cheeked Honeyeater Noisy Pitta Royal Spoonbill Pale-headed Rosella Eastern Rosella Stripped Honeyeater Pacific Golden Plover Tawny Frogmouth Purple Swamphen Spotless Crake Eastern Whipbird Rose-crowned Fruit Dove Superb Fruit Dove Satin bowerbird Lewins Rail Willie Wagtail Grey Fantail Rufous Fantail Channel Billed Cuckoo White-browed Scrubwren Larg-billed Scrubwren Figbird Crested Tern Pied Currawong Spotted Turtle Dove Common Starling Australian Grebe Double-Barred Finch Australian White Ibis Collared Kingfisher Forest Kingfisher Sacred Kingfisher Scaly-breasted lorikeet Rainbow Lorikeet SCIENTIFIC NAME Pahlacrocorax varius Philemon citreogularis Philemon corniculatus Philidonyris nigra Pitta versicolor Plataela regia Platycerus adscitus Platycerus eximius Plectorhyncha lanceolata Pluvialis fulva Podargus strigoides Porphyrio porphyrio Porzana tubuensis Poshodes olivaceus Ptilinopus regina Ptilinopus superbus Ptilonorhynchus violaceus Rallus pectoralis Rhipidura leucophrys Rhipidura fuliginosa Rhipidura rufifrons Scythrops novaehollandiae Sericornis frontalis Sericornis magnirostris Sphecotheres viridis Sterna bergii Strepera grucelena Streptopelia chinensis Sturnus vulgaris Tachybaptus novaehollandiae Taeniopygia bichenovii Threskiornis molucca Todiramphus chloris Todiramphus macleayi Todiramphus sanctus Trichoglossus chlorolepidotus Trichoglossus haematodus

99

TERRESTRIAL VERTEBRATE FAUNA - BIRDS COMMON NAME Common Greenshank Barn Owl Eastern Grass Owl Masked Owl Masked Lapwing Silvereye SCIENTIFIC NAME Tringa nebularia Tyto alba Tyto capenis Tyto navaehollandiae Venellus miles Zosterops lateralis

TERRESTRIAL VERTEBRATE FAUNA - MAMMALS COMMON NAME


Yellow-footed Antechinus

SCIENTIFIC NAME
Antechinus flavipes Chalindolobus morio

Feral Cat Water Rat Northern Brown Bandicoot Cape Hare Grassland Melomys Little Bent-wing Bat House Mouse Large-footed Myotis Eastern Long-eared Bat Goulds Wattled Bat Rabbit Long-nosed Bandicoot Squirrel Glider Common Planigale Long-nosed Potoroo Black Flying-fox Grey-headed Flying-fox Swamp Rat Bush Rat Black Rat Eastern Broad-nosed Bat Common Blossom Bat Short-beaked Echidna Mountain Brush-tailed Possum Common Brushtail Possum

Felis catus Hydromys chrysogaster Isoodon macrourus Lepus capensis Melomys burtoni Miniopteris australis Mus domesticus Myotus adversus Nyctophilus bifax Nyctophilus gouldii Oryctolagus cuniculus Perameles nasuta Petaurus norfolcensis Planigale maculata Potorous tridactylus Pteropus alecto Pteropus poliocephalus Rattus lutreolus Rattus fuscipes Rattus rattus Scotorepens orion Syconycteris australis Tachyglossus aculeatus Trichosurus caninus Tricholsurus vulpecula Vespedalus pumilus

Swamp Wallaby Dog/Fox Common Brushtail Possum

Wallabia bicolor

Tricholsurus vulpecula Vespedalus pumilus

Swamp Wallaby Dog/Fox

Wallabia bicolor

100

APPENDIX 6.0
GOLD COAST AIRPORT LIMITED LEGAL REGISTER Overview
Legislation that has been considered within the review:
COMMONWEALTH Airports Act 1996 Airports (Building Control & Environmental Protection) Regulations 1997 Environment Protection & Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 Australian Heritage Commission Act 1975 Ozone Protection Act 1989 Sec 3 & 12b National Environment Protection Council Act 1994 National Environment Protection Measures (Implementation) Act 1998 Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander Heritage Protection Act 1984 Environment Protection (Nuclear Codes) Act 1978 Environment Protection (Sea Dumping) Act 1981 Hazardous Waste (Regulation Of Exports And Imports) Act 1989 Industrial Chemicals (Notification And Assessment) Act 1989 Protection Of Movable Cultural Heritage Act 1986 Natural Resources Management (Financial Assistance) Act 1992 THE CORPORATIONS LAW 1990 Greenhouse Challenge (Non-Regulatory) QUEENSLAND INTEGRATED PLANNING ACT 1997 Environmental Protection Act 1994 National Environment Protection Council (Queensland) Act 1994 Land Act 1994 Queensland Heritage Act 1992 Fisheries Act 1994 National Trust Of Queensland Act 1963 Nature Conservation Act 1992 Sewerage And Water Supply Act 1949 Soil Conservation Act 1986 Radioactive Substances Act 1958 Transport Infrastructure Act 1994 Transport Operations (Marine Pollution) Act 1995 - Sect 3 Water Resources Act 1989 Health Act 1937 - Sect 1 Contaminated Land Act NEW SOUTH WALES Local Government Act 1993 Environmentally Hazardous Chemicals Act 1985 Protection Of The Environment Operations Act 1997 Coastal Protection Act 1979 Heritage Act 1977 Noxious Weeds Act 1993 Pesticides Act 1978 Rivers And Foreshores Improvement Act 1948 OZONE PROTECTION ACT 1989 DANGEROUS GOODS ACT 1975 Environmental Planning And Assessment Act 1979 Contaminated Land Management Act 1997 Unhealthy Building Land Act 1990

Voluntary initiative that have been considered within the review: Greenhouse Challenge ISO14001 Environment Management System GCAL Environment Management Plans GCAL Policies and Procedures

101

COMMONWEALTH LEGISLATION ACT/REGULATION Airports Act 1996 Airports (Building Control) Regulations SUMMARY OF REQUIREMENTS The Act provides a comprehensive regulatory framework for leased Commonwealth airports. It delegates much of the regulatory matters associated with the running of the airports (such as environmental issues) to be dealt with by sub-ordinate legislation. Gold Coast Airport is considered to be a core regulated airport within the Act. GCAL is required to have an airport master plan, with major development plans required for each significant development proposed to occur within each airport. Building activities on GCAL require approval. Buildings and structures on airport sites certified as complying with relevant regulations. The act specifically gives approval and controls the operation of airport services within an airport. These are services provided at an airport, where the service is necessary for the purposes of operating and/or maintaining civil aviation services, e.g. restaurants, shops, car rental outlets. The act regulates the operation of facilities in particular the control of liquor, commercial trading, vehicles movements, gambling and smoking. If no regulations are in force about a particular matter, the relevant State laws will generally apply to the control of that issue. An application for a building approval must be in a form acceptable to the airport building controller for GCAL, and must include a description of the proposed building activity, its location on the airport site, and a statement describing how the proposed building activity is consistent with the master plan and the final environment strategy. The regulation aims to establish a cooperative approach to airport environmental management. The intent is to promote awareness of environmental issues and to ensure that management systems are in place to deal with pollution, noise and other environmental impacts. The aim of the Act is to establish, in conjunction with national environment protection measures made under Section 14 of the National Environment Protection Council Act 1994, a Commonwealth system of regulation and accountability for activities at GCAL that generate, or have potential to generate, pollution; or excessive noise, and to promote improving environmental management practices for activities carried out within GOLD COAST AIRPORT. These Regulations do not apply to pollution generated by an aircraft; or noise generated by an aircraft in flight, when landing, taking off or taxiing within GOLD COAST AIRPORT. The Regulation requires that an environmental management strategy be developed, including the: management of the GOLD COAST AIRPORT, identification of environmentally significant areas within the GOLD COAST AIRPORT site, identification of sources of environmental impact at airport, proposed studies, reviews and monitoring, proposed measures for preventing, controlling or reducing environmental impact. The regulations do not cover the field of environmental regulation on airport. State laws related to the environment are still given effect on the GOLD COAST AIRPORT site, other than laws which deal with environmental pollution and noise. Specifically, State laws which make provisions about pollution from motor vehicles, occupational health and safety, ozone depleting substances and pesticides all apply to airports. Apart from these areas, the regulations are intended to override State laws relating to the prevention or minimisation of environmental pollution, including those laws which relate to monitoring, cleaning up, remedying or rectifying environmental pollution and ground-based noise generated within the GOLD COAST AIRPORT site. Commonwealth laws dealing with endangered species, flora and fauna, habitat, heritage sites and sites of indigenous significance will also have effect within the GOLD COAST AIRPORT site. In addition State laws covering these areas will also have effect where they are not inconsistent with Commonwealth laws. The Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act), in force from 16 July, 2000 enables the Commonwealth to join with the States and Territories to provide a national scheme of environment protection and biodiversity conservation. The Act establishes a legislative framework to deal with current and emerging environmental issues. The EPBC Act replaces the following: Environment Protection (Impact of Proposals) Act 1974; Endangered Species Protection Act 1992; National Parks and Wildlife Conservation Act 1975; World Heritage Properties Conservation Act 1983; and Whale Protection Act 1980. Under the Act, actions that are likely to have a significant impact on matters of national environmental significance (NES) are subject to a rigorous assessment and approval process. The EPBC Act also applies to actions that are likely to have a significant impact on the environment of Commonwealth land and actions taken by the Commonwealth that will have a significant impact on the environment anywhere in the world. The Act has six matters of national environmental significance, these include: World Heritage properties, Ramsar wetlands of international significance, nationally threatened species and ecological communities, migratory species, Commonwealth marine areas, nuclear actions. The legislation for the first time clearly defines the Commonwealths role in protecting the environment. It introduces an assessment and approval process which applies to actions likely to have a significant impact on any of the matters of national environmental significance. Whilst the GOLD COAST AIRPORT site does contain some rare or threatened species, these are located within a conservation area. Any activities undertaken within this conservation area should be referred to the Commonwealth to determine whether it is significant under the EPBC. Changes proposed for the EPBC Act will include Cultural Heritage issues this section will be updated once the changes are enforced.

Airports (Environment Protection) RegulationS 1997

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999

102

COMMONWEALTH LEGISLATION ACT/REGULATION Australian Heritage Commission Act 1975 s. 30 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Heritage Protection Act 1984 s. 20 Environment Protection (Sea Dumping) Act 1981 S. 10 Ozone Protection Act 1989 S. 3 & 12B SUMMARY OF REQUIREMENTS The Act prohibits anyone from undertaking any action which adversely affects a place that is in the Register of the National Estate unless the authority is satisfied, that there is no feasible and prudent alternative, and that all reasonable measures be taken to minimise the adverse effects. Before any action that might affect, to a significant extent a place which is part of the national estate, the Australian Heritage Commission must be advised. Places listed on the various heritage registers are listed at the Heritage commissions web-page (www.environment.gov.au/heritage) Persons who discover anything that they have reasonable grounds to suspect to be Aboriginal remains is required to report their discovery to the Minster. The Act makes it illegal to carry out the dumping of wastes or other matter into Australian waters from any aircraft, unless it is in accordance with a permit; The owner and the person in charge of the aircraft and the owner of the wastes or other matter are in each case guilty of an offence. The aim of the Act is to institute, a system of controls on the manufacture, import and export, distribution and use of substances that deplete ozone in the atmosphere and to encourage Australian industry to replace ozone depleting substances; and achieve a faster and greater reduction in the levels of production and use of ozone depleting substances. Operations using ozone depleting substances are required to obtain a license. The licensing does not apply to the importing or exporting of CFCs and HCFCs for use on board aircraft. Details of the substances that are considered to be ozone depleting and that hence require a license can be obtained from Schedule 1 of the Act and from the following website: www.unep.org/ozone/mp-text The Act establishes the National Environment Protectio Council. The aim of this Council is to ensure that people enjoy the benefits of equivalent protection from air, water, noise or soil pollution. Implementation of national environment protection measures: It is the intention of the Parliament that the Commonwealth will implement laws and other arrangements as are necessary, to ensure the protection of each national environment protection measure. The Act is closely linked to other federal legislation as listed in this review, including the EPBC, endangered species, or other acts covering the aspects of environmental protection. Compliance with the previsions of those Acts will normally ensure compliance with the provisions of the National Environment Protection Council Act. The aim of the Act is to make provision for the implementation of national environment protection measures in respect of activities carried out by the Commonwealth to protect, restore and enhance the quality of the environment, having regard to the need to maintain ecologically sustainable development, and to ensure that the community has access to relevant and meaningful information about pollution. State and Territory laws implementing national environment protection measures do not apply to the activities of the Commonwealth or Commonwealth authorities, either of their own force or because of the Commonwealth Places (Application of Laws) Act 1970. Under this Act, the Environment Minister may, subject to considerations of national interest or administrative efficiency apply those State laws to the activities of the Commonwealth. The Act regulates not only hazardous wastes destined for final disposal (for example, by incineration or landfill) by export from or import into Australia, but also hazardous wastes destined for recovery or recycling operations, even if someone is willing to pay for the waste. The aim of the Act is to regulate the export, import and transit of hazardous waste to ensure that exported, imported or transited waste is managed in an environmentally sound manner so that human beings and the environment, both within and outside Australia, are protected from the harmful effects of the waste. The way the legislation works depends on four important factors. i) Whether the material to be shipped is a waste or not, ii) Whether the waste is for final disposal or recovery, iii) Where the waste is coming from or going to, iv) Whether the waste is hazardous. A waste is considered hazardous if it listed as hazardous in the Basel Convention or in the Regulations under the Act. At this stage there are two lists of wastes - one for movements involving OECD countries, and another for non-OECD countries. The Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal came into force in 1992. It puts an onus on exporting countries to ensure environmentally sound management of hazardous wastes in importing countries. Its purpose is to minimise such movements and control essential ones. These lists of waste considered to be hazardous are available from Environment Australia. The aim of this Act is to provide for a national system of notification and assessment of industrial chemicals for the purposes of aiding in the protection of the Australian people and the environment. This is achieved by allowing people to find out the risks to occupational health and safety, to public health and to the environment that could be associated with the importation, manufacture or use of the chemicals. The National Occupational Health and Safety Commission has released a list of designated hazardous substances (NOHSC:10005(1999)).

National Environment Protection Council Act 1994 S. 3 & 7 National Environment Protection Measures (Implementation) Act 1998 S. 3

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COMMONWEALTH LEGISLATION ACT/REGULATION Protection of Movable Cultural Heritage 1986 S.7 SUMMARY OF REQUIREMENTS The aim of the Act is to protect movable cultural heritage of Australia. The Act defines movable cultural heritage of Australia as objects that are of importance to Australia, or to a particular part of Australia, for ethnological, archaeological, historical, literary, artistic, scientific or technological reasons. A list of items that are movable cultural heritage has been created and is called the National Cultural Heritage Control List. Items of this list are contained within the Australian Heritage Commissions web-page (www.environment.gov.au/heritage). The Act makes provision for the funding and administrative arrangements relating to natural resources management in Australia. The Acts primary object is to facilitate the development and implementation of integrated approaches to natural resources management in Australia. The Act has the following objectives: to promote community, industry and governmental partnership in the management of natural resources in Australia; to assist in establishing institutional arrangements to develop and implement policies, programs and practices that will encourage sustainable use of natural resources in Australia. This is the main Federal legislation governing the activities of corporations. It requires the Directors report for a financial year on the companys environmental performance, under particular or significant environmental regulations. This requirement refers to the companys performance under Commonwealth, State and Territory environmental laws. Note: Commonwealth reporting requirements are additional to EPA requirements to provide annual compliance reports.

Natural Resources Management (Financial Assistance) Act 1992 S. 3

THE Corporations Law 1990 S. 299

QUEENSLAND LEGISLATION ACT/REGULATION Integrated Planning Act 1997 SUMMARY OF REQUIREMENTS The Act provides the framework for integrating planning and development assessment, so that development and its effects are managed in a way that is ecologically sustainable. The Act achieves this by governing the format of local government planning frameworks and methods of assessing development against this framework. The Act binds all persons, including the State, and, as far as the legislative powers of the Parliament permits, the Commonwealth and the other States. Development within the GOLD COAST AIRPORT site is exempt from assessment under the Integrated Planning Act. The aim of the Act is to protect Queenslands environment whilst allowing for development that improves the total quality of life, both now and in the future, in a way that maintains the ecological processes on which life depends. The Act binds all persons, including the State, and, as far as the legislative powers of the Parliament permits, the Commonwealth and the other States. The act has an extensive list of activities and uses that are considered to be environmentally relevant due to their potential to cause environmental nuisance. This activities require specific licensing to conduct the activities. The act provides for environmental protection policies controlling the regulation of air, water and noise. The Qld EPAct applies to emissions that may impact on land other than the GOLD COAST AIRPORT site. THE EPA has enforcement powers to require action if unacceptable environmental harm is caused by the airport operations off site in terms of air, waters and noise.

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QUEENSLAND LEGISLATION ACT/REGULATION Fisheries Act 1994 S. 125 Land Act 1994 Queensland Heritage Act 1992 National Environment Protection Council (Queensland) Act 1994 S. 3 SUMMARY OF REQUIREMENTS The aim of the Act is to control the management, use, development and protection of fishery resources and fish habitats and the management of aqua-culture activities. The Act includes provisions for the Protection and Conservation of Fish Habitats. The act provides that an area may be declared under a regulation to be a fish habitat area, Upon designation of a habitat area, a person must not unlawfully cause pollution that may have an adverse effect on the quality or integrity of that fish habitat. The state can order the persons responsible for such pollution to correct and restore the fish habitat. The State maintains a list of areas designated as protected habitat areas, details of these areas can be obtained from the Queensland EPA. (www.epa.qld.gov.au) This Act relates to the administration and management of non-freehold land and deeds of grant in trust and the creation of free-hold land. Land administered by the Act must be dealt with in a way not inconsistent with the Native Title Act 1993 (Cwlth) and the Native Title (Qld) Act 1993. A register of places that have had a Native Title claim placed over the land is maintained both at a State and Federal level. The Act provides for the conservation of Queenslands cultural heritage. Associated with the Act is a register of properties and items considered to be worthy of protection and retention, this maintained by the State Government and additional items of significance are constantly assessed and added as required. Sites and features listed within this register are protected from redevelopment, unless overwhelming beneficial outcomes can be demonstrated. All items contained in this register are not subject to local government heritage policies and are instead subject to the higher criteria and assessment of the Heritage Act. Applications for works involving heritage listed buildings must be made to the Heritage Council in conjunction with an application to Local Government for approval. The State maintains a list of places and items of heritage significance, details of these places can be obtained from the Queensland EPA (heritage division). The Act establishes the National Environment Protection Council (QLD Div). The aim of the Council is to ensure that people enjoy the benefit of equivalent protection from air, water or soil pollution and from noise, wherever they live in Queensland. In addition the Act ensures that decisions are not affected by variations between participating jurisdictions in relation to the adoption or implementation of environmental protection measures. This Act binds all persons, including the State and, so far as the legislative power of the Parliament permits, the Commonwealth and the other States and Territories. It is the intention of the Parliament that the State will implement, by such laws and other arrangements as are necessary, each national environment protection measure in respect of activities that are subject to State law (including activities of the State and its instrumentalitys). The Act creates the The National Trust for the purposes of promoting the preservation and maintenance of lands, buildings, furniture, pictures and other chattels of beauty or of national, historic, scientific, artistic, or architectural interest. The National Trust of Queensland is a community organisation which works to conserve Queenslands cultural heritage. A list of places and features that are considered worthy of protection and preservation. This list can be found at www.powerup.com.au/~nattrust/Property.html The aim of the Act is the conservation of nature, by means of an integrated and comprehensive conservation strategy for the whole of Queensland. The Strategy includes, the gathering of information, education, dedication and management of protected areas, protection of native wildlife and its habitat. This Act binds the Crown not only in Queensland but also, so far as the legislative power of the Parliament permits, the Crown in all its other capacities.

National Trust of Queensland Act 1963

Nature Conservation Act 1992 S. 3

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QUEENSLAND LEGISLATION ACT/REGULATION Nature Conservation Act 1992 S. 3 SUMMARY OF REQUIREMENTS The aim of the Act is the conservation of nature, by means of an integrated and comprehensive conservation strategy for the whole of Queensland. The Strategy includes, the gathering of information, education, dedication and management of protected areas, protection of native wildlife and its habitat. This Act binds the Crown not only in Queensland but also, so far as the legislative power of the Parliament permits, the Crown in all its other capacities. This act prohibits the discharge of prohibited substances and trade waste into sewerage or stormwater drainage systems. Prohibited substances are anything inhibiting or interfering with the sewage treatment process, causing damage or a hazard to sewerage, causing a hazard for humans or animals, creating a public nuisance, creating a hazard in waters into which it is discharged. sewerage means a sewer, access chamber, vent, engine, pump, structure, machinery, outfall or other work used to receive, store, transport or treat sewage. trade waste means water-borne waste from business, trade or manufacturing premises, other than waste that is a prohibited substance; human waste; and stormwater. A person must not discharge trade waste into stormwater drainage; or sewerage other than under a permit or approval issued or given by a local government. Enforcement of the provisions is administered by local governments for their areas. The aim of the Act is to ensure soil conservation, through the prevention or mitigation of soil erosion. The Act controls the natural or accelerated removal or deposition of soil which may be detrimental to agricultural, pastoral, or forestry activities, or engineering works of a public utility. An owner must make application to the State for approval of a property plan for soil conservation for an area of land. This is required where a property discharges run-off water from a catchment area greater than 2 ha, under natural or controlled flow conditions, directly or indirectly onto the subject land or receives run-off water directly or indirectly from the subject land. The airport needs to ensure that in its operation that soil on adjoining properties as well as the GOLD COAST AIRPORT site is not disturbed by run-off as a direct result of development within the GOLD COAST AIRPORT site. This Act states that no person shall have in their possession, use, sell, or transport any radioactive substance otherwise than in accordance with the terms of a license issued to the person under this Act. Radio active substances that may enter or exit the GOLD COAST AIRPORT site within aircraft and the airport should monitor the fact and volumes of material involved. This Act is binding on the Crown. The overall objective of this Act is to provide a regime that allows for and encourages effective integrated planning and efficient management of a system of transport infrastructure. The state is responsible for the provision of the regional transport network in the area of the airport, as a result the airport and its activities can not impact upon the effectiveness of this network. The state in its provision of this network may require additional land for expansion or relocation and the airport is required to consider land designated for future roads in their planning. The aim of the Act is to promote, safeguard or maintain the health and wellbeing of the people. The act includes provisions for the State to prohibit the carrying-off of sewage or stormwater drainage into a watercourse, stream or canal, or any stormwater drain, open or underground channel, or any sewer, or stormwater drain. In an emergency, the State may exercise, undertake, and perform any or all of the functions, duties, powers, and authorities to promote, safeguard or maintain the health and wellbeing of the people, or to overcome an emergency, to remove or abate the causes of such emergency. The outcomes of this are that the State can take control of the airport or control activities within the airport if it believes that public health is at risk due to an activity undertaken within the airport.

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NEW SOUTH WALES LEGISLATION ACT/REGULATION Protection of the Environment Operations Act 1997 SUMMARY OF REQUIREMENTS The Act is the key piece of environmental pollution legislation in NSW, introduced to replace the Clean Air Act 1961, the Clean Waters Act 1970, the Environmental Offences and Penalties Act 1989, the Noise Control Act 1975, and the Pollution Control Act 1970. The NSW EPA licences and regulates all activities scheduled under Schedule 1 of the POEO Act. Current licenses issued under pre-existing legislation remain valid under the POEO until the expiry date noted on the license. On expiry, licensing requirements are reviewed to determine if any pollution-generating activity warrants licensing under the POEO. It is an offence not to maintain and operate control equipment in a proper and efficient manner. The NSW EPA must be notified of pollution incidents threatening or causing material harm to the environment, as defined by the Act. Notification must occur within a limited timeframe. The Act also makes it an offence to emit air pollutants above the limits set under regulations. The applicable regulations are those set under the repealed Clean Air Act 1961. POEO Act 1997 sections on water pollution relate to any activities which create risk of water pollution. The site could be liable for any activities which cause water pollution from the site, for example, any spills which result in contamination due to inappropriate clean-up, or which allow pollutants to enter the storm water system. The Act states that a noise offence is caused if the occupier of premises causes noise due to a failure to maintain plant in an efficient condition or operate plant in an efficient manner. Noise limits are expected to be set according to the NSW EPAs new NSW Industrial Noise Policy The Act controls the keeping, use and transport of hazardous chemicals. The NSW EPA may issue a notice requiring the provision of information in relation to contaminated land and/or the compulsory decontamination of premises. The occupier or owner of the premises must undertake actions as directed by Council in order to achieve compliance with Councils requirement, prevent or repair environmental damage or control the flow of water across the land Discharge of prohibited matter into the sewer, drain or council gutter is prohibited. The EPA may declare land to be unhealthy building land. Approval is required from the EPA to erect structures on unhealthy building land. Public authorities must obtain the concurrence of the Minister in order to undertake development or authorise the use, occupation or development of coastal zones where there may be an adverse impact on the environment. Destruction of trees on protected land is prohibited except under authority from the commissioner of the Soil conservation Service. The Commissioner has the authority to issue notices requiring works to be undertaken with respect to soil erosion, land degradation, protected works and proclaimed works. A building, work, relic, or land which is subject to an interim or permanent conservation order may not be demolished, damaged, moved, developed or altered without the approval of the Heritage Council. The occupier must comply with any exemptions or control notices issued by local authorities in relation to noxious weeds. The Act Controls the keeping and use of pesticides. The Act prohibits the keeping or use unregistered pesticides without a license. The Act Controls the preservation and protection of Rivers and their foreshores. The Act provides that a permit is required to excavate or remove material from protected land or to do anything which obstructs, or detrimentally affects, or which is likely to do so, the flow of protected waters. This Act and regulations control and prohibit the manufacture, sale and use of ozone depleting substances (ODS) and products which use ODSs. Under the Act, it is an offence to release ODS into the atmosphere, and there is a general duty to prevent releases. Contravention of the Act and regulations applies to directors and management of the site who knowingly permit releases (s22). Penalties for breaches apply to the company and to employees. Emission of ozone depleting substances is a Tier 1 Offence under Part 5 of the POEO Act, attracting the highest level of penalty.

Noxious Weeds Act 1993: Part 3 Pesticides Act 1978 Improvement Act 1948 s. 22

Ozone Protection Act 1989

This Act deals with the transport, handling and storage of dangerous goods, including explosives, and provides for dangerous goods licensing. Section 9 of the Act provides that a person shall not keep dangerous goods except: In or on premises licensed for the keeping of dangerous goods In such quantities and in such manner and subject to such conditions as may be prescribed The threshold levels of dangerous goods which can be kept without a license is outlined in dangerous goods regulations, along with conditions under which dangerous goods must be kept. The Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 (EP&A Act) controls development in NSW. It is administered by local councils and the Department of Urban Affairs and Planning. Under the Act, most developments and changes to facilities require development and building consent from Council. Most developments will require some form of environmental assessment, ranging from a checklist to a full Environmental Impact Assessment.

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The following list of legislation has not been specifically reviewed. It is included within this larger legislative review as the acts and regulations listed are believed to be of some relevance to the airport and its EMS, and were previously within airport EMS documentation.

GENERAL LEGISLATION ACT/REGULATION


Environment Protection (Nuclear Codes) Act 1978 : S. 3 ICAO Annex s (Nos 3,4,9,14 & 17) Air Services Act 1995 Search & Rescue Prices Surveilance Act 1983 Civial Aviation Act 1988 Disability Discrimination Act 1992

SUMMARY OF REQUIREMENTS
The object of this Act is to make provision for protecting the health and safety of the people of Australia, and the environment, from possible harmful effects associated with nuclear activities in Australia. The act covers the transportation and storage of radioactive substances. As a signatory to the 1947 Chicago Convention, Australia agreed to the application of International Civil Aviation Standards and Recommend Practices which have been enshrined in legislation. Meteorological Service for international Air Navigation Aeronautical Chart Type A Aerodrome Obstacle Chart International Standards And Recommended Practices for Passenger Facilitation Aerodrome Design and Operations Heliports- Design and Operations Security Manual Framework for aviation security, designation of international airports, Aircraft noise and Aircraft engine emissions. Established Airservices Australia, the provision of Air Traffic Service, Aeronautical information, navigation and telecommunications services and the Rescue and Fire Fighting Services. Australian Maritime Safety Authority responsible for the co-ordination of search and rescue activities. All changes in the charging of declared services Establishment of CASA, includes provisions for the issuing of aerodrome licenses, covers the regulation of safety aspects of aviation industry including airports. Guidelines for access controls to Premises and Infrastructure for persons with disabilities. To eliminate as far as possible discrimination against people with disabilities who use public transport and facilities. To facilitate trade and the movement of people across the Australian border. To assist Australian Industry and to collect customs and excise revenue. The Customs Act requires airport owners to provide suitable on site accommodation for the exclusive use of the Australian Customs Service Officers employed at the airport and such accommodation for the protection of goods as the ACS requires. Customs as the border agency having responsibility for meeting the Governments facilitation rates is concerned that airport owners consult on terminal design inward duty free shop sites in accordance with ICAO recommended practices. Gives Protective Service Officers (PSO) powers to arrest for offences beyond those of ordinary citizens in respect of offences against particular Acts identified within the Act. Under the Act, PSOs can arrest for offences such as Hijacking, violence against crew or passengers, Destroying or endangering the safety of aircraft, destroying or damaging air navigation or prescribed airport facilities. The object of the AQIS is to prevent the introduction , or spread, of diseases or pests affecting human beings, animals or plants and the environment, while facilitating the international movement of passengers and cargo.

Crimes (Aviation) Act 1991 Quarantine Act 1908 Export Control Act 1982 Imported Food Control Act 1992

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GENERAL LEGISLATION ACT/REGULATION World Health Organisation (Who) Pregulations Australian Federal Police Act 1979 SUMMARY OF REQUIREMENTS Australia is one of the few nations with quarantine requirements stricter than WHO regulations, however, AQIS consider the WHO regulations in discharging their responsibilities under Australian Legislation. The AFP is the principal law enforcement agency of the Commonwealth. The AFP must have a presence at all airports designated as international. The primary role of the AFP at international airports is by way of response to matters in which it has an operational interest in terms of the entry or departure of persons from Australia (ie drugs, fraud ), an intelligence collection/monitoring role in relation to such matters, and in facilitating the performance of its VIP/IPP protection and international functions. DIMA has the statutory responsibility for persons entering/departing Australia. It also assists to identify proper immigration documents for entry into Australia and it operates and maintains the movements database as a record of a persons arrival in and departure from Australia. If necessary and the Commonwealth agrees, any additional land for airport development is acquired under this act. Management of Commonwealth records. FAC records are Commonwealth records within the meaning of the Act. Its role is to oversee the new era in telecommunications and to manage and regulate the radio frequency spectrum. It is responsibilities also include setting of standards, licensing, use of radio communications equipment (including frequency assignment), and interference investigation. Aim is to provide aerodrome weather repots and to maintain a continuous meteorological watch function for the purposes of civil aviation. It has significant interrelationships with AsA, CASA and the aviation industry. Administers the requirement to report the carrying of cash into, and out of, Australia. Requires the free of charge display of multi lingual signs in terminals where international passengers travel. Staff files and Police Records Checks for ASIC issue. Baggage Check in Scales license Trade Certificates and Licenses (Builders/Electricians) GCAL has entered into a Cooperative Agreement with the AGO Commitments include: monitoring greenhouse gas emissions, setting reduction targets, reporting on initiatives, emissions and future targets Producing an annual report that is sent to AGO and becomes publically available on the AGO website. As a responsible company, GCAL has agreed to abide by various policies and procedures which are included on the site intranet. GCAL undertakes to develop and implement an environmental management system in line with the ISO14000 guidelines. Auditing of the system by a third-party is necessary to ensure achievement of the ISO14000 standards As part of the EMS, GCAL will develop a number of Enviromental Management Plans which must then be complied with.

Lands Acquisitions Act 1989 The Archives Act 1983 Australian Communications Authority Act 1997 Telecommuncations Act 1997 Radio communications ACt 1992

Financial Transaction Reports Act 1988 Privacy Act 1988 Trade Measurement Act 1993 Building Codes Various

Greenhouse Challenge

ISO14000 - EMS

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