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SOLUTION MANUAL FOR

Problem 1.1
1.1 Tar Silly Putty Modeling clay Wax A number of common substances are Sand Jello Toothpaste Shaving cream

[3]

Some of these materials exhibit characteristics of both solid and fluid behavior under different conditions. Explain and give examples.

Given:

Common Substances Tar Silly Putty Modeling clay Wax Sand Jello Toothpaste Shaving cream

Some of these substances exhibit characteristics of solids and fluids under different conditions.

Find: Solution:

Explain and give examples. Tar, Wax, and Jello behave as solids at room temperature or below at ordinary pressures. At high pressures or over long periods, they exhibit fluid characteristics. At higher temperatures, all three liquefy and become viscous fluids.

Modeling clay and silly putty show fluid behavior when sheared slowly. However, they fracture under suddenly applied stress, which is a characteristic of solids. Toothpaste behaves as a solid when at rest in the tube. When the tube is squeezed hard, toothpaste flows out the spout, showing fluid behavior. Shaving cream behaves similarly. Sand acts solid when in repose (a sand pile). However, it flows from a spout or down a steep incline.

Problem 1.2
1.2 Give a word statement of each of the five basic conservation laws stated in Section 1-4, as they apply to a

[2]

system.

Given: Write: Solution:


a. b.

Five basic conservation laws stated in Section 1-4. A word statement of each, as they apply to a system. Assume that laws are to be written for a system.

Conservation of mass The mass of a system is constant by definition. Newton's second law of motion The net force acting on a system is directly proportional to the product of the system mass times its acceleration.

c.

First law of thermodynamics The change in stored energy of a system equals the net energy added to the system as heat and work.

d.

Second law of thermodynamics The entropy of any isolated system cannot decrease during any process between equilibrium states.

e.

Principle of angular momentum The net torque acting on a system is equal to the rate of change of angular momentum of the system.

Problem 1.3
1.3

[3]

Discuss the physics of skipping a stone across the water surface of a lake. Compare these mechanisms with a

stone as it bounces after being thrown along a roadway.

Open-Ended Problem Statement: Consider the physics of skipping a stone across the water surface of a lake. Compare these mechanisms with a stone as it bounces after being thrown along a roadway. Discussion: Observation and experience suggest two behaviors when a stone is thrown along a water surface: 1. If the angle between the path of the stone and the water surface is steep the stone may penetrate the water surface. Some momentum of the stone will be converted to momentum of the water in the resulting splash. After penetrating the water surface, the high drag* of the water will slow the stone quickly. Then, because the stone is heavier than water it will sink. 2. If the angle between the path of the stone and the water surface is shallow the stone may not penetrate the water surface. The splash will be smaller than if the stone penetrated the water surface. This will transfer less momentum to the water, causing less reduction in speed of the stone. The only drag force on the stone will be from friction on the water surface. The drag will be momentary, causing the stone to lose only a portion of its kinetic energy. Instead of sinking, the stone may skip off the surface and become airborne again. When the stone is thrown with speed and angle just right, it may skip several times across the water surface. With each skip the stone loses some forward speed. After several skips the stone loses enough forward speed to penetrate the surface and sink into the water. Observation suggests that the shape of the stone significantly affects skipping. Essentially spherical stones may be made to skip with considerable effort and skill from the thrower. Flatter, more disc-shaped stones are more likely to skip, provided they are thrown with the flat surface(s) essentially parallel to the water surface; spin may be used to stabilize the stone in flight. By contrast, no stone can ever penetrate the pavement of a roadway. Each collision between stone and roadway will be inelastic; friction between the road surface and stone will affect the motion of the stone only slightly. Regardless of the initial angle between the path of the stone and the surface of the roadway, the stone may bounce several times, then finally it will roll to a stop. The shape of the stone is unlikely to affect trajectory of bouncing from a roadway significantly.

Problem 1.4
1.4 The barrel of a bicycle tire pump becomes quite warm during use. Explain the mechanisms responsible for

[3]

the temperature increase.

Open-Ended Problem Statement: The barrel of a bicycle tire pump becomes quite warm during use. Explain the mechanisms responsible for the temperature increase. Discussion: Two phenomena are responsible for the temperature increase: (1) friction between the pump piston and barrel and (2) temperature rise of the air as it is compressed in the pump barrel. Friction between the pump piston and barrel converts mechanical energy (force on the piston moving through a distance) into thermal energy as a result of friction. Lubricating the piston helps to provide a good seal with the pump barrel and reduces friction (and therefore force) between the piston and barrel. Temperature of the trapped air rises as it is compressed. The compression is not adiabatic because it occurs during a finite time interval. Heat is transferred from the warm compressed air in the pump barrel to the cooler surroundings. This raises the temperature of the barrel, making its outside surface warm (or even hot!) to the touch.

Problem 1.5

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on oxygen tank. Mass of oxygen. Compute tank volume, and then use oxygen density (Table A.6) to find the mass. p = 7 MPa J kg K T = ( 25 + 273) K T = 298 K

The given or available data is: D = 500 cm

RO2 = 259.8

(Table A.6)

The governing equation is the ideal gas equation p = RO2 T


3

and =

M V

where V is the tank volume

V =

D 6

V =

3 ( 5 m ) 6

V = 65.4 m

Hence

M = V =

pV RO2 T

M = 7 10

1 kg K 1 1 6 N 3 65.4 m 2 259.8 N m 298 K m

M = 5913 kg

Problem 1.6

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation:

Dimensions of a room Mass of air

p Rair T T = ( 59 + 460)R Rair = 53.33 V = 800 ft lbm ft


3 3

Given or available data

p = 14.7psi

ft lbf lbm R

V = 10 ft 10 ft 8 ft Then = p Rair T = 0.076

= 0.00238

slug ft
3

= 1.23

kg m
3

M = V

M = 61.2 lbm

M = 1.90 slug

M = 27.8 kg

Problem 1.7

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Mass of nitrogen, and design constraints on tank dimensions. External dimensions. Use given geometric data and nitrogen mass, with data from Table A.6. M = 10 lbm T = ( 70 + 460) K p = ( 200 + 1) atm T = 954 R p = 2.95 10 psi RN2 = 55.16 M V ft lbf lbm R (Table A.6)
3

The given or available data is:

The governing equation is the ideal gas equation


2

p = RN2 T

and

where V is the tank volume

V =

D L 4

where

L = 2 D

Combining these equations:


2 2 3

Hence

M = V =

D D pV p p p D = L = 2 D = 2 RN2 T RN2 T RN2 T 4 RN2 T 4


1 3 1 3

Solving for D

D =

2 RN2 T M p

D =

55.16

2 2 ft lbf 1 in ft 954 K 10 lbm lbm R 2950 lbf 12 in

D = 1.12 ft

D = 13.5 in

L = 2 D

L = 27 in

These are internal dimensions; the external ones are 1/4 in. larger: L = 27.25 in

D = 13.75 in

Problem 1.8
1.8

[3]

Very small particles moving in fluids are known to experience a drag force proportional to speed. Consider a

particle of net weight W dropped in a fluid. The particle experiences a drag force, FD = kV, where V is the particle speed. Determine the time required for the particle to accelerate from rest to 95 percent of its terminal speed, Vt, in terms of k, W, and g.

Given:

Small particle accelerating from rest in a fluid. Net weight is W, resisting force FD = kV, where V is speed.

Find: Solution:

Time required to reach 95 percent of terminal speed, Vt. Consider the particle to be a system. Apply Newton's second law.

Basic equation: Fy = may

Assumptions: 1. 2. W is net weight Resisting force acts opposite to V

Then

= W kV = ma y = m

dV W dV = dt g dt

or

dV k = g(1 V) dt W

Separating variables,

dV = g dt k 1 W V

Integrating, noting that velocity is zero initially,

dV W k = ln(1 V) k 1 W V k W

OP PQ

= gdt = gt
0 0

or

k W V=e W; V= 1 e W W k

kgt

LM MN

kgt

OP PQ

But VVt as t, so Vt =
kgt W

W k

. Therefore

V = 1 e W Vt

kgt

When

V Vt

= 0.95 , then e

= 0.05 and

kgt W

= 3. Thus t = 3 W/gk

Problem 1.9
1.9 Consider again the small particle of Problem 1.8. Express the distance required to reach 95 percent of its

[2]

terminal speed in terms of g, k, and W.

Given:

Small particle accelerating from rest in a fluid. Net weight is W, resisting force is FD = kV, where V is speed.

Find: Solution:

Distance required to reach 95 percent of terminal speed, Vt. Consider the particle to be a system. Apply Newton's second law.

Basic equation: Fy = may Assumptions: 1. 2. W is net weight. Resisting force acts opposite to V.

Then,

= W kV = ma y = m dV = dt
W k

W g

V dV dy

or
V Vg

k 1 W V =

V dV g dy

At terminal speed, ay = 0 and V = Vt =

. Then 1

1 = g V dV dy

Separating variables

V dV = g dy 1 1 Vt V

Integrating, noting that velocity is zero initially

gy =

0.95Vt

V V dV = VVt Vt 2 ln 1 1 Vt 1 V Vt

0.95Vt

gy = 0.95Vt 2 Vt 2 ln (1 0.95) Vt 2 ln (1) gy = Vt 2 [ 0.95 + ln 0.05] = 2.05 Vt 2 y = W2 2.05 2 Vt = 2.05 2 g gt

Problem 1.10

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on sphere and formula for drag. Maximum speed, time to reach 95% of this speed, and plot speed as a function of time. Use given data and data in Appendices, and integrate equation of motion by separating variables.

The data provided, or available in the Appendices, are: kg m


3 5 N s 2

air = 1.17

= 1.8 10

w = 999

kg m
3

SGSty = 0.016 kg m
3

d = 0.3 mm

Then the density of the sphere is

Sty = SGSty w
3

Sty = 16 ( 0.0003 m ) 6
3

The sphere mass is

d M = Sty 6

= 16

kg m
3

M = 2.26 10

10

kg

Newton's 2nd law for the steady state motion becomes (ignoring buoyancy effects) so Vmax = M g 1 m m 1 10 = 2.26 10 kg 9.81 2 5 3 d 3 1.8 10 N s 0.0003 m s
2

M g = 3 V d

Vmax = 0.0435

m s

Newton's 2nd law for the general motion is (ignoring buoyancy effects) so g dV 3 d M V M g 3 d = dt

dV = M g 3 V d dt

Integrating and using limits

V ( t) =

3 d t M 1 e

Using the given data


0.05 0.04

V (m/s)

0.03 0.02 0.01 0 0.01 0.02

t (s)
M g 1 e 3 d

The time to reach 95% of maximum speed is obtained from

3 d t M

= 0.95 Vmax

so

t=

0.95 Vmax 3 d M ln 1 3 d M g

Substituting values

t = 0.0133 s

The plot can also be done in Excel.

Problem 1.11

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on sphere and formula for drag. Diameter of gasoline droplets that take 1 second to fall 25 cm. Use given data and data in Appendices; integrate equation of motion by separating variables.

The data provided, or available in the Appendices, are:


5 N s 2

= 1.8 10

w = 999

kg m
3

SGgas = 0.72

gas = SGgas w

gas = 719

kg m
3

Newton's 2nd law for the sphere (mass M) is (ignoring buoyancy effects) M so dV 3 d V g M = dt
3 d t M

dV = M g 3 V d dt

Integrating and using limits

M g V( t) = 1 e 3 d

1 18 t d2 d2 gas d g gas e gas x ( t) = t + 1 18 18


2

Integrating again

M g M x ( t) = t + e 3 d 3 d

3 d t M

Replacing M with an expression involving diameter d

d M = gas 6

This equation must be solved for d so that x ( 1 s) = 1 m. The answer can be obtained from manual iteration, or by using Excel's Goal Seek. (See this in the corresponding Excel workbook.) d = 0.109 mm
0.25 0.2

x (m)

0.15 0.1 0.05 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1

t (s)
Note That the particle quickly reaches terminal speed, so that a simpler approximate solution would be to solve Mg = 3Vd for d, with V = 0.25 m/s (allowing for the fact that M is a function of d)!

Problem 1.12

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on sky diver:

M = 70 kg

k = 0.25

N s m

Maximum speed; speed after 100 m; plot speed as function of time and distance. Use given data; integrate equation of motion by separating variables.

Treat the sky diver as a system; apply Newton's 2nd law: dV 2 = M g k V dt M g k

Newton's 2nd law for the sky diver (mass M) is (ignoring buoyancy effects):

(1)

(a) For terminal speed Vt, acceleration is zero, so M g k V = 0

so
1 2

Vt =

m m N s Vt = 75 kg 9.81 2 2 0.25 N s kg m s
2 2

Vt = 54.2

m s

(b) For V at y = 100 m we need to find V(y). From (1)

dV dV dy dV 2 = M = M V = M g k V dt dy dt dt

Separating variables and integrating:

y V dV = g dy 2 0 k V 1 M g 0

so

k V2 2 k = y ln 1 M g M
2 k y M V ( y) = Vt 1 e 1 2

or

M g V = 1 e k
2

2 k y M

Hence

For y = 100 m:

2 N s 1 kg m 20.25 100 m 2 70 kg s2 N m m V ( 100 m) = 54.2 1 e

1 2

V ( 100 m) = 38.8

m s

60 40 20

V(m/s)

100

200

300

400

500

y(m)
M dV 2 = M g k V dt

(c) For V(t) we need to integrate (1) with respect to t:

Separating variables and integrating:

t V dV = 1 dt 0 2 M g V k 0

so

M 1 t= ln 2 k g 2 e V ( t) = Vt 2 e

M g V k 1 k g t M + 1
k g t M

M g +V k

1 M Vt + V ln 2 k g Vt V

Rearranging

or

k V ( t) = Vt tanh Vt t M

60 40 V ( t) 20

V(m/s)

10 t

15

20

t(s)

The two graphs can also be plotted in Excel.

Problem 1.13

[5]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on sky diver: Plot of trajectory.

M = 70 kg

kvert = 0.25

N s m

khoriz = 0.05

N s m

U0 = 70

m s

Use given data; integrate equation of motion by separating variables.

Treat the sky diver as a system; apply Newton's 2nd law in horizontal and vertical directions: dV 2 = M g kvert V (1) dt

Vertical: Newton's 2nd law for the sky diver (mass M) is (ignoring buoyancy effects):

For V(t) we need to integrate (1) with respect to t: 0


V

Separating variables and integrating:

V dV = 1 dt 0 M g 2 V kvert +V

so

M 1 t= ln 2 kvert g 2 M g e kvert 2 e

M g kvert

M g V kvert 1 kvert g t M + 1
kvert g t M

Rearranging

or ( t) = V

so

V ( t) =

M g kvert

tanh

kvert g t M

For y(t) we need to integrate again:

dy =V dt

or

y=

V dt

t y ( t) = V ( t) dt = 0 0 M g kvert

M g kvert

tanh

kvert g t dt = M

kvert g M g ln cosh t kvert M

y ( t) =

ln cosh

kvert g t M

600 400 y ( t) 200

y(m)

20 t

40

60

t(s)

Horizontal: Newton's 2nd law for the sky diver (mass M) is:

dU 2 = khoriz U dt

(2)

For U(t) we need to integrate (2) with respect to t:


U k 1 horiz dU = M dt 2 0 U U 0 t

Separating variables and integrating:

so

khoriz M

t =

1 1 + U U0

Rearranging

or

U ( t) = 1+

U0 khoriz U0 M t

For x(t) we need to integrate again:

dx =U dt

or

x = U dt
t

t U0 khoriz U0 M dt = x ( t) = U ( t) dt = ln t + 1 0 khoriz M k U 1 + horiz 0 t M 0

x ( t) =

M khoriz

ln

khoriz U0
M

t + 1

210 1.510

3 3 3

x(m)

x ( t)

110

500 0 20 t 40 60

t(s)
Plotting the trajectory:

0 1

y(km)

x(km)

These plots can also be done in Excel.

Problem 1.14

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


The data provided are:

Data on sphere and terminal speed. Drag constant k, and time to reach 99% of terminal speed. Use given data; integrate equation of motion by separating variables.
11

M = 5 10

kg

V t = 5

cm s M dV = M g k V dt (1)

Newton's 2nd law for the general motion is (ignoring buoyancy effects)

Newton's 2nd law for the steady state motion becomes (ignoring buoyancy effects)

M g = k Vt

so

k =

M g Vt

k=

M g m s 11 = 5 10 kg 9.81 2 0.05 m Vt s

k = 9.81 10

9 N s

m dV = dt

To find the time to reach 99% of Vt, we need V(t). From 1, separating variables M k ln 1 V k M g V = 0.99 Vt
2

k g V M

Integrating and using limits

t=

We must evaluate this when

V = 4.95

cm s

t = 5 10

11

kg

m 9.81 10
9

N s

N s 9 N s ln 1 9.81 10 kg m m

1 5 10
11

kg

s 0.0495 m kg m 2 9.81 m s N s
2

t = 0.0235 s

Problem 1.15

[5]

Given: Find: Solution:


The data provided are:

Data on sphere and terminal speed from Problem 1.14. Distance traveled to reach 99% of terminal speed; plot of distance versus time. Use given data; integrate equation of motion by separating variables.
11

M = 5 10

kg

Vt = 5

cm s M dV = M g k V dt so (1) M g Vt

Newton's 2nd law for the general motion is (ignoring buoyancy effects)

Newton's 2nd law for the steady state motion becomes (ignoring buoyancy effects) k= M g m s 11 = 5 10 kg 9.81 2 0.05 m Vt s k = 9.81 10
9 N s

M g = k Vt

k =

To find the distance to reach 99% of Vt, we need V(y). From 1: V dV Separating variables k g V M
2

dV dy dV dV = M = M V = M g k V dt dt dy dy

= dy

Integrating and using limits

y=

M g k
2

ln 1

k M V V M g k V = 4.95
2

We must evaluate this when

V = 0.99 Vt

cm s

y = 5 10

11

kg

9.81 m s
2

2 2 2 m 1 s 0.0495 m kg m N s ln 1 9.81 10 9 N s ... 9 11 2 kg m 9.81 m m s kg 5 10 N s 9.81 10 N s

+ 5 10

11

0.0495 m N s kg 9 kg m s 9.81 10 N s m

y = 0.922 mm Alternatively we could use the approach of Problem 1.14 and first find the time to reach terminal speed, and use this time in y(t) to find the above value of y: dV From 1, separating variables k g V M t= M k = dt

Integrating and using limits

ln 1

k M g

(2)

We must evaluate this when

V = 0.99 Vt
2

V = 4.95

cm s

t = 5 10

11

kg

m 9.81 10
9

N s

N s 9 N s ln 1 9.81 10 kg m m
k t

1 5 10
11

kg

s 0.0495 m kg m 2 9.81 m s N s
2

t = 0.0235 s

From 2, after rearranging

dy M g M V = = 1 e dt k

Integrating and using limits

M g M M y= t + e 1 k k
N s 0.0235 s ... kg m
2

y = 5 10

11

kg

9.81 m s
2

m 9.81 10
9

N s

m + 5 10 11 kg 9 9.81 10 N s

9.81 10 9 .0235 2 11 N s 5 10 e 1
kg m

y = 0.922 mm

1 0.75

y (mm)

0.5 0.25 0 5 10 15 20 25

t (ms)

This plot can also be presented in Excel.

Problem 1.16
1.16 The English perfected the longbow as a weapon after the Medieval period. In the hands of a skilled archer,

[3]

the longbow was reputed to be accurate at ranges to 100 meters or more. If the maximum altitude of an arrow is less than h = 10 m while traveling to a target 100 m away from the archer, and neglecting air resistance, estimate the speed and angle at which the arrow must leave the bow. Plot the required release speed and angle as a function of height h.

Given: Find: Plot: Solution:

Long bow at range, R = 100 m. Maximum height of arrow is h = 10 m. Neglect air resistance. Estimate of (a) speed, and (b) angle, of arrow leaving the bow. (a) release speed, and (b) angle, as a function of h Let V0 = u 0 i + v 0 j = V0 (cos 0 i + sin 0 j)

Fy = m dv = mg , so v = v0 gt, and tf = 2tv=0 = 2v0/g dt

Also,

mv

v2 dv = mg, v dv = g dy, 0 0 = gh dy 2 (1) (2)

Thus

h = v 2 2g 0
Fx = m 2u v du = 0, so u = u 0 = const, and R = u 0 t f = 0 0 dt g

From 1.
v 2 = 2gh 0

(3)
u2 = 0 gR 2 8h

2.

u0 =

gR gR = 2v 0 2 2gh

Then

2 V0

u2 0

v2 0

gR 2 gR 2 = + 2gh and V0 = 2gh + 8h 8h

LM NM

OP QP

1 2

(4)

V0

L m 9.81 m = M2 9.81 10 m + b100g 8 s s N


2 2

1 m 10 m
2

OP Q

1 2

= 37.7 m s

From Eq. 3

v 0 = 2gh = V0 sin , = sin 1

2gh V0 s = 21.8 37.7 m

(5)

= sin 1 2 9.81

LMF MNGH

m 10 m s

IJ K

1 2

OP PQ

Plots of V0 = V0(h) {Eq. 4} and 0 = 0(h) {Eq. 5} are presented below

Problem 1.17

[2]

Given: Find:

Basic dimensions F, L, t and T. Dimensional representation of quantities below, and typical units in SI and English systems.

Solution:
(a) Power Power = Energy Force Distance F L = = Time Time t Force F = 2 Area L Force F = 2 Area L Radians 1 = Time t N m s N m
2

lbf ft s lbf ft
2

(b) Pressure

Pressure =

(c) Modulus of elasticity

Pressure =

N m 1 s N m L t F = M L t
2 2

lbf ft 1 s lbf ft
2

(d) Angular velocity

AngularVelocity =

(e) Energy

Energy = Force Distance = F L

(f) Momentum

Momentum = Mass Velocity = M From Newton's 2nd law Hence

Force = Mass Acceleration so L t = F t L = F t L t


2

or N s N m
2 2

M= lbf s lbf ft
2 2

F t L

Momentum = M Force Area = F L


2

(g) Shear stress

ShearStress =

(h) Specific heat

SpecificHeat =

Energy Mass Temperature

F L M T

F L

F t2 T L
= 1 T

L
2

m
2

ft
2

t T

s K

s R

(i) Thermal expansion coefficient ThermalExpansionCoefficient =

LengthChange Length

Temperature

1 K N m s

1 R lbf ft s

(j) Angular momentum

AngularMomentum = Momentum Distance = F t L

Problem 1.18

[2]

Given: Find:

Basic dimensions M, L, t and T. Dimensional representation of quantities below, and typical units in SI and English systems.

Solution:
(a) Power Power = Energy Force Distance F L = = Time Time t Force = Mass Acceleration so
2

From Newton's 2nd law

F =

M L t
2 2 2

Hence

Power =

F L M L L M L = = 2 3 t t t t

kg m s
3

slugft s
3

(b) Pressure

Pressure =

Force F M L M = = = 2 2 2 2 Area L t L L t Force F M L M = = = 2 2 2 2 Area L t L L t Radians 1 = Time t M L L t


2

kg m s kg m s 1 s = M L t
2 2 2 2

slug ft s
2

(c) Modulus of elasticity

Pressure =

slug ft s 1 s
2 2

(d) Angular velocity

AngularVelocity =

(e) Energy

Energy = Force Distance = F L =

kg m s
2

slug ft s
2

(f) Moment of a force

MomentOfForce = Force Length = F L = L t =

M L L t
2

M L t
2

kg m s
2

slug ft s
2

(g) Momentum

Momentum = Mass Velocity = M Force Area F L


2

M L t

kg m s kg m s
2

slug ft s slug ft s
2

(h) Shear stress

ShearStress =

= L L

M L t L
2 2

M L t
2

(i) Strain

Strain =

LengthChange Length

Dimensionless M L t M L t
2

(j) Angular momentum

AngularMomentum = Momentum Distance =

L =

kg m s

slugs ft s

Problem 1.19

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:

Pressure, volume and density data in certain units Convert to different units

Using data from tables (e.g. Table G.2) (a) 1 psi = 1 psi 6895 Pa 1 kPa = 6.89 kPa 1 psi 1000 Pa 1 quart 1 gal = 0.264 gal 0.946 liter 4 quart
2

(b)

1 liter = 1 liter

(c)

1 ft lbf s lbf s 4.448 N 12 N s 1 = 1 = 47.9 2 2 2 0.0254 m 1 lbf ft ft m

Problem 1.20

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:

Viscosity, power, and specific energy data in certain units Convert to different units

Using data from tables (e.g. Table G.2)

(a)

1 ft 2 2 2 12 m m ft 1 = 1 = 10.76 s s s 0.0254 m
100 W = 100 W 1 hp = 0.134 hp 746 W

(b)

(c)

kJ kJ 1000 J 1 Btu 0.454 kg Btu = 1 = 0.43 kg kg 1 kJ 1055 J 1 lbm lbm

Problem 1.21

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:


(a)

Quantities in English Engineering (or customary) units. Quantities in SI units. Use Table G.2 and other sources (e.g., Google) 100 ft ft 0.0254 m 12 in 1 min = 0.0472 m = 100 m min 1 in 1 ft s 60 s 231 in 0.0254 m 3 = 0.0189 m 1 gal 1 in
3 3 3 3 3 3

(b)

5 gal = 5 gal

(c)

65 mph = 65

mile 1852 m 1 hr m = 29.1 hr 1 mile 3600 s s 4047 m 1 acre


3

(d)

5.4 acres = 5.4 acre

= 2.19 10 m

Problem 1.22

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:


(a)

Quantities in SI (or other) units. Quantities in BG units. Use Table G.2. 50 m = 50 m


3 2 2

1 in 1 ft = 538 ft2 0.0254 m 12 in 1 m 1 in 1 ft = 8.83 10 3 ft3 100 cm 0.0254 m 12 in


1000 W 1 hp = 134 hp 1 kW 746 W
3

(b)

250 cc = 250 cm 100 kW = 100 kW lbf s ft


2

(c)

(d)

is already in BG units

Problem 1.23

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:

Acreage of land, and water needs. Water flow rate (gpm) to water crops. Use Table G.2 and other sources (e.g., Google) as needed. Q = 1.5 in 25 acres week 1.5 in 25 acre 1.5 in 25 acre 4.36 10 ft 12 in 1 week 1 day 1 hr = 1 acre week week 7 day 24 hr 60 min 1 ft
4 2 2

The volume flow rate needed is

Performing unit conversions

Q =

Q = 101 gpm

Problem 1.24

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Geometry of tank, and weight of propane. Volume of propane, and tank volume; explain the discrepancy. Use Table G.2 and other sources (e.g., Google) as needed.

The author's tank is approximately 12 in in diameter, and the cylindrical part is about 8 in. The weight of propane specified is 17 lb. The tank diameter is The tank cylindrical height is The mass of propane is The specific gravity of propane is The density of water is D = 12 in L = 8 in mprop = 17 lbm SGprop = 0.495 = 998 kg m mprop prop
3

The volume of propane is given by

Vprop =

mprop SGprop 1 m 0.454 kg 1 in 0.495 998 kg 1 lbm 0.0254 m


3 3

Vprop = 17 lbm Vprop = 953 in


3

The volume of the tank is given by a cylinder diameter D length L, D2L/4 and a sphere (two halves) given by D3/6 Vtank = D D L + 4 6
2 2 3 3

( 12 in) ( 12 in) Vtank = 8 in + 4 6 Vtank = 1810 in The ratio of propane to tank volumes is Vprop Vtank = 53 %
3

This seems low, and can be explained by a) tanks are not filled completely, b) the geometry of the tank gave an overestimate of the volume (the ends are not really hemispheres, and we have not allowed for tank wall thickness).

Problem 1.25
1.25 The density of mercury is given as 26.3 slug/ft3. Calculate the specific gravity and the specific volume in

[1]

m3/kg of the mercury. Calculate the specific weight in lbf/ft3 on Earth and on the moon. Acceleration of gravity on the moon is 5.47 ft/s2.

Given:

Density of mercury is = 26.3 slug/ft3.

Acceleration of gravity on moon is gm = 5.47 ft/s2.

Find:
a. b. c. d. Specific gravity of mercury. Specific volume of mercury, in m3/kg. Specific weight on Earth. Specific weight on moon.

Solution: Apply definitions: g, v 1 , SG H 2 O


SG = 26.3 slug ft
3 3

Thus
v=

ft 3 = 13.6 1.94 slug

ft m3 slug lbm (0.3048) 3 3 = 7.37 10 5 m 3 kg 26.3 slug 32.2 lbm 0.4536 kg ft

On Earth,

E = 26.3

slug ft 3

32.2

ft s2

lbf s2 = 847 lbf ft 3 slug ft

On the moon,

m = 26.3

slug ft
3

5.47

ft s
2

lbf s2 = 144 lbf ft 3 slug ft

{Note that the mass based quantities (SG and ) are independent of gravity.}

Problem 1.26

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data in given units Convert to different units

(a)

in in 0.0254 m 1000 mm 1 min mm = 1 = 273 min min 1 in 1 m s 60 s m m = 1 s s


3 3

(b)

1 gal 4 0.000946 m
3

60 s = 15850 gpm 1 min

(c)

liter liter 1 gal 60 s = 1 = 0.264 gpm min min 4 0.946 liter 1 min ft 0.0254 m 60 min m 1 hr = 1.70 hr min 1 ft 12
3 3 3

(d)

1 SCFM = 1

Problem 1.27
1.27

[1]

The kilogram force is commonly used in Europe as a unit of force. (As in the U.S. customary system, where

1 lbf is the force exerted by a mass of 1 lbm in standard gravity, 1 kgf is the force exerted by a mass of 1 kg in standard gravity.) Moderate pressures, such as those for auto or truck tires, are conveniently expressed in units of kgf/cm2. Convert 32 psig to these units.

Given: Find: Solution:

In European usage, 1 kgf is the force exerted on 1 kg mass in standard gravity. Convert 32 psi to units of kgf/cm2. Apply Newton's second law.

Basic equation: F = ma The force exerted on 1 kg in standard gravity is


F = 1 kg 9.81 m s2 N s2 = 9.81 N = 1 kgf kg m
N in.2 kgf kgf = 0.0703 2 2 2 lbf (2.54) cm 9.81 N cm

Setting up a conversion from psi to kgf/cm2,

lbf in.2

=1

lbf in.2

4.448

or

0.0703 kgf cm 2 psi

Thus

32 psi = 32 psi

0.0703 kgf cm 2 psi

32 psi = 2.25 kgf cm 2

Problem 1.28

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Information on canal geometry. Flow speed using the Manning equation, correctly and incorrectly! Use Table G.2 and other sources (e.g., Google) as needed.
2 3 1 2

The Manning equation is

V =

R h S0 n

which assumes Rh in meters and V in m/s. S0 =


1 2

The given data is

Rh = 7.5 m

1 10

n = 0.014

7.5
Hence V =

2 3

1 10

0.014

V = 86.5

m s

(Note that we don't cancel units; we just write m/s next to the answer! Note also this is a very high speed due to the extreme slope S0.) Rh = 24.6 ft

Using the equation incorrectly:

Rh = 7.5 m
2 3

1 in 1 ft 0.0254 m 12 in
1 2

Hence

V =

1 24.6 10 0.014

V = 191

ft s ft s 12 in 1 ft

(Note that we again don't cancel units; we just write ft/s next to the answer!) 0.0254 m 1 in V = 58.2 m s which is wrong!

This incorrect use does not provide the correct answer

V = 191

This demonstrates that for this "engineering" equation we must be careful in its use! To generate a Manning equation valid for Rh in ft and V in ft/s, we need to do the following:
2 3 1 2

Rh ( m) S0 1 in ft m 1 ft V = V = n s s 0.0254 m 12 in
2 3 1 2 2 3

1 in 1 ft 0.0254 m 12 in
2 3 1 2 1 3

Rh ( ft) S0 ft V = n s

1 in 1 ft 0.0254 m 12 in

1 in

0.0254 m

Rh ( ft) S0 1 ft = 12 in n

1 in 1 ft 0.0254 m 12 in

In using this equation, we ignore the units and just evaluate the conversion factor 1.49 Rh ( ft) S0 ft V = n s
2 3 1 2

1 1 .0254 12

1 3

= 1.49

Hence

Handbooks sometimes provide this form of the Manning equation for direct use with BG units. In our case we are asked to instead define a new value for n: Rh ( ft) S0 ft V = nBG s
2 3 1 2

nBG =

n 1.49

nBG = 0.0094

where
1 2

24.6
Using this equation with Rh = 24.6 ft: Converting to m/s V =

2 3

1 10

0.0094 ft 12 in 0.0254 m s 1 ft 1 in

V = 284 V = 86.6

ft s m s which is the correct answer!

V = 284

Problem 1.29

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Equation for maximum flow rate. Whether it is dimensionally correct. If not, find units of 0.04 term. Write a BG version of the equation Rearrange equation to check units of 0.04 term. Then use conversions from Table G.2 or other sources (e.g., Google) 0.04 = mmax T0 At p0

"Solving" the equation for the constant 0.04:

Substituting the units of the terms on the right, the units of the constant are
1 2 1 2 2 2 1 2

kg 1 1 kg 1 m N s K s K = K = 2 Pa 2 s N kg m m s m m K s m
1 2

Hence the constant is actually

c = 0.04

For BG units we could start with the equation and convert each term (e.g., At), and combine the result into a new constant, or simply convert c directly: K s 1.8 R 0.0254 m 12 in = 0.04 m K 1 in 1 ft R s ft
1 2 1 2 1 2

c = 0.04

c = 0.0164

so

mmax = 0.0164

At p0 T0

with At in ft2, p0 in lbf/ft2, and T0 in R.

This value of c assumes p is in lbf/ft2. For p in psi we need an additional conversion:


1 2 2 1 2 2

c = 0.0164

R s 12 in ft 1 ft

c = 2.36

R in s ft
3

so

mmax = 2.36

At p0 T0

with At in ft2, p0 in psi, and T0 in R.

Problem 1.30

Given: Find: Solution:


The given data is The COPIdeal is

Equation for COP and temperature data. COPIdeal, EER, and compare to a typical Energy Star compliant EER value. Use the COP equation. Then use conversions from Table G.2 or other sources (e.g., Google) to find the EER. TL = ( 68 + 460) R TL = 528 R TH = ( 95 + 460) R TH = 555 R

TL 525 COPIdeal = = = 19.4 TH TL 555 528

The EER is a similar measure to COP except the cooling rate (numerator) is in BTU/hr and the electrical input (denominator) is in W:
BTU hr

2545 = 19.4

BTU = 66.2

EERIdeal = COPIdeal

hr 746 W

BTU hr

This compares to Energy Star compliant values of about 15 BTU/hr/W! We have some way to go! We can define the isentropic efficiency as EERActual isen = EERIdeal Hence the isentropic efficiency of a very good AC is about 22.5%.

Problem 1.31

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:

Equation for drag on a body. Dimensions of CD. Use the drag equation. Then "solve" for CD and use dimensions. FD = CD = CD = L 1 2 V A C D 2 2 FD V A F M L 2 L 3 t or M L t
2 2 2

The drag equation is "Solving" for CD, and using dimensions

But, From Newton's 2nd law

Force = Mass Acceleration F M L L 2 L 3 t


2 3

F = M

L t
2

Hence

CD =

L t 1 =0 2 2 M L L

The drag coefficient is dimensionless.

Problem 1.32

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:

Equation for mean free path of a molecule. Dimensions of C for a diemsionally consistent equation. Use the mean free path equation. Then "solve" for C and use dimensions. = C m d
2 2

The mean free path equation is

"Solving" for C, and using dimensions

C =

d m L

M L M
3

C = The drag constant C is dimensionless.

=0

Problem 1.33

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:

Equation for vibrations. Dimensions of c, k and f for a dimensionally consistent equation. Also, suitable units in SI and BG systems. Use the vibration equation to find the diemsions of each quantity m d x dt
2 2

The first term of the equation is

The dimensions of this are

L t
2

Each of the other terms must also have these dimensions. Hence c dx M L = 2 dt t M L t
2

so

L M L = 2 t t M L t
2

and

c =

M t M t
2

k x =

so

kL =

and

k =

f = kg s slug s kg
2

M L t
2

Suitable units for c, k, and f are c:

k:

slug
2

f:

kg m
2

slug ft
2

s s s s Note that c is a damping (viscous) friction term, k is a spring constant, and f is a forcing function. These are more typically expressed using F ( rather than M (mass). From Newton's 2nd law: F = M L t
2

or F t F t = L t L lbf ft f:
2

M=

F t L

Using this in the dimensions and units for c, k, and f we find = c N s m lbf s ft N m

k=

F t

2 2

F L

f =F

L t N

c:

k:

lbf

Problem 1.34

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:


The units are

Specific speed in customary units Units; Specific speed in SI units

rpm gpm ft
3 4

1 2

or

ft s

3 4 3 2

Using data from tables (e.g. Table G.2)


1 2

NScu = 2000

rpm gpm ft
3 4

1 4 0.000946 m3 1 min 12 ft rpm gpm 2 rad 1 min NScu = 2000 3 1 gal 60 s 1 rev 60 s 0.0254 m
ft
4 1 2

1 2

1 2

3 4

NScu = 4.06

3 rad m s s

3 4

Problem 1.35

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:

"Engineering" equation for a pump SI version

The dimensions of "1.5" are ft. The dimensions of "4.5 x 10-5" are ft/gpm2. Using data from tables (e.g. Table G.2), the SI versions of these coefficients can be obtained 1.5 ft = 1.5 ft 0.0254 m = 0.457 m 1 ft 12 = 4.5 10
5

4.5 10

ft gpm
2

ft gpm
2

1quart 0.0254 m 1 gal 60 s 1 4 quart 0.000946 m3 1min ft 12

4.5 10

ft gpm
2

= 3450

The equation is

m3 s

m3 H ( m) = 0.457 3450 Q s

Problem 1.36
1.36 A container weighs 3.5 lbf when empty. When filled with water at 90F, the mass of the container and its

[2]

contents is 2.5 slug. Find the weight of water in the container, and its volume in cubic feet, using data from Appendix A.

Given:

Empty container weighing 3.5 lbf when empty, has a mass of 2.5 slug when filled with water at 90F.

Find:
a. b. Weight of water in the container Container volume in ft3 Basic equation:
F = ma

Solution:

Weight is the force of gravity on a body, W = mg


Wt = WH 2 O + Wc

Then

WH 2 O = Wt Wc = mg Wc WH 2 O = 2.5 slug 32.2 ft s2 lbf s2 35 lbf = 77.0 lbf . slug ft

The volume is given by

M H 2O

M H 2O g

WH 2 O

From Table A.7, = 1.93 slug/ft3 at T = 90F

= 77.0 lbf

ft 3 s2 slug ft = 124 ft 3 . 2 193 slug 32.2 ft lbf s .

Problem 1.37
1.37 Calculate the density of standard air in a laboratory from the ideal gas equation of state. Estimate the

[2]

experimental uncertainty in the air density calculated for standard conditions (29.9 in. of mercury and 59F) if the uncertainty in measuring the barometer height is 0.1 in. of mercury and the uncertainty in measuring temperature is 0.5F. (Note that 29.9 in. of mercury corresponds to 14.7 psia.)

Given:

Air at standard conditions p = 29.9 in Hg, T = 59F

Uncertainty: in p is 0.1 in Hg, in T is 0.5F Note that 29.9 in Hg corresponds to 14.7 psia

Find:
a. b. air density using ideal gas equation of state. estimate of uncertainty in calculated value.

Solution:

lb R p lbf in 2 1 144 2 = 14.7 2 RT 53.3 ft lbf 519 R in ft

= 0.0765 lbm ft 3

The uncertainty in density is given by

1 p RT = RT = = 1; RT RT p

LF p I F T I = MG MNH p u JK + GH T u JK
2 p T

2 12

OP PQ

up = uT =

T T p p = = 1; = 2 T RT RT

FG H

IJ K

01 . = 0.334% 29.9 0.5 = 0.0963% 460 + 59


2

Then

u = u

LMdu i + b u g OP = b0.334g + b0.0963g N Q = 0.348% e 2.66 10 lbm ft j


2 2 12 2 p T 4 3

Problem 1.38
1.38 Repeat the calculation of uncertainty described in Problem 1.37 for air in a freezer. Assume the measured

[2]

barometer height is 759 1 mm of mercury and the temperature is 20 0.5 C. [Note that 759 mm of mercury corresponds to 101 kPa (abs).]

Given:

Air at pressure, p = 759 1 mm Hg and temperature, T = 20 0.5C.

Note that 759 mm Hg corresponds to 101 kPa.

Find:
a. b. Air density using ideal gas equation of state Estimate of uncertainty in calculated value

Solution:

1 p N kg K = 101 103 2 . = 139 kg m 3 287 N m 253 K RT m

The uncertainty in density is given by

1 p = RT = 1; RT p

LF p I F T I = MG MNH p u JK + GH T u JK
2 p T

2 1/ 2

OP PQ

up = uT =

p T T p = = 1; = T RT RT 2

FG H

IJ K

1 = 0132% . 759 0.5 = 0198% . 273 20


2 12

Then

u = u

LMdu i + b u g OP = b0132g + b0198g . . N Q = 0.238% e 3.31 10 kg m j


2 2 12 2 p T 3 3

Problem 1.39
1.39 The mass of the standard American golf ball is 1.62 0.01 oz and its mean diameter is 1.68 0.01 in.

[2]

Determine the density and specific gravity of the American golf ball. Estimate the uncertainties in the calculated values.
m = 162 0.01 oz (20 to 1) . D = 168 0.01 in. (20 to 1) .

Given: Find:
a. b.

Standard American golf ball:

Density and specific gravity. Estimate uncertainties in calculated values. Density is mass per unit volume, so

Solution:

= =

m = 6

m
4 R 3 3

3 6 m m = 4 ( D 2) 3 D 3 1 (168) 3 in.3 . 0.4536 kg in.3 = 1130 kg m 3 16 oz (0.0254) 3 m 3

. 162 oz

and

SG =

H 2 O

= 1130

kg m3
2

m3 = 113 . 1000 kg

The uncertainty in density is given by

LF m I F D = MG MNH m u JK + GH D u
m

IJ K

2 12

OP PQ

0.01 m m 1 = = = 1; u m = = 0.617 percent 162 m .

D 4 D D 6 m 6 m = 3 = 3; u D = 0.595 percent = 3 D D4 D4 6m
u = um

FG H

IJ K

FG H

IJ K

Thus
u u SG

b g + b3u g = {b0.617g + 3b0.595g } = 189 percent e 214 kg m j . . = u = 189 percent b 0.0214g .


2 2 12 D 2 2
1 2

Finally,

= 1130 214 kg m 3 (20 to 1) .


SG = 113 0.0214 (20 to 1) .

Problem 1.40
1.40

[2]

The mass flow rate in a water flow system determined by collecting the discharge over a timed interval is 0.2

kg/s. The scales used can be read to the nearest 0.05 kg and the stopwatch is accurate to 0.2 s. Estimate the precision with which the flow rate can be calculated for time intervals of (a) 10 s and (b) 1 min.

Given:

Mass flow rate of water determined by collecting discharge over a timed interval is 0.2 kg/s.

Scales can be read to nearest 0.05 kg. Stopwatch can be read to nearest 0.2 s.

Find: Solution:

Estimate precision of flow rate calculation for time intervals of (a) 10 s, and (b) 1 min. Apply methodology of uncertainty analysis, Appendix F:
m= m t

Computing equations:

Thus

LF m m u I + F t m u I OP u = MG MNH m m JK GH m t JK PQ m m t m t L m F 1I = = t G J = 1 and MNb1g t OPQ = 1 H t K m m m t m


2 2
1 2

The uncertainties are expected to be half the least counts of the measuring instruments. Tabulating results: Time Interval, t(s) 10 60 Error in t(s) 0.10 0.10 Uncertainty in t (percent) 1.0 0.167 Water Collected, m(kg) 2.0 12.0 Error in m(kg) 0.025 0.025 Uncertainty in m (percent) 1.25 0.208 Uncertainty in (percent) 1.60 0.267

A time interval of about 15 seconds should be chosen to reduce the uncertainty in results to 1 percent.

Problem 1.41
1.41

[2]

A can of pet food has the following internal dimensions: 102 mm height and 73 mm diameter (each 1 mm at

odds of 20 to 1). The label lists the mass of the contents as 397 g. Evaluate the magnitude and estimated uncertainty of the density of the pet food if the mass value is accurate to 1 g at the same odds.

Given:

Pet food can


H = 102 1 mm (20 to 1) D = 73 1 mm (20 to 1) m = 397 1 g (20 to 1)

Find: Solution:

Magnitude and estimated uncertainty of pet food density. Density is

4 m m m = = or = ( m, D, H ) R 2 H D 2 H

From uncertainty analysis

LF m I F D I F H = MG MNH m u JK + GH D u JK + GH H u
2 2 m D

IJ K

OP PQ

1 2

Evaluating,

m m 4 1 1 1 4m = = = 1; um = = 0.252% 2 2 m D H D H 397 D D 1 4m 1 4m . = ( 2) = ( 2 ) = 2; u D = = 137% 3 2 D D H 73 D H H H 1 4m 1 4m = ( 1) = ( 1) = 1; u H = = 0.980% H D 2 H 102 D 2 H 2


u = [(1)(0.252)]2 + [( 2)(137)]2 + [( 1)(0.980)]2 . u = 2.92 percent

Substituting

1 2

D2 H =

(73) 2 mm 2 102 mm

m3 109 mm 3

= 4.27 10 4 m 3

397 g m kg = = 930 kg m 3 4 3 4.27 10 m 1000 g

Thus

= 930 27.2 kg m 3 (20 to 1)

Problem 1.42
1.42

[2]

The mass of the standard British golf ball is 45.9 0.3 g and its mean diameter is 41.1 0.3 mm. Determine

the density and specific gravity of the British golf ball. Estimate the uncertainties in the calculated values.
m = 45.9 0.3 g

Given: Find:
a. b.

Standard British golf ball:

(20 to 1)

D = 411 0.3 mm (20 to 1) .

Density and specific gravity Estimate of uncertainties in calculated values. Density is mass per unit volume, so

Solution:

= =

m = 6

m
4 R 3 3

m 3 6 m = 3 4 ( D 2) D3 1 (0.0411)
3

0.0459 kg

m 3 = 1260 kg m 3

and

SG =

H 2 O

= 1260

kg m3

m3 = 126 . 1000 kg

The uncertainty in density is given by

m m 1 0.3 = = = 1; u m = = 0.654% 45.9 m D D = D uD =

LF m I F D = MG MNH m u JK + GH D u
2 m 4 3

IJ K

2 12

OP PQ

FG 3 6 m IJ = 3 FG 6m IJ = 3 H D K H D K
o

0.3 = 0.730% 411 .

u = [( u m ) 2 + ( 3u D ) 2 ]1 2 = (0.654) 2 + [ 3(0.730)]2

12

Thus

u = 2.29% ( 28.9 kg m 3 ) u SG = u = 2.29% ( 0.0289)

Summarizing

= 1260 28.9 kg m 3 (20 to 1)


SG = 126 0.0289 (20 to 1) .

Problem 1.43
1.43

[3]

The mass flow rate of water in a tube is measured using a beaker to catch water during a timed interval. The

nominal mass flow rate is 100 g/s. Assume that mass is measured using a balance with a least count of 1 g and a maximum capacity of 1 kg, and that the timer has a least count of 0.1 s. Estimate the time intervals and uncertainties in measured mass flow rate that would result from using 100, 500, and 1000 mL beakers. Would there be any advantage in using the largest beaker? Assume the tare mass of the empty 1000 mL beaker is 500 g.

Given:

Nominal mass flow rate of water determined by collecting discharge (in a beaker) over a timed interval is m = 100 g s

Scales have capacity of 1 kg, with least count of 1 g. Timer has least count of 0.1 s. Beakers with volume of 100, 500, 1000 mL are available tare mass of 1000 mL beaker is 500 g. Estimate (a) time intervals, and (b) uncertainties, in measuring mass flow rate from using each of the three beakers.

Find:

Solution:

To estimate time intervals assume beaker is filled to maximum volume in case of 100 and 500 mL beakers and to maximum allowable mass of water (500 g) in case of 1000 mL beaker.

Then

m=

m t

and

t =

m = m m

Tabulating results

= 100 mL 500 mL 1000 mL t = 1 s 5s 5 s

Apply the methodology of uncertainty analysis, Appendix E Computing equation:

um

LF m m u I + F t m u = MG MNH m m JK GH m t
2 m

IJ K

2 12

OP PQ

The uncertainties are expected to be half the least counts of the measuring instruments

m = 0.5 g

t = 0.05 s

m 1 m = = t =1 m m t

FG IJ H K

and

t t m = m t m

b g LM m OP = 1 MN btg PQ
2 2

u m = u m

b g + b u g
2 t

2 12

Tabulating results: Uncertainty Beaker Volume (mL) 100 500 1000 Water Collected m(g) 100 500 500 0.50 0.50 0.50 Error in m(g) Uncertainty in m (percent) 0.50 0.10 0.10 Time Interval t(s) 1.0 5.0 5.0 0.05 0.05 0.05 5.0 1.0 1.0 5.03 1.0 1.0 Error in t(s) in t (percent) in (percent)

Since the scales have a capacity of 1 kg and the tare mass of the 1000 mL beaker is 500 g, there is no advantage in using the larger beaker. The uncertainty in could be reduced to 0.50 percent by using the large beaker if a scale

with greater capacity the same least count were available

Problem 1.44
1.44

[3]

The estimated dimensions of a soda can are D = 66.0 0.5 mm and H = 110 0.5 mm. Measure the mass of

a full can and an empty can using a kitchen scale or postal scale. Estimate the volume of soda contained in the can. From your measurements estimate the depth to which the can is filled and the uncertainty in the estimate. Assume the value of SG = 1.055, as supplied by the bottler.

Given: Find:
a. b.

Soda can with estimated dimensions D = 66.0 0.5 mm, H = 110 0.5 mm. Soda has SG = 1.055

volume of soda in the can (based on measured mass of full and empty can). estimate average depth to which the can is filled and the uncertainty in the estimate. Measurements on a can of coke give
m f = 386.5 0.50 g, m e = 17.5 0.50 g m = m f m e = 369 u m g

Solution:

um

LF m = MG MNH m

m u mf m f

IJ + FG m m u IJ OP K H m m K PQ
2 e me e

2 1/ 2

u mf =

0.5 g 0.50 = 0.00129, u me = = 0.0286 386.5 g 17.5


2 2 1/ 2

um

RL 386.5 (1) (0.00129)O + L17.5 (1) (0.0286)O U | = SM V PQ | PQ MN 369 N 369 | | T W


=

= 0.0019

Density is mass per unit volume and SG = /2 so


= m m m3 kg 1 = 369 g = 350 10 6 m 3 1000 kg 1055 1000 g H 2 O SG .

The reference value H2O is assumed to be precise. Since SG is specified to three places beyond the decimal point, assume uSG = 0.001. Then

uv uv

LF m v u I + F m v I OP = [(1) u ] + [(1) u ] = MG J G J o t NMH v m K H SG SG K QP = o[(1) (0.0019)] + [( 1) (0.001)] t = 0.0021 or 0.21%


2 2 1/ 2 2 m m SG 2 2 1/ 2

2 1/ 2

D 2
4

L or L =

D 2

350 10 6 m 3 (0.066) 2 m 2

103 mm = 102 mm m

uL

LF L u I OP + LMF D L u = MG MNH L JK PQ MNGH L D


2

IJ K

2 1/ 2

OP PQ

0.5 mm L D 2 4 = = 1 uD = = 0.0076 4 L 66 mm D 2

D 2 4 D L 2 =D 3 = 2 L D 4 D
u L = [(1) (0.0021)]2 + [( 2) (0.0076)]2

FG H

IJ K

1/ 2

= 0.0153 or 1.53%

Note: 1. Printing on the can states the content as 355 ml. This suggests that the implied accuracy of the SG value may be over stated. 2. Results suggest that over seven percent of the can height is void of soda.

Problem 1.45

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


The data is:

Data on water Viscosity; Uncertainty in viscosity

A = 2.414 10

5 N s 2

B = 247.8 K 0.25 K 293 K

C = 140 K

T = 293 K

The uncertainty in temperature is


B ( TC)

uT =

uT = 0.085 %
3 N s 2

Also

( T) = A 10

Evaluating d ( T) = dT 10

( T) = 1.01 10 A B ln ( 10)
B C T

For the uncertainty

( C T)

Hence

u ( T) =

ln ( 10) B T uT T d ( T) uT = ( T) dT ( C T )2

Evaluating

u ( T) = 0.609 %

Problem 1.46
1.46 An enthusiast magazine publishes data from its road tests on the lateral acceleration capability of cars. The

[3]

measurements are made using a 150-ft-diameter skid pad. Assume the vehicle path deviates from the circle by 2 ft and that the vehicle speed is read from a fifth-wheel speed-measuring system to 0.5 mph. Estimate the experimental uncertainty in a reported lateral acceleration of 0.7 g. How would you improve the experimental procedure to reduce the uncertainty?

Given:

Lateral acceleration, a = 0.70 g, measured on 150-ft diameter skid pad.


Path deviation: 2 ft measurement uncertainty Vehicle speed: 0.5 mph

U V W

Find:
a. b. Estimate uncertainty in lateral acceleration. How could experimental procedure be improved? Lateral acceleration is given by a = V2/R.

Solution:

From Appendix F, u a = [(2 u v ) 2 + ( u R ) 2 ]1/ 2 From the given data,


V 2 = aR; V = aR = 0.70

LM N

32.2 ft s2

75 ft

OP Q

1/ 2

= 411 ft / s .

Then

uv = uR =

V
V

= 0.5

mi s ft hr 5280 = 0.0178 hr 41.1 ft mi 3600 s 1 = 0.0267 75 ft


1/ 2

and

R
R

= 2 ft

so

u a = (2 0.0178) 2 + (0.0267) 2 u a = 4.45 percent

= 0.0445

Experimental procedure could be improved by using a larger circle, assuming the absolute errors in measurement are constant.

D = 400 ft, R = 200 ft V = aR = 0.70

For

LM N

32.2 ft s2

200 ft

OP Q

1/ 2

= 67.1 ft / s = 458 mph .

uv =

0.5 mph 2 ft = 0.0109; u R = = 0.0100 45.8 mph 200 ft


1/ 2

u a = (2 0.0109) 2 + (0.0100) 2

= 0.0240 or 2.4 percent

Problem 1.47
1.47

[4]

Using the nominal dimensions of the soda can given in Problem 1.44, determine the precision with which the

diameter and height must be measured to estimate the volume of the can within an uncertainty of 0.5 percent.

Given:

Dimensions of soda can:

D = 66 mm H = 110 mm

Find:

Measurement precision needed to allow volume to be estimated with an uncertainty of 0.5 percent or less.

Solution:

Use the methods of Appendix F:

=
Computing equations:

D2H
4
1

H 2 D 2 2 u = uH + uD H D
H

Since =

D2 H
4

, then

= D and 4
2

= DH 2

Let u D = Dx and u H = Hx , substituting,

4H D 2 x 2 4D DH x 2 2 x 2 2 x 2 2 u = + = + 2 2 D H 4 H D H 2 D H D

Solving,

x 2 x 2 = + = ( x) H D
2 2

1 2 2 2 + H D

x=

u
1 2 ( H )2 + ( D )2
1 2

0.005

1 110 mm

) +(
2

2 66 mm

= 0.158 mm

uH =
Check:

x
H

= =

0.158 mm = 1.44 103 110 mm 0.158 mm = 2.39 103 66 mm


1 1

uD =

x
D

u = [(u H ) 2 + (2u D ) 2 ] 2 = [(0.00144) 2 + (0.00478) 2 ] 2 = 0.00499


If x represents half the least count, a minimum resolution of about 2 x 0.32 mm is needed.

Problem 1.19

Problem 1.48

[4]

Given data: H= L = = 57.7 0.5 0.2 ft ft deg

For this building height, we are to vary (and therefore L ) to minimize the uncertainty u H.

Plotting u H vs (deg) 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 Optimizing using Solver (deg) 31.4 uH 0.947% uH 4.02% 2.05% 1.42% 1.13% 1.00% 0.95% 0.96% 1.02% 1.11% 1.25% 1.44% 1.70% 2.07% 2.62% 3.52% 5.32% 10.69% 12% 10% 8% uH 6% 4% 2% 0% 0 10 20 30 40 ( )
o

Uncertainty in Height (H = 57.7 ft) vs

50

60

70

80

90

To find the optimum as a function of building height H we need a more complex Solver H (ft) 50 75 100 125 175 200 250 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 (deg) 29.9 34.3 37.1 39.0 41.3 42.0 43.0 43.5 44.1 44.4 44.6 44.7 44.8 44.8 44.9 uH 0.992% 0.877% 0.818% 0.784% 0.747% 0.737% 0.724% 0.717% 0.709% 0.705% 0.703% 0.702% 0.701% 0.700% 0.700%

Optimum Angle vs Building Height


50 40 (deg) 30 20 10 0 0 100 200 300 400 500 H (ft) 600 700 800 900 1000

Use Solver to vary ALL 's to minimize the total u H! Total u H's: 11.3%

Problem 1.50
1.50 In the design of a medical instrument it is desired to dispense 1 cubic millimeter of liquid using a piston-

[5]

cylinder syringe made from molded plastic. The molding operation produces plastic parts with estimated dimensional uncertainties of 0.002 in. Estimate the uncertainty in dispensed volume that results from the uncertainties in the dimensions of the device. Plot on the same graph the uncertainty in length, diameter, and volume dispensed as a function of cylinder diameter D from D = 0.5 to 2 mm. Determine the ratio of stroke length to bore diameter that gives a design with minimum uncertainty in volume dispensed. Is the result influenced by the magnitude of the dimensional uncertainty?

Given:

Piston-cylinder device to have = 1 mm3 .

Molded plastic parts with dimensional uncertainties, = 0.002 in.

Find:
a. b. c. Estimate of uncertainty in dispensed volume that results from the dimensional uncertainties. Determine the ratio of stroke length to bore diameter that minimizes u ; plot of the results. Is this result influenced by the magnitude of ? Apply uncertainty concepts from Appendix F:

Solution:

Computing equation:

D 2 L
4

; u

LF L u I + F D u = MG MNH L JK GH D
2 L
1

IJ K

OP PQ

1 2

From ,

L L

= 1, and

D D

= 2 , so u = [ u 2 + (2 u D ) 2 ] 2 L
mm in.

The dimensional uncertainty is = 0.002 in. 25.4 Assume D = 1 mm. Then L =


4

= 0.0508 mm
= 127 mm .

D 2

1 mm 3

1 (1) 2 mm2

0.0508 = 5.08 percent 1 1 u = [(4.00) 2 + (2(5.08)) 2 ] 2 0.0508 uL = = = 4.00 percent 127 . L uD = D =

U | V | W

u = 10.9 percent

To minimize u , substitute in terms of D:

u = [( u L ) 2 + (2 u D

LF I F I O ) ] = MG J + G 2 J P MNH L K H D K PQ
2 2 2

1 2

LF D I F I OP = MG MNH 4 JK + GH 2 D JK PQ
2 2 2

1 2

This will be minimum when D is such that []/D = 0, or


[] = D 4

FG IJ H K
1

4 D 3 + (2 ) 2 2
1 3

FG H

IJ = 0; D D K
1
3

=2

FG 4 IJ HK

; D = 26

FG 4 IJ HK

1 3

Thus

D opt = 2 6

FG 4 1 mm IJ H K
3

= 122 mm .

The corresponding L is

L opt =

1 mm 3

1 (122) mm 2 .
2

= 0.855 mm

The optimum stroke-to-bore ratio is L D) opt =

0.855 mm = 0.701 (see table and plot on next page) 1.22 mm

Note that drops out of the optimization equation. This optimum L/D is independent of the magnitude of However, the magnitude of the optimum u increases as increases.
Uncertainty in volume of cylinder: D (mm)

= 0.002 in.
= 1 mm
3

0.0508 mm

L (mm)

L/D (---)

uD(%)

uL(%)

u( % )

0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.22 1.3

5.09 3.54 2.60 1.99 1.57 1.27 1.05 0.884 0.855 0.753

10.2 5.89 3.71 2.49 1.75 1.27 0.957 0.737 0.701 0.580

10.2 8.47 7.26 6.35 5.64 5.08 4.62 4.23 4.16 3.91

1.00 1.44 1.96 2.55 3.23 3.99 4.83 5.75 5.94 6.74

20.3 17.0 14.6 13.0 11.7 10.9 10.4 10.2 10.2 10.3

1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5

0.650 0.566 0.497 0.441 0.393 0.353 0.318 0.289 0.263 0.241 0.221 0.204

0.464 0.377 0.311 0.259 0.218 0.186 0.159 0.137 0.120 0.105 0.092 0.081

3.63 3.39 3.18 2.99 2.82 2.67 2.54 2.42 2.31 2.21 2.12 2.03

7.82 8.98 10.2 11.5 12.9 14.4 16.0 17.6 19.3 21.1 23.0 24.9

10.7 11.2 12.0 13.0 14.1 15.4 16.7 18.2 19.9 21.6 23.4 25.3

Problem 2.1

[1]

Given: Find:

Velocity fields Whether flows are 1, 2 or 3D, steady or unsteady.

Solution:
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) V V V V V V V V =V =V =V =V =V =V =V =V ( y) ( x) ( x , y) ( x , y) ( x) ( x , y , z) ( x , y) ( x , y , z) 1D 1D 2D 2D 1D 3D 2D 3D V V V V V V V V =V V =V =V =V V =V V ( t) ( t) ( t) ( t) ( t) ( t) ( t) ( t) Unsteady Steady Unsteady Unsteady Unsteady Steady Unsteady Steady

Problem 2.2

[2]

Problem 2.3

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:


For streamlines

Velocity field Equation for streamlines

Streamline Plots
5

v dy B x y B y = = = 2 u dx A x A x

4 3 2 1

Integrating

ln ( y) = C x

B 1 ln ( x) + c = ln ( x) + c A 2

The solution is

y=

y (m)

So, separating variables

dy B dx = y A x

C=1 C=2 C=3 C=4

The plot can be easily done in Excel.

x (m)

Problem 2.4

[2]

t=0 c=1 y 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 c=2 y 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 c=3 y 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00

x 0.05 0.10 0.20 0.30 0.40 0.50 0.60 0.70 0.80 0.90 1.00 1.10 1.20 1.30 1.40 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00

t =1 s (### means too large to view) c=1 c=2 c=3 x y y y 0.05 20.00 40.00 60.00 0.10 10.00 20.00 30.00 0.20 5.00 10.00 15.00 0.30 3.33 6.67 10.00 0.40 2.50 5.00 7.50 0.50 2.00 4.00 6.00 0.60 1.67 3.33 5.00 0.70 1.43 2.86 4.29 0.80 1.25 2.50 3.75 0.90 1.11 2.22 3.33 1.00 1.00 2.00 3.00 1.10 0.91 1.82 2.73 1.20 0.83 1.67 2.50 1.30 0.77 1.54 2.31 1.40 0.71 1.43 2.14 1.50 0.67 1.33 2.00 1.60 0.63 1.25 1.88 1.70 0.59 1.18 1.76 1.80 0.56 1.11 1.67 1.90 0.53 1.05 1.58 2.00 0.50 1.00 1.50

t = 20 s c=1 y ###### ###### ###### ###### ###### ###### ###### ###### 86.74 8.23 1.00 0.15 0.03 0.01 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 c=2 y ###### ###### ###### ###### ###### ###### ###### ###### 173.47 16.45 2.00 0.30 0.05 0.01 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 c=3 y ###### ###### ###### ###### ###### ###### ###### ###### 260.21 24.68 3.00 0.45 0.08 0.02 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

x 0.05 0.10 0.20 0.30 0.40 0.50 0.60 0.70 0.80 0.90 1.00 1.10 1.20 1.30 1.40 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00

Streamline Plot (t = 0)
3.5 3.0 2.5 2.0

c=1 c=2 c=3

y
1.5 1.0 0.5 0.0 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0

Streamline Plot (t = 1 s)
70 60 50 40

c=1 c=2 c=3

y
30 20 10 0 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0

Streamline Plot (t = 20 s)
20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2

c=1 c=2 c=3

Problem 2.6

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:

Velocity field Whether field is 1D, 2D or 3D; Velocity components at (2,1/2); Equation for streamlines; Plot

The velocity field is a function of x and y. It is therefore 2D. At point (2,1/2), the velocity components are u = a x y = 2
2

1 1 2 m m m s 2 1 1 m m s 2
2

u = 2

m s

v = b y = 6 v dy by by = = = u dx a x y ax dy b dx = y a x ln ( y) = y = C x b ln ( x) + c a
3 2

3 m v= 2 s

For streamlines

So, separating variables

Integrating The solution is

y = C x

b a

The streamline passing through point (2,1/2) is given by

1 3 = C 2 2

C =

1 3 2 2

C=4

y=

4 x
3

20 16 12 8 4 1 1.3 1.7 2

Streamline for C Streamline for 2C Streamline for 3C Streamline for 4C

This can be plotted in Excel.

a= 1 b= 1 C= x 0.05 0.10 0.20 0.30 0.40 0.50 0.60 0.70 0.80 0.90 1.00 1.10 1.20 1.30 1.40 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 0 y 0.16 0.22 0.32 0.39 0.45 0.50 0.55 0.59 0.63 0.67 0.71 0.74 0.77 0.81 0.84 0.87 0.89 0.92 0.95 0.97 1.00 2 y 0.15 0.20 0.27 0.31 0.33 0.35 0.37 0.38 0.39 0.40 0.41 0.41 0.42 0.42 0.43 0.43 0.44 0.44 0.44 0.44 0.45 4 y 0.14 0.19 0.24 0.26 0.28 0.29 0.30 0.30 0.31 0.31 0.32 0.32 0.32 0.32 0.33 0.33 0.33 0.33 0.33 0.33 0.33 6 y 0.14 0.18 0.21 0.23 0.24 0.25 0.26 0.26 0.26 0.27 0.27 0.27 0.27 0.27 0.27 0.27 0.27 0.28 0.28 0.28 0.28

Streamline Plot
1.2 1.0 0.8
y 0.6

c=0 c=2 c=4 c=6

0.4 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.5 1.0


x

1.5

2.0

A = 10 B = 20 C= x 0.00 0.10 0.20 0.30 0.40 0.50 0.60 0.70 0.80 0.90 1.00 1.10 1.20 1.30 1.40 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 1 y 0.50 0.48 0.45 0.43 0.42 0.40 0.38 0.37 0.36 0.34 0.33 0.32 0.31 0.30 0.29 0.29 0.28 0.27 0.26 0.26 0.25 2 y 1.00 0.95 0.91 0.87 0.83 0.80 0.77 0.74 0.71 0.69 0.67 0.65 0.63 0.61 0.59 0.57 0.56 0.54 0.53 0.51 0.50 4 y 2.00 1.90 1.82 1.74 1.67 1.60 1.54 1.48 1.43 1.38 1.33 1.29 1.25 1.21 1.18 1.14 1.11 1.08 1.05 1.03 1.00 6 y 3.00 2.86 2.73 2.61 2.50 2.40 2.31 2.22 2.14 2.07 2.00 1.94 1.88 1.82 1.76 1.71 1.67 1.62 1.58 1.54 1.50

Streamline Plot
3.5
c=1

3.0 2.5 2.0 y 1.5 1.0 0.5 0.0 0.0 0.5 1.0 x 1.5

c=2 c=4 c = 6 ((x,y) = (1.2)

2.0

Problem 2.9

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


For streamlines

Velocity field Equation for streamline through (1,3) A v dy = = u dx dy dx = y x ln ( y) = ln ( x) + c y = C x 3 = C 1 up = dx A = dt x which is the equation of a straight line. C=3 or and x dx = A dt y = 3 x x= 2 A t + c t= c x 2 A 2 A
2

y x
2

A x

y x

So, separating variables Integrating The solution is For the streamline through point (1,3) For a particle

Hence the time for a particle to go from x = 1 to x = 2 m is ( 2 m) c ( 1 m) c 4 m 1 m = 2 2 A 2 A m 2 2 s


2 2 2 2

t = t ( x = 2) t ( x = 1)

t =

t = 0.75 s

Problem 2.10

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Flow field Plot of velocity magnitude along axes, and y = x; Equation of streamlines

On the x axis, y = 0, so Plotting

u =

2 x + y

K y
2 2

=0
100 50

v=

2 x + y

K x
2

K 2 x

v( m/s)

10

5 50 100

10

x (km)
The velocity is perpendicular to the axis, is very high close to the origin, and falls off to zero. This can also be plotted in Excel. On the y axis, x = 0, so u=

2 x + y Plotting

K y
2

K 2 y
100 50

v=

2 x + y

(2

K x

=0

u ( m/s)

10

5 50 100

10

y (km)
The velocity is perpendicular to the axis, is very high close to the origin, and falls off to zero.

This can also be plotted in Excel. K x


2

On the y = x axis

u=

2 x + x

K 4 x

v=

2 x + x

K x
2

K 4 x

The flow is perpendicular to line y = x:

Slope of line y = x: Slope of trajectory of motion:

1 u = 1 v r= x +x =
2 2

If we define the radial position:

r=

x +y
2

then along y = x

2 x

Then the magnitude of the velocity along y = x is V =

u +v =

1 1 K K K + = = 4 x2 x2 2 r 2 2 x

Plotting
100 50

V(m/s)

10

5 50 100

10

r (km)
This can also be plotted in Excel.
K x

For streamlines

v dy = = u dx

2 x + y

( 2 2)

2 x + y So, separating variables y dy = x dx


2 2

(2

K y

x y

Integrating

y x = +c 2 2

The solution is Streamlines form a set of concentric circles.

x +y = C

which is the equation of a circle.

This flow models a vortex flow. See Example 5.6 for streamline plots. Streamlines are circular, and the velocity approaches infinity as we approach the center. In Problem 2.11, we see that the streamlines are also circular. In a real tornado, at large distances from the center, the velocities behave as in this problem; close to the center, they behave as in Problem 2.11.

Problem 2.11

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Flow field Plot of velocity magnitude along axes, and y = x; Equation for streamlines

On the x axis, y = 0, so Plotting

u=

M y =0 2
1000 500

v=

M x 2

v (m/s)

10

5 500 1000

10

x (km)
The velocity is perpendicular to the axis and increases linearly with distance x. This can also be plotted in Excel. On the y axis, x = 0, so Plotting u= M y 2
1000 500

v=

M x =0 2

u (m/s)

10

5 500 1000

10

y (km)
The velocity is perpendicular to the axis and increases linearly with distance y. This can also be plotted in Excel.

On the y = x axis

u=

M y M x = 2 2 1 u = 1 v

v=

M x 2

The flow is perpendicular to line y = x:

Slope of line y = x: Slope of trajectory of motion:

If we define the radial position:

r=

x +y
2

2 2

then along y = x

r=

x +x =

2 x

Then the magnitude of the velocity along y = x is V = Plotting

u +v =

M M r 2 2 M 2 x x +x = = 2 2 2
1000 500

V(m/s)

10

5 500 1000

10

r (km)
This can also be plotted in Excel. v dy = = u dx
M x 2

For streamlines

M y 2

x y

So, separating variables

y dy = x dx

Integrating

y x = +c 2 2

The solution is

x +y = C

which is the equation of a circle.

The streamlines form a set of concentric circles. This flow models a rigid body vortex flow. See Example 5.6 for streamline plots. Streamlines are circular, and the velocity approaches zer as we approach the center. In Problem 2.10, we see that the streamlines are also circular. In a real tornado, at large distances from the center, the velocities behave as in Problem 2.10; close to the center, they behave as in this problem.

Problem 2.12

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Flow field Plot of velocity magnitude along axes, and y = x; Equations of streamlines

On the x axis, y = 0, so Plotting

u =

2 x + y

qx
2 2

q 2 x
35 25 15 5 5 0 15 25 35

v=

2 x + y

(2

q y

=0

u (m/s)

10

10

x (km)
The velocity is very high close to the origin, and falls off to zero. It is also along the axis. This can be plotted in Excel. On the y axis, x = 0, so u= q x
2

2 x + y

=0

v=

2 x + y

q y
2

q 2 y

Plotting

10

35 25 15 5 5 0 15 25 35

v (m/s)

10

y (km)
The velocity is again very high close to the origin, and falls off to zero. It is also along the axis. This can also be plotted in Excel.

On the y = x axis

u=

2 x + x The flow is parallel to line y = x: Slope of line y = x:

q x
2

q 4 x 1 v =1 u

v=

2 x + x

q x
2

q 4 x

Slope of trajectory of motion: If we define the radial position: r= x +y


2 2 2

then along y = x

r=

x +x =

2 x

Then the magnitude of the velocity along y = x is V =

u +v =

1 1 q q q + = = 2 2 4 x 2 r 2 2 x x

Plotting

10

35 25 15 5 5 0 15 25 35

V(m/s)

10

r (km)
This can also be plotted in Excel. For streamlines v dy = = u dx

2 x + y 2 x + y

(2 (2

q y q x

) )

y x

So, separating variables Integrating The solution is

dy dx = y x ln ( y) = ln ( x) + c y = C x which is the equation of a straight line.

This flow field corresponds to a sink (discussed in Chapter 6).

Problem 2.13

[2]

t=0 x 0.00 0.10 0.20 0.30 0.40 0.50 0.60 0.70 0.80 0.90 1.00 1.10 1.20 1.30 1.40 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 C=1 y 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 C=2 y 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 C=3 y 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00

t =1 s x 0.000 0.025 0.050 0.075 0.100 0.125 0.150 0.175 0.200 0.225 0.250 0.275 0.300 0.325 0.350 0.375 0.400 0.425 0.450 0.475 0.500 C=1 y 1.00 1.00 0.99 0.99 0.98 0.97 0.95 0.94 0.92 0.89 0.87 0.84 0.80 0.76 0.71 0.66 0.60 0.53 0.44 0.31 0.00 C=2 y 1.41 1.41 1.41 1.41 1.40 1.39 1.38 1.37 1.36 1.34 1.32 1.30 1.28 1.26 1.23 1.20 1.17 1.13 1.09 1.05 1.00 C=3 y 1.73 1.73 1.73 1.73 1.72 1.71 1.71 1.70 1.69 1.67 1.66 1.64 1.62 1.61 1.58 1.56 1.54 1.51 1.48 1.45 1.41

t = 20 s x 0.00 0.10 0.20 0.30 0.40 0.50 0.60 0.70 0.80 0.90 1.00 1.10 1.20 1.30 1.40 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 C=1 y 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.99 0.98 0.97 0.96 0.95 0.93 0.92 0.89 0.87 0.84 0.81 0.78 0.74 0.70 0.65 0.59 0.53 0.45 C=2 y 1.41 1.41 1.41 1.41 1.40 1.40 1.39 1.38 1.37 1.36 1.34 1.33 1.31 1.29 1.27 1.24 1.22 1.19 1.16 1.13 1.10 C=3 y 1.73 1.73 1.73 1.73 1.72 1.72 1.71 1.70 1.69 1.68 1.67 1.66 1.65 1.63 1.61 1.60 1.58 1.56 1.53 1.51 1.48

Streamline Plot (t = 0)
3.5 3.0 2.5 2.0 y 1.5 1.0 0.5 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 x 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.0

c=1 c=2 c=3

Streamline Plot (t = 1s)


2.0 1.8 1.6 1.4 1.2 1.0 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 x 0.4 0.5 0.6 y

c=1 c=2 c=3

Streamline Plot (t = 20s)


2.0 1.8 1.6 1.4 1.2 1.0 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.5 1.0 x 1.5 2.0 2.5 y

c=1 c=2 c=3

Problem 2.15

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:

Pathlines of particles Conditions that make them satisfy Problem 2.10 flow field; Also Problem 2.11 flow field; Plot pathlines

The given pathlines are

xp = a sin ( t) u=

yp = a cos ( t)

The velocity field of Problem 2.10 is

2 x + y

K y
2

v=

2 x + y

(2

K x

)
(1)

If the pathlines are correct we should be able to substitute xp and yp into the velocity field to find the velocity as a function of time: u =

2 x + y v =

K y
2 2

2 a sin( t ) + a cos ( t ) =

K a cos ( t )
2 2 2 2

K cos ( t ) 2 a

2 x + y

K x
2 2

2 a sin( t ) + a cos ( t )

K ( a sin( t ) )
2 2 2 2

K sin( t ) 2 a

(2)

We should also be able to find the velocity field as a function of time from the pathline equations (Eq. 2.9): dxp =u dt u = dxp dt = a cos ( t ) K cos ( t ) 2 a or dxp dt v= =v dyp dt (2.9)

= a sin ( t) K sin ( t) 2 a

(3)

Comparing Eqs. 1, 2 and 3

u = a cos ( t ) = K 2 a

v = a sin ( t) = K 2 a
2

Hence we see that

a =

for the pathlines to be correct.

The pathlines are

400

a = 300 m a = 400 m a = 500 m

To plot this in Excel, compute xp and yp for t ranging from 0 to 60 s, with given by the above formula. Plot yp versus xp. Note that outer particles travel much slower!

200

400

200

200

400

This is the free vortex flow discussed in Example 5.6

200

400

The velocity field of Problem 2.11 is

u=

M y 2

v=

M x 2

If the pathlines are correct we should be able to substitute xp and yp into the velocity field to find the velocity as a function of time: u= M y M ( a cos ( t) ) M a cos ( t) = = 2 2 2 (4)

v=

M x M ( a sin ( t) ) M a sin ( t) = = 2 2 2 dxp = a cos ( t) dt M a cos ( t) 2 v= dyp dt = a sin ( t) M a sin ( t) 2

(5)

Recall that Comparing Eqs. 1, 4 and 5 Hence we see that

u=

(3)

u = a cos ( t) = = M 2

v = a sin ( t) =

for the pathlines to be correct.

The pathlines
400

200

To plot this in Excel, compute xp and yp for t ranging from 0 to 75 s, with given by the above formula. Plot yp versus xp. Note that outer particles travel faster!

400

200 200

200

400

This is the forced vortex flow discussed in Example 5.6

400

a = 300 m a = 400 m a = 500 m

Note that this is rigid body rotation!

600

Problem 2.16

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


For streamlines

Time-varying velocity field Streamlines at t = 0 s; Streamline through (3,3); velocity vector; will streamlines change with time

v dy a y ( 2 + cos ( t ) ) y = = = u dx a x ( 2 + cos ( t ) ) x dy y = dx x dy dx = y x ln ( y) = ln ( x) + c y= C = C x 3 3 which is the equation of a hyperbola. C =1 and y= 1 x

At t = 0 (actually all times!) So, separating variables Integrating The solution is For the streamline through point (3,3)

The streamlines will not change with time since dy/dx does not change with time.
5 4 3

At t = 0

u = a x ( 2 + cos ( t) ) = 5 u = 45 m s

1 3 m 3 s

v = a y ( 2 + cos ( t) ) = 5 v = 45 m s

1 s

3 m 3

2 1

The velocity vector is tangent to the curve;


0 1 2 3 4 5

Tangent of curve at (3,3) is Direction of velocity at (3,3) is

dy y = = 1 dx x v = 1 u

This curve can be plotted in Excel.

Problem 2.17

[3]

Problem 2.18

[3]

Pathline t 0.00 0.25 0.50 0.75 1.00 1.25 1.50 1.75 2.00 2.25 2.50 2.75 3.00 3.25 3.50 3.75 4.00 4.25 4.50 4.75 5.00 x 1.00 1.00 1.01 1.03 1.05 1.08 1.12 1.17 1.22 1.29 1.37 1.46 1.57 1.70 1.85 2.02 2.23 2.47 2.75 3.09 3.49 y 1.00 0.78 0.61 0.47 0.37 0.29 0.22 0.17 0.14 0.11 0.08 0.06 0.05 0.04 0.03 0.02 0.02 0.01 0.01 0.01 0.01

Streamlines t=0 x y 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.78 1.00 0.61 1.00 0.47 1.00 0.37 1.00 0.29 1.00 0.22 1.00 0.17 1.00 0.14 1.00 0.11 1.00 0.08 1.00 0.06 1.00 0.05 1.00 0.04 1.00 0.03 1.00 0.02 1.00 0.02 1.00 0.01 1.00 0.01 1.00 0.01 1.00 0.01

t=1s x 1.00 1.00 1.01 1.03 1.05 1.08 1.12 1.17 1.22 1.29 1.37 1.46 1.57 1.70 1.85 2.02 2.23 2.47 2.75 3.09 3.49

y 1.00 0.97 0.88 0.75 0.61 0.46 0.32 0.22 0.14 0.08 0.04 0.02 0.01 0.01 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

t=2s x 1.00 1.00 1.01 1.03 1.05 1.08 1.12 1.17 1.22 1.29 1.37 1.46 1.57 1.70 1.85 2.02 2.23 2.47 2.75 3.09 3.49

y 1.00 0.98 0.94 0.87 0.78 0.68 0.57 0.47 0.37 0.28 0.21 0.15 0.11 0.07 0.05 0.03 0.02 0.01 0.01 0.00 0.00

Pathline and Streamline Plots


1.0 0.8 0.6
y

Pathline Streamline (t = 0) Streamline (t = 1 s) Streamline (t = 2 s)

0.4 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5


x

2.0

2.5

3.0

3.5

Problem 2.20

[3]

Problem 2.21

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Flow field Pathline for particle starting at (3,1); Streamlines through same point at t = 1, 2, and 3 s

For particle paths Separating variables and integrating

dx = u = a x t dt dx = a t dt x dy = b dt

and or or

dy =v=b dt ln ( x) = 1 2 a t + c1 2

y = b t + c2

Using initial condition (x,y) = (3,1) and the given values for a and b c1 = ln ( 3 m ) The pathline is then For streamlines (at any time t) So, separating variables Integrating x = 3 e
0.05 t
2

and and

c2 = 1 m y = 4 t + 1

v dy b = = u dx a x t dy = y= b dx at x b ln ( x) + c a t

We are interested in instantaneous streamlines at various times that always pass through point (3,1). Using a and b values: c = y b 4 ln ( x) = 1 ln ( 3) a t 0.1 t 40 t x ln 3

The streamline equation is


30 20 10

y = 1+

Pathline Streamline (t=1) Streamline (t=2) Streamline (t=3)


0 1 2 3 4 5

y
10 20

These curves can be plotted in Excel.

Problem 2.22

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:

Velocity field Plot streamlines that are at origin at various times and pathlines that left origin at these times

For streamlines

v dy = = u dx

v0 sin t

x u0

u0 x u0

v0 sin t So, separating variables (t=const) dy =

u0

dx

Integrating

x v0 cos t u 0 y= +c x v0 cos t u cos ( t) 0 y= dx = u = u0 dt dx = u0 dt c1 = u0 dy x = v = v0 sin t u dt 0 and dy = v = v0 sin ( ) dt dy = v0 sin ( ) dt c2 = v0 sin ( ) y = v0 sin ( ) t + c2 y = v0 sin ( ) ( t ) so or x = u0 t + c1 x = u0 ( t )

Using condition y = 0 when x = 0

This gives streamlines y(x) at each time t

For particle paths, first find x(t) Separating variables and integrating Using initial condition x = 0 at t = For y(t) we have

u0 ( t ) dy = v = v0 sin t dt u0

Separating variables and integrating Using initial condition y = 0 at t = The pathline is then x ( t , ) = u0 ( t )

y ( t , ) = v0 sin ( ) ( t )

These terms give the path of a particle (x(t),y(t)) that started at t = .

0.5 0.25 0 0.25 0.5 1 2 3

Streamline t = 0s Streamline t = 0.05s Streamline t = 0.1s Streamline t = 0.15s Pathline starting t = 0s Pathline starting t = 0.05s Pathline starting t = 0.1s Pathline starting t = 0.15s
The streamlines are sinusoids; the pathlines are straight (once a water particle is fired it travels in a straight line). These curves can be plotted in Excel.

Problem 2.23

[5]

Given: Find: Solution:

Velocity field Plot streakline for first second of flow

Following the discussion leading up to Eq. 2.10, we first find equations for the pathlines in form xp( t ) = x t , x0 , y0 , t0

) )

and

yp ( t) = y t , x0 , y0 , t0

) )

where x0, y0 is the position of the particle at t = t0, and re-interprete the results as streaklines xst t0 = x t , x0 , y0 , t0

( )

and

yst t0 = y t , x0 , y0 , t0

( )

which gives the streakline at t, where x0, y0 is the point at which dye is released (t0 is varied from 0 to t) For particle paths, first find x(t) Separating variables and integrating For y(t) we have dx = u = u0 dt dx = u0 dt or so x = x0 + u0 t t0

and

Separating variables and integrating

dy x = v = v0 sin t u dt 0 x0 dy = v = v0 sin t0 dt u0 x0 dy = v0 sin t0 dt u0 xst t0 = x0 + u0 t t0 x0 = y0 = 0 xst t0 = u0 t t0

x0 + u0 t t0 dy = v = v0 sin t dt u0

The streakline is then With

( ) ( )

x0 y = y0 + v0 sin t0 t t0 u0 x0 yst t0 = y0 + v0 sin t0 t t0 u0

( ) ( )

yst t0 = v0 sin t0 t t0

( ) (

Streakline for First Second


2 1

y (m)

0 1 2

10

x (m)
This curve can be plotted in Excel. For t = 1, t0 ranges from 0 to t.

Problem 2.24

[3] Part 1/2

Problem 2.24

[3] Part 2/2

Problem 2.25

[3] Part 1/2

Problem 2.25

[3] Part 2/2

Problem 2.26

[4] Part 1/2

Problem 2.26

[4] Part 2/2

Problem 2.27

[3]

Solution

The particle starting at t = 3 s follows the particle starting at t = 2 s; The particle starting at t = 4 s doesn't move! Starting at t = 0 x 0.00 0.20 0.40 0.60 0.80 1.00 1.20 1.40 1.60 1.80 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 y 0.00 0.40 0.80 1.20 1.60 2.00 2.40 2.80 3.20 3.60 4.00 3.80 3.60 3.40 3.20 3.00 2.80 2.60 2.40 2.20 2.00 Starting at t = 1 s x y Starting at t = 2 s x y Streakline at t = 4 s x 2.00 1.80 1.60 1.40 1.20 1.00 0.80 0.60 0.40 0.20 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 y 2.00 1.60 1.20 0.80 0.40 0.00 -0.40 -0.80 -1.20 -1.60 -2.00 -1.80 -1.60 -1.40 -1.20 -1.00 -0.80 -0.60 -0.40 -0.20 0.00

Pathlines: t 0.00 0.20 0.40 0.60 0.80 1.00 1.20 1.40 1.60 1.80 2.00 2.20 2.40 2.60 2.80 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.60 3.80 4.00

0.00 0.20 0.40 0.60 0.80 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00

0.00 0.40 0.80 1.20 1.60 2.00 1.80 1.60 1.40 1.20 1.00 0.80 0.60 0.40 0.20 0.00

0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

0.00 -0.20 -0.40 -0.60 -0.80 -1.00 -1.20 -1.40 -1.60 -1.80 -2.00

Pathline and Streakline Plots


4 3 2 1

y
0 -0.5 -1 -2 -3 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5

Pathline starting at t = 0 Pathline starting at t = 1 s Pathline starting at t = 2 s Streakline at t = 4 s

Problem 2.28

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:


For streamlines

2D velocity field Streamlines passing through (6,6); Coordinates of particle starting at (1,4); that pathlines, streamlines and streaklines coincide 2 a y dy = b dx

v dy = = u dx
3

b ay
2

or

Integrating For the streamline through point (6,6) For particle that passed through (1,4) at t = 0

ay = bx + C 3 C = 60 u = and y = 6 x + 180 2 1 dx = x x0 = a y dt 1 dy = b dt but we need y(t)


3

dx 2 = ay dt dy =b dt
t

v =

y = y0 + b t = y0 + 2 t
2 2 3 b t 3

Then Hence, with x0 = 1 y0 = 4

2 x x0 = a y0 + b t dt 0 2 4 3 x = 1 + 16 t + 8 t + t 3

x = x0 + a y0 t + b y0 t +

At t = 1 s

x = 26.3 m y = 6 m

y = 4 + 2 t 1 dy = b dt

For particle that passed through (-3,0) at t = 1 2 x x0 = a y0 + b t dt t


t

y = y0 + b t t0

2 b 3 2 2 3 x = x0 + a y0 t t0 + b y0 t t0 + t t0 3

Hence, with x0 = -3, y0 = 0 at t0 = 1 Evaluating at t = 3

x = 3 +

4 3

t 1 =

(3 )

1 3

4 t 13

y = 2 ( t 1) y = 4 m

x = 31.7 m

This is a steady flow, so pathlines, streamlines and streaklines always coincide

Problem 2.29

[4] Part 1/2

Problem 2.29

[4] Part 2/2

Problem 2.30

[4] Part 1/2

Problem 2.30

[4] Part 2/2

Problem 2.31

[4] Part 1/2

Problem 2.31

[4] Part 2/2

Problem 2.32

[2]

Problem 2.33

[2]

Data: T (oC) 0 100 200 300 400 T (K) 273 373 473 573 673 (x105) 1.86E-05 2.31E-05 2.72E-05 3.11E-05 3.46E-05

Using procedure of Appendix A.3: T (K) 273 373 473 573 673 T3/2/ 2.43E+08 3.12E+08 3.78E+08 4.41E+08 5.05E+08

The equation to solve for coefficients S and b is

3 2

S 1 = T + b b
Hence: b = 1.531E-06 S = 101.9 kg/m.s.K1/2 K

From the built-in Excel Linear Regression functions: Slope = 6.534E+05 Intercept = 6.660E+07 R2 = 0.9996

Plot of Basic Data and Trend Line


6.E+08 5.E+08 4.E+08
T3/2/ 3.E+08
Data Plot Least Squares Fit

2.E+08 1.E+08 0.E+00 0 100 200 300 400


T

500

600

700

800

Problem 2.35

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Velocity distribution between flat plates Shear stress on upper plate; Sketch stress distribution

yx =

du dy

2 8 umax y du d 2 y 4 = umax 1 = umax 2 2 y = 2 dy dy h h h

yx = At the upper surface y= h 2

8 umax y h
2

and

h = 0.1 mm

umax = 0.1

m s

= 1.14 10

3 N s 2

(Table A.8)

Hence

yx = 8 1.14 10 yx = 4.56 N m
2

1000 mm m 0.1 1 m 1 3 N s 0.1 mm 2 1 m s 2 1000 mm 0.1 mm m

The upper plate is a minus y surface. Since yx < 0, the shear stress on the upper plate must act in the plus x direction. The shear stress varies linearly with y yx ( y) =
0.05 0.04 0.03 0.02

8 umax y 2 h

y (mm)

0.01 5 4 3 2 1 0 0.01 0.02 0.03 0.04 0.05 1 2 3 4 5

Shear Stress (Pa)

Problem 2.36

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equations

Velocity distribution between parallel plates Force on lower plate

F = yx A

yx =

du dy

2 8 umax y du d 2 y 4 = umax 1 = umax 2 2 y = 2 dy dy h h h

so

yx = h 2

8 umax y h
2

and

F =

8 A umax y h
2

At the lower surface

y=

and m s
2

h = 0.1 mm = 1.14 10

A = 1 m
3 N s 2

umax = 0.05

(Table A.8)
2

Hence

F = 8 1 m 1.14 10

m 0.1 1 m 1 1 1000 mm 3 N s 0.05 mm 2 s 2 1000 mm 0.1 mm 1 m m

F = 2.28 N

(to the right)

Problem 2.37

[2]

Explain how an ice skate interacts with the ice surface. What mechanism acts to reduce sliding friction between skate and ice? Open-Ended Problem Statement: Explain how an ice skate interacts with the ice surface. What mechanism acts to reduce sliding friction between skate and ice? Discussion: The normal freezing and melting temperature of ice is 0C (32F) at atmospheric pressure. The melting temperature of ice decreases as pressure is increased. Therefore ice can be caused to melt at a temperature below the normal melting temperature when the ice is subjected to increased pressure. A skater is supported by relatively narrow blades with a short contact against the ice. The blade of a typical skate is less than 3 mm wide. The length of blade in contact with the ice may be just ten or so millimeters. With a 3 mm by 10 mm contact patch, a 75 kg skater is supported by a pressure between skate blade and ice on the order of tens of megaPascals (hundreds of atmospheres). Such a pressure is enough to cause ice to melt rapidly. When pressure is applied to the ice surface by the skater, a thin surface layer of ice melts to become liquid water and the skate glides on this thin liquid film. Viscous friction is quite small, so the effective friction coefficient is much smaller than for sliding friction. The magnitude of the viscous drag force acting on each skate blade depends on the speed of the skater, the area of contact, and the thickness of the water layer on top of the ice. The phenomenon of static friction giving way to viscous friction is similar to the hydroplaning of a pneumatic tire caused by a layer of water on the road surface.

Problem 2.38

[2]

Given: Find:

Velocity profile Plot of velocity profile; shear stress on surface

Solution:
The velocity profile is g y u= h y sin ( ) 2
2

g h so the maximum velocity is at y = h umax = sin ( ) 2

Hence we can plot

u umax
1 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2

= 2

y h

2 1 y 2 h

y/h

0.2

0.4

0.6

0.8

u/umax
This graph can be plotted in Excel The given data is h = 0.1 in du dy = 2.15 10 du dy
3 lbf s 2

= 45 deg

ft

Basic equation

yx =

yx =

2 d g y h y sin ( ) = g ( h y) sin ( ) 2 dy

At the surface y = 0

yx = g h sin ( ) yx = 0.85 1.94 slug ft


3

Hence

32.2

ft s
2

0.1 in

1 ft 12 in

sin ( 45 deg)

lbf s slug ft

yx = 0.313

lbf ft
2

The surface is a positive y surface. Since yx > 0, the shear stress on the surface must act in the plus x direction.

Problem 2.39

[2]

Problem 2.40

[2]

Problem 2.41

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Data on tape mechanism Maximum gap region that can be pulled without breaking tape

yx =

du dy

and

F = yx A FT = 2 F = 2 yx A

Here F is the force on each side of the tape; the total force is then The velocity gradient is linear as shown The area of contact is Combining these results V FT = 2 w L c Solving for L L= FT c 2 V w c = 0.012 in A = w L du V0 V = = dy c c

c t F,V x c

L
= 0.02 slug ft s V = 3 ft s w = 1 in L = 2.5 ft

The given data is Hence

FT = 25 lbf

L = 25 lbf 0.012 in

1 ft 1 1 ft s 1 s 1 1 12 in slug ft 2 1 ft 12 in 2 0.02 slug 3 ft 1 in s lbf

Problem 2.42

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Given data: Reference data:

Flow data on apparatus The terminal velocity of mass m

Dpiston = 73 mm water = 1000 kg m


3

Dtube = 75 mm

Mass = 2 kg

L = 100 mm

SGAl = 2.64

(maximum density of water) N s m


2

From Fig. A.2:, the dynamic viscosity of SAE 10W-30 oil at 25oC is:

= 0.13

The terminal velocity of the mass m is equivalent to the terminal velocity of the piston. At that terminal speed, the acceleration of the piston is zero. Therefore, all forces acting on the piston must be balanced. This means that the force driving the motion (i.e. the weight of mass m and the piston) balances the viscous forces acting on the surface of the piston. Thus, at r = Rpiston:
2 D piston L d Mass + SGAl water g = rz A = dr Vz ( Dpiston L) 4

The velocity profile within the oil film is linear ... Therefore V d Vz = dr Dtube Dpiston 2

Thus, the terminal velocity of the piston, V, is:

g SGAl water Dpiston L + 4 Mass Dtube Dpiston V = 8 Dpiston L


2

or

V = 10.2

m s

Problem 2.43

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


Given data: Reference data:

Flow data on apparatus Sketch of piston speed vs time; the time needed for the piston to reach 99% of its new terminal speed.

Dpiston = 73 mm water = 1000 kg m


3

Dtube = 75 mm

L = 100 mm

SGAl = 2.64

V0 = 10.2

m s

(maximum density of water) N s m


2

(From Problem 2.42)

From Fig. A.2, the dynamic viscosity of SAE 10W-30 oil at 25oC is:

= 0.13

The free body diagram of the piston after the cord is cut is: Piston weight:
2 D piston Wpiston = SGAl water g L 4

Viscous force:

Fviscous ( V) = rz A

or

V D Fviscous( V) = piston L 1 Dtube Dpiston 2

Applying Newton's second law: dV = g a V where dt V = g a V

dV mpiston = Wpiston Fviscous( V) dt a = 8 SGAl water Dpiston Dtube Dpiston

Therefore

If

then

dX dV = a dt dt dX = a X dt where X ( 0) = g a V 0

The differential equation becomes

The solution to this differential equation is: Therefore g ( a t) g V ( t) = V0 e + a a

X ( t) = X0 e

a t

or

g a V ( t) = g a V0 e

a t

Plotting piston speed vs. time (which can be done in Excel)

Piston speed vs. time


12 10 8 V ( t) 6 4 2

1 t

The terminal speed of the piston, Vt, is evaluated as t approaches infinity Vt = g a Vt = 3.63 m s

or

The time needed for the piston to slow down to within 1% of its terminal velocity is:

V g 0 a 1 t = ln a 1.01 Vt

g a

or

t = 1.93 s

Problem 2.44

[3] Part 1/2

Problem 2.44

[3] Part 2/2

Problem 2.45
Ff = A x, V, a

[4]

M g

Given: Find: Solution:


Given data

Data on the block and incline Initial acceleration; formula for speed of block; plot; find speed after 0.1 s. Find oil viscosity if speed is 0.3 m/s after 0.1 s

M = 5 kg = 0.4 N s m
2

A = ( 0.1 m )

d = 0.2 mm

= 30 deg

From Fig. A.2

Applying Newton's 2nd law to initial instant (no friction) a = M g sin( ) Ff = M g sin( ) M so m ainit = g sin( ) = 9.81 sin( 30 deg) 2 s M a = M g sin( ) Ff so M a = M and m ainit = 4.9 2 s du V A = A dy d

Applying Newton's 2nd law at any instant

Ff = A =

dV A = M g sin( ) V dt d = dt

Separating variables

dV A V g sin ( ) M d

Integrating and using limits

M d A ln 1 V = t A M g d sin ( )

or

A t M g d sin ( ) M d V ( t) = 1 e

At t = 0.1 s

V = 5 kg 9.81

m s
2

0.0002 m sin ( 30 deg)

0.4 N s ( 0.1 m)

2 0.1 N s 5 0.0002 1 e 2 kg m

0.4 0.01

V ( 0.1 s) = 0.404

m s

The plot looks like

1.5

V (m/s)

0.5

0.2

0.4

0.6

0.8

t (s)

To find the viscosity for which V(0.1 s) = 0.3 m/s, we must solve

M g d sin ( ) M d V ( t = 0.1 s) = 1 e A

( t=0.1 s)

The viscosity is implicit in this equation, so solution must be found by manual iteration, or by any of a number of classic root-finding numerical methods, or by using Excel's Goal Seek Using Excel: = 1.08 N s m
2

Problem 2.46

[3]

Problem 2.47

[2]

Problem 2.48

[3]

NOTE: Figure is wrong - length is 0.85 m

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on double pipe heat exchanger Whether no-slip is satisfied; net viscous force on inner pipe
2 r uz( r ) = umax 1 Rii

For the oil, the velocity profile is

where

umax =

Rii p 4 L

Check the no-slip condition. When

For the water, the velocity profile is

Check the no-slip condition. When

R 2 ii r = Rii uz( Rii) = umax 1 = 0 Rii 2 2 1 p 2 2 Roi Rio r uz( r ) = R r ln 4 L io Rio Rio ln Roi 2 2 Roi 1 p 2 2 Roi Rio r = Roi uz (Roi) = Rio Roi ln 4 L Rio Rio ln Roi
1 p 2 2 2 2 uz Roi = R Roi + Roi Rio = 0 4 L io

( )

When

r = Rio

Rio 1 p 2 2 Roi Rio uz Rio = Rio Rio ln = 0 4 L Rio Rio ln Roi


2 2

( )

The no-slip condition holds on all three surfaces. The given data is Rii = 7.5 cm 3 mm Rii = 3.45 cm 2 poil = 8 Pa Rio = 7.5 cm 2 Rio = 3.75 cm Roi = 11 cm 3 mm Roi = 5.2 cm 2

pw = 2.5 Pa The viscosity of water at 10oC is (Fig. A.2)

L = 0.85 m
3 N s 2

w = 1.25 10 oil = 1 10 du dr duz ( r) dr

The viscosity of SAE 10-30 oil at 100oC is (Fig. A.2)

2 N s 2

For each, shear stress is given by

rx = rx =

For water

d 1 pw 2 2 Roi Rio r = w Rio r ln dr 4 w L Rio Rio ln Roi


2 2

Roi Rio 1 pw rx = 2 r 4 L Rio ln r Roi


2


2 2

so on the pipe surface

Roi Rio 1 pw 2 R L Fw = rx A = 2 Rio io 4 L Rio ln Rio Roi


Fw
2 2 R Rio R 2 oi = pw io Rio 2 ln Roi 2 ( 5.2 cm) 2 ( 3.75 cm) 2 1 m 2 N 1 m 100 cm = 2.5 3.75 cm 2 100 cm 3.75 m 2 ln 5.2

Hence

Fw

Fw = 0.00454 N This is the force on the r-negative surface of the fluid; on the outer pipe itself we also have Fw = 0.00454 N For oil rx = duz ( r) dr
2 2 oil umax r poil r d r = oil umax 1 = R = 2 dr 2 L Rii ii

so on the pipe surface

Foil = rx A =

poil Rii 2 L

2 Rii L = poil Rii

This should not be a surprise: the pressure drop just balances the friction!

Hence

Foil = 8

N m
2

3.45 cm

1 m 100 cm

Foil = 0.0299 N Foil = 0.0299 N F = 0.0345 N

This is the force on the r-positive surface of the fluid; on the pipe it is equal and opposite The total force is F = Fw + Foil

Note we didn't need the viscosities because all quantities depend on the p's!

Problem 2.49

[3]

NOTE: Figure is wrong - length is 0.85 m

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on counterflow heat exchanger Whether no-slip is satisfied; net viscous force on inner pipe

The analysis for Problem 2.48 is repeated, except the oil flows in reverse, so the pressure drop is -2.5 Pa not 2.5 Pa. For the oil, the velocity profile is

r 2 uz ( r) = umax 1 Rii

where

umax =

Rii p 4 L

Check the no-slip condition. When

For the water, the velocity profile is

Check the no-slip condition. When

R 2 ii r = Rii uz (Rii) = umax 1 =0 Rii 2 2 1 p 2 2 Roi Rio r uz ( r) = R r ln 4 L io Rio Rio ln Roi 2 2 Roi 1 p 2 2 Roi Rio r = Roi uz (Roi) = R Roi ln 4 L io Rio Rio ln Roi
1 p 2 2 2 2 uz Roi = Rio Roi + Roi Rio = 0 4 L

( )

When

r = Rio

Rio 1 p 2 2 Roi Rio uz Rio = R Rio ln = 0 4 L io Rio Rio ln Roi


2 2

( )

The no-slip condition holds on all three surfaces. The given data is Rii = 7.5 cm 3 mm Rii = 3.45 cm 2 poil = 8 Pa Rio = 7.5 cm 2 Rio = 3.75 cm Roi = 11 cm 3 mm Roi = 5.2 cm 2

pw = 2.5 Pa The viscosity of water at 10oC is (Fig. A.2) The viscosity of SAE 10-30 oil at 100oC

L = 0.85 m
3 N s 2

w = 1.25 10

is (Fig. A.2) du dr

2 N s oil = 1 10 2

For each, shear stress is given by

rx = rx =

For water

duz ( r) dr

d 1 pw 2 2 Roi Rio r = w Rio r ln R dr 4 w L Rio io ln Roi


2 2

Roi Rio 1 pw rx = 2 r 4 L Rio ln r Roi


2


2 2

so on the pipe surface

Roi Rio 1 pw 2 R L Fw = rx A = 2 Rio io 4 L Rio ln Rio Roi


Fw
2 2 R Rio R 2 oi = pw io Rio 2 ln Roi 2 ( 5.2 cm) 2 ( 3.75 cm) 2 1 m 2 N 1 m 100 cm = 2.5 ( 3.75 cm) 2 100 cm 3.75 m 2 ln 5.2

Hence

Fw

Fw = 0.00454 N This is the force on the r-negative surface of the fluid; on the outer pipe itself we also have Fw = 0.00454 N For oil rx = duz ( r) dr
2 2 oil umax r poil r d r = oil umax 1 = R = 2 dr 2 L Rii ii

so on the pipe surface

Foil = rx A =

poil Rii 2 L

2 Rii L = poil Rii

This should not be a surprise: the pressure drop just balances the friction!

Hence

Foil = 8

N m
2

3.45 cm

1 m 100 cm

Foil = 0.0299 N Foil = 0.0299 N F = 0.0254 N

This is the force on the r-positive surface of the fluid; on the pipe it is equal and opposite The total force is F = Fw + Foil

Note we didn't need the viscosities because all quantities depend on the p's!

Problem 2.50

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Flow between two plates Force to move upper plate; Interface velocity

The shear stress is the same throughout (the velocity gradients are linear, and the stresses in the fluid at the interface must be equal and opposite). Hence du1 du2 = 1 = 2 dy dy Vi = 1+ V 1 h2 2 h1 or 1 1 m Vi = 0.714 m s Vi h1 = 2

( V Vi)
h2

where Vi is the interface velocity

Solving for the interface velocity Vi

s 0.1 0.3 1+ 0.15 0.5

Then the force required is

Vi N s m 1 1000 mm 2 F = A = 1 A = 0.1 0.714 1 m 2 h1 s 0.5 mm 1 m m

F = 143 N

Problem 2.51

[2]

Problem 2.52

[2]

Problem 2.53

[2]

Problem 2.54

[2]

Problem 2.55

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:


The given data is

Data on the viscometer Time for viscometer to lose 99% of speed

R = 50 mm

H = 80 mm

a = 0.20 mm

I = 0.0273 kg m

= 0.1

N s m
2

The equation of motion for the slowing viscometer is

I = Torque = A R

where is the angular acceleration and is the viscous stress, and A is the surface area of the viscometer The stress is given by = du V0 V R = = = dy a a a

where V and are the instantaneous linear and angular velocities. Hence I = I d R R A = A R = a dt a
2 2

Separating variables

d R A = dt aI
R A t aI R A t a I
2 2

Integrating and using IC = 0

( t ) = 0 e

The time to slow down by 99% is obtained from solving

0.01 0 = 0 e

so

t=

a I R A
2

ln ( 0.01)

Note that

A = 2 R H

so

t=

a I 2 R H
3

ln ( 0.01)

0.0002 m 0.0273 kg m m t = 2 0.1 N s

N s ln ( 0.01) 3 0.08 m kg m ( 0.05 m) 1 1

t = 4.00 s

Problem 2.56

[4]

Problem 2.57

[4] Part 1/2

Problem 2.57

[4] Part 2/2

Problem 2.58

[3]

Given: Find:

Shock-free coupling assembly Required viscosity

Solution:
Basic equation r = du dr Shear force F = A Torque T = F R Power P = T

Assumptions: Newtonian fluid, linear velocity profile r =

1 R 2 ( R + ) du V = = dr r

V2 = 2(R + )
r =

( 1 2 ) R

Because << R

V1 = 1R

Then

P = T 2 = F R 2 = A2 R 2 = 2 2 1 2 R L P =

1 2 R 2 R L R 2

Hence

P 2 2 1 2 R L

10 W 2.5 10 2 N s m
2

1 min 1 min 1 1 N m rev 60 s 3 0.02 m 9000 rev 1000 rev s W 2 rad min ( .01 m ) which corresponds to SAE 30 oil at 30oC.

= 0.202

= 2.02 poise

Problem 2.59

[4]

Problem 2.60

[4]

The data is

2 N (rpm) (Ns/m ) 10 0.121 20 0.139 30 0.153 40 0.159 50 0.172 60 0.172 70 0.183 80 0.185

The computed data is (rad/s) / (1/s) (Ns/m2x103) 1.047 2.094 3.142 4.189 5.236 6.283 7.330 8.378 120 240 360 480 600 720 840 960 121 139 153 159 172 172 183 185

From the Trendline analysis k = 0.0449 n - 1 = 0.2068 n = 1.21

The fluid is dilatant

The apparent viscosities at 90 and 100 rpm can now be computed N (rpm) (rad/s) 90 9.42 100 10.47 / (1/s) 1080 1200 (Ns/m2x103) 191 195

Viscosity vs Shear Rate


1000
2 3 (N.s/m x10 )

Data Power Trendline

100

= 44.94(/)0.2068 R2 = 0.9925
10 100 Shear Rate / (1/s)

1000

Problem 2.62 (In Excel)

[3]

Given: Viscometer data Find: Value of k and n in Eq. 2.17 Solution: (Pa) du/dy (s-1) The data is 0.0457 5 0.119 10 0.241 25 0.375 50 0.634 100 1.06 200 1.46 300 1.78 400

Shear Stress vs Shear Strain


10 Data Power Trendline

(Pa)

1 1 10 100 1000

0.1

= 0.0162(du/dy) 0.7934 R2 = 0.9902

0.01

du/dy (1/s)

Hence we have

k = 0.0162 n = 0.7934

Blood is pseudoplastic (shear thinning)

We can compute the apparent viscosity from du/dy (s-1) (Ns/m2) 5 10 25 50 100 200 300 400 0.0116 0.0101 0.0083 0.0072 0.0063 0.0054 0.0050 0.0047

k (du/dy )n -1

2 o water = 0.001 Ns/m at 20 C

Hence, blood is "thicker" than water!

Problem 2.63 (In Excel)

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on insulation material Type of material; replacement material

The velocity gradient is du/dy = U/ where = 0.001 m

Data and computations

(Pa)
50 100 150 163 171 170 202 246 349 444

U (m/s) 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.005 0.01 0.03 0.05 0.1 0.2 0.3

du/dy (s-1) 0 0 0 5 10 25 50 100 200 300

Hence we have a Bingham plastic, with

y = p =
du/dy =

154 0.963 307 250

Pa Ns/m2 s-1 Pa

At = 450 Pa, based on the linear fit For a fluid with

y =

we can use the Bingham plastic formula to solve for p given , y and du/dy from above

p =

0.652

Ns/m2

Shear Stress vs Shear Strain


500 450 400

(Pa)

350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350

Linear data fit: = 0.9632(du/dy ) + 154.34 R2 = 0.9977

du/dy (1/s)

Problem 2.64

[5]

Problem 2.65

[5]

Problem 2.66

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:

Conical bearing geometry Expression for shear stress; Viscous torque on shaft
ds dz z AA r

Basic equation

du dy

dT = r dA

Infinitesimal shear torque

Assumptions: Newtonian fluid, linear velocity profile (in narrow clearance gap), no slip condition tan( ) = Then = r z so r = z tan( )
a Section AA U = r

du u ( r 0) z tan( ) = = = dy y ( a 0) a

As we move up the device, shear stress increases linearly (because rate of shear strain does) But from the sketch dz = ds cos ( ) dA = 2 r ds = 2 r dz cos ( ) dT = 2 z tan( ) dz a cos ( )
3 3

The viscous torque on the element of area is

dT = r dA = r

z tan( ) dz 2 r a cos ( )
3 4

Integrating and using limits z = H and z = 0 N s m T = 2 0.2 N s m


2 2

T=

tan( ) H 2 a cos ( )

Using given data, and

= 0.2

from Fig. A.2

75

rev s

tan( 30 deg) ( 0.025 m)

1 0.2 10
3

1 cos ( 30 deg)

2 rad rev

T = 0.0643 N m

Problem 2.67

[5]

Problem 2.68

[5]

Problem 2.69

[5]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Geometry of rotating bearing Expression for shear stress; Maximum shear stress; Expression for total torque; Total torque

du dy

dT = r dA

Assumptions: Newtonian fluid, narrow clearance gap, laminar motion From the figure r = R sin ( ) h = a + R ( 1 cos ( ) ) Then = u = r = R sin ( ) du u0 u = = dy h h

dA = 2 r dr = 2 R sin ( ) R cos ( ) d

du R sin ( ) = dy a + R ( 1 cos ( ) ) so R ( R cos ( ) R + a cos ( ) ) ( R + a R cos ( ) ) = acos R 75 = acos R + a 75 + 0.5


2

To find the maximum set

d R sin ( ) =0 d a + R ( 1 cos ( ) ) R cos ( ) R + a cos ( ) = 0

=0

= 6.6 deg
2

70 rad 1 N s = 12.5 poise 0.1 2 0.075 m sin ( 6.6 deg) poise 60 s [ 0.0005 + 0.075 ( 1 cos ( 6.6 deg) ) ] m m kg = 79.2 N m
2 max

kg m s

The torque is

T= r A d = 0

R sin ( ) cos ( ) d a + R ( 1 cos ( ) )

where

R0 max = asin R
3

max = 15.5 deg

This integral is best evaluated numerically using Excel, Mathcad, or a good calculator

T = 1.02 10

N m

Problem 2.70

[2]

Problem 2.71

[2]

Slowly fill a glass with water to the maximum possible level. Observe the water level closely. Explain how it can be higher than the rim of the glass. Open-Ended Problem Statement: Slowly fill a glass with water to the maximum possible level before it overflows. Observe the water level closely. Explain how it can be higher than the rim of the glass. Discussion: Surface tension can cause the maximum water level in a glass to be higher than the rim of the glass. The same phenomenon causes an isolated drop of water to bead up on a smooth surface. Surface tension between the water/air interface and the glass acts as an invisible membrane that allows trapped water to rise above the level of the rim of the glass. The mechanism can be envisioned as forces that act in the surface of the liquid above the rim of the glass. Thus the water appears to defy gravity by attaining a level higher than the rim of the glass. To experimentally demonstrate that this phenomenon is the result of surface tension, set the liquid level nearly as far above the glass rim as you can get it, using plain water. Add a drop of liquid detergent (the detergent contains additives that reduce the surface tension of water). Watch as the excess water runs over the side of the glass.

Problem 2.72

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on size of various needles Which needles, if any, will float

For a steel needle of length L, diameter D, density s, to float in water with surface tension and contact angle , the vertical force due to surface tension must equal or exceed the weight 2 L cos ( ) W = m g = D s L g 4
3 N 2

or

8 cos ( ) s g = 1000 kg m
3

From Table A.4 From Table A.1, for steel 8 cos ( ) = SG g

= 72.8 10 SG = 7.83

= 0 deg

and for water

Hence

8 m s kg m 3 N 3 72.8 10 = 1.55 10 m = 1.55 mm 2 7.83 m 999 kg 9.81 m N s

Hence D < 1.55 mm. Only the 1 mm needles float (needle length is irrelevant)

Problem 2.73

[5]

Plan an experiment to measure the surface tension of a liquid similar to water. If necessary, review the NCFMF video Surface Tension for ideas. Which method would be most suitable for use in an undergraduate laboratory? What experimental precision could be expected? Open-Ended Problem Statement: Plan an experiment to measure the surface tension of a liquid similar to water. If necessary, review the NCFMF video Surface Tension for ideas. Which method would be most suitable for use in an undergraduate laboratory? What experimental precision could be expected? Discussion: Two basic kinds of experiment are possible for an undergraduate laboratory:
1. Using a clear small-diameter tube, compare the capillary rise of the unknown liquid with that of a known liquid (compare with water, because it is similar to the unknown liquid). This method would be simple to set up and should give fairly accurate results. A vertical traversing optical microscope could be used to increase the precision of measuring the liquid height in each tube. A drawback to this method is that the specific gravity and co ntact angle of the two liquids must be the same to allow the capillary rises to be compared. The capillary rise would be largest and therefore easiest to measure accurately in a tube with the smallest practical diameter. Tubes of several diameters could be used if desired. 2. Dip an object into a pool of test liquid and measure the vertical force required to pull the object from the liquid surface. The object might be made rectangular (e.g., a sheet of plastic material) or circular (e.g., a metal ring). The net force needed to pull the same object from each liquid should be proportional to the surface tension of each liquid. This method would be simple to set up. However, the force magnitudes to be measured would be quite small. A drawback to this method is that the contact angles of the two liquids must be the same.

The first method is probably best for undergraduate laboratory use. A quantitative estimate of experimental measurement uncertainty is impossible without knowing details of the test setup. It might be reasonable to expect results accurate to within 10% of the true surface tension.

*Net force is the total vertical force minus the weight of the object. A buoyancy correction would be necessary if part of the object were submerged in the test liquid.

Problem 2.74

[2]

Problem 2.75

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Boundary layer velocity profile in terms of constants a, b and c Constants a, b and c

y y u = a + b + c
0=a U = a+b+c = 0 = du =0 dy

Assumptions: No slip, at outer edge u = U and = 0 At y = 0 At y = At y = a=0 b +c = U (1)

d y y b y b c a + b + c = + 2 c = + 2 2 dy b = 2 U
2

b + 2 c = 0

(2)

From 1 and 2 Hence

c = U

y y u = 2 U U

u y y = 2 U

Dimensionless Height

0.75 0.5 0.25

0.25

0.5

0.75

Dimensionless Velocity

Problem 2.76

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Boundary layer velocity profile in terms of constants a, b and c Constants a, b and c

y y u = a + b + c

Assumptions: No slip, at outer edge u = U and = 0 At y = 0 At y = At y = 0=a U = a+b+c = du =0 dy


3 2

a =0 b +c = U (1)

0 =

d y y b y b c a + b + c = + 3 c = + 3 3 dy U 2 b= 3 U 2
3

b + 3 c = 0

(2)

From 1 and 2

c=

Hence

u=

3 U y U y 2 2

u 3 y 1 y = U 2 2

Dimensionless Height

0.75 0.5 0.25

0.25

0.5

0.75

Dimensionless Velocity

Problem 2.77

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Local temperature Minimum speed for compressibility effects

V = M c c= k R T

and

M = 0.3

for compressibility effects

For air at STP, k = 1.40 and R = 286.9J/kg.K (53.33 ft.lbf/lbmoR).

Hence

V = M c = M k R T V = 0.3 1.4 53.33 ft lbf 32.2 lbm ft 60 mph ( 60 + 460) R 2 lbm R ft lbf s 88 s
1 2

V = 229 mph

Problem 2.78

[2]

NOTE: Flow rate should be

0.75

ft min

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Geometry of and flow rate through garden hose At which point becomes turbulent

For pipe flow (Section 2-6) Also flow rate Q is given by

Re = Q =

V D = 2300 D V 4
2

for transition to turbulence

We can combine these equations and eliminate V to obtain an expression for Re in terms of D Re = V D D 4 Q 4 Q = = = 2300 2 D D 4 Q 2300
3 N s 2

Hence

D =

From Appendix A: 0.209 lbf s


2

= 1.94

slug ft
3

(Approximately)

= 1.25 10

ft N s m
2

(Approximately, from Fig. A.2)


2

= 2.61 10

4 lbf s 2

ft

Hence

D =

0.75 ft 4 1 min 1.94 slug ft lbf s 12 in 3 4 min slug ft 2300 60 s 1 ft 2.61 10 lbf s ft Dout = Din 4 Dout = 0.5 in Lturb L = L = 5 in D Din Dout Din

D = 0.617 in NOTE: For wrong flow rate, will be 1/10th of this!

The nozzle is tapered: Din = 1 in

Linear ratios leads to the distance from Din at which D = 0.617 in Lturb = L D Din Dout Din

Lturb = 3.83 in

NOTE: For wrong flow rate, this does not apply! Flow will not become turbulent.

Problem 2.79

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on supersonic aircraft Mach number; Point at which boundary layer becomes turbulent

Basic equation Hence

V = M c M= V = c

and V k R T

c=

k R T

For air at STP, k = 1.40 and R = 286.9J/kg.K (53.33 ft.lbf/lbmoR).

At 27 km the temperature is approximately (from Table A.3)

T = 223.5 K
2 1 2

M = 2700 10

3 m

hr

1 kg K 1 N s 1 hr 1 1 1 kg m 3600 s 1.4 286.9 N m 223.5 K Retrans = 500000 so xtrans = Retrans V

M = 2.5

For boundary layer transition, from Section 2-6 Then Retrans = V xtrans

We need to find the viscosity and density at this altitude and pressure. The viscosity depends on temperature only, but at 223.5 K = - 50oC, it is off scale of Fig. A.3. Instead we need to use formulas as in Appendix A At this altitude the density is (Table A.3)
1 2

= 0.02422 1.225

kg m
3

= 0.0297

kg m
3

For

b T 1+

S T

where

b = 1.458 10

kg m s K
1 2

S = 110.4 K

= 1.459 10

5 kg

m s
5 kg

= 1.459 10

5 N s 2

Hence

xtrans = 1.459 10

m s

500000

m 1 1 hr 3600 s 0.0297 kg 2700 103 m 1 hr 1

xtrans = 0.327 m

Problem 2.80

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on water tube Reynolds number of flow; Temperature at which flow becomes turbulent

Basic equation

For pipe flow (Section 2-6)


2 7 m

Re =

V D V D = m 1 s 0.005 m 7 2 s 9 10 m Re = 1389

At 20oC, from Fig. A.3 = 9 10 For the heated pipe Hence Re = =

and so

Re = 0.25

V D = 2300

for transition to turbulence = 5.435 10


2 7m

V D 1 m = 0.25 0.005 m 2300 2300 s

From Fig. A.3, the temperature of water at this viscosity is approximatelyT = 52 C

Problem 2.81

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Type of oil, flow rate, and tube geometry Whether flow is laminar or turbulent

Data on SAE 30 oil SG or density is limited in the Appendix. We can Google it or use the following
3 N s 2 2 5 m

so

At 100oC, from Figs. A.2 and A.3

= 9 10

= 1 10 1 1 10
5

s = 900 kg m
3 2

= 9 10

3 N s 2

s m
2

kg m s N
2

kg m
3

Hence

SG =

water

water = 1000 = 900 kg m


3

SG = 0.9 m s
2

The specific weight is

= g D V 4
2

9.81

N s kg m

= 8.829 10

3 N 3

For pipe flow (Section 2-6)

Q =

so
6 3

V =

4 Q D
2 3 5m

Q = 100 mL Then Hence V =

10 m 1 1 1 mL 9 s
3 2

Q = 1.111 10 V = 0.0981 m s

4 1 1 1000 mm 5 m 1.11 10 s 1 m 12 mm V D Re = kg m 1

m N s Re = 900 0.0981 0.012 m 3 3 N s kg m s m 9 10 Flow is laminar

Re = 118

Problem 2.82

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on seaplane Transition point of boundary layer

For boundary layer transition, from Section 2-6

Retrans = 500000 Retrans = V xtrans


5 m 2

Then

V xtrans ft s
2 2

so

xtrans =

Retrans V
5 ft 2

10.8 1
2

At 45oF = 7.2oC (Fig A.3)

= 0.8 10

= 8.64 10

m s

xtrans = 8.64 10 As the seaplane touches down: At 45oF = 7.2oC (Fig A.3) = 1.5 10

5 ft

500000

1 60 mph 100 mph ft 88 s

xtrans = 0.295 ft

5 m

10.8 1
2

ft s
2

= 1.62 10

4 ft

m s

xtrans = 1.62 10

4 ft

500000

1 60 mph 100 mph ft 88 s

xtrans = 0.552 ft

Problem 2.83 (In Excel)

[3]

Given: Data on airliner Find: Sketch of speed versus altitude (M = const) Solution: Data on temperature versus height can be obtained from Table A.3 At 5.5 km the temperature is approximatel The speed of sound is obtained from c = where k = 1.4 R = 286.9 c = 318 We also have V = 700 or V = 194 km/hr m/s 252 K

k R T

J/kgK m/s

(Table A.6)

Hence M = V/c or M = 0.611 To compute V for constant M , we use V = M c = 0.611c

V = 677 km/hr At a height of 8 km NOTE: Realistically, the aiplane will fly to a maximum height of about 10 km! z (km)
4 5 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 22 24 26 28 30 40 50 60 70 80 90

T (K)
262 259 256 249 243 236 230 223 217 217 217 217 217 217 217 217 217 217 219 221 223 225 227 250 271 256 220 181 181

c (m/s) V (km/hr)
325 322 320 316 312 308 304 299 295 295 295 295 295 295 295 295 295 295 296 298 299 300 302 317 330 321 297 269 269
713 709 704 695 686 677 668 658 649 649 649 649 649 649 649 649 649 649 651 654 657 660 663 697 725 705 653 592 592

Speed vs. Altitude


750

700 Speed V (km/hr)

650

600

550 0 20 40 60 80 100 Altitude z (km)

Problem 2.84
How does an airplane wing develop lift? Open-Ended Problem Statement: How does an airplane wing develop lift?

[4]

Discussion: The sketch shows the cross-section of a typical airplane wing. The airfoil section is rounded at the front, curved across the top, reaches maximum thickness about a third of the way back, and then tapers slowly to a fine trailing edge. The bottom of the airfoil section is relatively flat. (The discussion below also applies to a symmetric airfoil at an angle of incidence that produces lift.)

NACA 2412 Wing Section

It is both a popular expectation and an experimental fact that air flows more rapidly over the curved top surface of the airfoil section than along the relatively flat bottom. In the NCFMF video Flow Visualization, timelines placed in front of the airfoil indicate that fluid flows more rapidly along the top of the section than along the bottom. In the absence of viscous effects (this is a valid assumption outside the boundary layers on the airfoil) pressure falls when flow speed increases. Thus the pressures on the top surface of the airfoil where flow speed is higher are lower than the pressures on the bottom surface where flow speed does not increase. (Actual pressure profiles measured for a lifting section are shown in the NCFMF video Boundary Layer Control.) The unbalanced pressures on the top and bottom surfaces of the airfoil section create a net force that tends to develop lift on the profile.

Problem 3.1

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on nitrogen tank Mass of nitrogen; minimum required wall thickness

Assuming ideal gas behavior: where, from Table A.6, for nitrogen

p V = MRT R = 297 J kg K

Then the mass of nitrogen is

M =

D3 pV p = RT RT 6
25 10 N m
2 6

M =

kg K 1 J ( 0.75 m ) 297 J 298 K N m 6

M = 62.4 kg To determine wall thickness, consider a free body diagram for one hemisphere: F = 0 = p where c is the circumferential stress in the container Then p D p D t= = 4 D c 4 c
6 2

D c D t 4

t = 25 10

N m
2

0.75 m 4

1 210 10

m 6 N

t = 0.0223 m

t = 22.3 mm

Problem 3.2

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on flight of airplane Pressure change in mm Hg for ears to "pop"; descent distance from 8000 m to cause ears to "pop."

Assume the air density is approximately constant constant from 3000 m to 2900 m. From table A.3 SL = 1.225 kg m
3

air = 0.7423 SL

air = 0.909

kg m
3

We also have from the manometer equation, Eq. 3.7 p = air g z Combining hHg = air Hg z = and also air SGHg H2O p = Hg g hHg z SGHg = 13.55 from Table A.2

hHg =

0.909 100 m 13.55 999

hHg = 6.72 mm

For the ear popping descending from 8000 m, again assume the air density is approximately constant constant, this time at 8000 m. From table A.3 air = 0.4292 SL We also have from the manometer equation air8000 g z8000 = air3000 g z3000 where the numerical subscripts refer to conditions at 3000m and 8000m. Hence z8000 = air3000 g air8000 g z3000 = air3000 air8000 z3000 z8000 = 0.909 0.526 100 m z8000 = 173 m air = 0.526 kg m
3

Problem 3.3

[3]

Given: Boiling points of water at different elevations Find: Change in elevation Solution: From the steam tables, we have the following data for the boiling point (saturation temperature) of water Tsat (oF) 195 185 p (psia) 10.39 8.39

The sea level pressure, from Table A.3, is pSL = Hence Tsat ( F) 195 185
o

14.696

psia

Altitude vs Atmospheric Pressure p/pSL 0.707 0.571 Altitude (ft)


15000

12500

10000

Data Linear Trendline

From Table A.3 p/pSL Altitude (m) Altitude (ft) 0.7372 2500 8203 0.6920 3000 9843 0.6492 3500 11484 0.6085 4000 13124 0.5700 4500 14765

7500

z = -39217(p/pSL) + 37029 R2 = 0.999


5000

2500 0.55 0.60 0.65 0.70 0.75

p/pSL

Then, any one of a number of Excel functions can be used to interpolate (Here we use Excel 's Trendline analysis) p/pSL 0.707 0.571 Altitude (ft) 9303 14640

Current altitude is approximately

9303 ft

The change in altitude is then 5337 ft Alternatively, we can interpolate for each altitude by using a linear regression between adjacent data points p/pSL Altitude (m) Altitude (ft) 2500 8203 3000 9843 2834 9299 p/pSL 0.6085 0.5700 0.5730 Altitude (m) 4000 4500 4461 Altitude (ft) 13124 14765 14637

For

0.7372 0.6920

Then

0.7070

The change in altitude is then 5338 ft

Problem 3.4

[2]

Problem 3.5

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Data on system before and after applied force Applied force

dp = g dy

or, for constant

p = patm g y y0

with

p y0 = patm

( )

For initial state

p1 = patm + g h

and

F1 = p1 A = g h A

(Gage; F1 is hydrostatic upwards force)

For the initial FBD

Fy = 0

F1 W = 0

W = F1 = g h A

For final state

p2 = patm + g H

and

F2 = p2 A = g H A

(Gage; F2 is hydrostatic upwards force)

For the final FBD

Fy = 0

F2 W F = 0
2

F = F 2 W = g H A g h A = g A ( H h)

D F = H2O SG g ( H h) 4

From Fig. A.1

SG = 13.54 kg m F = 45.6 N
3

F = 1000

13.54 9.81

m s
2

( 0.05 m) ( 0.2 0.025) m

N s kg m

Problem 3.6

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Data on system Force on bottom of cube; tension in tether

dp = g dy

or, for constant

p = g h

where h is measured downwards

The absolute pressure at the interface is

pinterface = patm + SGoil g hoil

Then the pressure on the lower surface is pL = pinterface + g hL = patm + g SGoil hoil + hL For the cube V = 125 mL
1 3

V = 1.25 10

Then the size of the cube is Hence

d = V

d = 0.05 m hL = 0.35 m where

and the depth in water to the upper surface is hU = 0.3 m where hL is the depth in water to the lower surface A = d
2

hL = hU + d FL = pL A

The force on the lower surface is

A = 0.0025 m

FL = patm + g SGoil hoil + hL A

kg m N s 3 N 2 FL = 101 10 + 1000 9.81 ( 0.8 0.5 m + 0.35 m) 0.0025 m 2 3 2 kg m m m s


2

FL = 270.894 N For the tension in the tether, an FBD givesFy = 0

Note: Extra decimals needed for computing T later!

FL FU W T = 0

or

T = FL FU W

where FU = patm + g SGoil hoil + hU A

Note that we could instead compute Using FU

F = FL FU = g SGoil hL hU A

and

T = F W
2

kg m N s 3 N 2 FU = 101 10 + 1000 9.81 ( 0.8 0.5 m + 0.3 m) 0.0025 m 2 3 2 kg m m m s


FU = 269.668 N Note: Extra decimals needed for computing T later!

For the oak block (Table A.1)

SGoak = 0.77

so

W = SGoak g V m s
2 4

W = 0.77 1000

kg m
3

9.81

1.25 10

N s kg m

W = 0.944 N

T = FL FU W

T = 0.282 N

Problem 3.7

[1]

Given: Pressure and temperature data from balloon Find: Plot density change as a function of elevation Solution: Using the ideal gas equation, = p/RT
1.26

Density Distribution

1.24

p (kPa) 101.4 100.8 100.2 99.6 99.0 98.4 97.8 97.2 96.6 96.0 95.4

T ( C) 12.0 11.1 10.5 10.2 10.1 10.0 10.3 10.8 11.6 12.2 12.1

(kg/m ) 1.240 1.236 1.231 1.225 1.218 1.212 1.203 1.193 1.183 1.173 1.166
3

Density (kg/m3)

1.22

1.20

1.18

1.16 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Elevation Point

Problem 3.8

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on tire at 3500 m and at sea level Absolute pressure at 3500 m; pressure at sea level

At an elevation of 3500 m, from Table A.3: pSL = 101 kPa and we have pg = 0.25 MPa patm = 101 kPa patm = 0.6492 pSL pg = 250 kPa patm = 65.6 kPa p = pg + patm p = 316 kPa

At sea level

Meanwhile, the tire has warmed up, from the ambient temperature at 3500 m, to 25oC. At an elevation of 3500 m, from Table A.3 Tcold = 265.4 K and Thot = ( 25 + 273) K Thot = 298 K

Hence, assuming ideal gas behavior, pV = mRT, and that the tire is approximately a rigid container, the absolute pressure of the hot tire is phot = Then the gage pressure is pg = phot patm pg = 253 kPa Thot Tcold p phot = 354 kPa

Problem 3.9

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Properties of a cube floating at an interface The pressures difference between the upper and lower surfaces; average cube density

The pressure difference is obtained from two applications of Eq. 3.7 pU = p0 + SAE10 g ( H 0.1 d) pL = p0 + SAE10 g H + H2O g 0.9 d

where pU and pL are the upper and lower pressures, p0 is the oil free surface pressure, H is the depth of the interface, and d is the cube size Hence the pressure difference is p = pL pU = H2O g 0.9 d + SAE10 g 0.1 d From Table A.2 SGSAE10 = 0.92 p = 999 kg m
3

p = H2O g d 0.9 + SGSAE10 0.1

9.81

m s
2

0.1 m ( 0.9 + 0.92 0.1)

Ns kg m

p = 972 Pa

For the cube density, set up a free body force balance for the cube F = 0 = p A W Hence W = p A = p d cube = m d
3 2

W d g N m
2 3

p d d g
3

=
2

p d g cube = 991 kg m
3

cube = 972

1 0.1 m

s kg m 2 9.81 m Ns

Problem 3.10

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Properties of a cube suspended by a wire in a fluid The fluid specific gravity; the gage pressures on the upper and lower surfaces

From a free body analysis of the cube:

F = 0 = T + pL pU d M g

where M and d are the cube mass and size and pL and pU are the pressures on the lower and upper surfaces For each pressure we can use Eq. 3.7 Hence where H is the depth of the upper surface Hence the force balance gives SG = M g T H2O g d From Table A.1, the fluid is Meriam blue. The individual pressures are computed from Eq 3.7 p = p0 + g h or slug ft pg = 1.754 1.94
3 3

p = p0 + g h pL pU = p0 + g ( H + d) p0 + g H = g d = SG H2O d 2 slug 32.2 SG = slug ft s


2

lbf s 50.7 lbf slug ft


2

SG = 1.75

lbf s 3 1.94 32.2 ( 0.5 ft) 3 2 slug ft ft s ft

pg = g h = SG H2O h ft s 32.2
2

For the upper surface

pg = 1.754 1.94

32.2

2 lbf s 1 ft ft slug ft 12 in 3 2
2

pg = 0.507 psi
2

For the lower surface

slug ft
3

ft s
2

1 lbf s 1 ft + ft slug ft 12 in 3 2

pg = 0.888 psi

Note that the SG calculation can also be performed using a buoyancy approach (discussed later in the chapter): Consider a free body diagram of the cube: where M is the cube mass and FB is the buoyancy force T + SG H2O L g M g = 0
3

F = 0 = T + FB M g FB = SG H2O L g or SG = M g T H2O g L
3 3

Hence

as before

SG = 1.75

Problem 3.11

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Data on air bubble Bubble diameter as it reaches surface

dp = sea g dy

and the ideal gas equation

p = R T =

M R T V

We assume the temperature is constant, and the density of sea water is constant

For constant sea water density

p = patm + SGsea g h

where p is the pressure at any depth h

Then the pressure at the initial depth is

p1 = patm + SGsea g h1 p2 = patm

The pressure as it reaches the surface is

For the bubble

p =

M R T V

but M and T are constant

M R T = const = p V

Hence

p1 V1 = p2 V2
1 3

or

P1 V 2 = V 1 p2
1 3

or

3 3 p1 D2 = D1 p2 1 3

p1 Then the size of the bubble at the surface is 2 = D1 D p2

= D1

sea g h1 ( patm + sea g h1 ) = D1 1 + patm patm

From Table A.2

SGsea = 1.025

(This is at 68oF)
1 3

D2 = 0.3 in 1 + 1.025 1.94

slug ft
3

32.2

ft s
2

100 ft

in 1 ft lbf s 14.7 lbf 12 in slugft


2 2 2

D2 = 0.477 in

Problem 3.12

[4]

Problem 3.13

[3] Part 1/2

Problem 3.13

[4] Part 2/2

Problem 3.14

[3]

Problem 3.15

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Geometry of straw Pressure just below the thumb

dp = g dy

or, for constant

p = g h

where h is measured downwards

This equation only applies in the 6 in of coke in the straw - in the other 11 inches of air the pressure is essentially constant.

The gage pressure at the coke surface is

pcoke = g hcoke

assuming coke is about as dense as water (it's actually a bit dens

Hence, with

hcoke = 6 in

because h is measured downwards slug ft pcoke = 31.2 lbf ft pcoke = 14.5 psi
2 3

pcoke = 1.94

32.2

ft s
2

6 in

1 ft lbf s 12 in slugft

pcoke = 0.217 psi

gage

Problem 3.16

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Data on water tank and inspection cover If the support bracket is strong enough; at what water depth would it fail

dp = g dy

or, for constant

p = g h

where h is measured downwards

The absolute pressure at the base is

pbase = patm + g h

where

h = 5 m

The gage pressure at the base is

pbase = g h

This is the pressure to use as we have patm on the outside of the cover.
4 2

The force on the inspection cover is

F = pbase A F = g h A kg m F = 30.7 N
3

where

A = 2.5 cm 2.5 cm

A = 6.25 10

F = 1000

9.81

m s
2

5 m 6.25 10

N s kg m

The bracket is strong enough (it can take 40 N). To find the maximum depth we start with = 40 N F h= F g A m 1 s 1 1 kg m 1000 kg 9.81 m 6.25 10 4 m2 N s2 1
3 2

h = 40 N

h = 6.52 m

Problem 3.17

[4]

h = 39.3 mm

Problem 3.18

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on partitioned tank Gage pressure of trapped air; pressure to make water and mercury levels equal

The pressure difference is obtained from repeated application of Eq. 3.7, or in other words, from Eq. 3.8. Starting from the right air chamber pgage = SGHg H2O g ( 3 m 2.9 m ) H2O g 1 m pgage = H2O g SGHg 0.1 m 1.0 m pgage = 999 kg m
3

)
N s kg m
2

9.81

m s
2

( 13.55 0.1 m 1.0 m )

pgage = 3.48 kPa

If the left air pressure is now increased until the water and mercury levels are now equal, Eq. 3.8 leads to pgage = SGHg H2O g 1.0 m H2O g 1.0 m pgage = H2O g SGHg 1 m 1.0 m pgage = 999 kg m
3

)
Ns kg m
2

9.81

m s
2

( 13.55 1 m 1.0 m)

pgage = 123 kPa

Problem 3.19

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on partitioned tank Pressure of trapped air required to bring water and mercury levels equal if right air opening is sealed

First we need to determine how far each free surface moves. In the tank of Problem 3.15, the ratio of cross section areas of the partitions is 0.75/3.75 or 1:5. Suppose the water surface (and therefore the mercury on the left) must move down distance x to bring the water and mercury levels equal. Then by mercury volume conservation, the mercury free surface (on the right) moves up (0.75/3.75)x = x/5. These two changes in level must cancel the original discrepancy in free surface levels, of (1m + 2.9m) - 3 m = 0.9 m. Hence x + x/5 = 0.9 m, or x = 0.75 m. The mercury level thus moves up x/5 = 0.15 m. Assuming the air (an ideal gas, pV=RT) in the right behaves isothermally, the new pressure there will be pright = Aright Lrightold Lrightold patm = patm = p Vrightnew Aright Lrightnew Lrightnew atm Vrightold

where V, A and L represent volume, cross-section area, and vertical length Hence pright = 3 101 kPa 3 0.15 pright = 106 kPa

When the water and mercury levels are equal application of Eq. 3.8 gives: pleft = pright + SGHg H2O g 1.0 m H2O g 1.0 m pleft = pright + H2O g SGHg 1.0 m 1.0 m pleft = 106 kPa + 999 pgage = pleft patm kg m
3

)
Ns kg m
2

9.81

m s
2

( 13.55 1.0 m 1.0 m)

pleft = 229 kPa pgage = 128 kPa

pgage = 229 kPa 101 kPa

Problem 3.20

[2]

Problem 3.21

[2]

Problem 3.22

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on manometer Deflection due to pressure difference

Basic equation

dp = g dy

or, for constant

p = g h

where h is measured downwards

Starting at p1

pA = p1 + SGA g ( h + l )

where l is the (unknown) distance from the level of the right interface

Next, from A to B

pB = pA SGB g h

Finally, from A to the location of p2

p2 = pB SGA g l

Combining the three equations

p2 = pA SGB g h SGA g l = p1 + SGA g ( h + l) SGB g h SGA g l

p2 p1 = SGA SGB g h p1 p2

h=

(SGB SGA) g
lbf ft
2

h = 18

1 ( 2.95 0.88)

ft 1 s slug ft 2 1.94 slug 32.2 ft s lbf 1

h = 0.139 ft

h = 1.67 in

Problem 3.23

[2]

Problem 3.24

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on manometer Gage pressure at point a

Basic equation

dp = g dy

or, for constant

p = g h

where h is height difference

Starting at point a

p1 = pa g h1

where

h1 = 0.125 m + 0.25 m

h1 = 0.375 m

Next, in liquid A

p2 = p1 + SGA g h2

where

h2 = 0.25 m

Finally, in liquid B

patm = p2 SGB g h3

where

h3 = 0.9 m 0.4 m

h3 = 0.5 m

Combining the three equations

patm = p1 + SGA g h2 SGB g h3 = pa g h1 + SGA g h2 SGB g h3

pa = patm + g h1 SGA h2 + SGB h3

or in gage pressures

pa = g h1 SGA h2 + SGB h3

)
2

N s pa = 1000 9.81 [ 0.375 ( 0.75 0.25) + ( 1.20 0.5) ] m 3 2 kg m m s kg m pa = 7.73 10 Pa


3

pa = 7.73 kPa

(gage)

Problem 3.25

[2]

Problem 3.26

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on fluid levels in a tank Air pressure; new equilibrium level if opening appears

Using Eq. 3.8, starting from the open side and working in gage pressure pair = H2O g SGHg ( 0.3 0.1) m 0.1 m SGBenzene 0.1 m N s kg m
2

Using data from Table A.2

pair = 999

kg m
3

9.81

m s
2

( 13.55 0.2 m 0.1 m 0.879 0.1 m )

pair = 24.7 kPa

To compute the new level of mercury in the manometer, assume the change in level from 0.3 m is an increase of x. Then, because the volume of mercury is constant, the tank mercury level will fall by distance (0.025/0.25)2x. Hence, the gage pressure at the bottom of the tank can be computed from the left and the right, providing a formula for x

0.025 SGHg H2O g ( 0.3 m + x) = SGHg H2O g 0.1 m x m ... 0.25 + H2O g 0.1 m + SGBenzene H2O g 0.1 m
2

Hence

x =

[ 0.1 m + 0.879 0.1 m + 13.55 ( 0.1 0.3) m]

0.025 2 1 + 13.55 0.25

x = 0.184 m (The negative sign indicates the manometer level actually fell) h = 0.116 m

The new manometer height is h = 0.3 m + x

Problem 3.27

[2]

Problem 3.28

[2]

Problem 3.29

[2]

Problem 3.30

[2]

Problem 3.31

[2]

Problem 3.32

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on inclined manometer Angle for given data; find sensitivity

Basic equation Under applied pressure From Table A.1 and p = 1 in. of water, or

dp = g dy

or, for constant

p = g h

where h is height difference (1)

p = SGMer g ( L sin( ) + x) SGMer = 0.827 p = g h p = 1000 kg m


3

where 9.81 m s
2

h = 25 mm N s kg m = L d D
2 2

h = 0.025 m

0.025 m Atube Ares

p = 245 Pa

The volume of liquid must remain constant, so x Ares = L Atube

x = L

(2)

Combining Eqs 1 and 2

2 d p = SGMer g L sin ( ) + L D

Solving for

sin ( ) =

d p SGMer g L D N m
2

sin ( ) = 245

1 0.827

m 1 s 1 1 kg m 8 = 0.186 1000 kg 9.81 m 0.15 m s2 N 76 1

= 11 deg The sensitivity is the ratio of manometer deflection to a vertical water manometer s= L h = 0.15 m 0.025 m s=6

Problem 3.33

[3]

s = L/he = L/(SG h) = 5/SG

Problem 3.34

[3] Part 1/2

Problem 3.34

[3] Part 2/2

Problem 3.35

[4]

Problem 3.36

[4]

Problem 3.37

[3]

Problem 3.38

[2]

Fluid 1

Fluid 2

Given: Find: Solution:

Two fluids inside and outside a tube An expression for height h; find diameter for h < 10 mm for water/mercury

A free-body vertical force analysis for the section of fluid 1 height h in the tube below the "free surface" of fluid 2 leads to

F = 0 = p

D D 1 g h + D cos ( ) 4 4 p = 2 g h
2

where p is the pressure difference generated by fluid 2 over height h,

Assumption: Neglect meniscus curvature for column height and volume calculations Hence p D D D D 1 g h = 2 g h 1 g h = D cos ( ) 4 4 4 4 4 cos ( ) g D 2 1
2 2 2

Solving for h

h =

For fluids 1 and 2 being water and mercury (for mercury = 375 mN/m and = 140o, from Table A.4), solving for D to make h = 10 mm D = 4 cos ( ) 4 cos ( ) = g h 2 1 g h H2O SGHg 1

)
2

4 0.375 D = 9.81 m s
2

N cos ( 140 deg) m kg m


3

kg m N s D = 0.93 mm D 1 mm

0.01 m 1000

( 13.6 1)

Problem 3.39

[2]

h1

Oil Air

h4

h2 Hg h3 x

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Data on manometer before and after an "accident" Change in mercury level

dp = g dy

or, for constant

p = g h

where h is height difference

For the initial state, working from right to left

patm = patm + SGHg g h3 SGoil g h1 + h2 SGHg g h3 = SGoil g h1 + h2

)
(1)

( (

Note that the air pocket has no effect! For the final state, working from right to left patm = patm + SGHg g h3 x SGoil g h4 SGHg g h3 x = SGoil g h4 The two unknowns here are the mercury levels before and after (i.e., h3 and x) Combining Eqs. 1 and 2 From Table A.1 The term SGHg g x = SGoil g h1 + h2 h4 SGHg = 13.55 h1 + h2 h4 is the difference between the total height of oil before and after the accident V 4 1 1 1 m 3 cc = 0.0316 m 0.011 m 100 cm
2 3

(2)

x=

SGoil h + h2 h4 SGHg 1

(3)

h1 + h2 h4 =

d2 4

Then from Eq. 3

x =

1.67 13.55

0.0316 m

x = 3.895 10

x = 0.389 cm

p SL = R = =

101 286.9 999

kPa J/kg.K kg/m3

The temperature can be computed from the data in the figure The pressures are then computed from the appropriate equation z (km) 0.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 8.0 11.0 12.0 14.0 16.0 18.0 20.1 22.0 24.0 26.0 28.0 30.0 32.2 34.0 36.0 38.0 40.0 42.0 44.0 46.0 47.3 50.0 52.4 54.0 56.0 58.0 60.0 61.6 64.0 66.0 68.0 70.0 72.0 74.0 76.0 78.0 80.0 82.0 84.0 86.0 88.0 90.0 T (oC) 15.0 2.0 -11.0 -24.0 -37.0 -56.5 -56.5 -56.5 -56.5 -56.5 -56.5 -54.6 -52.6 -50.6 -48.7 -46.7 -44.5 -39.5 -33.9 -28.4 -22.8 -17.2 -11.7 -6.1 -2.5 -2.5 -2.5 -5.6 -9.5 -13.5 -17.4 -20.5 -29.9 -37.7 -45.5 -53.4 -61.2 -69.0 -76.8 -84.7 -92.5 -92.5 -92.5 -92.5 -92.5 -92.5 T (K) 288.0 275.00 262.0 249.0 236.0 216.5 216.5 216.5 216.5 216.5 216.5 218.4 220.4 222.4 224.3 226.3 228.5 233.5 239.1 244.6 250.2 255.8 261.3 266.9 270.5 270.5 270.5 267.4 263.5 259.5 255.6 252.5 243.1 235.3 227.5 219.6 211.8 204.0 196.2 188.3 180.5 180.5 180.5 180.5 180.5 180.5 m = 0.0065 (K/m) p /p SL 1.000 0.784 0.608 0.465 0.351 0.223 0.190 0.139 0.101 0.0738 0.0530 0.0393 0.0288 0.0211 0.0155 0.0115 0.00824 0.00632 0.00473 0.00356 0.00270 0.00206 0.00158 0.00122 0.00104 0.000736 0.000544 0.000444 0.000343 0.000264 0.000202 0.000163 0.000117 0.0000880 0.0000655 0.0000482 0.0000351 0.0000253 0.0000180 0.0000126 0.00000861 0.00000590 0.00000404 0.00000276 0.00000189 0.00000130

From Table A.3 z (km) 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 6.0 7.0 8.0 9.0 10.0 11.0 12.0 13.0 14.0 15.0 16.0 17.0 18.0 19.0 20.0 22.0 24.0 26.0 28.0 30.0 40.0 50.0 60.0 70.0 80.0 90.0 p /p SL 1.000 0.942 0.887 0.835 0.785 0.737 0.692 0.649 0.609 0.570 0.533 0.466 0.406 0.352 0.304 0.262 0.224 0.192 0.164 0.140 0.120 0.102 0.0873 0.0747 0.0638 0.0546 0.0400 0.0293 0.0216 0.0160 0.0118 0.00283 0.000787 0.000222 0.0000545 0.0000102 0.00000162

T = const

m = -0.000991736 (K/m)

m = -0.002781457 (K/m)

T = const m = 0.001956522 (K/m)

m = 0.003913043 (K/m)

T = const

Atmospheric Pressure vs Elevation


1.00000 0 0.10000 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100

0.01000

Pressure Ratio p /p SL

0.00100

Computed
0.00010

Table A.3

0.00001

0.00000

Elevation (km)

Agreement between calculated and tabulated data is very good (as it should be, considering the table data is also computed!)

= =

72.8 1000

mN/m kg/m3

Using the formula above a (mm) h (mm) 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 0.40 0.45 0.50 0.55 0.60 0.65 0.70 0.75 1.00 1.25 1.50 1.75 2.00 148 98.9 74.2 59.4 49.5 42.4 37.1 33.0 29.7 27.0 24.7 22.8 21.2 19.8 14.8 11.9 9.89 8.48 7.42

Capillary Height Between Vertical Plates


160

Height h (mm)

140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0

Gap a (mm)

Problem 3.42

[2]

Water

Given: Find: Solution:

Water in a tube or between parallel plates Height h for each system

a) Tube: A free-body vertical force analysis for the section of water height h above the "free surface" in the tube, as shown in the figure, leads to

F = 0 = D cos ( ) g h

D 4

Assumption: Neglect meniscus curvature for column height and volume calculations 4 cos ( ) g D

Solving for h

h =

b) Parallel Plates: A free-body vertical force analysis for the section of water height h above the "free surface" between plates arbitrary width w (similar to the figure above), leads to

F = 0 = 2 w cos() g h w a
Solving for h h = 2 cos ( ) g a

For water = 72.8 mN/m and = 0o (Table A.4), so 4 0.0728 a) Tube h = 999 kg m b) Parallel Plates h = 999
3

N m 0.005 m N m 0.005 m

9.81

m s
2

kg m N s
2

h = 5.94 10

h = 5.94 mm

2 0.0728 kg m
3

9.81

m s
2

kg m N s
2

h = 2.97 10

h = 2.97 mm

Problem 3.43

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Data on isothermal atmosphere Elevation changes for 2% and 10% density changes; plot of pressure and density versus elevation

dp = g dz

and

p = R T

Assumptions: static, isothermal fluid,; g = constant; ideal gas behavior Then dp p g = g = dz Rair T Rair T0 g and dp g = dz p Rair T

Integrating

z =

ln

p2 p1
2 1

where

T = T0 Rair T0 g

For an ideal with T constant

p2 p1

2 Rair T 1 Rair T

so

z =

ln

2 2 = C ln 1 1

(1)

From Table A.6

Rair = 53.33 Rair T0 g = 0.98

ft lbf lbm R ft lbf lbm R s 32.2 lbm ft 2 32.2 ft s lbf 1


2

Evaluating

C= 2 1 2 1 2 1

= 53.33

( 85 + 460) R

C = 29065 ft

For a 2% reduction in density

so from Eq. 1

z = 29065 ft ln ( 0.98)

z = 587 ft

For a 10% reduction in density

= 0.9

so from Eq. 1
z C

z = 29065 ft ln ( 0.9)

z = 3062 ft

To plot

p2 p1

and

2 1

we rearrange Eq. 1

p2 p1

=e

20000

15000

Elevation (ft)

10000

5000

0.4

0.5

0.6

0.8

0.9

Pressure or Density Ratio

This plot can be plotted in Excel

Problem 3.44

[3] Part 1/2

Problem 3.44

[3] Part 2/2

Problem 3.45

[3] Part 1/2

Problem 3.45

[3] Part 2/2

Problem 3.46

[2] Part 1/2

Problem 3.46

[2] Part 2/2

Problem 3.47

[5] Part 1/3

Problem 3.47

[5] Part 2/3

Problem 3.47

[5] Part 3/3

Problem 3.48

[3] Part 1/3

Problem 3.48

[3] Part 2/3

Problem 3.48

[3] Part 3/3

Problem 3.49

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation For point A Here we have

Geometry of chamber system Pressure at various locations

dp = g dy

or, for constant or in gage pressure

p = g h pA = g h1 h1 = 0.2 m

where h is height difference

pA = patm + g h1 h1 = 20 cm pA = 1000 kg m
3

9.81

m s
2

0.2 m

N s kg m

pA = 1962 Pa h2 = 10 cm

pA = 1.96 kPa h2 = 0.1 m

(gage)

For the air cavity From Table A.1

pair = pA SGHg g h2 SGHg = 13.55 pair = 1962 N m


2

where

13.55 1000

kg m
3

9.81

m s
2

0.1 m

N s kg m

pair = 11.3 kPa

(gage)

Note that p = constant throughout the air pocket For point B pB = patm + SGHg g h3 pB = 11300 For point C N m
2

where kg m
3

h3 = 15 cm m s
2

h3 = 0.15 m
2

+ 13.55 1000

9.81

0.15 m

N s kg m

pB = 8.64 kPa h4 = 0.25 m

(gage)

pC = patm + SGHg g h4 pC = 11300 N m


2

where kg m
3

h4 = 25 cm m s
2

+ 13.55 1000

9.81

0.25 m

N s kg m

pC = 21.93 kPa h5 = 0.15 m

(gage)

For the second air cavity pair = pC SGHg h5 N

where kg m

h5 = 15 cm
2

N s pair = 21930 13.55 1000 9.81 0.15 m 2 3 2 kg m m m s

pair = 1.99 kPa

(gage)

Problem 3.50

[2]

Given: Find:

Geometry of access port Resultant force and location


y a = 1.25 ft w FR SG = 2.5 b = 1 ft dy y

Solution:
Basic equation FR = p dA dp = g dy FR = pc A Ms = y' FR = y dFR = y p dA Ixx y' = yc + A yc

or, use computing equations We will show both methods

Assumptions: static fluid; = constant; patm on other side FR = p dA = SG g y dA


a a

but

dA = w dy and

w y = b a

w =

b y a

Hence

2 b b 2 SG g b a FR = SG g y y dy = SG g y dy = 3 a a 0 0

Alternatively Hence

FR = pc A FR = SG g b a 3
2

and

2 pc = SG g yc = SG g a 3

with

A =

1 a b 2

For y'

3 b 3 SG g b a y' FR = y p dA = SG g y dy = 4 a 0

y' =

SG g b a 3 = a 4 FR 4

Alternatively

Ixx y' = yc + A yc 2
3

and

b a Ixx = 36

(Google it!)

b a 2 3 3 y' = a + = a 36 a b 2 a 3 4 Using given data, and SG = 2.5 (Table A.1) and lbf s FR = 1.94 32.2 1 ft ( 1.25 ft) 3 2 slug ft 3 ft s 3 y' = a y' = 0.938 ft 4 2.5 slug ft
2 2

FR = 81.3 lbf

Problem 3.51

[3]

Given: Find:

Geometry of gate Force FA for equilibrium

h H = 25 ft A R = 10 ft y B FA y z x

Solution:
Basic equation FR = p dA dp = g dh FR = pc A Mz = 0 Ixx y' = yc + A yc where y would be measured from the free surface

or, use computing equations

Assumptions: static fluid; = constant; patm on other side; door is in equilibrium Instead of using either of these approaches, we note the following, using y as in the sketch Mz = 0 1 y g h dA R FA R = y p dA with p = g h (Gage pressure, since p = patm on other side) h = Hy

FA =

with

dA = r dr d

and

y = r sin ( )

Hence

R 3 4 1 g H R R 2 FA = g r sin ( ) ( H r sin ( ) ) r dr d = sin ( ) sin ( ) d 3 4 R 0 0 R 0


3 4 2 H R2 R3 R g 2 H R = g FR = 8 8 R 3 3

Using given data

FR = 1.94

slug ft
3

32.2

2 2 3 lbf s 25 ft ( 10 ft) ( 10 ft) 2 3 8 slug ft s ft

FR = 7.96 10 lbf

Problem 3.52

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Gate geometry Depth H at which gate tips

This is a problem with atmospheric pressure on both sides of the plate, so we can first determine the location of the center of pressure with respect to the free surface, using Eq.3.11c (assuming depth H) Ixx y' = yc + A yc where L = 1 m is the plate height and w is the plate width L y' = H + 2 L L = H + 2 L L 12 H 12 w L H 2 2 w L
3 2

and

Ixx =

w L 12

with

yc = H

L 2

Hence

But for equilibrium, the center of force must always be at or below the level of the hinge so that the stop can hold the gate in place. Hence we must have y' > H 0.45 m L Combining the two equations H + 2
2

12 H

L 2

H 0.45 m

Solving for H

L + 2

L 12 0.45 m 2

1 m + 2

( 1 m)

1 m 12 0.45 m 2

H 2.17 m

Problem 3.53

[3]

Given: Find:

Geometry of plane gate Minimum weight to keep it closed


h y dF W w=2m L/2 L=3m

Solution:
Basic equation FR = p dA dp = g dh FR = pc A MO = 0 Ixx y' = yc + A yc

or, use computing equations

Assumptions: static fluid; = constant; patm on other side; door is in equilibrium Instead of using either of these approaches, we note the following, using y as in the sketch L W cos ( ) = y dF 2 with p = g h = g y sin( ) (Gage pressure, since p = patm on other side)

MO = 0 We also have dF = p dA 2

Hence

W =

2 y p dA = y g y sin( ) w dy L cos ( ) L cos ( )

L 2 2 g w tan( ) 2 2 y dy = g w L tan( ) W = y p dA = 0 3 L cos ( ) L

Using given data

W =

2 3

1000

kg m
3

9.81

m s
2

2 m ( 3 m ) tan( 30 deg)

N s kg m

W = 68 kN

Problem 3.54

[4] Part 1/2

Problem 3.54

[4] Part 2/2

Problem 3.55

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:

Geometry of cup Force on each half of cup

Basic equation or, use computing equation

FR = p dA FR = pc A

dp = g dh

Assumptions: static fluid; = constant; patm on other side; cup does not crack! The force on the half-cup is the same as that on a rectangle of size FR = p dA = g y dA Hence g w h FR = g y w dy = 0 2 FR = pc A FR = and
h 2

h = 3 in

and

w = 2.5 in

but

dA = w dy

Alternatively

h g w h FR = pc A = g yc A = g h w = 2 2
3 2

Using given data

1 slug ft 1 ft lbf s 2 1.94 32.2 2.5 in ( 3 in) 3 2 slug ft 2 12 in ft s

FR = 0.407 lbf

Hence a teacup is being forced apart by about 0.4 lbf: not much of a force, so a paper cup works!

Problem 3.56

[4] Part 1/2

Problem 3.56

[4] Part 2/2

Problem 3.57

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Geometry of lock system Force on gate; reactions at hinge

Ry Rx

FR = p dA FR = pc A

dp = g dh

FR

or, use computing equation

Assumptions: static fluid; = constant; patm on other side


Fn

The force on each gate is the same as that on a rectangle of size FR = p dA = g y dA Hence g w h FR = g y w dy = 0 2 FR = pc A FR = 1 2 1000 kg m
3 h 2

h = D = 10 m

and

w =

W 2 cos ( 15 deg)

but

dA = w dy

Alternatively

and m s
2

h g w h FR = pc A = g yc A = g h w = 2 2 34 m 2 cos ( 15 deg) ( 10 m )
2

Using given data

9.81

N s kg m

FR = 8.63 MN

For the force components Rx and Ry we do the following w Mhinge = 0 = FR Fn w sin( 15 deg) 2 Fx = 0 = FR cos ( 15 deg) Rx = 0 Fy = 0 = Ry FR sin( 15 deg) + Fn = 0 R = ( 8.34 MN , 14.4 MN) Fn = FR 2 sin ( 15 deg) Fn = 16.7 MN Rx = 8.34 MN Ry = 14.4 MN

Rx = FR cos ( 15 deg) Ry = Fn FR sin ( 15 deg) R = 16.7 MN

Problem 3.58

[2]

Problem 3.59

[2]

Problem 3.60

[2]

Problem 3.61

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:

Description of car tire Explanation of lift effect

The explanation is as follows: It is true that the pressure in the entire tire is the same everywhere. However, the tire at the top of the hub will be essentially circular in cross-section, but at the bottom, where the tire meets the ground, the cross section will be approximately a flattened circle, or elliptical. Hence we can explain that the lower cross section has greater upward force than the upper cross section has downward force (providing enough lift to keep the car up) two ways. First, the horizontal projected area of the lower ellipse is larger than that of the upper circular cross section, so that net pressure times area is upwards. Second, any time you have an elliptical cross section that's at high pressure, that pressure will always try to force the ellipse to be circular (thing of a round inflated balloon - if you squeeze it it will resist!). This analysis ignores the stiffness of the tire rubber, which also provides a little lift.

Problem 3.62

[3]

Problem 3.63

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Geometry of rectangular gate Depth for gate to open

L D y F1
Ixx = bD 12
3

Basic equation

dp = g dh FR = pc A

Mz = 0 Ixx y' = yc + A yc

Computing equations

F2

Assumptions: static fluid; = constant; patm on other side; no friction in hinge For incompressible fluid p = g h where p is gage pressure and h is measured downwards

The force on the vertical gate (gate 1) is the same as that on a rectangle of size h = D and width w Hence The location of this force is D g w D F1 = pc A = g yc A = g D w = 2 2
3 Ixx 1 D w D 2 2 y' = yc + = + = D 12 w D D A yc 2 3 2

The force on the horizontal gate (gate 2) is due to constant pressure, and is at the centroid F2 = p ( y = D) A = g D w L Summing moments about the hinge L 2 L Mhinge = 0 = F1 ( D y') + F2 = F1 D D + F2 2 3 2 F 1 D 3 = g w D D L L = F 2 = g D w L 2 3 2 2
3 2 2

g w D g D w L = 6 2 D = 3 L = 3 5ft

D = 8.66 ft

Problem 3.64

[3]

Given: Find:

Geometry of gate
y D

Force at A to hold gate closed


h y

Solution:
Basic equation dp = g dh Mz = 0
3

FR

FA

Computing equations

FR = pc A

Ixx y' = yc + A yc

Ixx =

w L 12

Assumptions: static fluid; = constant; patm on other side; no friction in hinge For incompressible fluid p = g h where p is gage pressure and h is measured downwards

The hydrostatic force on the gate is that on a rectangle of size L and width w. Hence L FR = pc A = g hc A = g D + sin( 30 deg) L w 2 FR = 1000 kg m
3

9.81

m s
2

1.5 +

3 N s sin( 30 deg) m 3 m 3 m kg m 2

FR = 199 kN

Ixx The location of this force is given by y' = yc + where y' and y are measured along the plane of the gate to the free surface A yc c L 3 m D 1.5 m yc = + yc = + yc = 4.5 m 2 sin ( 30 deg) 2 sin ( 30 deg)
3 2 2 Ixx 1 1 w L L ( 3 m) y' = yc + = yc + = yc + = 4.5 m + 12 yc 12 4.5 m 12 w L yc A yc

y' = 4.67 m

Taking moments about the hinge

D F L MH = 0 = FR y' A sin ( 30 deg) D y' sin ( 30 deg) FA = FR L 1.5 4.67 sin ( 30 deg) FA = 199 kN 3

FA = 111 kN

Problem 3.65

[3]

Problem 3.66

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:

Various dam cross-sections Which requires the least concrete; plot cross-section area A as a function of

For each case, the dam width b has to be large enough so that the weight of the dam exerts enough moment to balance the moment due to fluid hydrostatic force(s). By doing a moment balance this value of b can be found a) Rectangular dam Straightforward application of the computing equations of Section 3-5 yields D 1 2 FH = pc A = g w D = g D w 2 2
3 Ixx w D D 2 y' = yc + = + = D A yc 2 3 D 12 w D 2

so Also

y = D y' =

D 3

m = cement g b D w = SG g b D w

Taking moments about O

M0. = 0 = FH y + 2 m g
b

so

1 g D2 w D = b ( SG g b D w) 2 3 2
b= D 3 SG D
2

Solving for b

The minimum rectangular cross-section area is

A = b D =
2

3 SG = D
2

For concrete, from Table A.1, SG = 2.4, so

A =

3 SG

3 2.4

A = 0.373 D

a) Triangular dams Instead of analysing right-triangles, a general analysis is made, at the end of which right triangles are analysed as special cases by setting = 0 or 1. Straightforward application of the computing equations of Section 3-5 yields D 1 2 FH = pc A = g w D = g D w 2 2
3 Ixx w D D 2 y' = yc + = + = D A yc 2 3 D 12 w D 2

so

y = D y' =

D 3 b D 1 w = g b D w 2 2 x = ( b b) + 2 b = b 1 3 3

Also

FV = V g = g

For the two triangular masses 1 m1 = SG g b D w 2 1 m2 = SG g ( 1 ) b D w 2 Taking moments about O x1 = ( b b) + x2 = 2 b ( 1 ) 3 1 2 b = b 1 3 3

M0. = 0 = FH y + FV x + m1 g x1 + m2 g x2
so 1 1 2 D g D w + g b D w b 1 ... 3 2 3 2 1 SG g b D w b 1 2 + 1 SG g ( 1 ) b D w 2 b ( 1 ) + 3 2 2 3 b= =0

Solving for b

(3 ) + SG (2 )
2

For a right triangle with the hypotenuse in contact with the water, = 1, D 3 1 + SG D 3 1 + 2.4 A = b D 2 = 0.238 D
2

and
b = 0.477 D

b=

The cross-section area is

A = 0.238 D

For a right triangle with the vertical in contact with the water, = 0, and

b=

D 2 SG

D 2 2.4

b = 0.456 D

The cross-section area is

A =

b D 2 = 0.228 D 2 D
2

A = 0.228 D

For a general triangle

b D A = = 2

2 D

(3 2) + SG (2 )
2 2

A = 2

(3 2) + 2.4 (2 )

The final result is

A =

2 4.8 + 0.6

From the corresponding Excel workbook, the minimum area occurs at = 0.3 Amin = D
2

A = 0.226 D
2

2 4.8 + 0.6 0.3 0.3

The final results are that a triangular cross-section with = 0.3 uses the least concrete; the next best is a right triangle with the vertical in contact with the water; next is the right triangle with the hypotenuse in contact with the water; and the cross-section requiring the most concrete is the rectangular cross-section.

Solution:
The triangular cross-sections are considered in this workbook

2 The dimensionless area, A /D , is plotted

Dimensionless Area A /D 2

0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0

A /D

0.2282 0.2270 0.2263 0.2261 0.2263 0.2270 0.2282 0.2299 0.2321 0.2349 0.2384

Dam Cross Section vs Coefficient


0.240 0.238 0.236 0.234 0.232 0.230 0.228 0.226

Solver can be used to find the minimum area 0.30 A /D


2

0.224 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0

Coefficient

0.2261

Problem 3.67

[3]

Mg y y F1 F2
Given: Find:
Block hinged and floating SG of the wood

Solution:
Basic equation Computing equations dp = g dh FR = pc A Mz = 0 Ixx y' = yc + A yc

Assumptions: static fluid; = constant; patm on other side; no friction in hinge For incompressible fluid p = g h where p is gage pressure and h is measured downwards

The force on the vertical section is the same as that on a rectangle of height d and width L Hence The location of this force is d g L d F1 = pc A = g yc A = g d L = 2 2 3 Ixx 1 d L d 2 2 y' = yc + = + = d 12 L d d A yc 2 3
2

The force on the horizontal section is due to constant pressure, and is at the centroid F2 = p ( y = d ) A = g d L L Summing moments about the hinge Hence L L Mhinge = 0 = F1 ( d y') F2 + M g 2 2 F 1 d 2 3
4

L 3 L d + F2 = SG L g 2 2
2

SG g L g L d d 2 L = + g d L 2 2 3 2 1 d d SG = + 3 L L SG = 1 0.5 0.5 + 3 1 1
3 3

SG = 0.542

Problem 3.68

[2]

Given: Find:

Geometry of dam Vertical force on dam

Solution:
Basic equation dp = g dh

Assumptions: static fluid; = constant For incompressible fluid p = patm + g h where h is measured downwards from the free surface

The force on each horizontal section (depth d = 1 ft and width w = 10 ft) is F = p A = patm + g h d w Hence the total force is FT = patm + patm + g h + patm + g 2 h + patm + 3 g h + patm + g 4 h d w

) ( )
lbf in
2

) (

) (

where we have used h as the height of the steps FT = d w 5 patm + 10 g h FT = 1 ft 10 ft 5 14.7

2 2 slug ft lbf s + 10 1.94 3 32.2 2 1 ft slug ft 1 ft ft s

12 in

FT = 1.12 10 lbf

Problem 3.69

[2]

Given: Find:

Geometry of dam Vertical force on dam

Solution:
Basic equation dp = g dh

Assumptions: static fluid; = constant; since we are asked for the force of water, we use gage pressures For incompressible fluid p = g h where p is gage pressure and h is measured downwards from the free surface

The force on each horizontal section (depth d and width w) is F = p A = g h d w Hence the total force is (allowing for the fact that some faces experience an upwards (negative) force) FT = p A = g h d w = g d h w Starting with the top and working downwards kg m
3

FT = 1000

9.81

m s
2

1 m [ ( 1 m 4 m ) + ( 2 m 2 m ) ( 3 m 2 m ) ( 4 m 4 m ) ]

Ns kg m

FT = 137 kN The negative sign indicates a net upwards force (it's actually a buoyancy effect on the three middle sections)

Problem 3.70

[3] Part 1/2

Problem 3.70

[3] Part 2/2

Problem 3.71

[3] Part 1/2

Problem 3.71

[3] Part 2/2

Problem 3.72

[2]

Problem 3.73

[2]

Problem 3.74

[2]

Problem 3.75

[3]

Problem 3.76

[4]

Given: Find:

Gate geometry Force on stop B

Solution:
Basic equations dp = g dh MA = 0

x D FV A R FB WGate

y R/2 W1 FH y

4R/3

W2 x Weights for computing FV

F1
Assumptions: static fluid; = constant; patm on other side p = g h

For incompressible fluid

where p is gage pressure and h is measured downwards

We need to compute force (including location) due to water on curved surface and underneath. For curved surface we could integrate pressure, but here we use the concepts that FV (see sketch) is equivalent to the weight of fluid above, and FH is equivalent to the force on a vertical flat plate. Note that the sketch only shows forces that will be used to compute the moment at A FV = W1 W2 N s W1 = g w D R = 1000 9.81 3 m 4.5 m 3 m 3 2 kg m m s kg m W2 = g w R kg m 2 N s = 1000 9.81 3 m ( 3 m) 3 2 4 kg m 4 m s FV = 189 kN W1 R W2 4 R Fv 2 Fv 3
2 2 2

For FV

with

W1 = 397 kN

W2 = 208 kN

FV = W1 W2 R 4 R FV x = W1 W2 2 3 x = 397 189

with x given by

or

x=

3 m 208 4 3 m 2 189 3 FH = pc A

x = 1.75 m Ixx y' = yc + A yc

For FH

Computing equations

Hence

R FH = pc A = g D w R 2 FH = 1000 kg m
3

9.81

m s
2

4.5 m

3 m N s 3 m 3 m kg m 2

FH = 265 kN

The location of this force is


3 2 Ixx w R 1 R R R y' = yc + = D + = D + 12 A yc 2 2 R R 12 D w R D 2 2

y' = 4.5 m

3 m + 2

( 3 m)

12 4.5 m

3 m 2

y' = 3.25 m

The force F1 on the bottom of the gate is F1 = p A = g D w R F1 = 1000 kg m


3

9.81

m s
2

4.5 m 3 m 3 m

N s kg m

F1 = 397 kN

For the concrete gate (SG = 2.4 from Table A.2)


2 2

WGate = SG g w

R kg m 2 N s = 2.4 1000 9.81 3 m ( 3 m) 3 2 4 kg m 4 m s R 4 R WGate FV x FH [ y' ( D R) ] = 0 2 3

WGate = 499 kN

Hence, taking moments about A

FB R + F1

FB =

4 x [ y' ( D R) ] 1 WGate + FV + FH F1 3 R R 2 4 1.75 [ 3.25 ( 4.5 3) ] 1 499 kN + 189 kN + 265 kN 397 kN 3 3 3 2

FB =

FB = 278 kN

Problem 3.77

[3]

Problem 3.78

[3]

Problem 3.79

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:

Sphere with different fluids on each side Resultant force and direction

The horizontal and vertical forces due to each fluid are treated separately. For each, the horizontal force is equivalent to that on a vertical flat plate; the vertical force is equivalent to the weight of fluid "above". For horizontal forces, the computing equation of Section 3-5 is FH = pc A where A is the area of the equivalent vertical plate. For vertical forces, the computing equation of Section 3-5 is FV = g V where V is the volume of fluid above the curved surface. The data is For water For the fluids For the weir (a) Horizontal Forces For fluid 1 (on the left) D 1 2 FH1 = pc A = 1 g D L = SG1 g D L 2 2 FH1 = 1 kg m N s 2 1.6 999 9.81 ( 3 m ) 6 m 3 2 kg m 2 m s
2

= 999

kg m
3

SG1 = 1.6 D = 3 m

SG2 = 0.8 L = 6 m

FH1 = 423 kN

For fluid 2 (on the right)

D D 1 2 FH2 = pc A = 2 g L = SG2 g D L 4 2 8 FH2 = 1 8 0.8 999 kg m


3

9.81

m s
2

( 3 m) 6 m

N s kg m

FH2 = 52.9 kN

The resultant horizontal force is (b) Vertical forces

FH = FH1 FH2

FH = 370 kN

For the left geometry, a "thought experiment" is needed to obtain surfaces with fluid "above"

Hence

FV1 = SG1 g

D 4

2 kg m
3

L ( 3 m) N s 6 m 8 kg m
2 2

FV1 = 1.6 999 (Note: Use of buoyancy leads to the same result!) For the right side, using a similar logic

9.81

m s
2

FV1 = 333 kN

FV2 = SG2 g

D 4

FV2 = 0.8 999

kg m
3

9.81

m s
2

( 3 m) N s 6 m 16 kg m

FV2 = 83.1 kN

The resultant vertical force is

FV = FV1 + FV2

FV = 416 kN

Finally the resultant force and direction can be computed F = FH + FV


2 2

F = 557 kN = 48.3 deg

= atan

FV FH

Problem 3.80

[3]

Problem 3.81

[3] Part 1/2

Problem 3.81

[3] Part 2/2

Problem 3.82

[3] Part 1/3

Problem 3.82

[3] Part 2/3

Problem 3.82

[3] Part 3/3

Problem 3.83

[3]

Problem 3.84

[4] Part 1/2

Problem 3.84

[4] Part 2/2

Problem 3.85

[4] Part 1/2

Problem 3.85

[4] Part 2/2

Problem 3.86

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:

Geometry of glass observation room Resultant force and direction

The x, y and z components of force due to the fluid are treated separately. For the x, y components, the horizontal force is equivalent to that on a vertical flat plate; for the z component, (vertical force) the force is equivalent to the weight of fluid above. For horizontal forces, the computing equation of Section 3-5 is FH = pc A where A is the area of the equivalent vertical plate. For the vertical force, the computing equation of Section 3-5 is FV = g V where V is the volume of fluid above the curved surface. The data is For water For the fluid (Table A.2) For the aquarium (a) Horizontal Forces Consider the x component The center of pressure of the glass is yc = H 4 R 3 yc = 9.36 m = 999 kg m
3

SG = 1.025 R = 1.5 m H = 10 m

Hence

R FHx = pc A = SG g yc 4

FHx = 1.025 999

kg m
3

9.81

m s
2

9.36 m

( 1.5 m) N s 4 kg m

FHx = 166 kN

The y component is of the same magnitude as the x component FHy = FHx The resultant horizontal force (at 45o to the x and y axes) is
2 2

FHy = 166 kN

FH =

FHx + FHy

FH = 235 kN

(b) Vertical forces The vertical force is equal to the weight of fluid above (a volume defined by a rectangular column minus a segment of a sphere)
2 4 R 3
3

The volume is

V =

R H 4

V = 15.9 m

3 2

Then

FV = SG g V

FV = 1.025 999

kg m
3

9.81

m s
2

15.9 m

N s kg m

FV = 160 kN

Finally the resultant force and direction can be computed F = FH + FV


2 2

F = 284 kN

= atan

FV FH

= 34.2 deg

Note that is the angle the resultant force makes with the horizontal

Problem *3.87

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Data on sphere and weight SG of sphere; equilibrium position when freely floating
T FB

F B = g V where

and

Fz = 0 M = 10 kg

Fz = 0 = T + FB W F B = g SG = 1 M + V 2 SG = 0.9 V 2 W = SG g V

T = M g

Hence

M g + g

V SG g V = 0 2 m 1000 kg
3

SG = 10 kg

1 0.025 m
3

1 2

The specific weight is

Weight SG g V = = SG g Volume V

= 0.9 1000

kg m
3

9.81

m s
2

N s kg m

= 8829

N m
3

For the equilibriul position when floating, we repeat the force balance with T = 0 FB W = 0 W = FB with FB = g Vsubmerged
2

From references (trying Googling "partial sphere volume")

h Vsubmerged = ( 3 R h ) 3 3 V R = 4
2 1 3

where h is submerged depth and R is the sphere radius

3 3 R = 0.025 m 4
2

1 3

R = 0.181 m

Hence

h W = SG g V = FB = g ( 3 R h ) 3 h ( 3 0.181 m h ) =
2

h ( 3 R h ) =

3 SG V

3 0.9 .025 m

h ( 0.544 h ) = 0.0215

This is a cubic equation for h. We can keep guessing h values, manually iterate, or use Excel's Goal Seek to find

h = 0.292 m

Problem 3.88

[2]

Problem *3.89

[2]

Problem *3.90

[2]

Problem *3.91

[2]

Problem *3.92

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


The data is

Geometry of steel cylinder Volume of water displaced; number of 1 kg wts to make it sink

For water For steel (Table A.1) For the cylinder

= 999

kg m
3

SG = 7.83 D = 100 mm Vsteel = H = 1 m + D H = 1 mm


4 3

The volume of the cylinder is The weight of the cylinder is

D 2 4

Vsteel = 3.22 10

W = SG g Vsteel W = 7.83 999 kg m


3

9.81

m s
2

3.22 10

N s kg m

W = 24.7 N

At equilibium, the weight of fluid displaced is equal to the weight of the cylinder Wdisplaced = g Vdisplaced = W W m s kg m Vdisplaced = = 24.7 N 2 999 kg 9.81 m g N s
3 2

Vdisplaced = 2.52 L

To determine how many 1 kg wts will make it sink, we first need to find the extra volume that will need to be dsiplaced Distance cylinder sank x1 = Vdisplaced x1 = 0.321 m

D2 4

Hence, the cylinder must be made to sink an additional distance D x2 4


2

x2 = H x1

x2 = 0.679 m

We deed to add n weights so that

1 kg n g = g
2

2 D x2 kg 1 N s 2 n = = 999 ( 0.1 m ) 0.679 m 3 4 4 1 kg 1 kg kg m m

n = 5.33

Hence we need n = 6 weights to sink the cylinder

Problem *3.93

[2]

V y

FB

FD

W = Mg

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Data on hydrogen bubbles Buoyancy force on bubble; terminal speed in water

FB = g V = g FB = 1.94 slug ft
3

3 d 6 ft s
2

and

Fy = M ay
3

Fy = 0 = FB FD W
2

for terminal speed


11

32.2

1 ft lbf s 0.001 in slug ft 6 12 in

FB = 1.89 10

lbf

For terminal speed

FB FD W = 0

FD = 3 V d = FB

where we have ignored W, the weight of the bubble (at STP most gases are about 1/1000 the density of water)
5 lbf s 2

Hence

V =

FB 3 d
11

with

= 2.10 10
2

from Table A.7 at 68oF

ft

V = 1.89 10

lbf

1 1 ft 1 12 in 3 2.10 10 5 lbf s 0.001 in 1 ft V = 0.825 in min

V = 1.15 10

3 ft

As noted by Professor Kline in the film "Flow Visualization", bubbles rise slowly!

Problem *3.94

[2]

Gas bubbles are released from the regulator of a submerged scuba diver. What happens to the bubbles as they rise through the seawater? Explain.

Open-Ended Problem Statement: Gas bubbles are released from the regulator of a submerged Scuba diver. What happens to the bubbles as they rise through the seawater? Discussion: Air bubbles released by a submerged diver should be close to ambient pressure at the depth where the diver is swimming. The bubbles are small compared to the depth of submersion, so each bubble is exposed to essentially constant pressure. Therefore the released bubbles are nearly spherical in shape. The air bubbles are buoyant in water, so they begin to rise toward the surface. The bubbles are quite light, so they reach terminal speed quickly. At low speeds the spherical shape should be maintained. At higher speeds the bubble shape may be distorted. As the bubbles rise through the water toward the surface, the hydrostatic pressure decreases. Therefore the bubbles expand as they rise. As the bubbles grow larger, one would expect the tendency for distorted bubble shape to be exaggerated.

Problem *3.86

Problem *3.95

[2]

Problem *3.96

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Data on hot air balloon Volume of balloon for neutral buoyancy; additional volume for initial acceleration of 0.8 m/s2.

FB = atm g V

and

Fy = M ay

Hence

Fy = 0 = FB Whotair Wload = atm g V hotair g V M g V = M = atm hotair M patm R Tatm patm R Thotair
2

for neutral buoyancy

M R patm

1 1 T Thotair atm
1 1 V = 2027 m
3

N m 1 m V = 450 kg 286.9 3 N kg K 101 10 Initial acceleration Solving for Vnew

1 1 ( 9 + 273) K ( 70 + 273) K

Fy = FB Whotair Wload = atm hotair g Vnew M g = Maccel a = M + 2 hotair Vnew a

(atm hotair) g Vnew M g = (M + 2 hotair Vnew) a ( )

a M 1 + R M g + M a g Vnew = = 1 2 a atm hotair g 2 hotair a 1 patm T Thotair Thotair g atm Vnew = 450 kg 1 +

0.8 N m 1 m 286.9 9.81 kg K 101 103 N Hence

1 K 1 0.8 1 2 9 + 273 70 + 273 70 + 273 9.81


3

V = Vnew V V = 6884 m To make the balloon move up or down during flight, the air needs to be heated to a higher temperature, or let cool (or let in ambient air).

Vnew = 8911 m

Problem *3.97

[4]

Problem *3.98

[3]

Problem 3.99

[3]

NEW PROBLEM STATEMENT NEEDED NOTE: Cross section is 25 cm2

Given: Find:

Geometry of block and rod Angle for equilibrium

(L + c)/2

L/2 c

Solution:
Basic equations MHinge = 0 FB = g V (Buoyancy)

FBR FBB WR L WB

The free body diagram is as shown. FBB and FBR are the buoyancy of the block and rod, respectively; c is the (unknown) exposed length of the rod

Taking moments about the hinge

( WB FBB) L cos() FBR


with WB = MB g

( L + c) L cos ( ) + WR cos ( ) = 0 2 2 FBR = g ( L c) A ( L + c) L + MR = 0 2 2 WR = MR g

FBB = g VB

Combining equations

(MB VB) L A (L c)
A L c

We can solve for c

) = 2 MB VB + 1 MR L

c=

2 L 1 MB VB + MR A 2
3 2

c =

( 5 m) 2 5 m

m 1 1 100 cm kg 3 1 30 kg 1000 3 0.025 m + 1.25 kg 2 1 m 1000 kg 25 2 cm m

c = 1.58 m a c a = asin c

Then

sin ( ) =

with

a = 0.25 m

= 9.1 deg

Problem *3.100

[3]

Problem 3.101

[2]

Given: Find:

Geometry of rod How much of rod is submerged; force to lift rod out of water

(L + c)/2

L/2 c

Solution:
Basic equations MHinge = 0 F B = g V (Buoyancy)

FBR WR L

The free body diagram is as shown. FBR is the buoyancy of the rod; c is the (unknown) exposed length of the rod

Taking moments about the hinge ( L + c) L cos ( ) + WR cos ( ) = 0 2 2 WR = MR g

FBR with

FBR = g ( L c) A

Hence

A ( L c)

( L + c) L + MR = 0 2 2

We can solve for c

A L c

) = MR L

c =

L MR A m 1 1 100 cm 1.25 kg 2 1 m 1000 kg 25 cm


3 2

c =

( 5 m ) 5 m

c = 4.74 m

Then the submerged length is

L c = 0.257 m

To lift the rod out of the water requires a force equal to half the rod weight (the reaction also takes half the weight) N s F = MR g = 1.25 kg 9.81 2 kg m 2 2 s 1 1 m
2

F = 6.1 N

Problem *3.102

[4]

Problem *3.103
FB H = 2 ft W

[2]

h = 1 in.

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Data on river Largest diameter of log that will be transported

FB = g Vsub

and

Fy = 0

Fy = 0 = FB W

where

FB = g Vsub = g Asub L

W = SG g V = SG g A L R ( sin( ) ) 2
2

From references (trying Googling "segment of a circle")

Asub =

where R is the radius and is the included angle

Hence

R 2 ( sin( ) ) L = SG g R L 2

sin( ) = 2 SG = 2 0.8

This equation can be solved by manually iterating, or by using a good calculator, or by using Excel's Goal Seek = 239 deg R + R cos

From geometry the submerged amount of a log is H h H h = R + R cos

and also

Hence

2 1 ft 12 R = 239 1 + cos 180 deg 2


R = 1.28 ft

Solving for R

R =

Hh

1 + cos 180deg

D = 2 R

D = 2.57 ft

Problem *3.104

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equations

Data on sphere and tank bottom Expression for SG of sphere at which it will float to surface; minimum SG to remain in position

FU

FB

F B = g V

and

Fy = 0

Fy = 0 = FL FU + FB W

FL
where FL = patm a
2

FU = patm + g ( H 2 R) a 4 3 2 R a 2 R 3

FB = g Vnet

Vnet =

W = SG g V

with

V =

4 3 R 3

Note that we treat the sphere as a sphere with SG, and for fluid effects a sphere minus a cylinder (buoyancy) and cylinder with hydrostatic pressures 4 4 2 2 3 2 3 patm a patm + g ( H 2 R) a + g R 2 R a SG g R = 0 3 3 SG = 4 2 3 2 g ( H 2 R) a + g R 2 R a 3 4 g R 3
3

Hence

Solving for SG

SG = 1

3 H a 4 R3 3 4

SG = 1

2.5 ft 0.075 in

1 ft 1 12 in 12 in 1 in 1 ft

SG = 0.873

This is the minimum SG to remain submerged; any SG above this and the sphere remains on the bottom; any SG less than this and the sphere rises to the surface

Problem *3.105

[4]

Problem *3.106

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equations

Data on boat Effective density of water/air bubble mix if boat sinks

Floating H = 8 ft

Sinking

h = 7 ft
F B = g V and Fy = 0

We can apply the sum of forces for the "floating" free body Fy = 0 = FB W where FB = SGsea g Vsubfloat

= 60o

Vsubfloat = SGsea g L h W= tan( )


2

1 2 h L h h L = tan( ) 2 tan

SGsea = 1.024

(Table A.2)

Hence

(1)

We can apply the sum of forces for the "sinking" free body Fy = 0 = FB W SGmix g L H W= tan( )
2

where

FB = SGmix g Vsub

Vsubsink =

1 2 H L H H L = tan( ) 2 tan

Hence

(2)

Comparing Eqs. 1 and 2

SGsea g L h SGmix g L H W= = tan( ) tan( ) h SGmix = SGsea H


2

7 SGmix = 1.024 8

SGmix = 0.784 slug ft


3

The density is

mix = SGmix

mix = 0.784 1.94

slug ft
3

mix = 1.52

Problem *3.107
FB

[2]

F 7 in.

D = 4 in. 1 in. W

3 in.

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Data on inverted bowl and BXYB fluid Force to hold in place

F B = g V

and

Fy = 0

Fy = 0 = FB F W

Hence

F = FB W FB = SGBXYB g Vsub W = SGbowl g Vbowl F = SGBXYB g Vbowl + Vair SGbowl g Vbowl F = g SGBXYB Vbowl + Vair SGbowl Vbowl slug ft F = 34.2 lbf
3

For the buoyancy force

with

Vsub = Vbowl + Vair

For the weight

Hence

F = 1.94

32.2

ft s
2

15.6 56 in + ( 3 1) in

2 3 2 ( 4 in) 1 ft lbf s 5.7 56 in3 4 12 in slug ft

Problem *3.108

[4]

Consider a conical funnel held upside down and submerged slowly in a container of water. Discuss the force needed to submerge the funnel if the spout is open to the atmosphere. Compare with the force needed to submerge the funnel when the spout opening is blocked by a rubber stopper.
Open-Ended Problem Statement: Consider a conical funnel held upside down and submerged slowly in a container of water. Discuss the force needed to submerge the funnel if the spout is open to the atmosphere. Compare with the force needed to submerge the funnel when the spout opening is blocked by a rubber stopper. Discussion: Let the weight of the funnel in air be Wa. Assume the funnel is held with its spout vertical and the conical section down. Then Wa will also be vertical. Two possible cases are with the funnel spout open to atmosphere or with the funnel spout sealed. With the funnel spout open to atmosphere, the pressures inside and outside the funnel are equal, so no net pressure force acts on the funnel. The force needed to support the funnel will remain constant until it first contacts the water. Then a buoyancy force will act vertically upward on every element of volume located beneath the water surface. The first contact of the funnel with the water will be at the widest part of the conical section. The buoyancy force will be caused by the volume formed by the funnel thickness and diameter as it begins to enter the water. The buoyancy force will reduce the force needed to support the funnel. The buoyancy force will increase as the depth of submergence of the funnel increases until the funnel is fully submerged. At that point the buoyancy force will be constant and equal to the weight of water displaced by the volume of the material from which the funnel is made. If the funnel material is less dense than water, it would tend to float partially submerged in the water. The force needed to support the funnel would decrease to zero and then become negative (i.e., down) to fully submerge the funnel. If the funnel material were denser than water it would not tend to float even when fully submerged. The force needed to support the funnel would decrease to a minimum when the funnel became fully submerged, and then would remain constant at deeper submersion depths. With the funnel spout sealed, air will be trapped inside the funnel. As the funnel is submerged gradually below the water surface, it will displace a volume equal to the volume of the funnel material plus the volume of trapped air. Thus its buoyancy force will be much larger than when the spout is open to atmosphere. Neglecting any change in air volume (pressures caused by submersion should be small compared to atmospheric pressure) the buoyancy force would be from the entire volume encompassed by the outside of the funnel. Finally, when fully submerged, the volume of the rubber stopper (although small) will also contribute to the total buoyancy force acting on the funnel.

Problem *3.109

[4]

In the Cartesian diver childs toy, a miniature diver is immersed in a column of liquid. When a diaphragm at the top of the column is pushed down, the diver sinks to the bottom. When the diaphragm is released, the diver again rises. Explain how the toy might work.

Open-Ended Problem Statement: In the Cartesian diver child's toy, a miniature diver is immersed in a column of liquid. When a diaphragm at the top of the column is pushed down, the diver sinks to the bottom. When the diaphragm is released, the diver again rises. Explain how the toy might work. Discussion: A possible scenario is for the toy to have a flexible bladder that contains air. Pushing down on the diaphragm at the top of the liquid column would increase the pressure at any point in the liquid. The air in the bladder would be compressed slightly as a result. The volume of the bladder, and therefore its buoyancy, would decrease, causing the diver to sink to the bottom of the liquid column. Releasing the diaphragm would reduce the pressure in the water column. This would allow the bladder to expand again, increasing its volume and therefore the buoyancy of the diver. The increased buoyancy would permit the diver to rise to the top of the liquid column and float in a stable, partially submerged position, on the surface of the liquid.

Problem *3.110

[4]

A proposed ocean salvage scheme involves pumping air into bags placed within and around a wrecked vessel on the sea bottom. Comment on the practicality of this plan, supporting your conclusions with analyses.

Open-Ended Problem Statement: A proposed ocean salvage scheme involves pumping air into bags placed within and around a wrecked vessel on the sea bottom. Comment on the practicality of this plan, supporting your conclusions with analyses. Discussion: This plan has several problems that render it impractical. First, pressures at the sea bottom are very high. For example, Titanic was found in about 12,000 ft of seawater. The corresponding pressure is nearly 6,000 psi. Compressing air to this pressure is possible, but would require a multi-stage compressor and very high power. Second, it would be necessary to manage the buoyancy force after the bag and object are broken loose from the sea bed and begin to rise toward the surface. Ambient pressure would decrease as the bag and artifact rise toward the surface. The air would tend to expand as the pressure decreases, thereby tending to increase the volume of the bag. The buoyancy force acting on the bag is directly proportional to the bag volume, so it would increase as the assembly rises. The bag and artifact thus would tend to accelerate as they approach the sea surface. The assembly could broach the water surface with the possibility of damaging the artifact or the assembly. If the bag were of constant volume, the pressure inside the bag would remain essentially constant at the pressure of the sea floor, e.g., 6,000 psi for Titanic. As the ambient pressure decreases, the pressure differential from inside the bag to the surroundings would increase. Eventually the difference would equal sea floor pressure. This probably would cause the bag to rupture. If the bag permitted some expansion, a control scheme would be needed to vent air from the bag during the trip to the surface to maintain a constant buoyancy force just slightly larger than the weight of the artifact in water. Then the trip to the surface could be completed at low speed without danger of broaching the surface or damaging the artifact.

Problem *3.111

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Steel balls resting in floating plastic shell in a bucket of water What happens to water level when balls are dropped in water Basic equation FB = Vdisp g = W for a floating body weight W

When the balls are in the plastic shell, the shell and balls displace a volume of water equal to their own weight - a large volume because the balls are dense. When the balls are removed from the shell and dropped in the water, the shell now displaces only a small volume of water, and the balls sink, displacing only their own volume. Hence the difference in displaced water before and after moving the balls is the difference between the volume of water that is equal to the weight of the balls, and the volume of the balls themselves. The amount of water displaced is significantly reduced, so the water level in the bucket drops. Volume displaced before moving balls: V1 = Wplastic + Wballs g

Volume displaced after moving balls:

V2 =

Wplastic + Vballs g

Change in volume displaced

V = V2 V1 = Vballs

Wballs SGballs g Vballs = Vballs g g

V = Vballs 1 SGballs

Hence initially a large volume is displaced; finally a small volume is displaced (V < 0 because SGballs > 1)

Problem *3.112 3.10

[3]

3.10

Problem *3.113

[2]

Problem *3.114

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


In components

Rectangular container with constant acceleration Slope of free surface Basic equation x y z

p + gx = ax

p + gy = ay

p + gz = az gz = 0 (3)

We have

ay = az = 0 x p + g sin( ) = ax

gx = g sin( ) (1) y p g cos ( ) = 0 (2)

gy = g cos ( ) z p =0

Hence

From Eq. 3 we can simplify from Hence a change in pressure is given by

p = p ( x , y , z) dp = x p dx +

to p dy

p = p ( x , y)

y p dy or x dy = dx y

At the free surface p = const., so

dp = 0 =

p at the free surface p

p dx +

Hence at the free surface, using Eqs 1 and 2 x dy = dx y

p = p

g sin ( ) ax g cos ( )

g sin ( ) ax g cos ( )

9.81 ( 0.5) dy = dx

m s
2

3 m s
2

m s
2

9.81 ( 0.866)

At the free surface, the slope is

dy = 0.224 dx

Problem *3.115

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


In components

Spinning U-tube sealed at one end Maximum angular speed for no cavitation Basic equation V 2 p = ar = = r r r z z r p = g and so
2

p = g

Between D and C, r = constant, so

pD pC = g H pA pB = g H p
pC B L

(1)

Between B and A, r = constant, so

p = g
2

and so

(2)

Between B and C, z = constant, so

p = r
2

and so

2 1 dp = r dr 0

Integrating Since pD = patm, then from Eq 1

2 L pC pB = 2

(3)

pC = patm + g H
2 L pB = pC 2 2

From Eq. 3

so

2 L pB = patm + g H 2 2 L pA = patm 2 2

From Eq. 2

pA = pB g H

so

Thus the minimum pressure occurs at point A (not B) At 68oF from steam tables, the vapor pressure of water is pv = 0.339 psi

Solving for with pA = pv, we obtain

2 patm pv L
2

3 4 1 12 in slugft 2 ( 14.7 0.339) lbf ft = 2 1.94 slug 2 1 ft 2 in ( 3 in) s lbf

1 2

= 185

rad s

= 1764 rpm

Problem *3.116

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Spinning U-tube sealed at one end Pressure at A; water loss due to leak Basic equation

From the analysis of Example Problem 3.10, solving the basic equation, the pressure p at any point (r,z) in a continuous rotating fluid is given by p = p0 + 2 2 r r0 g z z0 2
2

(1)

where p0 is a reference pressure at point (r0,z0) In this case The speed of rotation is The pressure at D is Hence p = pA = 200 rpm pD = 0 kPa
2

p0 = pD

z = zA = zD = z0 = H = 20.9 rad s

r =0

r0 = rD = L

(gage)

L 1 slug rad lbf s 2 2 1 ft pA = L g ( 0) = = 1.94 20.9 ( 3 in) 3 2 2 2 s 12 in slug ft ft pA = 0.18 psi (gage)

( )

2 2

When the leak appears,the water level at A will fall, forcing water out at point D. Once again, from the analysis of Example Problem 3.10, we can use Eq 1 In this case p = pA = 0
2

p0 = pD = 0

z = zA

z0 = zD = H

r=0

r0 = rD = L

Hence

0=

2 L g zA H 2

( )

)
2 2

L 1 rad s 1 ft 2 zA = H = 12in 20.9 ( 3 in) 2 g 32.2 ft 12 in 2 s The amount of water lost is h = H zA = 12 in 6.91 in h = 5.09 in

2 2

zA = 6.91 in

Problem *3.117

[2]

Problem *3.118

[2]

Problem *3.119

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


In components We have Hence

Cubical box with constant acceleration Slope of free surface; pressure along bottom of box Basic equation x p + gx = ax gx = 0 y p + gy = ay gy = g z p + gz = az gz = 0 (3)

ax = ax x

ay = 0 y

az = 0 z p =0

p = SG ax (1)

p = SG g (2)

From Eq. 3 we can simplify from Hence a change in pressure is given by

p = p ( x , y , z) dp = x p dx + x

to p dy y

p = p ( x , y) (4) p dy or dy x = dx y p = p ax 0.25 g = g g

At the free surface p = const., so

dp = 0 =

p dx +

Hence at the free surface

dy = 0.25 dx y= x +C 4

The equation of the free surface is then

and through volume conservation the fluid rise in the rear balances the fluid fall in the front, so at the midpoint the free surface has not moved from the rest position L 1 L = +C 2 4 2 or C= 5 L 8 y= 5 x L 8 4

For size

L = 80 cm at the midpoint x =

L 2

y=

L 2

(box is half filled)

Combining Eqs 1, 2, and 4 5 8

dp = SG ax dx SG g dy x=0 y= L so 5 patm = SG g L + c 8

p = SG ax x SG g y + c

We have

p = patm

when

5 c = patm + SG g L 8

5 5 x p ( x , y) = patm + SG g L ax x g y = patm + SG g L y 4 8 8 5 x kg N s m 5 On the bottom y = 0 so p ( x , 0) = patm + SG g L = 101 + 0.8 1000 9.81 0.8 m 3 kg m 2 8 8 4 m s p ( x , 0) = 105 1.96 x (p in kPa, x in m)
2

x 4

kPa 10 Pa
3

Problem *3.120

[3]

Problem *3.121

[3]

Problem *3.122

[3]

Problem *3.123

[3]

Problem *3.124

[3]

Problem *3.125

[4] Part 1/2

Problem *3.111 cont'd

Problem *3.125

[4] Part 2/2

Problem *3.126

[4]

Problem *3.127
3.120

[4]

Problem 4.1

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:


The given data is

Data on mass and spring Maximum spring compression

M = 3 kg

h = 5 m

k = 400

N m

Apply the First Law of Thermodynamics: for the system consisting of the mass and the spring (the spring has gravitional potential energy and the spring elastic potential energy) Total mechanical energy at initial state E1 = M g h E2 = M g ( x) + 1 2 k x 2

Total mechanical energy at instant of maximum compression x Note: The datum for zero potential is the top of the uncompressed spring But so E1 = E2 M g h = M g ( x) +
2

1 2 k x 2

Solving for x

2 M g 2 M g h x =0 k k M g + k

x=

M g + 2 M g h k k
m

m x = 3 kg 9.81 + 2 400 N s x = 0.934 m

3 kg 9.81 m m + 2 3 kg 9.81 m 5 m m 2 400 N 2 400 N s s

Note that ignoring the loss of potential of the mass due to spring compression x gives x = 2 M g h k x = 0.858 m

Note that the deflection if the mass is dropped from immediately above the spring is x = 2 M g k x = 0.147 m

Problem 4.2

[1]

Problem 4.3

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Data on Boeing 777-200 jet Minimum runway length for takeoff

Fx = M

dV dV = M V = Ft = constant dt dx

Note that the "weight" is already in mass units!

Separating variables

M V dV = Ft dx x= M V 2 Ft
2

Integrating

x =

1 km 1 km 1 hr 1 1 N s 3 325 10 kg 225 3 N kg m 2 hr 1000 m 3600 s 2 425 10 dV = Ft M dt

x = 747 m

For time calculation

dV = Ft dt M V Ft
3

Integrating

t=

t = 325 10 kg 225

1 km km 1 hr 1 1 N s hr 1000 m 3600 s 2 425 103 N kg m

t = 23.9 s

Aerodynamic and rolling resistances would significantly increase both these results

Problem 4.5

Problem 4.4

[2]

Problem 4.4

Problem 4.5

[2]

Problem 4.6

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Data on air compression process Internal energy change

Q W = dE

Assumptions: 1) Adiabatic so Q = 0 2) Stationary system dE =dU 3) Frictionless process W = pdV = Mpdv Then dU = W = M p dv

Before integrating we need to relate p and v. An adiabatic frictionless (reversible) process is isentropic, which for an ideal gas gives cp k where p v = C k= cv
1 1 k k 1 k 1 1 1 k

Hence

v = C p

and

dv = C p k
1 k 1 1 1 k 1 k

dp

Substituting

du =

dU = p dv = p C p M k

dp =

C p k

1 k

dp

Integrating between states 1 and 2

C u = p2 k1
1 k k1 k

1 k

k1 k

p1

k1 k

C p1 k1

1 k

k1 k

k1 k p2 1 p1

But

C p

= C p

1 1 k k

p = p v = Rair T

Hence

k1 k Rair T1 p2 u = 1 k1 p1

From Table A.6

Rair = 53.33

ft lbf lbm R

and

k = 1.4

1.41 1.4 1 ft lbf 3 u = 53.33 ( 68 + 460) R 1 0.4 lbm R 1

u = 2.6 10

4 ft lbf

lbm

u = 33.4

Btu lbm

u = 1073

Btu slug

(Using conversions from Table G.2)

Problem 4.7

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on cooling of a can of soda in a refrigerator How long it takes to warm up in a room

The First Law of Thermodynamics for the can (either warming or cooling) is M c dT = k T Tamb dt

or

dT = A T Tamb dt

where

A =

k M c

where M is the can mass, c is the average specific heat of the can and its contents, T is the temperature, and Tamb is the ambient temperature Separating variables dT = A dt T Tamb T ( t) = Tamb + Tinit Tamb e

Integrating

At

where Tinit is the initial temperature. The available data from the coolling can now be used to obtain a value for constant A Given data for cooling Tinit = ( 25 + 273) K T = ( 10 + 273) K Tinit = 298 K T = 283 K Tamb = ( 5 + 273) K when Tamb = 278 K t = = 10 hr
4 1

Hence

A =

1 hr 1 Tinit Tamb 1 298 278 ln ln = T Tamb 3 hr 3600 s 283 278

A = 1.284 10

Then, for the warming up process Tinit = ( 10 + 273) K Tend = ( 15 + 273) K with Tend = Tamb + Tinit Tamb e 1 A Tinit = 283 K Tend = 288 K Tamb = ( 20 + 273) K Tamb = 293 K

Hence the time is

ln

Tinit Tamb s 283 293 ln = 4 288 293 Tend Tamb 1.284 10

= 5.40 10 s

= 1.50 hr

Problem 4.8

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Data on heat loss from persons, and people-filled auditorium Internal energy change of air and of system; air temperature rise

Q W = E

Assumptions: 1) Stationary system dE =dU 2) No work W = 0 Then for the air For the air and people U = Q = 85 W 60 s 6000 people 15 min person min U = 459 MJ

U = Qsurroundings = 0

The increase in air energy is equal and opposite to the loss in people energy For the air Hence From Table A.6 U = Q T = but for air (an ideal gas) U = M cv T with M = V = p V Rair T

Rair Q T Q = M cv cv p V J and Rair = 286.9 kg K T = 286.9 717.4 459 10 J ( 20 + 273) K


6

J cv = 717.4 kg K m 1 1 3 N 5 3 101 10 3.5 10 m T K = 6.09 15 min hr 1


2

T = 1.521 K

This is the temperature change in 15 min. The rate of change is then

Problem 4.9

[3] Part 1/2

Problem 4.9

[3] Part 2/2

Problem 4.10

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on velocity field and control volume geometry Several surface integrals

r dA1 = wdz + wdyk j


r dA2 = wdz j r V = az + bk j

r dA1 = dz + dyk j
r dA2 = dz j

) )( )

r V = 10 z + 5k j

(a)

r V dA1 = 10 z + 5k dz + dyk = 10 zdz + 5dy j j

(b)

A1

1 1 r 1 1 V dA1 = 10 zdz + 5dy = 5 z 2 + 5 y 0 = 0

(c)

r V dA2 = 10 z + 5k dz = 10 zdz j j r r V V dA2 = 10 z + 5k 10 zdz j

)( ) )

(d)

) (

(e)

(
A2

r r V V dA2 =

) (10 zj + 5k )10 zdz = 100 z 3


1 0

1 3 0

+ 25 z 2 k = 33.3 + 25k j j
0

Problem 4.11

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Geometry of 3D surface Volume flow rate and momentum flux through area
r dA = dxdz + dxdyk j

r V = axi by j

r j V = xi y

We will need the equation of the surface: z = 3

1 y or y = 6 2 z 2

a)

Volume flow rate

r Q = V dA = xi y dxdz + dxdyk j j
A A 10 3 3 3

)(

)
3 0

2 ydzdx = 10 ydz = 10(6 2 z )dz = 60 z + 10 z 0 0 0 0

Q = ( 180 + 90 )

ft 3 s

Q = 90
b) Momentum flux

ft 3 s

V V dA = xi y ( ydxdz ) j
A A

r r

= ( xy )dzdxi + 10 y 2dz j
0 0 10 3 0 3

10 3

= xdx (6 2 z )dzi + 10(6 2 z )2 dz j


0 0 2 10 0 3 6 z z 2 3 i + 10 36 z 12 z 2 + 4 z 3 j 0 3 0 0 + (10(108 108 + 36)) = ( 50 )(18 9 )i j

x = 2

= 450 i + 360 j

slug ft s if is in slug s ft 3

Problem 4.12

Problem 4.12

[2]

Problem 4.13

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Geometry of 3D surface Surface integrals

r dA = dydzi dxdz j r V = axi + by + ck j r V = 2 x i + 2 y + 2. 5k j 3 2 x or x = y 2 3

We will need the equation of the surface: y =

V dA = ( axi + byj + ck ) (dydzi dxdzj )


r
A A

= axdydz bydxdz = a dz Q = ( 6a 6b ) Q = 24 m3 s
0 0 0 0 0

2 3

2 2

2 3 1 3 ydy b dz xdx = 2a y 2 2b x 2 3 2 3 0 4 0 0 0 0

We will again need the equation of the surface: y =

3 2 3 x or x = y , and also dy = dx and a = b 2 3 2

j V (V dA) = ( axi + by + ck )( axi + byj + ck) (dydzi dxdzj ) j = ( axi + by + ck )( axdydz bydxdz ) r r r
A A A

= axi + A = axi + A
2 2

3 3 3 axj + ck ax dxdz a xdxdz 2 2 2 3 axj + ck ( 3axdxdz ) 2


2 2 2 2

9 j = 3 a 2 x 2 dxdzi a 2 x 2 dxdz 3 acxdxdzk 200 0 0 0 0


3 2 x3 2 i (9 ) a 2 x = (6) a 3 3 0 2 2 = 16a i 24a j 12ack 2 j (6 ) ac x 2 0 2

0
2

= 64i 96 j 60k

m4 s2

Problem 4.14
Problem 4.12

[2]

Problem 4.15

[2]

Problem 4.16

[2]

Problem 4.17

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Data on flow through nozzles Average velocity in head feeder; flow rate

( ) = 0 V A
CS

Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow 3) Uniform flow Then for the nozzle flow

( ) = Vfeeder Afeeder + 10 Vnozzle Anozzle = 0 V A


CS

Hence

Vfeeder = Vnozzle Afeeder

10 Anozzle
2

Dnozzle = Vnozzle 10 Dfeeder

1 8 ft Vfeeder = 10 10 s 1
The flow rate is

Vfeeder = 1.56 Dfeeder 4


2 2

ft s

Q = Vfeeder Afeeder = Vfeeder Q = 1.56

ft 1 ft 7.48 gal 60 s 1 in 3 s 4 12 in 1 min 1 ft

Q = 3.82 gpm

Problem 4.18

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Data on flow into and out of tank Time at which exit pump is switched on; time at which drain is opened; flow rate into drain

MCV +

( ) = 0 V A
CS

Assumptions: 1) Uniform flow 2) Incompressible flow After inlet pump is on t MCV +

( ) = Mtank Vin Ain = 0 V A


CS

dh = Vin Ain Mtank = Atank dt

Ain Din dh = Vin = Vin dt Atank Dtank Hence the time to reach hexit = 0.7 m is t texit = hexit
dh dt

where h is the level of water in the tank

hexit Dtank = Vin Din

1 s 3 m texit = 0.7 m 5 m 0.1 m Atank

texit = 126 s

After exit pump is on

MCV +

( V A) = t Mtank Vin Ain + Vexit Aexit = 0

CS 2 2

dh = Vin Ain Vexit Aexit dt

Ain Aexit Din Dexit dh = Vin Vexit = Vin Vexit dt Atank Atank Dtank Dtank tdrain = texit +

Hence the time to reach hdrain = 2 m is

(hdrain hexit)
dh dt

(hdrain hexit)
Din Dexit Vin Vexit Dtank Dtank
2 2

tdrain = 126 s + ( 2 0.7) m 5

1 m 0.08 m m 0.1 m 3 s 3 m s 3 m
2 2

tdrain = 506 s

The flow rate into the drain is equal to the net inflow (the level in the tank is now constant) Qdrain = Vin Din 4
2

Vexit

Dexit 4

Qdrain = 5

m s

( 0.1 m) 3

m s

( 0.08 m)

m Qdrain = 0.0242 s

Problem 4.19
Moist air

[4]

CS

Warm water

Cool water

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Data on flow into and out of cooling tower Volume and mass flow rate of cool water; mass flow rate of moist and dry air

( ) = 0 V A
CS

and at each inlet/exit

Q = V A

Assumptions: 1) Uniform flow 2) Incompressible flow At the cool water exit Qcool = V A mcool = Qcool Qcool = 5.55 mcool = 1.94 ft 2 ( 0.5 ft) s 4 slug ft
3

Qcool = 1.09

ft s

Qcool = 489 gpm


5 lb mcool = 2.45 10 hr

The mass flow rate is

1.09

ft s

slug mcool = 2.11 s

NOTE: Software does not allow dots over terms, so m represents mass flow rate, not mass! For the air flow we need to use to balance the water flow V A = 0

(
CS

We have

mwarm + mcool + mv = 0

mv = mwarm mcool

lb mv = 5073 hr x= mv mair = 1+x 1 + x RH2O Rair

This is the mass flow rate of water vapor. We need to use this to obtain air flow rates. From psychrometrics

where x is the relative humidity. It is also known (try Googling "density of moist air") that

moist dry

We are given

moist = 0.066

lb ft
3

p For dry air we could use the ideal gas equation dry = R T dry = 0.002377 slug ft
3

but here we use atmospheric air density (Table A.3) slug ft


3

dry = 0.002377

32.2

lb slug

dry = 0.0765

lb ft
3

Note that moist air is less dense than dry air!

Hence

0.066 = 0.0765

1+x 1 + x 85.78 53.33

using data from Table A.6

x =

0.0765 0.066 85.78 .0765 0.066 53.33

x = 0.354

Hence

mv =x mair

leads to

mv mair = x mmoist = mv + mair

lb 1 mair = 5073 hr 0.354 lb mmoist = 19404 hr

lb mair = 14331 hr

Finally, the mass flow rate of moist air is

Problem 4.20

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Data on wind tunnel geometry Average speeds in wind tunnel

Q = V A

Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow 3) Uniform flow Between sections 1 and 2 Q = V1 A1 = V1 D 1 4
2

= V2 A2 = V2

D 2 4
2

Hence

D1 V2 = V1 D2 D1 V3 = V1 D3

5 V2 = 20 mph 3 5 V3 = 20 mph 2

V2 = 55.6 mph
2

Similarly

V3 = 125 mph

Problem 4.21

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Data on flow through box Velocity at station 3

( ) = 0 V A
CS

Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow 3) Uniform flow Then for the box V A = V1 A1 + V2 A2 + V3 A3 = 0

( )
CS

Note that the vectors indicate that flow is in at location 1 and out at location 2; we assume outflow at location 3 Hence A1 A2 V3 = V1 V2 A3 A3 Vx = V3 sin( 60 deg) Vy = V3 cos ( 60 deg) ft ft V3 = 4.33 , 2.5 s s V3 = 10 ft 0.5 ft 0.1 20 s 0.6 s 0.6 ft s ft s V3 = 5 ft s

Based on geometry

Vx = 4.33 Vy = 2.5

Problem 4.22

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Data on flow through device Volume flow rate at port 3

( ) = 0 V A
CS

Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow 3) Uniform flow Then for the box V A = V1 A1 + V2 A2 + V3 A3 = V1 A1 + V2 A2 + Q3

( )
CS

Note we assume outflow at port 3 Hence Q3 = V1 A1 V2 A2 Q3 = 3 m m 2 2 0.1 m 10 0.05 m s s Q3 = 0.2 m s


3

The negative sign indicates the flow at port 3 is inwards.

Flow rate at port 3 is 0.2 m3/s inwards

Problem 4.23

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Water needs of farmer Number of 6 in. pipes needed

Q = V A

Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow 3) Uniform flow Then Q = n V D 4


2

where n is the number of pipes, V is the average velocity in the pipes, and D is the pipe diameter Q = 5 acre 0.25 ft 5 acre 0.25 ft 43560 ft 1 hr = 1 acre 1 hr 1 hr 3600 s ft s
3 2 3 2

The flow rate is given by

Data on acres from Googling!

Q = 15.1 Hence n= 4 Q V D
2

n =

s 4 1 ft 15.1 s 10 ft 0.5 ft

n = 7.69

Hence we need at least eight pipes

Problem 4.24

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on filling of gas tank

CS
Cross-section area of tank

Rising level

We can treat this as a steady state problem if we choose a CS as the original volume of gas in the tank, so that additional gas "leaves" the gas as the gas level in the tank rises, OR as an unsteady problem if we choose the CS as the entire gas tank. We choose the latter Basic equation t MCV +

Inflow

( ) = 0 V A
CS

Assumptions: 1) Incompressible flow 2) Uniform flow Hence t dh = MCV = A dt

( ) = Q V A
CS

where Q is the gas fill rate, A is the tank cross-section area, and h is the rate of rise in the gas tank Hence A = Q
dh dt 2

A = 5.3

gal 1 ft 1 min 12 in min 7.48 gal 4.3 in 1 ft


2

Data on gals from Table G.2

A = 1.98 ft

A = 285 in

This seems like a reasonable area e.g., 1 ft x 2 ft

Problem 4.25

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on filling of a sink Accumulation rate under various circumstances

This is an unsteady problem if we choose the CS as the entire sink Basic equation t MCV +

( ) = 0 V A
CS

Assumptions: 1) Incompressible flow Hence t MCV = Accumulationrate=

( ) = Inflow Outflow V A
CS

Accumulationrate= Inflow Outflow For the first case For the second case For the third case Accumulationrate= 5000 Accumulationrate= 5000 units units 60 min 60 hr min hr units units 60 min 13 hr min hr Accumulationrate= 1400 Accumulationrate= 4220 units hr units hr

Outflow = Inflow Accumulationrate Outflow = 5 units units ( 4) s s Outflow = 9 units s

Problem 4.26

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on filling of a basement during a storm Flow rate of storm into basement

This is an unsteady problem if we choose the CS as the entire basement Basic equation t MCV +

( ) = 0 V A
CS

Assumptions: 1) Incompressible flow Hence dh MCV = A = dt t

( ) = Qstorm Qpump V A
CS

or

dh Qstorm = Qpump A dt Qstorm = 10 gal 1 ft 7.48 gal 1 hr 25 ft 20 ft 3 min 60 min 12 hr ft

where A is the basement area and dh/dt is the rate at which the height of water in the basement changes.

Data on gals from Table G.2

Qstorm = 15.2 gpm

Problem 4.27

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Data on flow through device Volume flow rate at port 3

( ) = 0 V A
CS

Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Uniform flow Then for the box V A = u Vu Au + d Vd Ad = 0

(
CS

Hence

Vd Ad u = d Vu Au

u = 4

lb ft
3

10 1 15 0.25

u = 10.7

lb ft
3

Problem 4.28

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Governing equation:

Data on flow through device Velocity V3; plot V3 against time; find when V3 is zero; total mean flow

For incompressible flow (Eq. 4.13) and uniform flow

V dA =

V A = 0

Applying to the device (assuming V3 is out)

V1 A1 V2 A2 + V3 A3 = 0
t 2 m

V3 =

V1 A1 + V2 A2 A3
t 2

10 e =

0.1 m + 2 cos ( 2 t) 0.15 m


2

m 2 0.2 m s

The velocity at A3 is

V3 = 6.67 e

+ 2.67 cos ( 2 t)

The total mean volumetric flow at A3 is

Q = 0

t m 2 2 6.67 e V3 A3 dt = + 2.67 cos ( 2 t) 0.15 dt m 0 s


3

t 1 3 2 Q = lim 2 e + sin ( 2 t) ( 2) = 2 m 5 t

Q = 2 m

The time at which V3 first is zero, and the plot of V3 is shown in the corresponding Excel workbook

t = 2.39 s

t (s) V 3 (m/s) 0.00 0.10 0.20 0.30 0.40 0.50 0.60 0.70 0.80 0.90 1.00 1.10 1.20 1.30 1.40 1.50 1.60 1.70 1.80 1.90 2.00 2.10 2.20 2.30 2.40 2.50 9.33 8.50 6.86 4.91 3.30 2.53 2.78 3.87 5.29 6.41 6.71 6.00 4.48 2.66 1.15 0.48 0.84 2.03 3.53 4.74 5.12 4.49 3.04 1.29 -0.15 -0.76

Exit Velocity vs Time


10 8

V 3 (m/s)

6 4 2 0 0.0 -2 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5

t (s)

The time at which V 3 first becomes zero can be found using Goal Seek t (s) 2.39 V 3 (m/s) 0.00

Problem 4.29

[2]

Problem 4.30

[2]

2h

y x

CS

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Data on flow at inlet and outlet of channel Find umax

V dA = 0
CS

Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow U 2 h w + u ( y) dy = 0 h umax [ h ( h ) ]


h

Evaluating at 1 and 2

2 y umax 1 dy = 2 h U h h 4 umax h = 2 h U 3 umax = 3.75 m s

h 3 h 3 = 2 h U 3 h 2 3 h 2

Hence

umax =

3 3 m U = 2.5 2 2 s

Problem 4.31

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Data on flow at inlet and outlet of pipe Find U

V dA = 0
CS

Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow


2 Evaluating at inlet and exit U R + u ( r ) 2 r dr = 0 0 R

umax R
2

1 2 2 R = R U 2

2 r 2 umax 1 2 r dr = R U R 0 U = 1 u 2 max m s

Hence

1 m U = 3 2 s

U = 1.5

Problem 4.32

[2]

Problem 4.33

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


Governing equation

Velocity distribution in annulus Volume flow rate; average velocity; maximum velocity; plot velocity distribution

For the flow rate (Eq. 4.14a) and average velocity (Eq. 4.14b) p kPa = 10 L m

Q = V dA = 0.1 N s m
2

Vav =

Q A

The given data is

Ro = 5 mm

Ri = 1 mm
2 2

(From Fig. A.2)

Ro p 2 2 Ro Ri u ( r) = R r + ln 4 L o Ri r ln Ro
The flow rate is Q = u ( r) 2 r dr R
i Ro

Considerable mathematical manipulation leads to

2 2 p 2 2 Ro Ri 2 2 Q = R Ri R Ri + Ro 8 L o o ln Ri 2

Substituting values

N m m 3 2 2 Q = 10 10 5 1 2 0.1 N s 8 1000 m m Q = 1.045 10


3 5m

2 52 12 (52 + 12) m 5 1000 ln 1

Q = 10.45

mL s 1 1.045 10
3 5 m 2

Q Q The average velocity is Vav = = 2 2 A R o R i

Vav =

2 2 5 1 m

1000

Vav = 0.139

m s

Ri Ro p The maximum velocity occurs when du d p 2 2 Ro =0= Ro r + ln = 2 r dr 4 L dx 4 L Ri r ln Ro


2 2

R 2 R 2 i o Ri ln r Ro
m s

r =

Ri Ro 2 ln

Ri Ro

r = 2.73 mm

Substituting in u(r)

umax = u ( 2.73 mm) = 0.213

The maximum velocity using Solver instead, and the plot, are also shown in the corresponding Excel workbook

Ro = Ri = p /L = =

5 1 -10 0.1

mm mm kPa/m N.s/m2

r (mm) u (m/s) 1.00 1.25 1.50 1.75 2.00 2.25 2.50 2.75 3.00 3.25 3.50 3.75 4.00 4.25 4.50 4.75 5.00 0.000 0.069 0.120 0.157 0.183 0.201 0.210 0.213 0.210 0.200 0.186 0.166 0.142 0.113 0.079 0.042 0.000

Annular Velocity Distribution


6 5 r (mm) 4 3 2 1 0 0.00 0.05 0.10 u (m/s) 0.15 0.20 0.25

The maximum velocity can be found using Solver r (mm) u (m/s) 2.73 0.213

Problem 4.25

Problem 4.34

[2]

Problem 4.26

Problem 4.35

[2]

Problem 4.27

Problem 4.36

[2]

Problem 4.28

Problem 4.37

[2]

Problem 4.38
CS Outflow

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Data on airflow out of tank Find rate of change of density of air in tank

r r dV + V dA = 0 t CV CS
dtank dt dtank dt exit V A Vtank pexit V A Rair Texit Vtank 1 0.4 m
3

Assumptions: 1) Density in tank is uniform 2) Uniform flow 3) Air is an ideal gas Hence Vtank + exit V A = 0 = =

dtank dt dtank Hence dt

= 300 10
kg

2 m 1 m 1 kg K 1 3 N 2 250 100 mm 2 s 1000 mm 286.9 N m ( 20 + 273) K

= 0.258

The mass in the tank is decreasing, as expected

Problem 4.30

Problem 4.39

[2]

Problem 4.32

Problem 4.40

[2]

Problem 4.31

Problem 4.41

[2]

Problem 4.33

Problem 4.42

[2]

Problem 4.35

Problem 4.43

[2]

Problem 4.44

[3] Part 1/2

Problem 4.44

[3] Part 2/2

Problem 4.45

[3] Part 1/2

Problem 4.45

[3] Part 2/2

Problem 4.38

Problem 4.46

[3]

Problem 4.39

Problem 4.47

[3]

Problem 4.40

Problem 4.48

[3]

Problem 4.41

Problem 4.49
P4.48.

[3]

Problem 4.42

Problem 4.50

[4]

Problem 4.51

[4] Part 1/2

Problem 4.51

[4] Part 2/2

Problem 4.52

[4] Part 1/2

Problem 4.52

[4] Part 2/2

Problem 4.53

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on flow through a control surface Net rate of momentum flux

Basic equation: We need to evaluate

CS

r r VV dA

Assumptions: 1) Uniform flow at each section From Problem 4.21 V1 = 10 ft s A1 = 0.5 ft


2

V2 = 20

ft s

A2 = 0.1 ft

A3 = 0.6 ft

V 3 = 5

ft s

It is an outlet

Then for the control surface

r r r r r r r r r r r VV dA = V1V1 A1 + V2 V2 A2 + V3 V3 A3 CS r r r r r r = V1i V1 A1 + V2 V2 A2 + V3 sin(60 )i V3 cos(60 ) V3 A3 j j = V1i V1 A1 + V2 V2 A2 + V3 sin(60 )i V3 cos(60 ) V3 A3 j j

= V12 A1 + V32 A3 sin(60) i + V22 A2 V32 A3 cos(60) j


65 lbm ft
3

) [

](
4

)
2

Hence the x component is

[ V12 A1 + V32 A3 sin(60)] = [V22 A2 V32 A3 cos(60)] =

10 0.5 + 5 0.6 sin( 60 deg)

) ft2 lbf s
s
4

lbm ft
2

= 2406 lbf

and the y component is

65

lbm ft
3

20 0.1 5 0.6 cos ( 60 deg)

) ft2 lbf s
s

lbm ft

= 2113 lbf

Problem 4.54

[3]

2h

y x

CS

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on flow at inlet and outlet of channel Ratio of outlet to inlet momentum flux

Basic equation: Momentum flux in x direction at a section Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow Evaluating at 1 and 2 mfx1 = U ( U 2 h) w
h

r mf x = uV dA
A

mfx1 = 2 w U h
h

Hence

h 2 2 2 4 y y y 2 2 2 mfx2 = u w dy = w umax 1 dy = w umax 1 2 + dy h h h h h h

4 2 2 2 16 mfx2 = w umax 2 h h + h = w umax h 3 5 15 Then the ratio of momentum fluxes is mfx2 mfx1 16 2 w umax h 15 2 w U h 3 U 2
2

8 umax = 15 U

But, from Problem 4.30

umax =

3 U mfx2 8 2 6 = = = 1.2 mfx1 15 U 5

Hence the momentum increases as it flows in the entrance region of the channel. This appears to contradict common sense, as friction should reduce flow momentum. What happens is the pressure drops significantly along the channel so the net force on the CV is to the right.

Problem 4.55

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on flow at inlet and outlet of pipe Ratio of outlet to inlet momentum flux

Basic equation: Momentum flux in x direction at a section Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow Evaluating at 1 and 2 mfx1 = U U R
R

r mf x = uV dA
A

mfx1 = U R
R

Hence

R 2 r 2 2 2 2 mfx2 = u 2 r dr = 2 umax r 1 dr = 2 umax 0 R 0 2 R2 R2 R2 R = umax2 mfx2 = 2 umax + 2 6 3 2 2 0

3 5 r 2 r + r dy 2 4 R R

Then the ratio of momentum fluxes is mfx2 mfx1 1 2 2 umax R 3 U R


2 2

1 umax = 3 U mfx2 mfx1

But, from Problem 4.31

umax = 2 U

1 2 U 4 = = 1.33 3 U 3

Hence the momentum increases as it flows in the entrance region of the pipe This appears to contradict common sense, as friction should reduce flow momentum. What happens is the pressure drops significantly along the pipe so the net force on the CV is to the right.

Problem 4.48

Problem 4.56

[2]

Problem 4.49

Problem 4.57

[2]

Problem 4.58

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Water jet hitting wall Force generated on wall

CS y U x Rx

Basic equation: Momentum flux in x direction

Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow 3) Atmospheric pressure throughout 4) Uniform flow 5) Water leaves vertically Hence Rx = u1 u1 A1 = U A = U
2 2

2 D

1 ft 2 slug ft 6 lbf s Rx = 1.94 20 3 slug ft 4 s ft

Rx = 16.9 lbf

Problem 4.59

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:

Fully developed flow in pipe Why pressure drops if momentum is constant

Basic equation: Momentum flux in x direction

Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Fully developed flow Hence Fx = p w A s = 0 L p = L w As

where p is the pressure drop over length L, w is the wall friction and As is the pipe surface area The sum of forces in the x direction is zero. The friction force on the fluid is in the negative x direction, so the net pressure force must be in the positive direction. Hence pressure drops in the x direction so that pressure and friction forces balance

Problem 4.60

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


The given data is

Data on flow and system geometry Force required to hold plug

D1 = 0.25 m A1 = A2 = V1 = V2 = D 1 4
2

D2 = 0.2 m

Q = 1.5

m s

p1 = 3500 kPa
2 2

= 999

kg m
3

Then

A1 = 0.0491 m A2 = 0.0177 m V1 = 30.6 V2 = 84.9 m s m s

2 2 D D2 4 1 Q A1 Q A2

Governing equation: Momentum Applying this to the current system F + p1 A2 p2 A2 = 0 + V1 V1 A1 + V2 V2 A2 Hence F = p1 A1 + V1 A1 V2 A2


2 2

(4.18a)

and

p2 = 0

(gage)

F = 3500

kN m
2

0.0491 m + 999

kg m
3

30.6

0.0491 m 84.9
2

2 0.0177 m s 2

F = 90.4 kN

Problem 4.61

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Large tank with nozzle and wire Tension in wire; plot for range of water depths

Basic equation: Momentum flux in x direction for the tank Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow 3) Atmospheric pressure throughout 4) Uniform flow Hence When y = 0.9 m Rx = T = V ( V A) = V A = ( 2 g y) T =
2

d 4

T=
2

1 2 g y d 2

(1)

kg m 2 N s 1000 9.81 0.9 m ( 0.015 m) 3 2 kg m 2 m s


4 3

T = 3.12 N

From Eq 1

T (N)

2 1 0 0.3 0.6 0.9

y (m)
This graph can be plotted in Excel

Problem 4.62
V

[2]

CS

Rx

Given: Find: Solution:

Nozzle hitting stationary cart Value of M to hold stationary; plot M versu

Basic equation: Momentum flux in x direction for the tank Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow 3) Atmospheric pressure throughout 4) Uniform flow 5) Exit velocity is V Hence Rx = M g = V ( V A) + V cos ( ) ( V A) = V A ( cos ( ) 1) M = s kg m 2 1000 10 0.1 m ( 1 cos ( 40 deg) ) 3 9.81 m s m
3000 2000 1000 2 2 2

M =

V A ( 1 cos ( ) ) g

(1)

When = 40o From Eq 1

M = 238 kg

M (kg)

45

90

135

180

Angle (deg)
This graph can be plotted in Excel

Problem 4.63

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Water jet hitting plate with opening Force generated on plate; plot force versus diameter d
V y x

CS

Basic equation: Momentum flux in x direction


Rx

Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow 3) Atmospheric pressure throughout 4) Uniform flow Hence Rx = u1 u1 A1 + u2 u2 A2 = V

2 D

+ V

2 d

Rx =

2 2 2 V D d 1 4 D

(1)

For given data

2 2 2 2 slug ft 1 1 lbf s Rx = 1.94 15 ft 1 3 4 s 3 4 slug ft ft

Rx = 35.7 lbf

From Eq 1 (using the absolute value of Rx)


40

Force (lbf)

30 20 10 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1

Diameter Ratio (d/D)


This graph can be plotted in Excel

Problem 4.64

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Water flowing past cylinder


y V x Rx CS

Horizontal force on cylinder

Basic equation: Momentum flux in x direction

Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow 3) Atmospheric pressure throughout 4) Uniform flow Hence Rx = u1 u1 A1 + u2 u2 A2 = 0 + ( V sin( ) ) ( V a b ) Rx = 1000 kg m
3

V
2

Rx = V a b sin( )
2

For given data

m N s 0.0125 m 0.0025 m sin( 20 deg) kg m s R x = R x

Rx = 0.0962 N Rx = 0.0962 N

This is the force on the fluid (it is to the left). Hence the force on the cylinder is

Problem 4.65

[5]

V x CS

Rx

Given: Find: Solution:

Water flowing into tank Mass flow rates estimated by students. Explain discrepancy

Basic equation: Momentum flux in y direction Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow 3) Atmospheric pressure throughout 4) Uniform flow For the first student m1 = V t slug ft For the second student M m2 = t
3

where m1 represents mass flow rate (software cannot render a dot above it!) 15 ft
3

m1 = 1.94

1 30 s

slug m1 = 0.97 s

lbm m1 = 31.2 s

where m2 represents mass flow rate slug m2 = 0.995 s lbm m2 = 32 s

1 m2 = 960 lb 30 s

There is a discrepancy because the second student is measuring instantaneous weight PLUS the force generated as the pipe flow momentum is "killed". To analyse this we first need to find the speed at which the water stream enters the tank, 5 ft below the pipe exit. This would be a good place to use the Bernoulli equation, but this problem is in the set before Bernoulli is covered. Instead we use the simple concept that the fluid is falling under gravity (a conclusion supported by the Bernoulli equation). From the equations for falling under gravity: Vtank = Vpipe + 2 g h where Vtank is the speed entering the tank, Vpipe is the speed at the pipe, and h = 5 ft is the distance traveled. Vpipe is obtained from Vpipe = Vpipe = 4 m1 dpipe 4 31.2 lbm s ft 1 slug 1 1.94 slug 32.2 lbm 1 ft 6
2 3 2 2 2 2

4 m1 dpipe
2

Vpipe = 22.9

ft s

Then

Vtank =

Vpipe + 2 g h

Vtank =

22.9 ft + 2 32.2 ft 5ft 2 s s

Vtank = 29.1

ft s

We can now use the y momentum equation for the CS shown above Ry W = Vtank Vtank Atank where Atank is the area of the water flow as it enters the tank. But for the water flow Hence W = Ry W = Vtank Vpipe dpipe 4
2

Vtank Atank = Vpipe Apipe

This equation indicate the instantaneous difference W between the scale reading (Ry ) and the actual weight of water (W) in the tank W = 1.94 slug ft
3

29.1

ft ft 1 lbf s 22.9 ft slug ft s s 4 6

W = 28.2 lbf

Hence the scale overestimates the weight of water by 28.2 lbf, or a mass of 28.2 lbm For the second student Hence M = 960 lbm 28.2 lbm = 932 lbm M m2 = t 1 m2 = 932 lb 30 s where m2 represents mass flow rate slug m2 = 0.966 s lbm m2 = 31.1 s

Comparing with the answer obtained from student 1, we see the students now agree! The discrepancy was entirely caused by the fact that t second student was measuring the weight of tank water PLUS the momentum lost by the water as it entered the tank!

Problem 4.66
CS V y x Rx

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Water tank attached to mass Whether tank starts moving

Basic equation: Momentum flux in x direction for the tank Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow 3) Atmospheric pressure at exit 4) Uniform flow Hence Rx = V cos ( ) ( V A) = V
2 2 D

cos ( ) V = 2 g h where h = 4 m is the height of fluid in the tank

We need to find V. We could use the Bernoulli equation, but here it is known that V = 2 9.81 m s Hence Rx = 1000 kg m
3 2

4 m
2

V = 8.86

m s Rx = 49.3 N T = 49.3 N Fmax = M g Fmax = 44.1 N where is static friction

8.86

m 2 ( 0.04 m) cos ( 60 deg) s 4 T = Rx

This force is equal to the tension T in the wire

For the block, the maximum friction force a mass of M = 9 kg can generate is Fmax = 9 kg 9.81 m s
2

0.5

N s kg m

Hence the tension T created by the water jet is larger than the maximum friction Fmax; the tank starts to move

Problem 4.67
CS

[4]

y y x

FR

Given: Find: Solution:

Gate held in place by water jet Required jet speed for various water depths

Basic equation: Momentum flux in x direction for the wall Note: We use this equation ONLY for the jet impacting the wall. For the hydrostatic force and location we use computing equations Ixx FR = pc A y' = yc + A yc Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow 3) Uniform flow Hence Rx = V V Ajet = V

2 D

This force is the force generated by the wall on the jet; the force of the jet hitting the wall is then Fjet = Rx = V For the hydrostatic force
2 D 2

where D is the jet diameter Ixx h 2 y' = yc + = + = h h A yc 2 3 w h 2 h Fjet hjet + FR ( h y') = Fjet hjet + FR = 0 3
w h 12
3

h 1 2 FR = pc A = g h w = g w h 2 2

where h is the water depth and w is the gate width For the gate, we can take moments about the hinge to obtain where hjet is the height of the jet from the ground Fjet = V
2 D 2

Hence

h 1 2 h hjet = FR = g w h 3 2 3 0.5 m ( 0.5 m)


3

V =

2 g w h
2

3 D hj
2

For the first case (h = 0.5 m)

V =

2 3 2

9.81

m s
2

1 0.01 m 0.5 m
1
2

V = 51

m s m s m s

For the second case (h = 0.25 m)

V =

1 1 9.81 0.5 m ( 0.25 m) 2 3 0.01 m 0.5 m s m


3

V = 18

For the first case (h = 0.6 m)

V =

2 3

9.81

m s
2

0.5 m ( 0.6 m)
3

1 0.01 m 0.5 m
1

V = 67.1

Problem 4.55

Problem 4.68

[2]

Problem 4.56

Problem 4.69

[2]

Problem 4.70

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Flow into and out of CV Expressions for rate of change of mass, and force

Basic equations: Mass and momentum flux

Assumptions: 1) Incompressible flow 2) Uniform flow For the mass equation dMCV + dt

( ) = dMCV + (V1 A1 V2 A2 + V3 A3 + V4 A4) = 0 V A


dt
CS

dMCV = V1 A1 + V2 A2 V3 A3 V4 A4 dt

) ( ( ) ( )

For the x momentum

Fx +

p1 A1 2

V1 5 4 5 5 p2 A2 p3 A3 p4 A4 = 0 + V 1 A 1 + V V2 A2 ... 13 5 13 13 2 2 4 5 + V3 V3 A3 + V V 3 A 3 5 13 3

Fx =

p1 A1 2

5 4 5 1 5 4 5 2 2 2 2 p A + p A + p A + V1 A1 V A2 + V3 A3 + V A3 13 2 2 5 3 3 13 4 4 13 2 5 13 3 2

For the y momentum

Fy +

p1 A1 2

12 13

p2 A2

3 5

p3 A3 +

12 13

p4 A4 = 0 +

V V2 A2 ... 13 2 3 12 + V3 V3 A3 V V 3 A 3 5 13 3

V1

( 2 (

V 1 A 1

12

Fy =

p1 A1 2

3 12 1 12 3 12 2 2 2 2 p A + p A p A + V1 A1 V A2 + V3 A3 V A3 13 2 2 5 3 3 13 4 4 13 2 5 13 3 2 12

Problem 4.71

[2]

Problem 4.72
y x CS

[2]

Rx

Given: Find: Solution:

Water flow through elbow Force to hold elbow

Basic equation: Momentum flux in x direction for the elbow Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow 3) Atmospheric pressure at exit 4) Uniform flow Hence Rx + p1g A1 = V1 V1 A1 V2 V2 A2 so
2

Rx = p1g A1 V1 A1 + V2 A2
2 2

From continuity V2 A2 = V1 A1 Hence Rx = 15 lbf in


2

A1 V2 = V1 A2

ft 4 V2 = 10 s 1

V2 = 40

ft s

4 in 1.94

2 2 2 2 slug ft ft 1 ft lbf s 2 2 10 4 in + 40 1 in 3 s s 12 in slugft ft

Rx = 86.9 lbf

The force is to the left: It is needed to hold the elbow on against the high pressure, plus it generates the large change in x momentum

Problem 4.73
y x CS

[2]

Rx

Given: Find: Solution:

Water flow through elbow Force to hold elbow

Basic equation: Momentum flux in x direction for the elbow Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow 3) Uniform flow Hence Rx + p1g A1 + p2g A2 = V1 V1 A1 V2 V2 A2

)
2

Rx = p1g A1 p2g A2 V1 A1 + V2 A2
2 2

From continuity V2 A2 = V1 A1

so

D1 V2 = V1 = V1 A2 D2
A1

V2 = 0.8

m 0.2 s 0.04

V2 = 20

m s

Hence

Rx = 350 10 + 1000

2 2 ( 0.2 m ) ( 0.04 m ) 3 N 3 N ... 75 10 2 2 4 4

Rx = 11.6 kN

kg m
3

0.8

2 2 2 2 2 ( 0.2 m ) ( .04 m ) N s m m + 20 4 4 s s kg m

The force is to the left: It is needed to hold the elbow on against the high pressures, plus it generates the large change in x momentum

Problem 4.74
y x

[2]

Rx

CS

Given: Find: Solution:

Water flow through nozzle Force to hold nozzle

Basic equation: Momentum flux in x direction for the elbow Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow 3) Uniform flow Hence Rx + p1g A1 + p2g A2 = V1 V1 A1 + V2 cos ( ) V2 A2

Rx = p1g A1 + V2 A2 cos ( ) V1 A1
2 2

From continuity V2 A2 = V1 A1

so

D1 V 2 = V 1 = V1 A2 D2
A1

V2 = 1.5

m 30 s 15

V 2 = 6

m s

Hence

Rx = 15 10

2 2 2 2 2 2 ( 0.15 m) ( .3 m) N s ( 0.3 m) kg m m 3 N + 1000 6 cos ( 30 deg) 1.5 2 3 s 4 4 4 s kg m

Rx = 668 N

The joint is in tension: It is needed to hold the elbow on against the high pressure, plus it generates the large change in x momentum

Problem 4.61

Problem 4.75

[2]

Problem 4.76
CS

[2]

y x Rx

Given: Find: Solution:

Water flow through orifice plate Force to hold plate

Basic equation: Momentum flux in x direction for the elbow Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow 3) Uniform flow Hence Rx + p1g A1 p2g A2 = V1 V1 A1 + V2 V2 A2

Rx = p1g A1 + V2 A2 V1 A1
2 2

From continuity Q = V1 A1 = V2 A2 Q ft = 20 s A1
3

so

V1 =

1 ft 3

= 229

ft s

and

2 2 A1 D ft 4 ft V2 = V1 = V1 = 229 = 1628 A2 s 1.5 s d

NOTE: problem has an error: Flow rate should be 2 ft3/s not 20 ft3/s! We will provide answers to both
2 2 2 2 2 2 2 ( 1.5 in) ( 4 in) slug ft 229 ft ( 4 in) 1 ft lbf s 1628 Rx = 200 + 1.94 2 3 4 4 4 s s 12 in slugft in ft

Hence

lbf

Rx = 51707 lbf With more realistic velocities Hence Rx = 200 lbf in Rx = 1970 lbf
2

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 ( 1.5 in) ( 4 in) 1 ft ( 4 in) slug ft ft lbf s + 1.94 163 22.9 3 4 4 4 s s 12 in slug ft ft

Problem 4.63

Problem 4.77

[2]

Problem 4.64

Problem 4.78

[2]

Problem 4.79
CS y x Rx Given: Find: Solution:
Basic equation: Momentum flux in x direction for the elbow Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Neglect change of momentum within CV 3) Uniform flow Hence Rx peg Ae = Ve e Ve Ae = me Ve Data on rocket motor Thrust produced

[2]

Ve

Rx = peg Ae + me Ve

where peg is the exit pressure (gage), me is the mass flow rate at the exit (software cannot render dot over m!) and Ve is the xit velocity For the mass flow rate Hence kg kg me = mnitricacid + maniline = 80 + 32 s s Rx = ( 110 101) 10
2 2 ( 0.6 m) kg m N s 3 N + 112 180 2 4 s s kg m

kg me = 112 s Rx = 22.7 kN

Problem 4.65

Problem 4.80

[2]

Problem 4.81

[3]

Problem 4.82

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


The given data is Governing equation: y -momentum

Data on flow and system geometry Deflection angle as a function of speed; jet speed for 10o deflection

= 999

kg m
3

A = 0.005 m

L = 2 m

k = 1

N m

x0 = 1 m

(4.18b)

Applying this to the current system in the vertical direction Fspring = V sin( ) ( V A) But Hence Fspring = k x = k x0 L sin( )

k x0 L sin( ) = V A sin( ) = asin k x0 k L + A V2 k x0 L sin ( ) A sin ( )

Solving for

For the speed at which = 10o, solve

V =

1 V =

N ( 1 2 sin ( 10 deg) ) m m kg m
3

kg m
2

V = 0.867

m s

999

2 0.005 m sin ( 10 deg) N s

The deflection is plotted in the corresponding Excel workbook, where the above velocity is obtained using Goal Seek

= xo = L = k = A =

999 1 2 1 0.005

kg/m3 m m N/m m
2

To find when = 10o, use Goal Seek V (m/s) 0.867 (o) 10

V (m/s) 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5

o ( )

30.0 29.2 27.0 24.1 20.9 17.9 15.3 13.0 11.1 9.52 8.22 7.14 6.25 5.50 4.87 4.33

Deflection Angle vs Jet Speed


35 30 (deg) 25 20 15 10 5 0 0.00 0.25 0.50 0.75 V (m/s) 1.00 1.25 1.50

Problem 4.69

Problem 4.83

[3]

Problem 4.84
y x Ry Rx CS

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on nozzle assembly Reaction force

Basic equation: Momentum flux in x and y directions

Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow CV 3) Uniform flow For x momentum From continuity Rx = V2 cos ( ) V2 A2 = V2 A1 V1 = A2 V2 Rx = 1000 kg m For y momentum
3

2 2 D 2

cos ( )
2

D1 V2 = V1 = V1 A2 D2
A1
2

V2 = 2
2

m 7.5 s 2.5

V2 = 18

m s

Hence

18

m N s 2 ( 0.025 m) cos ( 30 deg) kg m s 4

Rx = 138 N

Ry p1 A1 W Vol g = V1 V1 A1 V2 sin ( ) V2 A2 Ry = p1 D 1 4
2

)
3

+ W + Vol g + m
2

2 2 2 2 V D1 V2 D2 sin ( ) 4 1 W = 44.1 N Vol = 0.002 m

where

N s W = 4.5 kg 9.81 2 kg m s Ry = 125 10

Hence

2 2 ( 0.075 m) kg m N s 3 N 3 ... + 44.1 N + 1000 0.002 m 9.81 2 3 2 kg m 4

2 2 N s2 m kg m 2 ( 0.075 m) 2 18 ( 0.025 m) 2 sin ( 30 deg) + 1000 3 4 s s kg m m

Ry = 554 N

Problem 4.71

Problem 4.85

[3]

Problem 4.86

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on water jet pump Speed at pump exit; pressure rise

Basic equation: Continuity, and momentum flux in x direction

Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow CV 3) Uniform flow From continuity Vs As Vj Aj + V2 A2 = 0 V2 = 10 For x momentum ft 0.75 0.1 ft 0.1 + 100 s 0.75 s 0.75 As Aj Aj A2 Aj V2 = Vs + Vj = Vs + Vj A2 A2 A2 A2 ft V2 = 22 s

p1 A2 p2 A2 = Vj Vj Aj + Vs Vs As + V2 V2 A2

2 Aj 2 As 2 p = p2 p1 = Vj + Vs V2 A2 A2
p = 1.94 slug

2 2 2 2 0.1 ft ( 0.75 0.1) ft lbf s ft 100 + 10 22 3 0.75 0.75 s s s slug ft ft 2

Hence

p = 1816

lbf ft

p = 12.6 psi

Problem 4.73

Problem 4.87

[3]

Problem 4.74

Problem 4.88

[3]

Problem 4.89

[3]

V1 CS p1 y x Rx

V2 p2

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on adiabatic flow of air Force of air on pipe

Basic equation: Continuity, and momentum flux in x direction, plus ideal gas equation p = R T

Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Ideal gas CV 3) Uniform flow From continuity For x momentum 1 V1 A1 + 2 V2 A2 = 0 1 V1 A = 2 V2 A 1 V1 = 2 V2

Rx + p1 A p2 A = V1 1 V1 A + V2 2 V2 A = 1 V1 A V2 V1 Rx = p2 p1 A + 1 V1 A V2 V1

)
1 = 3.15 kg m
3

)
kg K 1 3 N 2 286.9 N m ( 60 + 273) K m

For the air

1 =

P1 Rair T1

1 = ( 200 + 101) 10

2 kg m m N s 3 N 2 2 Rx = ( 80 200) 10 0.05 m + 3.15 150 0.05 m ( 300 150) 2 3 s s kg m

Hence

Rx = 2456 N Fpipe = Rx Fpipe = 2456 N The air is dragging the pipe to the right

This is the force of the pipe on the air; the pipe is opposing flow. Hence the force of the air on the pipe is

Problem 4.90

[3]

V1 CS

V2 p2 y x Rx V3

p1

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on heated flow of gas Force of gas on pipe

Basic equation: Continuity, and momentum flux in x direction p = R T

Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Uniform flow From continuity 1 V1 A1 + 2 V2 A2 + m3 = 0 1 m3 V 2 = V 1 2 2 A


3

where m3 = 20 kg/s is the mass leaving through the walls (the software does not allow a dot)

V2 = 170 For x momentum

m 6 kg m 1 20 2 2.75 kg s 2.75 s 0.15 m

V2 = 322

m s

Rx + p1 A p2 A = V1 1 V1 A + V2 2 V2 A
2 2 Rx = p2 p1 + 2 V2 1 V1 A

)
2 2 N s 0.15 m2 kg m

kg m kg m 3 N Rx = ( 300 400) 10 + 2.75 322 6 170 2 3 3 s s m m m


2

Hence

Rx = 1760 N

Problem 4.77

Problem 4.91

[3]

Problem 4.78

Problem 4.92

[3]

Problem 4.79

Problem 4.93

[3]

Problem 4.94

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on flow in wind tunnel Mass flow rate in tunnel; Maximum velocity at section 2; Drag on object

Basic equations: Continuity, and momentum flux in x direction; ideal gas equation p = R T Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Uniform density at each section From continuity mflow = 1 V1 A1 = 1 V1 D 1 4 patm Rair Tatm
2 2

where mflow is the mass flow rate air = 101000 N m kg mflow = 6.63 s
2 2

We take ambient conditions for the air density

air =

kg K 1 286.9 N m 293 K

air = 1.2

kg m
3

kg m ( 0.75 m) mflow = 1.2 12.5 3 4 s m


R

Also

2 air Vmax R 2 air Vmax R 2 r r dr = mflow = 2 u2 dA2 = air Vmax 2 r dr = 0 3 R R 0 Vmax = 3 mflow 2 air R
2

3 kg m 1 Vmax = 6.63 1.2 kg 0.375 m 2 s

Vmax = 18.8

m s

For x momentum

Rx + p1 A p2 A = V1 1 V1 A + 2 u2 u2 dA2

2 2 2 air Vmax R 3 V r 2 r dr = p p A V m r dr Rx = p2 p1 A V1 mflow + air max 2 1 1 flow + 2 0 R R 0

2 2 Rx = p2 p1 A V1 mflow + air Vmax R 2 We also have p1 = g h1 p1 = 1000 N kg m Hence


3

9.81
2

m s
2

0.03 m

p1 = 294 Pa

p2 = g h2
2

p2 = 147 Pa
2

( 0.75 m) kg m kg m 2 N s Rx = ( 147 294) + 6.63 12.5 + 1.2 18.8 ( 0.375 m) 2 3 4 kg m s s 2 s m m


Rx = 54 N The drag on the object is equal and opposite Fdrag = Rx Fdrag = 54.1 N

Problem 4.95

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Governing equation: Momentum

Data on wake behind object An expression for the drag

(4.18a)

Applying this to the horizontal motion 2 F = U ( 1 U) +


1

u ( r ) 2 r u ( r ) dr

1 2 2 r 2 F = U 1 2 r 1 cos dr 2 0 1 2 4 2 r + r cos r dr F = U 1 2 r 2 r cos 2 2 0

1 2 U 2 r u ( r ) 2 dr F = 0

2 3 2 Integrating and using the limits F = U 1 + 8 2

F=

5 2 U2 8

Problem 4.96

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on flow in 2D channel Maximum velocity; Pressure drop


2h y x

Basic equations: Continuity, and momentum flux in x direction; ideal gas equation

CS

Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Neglect frition From continuity U1 A1 + u2 dA = 0 2 h h y 4 dy = w umax [ h ( h ) ] = w umax h U1 2 h w = w umax 1 2 3 3 3 h h Hence umax = 3 U 2 1 umax = 3 m 7.5 2 s umax = 11.3 m s
h

For x momentum

p1 A p2 A = V1 1 V1 A + 2 u2 u2 dA2

Note that there is no Rx (no friction)


2

2 w 2 p1 p2 = U1 + umax 1 A h

2 y

dy = U1 +
2

umax h

2 1 2 h 2 h + 2 h 3 5

8 3 1 8 2 2 p = p1 p2 = U1 + umax = U1 1 = U1 15 15 2 5
Hence p = 1 5 1.24 kg m
3

7.5

N s kg m

p = 14 Pa

Problem 4.83

Problem 4.97

[3]

Problem 4.84

Problem 4.98

[3]

Problem 4.86

Problem 4.99

[3]

Problem 4.100

[4]

CS

c y x

a Ff

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on flow of boundary layer Force on plate per unit width

Basic equations: Continuity, and momentum flux in x direction

Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible 3) No net pressure force From continuity U0 w + mbc + u w dy = 0 0 mbc = U0 u w dy 0

where mbc is the mass flow rate across bc (Note: sotware cannot render a dot!)

Hence

For x momentum

2 2 Ff = U0 U0 w + U0 mbc + u u w dy = U0 + u + U0 U0 u w dy 0 0

u 2 u Then the drag force is Ff = u U0 u w dy = U0 1 dy U0 0 U0 0

But we have

u 3 1 3 = U0 2 2 Ff = w 0
=1 2

where we have used substitution


1

y =

u u 3 9 2 1 3 3 4 1 6 2 d = U0 + d U 0 1 2 U0 4 2 2 4 U0
0

Ff w Hence Ff w Ff w

= U 0
2

3 1 3 1 2 + = 0.139 U0 4 8 10 28 slug ft 0.1 lbf s 30 ft 3 slug ft s 12 ft


2 2

= 0.139 0.002377
3 lbf

(using standard atmosphere density)

= 2.48 10

ft

Problem 4.101
b CS c y

[4]

x a Ff d

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on flow of boundary layer Force on plate per unit width

Basic equations: Continuity, and momentum flux in x direction

Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible 3) No net pressure force From continuity U0 w + mbc + u w dy = 0 0 mbc = U0 u w dy 0

where mbc is the mass flow rate across bc (Note: sotware cannot render a dot!)

Hence

For x momentum

2 2 Ff = U0 U0 w + U0 mbc + u u w dy = U0 + u + U0 U0 u w dy 0 0

u 2 u Then the drag force is Ff = u U0 u w dy = U0 dy 1 U0 U0 0 0

But we have

u y = U0 Ff = w 0
=1

where we have used substitution


1

y =

U 0

u u 2 1 d = U0 ( 1 ) d 0 U0 U0

Ff w Hence Ff w Ff w

= U 0
2

1 1 2 = U 0 3 6
2 2

1 kg m 2 N s 1.225 20 m 3 6 kg m s 1000 m N m

(using standard atmosphere density)

= 0.163

Problem 4.102

[4] Part 1/2

Problem 4.102

[4] Part 2/2

Problem 4.103

[4]

Problem 4.104

[4]

Problem *4.91

Problem *4.105

[4]

Problem *4.106
CS

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:

Air jet striking disk Manometer deflection; Force to hold disk

Basic equations: Hydrostatic pressure, Bernoulli, and momentum flux in x direction p V + + g z = constant 2 Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible 3) No friction 4) Flow along streamline 5) Uniform flow 6) Horizontal flow (gx = 0) Applying Bernoulli between jet exit and stagnation point
2 p0 p V + = +0 air 2 air 2

p0 p =

1 2 air V 2 = air V
2

But from hydrostatics

p0 p = SG g h h = 0.002377

so
2

h =
3

1 2 V 2 air SG g
2

2 SG g h = 0.55 ft h = 6.6 in

slug ft 1 ft s 225 3 s 2 1.75 1.94 slug 32.2 ft ft

For x momentum

Rx = V air A V = air V

2 2 D

4
2

0.5 ft 2 2 slug ft 12 lbf s Rx = 0.002377 225 3 slugft s 4 ft


The force of the jet on the plate is then F = Rx

Rx = 0.164 lbf F = 0.164 lbf

Problem *4.107
CS y V, A x Rx

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Water jet striking surface Force on surface

Basic equations: Momentum flux in x direction

Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow 3) Atmospheric pressure throughout 4) Uniform flow Hence Q Q 2 Rx = u1 u1 A1 = V A = A = A A

4 Q D

where Q is the flow rate

The force of the jet on the surface is then

F = R x = 1

4 Q D

For a fixed flow rate Q, the force of a jet varies as

: A smaller diameter leads to a larger force. This is because as 2 D the diameter decreases the speed increases, and the impact force varies as the square of the speed, but linearly with area For a force of F = 650 N D F 4
2

Q =

Q =

1 L 6 m kg m 60 s m 650 N 2 3 3 1 min 1000 kg 4 1000 s N 10 m

Q = 257

L min

Problem *4.108

[3]

Problem *4.109
CS

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Water jet striking disk Expression for speed of jet as function of height; Height for stationary disk

Basic equations: Bernoulli; Momentum flux in z direction p V + + g z = constant 2 Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow 3) Atmospheric pressure in jet 4) Uniform flow The Bernoulli equation becomes Hence But from continuity Hence we get V0 2
2 2

+ g 0 =

V + g h 2

V = V0 2 g h

V =

V0 2 g h

M g = w1 w1 A1 = V A V 0 A 0 = V A so
2

V A = V0 A0

M g = V V A = V0 A0 V0 2 g h
2 1 2 M g V h= V A 2 g 0 0 0

Solving for h

s m 9.81 m m s h = 10 2 kg 2 1000 kg 10 m 2 9.81 m s s


1
2 3

2 25 m 1000
4

h = 4.28 m

Problem *4.96

Problem *4.110

[4] Part 1/2

Problem *4.96 cont'd

Problem *4.110

[4] Part 2/2

Problem *4.95

Problem *4.111

[3]

Problem *4.112

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


The given data is

Data on flow and venturi geometry Force on convergent section

= 999

kg m
3 2

D = 0.1 m
2

d = 0.04 m 2 d 4 Q A2

p1 = 600 kPa A2 = 0.00126 m V2 = 31.3 m s


2

V 1 = 5

m s

Then

A1 =

D 4

A1 = 0.00785 m Q = 0.0393 m s
3

A2 = V2 =

Q = V1 A1 Governing equations: Bernoulli equation p V + + g z = const 2


2

(4.24)

Momentum p1 Solving for p2 V1 2


2

(4.18a) p2 V2 2 kg m
3 2

Applying Bernoulli between inlet and throat

2 2 p2 = p1 + V1 V2 2

p2 = 600 kPa + 999

5 31.3

(2

2 2 N s kN 2 m 2 kg m 1000 N

p2 = 125 kPa

Applying the horizontal component of momentum F + p1 A2 p2 A2 = V1 V1 A1 + V2 V2 A2

)
kg m
3

or

F = p1 A1 p2 A2 + V1 A1 V2 A2
2 2 2

F = 600

kN m
2

0.00785 m 125

kN m
2

0.00126 m + 999

0.00785 m 31.3
2

0.00126 m

N s kg m F = 3.52 kN

Problem *4.98

Problem *4.113

[4]

Problem *4.99

Problem *4.114

[4]

Problem *4.101

Problem *4.115

[4]

Problem *4.100

Problem *4.116

[4]

Problem *4.102

Problem *4.117

[4]

Problem *4.118

[4] Part 1/2

Problem *4.118

[4] Part 2/2

Problem *4.105

Problem *4.119

[5]

Problem *4.104

Problem *4.120

[5] Part 1/2

Problem *4.104 cont'd

Problem *4.120

[5] Part 2/2

Problem *4.121

[4] Part 1/2

Problem *4.121

[4] Part 2/2

Problem *4.122
CS (moves at speed U)

[3]

y x Ry Rx

Given: Find: Solution:

Water jet striking moving vane Force needed to hold vane to speed U = 5 m/s

Basic equations: Momentum flux in x and y directions

Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow 3) Atmospheric pressure in jet 4) Uniform flow 5) Jet relative velocity is constant Then Rx = u1 V1 A1 + u2 V2 A2 = ( V U) [ ( V U) A] + ( V U) cos ( ) [ ( V U) A] Rx = ( V U) A ( cos ( ) 1) Using given data Rx = 1000 Then m N s 3 2 ( 25 5) 1.26 10 m ( cos ( 150 deg) 1) 3 kg m s m kg
2 2 2

A =

40 m 4 1000

A = 1.26 10

3 2

Rx = 940 N

Ry = v1 V1 A1 + v2 V2 A2 = 0 + ( V U) sin ( ) [ ( V U) A] m N s 3 2 Ry = ( V U) A sin ( ) Ry = 1000 ( 25 5) 1.26 10 m sin ( 150 deg) 3 kg m s m


2

kg

Ry = 252 N

Hence the force required is 940 N to the left and 252 N upwards to maintain motion at 5 m/s

Problem 4.123

[3]

CS (moves at speed U)

y Ry Rx x

Given: Find: Solution:

Water jet striking moving vane Force needed to hold vane to speed U = 10 m/s

Basic equations: Momentum flux in x and y directions

Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow 3) Atmospheric pressure in jet 4) Uniform flow 5) Jet relative velocity is constant Then Rx = u1 V1 A1 + u2 V2 A2 = ( V U) [ ( V U) A] + ( V U) cos ( ) [ ( V U) A] Rx = ( V U) A ( cos ( ) 1) Using given data Rx = 1000 Then m N s 2 ( 30 10) 0.004 m ( cos ( 120 deg) 1) 3 kg m s m kg
2 2 2

Rx = 2400 N

Ry = v1 V1 A1 + v2 V2 A2 = 0 + ( V U) sin ( ) [ ( V U) A] m N s 2 Ry = ( V U) A sin ( ) Ry = 1000 ( 30 10) 0.004 m sin ( 120 deg) 3 kg m s m


2

kg

Ry = 1386 N

Hence the force required is 2400 N to the left and 1390 N upwards to maintain motion at 10 m/s

Problem 4.124

[2]

Problem 4.125

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Governing equation: Momentum

Data on jet boat Formula for boat speed; jet speed to double boat speed

CV in boat coordinates (4.26)

Applying the horizontal component of momentum Fdrag = V ( Q) + Vj ( Q) k V + Q V Q Vj = 0 Q + 2 k


2 Q + Q V j k 2 k 2

or, with

Fdrag = k V

k V = Q Vj Q V

Solving for V

V =

Let

Q 2 k + 2 Vj V = 10 m s
2 2

V = +

We can use given data at V = 10 m/s to find 10 m s = + + 2 25


2

m s

Vj = 25
2

m s
2

+ 50 = ( 10 + ) = 100 + 20 +

10 m 3 s

Hence

V =

10 3 10 3

100 9 100 9

20 V 3 j 20 V 3 j 100 20 70 + V = 9 3 j 3 Vj = 80 m s

For V = 20 m/s

20 =

Problem 4.110

Problem 4.126

[2]

Problem 4.112

Problem 4.127

[2]

Problem 4.128

[3]

CS (moves at speed U)

y Ry Rx x

Given: Find: Solution:

Water jet striking moving vane Expressions for force and power; Show that maximum power is when U = V/3

Basic equation: Momentum flux in x direction Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow 3) Atmospheric pressure in jet 4) Uniform flow 5) Jet relative velocity is constant Then Rx = u1 V1 A1 + u2 V2 A2 = ( V U) [ ( V U) A] + ( V U) cos ( ) [ ( V U) A] Rx = ( V U) A ( cos ( ) 1) This is force on vane; Force exerted by vane is equal and opposite The power produced is then To maximize power wrt to U Hence Fx = ( V U) A ( 1 cos ( ) ) P = U Fx = U ( V U) A ( 1 cos ( ) ) dP 2 = ( V U) A ( 1 cos ( ) ) + ( 2) ( 1) ( V U) U A ( 1 cos ( ) ) = 0 dU V U 2 U = V 3 U = 0 U = V 3 for maximum power
2 2 2

Note that there is a vertical force, but it generates no power

Problem 4.114

Problem 4.129

[3]

Problem 4.130
CS (moves to left at speed Vc) V j + Vc R y x t Rx V j + Vc

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Water jet striking moving cone Thickness of jet sheet; Force needed to move cone

Basic equations: Mass conservation; Momentum flux in x direction

Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow 3) Atmospheric pressure in jet 4) Uniform flow 5) Jet relative velocity is constant Then V 1 A 1 + V 2 A 2 = 0 t= Dj
2

V j + V c t =

D j 4

+ V j + V c 2 R t = 0

(Refer to sketch)

Hence

8 R

1 1 2 ( 4 in) 8 9 in

t = 0.222 in

Using relative velocities, x momentum is Rx = u1 V1 A1 + u2 V2 A2 = Vj + Vc Vj + Vc Aj + Vj + Vc cos ( ) Vj + Vc Aj Rx = Vj + Vc Aj ( cos ( ) 1) Using given data

) (

4 2 ft 2 slug ft 12 lbf s Rx = 1.94 ( 100 + 45) ( cos ( 60 deg) 1) 3 slug ft s 4 ft


Hence the force is 1780 lbf to the left; the upwards equals the weight

Rx = 1780 lbf

Problem 4.116

Problem 4.131

[3]

Problem 4.117

Problem 4.132

[3]

Problem 4.133

[2]

Problem 4.119

Problem 4.134

[3]

Problem 4.120

Problem 4.135

[2]

Problem 4.133

Problem 4.136

[2]

Problem 4.137

[2]

Problem 4.138

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:


The given data is

Data on vane/slider Formula for acceleration, speed, and position; plot

= 999

kg m
3

M = 30 kg
2

A = 0.005 m

V = 20

m s

k = 0.3

The equation of motion, from Problem 4.136, is


2

dU ( V U ) A = g k dt M

The acceleration is thus

a=

( V U ) A g k M dU = dt

Separating variables

( V U ) A g k M Substitute u = VU dU = du du A u g k M M A 1 du = atanh u 2 g k A A u g k M g k M
2

= dt

and u = V - U so

M A A M atanh u = atanh ( V U) g k A g k A g k M g k M M A atanh ( V U) + g k A g k M


g k M A tanh M g k A atanh

Using initial conditions

g k M

V = t

VU =

g k A A t + atanh V M g k M g k A A t + atanh V M g k M

U = V

g k M A

tanh

Note that

atanh

A V = 0.213 i g k M 2 1 atanh ( x) = atanh i x 2


for x > 1

which is complex and difficult to handle in Excel, so we use the identity

so

U = V

g k M A

tanh

g k A 1 i t + atanh M 2 A V g k M

and finally the identity

tanh x

1 i = tanh( x) 2 g k M

to obtain

U = V

A tanh

g k A g k M 1 t + atanh M A V
g k M A

For the position x

dx = V dt

tanh

g k A g k M 1 t + atanh M A V

This can be solved analytically, but is quite messy. Instead, in the corresponding Excel workbook, it is solved numerically using a simple Euler method. The complete set of equations is g k M U = V A tanh

g k A g k M 1 t + atanh M A V
2

( V U ) A a= g k M g k M A V t x ( n + 1) = x ( n) + g k A g k M 1 tanh t + atanh M A V The plots are presented in the Excel workbook

The equations are

= 999 kg/m3 k = 0.3 A V M t = 0.005 m = 20 m/s = 30 kg = 0.1 s


2

Position x vs Time
45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5
t (s)

t (s) x (m) U (m/s) a (m/s2) 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 2.9 3.0 0.0 0.0 0.5 1.2 2.2 3.3 4.4 5.7 7.0 8.4 9.7 11.2 12.6 14.1 15.5 17.0 18.5 20.1 21.6 23.1 24.7 26.2 27.8 29.3 30.9 32.4 34.0 35.6 37.1 38.7 40.3 0.0 4.8 7.6 9.5 10.8 11.8 12.5 13.1 13.5 13.9 14.2 14.4 14.6 14.8 14.9 15.1 15.2 15.3 15.3 15.4 15.4 15.5 15.5 15.6 15.6 15.6 15.6 15.7 15.7 15.7 15.7 63.7 35.7 22.6 15.5 11.2 8.4 6.4 5.1 4.0 3.3 2.7 2.2 1.9 1.6 1.3 1.1 0.9 0.8 0.7 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.1 0.1

x (m)

2.0

2.5

3.0

Velocity U vs Time
18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5
t (s)

U (m/s)

2.0

2.5

3.0

70 60

Acceleration a vs Time

a (m/s )

50 40 30 20 10 0 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0

t (s)

Problem 1.24

Problem 4.139

[3]

Problem 4.133

Problem 4.140

[4]

CS (moves at speed instantaneous speed U) y x

Given: Find: Solution:

Water jet striking moving vane/cart assembly Angle at t = 5 s; Plot (t)

Basic equation: Momentum flux in x direction for accelerating CV

Assumptions: 1) cahnges in CV 2) Incompressible flow 3) Atmospheric pressure in jet 4) Uniform flow 5) Constant jet relative velocity Then M arfx = u1 V1 A1 + u2 V2 A2 = ( V U) [ ( V U) A] + ( V U) cos ( ) [ ( V U) A] M arfx = ( V U) A ( cos ( ) 1) Since arfx = constant = acos 1 then M arfx
2

or

cos ( ) = 1

M arfx ( V U ) A M arfx V arfx t A


2

U = arfx t

cos ( ) = 1

2 (V arfx t) A
m s
2

Using given data = acos 1 55 kg 1.5

m 1000 kg

15 m 1.5 m 5 s s 2 s

2 0.025 m
1

= 19.7 deg

at t = 5 s

180

20 15 10 5 0 10

Angle (deg)

135 90 45 0

2.5

7.5

Time t (s)

The solution is only valid for up to 180o (when t = 9.14 s). This graph can be plotted in Excel

Speed U (m/s)

Problem 4.126

Problem 4.141

[3]

Problem 4.142

[3] Part 1/2

Problem 4.142

[3] Part 2/2

Problem 4.143

[3]

Problem 4.144

[3] Part 1/2

Problem 4.144

[3] Part 2/2

Problem 4.130

Problem 4.145

[3]

Problem 4.146

[4] Part 1/3

Problem 4.146

[4] Part 2/3

Problem 4.146

[4] Part 3/3

Problem 4.132

Problem 4.147

[3]

Problem 4.148

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:


The given data is

Data on vane/slider Formula for acceleration, speed, and position; plot

= 999

kg m
3

M = 30 kg
2

A = 0.005 m

V = 20

m s

k = 7.5

N s m

The equation of motion, from Problem 4.147, is

dU ( V U) A k U = dt M M

The acceleration is thus a =

( V U) A k U M M

The differential equation for U can be solved analytically, but is quite messy. Instead we use a simple numerical method Euler's method U( n + 1) = U( n ) +

( V U) 2 A
M

k U t M

where t is the time step

For the position x so

dx =U dt x ( n + 1) = x ( n) + U t

The final set of equations is

( V U) 2 A k U t U ( n + 1) = U ( n) + M M
a= ( V U) A k U M M
2

x ( n + 1) = x ( n) + U t The results are plotted in the corresponding Excel workbook

t (s) 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 2.9 3.0

x (m) 0.0 0.0 0.7 1.6 2.7 3.9 5.2 6.6 7.9 9.3 10.8 12.2 13.7 15.2 16.6 18.1 19.6 21.1 22.6 24.1 25.7 27.2 28.7 30.2 31.7 33.2 34.8 36.3 37.8 39.3 40.8

U (m/s) 0.0 6.7 9.5 11.1 12.1 12.9 13.4 13.8 14.1 14.3 14.5 14.6 14.7 14.8 14.9 15.0 15.0 15.1 15.1 15.1 15.1 15.1 15.2 15.2 15.2 15.2 15.2 15.2 15.2 15.2 15.2

a (m/s2) 66.6 28.0 16.1 10.5 7.30 5.29 3.95 3.01 2.32 1.82 1.43 1.14 0.907 0.727 0.585 0.472 0.381 0.309 0.250 0.203 0.165 0.134 0.109 0.0889 0.0724 0.0590 0.0481 0.0392 0.0319 0.0260 0.0212

x (m)

= 999 k = 7.5 A = 0.005 V = 20 M = 30 t = 0.1

kg/m3 N.s/m m2 m/s kg s

Position x vs Time
45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 -5 0.0

0.5

1.0

1.5
t (s)

2.0

2.5

3.0

Velocity U vs Time
16 14
U (m/s)

12 10 8 6 4 2 0 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5


t (s)

2.0

2.5

3.0

70 60
2 a (m/s )

Acceleration a vs Time

50 40 30 20 10 0 0 1 1 2
t (s)

Problem 4.134

Problem 4.149

[3]

Problem 4.136

Problem 4.150

[3]

Problem 4.151

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


The given data is

Data on system Jet speed to stop cart after 1 s; plot speed & position; maximum x; time to return to origin

= 999

kg m
3

M = 100 kg
2

A = 0.01 m

U0 = 5

m s

The equation of motion, from Problem 4.149, is

dU ( V + U ) A = dt M

which leads to

d ( V + U) ( V + U)
2

A = dt M U = V + 1+ V + U0 A V + U 0 M

Integrating and using the IC U = U0 at t = 0

) t

To find the jet speed V to stop the cart after 1 s, solve the above equation for V, with U = 0 and t = 1 s. (The equation becomes a quadratic in V). Instead we use Excel's Goal Seek in the associated workbook From Excel V = 5 m s dx = U = V + dt V + U0 1+ A V + U 0 M

For the position x we need to integrate

) t

The result is

x = V t +

M A

ln 1 +

A V + U 0 t M

This equation (or the one for U with U = 0) can be easily used to find the maximum value of x by differentiating, as well as the time for x to be zero again. Instead we use Excel's Goal Seek and Solver in the associated workbook From Excel xmax = 1.93 m t ( x = 0) = 2.51 s

The complete set of equations is U = V + 1+ V + U0 A V + U 0 M

) t

x = V t +

M A

ln 1 +

A V + U 0 t M

The plots are presented in the Excel workbook

M = = A = Uo = t (s) 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.0 2.2 2.4 2.6 2.8 3.0

100 999 0.01 5 x (m) 0.00 0.82 1.36 1.70 1.88 1.93 1.88 1.75 1.56 1.30 0.99 0.63 0.24 -0.19 -0.65 -1.14

kg kg/m3 m2 m/s U (m/s) 5.00 3.33 2.14 1.25 0.56 0.00 -0.45 -0.83 -1.15 -1.43 -1.67 -1.88 -2.06 -2.22 -2.37 -2.50 To find V for U = 0 in 1 s, use Goal Seek t (s) 1.0 U (m/s) 0.00 V (m/s) 5.00

To find the maximum x , use Solver t (s) 1.0 x (m) 1.93

To find the time at which x = 0 use Goal Seek t (s) 2.51 x (m) 0.00

Cart Position x vs Time


2.5 2.0 1.5

x (m)

1.0 0.5 0.0 -0.5 0.0 -1.0 -1.5 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0

t (s)

Cart Speed U vs Time


6 5 4 3 2 1 0 -1 0.0 -2 -3 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0

U (m/s)

t (s)

Problem 4.137

Problem 4.152

[3]

Problem *4.153

[3]

CS moving at speed U

Given: Find: Solution:

Water jet striking moving disk Acceleration of disk when at a height of 3 m

Basic equations: Bernoulli; Momentum flux in z direction (treated as upwards) for linear accelerating CV p V + + g z = constant 2 Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow 3) Atmospheric pressure in jet 4) Uniform flow in jet) (All The Bernoulli equation becomes V0 2
2 2

+ g 0 =

V1 2

+ g z z0
2

V1 =

V0 + 2 g z0 z m s

V1 = The momentum equation becomes

15 m + 2 9.81 m ( 0 3) m 2 s s

V1 = 12.9

W M arfz = w1 V1 A1 + w2 V2 A2 = V1 U V1 U A1 + 0 V0 2 V1 U A0 V 1 U A 1 W V 1 U A 1 V1 arfz = = g = g M M M

) (

Hence

using

V1 A1 = V0 A0

kg m 15 1 m 2 arfz = 1000 ( 12.9 5) 0.005 m 9.81 3 2 s 12.9 30 kg m s

m arfz = 2.28 2 s

Problem *4.154
M = 35 kg

[4]

CS moving at speed U D = 75 mm

Given: Find: Solution:

Water jet striking disk Plot mass versus flow rate to find flow rate for a steady height of 3 m

Basic equations: Bernoulli; Momentum flux in z direction (treated as upwards) p V + + g z = constant 2 Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow 3) Atmospheric pressure in jet 4) Uniform flow in jet) (All The Bernoulli equation becomes The momentum equation becomes M g = w1 V1 A1 + w2 V2 A2 = V1 V1 A1 + 0 Hence V 1 A 1 M= g M= V 1 V 0 A 0 g
2 2 2

V0 2

+ g 0 =

V1 2

+ g h

V1 =

V0 2 g h

but from continuity V0 D0 2 = V0 2 g h g 4

V1 A1 = V0 A0 and also Q = V0 A0

This equation is difficult to solve for V0 for a given M. Instead we plot first:
100 80

M (kg)

60 40 20 0.02 0.03 0.04 0.05 0.06

Q (cubic meter/s)
This graph can be parametrically plotted in Excel. The Goal Seek or Solver feature can be used to find Q when M = 35 kg m s
3

Q = 0.0469

Problem 4.155

[3]

Problem 4.156

[3]

Problem 4.142

Problem 4.157

[3] Part 1/2

Problem 4.142 cont'd

Problem 4.157

[3] Part 2/2

Problem 4.158

[3] Part 1/2

Problem 4.158

[3] Part 2/2

Problem 4.159
CS at speed U Ve Y y x

[3]

X Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation: Momentum flux in x direction Assumptions: 1) No resistance 2) pe = patm 3) Uniform flow 4) Use relative velocities From continuity dM = mrate = constant dt arfx M = dU = so M = M0 mrate t (Note: Software cannot render a dot!) Data on rocket sled Minimum fuel to get to 265 m/s

Hence from momentum

dU M0 mrate t = ue e Ve Ae = Ve mrate dt

Separating variables

Integrating

dt M0 mrate t M0 mrate t U = Ve ln = Ve ln 1 M0 M0 mrate t


U Ve = mrate t = M0 1 e 265 2750 = 900 kg 1 e

Ve mrate

or

M0 Ve t= 1 e mrate

The mass of fuel consumed is

mf mf

Hence

mf = 82.7 kg

Problem 4.160
CS at speed U Ve Y X Given: Find: Solution:
Basic equation: Momentum flux in x direction Assumptions: 1) No resistance 2) pe = patm 3) Uniform flow 4) Use relative velocities 5) Constant mass flow rate From continuity dM = mrate = constant dt so M = M0 mrate t Data on rocket weapon Expression for speed of weapon; minimum fraction of mass that must be fuel

[3]

y x

(Note: Software cannot render a dot!)

dU Hence from momentum arfx M = M0 mrate t = ue e Ve Ae = Ve mrate dt Separating variables dU = Ve mrate M0 mrate t dt

Integrating from U = U0 at t = 0 to U = U at t = t U U0 = Ve ln M0 mrate t ln M0

( (

( )) = Ve ln1

mrate t M0

mrate t U = U0 Ve ln 1 M0

Rearranging

MassFractionConsumed =

mrate t M0

( UU0)
Ve

= 1e

= 1e

( 3500600) 6000

= 0.383

Hence 38.3% of the mass must be fuel to accomplish the task. In reality, a much higher percentage would be needed due to drag effects

Problem 4.161

[3] Part 1/2

Problem 4.161

[3] Part 2/2

Problem 4.147

Problem 4.162

[3]

Problem 4.163

[3] Part 1/2

Problem 4.163

[3] Part 2/2

Problem 4.148

Problem 4.164

[3]

Problem 4.165
CS at speed V y x

[3]

Y X Ve

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on rocket Speed after 8 s; Plot of speed versus time

Basic equation: Momentum flux in y direction

Assumptions: 1) No resistance 2) pe = patm 3) Uniform flow 4) Use relative velocities 5) Constant mass flow rate From continuity dM = mrate = constant dt so M = M0 mrate t (Note: Software cannot render a dot!)

Hence from momentum M g arfy M = ue e Ve Ae = Ve mrate Ve mrate Ve mrate dV arfy = = g = g dt M M0 mrate t (1)

Hence

Separating variables

dV =

Ve mrate M0 mrate t

g dt

Integrating from V = at t = 0 to V = V at t = t V = Ve ln M0 mrate t ln M0 g t = Ve ln 1

( (

( ))

mrate t M0

g t

V = Ve ln 1 m s

mrate t M0

g t
kg s 1 300 kg 8 s 9.81 m s
2

(2)

At t = 8 s

V = 3000

ln 1 8

8 s

V = 641

m s

The speed and acceleration as functions of time are plotted below. These are obtained from Eqs 2 and 1, respectively, and can be plotted in Excel

5000 4000

V (m/s)

3000 2000 1000 0 10 20 30

Time (s)

400 300

a (m/s2)

200 100

10

20

30

Time (s)

Problem 4.151

Problem 4.166

[3]

Problem 4.167
y x

[4]

CS (moves at speed U)

Ry

Ff

Given: Find: Solution:

Water jet striking moving vane Plot of terminal speed versus turning angle; angle to overcome static friction

Basic equations: Momentum flux in x and y directions

Assumptions: 1) Incompressible flow 2) Atmospheric pressure in jet 3) Uniform flow 4) Jet relative velocity is constant Then Ff M arfx = u1 V1 A1 + u2 V2 A2 = ( V U) [ ( V U) A] + ( V U) cos ( ) [ ( V U) A] arfx = Also ( V U) A ( 1 cos ( ) ) Ff M
2

(1)

Ry M g = v1 V1 A1 + v2 V2 A2 = 0 + ( V U) sin ( ) [ ( V U) A] Ry = M g + ( V U) A sin ( )
2

At terminal speed arfx = 0 and Ff = kRy . Hence in Eq 1 V Ut A ( 1 cos ( ) ) k M g + V Ut A sin ( )

0=

M k M g

= (V Ut) A (1 cos ( ) k sin ( ) ) g k M


2

or

V Ut =

A 1 cos ( ) k sin ( )

Ut = V

A 1 cos ( ) k sin ( )

k M g

The terminal speed as a function of angle is plotted below; it can be generated in Excel

20

Terminal Speed (m/s)

15 10 5

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

Angle (deg)
For the static case Ff = s Ry and arfx = 0 (the cart is about to move, but hasn't)

Substituting in Eq 1, with U = 0
2

0=

V A 1 cos ( ) s V A sin ( ) + M g

M s M g V A = 19 deg
2

or

cos ( ) + s sin ( ) = 1

We need to solve this for ! This can be done by hand or by using Excel's Goal Seek or Solver

Note that we need = 19o, but once started we can throttle back to about = 12.5o and still keep moving!

Problem 4.168

[4]

Problem 4.169

[4]

Problem 4.170

[4]

Problem 4.171
CS at speed V y x

[5]

Y X Ve

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on rocket Maximum speed and height; Plot of speed and distance versus time

Basic equation: Momentum flux in y direction

Assumptions: 1) No resistance 2) pe = patm 3) Uniform flow 4) Use relative velocities 5) Constant mass flow rate From continuity dM = mrate = constant dt so M = M0 mrate t (Note: Software cannot render a dot!)

Hence from momentum M g arfy M = ue e Ve Ae = Ve mrate Hence Ve mrate Ve mrate dV arfy = = g = g dt M M0 mrate t dV =

Separating variables

Ve mrate M0 mrate t

g dt

Integrating from V = at t = 0 to V = V at t = t V = Ve ln M0 mrate t ln M0 g t = Ve ln 1

( (

( ))

mrate t M0

g t
(1)
3 kg

V = Ve ln 1

mrate t M0

g t

for

t tb 12.5 gm 1.7 s Ft mrate

(burn time)

mf To evaluate at tb = 1.7 s, we need Ve and mrate mrate = tb Also note that the thrust Ft is due to momentum flux from the rocket Ft = mrate Ve

mrate = Ve =

mrate = 7.35 10 Ve =

s kg m s N
2

5.75 N 7.35 10
3 kg

Ve = 782

m s

Hence

mrate tb Vmax = Ve ln 1 g tb M0
Vmax = 782 m s ln 1 7.35 10
3 kg

1 0.0696 kg

1.7 s 9.81

m s
2

1.7 s

Vmax = 138

m s

To obtain Y(t) we set V = dY/dt in Eq 1, and integrate to find Y = Ve M0 mrate t mrate t 1 2 1 ln 1 1 + 1 g t mrate M0 M0 2 t tb tb = 1.7 s (2)

At t = tb

m s 0.00735 1.7 ln 1 .00735 1.7 1 + 1 ... 0.0696 kg 1 3 s 0.0696 .0696 7.35 10 kg 1 m 2 + 9.81 ( 1.7 s) 2 2 s Yb = 113 m Yb = 782 V ( t) = Vmax g t tb

After burnout the rocket is in free assent. Ignoring drag

) ) ( )
t > tb

(3)

1 2 Y ( t) = Yb + Vmax t tb g t tb 2

(4)

The speed and position as functions of time are plotted below. These are obtained from Eqs 1 through 4, and can be plotted in Excel

150 100

V (m/s)

50

0 50

10

15

20

Time (s)

1500

Y (m)

1000

500

10

15

20

Time (s)
Using Solver, or by differentiating y(t) and setting to zero, or by setting V(t) = 0, we find for the maximumt y 15.8 s = ymax = 1085 m

Problem 4.172

[4]

Problem *4.173

[5] Part 1/3

Problem *4.173

[5] Part 2/3

Problem *4.173

[5] Part 3/3

Problem *4.174

[5] Part 1/2

Problem *4.174

[5] Part 2/2

Problem *4.175

[5]

CS moving at speed U

Given: Find: Solution:

Water jet striking moving disk Motion of disk; steady state height

Basic equations: Bernoulli; Momentum flux in z direction (treated as upwards) for linear accelerating CV p V + + g z = constant 2 Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible flow 3) Atmospheric pressure 4) Uniform flow 5) velocities wrt CV The Bernoulli equation becomes V0 2
2 2

(All in jet) (1)

+ g 0 =

V1 2

+ g h

V1 =

V0 2 g h m s

V1 = The momentum equation becomes

15 m + 2 9.81 m ( 0 3) m 2 s s

V1 = 12.9

M g M arfz = w1 V1 A1 + w2 V2 A2 = V1 U V1 U A1 + 0 With arfz = d h dt


2 2

) (

and

U =

dh dt

we get

M g M

d h

dh = V 1 A 1 2 dt dt

Using Eq 1, and from continuity V1 A1 = V0 A0 d h


2 A 0 V 0 dh 2 = V0 2 g h g 2 dt 2 dt M V0 2 g h 2

(2)

This must be solved numerically! One approach is to use Euler's method (see the Excel solution) At equilibrium h = h0 dh =0 dt d h dt
2 2

=0

so V0 h0 = 1 2 g
2

Hence

2 V 0 A 0 2 2 2 3 2 1 m s m m s 1 h0 = 15 1 30 kg 9.81 h0 = 10.7 m 2 1000 kg 15 m 2 9.81 m 2 s s .005 m V 2 2 g h A V M g = 0 0 0 0 0


and M g
2

Problem *4.175 (In Excel)

[3]

t = 0.05 s 2 A 0 = 0.005 m g = V = M = = 9.81 15 30 1000 m/s2 m/s kg kg/m3

h i +1 = h i + t

dh dt

d 2h dh dh = + t 2 dt dt i +1 dt i

t (s) 0.000 0.050 0.100 0.150 0.200 0.250 0.300 0.350 0.400 0.450 0.500 0.550 0.600 0.650 0.700 0.750 0.800 0.850 0.900 0.950 1.000 1.050 1.100 1.150 1.200 1.250 1.300 1.350 1.400 1.450 1.500 1.550 1.600 1.650 1.700 1.750 1.800 1.850 1.900 1.950 2.000

h (m) dh/dt (m/s) d 2h/dt 2 (m/s2) 2.000 2.000 2.061 2.167 2.310 2.481 2.673 2.883 3.107 3.340 3.582 3.829 4.080 4.333 4.587 4.840 5.092 5.341 5.588 5.830 6.069 6.302 6.530 6.753 6.969 7.179 7.383 7.579 7.769 7.952 8.127 8.296 8.457 8.611 8.757 8.896 9.029 9.154 9.272 9.384 9.488 0.000 1.213 2.137 2.852 3.412 3.853 4.199 4.468 4.675 4.830 4.942 5.016 5.059 5.074 5.066 5.038 4.991 4.930 4.854 4.767 4.669 4.563 4.449 4.328 4.201 4.069 3.934 3.795 3.654 3.510 3.366 3.221 3.076 2.931 2.787 2.645 2.504 2.365 2.230 2.097 1.967 24.263 18.468 14.311 11.206 8.811 6.917 5.391 4.140 3.100 2.227 1.486 0.854 0.309 -0.161 -0.570 -0.926 -1.236 -1.507 -1.744 -1.951 -2.130 -2.286 -2.420 -2.535 -2.631 -2.711 -2.776 -2.826 -2.864 -2.889 -2.902 -2.904 -2.896 -2.878 -2.850 -2.814 -2.769 -2.716 -2.655 -2.588 -2.514
12 10
Position (m)

6 5
Speed (m/s)

8 6 4 2 0 0 1 2
Time t (s) Position Speed

4 3 2 1 0 3 4 5

Problem 4.176

[5] Part 1/2

Problem 4.176

[5] Part 2/2

Problem *4.177

[5] Part 1/3

Problem 4.133

Problem *4.177

[5] Part 2/3

Problem *4.177

[5] Part 3/3

Problem *4.178

[5] Part 1/2

*4.179 *4.179

*4.179

Problem *4.178

[5] Part 2/2

Problem *4.179

[5] Part 1/4

4.137

Problem *4.179

[5] Part 2/4

Problem *4.179

[5] Part 3/4

Problem *4.179

[5] Part 4/4

Problem *4.180

[3] Part 1/2

Problem *4.180

[3] Part 2/2

Problem *4.165

Problem *4.181
Example 4.6

[2]

Problem *4.182

[3]

Problem *4.168

Problem *4.183

[3]

Problem *4.169

Problem *4.184

[3]

Problem *4.170

Problem *4.185

[3]

Problem *4.186

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


The given data is

Data on rotating spray system Torque required to hold stationary; steady-state speed

= 999

kg m
3

kg mflow = 15 s

D = 0.015 m

ro = 0.25 m

ri = 0.05 m

= 0.005 m

Governing equation: Rotating CV

For no rotation ( = 0) this equation reduces to a single scalar equation Tshaft = r Vxyz Vxyz dA 2 2 2 2 Tshaft = 2 r V V dr = 2 V r dr = V ro ri r r
i i mflow ro ro

or

where V is the exit velocity with respect to the CV

V =

2 ro ri

)
mflow ro + ri Tshaft = 4 ro ri
2

Hence

mflow 2 2 Tshaft = ro ri 2 (ro ri)


Tshaft = 1 4 15 kg
2

( (

) )

999 kg 0.005 m ( 0.25 0.05) s

( 0.25 + 0.05)

Tshaft = 16.9 N m

For the steady rotation speed the equation becomes

r 2 Vxyz dV = r Vxyz Vxyz dA

The volume integral term

r 2 Vxyz dV must be evaluated for the CV. The velocity in the CV

varies with r. This variation can be found from mass conservation For an infinitesmal CV of length dr and cross-section A at radial position r, if the flow in is Q, the flow out is Q + dQ, and the loss through the slot is Vdr. Hence mass conservation leads to ( Q + dQ) + V drdQQ = V dr = 0 Q ( r) = V r + const

At the inlet (r = ri)

Q = Qi =

mflow 2

Hence

Q = Qi + V ri r =

mflow mflow + ri r 2 ro ri 2

) (

Q =

mflow 1 + 2

ri r mflow ro r = ro ri ro ri 2

and along each rotor the water speed is

v ( r) =

mflow ro r Q = A 2 A ro ri

Hence the term -

r 2 V dV becomes xyz
o mflow ro r r 2 Vxyz dV = 4 A r v ( r) dr = 4 r dr 2 r ro ri i r i r ro

or

ro + ri 2 ri 3 ro ro r r 2 Vxyz dV = 2 mflow r dr = mflow 3 ro ri ro ri r

ro

Recall that

2 2 2 r V V xyz xyz dA = V ro ri r 2 Vxyz dV = r Vxyz Vxyz dA ro + ri 2 ri 3 ro 2 2 2 mflow = V ro ri 3 ro ri


3 2

Hence equation

becomes

Solving for

3 ro ri V ro ri = 3 2 mflow ro + ri 2 ri 3 ro

= 461 rpm

Problem *4.187

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


The given data is

Data on rotating spray system Torque required to hold stationary; steady-state speed

= 999

kg m
3

kg mflow = 15 s

D = 0.015 m

ro = 0.25 m

ri = 0.05 m

= 0.005 m

Governing equation: Rotating CV

For no rotation ( = 0) this equation reduces to a single scalar equation Tshaft = r Vxyz VxyzdA Tshaft = 2 r
ro

or

r V V dr
i

where V is the exit velocity with respect to the CV. We need to find V(r). To do this we use mass conservation, and the fact that the distribution is linear r ri V ( r) = Vmax ro ri so V ( r) =

( (

) ) ) )

and

mflow 1 2 Vmax ro ri = 2

mflow r ri 2 ro ri

Hence

mflow r ri 2 r Tshaft = 2 r V dr = 2 r r r i o i r

ro

ro

) 2 )

dr

mflow ri + 3 ro Tshaft = 6 ro ri

( (

Tshaft =

1 6

15

kg

m 1 ( 0.05 + 3 0.25) 999 kg 0.005 m ( 0.25 0.05)

Tshaft = 30 N m

For the steady rotation speed the equation becomes r 2 Vxyz dV = r Vxyz Vxyz dA

r 2 V dV The volume integral term must be evaluated for the CV. The velocity in the CV xyz varies with r. This variation can be found from mass conservation

For an infinitesmal CV of length dr and cross-section A at radial position r, if the flow in is Q, the flow out is Q + dQ, and the loss through the slot is Vdr Hence mass conservation leads to m m flow r ri flow r ri dr = Qi dr Q ( r) = Qi 2 2 ro ri ro ri r r
r

( Q + dQ) + V dr Q = 0

dQ = V dr

) )

) )

At the inlet (r = ri)

Q = Qi =

mflow 2

Hence

mflow r ri Q ( r) = 1 2 ro ri

( (

) 2 )
2

and along each rotor the water speed is

mflow r ri Q v ( r) = = 1 A 2 A ro ri

( (

) 2 )
2 ro

r 2 V dV Hence the term xyz becomes r 1 2 mflow r


i ro 2

ro r v ( r) dr = 4 4 A r i

mflow r ri r 1 2 ro ri

( (

) dr 2 )
2

or

(ro r) dr = m 1 r 2 + 1 r r 1 r 2 flow 6 o 2 3 i o 2 i ro ri) (


2

Recall that

mflow ri + 3 ro r V V xyz xyz dA = 6 r r o i

Hence equation

r 2 Vxyz dV = r Vxyz Vxyz dA 1 2 1 1 2 mflow (ri + 3 ro) mflow ro + ri ro ri = 6 (ro ri) 3 2 6


2

becomes

Solving for

mflow ri + 3 ro

r 2 + 2 r r 3 r 2 r r i o i ( o i) o

= 1434 rpm

Problem *4.188

[3]

Problem *4.189

[3]

Problem *4.175

Problem *4.190

[3]

Problem *4.176

Problem *4.191

[3]

Problem *4.192

[4]

Problem *4.178

Problem *4.193

[4]

Problem *4.179

Problem *4.194

[4] Part 1/2

Problem *4.179 cont'd

Problem *4.194

[4] Part 2/2

Problem *4.180

Problem *4.195

[4] Part 1/3

Problem *4.180 cont'd

Problem *4.195

[4] Part 2/3

Problem *4.180 cont'd

Problem *4.195

[4] Part 3/3

Problem *4.181

Problem *4.196

[5] Part 1/2

Problem *4.181 cont'd

Problem *4.196

[5] Part 2/2

Problem *4.197

[5] Part 1/2

Problem *4.197

[5] Part 2/2

Problem 4.183

Problem 4.198

[2]

Problem 4.199

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Compressed air bottle Rate of temperature change

Basic equations: Continuity; First Law of Thermodynamics for a CV

Assumptions: 1) Adiabatic 2) No work 3) Neglect KE 4) Uniform properties at exit 5) Ideal gas From continuity t t MCV + mexit = 0 MCV = mexit where mexit is the mass flow rate at the exit (Note: Software does not allow a dot!)

From the 1st law

0 =

p p u dM + u + mexit = u M + M u + u + mexit t t t

Hence

dT p u mexit + M cv + u mexit + mexit = 0 dt M = Vol so

But

mexit p dT = dt M cv mexit p dT = 2 dt Vol cv = 209 kg m


3

For air

p R T

= 20 10

kg K 1 6 N 2 286.9 N m ( 60 + 273) K m
3 2

Hence

m dT kg 1 kg K K 6 N = 0.064 = 0.05 20 10 2 3 717.4 N m 209 kg dt s s m 0.5 m

Problem 4.200

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equations:

Data on centrifugal water pump Pump efficiency

(4.56) Ws Pin Q = 0.02 m s


3

p = SGHg g h Available data: D1 = 0.1 m = 1000 kg m


3

D2 = 0.1 m SGHg = 13.6

Pin = 6.75 kW p2 = 240 kPa

h1 = 0.2 m

Assumptions: 1) Adiabatic 2) Only shaft work 3) Steady 4) Neglect u 5) z = 0 6) Incompressible 7) Uniform flow
2 2 V1 V2 Ws = p1 v1 + m + p v + m 2 ( rate) 2 2 2 ( rate)

Then Since

mrate = Q

and

V1 = V2

(from continuity)

Ws = Q p2 v2 p1 v1 = Q p2 p1 p1 = Hg g h Ws = Q p1 p2 = Ws Pin or

)
p1 = 26.7 kPa The negative sign indicates work in

p1 = SGHg g h1 Ws = 5.33 kW = 79.0 %

Problem 4.187

Problem 4.201

[2]

Problem 4.186

Problem 4.202

[2]

Problem 4.188

Problem 4.203

[2]

Problem 4.204

[3]

zmax V2 z x

CV (b)

CV (a)

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on fire boat hose system Volume flow rate of nozzle; Maximum water height; Force on boat

Basic equation: First Law of Thermodynamics for a CV

Assumptions: 1) Neglect losses 2) No work 3) Neglect KE at 1 4) Uniform properties at exit 5) Incompressible 6) patm at 1 and 2

Hence for CV (a)

V 2 2 Ws = + g z2 mexit 2

mexit = V2 A2

where mexit is mass flow rate (Note: Software cannot render a dot!) which is a cubic for V2!

Hence, for V2 (to get the flow rate) we need to solve

1 V 2 + g z V A = W 2 2 2 2 s 2

To solve this we could ignore the gravity term, solve for velocity, and then check that the gravity term is in fact minor. Alternatively we could manually iterate, or use a calculator or Excel, to solve. The answer is Hence the flow rate is Q = V2 A2 = V2 D 2 4
2

V2 = 114

ft s

To find zmax, use the first law again to (to CV (b)) to get zmax = = g mexit g Q Ws Ws zmax = 15 hp

ft 1 Q = 114 ft s 4 12 Ws = g zmax mexit


550 ft lbf s 2 3

ft Q = 0.622 s

Q = 279 gpm

1 hp

s ft 32.2 ft 1.94 slug

s 0.622 ft
3

slug ft s lbf
2

zmax = 212 ft

For the force in the x direction when jet is horizontal we need x momentum

Then

Rx = u1 V1 A1 + u2 V2 A2 = 0 + V2 Q Rx = 1.94 slug ft
3

R x = Q V 2 Rx = 138 lbf

0.622

ft ft lbf s 114 s s slug ft

Problem 4.189

Problem 4.205

[3]

Problem *4.191

Problem *4.206

[4] Part 1/2

Problem *4.191 cont'd

Problem *4.206

[4] Part 2/2

Problem 4.192

Problem 4.207

[4] Part 1/2

Problem 4.192 cont'd

Problem 4.207

[4] Part 2/2

Problem 5.1

[1]

Problem 5.2

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation:

Velocity fields Which are 3D incompressible

u+

v +

w =0

Assumption: Incompressible flow a) u ( x , y , z , t) = y + 2 x z x


2

v ( x , y , z , t ) = 2 y z + x y z y x
2

w ( x , y , z , t) = z

1 2 2 3 4 x z + x y 2
2

u ( x , y , z , t) 2 z

v ( x , y , z , t ) x z 2 z y z

w ( x , y , z , t) x z

Hence

u+

v +

w =0
2

INCOMPRESSIBLE z 2 x t y t 2
2

b)

u ( x , y , z , t) = x y z t x

v ( x , y , z , t ) = x y z t y x
2

w( x , y , z , t) = z

) )

u ( x , y , z , t) t y z

v ( x , y , z , t ) t x z

w( x , y , z , t ) z t x t y

(2

Hence

u+

v+

w =0

INCOMPRESSIBLE

c)

u ( x , y , z , t) = x + y + z

v ( x , y , z , t) = x y + z

w ( x , y , z , t) = 2 x z + y + z

u ( x , y , z , t) 2 x

y x

v ( x , y , z , t) 1

w ( x , y , z , t) 1 2 x

Hence

u+

v+

w =0

INCOMPRESSIBLE

Problem 5.3

[1]

Problem 5.4

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation:

x component of velocity y component for incompressible flow; Valid for unsteady?; How many y components?

( u) +

( v) +

( w ) +

=0

Assumption: Incompressible flow; flow in x-y plane Hence x u+ y v =0 or y v = x u = x [ A x ( y B ) ] = A ( y B )

Integrating

y2 v ( x , y) = A ( y B) dy = A B y + f ( x) 2 This basic equation is valid for steady and unsteady flow (t is not explicit) There are an infinite number of solutions, since f(x) can be any function of x. The simplest is f(x) = 0 v ( x , y) = A

y2 2

B y

v ( x , y) = 6 y

y 2

Problem 5.5

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation:

x component of velocity y component for incompressible flow; Valid for unsteady? How many y components?

( u) +

( v ) +

( w) +

=0

Assumption: Incompressible flow; flow in x-y plane Hence x u+ y v =0 or y v = x u = x

( x3 3 x y2) = ( 3 x2 3 y2)

Integrating

2 2 2 3 v ( x , y) = 3 x 3 y dy = 3 x y + y + f ( x) This basic equation is valid for steady and unsteady flow (t is not explicit) There are an infinite number of solutions, since f(x) can be any function of x. The simplest is f(x) = 0 v ( x , y) = y 3 x y
3 2

Problem 5.6

[2]

Problem 5.7

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation:

y component of velocity x component for incompressible flow; Simplest x components?

( u) +

( v ) +

( w) +

=0

Assumption: Incompressible flow; flow in x-y plane Hence x u+ y v =0 or x u = y v =


2 2 2 2 A x y y x = A x y x + A x y 2 y y

Integrating

3 2 3 2 2 1 4 u ( x , y) = A 3 x y x dx = A x y + A x + f ( y) 2 4

This basic equation is valid for steady and unsteady flow (t is not explicit) There are an infinite number of solutions, since f(y) can be any function of y. The simplest is f(y) = 0 u ( x , y) = 1 4 3 2 2 A x A x y 4 2 u ( x , y) = 1 4 2 2 x 3 x y 2

Problem 5.8

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation:

x component of velocity y component for incompressible flow; Valid for unsteady? How many y components?

( u) +

( v) +

( w ) +

=0

Assumption: Incompressible flow; flow in x-y plane Hence x u+ y v =0 or

x y = A e b cos y v = u = A e cos y x x b b b

x b

Integrating

x x A b y dy = A e b sin y + f ( x) v ( x , y) = e cos b b b

This basic equation is valid for steady and unsteady flow (t is not explicit) There are an infinite number of solutions, since f(x) can be any function of x. The simplest is f(x) = 0
x b x 5

y v ( x , y) = A e sin b

y v ( x , y) = 10 e sin 5

Problem 5.9

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation:

y component of velocity x component for incompressible flow; Simplest x component

( u) +

( v) +

( w ) +

=0

Assumption: Incompressible flow; flow in x-y plane Hence x u+ y v =0 or x u = y v =

2 x y y 2 2 x +y

2 x (x2 3 y2) = 2 ( 2 2)3 ) x +y

Integrating

u ( x , y) = u ( x , y) = 1

2 2 2 2 2 2 x (x2 3 y2) dx = x y + f ( y) = x + y 2 y + f ( y) ( 2 2)3 (x2 + y2)2 (x2 + y2)2 x +y

x +y u ( x , y) = 1 x +y
2

2 y

2 2

(x

+y

+ f ( y)

The simplest form is

2 y

2 2

(x2 + y2)
2

Note: Instead of this approach we could have verified that u and v satisfy continuity 1

x x2 + y2

+ 2 x y 0 2 y 2 (x2 + y2) (x2 + y2)


2 y

However, this does not verify the solution is the simplest

Problem 5.10

[2]

Problem 5.11

[3]

Problem 5.12

[3]

Problem 5.13

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on boundary layer y component of velocity ratio; location of maximum value; plot velocity profiles; evaluate at particular point

3 y 1 y 3 u ( x , y) = U 2 ( x) 2 ( x)
3 3 y 1 y u ( x , y) = U 2 c x 2 c x

and

( x) = c x

so

For incompressible flow

u+

v =0

Hence

d v ( x , y) = u ( x , y) dy dx y3 x5 y x3 3 v ( x , y) = U dy c3 2 c 2 4
4 y2 y v ( x , y) = U 3 5 8 2 3 2 2 c x c x

and

du 3 y = U 5 dx 4
3

y c x
3 2

3 2 c x

so

v ( x , y) =

2 4 1 y y U 2 8 x

The maximum occurs at

y=

as seen in the corresponding Excel workbook

vmax =

1 U 1 1 8 x 2 3 vmax U = 0.00188

At = 5 mm and x = 0.5 m, the maximum vertical velocity is

To find when v /U is maximum, use Solver v /U 0.00188 v /U 0.000000 0.000037 0.000147 0.000322 0.000552 0.00082 0.00111 0.00139 0.00163 0.00181 0.00188 y /d 1.0 y /d 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0

Vertical Velocity Distribution In Boundary layer


1.0 0.8 y / 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.0 0.0000

0.0005

0.0010 v /U

0.0015

0.0020

Problem 5.14

[3]

Problem 5.15

[3]

Problem 5.16

[4]

Problem 5.17
Consider a water stream from a jet of an oscillating lawn sprinkler. corresponding pathline and streakline.

[5]

Describe the

Open-Ended Problem Statement: Consider a water stream from a jet of an oscillating lawn sprinkler. Describe the corresponding pathline and streakline. Discussion: Refer back to the discussion of streamlines, pathlines, and streaklines in Section 2-2. Because the sprinkler jet oscillates, this is an unsteady flow. Therefore pathlines and streaklines need not coincide. A pathline is a line tracing the path of an individual fluid particle. The path of each particle is determined by the jet angle and the speed at which the particle leaves the jet. Once a particle leaves the jet it is subject to gravity and drag forces. If aerodynamic drag were negligible, the path of each particle would be parabolic. The horizontal speed of the particle would remain constant throughout its trajectory. The vertical speed would be slowed by gravity until reaching peak height, and then it would become increasingly negative until the particle strikes the ground. The effect of aerodynamic drag is to reduce the particle speed. With drag the particle will not rise as high vertically nor travel as far horizontally. At each instant the particle trajectory will be lower and closer to the jet compared to the no-friction case. The trajectory after the particle reaches its peak height will be steeper than in the no-friction case. A streamline is a line drawn in the flow that is tangent everywhere to the velocity vectors of the fluid motion. It is difficult to visualize the streamlines for an unsteady flow field because they move laterally. However, the streamline pattern may be drawn at an instant. A streakline is the locus of the present locations of fluid particles that passed a reference point at previous times. As an example, choose the exit of a jet as the reference point. Imagine marking particles that pass the jet exit at a given instant and at uniform time intervals later. The first particle will travel farthest from the jet exit and on the lowest trajectory; the last particle will be located right at the jet exit. The curve joining the present positions of the particles will resemble a spiral whose radius increases with distance from the jet opening.

Problem 5.18

[2]

Problem 5.19

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation:

r component of velocity component for incompressible flow; How many components

1 1 r Vr + V z + = 0 V + r r r z t

Assumption: Incompressible flow; flow in r- plane Hence 1 1 r Vr + V =0 r r r

( )

( )

or

V =

(r Vr) = r r

cos ( ) r

cos ( ) r
2

Integrating

sin ( ) cos ( ) d = V ( r , ) = + f ( r) 2 2 r r V ( r , ) = sin ( ) r


2

+ f ( r)

There are an infinite number of solutions as f(r) can be any function of r The simplest form is V ( r , ) = sin ( ) r
2

Problem 5.20

[2]

Problem 5.21

[4]

169 5.2c.

(3.19)

(Page 169)

5.2c.

Problem 5.22

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

The velocity field Whether or not it is a incompressible flow; sketch various streamlines

Vr = For incompressible flow

A r

V =

B r

1 d 1 d r Vr + V = 0 r dr r d 1 d 1 d r Vr + V = 0 r dr r d dr r d = Vr V 1 dr = A d r B
A B

( (

) )

1 d r Vr = 0 r dr Flow is incompressible
2

1 d V =0 r d

Hence

For the streamlines

r dr r d = A B

so

Integrating

ln ( r ) =

A + const B

Equation of streamlines is r = C e

(a) For A = B = 1 m2/s, passing through point (1m, /2)


2 2

r=e

(b) For A = 1 m2/s, B = 0 m2/s, passing through point (1m, /2) = 2


2 4 2 0 2 4

(c) For A = 0 m2/s, B = 1 m2/s, passing through point (1m, /2) r = 1 m

(a) (b) (c)

Problem *5.23

[2]

Problem *5.24

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation:

Velocity field Stream function

( u) +

( v) +

( w ) +

=0

u=

v=

Assumption: Incompressible flow; flow in x-y plane Hence x u+ y v =0 y or x [ y ( 2x + 2) ] +


2 x ( x + 1) y 0 y

Hence

u = y ( 2 x + 1) =
2

2 2 y ( x , y) = y ( 2 x + 1) dy = x y + + f ( x) 2

and

v = x ( x + 1) y = x x 3 2
2 3 2

3 2 x x 2 2 ( x , y) = x ( x + 1) y dx = + x y + g ( y) 3 2

Comparing these

f ( x) =

and
2 3

g ( y) =

y 2

The stream function is ( x , y) =

y x 2 x + x y 2 2 3

Checking

u ( x , y) =

2 2 3 x x y + x y2 u ( x , y) = y + 2 x y 2 3 y 2 2 2 3 x x y + x y2 v ( x , y) = x2 + x y2 2 3 x 2

v ( x , y) =

Problem *5.25

[2]

Problem *5.26

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

The velocity field Whether or not it is a incompressible flow; sketch stream function

Vr = For incompressible flow

A r

V =

B r

1 d 1 d r Vr + V = 0 r dr r d 1 d 1 d r Vr + V = 0 r dr r d = r Vr = A

( (

) )

1 d r Vr = 0 r dr Flow is incompressible

1 d V =0 r d

Hence

For the stream function

= A + f ( r )

Integrating

B = V = r r

= B ln ( r ) + g( )

Comparing, stream function is

= A B ln ( r )

Problem *5.27

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation:

Velocity field Whether it's 1D, 2D or 3D flow; Incompressible or not; Stream function

( u) +

( v) +

( w ) +

=0

v=

w =

Assumption: Incompressible flow; flow in y-z plane (u = 0) Velocity field is a function of y and z only, so is 2D y z

Check for incompressible

v+

w =0

2 2 2 2 y y 3 z 3 y 3 z y

2 2 2 2 z z 3 y 3 z 3 y z

Hence

v+

w =0

Flow is INCOMPRESSIBLE

Hence

v = y y 3 z

(2

)=

2 2 3 3 ( y , z) = y y 3 z dz = y z y z + f ( y) 2 2 3 3 ( y , z) = z z 3 y dy = y z + z y + g ( z) and g ( z) = 0

and

w = z z 3 y

(2

) =

Comparing these

f ( y) = 0
3 3

The stream function is

( y , z) = z y z y z

Checking

u ( y , z) =

(z y3 z3 y) u (y , z) = y3 3 y z2 (z y3 z3 y) w (y , z) = z3 3 y2 z

w ( y , z) =

Problem *5.28

[3]

Problem *5.29
U h y x

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equations:

Linear velocity profile Stream function ; y coordinate for half of flow

u=

v=

y and we have u = U h

v=0

Assumption: Incompressible flow; flow in x-y plane Check for incompressible x u+ y v =0 y

y U 0 x h Hence x u+ y v =0

00

Flow is INCOMPRESSIBLE
2 U y y ( x , y) = U dy = + f ( x) 2 h h

Hence

u = U

y = h y x

and

v=0=

( x , y) = 0 dx = g ( y) and
2

Comparing these

f ( x) = 0 U y ( x , y) = 2 h
h

g ( y) =

U y 2 h

The stream function is

For the flow (0 < y < h)

U U h Q = u dy = y dy = 0 0 h 2 Q = 0 2
2 hhalf

For half the flow rate

U u dy = h 0

hhalf

y dy =

U hhalf 2 h

1 U h U h = 2 2 4 hhalf = 1 2 h = 1.5 m 2 s = 1.06 m s

Hence

hhalf =

1 2 h 2

Problem *5.30

[3]

Problem *5.31

[3]

Problem *5.32

[3]

Problem *5.33

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on boundary layer Stream function; locate streamlines at 1/4 and 1/2 of total flow rate

3 y 1 y 3 u ( x , y) = U 2 2
For the stream function u =

and

( x) = c x

3 y 1 y 3 = U y 2 2 3 y 1 y = U + f ( x) 4 8 3
2 4

Hence

3 y 1 y 3 = U dy 2 2

Let = 0 = 0 along y = 0, so f(x) = 0, so The total flow rate in the boundary layer is

3 y 2 1 y 4 = U 4 8

Q 3 1 5 = ( ) ( 0) = U = U W 4 8 8 At 1/4 of the total

3 y 2 1 y 4 1 5 0 = U = U 4 8 4 8
y y 24 4 = 5
2 4

or

4 X 24 X + 5 = 0

where

X = 24 +

y 24 4 4 5 = 5.784 2 4
2

The solution to the quadratic is X = Hence y =

24

24 4 4 5 2 4

X = 0.216

Note that the other root is

X = 0.465

3 y 2 1 y 4 1 5 At 1/2 of the total flow 0 = U = U 4 8 2 8


y y 12 2 = 5 The solution to the quadratic is X = y = 12 12 4 2 5. 2 2
2 2 4

or

2 X 12 X + 5 = 0

where

X = 12 +

y 12 4 2 5 = 5.55 2 2
2

X = 0.450

Note that the other root is

Hence

X = 0.671

Problem *5.34

[3]

Problem *5.35

[3]

Problem 5.36

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equations

Velocity field Whether flow is incompressible; Acceleration of particle at (2,1)

u+

v =0

u ( x , y) = A x 6 x y + y For incompressible flow x u+ y v =0

(4

2 2

) (

v ( x , y) = A 4 x y 4 x y

) ) ( )

Checking Hence

4 2 2 4 3 2 A x 6 x y + y A 4 x 12 x y x

3 3 3 2 A 4 x y 4 x y A 4 x 12 x y y

u+

v =0

The acceleration is given by

For this flow

ax = u

u + v

u
4

ax = A x 6 x y + y ax = 4 A x x + y ay = u x v + v y
2

(4

2 2

A (x4 6 x2 y2 + y4) + A (4 x y3 4 x3 y) A (x4 6 x2 y2 + y4)


y

(2

)3 )
A (4 x y3 4 x3 y) + A (4 x y3 4 x3 y) A (4 x y3 4 x3 y)
y

v
4

ay = A x 6 x y + y ay = 4 A y x + y Hence at (2,1)
2

(4

2 2

(2

3 3

1 1 2 2 ax = 4 4 3 2 m ( 2 m) + ( 1 m) m s
2

m ax = 62.5 2 s m ay = 31.3 2 s a = ax + ay
2 2

3 1 1 2 2 ay = 4 1 m ( 2 m) + ( 1 m) 4 3 m s

a = 69.9

m s
2

Problem 5.37

[2]

Problem 5.38

[2]

Problem 5.39

[2]

Problem 5.40

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equations

x component of velocity field Simplest y component for incompressible flow; Acceleration of particle at (1,3)

u=

v =

We are given

u ( x , y) = A x 10 x y + 5 x y

(5

3 2

) ) ( )

10 3 3 5 3 2 4 5 5 Hence for incompressible flow ( x , y) = u dy = A x 10 x y + 5 x y dy = A x y 3 x y + x y + f ( x) v ( x , y) = Hence The simplest is The acceleration is given by x xy =

( )

2 3 5) ( 4 + F ( x) 4 2 3 5 v ( x , y) = A ( 5 x y 10 x y + y )

10 3 3 5 4 2 3 5 5 A x y x y + x y + f ( x) = A 5 x y 10 x y + y + F ( x) 3 x where F(x) is an arbitrary function of x

v ( x , y) = A 5 x y 10 x y + y

For this flow

ax = u

u + v

ax = A x 10 x y + 5 x y
2

(5

3 2

x
2

A (x5 10 x3 y2 + 5 x y4) A (5 x4 y 10 x2 y3 + y5) A (x5 10 x3 y2 + 5 x y4)


y
4

ax = 5 A x x + y ay = u x v + v y

(2

ay = A x 10 x y + 5 x y
2

(5

3 2

ay = 5 A y x + y Hence at (1,3)

x
2

A (5 x4 y 10 x2 y3 + y5) A (5 x4 y 10 x2 y3 + y5) A (5 x4 y 10 x2 y3 + y5)


y
4

4 1 1 2 2 ax = 5 1 m ( 1 m) + ( 3 m) 2 4 m s 4 1 1 2 2 ay = 5 3 m ( 1 m) + ( 3 m) 2 4 m s 2

ax = 1.25 10

4m 2

ay = 3.75 10

4m 2

a =

ax + ay

a = 3.95 10

4m 2

Problem 5.41

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


The given data is

Velocity field Whether flow is incompressible; expression for acceleration; evaluate acceleration along axes and along y = x

A = 10 x x

m s

u ( x , y) =

A x x +y
2 2

v ( x , y) =

A y x +y
2 2

For incompressible flow

u+

y y

v =0

Hence, checking

u+

v = A

(x2 y2) + A (x2 y2) = 0 (x2 + y2)2 (x2 + y2)2

Incompressible flow

The acceleration is given by

du du A x A x y + A y 2 A x y For the present steady, 2D flow ax = u + v = 2 2 2 2 2 2 dx dy 2 2 x +y x + y x2 + y2 x +y


2

(2

ax =

A x

(x2 + y2)2
A y
2

dv dv A x 2 A x y A y A x y ay = u + v = + 2 2 2 2 2 2 dx dy x + y x2 + y2 x + y x2 + y2
2

(2

ay =

(x2 + y2)

Along the x axis

A 100 ax = = 3 3 x x ax = 0 A x r
4 2 2

ay = 0 A 100 ay = = 3 3 y y
2

Along the y axis

Along the line x = y

ax = r=

100 x r
4

ay =

A y r
4

100 y r
4

where

x +y

For this last case the acceleration along the line x = y is a= A A 100 2 2 2 2 ax + ay = x + y = = 4 3 3 r r r
2 2

a=

A r

100 r
3

In each case the acceleration vector points towards the origin, proportional to 1/distance3, so the flow field is a radial decelerating flow

Problem 5.42

[2]

Problem 5.43

[2]

Problem 5.44

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:

Flow in a pipe with variable diameter Expression for particle acceleration; Plot of velocity and acceleration along centerline

Assumptions: 1) Incompressible flow 2) Flow profile remains unchanged so centerline velocity can represent average velocity Basic equations Q = V A D 4
2

For the flow rate

Q = V A = V

But

D = Di +

( Do Di) x
L

where Di and Do are the inlet and exit diameters, and x is distance along the pipe of length L: D(0) = Di, D(L) = Do.
2

Hence

( Do Di) x Di + D i L Vi = V
2

V = Vi

Di

2 2

(Do Di) x Di + L
m s

Vi

1 +

Some representative values are V ( 0 m) = 1

Do 1 Di x L L m V = 2.56 s 2

V ( x) =

Vi

1 +
V ( L) = 16 m s

Do 1 Di x L

The acceleration is given by

For this flow

ax = V

ax =

Vi

1 +

Do 1 Di x L

Di = 2 5 x Do Do x 1 1 Di Di L x + 1 1 + L L
Vi

2 Vi

2 Do

2 V i ax ( x) =

2 Do

Di

Do x 1 Di L + 1 L

m Some representative values are ax ( 0 m) = 0.75 2 s The following plots can be done in Excel
20 15

m L ax = 7.864 2 2 s

m ax ( L) = 768 2 s

V (m/s)

10 5 0 0.5 1 1.5 2

x (m)
0 0.5 1 1.5 2

a (m/s2)

200 400 600 800

x (m)

Problem 5.45

[2]

Problem 5.46

[2]

Problem 5.47

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data on pollution concentration Plot of concentration; Plot of concentration over time for moving vehicle; Location and value of maximum rate change

Basic equation: Material derivative

D =u +v +w + Dt x y z t
u=U v=0 w =0

For this case we have

x x a 2 a c ( x) = A e e
x

Hence

Dc dc U A 1 2 a 2 a a d a = u e e e = U A e = Dt dx a 2 dx

We need to convert this to a function of time. For this motion u = U so x = U t Dc U A 1 2 a = e e Dt a 2 The following plots can be done in Excel

U t

U t a

10

c (ppm)

110 210 310

x (m)

510

Dc/Dt (ppm/s)

0 510 110
5

0.1

0.2

0.3

0.4

0.5

t (s)
The maximum rate of change is when d Dc d U A 1 2 a a e e = 0 = dx Dt dx a 2

U A a 1 2 a e e =0 2 4 a

or

x 2 a

1 4

1 xmax = 2 a ln ( 4) = 2 1 m ln 4 tmax = xmax U = 2.77 m s 20 m

xmax = 2.77 m tmax = 0.138 s

xmax xmax 1 2 a U A a = e e Dt a 2 2.77 2.77 Dcmax 1 2 1 m 1 5 1 = 20 10 ppm e e Dt s 1 m 2

Dcmax

Dcmax Dt

= 1.25 10

5 ppm

Note that there is another maximum rate, at t = 0 (x = 0) Dcmax Dt Dcmax Dt

= 20

m 1 1 5 10 ppm 1 s 1 m 2

= 1 10

4 ppm

Problem 5.48

[2]

Problem 5.49

[2]

Problem 5.50

[3]

Problem 5.51

[3]

Problem 5.52

[3]

Problem 5.53

[3]

Problem 5.54

[3]

Problem 5.55

[3]

Problem 5.56

[3]

Problem 5.57
U y x

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equations

Flow in boundary layer Expression for particle acceleration ax; Plot acceleration and find maximum at x = 0.8 m
3 v 1 y 1 y = U x 2 3

u y y = 2 U

= c x

We need to evaluate First, substitute

ax = u

u + v y ( x)

u so u 2 = 2 U v 1 1 3 = U x 2 3 d 1 2 = c x dx 2
1 2 1

( x , y) =

Then

du d y d u = = U ( 2 2 ) 2 dx d dx x 1 u = U ( 2 2 ) c x x 2
1 2

U = u = U ( 2 2 ) x 2 x x

1 = U ( 2 2 ) c x 1 2 2 c x
2

2 2 y 2 U y y 2 U 2 = u = U 2 = 2 y y

Hence

ax = u

u + v

u = U 2

2 2 U

) (

) + U 1 1 3 2 U ( 2)

x 2 3 y

Collecting terms

2 2 2 3 4 U 2 4 3 1 4 U y 4 y 1 y ax = + = + x x 3 3 3 3 2 dax U 2 4 3 =0= 2 + 4 d x 3

To find the maximum

or

1 + 2 y = 0.634

2 2 = 0 3

The solution of this quadratic ( < 1) is

3 3 2

= 0.634

At = 0.634

U U 2 4 3 1 4 ax = 0.634 + 0.634 0.634 = 0.116 x x 3 3 1 m ax = 0.116 6 s 0.8 m


2

m ax = 5.22 2 s

The following plot can be done in Excel


1 0.9 0.8 0.7 0.6

y/d

0.5 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 6 5 4 3 2 1 0

a (m/s2)

Problem 5.58

[3] Part 1/2

Problem 5.58

[3] Part 2/2

Problem 5.59

[3]

Problem 5.60

[3]

Problem 5.61

[3] Part 1/2

Problem 5.61

[3] Part 2/2

A0 = L = b = = U0 =

0.5 5 0.1 0.2 5

m2 m m-1 s-1 m/s

0 5 10 60 t= 2 2 2 x (m) a x (m/s ) a x (m/s ) a x (m/s ) a x (m/s2) 0.0 1.00 1.367 2.004 2.50 0.5 1.05 1.552 2.32 2.92 1.0 1.11 1.78 2.71 3.43 1.5 1.18 2.06 3.20 4.07 2.0 1.25 2.41 3.82 4.88 2.5 1.33 2.86 4.61 5.93 3.0 1.43 3.44 5.64 7.29 3.5 1.54 4.20 7.01 9.10 4.0 1.67 5.24 8.88 11.57 4.5 1.82 6.67 11.48 15.03 5.0 2.00 8.73 15.22 20.00 For large time (> 30 s) the flow is essentially steady-state

Acceleration in a Nozzle
22 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 0.0 0.5 1.0

Acceleration ax (m/s2)

t=0s t=1s t=2s t = 10 s

1.5

2.0

2.5 x (m)

3.0

3.5

4.0

4.5

5.0

Problem 5.63

[3] Part 1/2

Problem 5.63

[3] Part 2/2

Problem 5.64
5.53

[4]

5.53

5.53

Problem 5.65

[4]

Problem 5.66

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Velocity components Which flow fields are irrotational

For a 2D field, the irrotionality the test is

u =0

(a)

x x x

y y y

2 2 2 2 2 u = 3 x + y 2 y 2 y x = 4 x + y 4 y 0

) (

Not irrotional

(b)

u = ( 2 y + 2 x) ( 2 y 2 x) = 4 x 0

Not irrotional

(c)

u = t

( 2) (2) = t2 2 0

Not irrotional

(d)

u = ( 2 y t) ( 2 x t) = 2 x t 2 y t 0

Not irrotional

Problem 5.67

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Flow field If the flow is incompressible and irrotational

Basic equations: Incompressibility a)


7 5 2 3 4

u+
6

v =0

Irrotationality
6

u =0
2 5 7 6

u ( x , y) = x 21 x y + 35 x y 7 x y x
6 4 2 2 4

v ( x , y) = 7 x y 35 x y + 21 x y y
6

4 3

u ( x , y) 7 x 105 x y + 105 x y 7 y y

v ( x , y) 7 x 105 x y + 105 x y 7 y

4 2

2 4

Hence

u+

v 0
7 5 2 3 4 6

COMPRESSIBLE
6 4 3 2 5 7 5

b)

u ( x , y) = x 21 x y + 35 x y 7 x y x v ( x , y) 42 x y 140 x y + 42 x y y
5 3 3

v ( x , y) = 7 x y 35 x y + 21 x y y y
5 3 3

u ( x , y) 42 x y 140 x y + 42 x y

Hence

u 0

ROTATIONAL

Note that if we define

v ( x , y) = 7 x y 35 x y + 21 x y y

4 3

2 5

then the flow is incompressible and irrotational!

Problem 5.68

[2]

5.12

Problem 5.69

[2]

Problem 5.70

[2]

Problem *5.71

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equations:

Stream function If the flow is incompressible and irrotational

x y x Note: The fact that exists means the flow is incompressible, but we check anyway ( x , y) = x 15 x y + 15 x y y
6 4 2 2 4 6 4 5

Incompressibility

u+

v =0

Irrotationality

u =0

Hence

u ( x , y) =

( x , y) 60 x y 30 x y 6 y

2 3

v ( x , y) =

( x , y) 60 x y 6 x 30 x y

3 2

For incompressibility x Hence For irrotationality x Hence x v ( x , y) 180 x y 30 x 30 y y


2 2 4 4

u ( x , y) 120 x y 120 x y y

v ( x , y) 120 x y 120 x y

u+

v =0

INCOMPRESSIBLE

u ( x , y) 30 x 180 x y + 30 y

2 2

u =0

IRROTATIONAL

Problem *5.72

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equations:

Stream function If the flow is incompressible and irrotational

x y x Note: The fact that exists means the flow is incompressible, but we check anyway ( x , y) = 3 x y 10 x y + 3 x y
5 3 3 5 4

Incompressibility

u+

v =0

Irrotationality

u =0

Hence

u ( x , y) =

( x , y) 3 x 30 x y + 15 x y

3 2

v ( x , y) =

( x , y) 30 x y 15 x y 3 y

2 3

For incompressibility x Hence For irrotationality x Hence x v ( x , y) 60 x y 60 x y y


3 3

u ( x , y) 15 x 90 x y + 15 y y

2 2

v ( x , y) 90 x y 15 x 15 y

2 2

u+

v =0

INCOMPRESSIBLE

u ( x , y) 60 x y 60 x y

u =0

IRROTATIONAL

Problem *5.73

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

The stream function Whether or not the flow is incompressible; whether or not the flow is irrotational

The stream function is

2 x + y u = d = dy

(2

A
2

)
2

The velocity components are

A y x +y

(2

v=

d = dx

A x x +y

(2

)2
Incompressible

Because a stream function exists, the flow is: Alternatively, we can check with x x For a 2D field, the irrotionality the test is x x u+ y y y y v =0 4 A x y x +y u =0 4 A x y x +y

u+

v =

=0

Incompressible

u =

A x 3 y

( 2 2) A (3 x2 y2) = 2 A 0 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 ( x + y ) ( x + y ) ( x + y )

Not irrotational

Problem *5.74

[2]

Problem *5.75

[3]

Problem *5.76

[2]

Problem *5.77

[2]

Problem *5.78

[2]

Problem 5.79

[3]

Problem *5.80

[3]

Problem 5.81

[3]

Problem 5.82

[2]

Problem 5.83

[3]

Problem 5.84

[3]

Problem 5.85

[2]

Problem 5.86

[2]

Problem 5.87

N =4 x = 0.333 Eq. 5.34 (LHS) 1.000 -1.000 0.000 0.000 x 0.000 0.333 0.667 1.000 Inverse Matrix 1.000 0.750 0.563 0.422 0.000 1.333 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.333 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.333 (RHS) 1 0 0 0 Result 1.000 0.750 0.563 0.422 Exact 1.000 0.717 0.513 0.368 Error 0.000 0.000 0.001 0.001 0.040

0.000 0.750 0.563 0.422

0.000 0.000 0.750 0.563

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.750

N =8 x = 0.143 Eq. 5.34 (LHS) 1.000 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 Inverse Matrix 1 1.000 0.875 0.766 0.670 0.586 0.513 0.449 0.393 0.000 1.143 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.143 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.143 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.143 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.143 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.143 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.143 (RHS) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

x 0.000 0.143 0.286 0.429 0.571 0.714 0.857 1.000

2 0.000 0.875 0.766 0.670 0.586 0.513 0.449 0.393

3 0.000 0.000 0.875 0.766 0.670 0.586 0.513 0.449

4 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.875 0.766 0.670 0.586 0.513

5 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.875 0.766 0.670 0.586

6 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.875 0.766 0.670

7 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.875 0.766

8 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.875

Result 1.000 0.875 0.766 0.670 0.586 0.513 0.449 0.393

Exact 1.000 0.867 0.751 0.651 0.565 0.490 0.424 0.368

Error 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.019

N = 16 x = 0.067 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 x 0.000 0.067 0.133 0.200 0.267 0.333 0.400 0.467 0.533 0.600 0.667 0.733 0.800 0.867 0.933 1.000

Eq. 5.34 (LHS) 1 1.000 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 Inverse Matrix 1.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637 0.597 0.559 0.524 0.492 0.461 0.432 0.405 0.380 x 0.333 0.143 0.067

2 0.000 1.067 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

3 0.000 0.000 1.067 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

4 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.067 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

5 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.067 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

6 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.067 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

7 8 9 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.067 0.000 0.000 -1.000 1.067 0.000 0.000 -1.000 1.067 0.000 0.000 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

10 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.067 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

11 12 13 14 15 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.067 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 -1.000 1.067 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 -1.000 1.067 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 -1.000 1.067 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 -1.000 1.067 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 -1.000

16 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.067

(RHS) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Result 1.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637 0.597 0.559 0.524 0.492 0.461 0.432 0.405 0.380 Exact 1.000 0.936 0.875 0.819 0.766 0.717 0.670 0.627 0.587 0.549 0.513 0.480 0.449 0.420 0.393 0.368 Error 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.009

0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637 0.597 0.559 0.524 0.492 0.461 0.432 0.405 0.380

0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637 0.597 0.559 0.524 0.492 0.461 0.432 0.405

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637 0.597 0.559 0.524 0.492 0.461 0.432

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637 0.597 0.559 0.524 0.492 0.461

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637 0.597 0.559 0.524 0.492

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637 0.597 0.559 0.524

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637 0.597 0.559

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637 0.597

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938

N 4 8 16

Error 0.040 0.019 0.009

1.0 0.9 0.8 0.7 N=4 N=8 N = 16 Exact solution

u
0.6 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0

0.1

0.01

Actual Error Least Squares Fit


0.001 0.01

0.10

1.00

Problem 5.88

New Eq. 5.34:

ui 1 + (1 + x )ui = 2x sin( xi )

N =4 x = 0.333 Eq. 5.34 (LHS) 1.000 -1.000 0.000 0.000 x 0.000 0.333 0.667 1.000 Inverse Matrix 1.000 0.750 0.563 0.422 0.000 1.333 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.333 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.333 (RHS) 0 0.21813 0.41225 0.56098 Result 0.000 0.164 0.432 0.745 Exact 0.000 0.099 0.346 0.669 Error 0.000 0.001 0.002 0.001 0.066

0.000 0.750 0.563 0.422

0.000 0.000 0.750 0.563

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.750

N =8 x = 0.143 Eq. 5.34 (LHS) 1.000 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 Inverse Matrix 1 1.000 0.875 0.766 0.670 0.586 0.513 0.449 0.393 0.000 1.143 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.143 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.143 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.143 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.143 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.143 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.143 (RHS) 0 0.04068 0.08053 0.11873 0.15452 0.18717 0.21599 0.24042

x 0.000 0.143 0.286 0.429 0.571 0.714 0.857 1.000

2 0.000 0.875 0.766 0.670 0.586 0.513 0.449 0.393

3 0.000 0.000 0.875 0.766 0.670 0.586 0.513 0.449

4 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.875 0.766 0.670 0.586 0.513

5 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.875 0.766 0.670 0.586

6 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.875 0.766 0.670

7 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.875 0.766

8 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.875

Result 0.000 0.036 0.102 0.193 0.304 0.430 0.565 0.705

Exact 0.000 0.019 0.074 0.157 0.264 0.389 0.526 0.669

Error 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.032

N = 16 x = 0.067 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 x 0.000 0.067 0.133 0.200 0.267 0.333 0.400 0.467 0.533 0.600 0.667 0.733 0.800 0.867 0.933 1.000

Eq. 5.34 (LHS) 1 1.000 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 Inverse Matrix 1.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637 0.597 0.559 0.524 0.492 0.461 0.432 0.405 0.380 x 0.333 0.143 0.067

2 0.000 1.067 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

3 0.000 0.000 1.067 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

4 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.067 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

5 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.067 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

6 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.067 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

7 8 9 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.067 0.000 0.000 -1.000 1.067 0.000 0.000 -1.000 1.067 0.000 0.000 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

10 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.067 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

11 12 13 14 15 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.067 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 -1.000 1.067 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 -1.000 1.067 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 -1.000 1.067 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 -1.000 1.067 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 -1.000

16 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.067

(RHS) 0 0.00888 0.01773 0.02649 0.03514 0.04363 0.05192 0.05999 0.06779 0.07529 0.08245 0.08925 0.09565 0.10162 0.10715 0.1122 Result 0.000 0.008 0.024 0.048 0.078 0.114 0.155 0.202 0.253 0.308 0.366 0.426 0.489 0.554 0.620 0.686 Exact 0.000 0.004 0.017 0.037 0.065 0.099 0.139 0.184 0.234 0.288 0.346 0.407 0.470 0.535 0.602 0.669 Error 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.016

0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637 0.597 0.559 0.524 0.492 0.461 0.432 0.405 0.380

0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637 0.597 0.559 0.524 0.492 0.461 0.432 0.405

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637 0.597 0.559 0.524 0.492 0.461 0.432

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637 0.597 0.559 0.524 0.492 0.461

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637 0.597 0.559 0.524 0.492

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637 0.597 0.559 0.524

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637 0.597 0.559

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637 0.597

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938

N 4 8 16

Error 0.066 0.032 0.016

0.0

0.2

0.4

N=4 N=8 N = 16 x 0.6 Exact solution

0.8

1.0

Actual Error Least Squares Fit

.01

0.10

1.00

Problem 5.89

New Eq. 5.34:

ui 1 + (1 + x )ui = x xi2

N =4 x = 0.333 Eq. 5.34 (LHS) 1.000 -1.000 0.000 0.000 x 0.000 0.333 0.667 1.000 Inverse Matrix 1.000 0.750 0.563 0.422 0.000 1.333 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.333 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.333 (RHS) 2 0.03704 0.14815 0.33333 Result 2.000 1.528 1.257 1.193 Exact 2.000 1.444 1.111 1.000 Error 0.000 0.002 0.005 0.009 0.128

0.000 0.750 0.563 0.422

0.000 0.000 0.750 0.563

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.750

N =8 x = 0.143 Eq. 5.34 (LHS) 1.000 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 Inverse Matrix 1 1.000 0.875 0.766 0.670 0.586 0.513 0.449 0.393 0.000 1.143 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.143 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.143 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.143 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.143 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.143 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.143 (RHS) 2 0.00292 0.01166 0.02624 0.04665 0.07289 0.10496 0.14286

x 0.000 0.143 0.286 0.429 0.571 0.714 0.857 1.000

2 0.000 0.875 0.766 0.670 0.586 0.513 0.449 0.393

3 0.000 0.000 0.875 0.766 0.670 0.586 0.513 0.449

4 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.875 0.766 0.670 0.586 0.513

5 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.875 0.766 0.670 0.586

6 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.875 0.766 0.670

7 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.875 0.766

8 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.875

Result 2.000 1.753 1.544 1.374 1.243 1.151 1.099 1.087

Exact 2.000 1.735 1.510 1.327 1.184 1.082 1.020 1.000

Error 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.001 0.001 0.001 0.057

N = 16 x = 0.067 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 x 0.000 0.067 0.133 0.200 0.267 0.333 0.400 0.467 0.533 0.600 0.667 0.733 0.800 0.867 0.933 1.000

Eq. 5.34 (LHS) 1 1.000 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 Inverse Matrix 1.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637 0.597 0.559 0.524 0.492 0.461 0.432 0.405 0.380 x 0.333 0.143 0.067

2 0.000 1.067 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

3 0.000 0.000 1.067 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

4 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.067 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

5 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.067 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

6 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.067 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

7 8 9 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.067 0.000 0.000 -1.000 1.067 0.000 0.000 -1.000 1.067 0.000 0.000 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

10 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.067 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

11 12 13 14 15 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.067 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 -1.000 1.067 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 -1.000 1.067 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 -1.000 1.067 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 -1.000 1.067 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 -1.000

16 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.067

(RHS) 2 0.0003 0.00119 0.00267 0.00474 0.00741 0.01067 0.01452 0.01896 0.024 0.02963 0.03585 0.04267 0.05007 0.05807 0.06667 Result 2.000 1.875 1.759 1.652 1.553 1.463 1.381 1.309 1.245 1.189 1.143 1.105 1.076 1.056 1.044 1.041 Exact 2.000 1.871 1.751 1.640 1.538 1.444 1.360 1.284 1.218 1.160 1.111 1.071 1.040 1.018 1.004 1.000 Error 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.027

0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637 0.597 0.559 0.524 0.492 0.461 0.432 0.405 0.380

0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637 0.597 0.559 0.524 0.492 0.461 0.432 0.405

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637 0.597 0.559 0.524 0.492 0.461 0.432

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637 0.597 0.559 0.524 0.492 0.461

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637 0.597 0.559 0.524 0.492

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637 0.597 0.559 0.524

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637 0.597 0.559

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637 0.597

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679 0.637

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724 0.679

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772 0.724

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824 0.772

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879 0.824

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938 0.879

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.938

N 4 8 16

Error 0.128 0.057 0.027

0.0

0.2

0.4

N=4 N=8 N = 16 0.6 Exact solution 0.8

1.0

Actual Error Least Squares Fit

.01

0.10

1.00

Problem 5.90
u du du A = A = dt dy

Equation of motion:

du A + u = 0 dt M du + k u = 0 dt

New Eq. 5.34:

u i 1 + (1 + k x )u i = 0

N =4 t = 0.333 Eq. 5.34 (LHS) 1.000 -1.000 0.000 0.000 t 0.000 0.333 0.667 1.000 Inverse Matrix 1.000 0.484 0.234 0.113 0.000 2.067 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 2.067 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 2.067 (RHS) 1 0 0 0 Result 1.000 0.484 0.234 0.113 Exact 1.000 0.344 0.118 0.041 Error 0.000 0.005 0.003 0.001 0.098

A = = = M = k =

0.01 0.25

m2 mm

2 0.4 N.s/m 5 kg -1 3.2 s

0.000 0.484 0.234 0.113

0.000 0.000 0.484 0.234

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.484

N =8 t = 0.143 Eq. 5.34 (LHS) 1.000 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 Inverse Matrix 1 1.000 0.686 0.471 0.323 0.222 0.152 0.104 0.072 0.000 1.457 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.457 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.457 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.457 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.457 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.457 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.457 (RHS) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

t 0.000 0.143 0.286 0.429 0.571 0.714 0.857 1.000

2 0.000 0.686 0.471 0.323 0.222 0.152 0.104 0.072

3 0.000 0.000 0.686 0.471 0.323 0.222 0.152 0.104

4 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.686 0.471 0.323 0.222 0.152

5 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.686 0.471 0.323 0.222

6 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.686 0.471 0.323

7 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.686 0.471

8 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.686

Result 1.000 0.686 0.471 0.323 0.222 0.152 0.104 0.072

Exact 1.000 0.633 0.401 0.254 0.161 0.102 0.064 0.041

Error 0.000 0.000 0.001 0.001 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.052

N = 16 t = 0.067 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 t 0.000 0.067 0.133 0.200 0.267 0.333 0.400 0.467 0.533 0.600 0.667 0.733 0.800 0.867 0.933 1.000

Eq. 5.34 (LHS) 1 1.000 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 Inverse Matrix 1.000 0.824 0.679 0.560 0.461 0.380 0.313 0.258 0.213 0.175 0.145 0.119 0.098 0.081 0.067 0.055 t 0.333 0.143 0.067

2 0.000 1.213 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

3 0.000 0.000 1.213 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

4 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.213 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

5 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.213 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

6 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.213 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

7 8 9 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.213 0.000 0.000 -1.000 1.213 0.000 0.000 -1.000 1.213 0.000 0.000 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

10 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.213 -1.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

11 12 13 14 15 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.213 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 -1.000 1.213 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 -1.000 1.213 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 -1.000 1.213 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 -1.000 1.213 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 -1.000

16 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1.213

(RHS) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Result 1.000 0.824 0.679 0.560 0.461 0.380 0.313 0.258 0.213 0.175 0.145 0.119 0.098 0.081 0.067 0.055 Exact 1.000 0.808 0.653 0.527 0.426 0.344 0.278 0.225 0.181 0.147 0.118 0.096 0.077 0.062 0.050 0.041 Error 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.027

0.000 0.824 0.679 0.560 0.461 0.380 0.313 0.258 0.213 0.175 0.145 0.119 0.098 0.081 0.067 0.055

0.000 0.000 0.824 0.679 0.560 0.461 0.380 0.313 0.258 0.213 0.175 0.145 0.119 0.098 0.081 0.067

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.824 0.679 0.560 0.461 0.380 0.313 0.258 0.213 0.175 0.145 0.119 0.098 0.081

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.824 0.679 0.560 0.461 0.380 0.313 0.258 0.213 0.175 0.145 0.119 0.098

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.824 0.679 0.560 0.461 0.380 0.313 0.258 0.213 0.175 0.145 0.119

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.824 0.679 0.560 0.461 0.380 0.313 0.258 0.213 0.175 0.145

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.824 0.679 0.560 0.461 0.380 0.313 0.258 0.213 0.175

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.824 0.679 0.560 0.461 0.380 0.313 0.258 0.213

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.824 0.679 0.560 0.461 0.380 0.313 0.258

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.824 0.679 0.560 0.461 0.380 0.313

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.824 0.679 0.560 0.461 0.380

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.824 0.679 0.560 0.461

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.824 0.679 0.560

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.824 0.679

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.824

N 4 8 16

Error 0.098 0.052 0.027

1.2 1.0 0.8


u (m/s)

N=4 N=8 N = 16 Exact solution

0.6 0.4 0.2 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.4


t (s)

0.6

0.8

1.0

Actual Error Least Squares Fit

0.1

0.01 0.01

0.10

1.00

Problem 5.91
ui =
2 u g i 1 + x u g i

1 + 2 x u g i

x =

0.333 x

Iteration 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Exact

0.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000

0.333 1.000 0.800 0.791 0.791 0.791 0.791 0.791 0.750

0.667 1.000 0.800 0.661 0.650 0.650 0.650 0.650 0.600

1.000 1.000 0.800 0.661 0.560 0.550 0.550 0.550 0.500

Residuals 0.204 0.127 0.068 0.007 0.000 0.000

1E+00 1E-01 1E-02 1E-03

1.0 0.9 0.8 Iterations = 2 Iterations = 4 Iterations = 6 Exact Solution

Residual R

1E-04 1E-05 1E-06 1E-07 1E-08 1E-09 1E-10 0 1 2 3 4 5 6

u
0.7 0.6 0.5 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0
Iteration N

Problem 5.92
ui =
2 ug i 1 + x ug i

1 + 2x ug i

x =

0.0667 x 0.467 1.000 0.941 0.889 0.842 0.799 0.761 0.726 0.694 0.693 0.693 0.693 0.693 0.693 0.693 0.693 0.693 0.693 0.693 0.693 0.693 0.693 0.693 0.693 0.693 0.693 0.693 0.693 0.693 0.693 0.693 0.693 0.682

Iteration 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Exact

0.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000

0.067 1.000 0.941 0.941 0.941 0.941 0.941 0.941 0.941 0.941 0.941 0.941 0.941 0.941 0.941 0.941 0.941 0.941 0.941 0.941 0.941 0.941 0.941 0.941 0.941 0.941 0.941 0.941 0.941 0.941 0.941 0.941 0.938

0.133 1.000 0.941 0.889 0.888 0.888 0.888 0.888 0.888 0.888 0.888 0.888 0.888 0.888 0.888 0.888 0.888 0.888 0.888 0.888 0.888 0.888 0.888 0.888 0.888 0.888 0.888 0.888 0.888 0.888 0.888 0.888 0.882

0.200 1.000 0.941 0.889 0.842 0.841 0.841 0.841 0.841 0.841 0.841 0.841 0.841 0.841 0.841 0.841 0.841 0.841 0.841 0.841 0.841 0.841 0.841 0.841 0.841 0.841 0.841 0.841 0.841 0.841 0.841 0.841 0.833

0.267 1.000 0.941 0.889 0.842 0.799 0.799 0.799 0.799 0.799 0.799 0.799 0.799 0.799 0.799 0.799 0.799 0.799 0.799 0.799 0.799 0.799 0.799 0.799 0.799 0.799 0.799 0.799 0.799 0.799 0.799 0.799 0.789

0.333 1.000 0.941 0.889 0.842 0.799 0.761 0.760 0.760 0.760 0.760 0.760 0.760 0.760 0.760 0.760 0.760 0.760 0.760 0.760 0.760 0.760 0.760 0.760 0.760 0.760 0.760 0.760 0.760 0.760 0.760 0.760 0.750

0.400 1.000 0.941 0.889 0.842 0.799 0.761 0.726 0.725 0.725 0.725 0.725 0.725 0.725 0.725 0.725 0.725 0.725 0.725 0.725 0.725 0.725 0.725 0.725 0.725 0.725 0.725 0.725 0.725 0.725 0.725 0.725 0.714

0.533 1.000 0.941 0.889 0.842 0.799 0.761 0.726 0.694 0.664 0.664 0.664 0.664 0.664 0.664 0.664 0.664 0.664 0.664 0.664 0.664 0.664 0.664 0.664 0.664 0.664 0.664 0.664 0.664 0.664 0.664 0.664 0.652

0.600 1.000 0.941 0.889 0.842 0.799 0.761 0.726 0.694 0.664 0.637 0.637 0.637 0.637 0.637 0.637 0.637 0.637 0.637 0.637 0.637 0.637 0.637 0.637 0.637 0.637 0.637 0.637 0.637 0.637 0.637 0.637 0.625

0.667 1.000 0.941 0.889 0.842 0.799 0.761 0.726 0.694 0.664 0.637 0.612 0.612 0.612 0.612 0.612 0.612 0.612 0.612 0.612 0.612 0.612 0.612 0.612 0.612 0.612 0.612 0.612 0.612 0.612 0.612 0.612 0.600

0.733 1.000 0.941 0.889 0.842 0.799 0.761 0.726 0.694 0.664 0.637 0.612 0.589 0.589 0.589 0.589 0.589 0.589 0.589 0.589 0.589 0.589 0.589 0.589 0.589 0.589 0.589 0.589 0.589 0.589 0.589 0.589 0.577

0.800 1.000 0.941 0.889 0.842 0.799 0.761 0.726 0.694 0.664 0.637 0.612 0.589 0.568 0.567 0.567 0.567 0.567 0.567 0.567 0.567 0.567 0.567 0.567 0.567 0.567 0.567 0.567 0.567 0.567 0.567 0.567 0.556

0.867 1.000 0.941 0.889 0.842 0.799 0.761 0.726 0.694 0.664 0.637 0.612 0.589 0.568 0.548 0.547 0.547 0.547 0.547 0.547 0.547 0.547 0.547 0.547 0.547 0.547 0.547 0.547 0.547 0.547 0.547 0.547 0.536

0.933 1.000 0.941 0.889 0.842 0.799 0.761 0.726 0.694 0.664 0.637 0.612 0.589 0.568 0.548 0.529 0.529 0.529 0.529 0.529 0.529 0.529 0.529 0.529 0.529 0.529 0.529 0.529 0.529 0.529 0.529 0.529 0.517

1.000 1.000 0.941 0.889 0.842 0.799 0.761 0.726 0.694 0.664 0.637 0.612 0.589 0.568 0.548 0.529 0.512 0.511 0.511 0.511 0.511 0.511 0.511 0.511 0.511 0.511 0.511 0.511 0.511 0.511 0.511 0.511 0.500

1.0

0.9

0.8

Iterations = 10 Iterations = 20 Iterations = 30 Exact Solution

u
0.7

0.6

0.5 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0

Problem 5.93
ui = ui u g i 1 1 1 ui 1 = ui ug i + ui u g i ug i

ui ui 1 1 + =0 ui x ui ui 1 1 ui ug i 1 + ug i ug i x ui ui 1 1 2 ui + x ug i ug i =0

=0

x 2x ui 1 2 = ui 1 u ug i gi 2x ui 1 ug i ui = x 1 2 ug i

x = Iteration 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 Exact x = Iteration 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60

0.667 x 0.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 0.133 0.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 2.000 0.133 2.000 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 1.931 0.267 2.000 1.931 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 1.859 0.400 2.000 1.931 1.859 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 1.785 0.533 2.000 1.931 1.859 1.785 1.707 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 1.706 0.667 2.000 1.931 1.859 1.785 1.707 1.625 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 1.624 0.800 2.000 1.931 1.859 1.785 1.707 1.625 1.539 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 1.538 x 0.933 2.000 1.931 1.859 1.785 1.707 1.625 1.539 1.447 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.445 1.067 2.000 1.931 1.859 1.785 1.707 1.625 1.539 1.447 1.348 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.346 1.200 2.000 1.931 1.859 1.785 1.707 1.625 1.539 1.447 1.348 1.242 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.239 1.333 2.000 1.931 1.859 1.785 1.707 1.625 1.539 1.447 1.348 1.242 1.124 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.120 1.467 2.000 1.931 1.859 1.785 1.707 1.625 1.539 1.447 1.348 1.242 1.124 0.991 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 0.984 1.600 2.000 1.931 1.859 1.785 1.707 1.625 1.539 1.447 1.348 1.242 1.124 0.991 0.836 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 0.822 1.733 2.000 1.931 1.859 1.785 1.707 1.625 1.539 1.447 1.348 1.242 1.124 0.991 0.836 0.639 0.601 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 0.599 1.867 2.000 1.931 1.859 1.785 1.707 1.625 1.539 1.447 1.348 1.242 1.124 0.991 0.836 0.639 0.329 0.899 0.363 9.602 0.572 0.225 0.359 3.969 0.537 0.191 0.300 0.600 0.246 0.403 -0.345 -11.373 0.623 0.261 0.442 -0.013 -0.027 -0.059 -0.136 -0.414 5.624 0.554 0.209 0.329 0.919 0.367 -11.148 0.624 0.262 0.443 -0.010 -0.019 -0.041 -0.090 -0.231 -1.171 0.916 0.366 -18.029 0.614 0.256 0.426 -0.097 2.000 2.000 1.931 1.859 1.785 1.707 1.625 1.539 1.447 1.348 1.242 1.124 0.991 0.836 0.639 0.329 2.061 0.795 0.034 -0.016 -0.034 -0.070 -0.160 -1.332 0.797 -0.182 -0.584 1.734 0.097 0.178 0.572 -19.981 0.637 -0.234 -1.108 0.255 1.023 -0.366 132.420 -0.416 27.391 0.545 -0.510 1.749 0.802 0.044 0.252 0.394 -2.929 0.542 -0.918 0.322 3.048 -0.180 -0.402 -2.886 1.025 0.122 2.526 0.520 -0.509 1.962 0.667 2.000 1.600 1.577 1.577 1.577 1.577 1.577 1.633 1.333 2.000 1.600 1.037 0.767 1.211 0.873 0.401 1.155 2.000 2.000 1.600 1.037 -0.658 -5.158 1.507 -0.017 0.000

Exact

2.000

1.932

1.862

1.789

1.713

1.633

1.549

1.461

1.366

1.265

1.155

1.033

0.894

0.730

0.516

0.000

2.5 2.0 1.5 Iterations = 2 Iterations = 4 Iterations = 6 Exact Solution

u
1.0 0.5 0.0 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0

x
2.5 2.0 1.5 Iterations = 20 Iterations = 40 Iterations = 60 Exact Solution

u
1.0 0.5 0.0 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0

Problem 5.94
du 2 = k (U u ) dt v =U u dv = du M M dv = kv 2 dt dv k 2 v =0 + dt M
2 vi2 2v g i vi v g i

vi vi 1 k 2 + 2vg i vi vg i = 0 t M k 2 t v g i v g i 1 + M vi = k 1 + 2 t v g i M

t =

1.000

k = M = t

10 70

N.s2/m2 kg

Iteration 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40

0 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500 7.500

1 7.500 4.943 4.556 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547 4.547

2 7.500 4.943 3.496 3.153 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139 3.139

3 7.500 4.943 3.496 2.623 2.364 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350 2.350

4 7.500 4.943 3.496 2.623 2.061 1.870 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857 1.857

5 7.500 4.943 3.496 2.623 2.061 1.679 1.536 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525 1.525

6 7.500 4.943 3.496 2.623 2.061 1.679 1.407 1.297 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288 1.288

7 7.500 4.943 3.496 2.623 2.061 1.679 1.407 1.205 1.119 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112 1.112

8 7.500 4.943 3.496 2.623 2.061 1.679 1.407 1.205 1.051 0.982 0.976 0.976 0.976 0.976 0.976 0.976 0.976 0.976 0.976 0.976 0.976 0.976 0.976 0.976 0.976 0.976 0.976 0.976 0.976 0.976 0.976 0.976 0.976 0.976 0.976 0.976 0.976 0.976 0.976 0.976 0.976

9 7.500 4.943 3.496 2.623 2.061 1.679 1.407 1.205 1.051 0.930 0.874 0.868 0.868 0.868 0.868 0.868 0.868 0.868 0.868 0.868 0.868 0.868 0.868 0.868 0.868 0.868 0.868 0.868 0.868 0.868 0.868 0.868 0.868 0.868 0.868 0.868 0.868 0.868 0.868 0.868 0.868

10 7.500 4.943 3.496 2.623 2.061 1.679 1.407 1.205 1.051 0.930 0.832 0.786 0.781 0.781 0.781 0.781 0.781 0.781 0.781 0.781 0.781 0.781 0.781 0.781 0.781 0.781 0.781 0.781 0.781 0.781 0.781 0.781 0.781 0.781 0.781 0.781 0.781 0.781 0.781 0.781 0.781

11 7.500 4.943 3.496 2.623 2.061 1.679 1.407 1.205 1.051 0.930 0.832 0.752 0.713 0.709 0.709 0.709 0.709 0.709 0.709 0.709 0.709 0.709 0.709 0.709 0.709 0.709 0.709 0.709 0.709 0.709 0.709 0.709 0.709 0.709 0.709 0.709 0.709 0.709 0.709 0.709 0.709

12 7.500 4.943 3.496 2.623 2.061 1.679 1.407 1.205 1.051 0.930 0.832 0.752 0.686 0.653 0.649 0.649 0.649 0.649 0.649 0.649 0.649 0.649 0.649 0.649 0.649 0.649 0.649 0.649 0.649 0.649 0.649 0.649 0.649 0.649 0.649 0.649 0.649 0.649 0.649 0.649 0.649

13 7.500 4.943 3.496 2.623 2.061 1.679 1.407 1.205 1.051 0.930 0.832 0.752 0.686 0.629 0.601 0.598 0.598 0.598 0.598 0.598 0.598 0.598 0.598 0.598 0.598 0.598 0.598 0.598 0.598 0.598 0.598 0.598 0.598 0.598 0.598 0.598 0.598 0.598 0.598 0.598 0.598

14 7.500 4.943 3.496 2.623 2.061 1.679 1.407 1.205 1.051 0.930 0.832 0.752 0.686 0.629 0.581 0.557 0.554 0.554 0.554 0.554 0.554 0.554 0.554 0.554 0.554 0.554 0.554 0.554 0.554 0.554 0.554 0.554 0.554 0.554 0.554 0.554 0.554 0.554 0.554 0.554 0.554

15 7.500 4.943 3.496 2.623 2.061 1.679 1.407 1.205 1.051 0.930 0.832 0.752 0.686 0.629 0.581 0.540 0.519 0.516 0.516 0.516 0.516 0.516 0.516 0.516 0.516 0.516 0.516 0.516 0.516 0.516 0.516 0.516 0.516 0.516 0.516 0.516 0.516 0.516 0.516 0.516 0.516

Above values are for v! To get u we compute u = U - v Iteration 10 20 40 Exact

0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000

2.953 2.953 2.953 3.879

4.361 4.361 4.361 5.114

5.150 5.150 5.150 5.720

5.643 5.643 5.643 6.081

5.975 5.975 5.975 6.320

6.212 6.212 6.212 6.490

6.388 6.388 6.388 6.618

6.524 6.524 6.524 6.716

6.626 6.632 6.632 6.795

6.668 6.719 6.719 6.860

6.668 6.791 6.791 6.913

6.668 6.851 6.851 6.959

6.668 6.902 6.902 6.998

6.668 6.946 6.946 7.031

6.668 6.984 6.984 7.061

8 7 6

u (m/s)

5 4 3 2 1 0 0 2 4 6 8 10 12

Iterations = 10 Iterations = 20 Iterations = 40 Exact Solution

14

16

t (s)

Problem 6.1

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Velocity field Acceleration of particle and pressure gradient at (1,1)

NOTE: Units of B are s-1 not ft-1s-1 Basic equations

For this flow

u ( x , y) = A y x x

(2

) B x ( )

v ( x , y) = 2 A x y + B y

ax = u

u + v

2 2 2 2 2 2 u = A y x B x A y x B x + ( 2 A x y + B y) A y x B x y x y

ax = ( B + 2 A x) A x + B x + A y ay = u x v + v

2 2 v = A y x B x ( 2 A x y + B y) + ( 2 A x y + B y) ( 2 A x y + B y) y x y

2 2 ay = ( B + 2 A x) ( B y + 2 A x y) 2 A y B x + A x y

Hence at (1,1)

1 2 2 ft ax = ( 1 + 2 1 1) 1 1 + 1 1 + 1 1 s s 1 ft 1 2 2 ft ay = ( 1 + 2 1 1) ( 1 1 + 2 1 1 1) 2 1 1 1 1 + 1 1 1 s s s s a = ax + ay
2 2

ft ax = 9 2 s ft ay = 7 2 s a = 11.4 ft s
2

= atan

ay ax

= 37.9 deg

For the pressure gradient


lbf 2
2

p = gx ax = 2

slug ft
3

ft s
2

lbf s slug ft

x
2

p = 18

ft

ft
lbf

= 0.125

psi ft

p = gy ay = 2

slug ft
3

( 32.2 7)

ft s
2

lbf s slug ft

p = 78.4

ft

ft

= 0.544

psi ft

Problem 6.2

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equations

Velocity field Acceleration of particle and pressure gradient at (0.7,2)

For this flow

u ( x , y) = A x B y ax = u x x u + v y y u = ( A x B y) x x

v ( x , y) = A y ( A x B y) + ( A y) y ( A x B y)
2

ax = A x ay = A y m ax = 0.7 2 s m ay = 2 2 s
2

ay = u

v + v
2

v = ( A x B y)

( A y) + ( A y)

( A y)

Hence at (0.7,2)

1 ax = 0.7 m s 1 ay = 2 m s a = ax + ay
2 2 2

= atan

ay ax
2

a = 2.12

m s
2

= 70.7 deg

For the pressure gradient kg m N s 0.7 p = gx ax = 1000 3 2 kg m x m s kg m N s ( 9.81 2) p = gy ay = 1000 3 2 kg m y m s


2

p = 700

Pa kPa = 0.7 m m

p = 11800

Pa kPa = 11.8 m m

Problem 6.3

[2]

Problem 6.4

[2]

Problem 6.5

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equations

Velocity field Acceleration of particle and pressure gradient at (1,1)

For this flow

u ( x , y) = A x y ax = u x u + v y

(2

) 3 B x (2
2

v ( x , y) = 2 A x y + 3 B y

u = A x y

) 3 B x )

A ( x2 y2) 3 B x ...

+ ( 2 A x y + 3 B y) ax = ( 2 A x 3 B) A x 3 B x + A y ay = u x v + v y v = A x y

2 2 A x y 3 B x y

(2

) 3 B x )

( 2 A x y + 3 B y) + ( 2 A x y + 3 B y)

( 2 A x y + 3 B y)

ay = ( 3 B y 2 A x y) ( 3 B 2 A x) 2 A y A x y Hence at (1,1) 1 2 2 ft ax = ( 2 1 1 3 1) 1 1 3 1 1 + 1 1 s s

(2

) 3 B x ( )

1 ft 1 ft 2 2 ay = ( 3 1 1 2 1 1 1) ( 3 1 2 1 1) 2 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 s s s s a = For the pressure gradient


lbf 2
2

ft ax = 1 2 s ft ay = 7 2 s a = 7.1 ft s
2

ax + ay

= atan

ay ax

= 81.9 deg

x y

p = gx ax = 2

slug ft
3

ft s
2

lbf s slug ft lbf s slug ft


2

x y

p = 2

ft

ft

= 0.0139
lbf

psi ft

p = gy ay = 2

slug ft
3

( 32.2 7)

ft s
2

p = 78.4

ft

ft

= 0.544

psi ft

Problem 6.6

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


The given data is

Velocity field Expressions for local, convective and total acceleration; evaluate at several points; evaluate pressure gradient

A = 2

1 s

= 1 x x

1 s v =0

= 2

kg m
3

u = A x sin ( 2 t)

v = A y sin ( 2 t)

Check for incompressible flow

u+

y y

Hence

u+

v = A sin ( 2 t) A sin ( 2 t) = 0

Incompressible flow

The governing equation for acceleration is

The local acceleration is then

x - component

t t

u = 2 A x cos ( 2 t)

y - component

v = 2 A y cos ( 2 t)

For the present steady, 2D flow, the convective acceleration is x - component u x x u + v y y u = A x sin ( 2 t) ( A sin ( 2 t) ) + ( A y sin ( 2 t) ) 0 = A x sin ( 2 t)
2 2

y - component

v + v

v = A x sin ( 2 t) 0 + ( A y sin ( 2 t) ) ( A sin ( 2 t) ) = A y sin ( 2 t)

The total acceleration is then

x - component

t t

u + u

x x

u + v

y y

u = 2 A x cos ( 2 t) + A x sin ( 2 t)

y - component

v + u

v + v

v = 2 A y cos ( 2 t) + A y sin ( 2 t)

Evaluating at point (1,1) at t = 0 s Local 12.6 m s Total 12.6


2

and

12.6

m s
2

Convective

m s
2

and

m s
2

m s
2

and

12.6

m s
2

t = 0.5 s

Local

12.6

m s
2

and

12.6

m s
2

Convective

m s
2

and

m s
2

Total

12.6

m s
2

and

12.6

m s
2

t = 1 s

Local

12.6

m s
2

and

12.6

m s
2

Convective

m s
2

and

m s
2

Total

12.6

m s
2

and

12.6

m s
2

The governing equation (assuming inviscid flow) for computing the pressure gradient is Hence, the components of pressure gradient (neglecting gravity) are x y Evaluated at (1,1) and time Du Dt x x

(6.1)

p =

p = 2 A x cos ( 2 t) + A x sin ( 2 t)

( (

)
2

p =

Dv Dt

p = 2 A y cos ( 2 t) + A y sin ( 2 t)

t = 0 s t = 0.5 s t = 1 s

x comp. x comp. x comp.

25.1 25.1

Pa m

y comp. y comp. y comp.

25.1

Pa m Pa m

Pa m Pa m

25.1 25.1

25.1

Pa m

Problem 6.7

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equations

Velocity field Simplest y component of velocity; Acceleration of particle and pressure gradient at (2,1); pressure on x axis

For this flow

u ( x , y) = A x

u+

v =0

so

v ( x , y) = u dy = A dy = A y + c x

Hence For acceleration

v ( x , y) = A y ax = u ay = u x x u + v y y

is the simplest y component of velocity u = A x x x ( A x) + ( A y) y ( A x) = A x


2

ax = A x ay = A y m ax = 8 2 s a = 8.94 m s
2 2

v + v
2

v = A x

( A y) + ( A y)
2

( A y)

Hence at (2,1)

2 ax = 2 m s a = ax + ay
2 2

2 ay = 1 m s = atan

m ay = 4 2 s = 26.6 deg

ay ax
2

For the pressure gradient kg m N s 8 p = gx ax = 1.50 3 2 kg m x m s kg m N s 4 p = gy ay = 1.50 3 2 kg m y m s z p = gz az = 1.50 dp = x p kg m


3 2

x y N s kg m
2

p = 12

Pa m

p = 6

Pa m Pa m

( 9.81)
x

m s
2

y
x

p = 14.7

For the pressure on the x axis 1 2 2 p ( x) = p0 A x 2

1 2 2 2 p p0 = gx ax dx = A x dx = A x 0 2 0

p ( x) = 190 kPa

1 2

1.5

2 N s 2 x 3 s kg m m kg

p ( x) = 190

3 1000

(p in kPa, x in m)

Problem 6.8

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Velocity field Expressions for velocity and acceleration along wall; plot; verify vertical components are zero; plot pressure gradient

The given data is

q = 2

m s

m q x

h = 1 m q x

= 1000

kg m
3

u=

2 x + ( y h)
2

2 x + ( y + h)
2

v=

q ( y h) 2 x + ( y h)
2 2

q ( y + h)
2 2 2 x + ( y + h)

The governing equation for acceleration is

For steady, 2D flow this reduces to (after considerable math!) x y q x x + y


2

x - component

ax = u

u + v

u =

(2

)2 h2 (h2 4 y2)
2

x2 + ( y + h) 2 x2 + ( y h) 2 2
v = q y x + y
2

y - component

ay = u

v + v

(2

)2 h 2 ( h 2 + 4 x2)
2 2

2 2 2 2 2 x + ( y + h ) x + ( y h )

For motion along the wall q x

y = 0 m q x x h x +h
2 2

u=

x + h

(2

v=0

(No normal velocity)

ax =

(2
2

ay = 0

(No normal acceleration)

The governing equation (assuming inviscid flow) for computing the pressure gradient is Hence, the component of pressure gradient (neglecting gravity) along the wall is
2

(6.1)

p =

Du Dt

p =

q x x h x +h
2

(2

(2

The plots of velocity, acceleration, and pressure gradient are shown in the associated Excel workbook. From the plots it is clear that the fluid experiences an adverse pressure gradient from the origin to x = 1 m, then a negative one promoting fluid acceleration. If flow separates, it will likely be in the region x = 0 to x = h.

The velocity, acceleration and pressure gradient are given by

q = h = =

2 1 1000

m3/s/m m kg/m3

x (m) u (m/s) a (m/s2) dp /dx (Pa/m) 0.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 6.0 7.0 8.0 9.0 10.0 0.00 0.32 0.25 0.19 0.15 0.12 0.10 0.09 0.08 0.07 0.06 0.00000 0.00000 0.01945 0.00973 0.00495 0.00277 0.00168 0.00109 0.00074 0.00053 0.00039 0.00 0.00 -19.45 -9.73 -4.95 -2.77 -1.68 -1.09 -0.74 -0.53 -0.39

Velocity Along Wall Near A Source


0.35 0.30 u (m/s) 0.25 0.20 0.15 0.10 0.05 0.00 0 1 2 3 4 5 x (m) 6 7 8 9 10

Acceleration Along Wall Near A Source


0.025 0.020 a (m/s2) 0.015 0.010 0.005 0.000 -0.005 0 1 2 3 4 5 x (m) 6 7 8 9 10

Pressure Gradient Along Wall


5 dp /dx (Pa/m) 0 -5 -10 -15 -20 -25 x (m) 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Problem 6.9

[2]

Problem 6.10

[2]

Problem 6.11

[2]

Problem 6.12

[2]

Problem 6.13

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


The given data is

Velocity field The acceleration at several points; evaluate pressure gradient


3 3

q = 2

m s

K = 1

m s

= 1000

kg m
3

Vr =

q 2 r

V =

K 2 r

The governing equations for this 2D flow are

The total acceleration for this steady flow is then r - component V V ar = Vr Vr + r r r V V a = Vr V + r r m ar = 0.101 2 s m ar = 0.101 2 s m ar = 0.0127 2 s r p = ar ar = q
2 2 3

4 r q K

- component

a =

4 r

2 3

Evaluating at point (1,0)

m a = 0.0507 2 s m a = 0.0507 2 s m a = 0.00633 2 s r p = q


2 2 3

Evaluating at point (1,/2)

Evaluating at point (2,0)

From Eq. 6.3, pressure gradient is

4 r

1 p = a r Evaluating at point (1,0) r r r p = 101 Pa m Pa m Pa m

1 q K p = 2 3 r 4 r 1 Pa p = 50.5 r m 1 Pa p = 50.5 r m 1 Pa p = 6.33 r m

Evaluating at point (1,/2)

p = 101

Evaluating at point (2,0)

p = 12.7

Problem 6.14

[3]

Problem 6.15

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:

Flow in a pipe with variable area Expression for pressure gradient and pressure; Plot them

Assumptions: 1) Incompressible flow 2) Flow profile remains unchanged so centerline velocity can represent average velocity Basic equations Q = V A

For this 1D flow

Q = ui Ai = u A

A = Ai

(Ai Ae) x
L

so

Ai u ( x) = ui = ui A

Ai
2 2

(Ai Ae) x L
2

Ai

Ai A L ui Ae Ai = i ui ax = u u + v u = ui 3 x y Ai Ae x Ai Ae Ai L + Ae x Ai x x x Ai Ai L L

Ai

) )

For the pressure

p = ax gx =

Ai L ui Ae Ai

2 2

)
x

(Ai L + Ae x Ai x)

and

dp =

p dx

x 2 2 2 Ai L ui Ae Ai dx p pi = p dx = x 3 Ai L + Ae x Ai x 0 0

This is a tricky integral, so instead consider the following:


x x

p = ax = u

1 2 u = u 2 x x

( )

Hence

2 2 2 p pi = p dx = u dx = u ( x = 0) u ( x) x 2 x 2 0 0

( )

2 2 p ( x) = pi + ui u ( x) 2
2 ui p ( x) = pi + 1 2

which we recognise as the Bernoulli equation!


2

(Ai Ae) x Ai L
Ai

The following plots can be done in Excel


30

Pressure Gradient (kPa/m)

20

10

0.5

1.5

x (m)

250

Pressure (kPa)

248 246 244 242 240 0 0.5 1 1.5 2

x (m)

Problem 6.16

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:

Flow in a pipe with variable area Expression for pressure gradient and pressure; Plot them

Assumptions: 1) Incompressible flow 2) Flow profile remains unchanged so centerline velocity can represent average velocity Basic equations Q = V A

For this 1D flow so

Q = u0 A0 = u A A0 u ( x) = u0 = A

x x a 2 a A ( x) = A0 1 + e e

u0

x x a 2 a 1 + e e

ax = u

u + v

u =

u0

x x x x a 2 a 1 + e a 1 + e e x 2 a

u0

u0 e = x 3 x x 2 a a 2 a e 2 a e e + 1

x 2 a

x 2 a 2 e 1

For the pressure

p = ax gx =

u0 e

x 2 a 2 e 1
3

x x a 2 a 2 a e e + 1
x

and

dp =

p dx

x x x 2 2 a 2 a 2 e 1 u0 e dx p pi = p dx = x 3 x x 0 a 2 a 2 a e e + 1 0 x 1 2 u = u 2 x x

This is a tricky integral, so instead consider the following:

p = ax = u

( )

Hence

2 2 2 p pi = p dx = u dx = u ( x = 0) u ( x) x 2 x 2 0 0

( )

2 2 p ( x) = p0 + u0 u ( x) 2 u0 p ( x) = p0 + 1 2
2

which we recognise as the Bernoulli equation!

x x a 2 a 1 + e e
1

The following plots can be done in Excel


0.1

Pressure Gradient (kPa/m)

0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4

10

x (m)
200

Pressure (kPa)

199.9

199.8

199.7

10

x (m)
0.1

Area (m2)

0.09

0.08

0.07

10

x (m)

Problem 6.17

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


The given data is

Nozzle geometry Acceleration of fluid particle; Plot; Plot pressure gradient; find L such that pressure gradient < 5 MPa/m in absolute value m s kg m
3

Di = 0.1 m

Do = 0.02 m D ( x) = Di + Do Di L x

L = 0.5 m

Vi = 1

= 1000

For a linear decrease in diameter

From continuity

Q = V A = V

2 2 D = Vi Di 4 4

Q = 0.00785

m s

Hence

V ( x)

2 D ( x) = Q 4 Vi

V ( x) =

4 Q Do Di x D i + L
2

or

V ( x) =

Do Di x 1 + L D i
The governing equation for this flow is

or, for steady 1D flow, in the notation of the problem d ax = V V = dx Vi d 2 dx Vi

Do Di x 1 + L D i

Do Di x 1 + L D i

ax ( x) =

( ) 5 (Do Di) x D L 1 +
2 V i D o D i
2

Di L

This is plotted in the associated Excel workbook From Eq. 6.2a, pressure gradient is x p = ax x p = 2 Vi Do Di
2

)
5

(Do Di) x Di L 1 + Di L

This is also plotted in the associated Excel workbook. Note that the pressure gradient is always negative: separation is unlikely to occur in the nozzle At the inlet x p = 3.2 kPa m At the exit x p = 10 MPa m

To find the length L for which the absolute pressure gradient is no more than 5 MPa/m, we need to solve MPa p 5 = m x 2 Vi Do Di
2

)
5

(Do Di) x Di L 1 + Di L

with x = L m (the largest pressure gradient is at the outlet) 2 Vi Do Di Di


2

Hence

Do
Di

p x

L 1 m

This result is also obtained using Goal Seek in the Excel workbook

The acceleration and pressure gradient are given by Di = Do = L = Vi = = 0.1 0.02 0.5 1 1000 m m m m/s kg/m3

x (m) a (m/s2) dp /dx (kPa/m) 0.000 0.050 0.100 0.150 0.200 0.250 0.300 0.350 0.400 0.420 0.440 0.460 0.470 0.480 0.490 0.500 3.20 4.86 7.65 12.6 22.0 41.2 84.2 194 529 843 1408 2495 3411 4761 6806 10000 -3.20 -4.86 -7.65 -12.6 -22.0 -41.2 -84.2 -194 -529 -843 -1408 -2495 -3411 -4761 -6806 -10000

For the length L required for the pressure gradient to be less than 5 MPa/m (abs) use Goal Seek L = 1.00 m

x (m) dp /dx (kPa/m) 1.00 -5000

Acceleration Through A Nozzle


12000 10000 a (m/s2) 8000 6000 4000 2000 0 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 x (m) 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5

Pressure Gradient Along A Nozzle


0 0.0 dp /dx (kPa/m) -2000 -4000 -6000 -8000 -10000 -12000 x (m) 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.5 0.5

Problem 6.18

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


The given data is

Diffuser geometry Acceleration of a fluid particle; plot it; plot pressure gradient; find L such that pressure gradient is less than 25 kPa/m

Di = 0.25 m

Do = 0.75 m D ( x) = Di + 2 2 D = Vi Di 4 4 V ( x) = 4 Q Do Di L x

L = 1 m

Vi = 5

m s

= 1000

kg m
3

For a linear increase in diameter

From continuity

Q = V A = V

Q = 0.245

m s

Hence

V ( x)

2 D ( x) = Q 4

Do Di x D i + L

or

V ( x) =

Vi

Do Di x 1 + L D i

The governing equation for this flow is

or, for steady 1D flow, in the notation of the problem ax = V

d V = dx

Vi

Do Di x 1 + L D i

d 2 dx

Vi

Do Di x 1 + L D i

Hence

ax ( x) =

( ) 5 (Do Di) x D L 1 +
2 V i D o D i
2

Di L

This is plotted in the associated Excel workbook From Eq. 6.2a, pressure gradient is x p = ax x
2

p =

2 Vi Do Di

)
5

(Do Di) x Di L 1 + Di L

This is also plotted in the associated Excel workbook. Note that the pressure gradient is adverse: separation is likely to occur in the diffuser, and occur near the entrance

At the inlet

p = 100

kPa m

At the exit

p = 412

Pa m

To find the length L for which the pressure gradient is no more than 25 kPa/m, we need to solve x kPa m 2 Vi Do Di
2

p 25

)
5

(Do Di) x Di L 1 + Di L

with x = 0 m (the largest pressure gradient is at the inlet) 2 Vi Do Di Di x p


2

Hence

L 4 m

This result is also obtained using Goal Seek in the Excel workbook

The acceleration and pressure gradient are given by Di = Do = L = Vi = = 0.25 0.75 1 5 1000 m m m m/s kg/m3

x (m) a (m/s2) dp /dx (kPa/m) 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.40 0.50 0.60 0.70 0.80 0.90 1.00 -100 -62.1 -40.2 -26.9 -18.59 -13.17 -9.54 -5.29 -3.125 -1.940 -1.256 -0.842 -0.581 -0.412 100 62.1 40.2 26.93 18.59 13.17 9.54 5.29 3.125 1.940 1.256 0.842 0.581 0.412

For the length L required for the pressure gradient to be less than 25 kPa/m use Goal Seek L = 4.00 m

x (m) dp /dx (kPa/m) 0.0 25.0

Acceleration Through a Diffuser


0 0.0 -20
2 a (m/s )

0.1

0.2

0.3

0.4

0.5

0.6

0.7

0.8

0.9

1.0

-40 -60 -80 -100 -120

x (m)

Pressure Gradient Along A Diffuser


120

dp /dx (kPa/m)

100 80 60 40 20 0 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0

x (m)

Problem 6.19

[4]

Problem 6.20

[4]

Problem 6.20

Problem 6.21

[5]

Problem 6.22

[4] Part 1/2

Problem 6.19 cont'd

Problem 6.22

[4] Part 2/2

Problem 6.23

[5]

Problem 6.24

[2]

Problem 6.25

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equations

Velocity field for doublet Expression for pressure gradient

For this flow

Vr ( r , ) =

r
2

cos ( )

V ( r , ) =

r
2

sin ( )

Vz = 0

Hence for r momentum

2 V V V gr p = Vr Vr + r r r r r

Ignoring gravity

p = cos ( ) cos ( ) + 2 r 2 r r r
For momentum Ignoring gravity g

sin ( ) 2 r cos ( ) r r2

2 sin ( ) 2 r r

p =

2 r
5

V Vr V 1 p = Vr V + V + r r r r

p = r cos ( ) sin ( ) + r 2 2 r r
The pressure gradient is purely radial

sin ( ) 2 r sin ( ) + r r2

sin ( ) cos ( ) 2 2 r r r

p =0

Problem 6.26

[2]

Problem 6.27

[2]

Problem 6.28

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Velocity field for free vortex flow in elbow Similar solution to Example 6.1; find k (above)

p =

V r

with

c V = V = r

Assumptions: 1) Frictionless 2) Incompressible 3) free vortex For this flow p p ( ) p = p2 p1 = r


r2

so

p =

c V d = p = 3 r dr r

Hence

2 2 2 2 c r2 r1 c 1 1 dr = = 3 2 2 2 2 2 r r r2 2 r1 r2 1 2

(1)

Next we obtain c in terms of Q


2 2 w c r2 dr = w c ln Q = V dA = V w dr = r r r1 1 r 1 r r

Hence

c=

Q w ln

r2 r1
2 2 2 c r2 r1 2 2

Using this in Eq 1

p = p2 p1 =

2 2 2 Q r2 r1

2 r1 r2

r2 2 2 2 w ln r1 r2 r1
2

Solving for Q

2 r1 r2 r2 Q = w ln p 2 2 r1 r2 r1

2 r1 r2 r2 k = w ln 2 2 r1 r2 r1

Problem 6.29

From Example 6.1:

or

Eq. 1

From Problem 6.28:

Eq. 2

Instead of plotting as a function of inner radius we plot as a function of r 2/r1 r2/r1 1.01 1.05 1.10 1.15 1.20 1.25 1.30 1.35 1.40 1.45 1.50 1.55 1.60 1.65 1.70 1.75 1.80 1.85 1.90 1.95 2.00 2.05 2.10 2.15 2.20 2.25 2.30 2.35 2.40 2.45 2.50 Eq. 1 0.100 0.226 0.324 0.401 0.468 0.529 0.586 0.639 0.690 0.738 0.785 0.831 0.875 0.919 0.961 1.003 1.043 1.084 1.123 1.162 1.201 1.239 1.277 1.314 1.351 1.388 1.424 1.460 1.496 1.532 1.567 Eq. 2 0.100 0.226 0.324 0.400 0.466 0.526 0.581 0.632 0.680 0.726 0.769 0.811 0.851 0.890 0.928 0.964 1.000 1.034 1.068 1.100 1.132 1.163 1.193 1.223 1.252 1.280 1.308 1.335 1.362 1.388 1.414 Error 0.0% 0.0% 0.1% 0.2% 0.4% 0.6% 0.9% 1.1% 1.4% 1.7% 2.1% 2.4% 2.8% 3.2% 3.6% 4.0% 4.4% 4.8% 5.2% 5.7% 6.1% 6.6% 7.0% 7.5% 8.0% 8.4% 8.9% 9.4% 9.9% 10.3% 10.8%

10.0%

7.5%

Error

5.0%

2.5%

0.0% 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 r2/r1 2.0 2.2 2.4 2.6

Problem 6.30

[3] Part 1/2

Problem 6.30

[3] Part 2/2

Problem 6.31

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equations

Velocity field Constant B for incompressible flow; Acceleration of particle at (2,1); acceleration normal to velocity at (2,1)

For this flow

u ( x , y) = A x + B x y x x u ( x , y) + y y

v ( x , y) = A y + B x y x

v ( x , y) =

( A x3 + B x y2) + ( A y3 + B x2 y) = 0
y

u ( x , y) +

v ( x , y) = ( 3 A + B) x + y
2 3

(2

)=0
3

Hence
2

B = 3 A

B = 0.6

1 m s
2

We can write Hence for ax

u ( x , y) = A x 3 A x y ax = u x u + v y

v ( x , y) = A y 3 A x y
2

u = A x 3 A x y
2

( (

) (A x3 3 A x y2) + (A y3 3 A x2 y) (A x3 3 A x y2)
x y

ax = 3 A x x + y For ay ay = u x v + v y

(2 (

)2
3 2

v = A x 3 A x y
2

) (A y3 3 A x2 y) + (A y3 3 A x2 y) (A y3 3 A x2 y)
x y

ay = 3 A y x + y
2

Hence at (2,1)

2 0.2 2 2 ax = 3 2 m ( 2 m) + ( 1 m) 2 m s 2 0.2 2 2 ay = 3 1 m ( 2 m) + ( 1 m) 2 m s 2

m ax = 6.00 2 s m ay = 3.00 2 s a = 6.71 m s


2

a =

ax + ay

We need to find the component of acceleration normal to the velocity vector

At (2,1) the velocity vector is at angle

A y3 3 A x2 y v vel = atan = atan A x3 3 A x y2 u 1 3 2 1 vel = atan 23 3 2 12


3 2

r V

r a

vel = 79.7 deg

At (1,2) the acceleration vector is at angle

ay accel = atan ax

1 accel = atan 2
= accel vel m an = a sin ( ) = 6.71 sin ( 106 deg) 2 s

accel = 26.6 deg = 106 deg m an = 6.45 2 s

Hence the angle between the acceleration and velocity vectors is

The component of acceleration normal to the velocity is then

Problem 6.32

[4] Part 1/2

Problem 6.32

[4] Part 2/2

Problem 6.33

[4] Part 1/2

Problem 6.33

[4] Part 2/2

Problem 6.34

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:


The given data is

x component of velocity field y component of velocity field; acceleration at several points; estimate radius of curvature; plot streamlines

= 2

m s

u=

x y

(2

(x2 + y2)2

The governing equation (continuity) is

u+

v =0 du dy = dx

Hence

v =

2 x x 3 y

(2

( x2 + y2)

) dy

Integrating (using an integrating factor)

v=

2 x y

(x2 + y2)2 (2 ) (2 )

Alternatively, we could check that the given velocities u and v satisfy continuity x y

u=

(2

x x

(x2 + y2)2

u =

2 x x 3 y

(x2 + y2)3
y v =0

v=

2 x y

(x2 + y2)2

v =

2 x x 3 y

(x2 + y2)3

so

u+

The governing equation for acceleration is

For steady, 2D flow this reduces to (after considerable math!) x - component ax = u x u + v y u

ax =

(x2 y2) 2 x (x2 3 y2) 2 x y 2 y (3 x2 y2) + ( 2 2)2 ( 2 2)3 ( 2 2)2 ( 2 2)3 x +y x +y x +y x +y


x v + v y v

ax =

2 x

(x2 + y2)3

y - component

ay = u

ay =

(x2 y2) 2 y (3 x2 y2) 2 x y 2 y (3 y2 x2) + ( 2 2)2 ( 2 2)3 ( 2 2)2 ( 2 2)3 x +y x +y x +y x +y


m s m s m s v = 0 m s m s m s
2

ay =

2 y

(x2 + y2)3

Evaluating at point (0,1)

u = 2

m ax = 0 2 s m ax = 0 2 s m ax = 0 2 s

m ay = 8 2 s m ay = 0.25 2 s m ay = 0.0333 2 s r= u ay
2

Evaluating at point (0,2)

u = 0.5

v = 0

Evaluating at point (0,3)

u = 0.222

v = 0

u The instantaneous radius of curvature is obtained from aradial = ay = r

or

For the three points

y = 1m

2 m s r =
8 m s
2

r = 0.5 m

y = 2m

0.5 m s r =
0.25 m s
2

r = 1m

y = 3m

0.2222 m s r =
0.03333 m s
2

r = 1.5 m

The radius of curvature in each case is 1/2 of the vertical distance from the origin. The streamlines form circles tangent to the x axis

The streamlines are given by

dy v = = dx u

(x2 + y2)2 = 2 x y 2 2 (x2 y2) ( x y ) (x2 + y2)2 (2


2

2 x y

so

2 x y dx + x y dy = 0

This is an inexact integral, so an integrating factor is needed 1 2 d 2 2 d x y ( 2 x y) = 2 x y dx y dy


2 dy y

First we try

R=

Then the integrating factor is

F=e

1 y
2

The equation becomes an exact integral

x x y 2 dx + dy = 0 2 y y
2 x x u = 2 dx = + f ( y) y y

(2

So

and

u=
2 2

(x2 y2) dy = x2 y + g (x)


y
2

Comparing solutions

x +y y

or

x + y = y = const y

These form circles that are tangential to the x axis, as shown in the associated Excel workbook

This function is computed and plotted below y values 2.50 2.75 5.00 5.02 4.53 4.59 4.10 4.20 3.73 3.86 3.40 3.57 3.13 3.32 2.90 3.11 2.73 2.95 2.60 2.84 2.53 2.77 2.50 2.75

2.50 2.25 2.00 1.75 1.50 1.25 1.00 0.75 0.50 0.25 0.00

0.10 62.6 50.7 40.1 30.7 22.6 15.7 10.1 5.73 2.60 0.73 0.10

0.25 25.3 20.5 16.3 12.5 9.25 6.50 4.25 2.50 1.25 0.50 0.25

0.50 13.0 10.6 8.50 6.63 5.00 3.63 2.50 1.63 1.00 0.63 0.50

0.75 9.08 7.50 6.08 4.83 3.75 2.83 2.08 1.50 1.08 0.83 0.75

1.00 7.25 6.06 5.00 4.06 3.25 2.56 2.00 1.56 1.25 1.06 1.00

1.25 6.25 5.30 4.45 3.70 3.05 2.50 2.05 1.70 1.45 1.30 1.25

1.50 5.67 4.88 4.17 3.54 3.00 2.54 2.17 1.88 1.67 1.54 1.50

1.75 5.32 4.64 4.04 3.50 3.04 2.64 2.32 2.07 1.89 1.79 1.75

2.00 5.13 4.53 4.00 3.53 3.13 2.78 2.50 2.28 2.13 2.03 2.00

2.25 5.03 4.50 4.03 3.61 3.25 2.94 2.69 2.50 2.36 2.28 2.25

3.00 5.08 4.69 4.33 4.02 3.75 3.52 3.33 3.19 3.08 3.02 3.00

3.25 5.17 4.81 4.48 4.19 3.94 3.73 3.56 3.42 3.33 3.27 3.25

3.50 5.29 4.95 4.64 4.38 4.14 3.95 3.79 3.66 3.57 3.52 3.50

3.75 5.42 5.10 4.82 4.57 4.35 4.17 4.02 3.90 3.82 3.77 3.75

4.00 5.56 5.27 5.00 4.77 4.56 4.39 4.25 4.14 4.06 4.02 4.00

4.25 5.72 5.44 5.19 4.97 4.78 4.62 4.49 4.38 4.31 4.26 4.25

4.50 5.89 5.63 5.39 5.18 5.00 4.85 4.72 4.63 4.56 4.51 4.50

4.75 6.07 5.82 5.59 5.39 5.22 5.08 4.96 4.87 4.80 4.76 4.75

5.00 6.25 6.01 5.80 5.61 5.45 5.31 5.20 5.11 5.05 5.01 5.00

x values

Problem 6.35

[4] Part 1/2

Problem 6.35

[4] Part 2/2

Problem 6.36

[5]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equations

Velocity field Constant B for incompressible flow; Equation for streamline through (1,2); Acceleration of particle; streamline curvature

For this flow

u ( x , y) = A x 6 x y + y x x u ( x , y) + y y v ( x , y) =

(4

2 2

) (

v ( x , y) = B x y x y

(3

) )

4 2 2 4 3 3 A x 6 x y + y + B x y x y = 0 x y

u ( x , y) +

v ( x , y) = B x 3 x y

(3

) + A (4 x3 12 x y2) = (4 A + B) x (x2 3 y2) = 0


B = 8 1 m s
3

Hence Hence for ax ax = u x u + v

B = 4 A

u = A x 6 x y + y
2

(4

2 2

A (x4 6 x2 y2 + y4) + 4 A (x3 y x y3) A (x4 6 x2 y2 + y4)


y

ax = 4 A x x + y For ay ay = u x v + v y

(2

)3
4

v = A x 6 x y + y
2

(4

2 2

4 A (x3 y x y3) + 4 A (x3 y x y3) 4 A (x3 y x y3)


y

ay = 4 A y x + y For a streamline dy v = dx u so

(2

dy = dx

4 A x y x y

A x 6 x y + y

(4

(3

2 2

(x4 6 x2 y2 + y4)
dy du = x +u dx dx

4 x y x y

(3

Let

u=

y x

1 y d d du 1 dy x 1 dy y x so = = + y = dx dx dx x dx x dx x2

Hence

dy du 4 x y x y 4 1 u 4 1 u = x +u = = u+ 4 2 2 4 dx dx 1 6 u + u3 1 6 u + u3 x 6 x y + y u u

(3
2

du 4 1 u = u u 10 u + 5 = u+ 1 4 2 dx 3 u 6 u + 1 u 6 u + u
2

(4

) )

Separating variables

dx = x

u (u

u 6 u + 1
4

10 u

+ 5)

du

1 5 3 ln ( x) = ln u 10 u + 5 u + C 5 y 10 y x + 5 y x = const
5 3 2 4

(u5 10 u3 + 5 u) x5 = c
For the streamline through (1,2) y 10 y x + 5 y x = 38
5 3 2 4

Note that it would be MUCH easier to use the stream function method here! To find the radius of curvature we use V an = R
2

or

R =

V an

We need to find the component of acceleration normal to the velocity vector At (1,2) the velocity vector is at angle

4 x y x y v vel = atan = atan x4 6 x2 y2 + y4 u


3

(3

r V

r a

4 ( 2 8) vel = atan 1 24 + 16

vel = 73.7 deg

At (1,2) the acceleration vector is at angle

3 2 4 A y (x2 + y2) ay y accel = atan = atan = atan 3 ax x 4 A2 x (x2 + y2)

2 accel = atan 1 Hence the angle between the acceleration and velocity vectors is The component of acceleration normal to the velocity is then At (1,2) ax = 4 A x x + y ay = 4 A y x + y a =
2 2 2

accel = 63.4 deg = accel vel an = a sin ( )


2

= 137 deg a= ax + ay
2 2

where

(2 (2

)3 = 500 m7 A2 = 500 m7

)3 = 1000 m7 A2 = 1000 m7
a = 4472 s

2 m = 2000 3 2 s m s 2 m = 4000 3 2 s m s m s
2 2

2000 + 4000

2 m 2 4

an = a sin ( )
3

m an = 3040 2 s V = u + v = 50
2 2

u = A x 6 x y + y
2

(4

2 2

) = 14 m
s m s
2

v = B x y x y
2

(3

) = 48 m
s

m s

Then

R =

an

R = 50

1 s 3040 m

R = 0.822 m

Problem 6.37

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Water at speed 10 ft/s Dynamic pressure in in. Hg

pdynamic = h =

1 2 V 2
2 2

p = Hg g h = SGHg g h

Hence

V V = 2 SGHg g 2 SGHg g 1 ft 1 s 12 in 10 2 s 13.6 32.2 ft 1 ft


2 2

h =

h = 1.37 in

Problem 6.38

[1]

Problem 6.39

[1]

Given: Find: Solution:


For air

Velocity of automobile Estimates of aerodynamic force on hand

= 0.00238

slug ft
3

We need an estimate of the area of a typical hand. Personal inspection indicates that a good approximation is a square of sides 9 cm and 17 cm A = 9 cm 17 cm A = 153 cm
2

The governing equation is the Bernoulli equation (in coordinates attached to the vehicle) patm + 1 2 V = pstag 2

where V is the free stream velocity Hence, for pstag on the front side of the hand, and patm on the rear, by assumption, 1 2 F = pstag patm A = V A 2 V = 30 mph ft 1 ft 22 12 1 1 slug s 2 2 F = V A = 0.00238 30 mph 153 cm 3 2 2 15 mph 2.54 cm ft (b) V = 60 mph ft 1 ft 22 12 1 1 slug s 2 2 F = V A = 0.00238 60 mph 153 cm 3 2 2 15 mph 2.54 cm ft
2 2 2 2

(a)

F = 0.379 lbf

F = 1.52 lbf

Problem 6.40

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Air jet hitting wall generating pressures Speed of air at two locations

p air

V + g z = const 2

air =

p Rair T

p = Hg g h = SGHg g h

Assumptions: 1) Incompressible flow 2) Inviscid 3) Steady 4) Along a streamline Hence, applying Bernoulli between the jet and where it hits the wall directly patm air For air Vj 2
2

= lbf in

pwall air
2 2

pwall =

air Vj 2

(working in gage pressures)


3 slug 3

air = 14.7

144 in 1 ft
2

lbm R 1 slug 1 53.33 ft lbf 32.2 lbm ( 50 + 460) R


2

air = 2.42 10

ft

Hence

pwall = SGHg g h =

air Vj 2

so
3

Vj =

2 SGHg g h air Vj = 93.7 ft s

Hence

Vj =

2 13.6 1.94

slug ft
3

ft ft 1ft 32.2 0.15 in 3 slug 2 12 in 2.42 10 s

Repeating the analysis for the second point patm air Vj 2


2

pwall air
2

V 2

V =

Vj
3

2 pwall air

Vj

2 SGHg g h air ft s

Hence

V =

1 ft ft 1ft 93.7 ft 2 13.6 1.94 slug 32.2 0.1 in 3 3 slug 2 s 12 in ft 2.42 10 s

V = 54.1

Problem 6.41

[2]

Problem 6.42

[2]

Problem 6.43

[2]

Problem 6.44

[2]

Problem 6.45
4.123

[4]

Problem 6.46

[2]

Problem 6.47

[2]

Problem 6.48

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Siphoning of gasoline Flow rate

p gas

V + g z = const 2

Assumptions: 1) Incompressible flow 2) Inviscid 3) Steady 4) Along a streamline Hence, applying Bernoulli between the gas tank free surface and the siphon exit patm gas Hence The flow rate is then V = = patm gas + V g h 2
2

where we assume the tank free surface is slowly changing so Vtank <<, and h is the difference in levels

2 g h D 2 g h 4
2 2

Q = V A = Q =

1 ft 2 ( 1 in) 2 4 144 in

2 32.2

ft s
2

1 ft 2

Q = 0.0309

ft s

Q = 13.9

gal min

Problem 6.49

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Ruptured pipe Pressure in tank

p ben

V + g z = const 2

Assumptions: 1) Incompressible flow 2) Inviscid 3) Steady 4) Along a streamline Hence, applying Bernoulli between the pipe and the rise height of the benzene ppipe ben Hence From Table A.2 Hence = patm ben + g h where we assume Vpipe <<, and h is the rise height where ppipe is now the gage pressure

ppipe = ben g h = SGben g h SGben = 0.879 pben = 0.879 1.94 slug ft


3

32.2

ft s
2

25 ft

lbf s slugft

pben = 1373

lbf ft
2

pben = 9.53 psi

(gage)

Problem 6.50

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Ruptured Coke can Pressure in can

p Coke

V + g z = const 2

Assumptions: 1) Incompressible flow 2) Inviscid 3) Steady 4) Along a streamline Hence, applying Bernoulli between the coke can and the rise height of the coke pcan Coke Hence From a web search Hence = patm Coke + g h where we assume VCoke <<, and h is the rise height where ppipe is now the gage pressure

pCoke = Coke g h = SGCoke g h SGDietCoke = 1 slug ft


3

SGRegularCoke = 1.11 ft s
2

pDiet = 1 1.94

32.2 slug ft
3

20 in ft s
2

1 ft lbf s 12 in slugft 1 ft lbf s 12 in slugft


2

pDiet = 104

lbf ft
2

pDiet = 0.723 psi lbf ft


2

(gage)

Hence

pRegular = 1.11 1.94

32.2

20 in

pRegular = 116

pRegular = 0.803 psi (gage)

Problem 6.51

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Flow rate through siphon Maximum height h to avoid cavitation

p V + + g z = const 2

Q = V A

Assumptions: 1) Incompressible flow 2) Inviscid 3) Steady 4) Along a streamline From continuity V = Q 4 Q = 2 A D V = 4 ft 1 12 in 0.7 s 2 in 1 ft
3 2 2

V = 32.1

ft s

Hence, applying Bernoulli between the free surface and point A patm Hence = pA + g h + V 2
2

where we assume VSurface <<


2

V pA = patm g h 2

From the steam tables, at 70oF the vapor pressure is This is the lowest permissible value of pA Hence V pA = pv = patm g h 2 h = ( 14.7 0.363) lbf in
2 2

pv = 0.363 psi patm pv g


2

or
3

h=
2

2 g
2 2

Hence

12 in

1 ft

ft s slug ft 1 ft s 32.18 32.2 ft 1.94 slug 32.2 ft lbf s2 2 s 1

h = 17.0 ft

Problem 6.52

[2]

H=

h1 =

(h2)

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Flow through tank-pipe system Velocity in pipe; Rate of discharge

p V + + g z = const 2

p = g h

Q = V A

Assumptions: 1) Incompressible flow 2) Inviscid 3) Steady 4) Along a streamline Hence, applying Bernoulli between the free surface and the manometer location patm Hence For the manometer = p V g H + 2
2

where we assume VSurface <<, and H = 4 m


2

V p = patm + g H 2

p patm = SGHg g h2 g h1 g H V = V = SGHg g h2 g h1 2 m s


2 2

Note that we have water on one side and mercury on the other of the manometer or V = 2 g H SGHg h2 + h2

Combining equations Hence

)
V = 7.29 m s m s
3

2 9.81 D 4
2

( 4 13.6 0.15 + 0.75) m m 2 7.29 ( 0.05 m) 4 s

The flow rate is

Q = V

Q =

Q = 0.0143

Problem 6.53

[2]

Problem 6.54

[2]

Problem 6.55

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Air flow over a wing Air speed relative to wing at a point

p V + + g z = const 2

p = R T

Assumptions: 1) Incompressible flow 2) Inviscid 3) Steady 4) Along a streamline Hence, applying Bernoulli between the upstream point (1) and the point on the wing (2) p1 + V1 2
2

p2 V2 = + 2
2

where we ignore gravity effects

Hence For air

V2 = =

V1 + 2

( p1 p2 )
= ( 75 + 101) 10 kg K 1 3 N 2 286.9 N m ( 4 + 273) K m = 2.21 kg m V = 262 m s
3

p R T
2

Then

V =

60 m + 2 m ( 75 3) 103 N kg m 2 2 2.21 kg s m N s

NOTE: At this speed, significant density changes will occur, so this result is not very realistic

Problem 6.56

[2]

Problem 6.57

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Flow through fire nozzle Maximum flow rate

p V + + g z = const 2

Q = V A

Assumptions: 1) Incompressible flow 2) Inviscid 3) Steady 4) Along a streamline Hence, applying Bernoulli between the inlet (1) and exit (2) p1 But we have + V1 2
2

p2 V2 = + 2

where we ignore gravity effects


2 2

Q = V1 A1 = V1
4

D d = V2 A2 = 4 4 2 p2 p1

so

2 2 d V2 V2 = D

d V 1 = V 2 D

Hence

V2 =

2 p1 p2

1
2

D
3

4 d

Then

V2 =

ft lbf 12 in ( 100 0) 2 1 ft 1.94 slug in

1 1 3
2

slugft lbf s
2

V2 = 124

ft s

d Q = V2 4

1 Q = 124 ft 4 s 12 ft

ft Q = 0.676 s

Q = 304

gal min

Problem 6.58

[2]

Problem 6.59

[2]

Problem 6.60

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


The given data is

Velocity field for plane doublet Pressure distribution along x axis; plot distribution

= 3

m s r
2

= 1000 r
2

kg m
3

p0 = 100 kPa

From Table 6.1

Vr =

cos ( )

V =

sin ( )

where Vr and V are the velocity components in cylindrical coordinates (r,). For points along the x axis, r = x, = 0, Vr = u and V = v = 0 u= x
2

v = 0

The governing equation is the Bernoulli equation p 1 2 + V + g z = const 2 so (neglecting gravity) p 1 2 + u = const 2 where V = u +v
2 2

Apply this to point arbitrary point (x,0) on the x axis and at infinity At At point (x,0) x u= x Hence the Bernoulli equation becomes p0 = p + 4 2 x
2 2

u 0

p p0

or

p ( x) = p0

2 x

The plot of pressure is shown in the associated Excel workbook

The given data is = = p0 = 3 1.5 100 m3/s kg/m3 kPa

x (m) p (Pa) 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 2.0 99.892 99.948 99.972 99.984 99.990 99.993 99.995 99.997 99.998 99.998 99.999 99.999 99.999 99.999 99.999 100.000

Pressure Distribution Along x axis


100.0

p (kPa)

100.0

99.9

99.9

99.8 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 x (m) 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.0

Problem 6.61

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


The given data is

Velocity field Pressure distribution along wall; plot distribution; net force on wall
3

q = 2

m s

m q x +

h = 1 m q x 2 x + ( y + h)
2 2

= 1000

kg m
3

u=

2 x + ( y h)
2

v =

q (y h ) 2 x + ( y h )
2 2

q (y + h )
2 2 2 x + ( y + h )

The governing equation is the Bernoulli equation p 1 2 + V + g z = const 2 where V = u +v


2 2

Apply this to point arbitrary point (x,0) on the wall and at infinity (neglecting gravity) At At point (x,0) x 0 u= u 0 q x
2

v 0

V 0 V =

x + h

v=0

x + h patm = p 1 q x + 2 2 x2 +h
2

(2

q x

Hence the Bernoulli equation becomes

or (with pressure expressed as gage pressure)

q x p ( x) = 2 2 2 x + h

(Alternatively, the pressure distribution could have been obtained from Problem 6.8, where the momentum equation was used to find the pressure gradient leads to the same result for p(x)) The plot of pressure is shown in the associated Excel workbook. From the plot it is clear that the wall experiences a negative gage pressure on the upper surface (and zero gage pressure on the lower), so the net force on the wall is upwards, towards the source The force per width on the wall is given by F= pupper plower dx 10 h
10 h

p =

q x x h x +h
2

(2

(2

) along the wall. Integration of this with respect to x

2 2 q x dx F= 2 2 2 2 2 x +h 10 h

10 h

The integral is

2 2

(x2 + h2)
q
2 2

dx

x atan h 2 h

x 2 h + 2 x
2 2

so

F=

10 + atan ( 10) 2 h 101



2

2 m2 1 10 + atan ( 10) N s F = 1000 2 2 3 s 1 m 101 kg m 2 m

kg

F = 278

N m

The given data is q = h = m3/s/m m = 1000 kg/m3 2 1

x (m) p (Pa) 0.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 6.0 7.0 8.0 9.0 10.0 0.00 -50.66 -32.42 -18.24 -11.22 -7.49 -5.33 -3.97 -3.07 -2.44 -1.99

Pressure Distribution Along Wall


0 0 -10 p (Pa) -20 -30 -40 -50 -60 x (m) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Problem 6.62

[3]

Rx

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Flow through fire nozzle Maximum flow rate

p V + + g z = const 2

Q = V A

Assumptions: 1) Incompressible flow 2) Inviscid 3) Steady 4) Along a streamline Hence, applying Bernoulli between the inlet (1) and exit (2) p1 But we have + V1 2
2

p2 V2 = + 2

where we ignore gravity effects


2 2

Q = V1 A1 = V1
4

D d = V2 4 4 2 p2 p1

so

2 2 d V2 V2 = D

d V1 = V2 D

Hence

V2 =

2 p1 p2 1

4 d D 3

V2 =

m 3 N ( 700 0) 10 2 1000 kg m
2

1 1

25 75

kg m N s
2

V2 = 37.6

m s

Then From x momentum Hence

d Q = V2 4

Q =

37.6

m s

( 0.025 m)

Q = 0.0185

m s

Q = 18.5

L s

Rx + p1 A1 = u1 V1 A1 + u2 V2 A2 Rx = p1

using gage pressures

2 2 2 D D d + Q V2 V1 = p1 + Q V2 1 4 4 D

Rx = 700 10

3 3 2 kg m m 25 N s 3 N 2 ( 0.075 m) + 1000 0.0185 37.6 1 2 4 3 s s 75 kg m

Rx = 2423 N

This is the force of the nozzle on the fluid; hence the force of the fluid on the nozzle is 2400 N to the right; the nozzle is in tension

Problem 6.63

[3]

Problem 6.64

[3]

Problem 6.65

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equations:

Flow through reducing elbow Mass flow rate in terms of p, T1 and D1 and D2

p V + + g z = const 2

Q = V A

Assumptions: 1) Incompressible flow 2) Inviscid 3) Steady 4) Along a streamline 5) Ignore elevation change 6) p2 = patm Q = 20 gpm Q = 0.0446 ft s
3

Available data:

D = 1.5 in

d = 0.5 in

= 1.94

slug ft
3

From contnuity

V1 =

D 4

V1 = 3.63

ft s

V2 =

d 4
2

V2 = 32.7

ft s

Hence, applying Bernoulli between the inlet (1) and exit (2)

p1

V1 2

p2

V2 2

or, in gage pressures

p1g =

2 2 V V1 2 2

p1g = 7.11 psi

From x-momentum

Rx + p1g A1 = u1 mrate + u2 mrate = mrate V1 = Q V1 D Rx = p1g Q V 1 4


2

because

u1 = V1

u2 = 0

Rx = 12.9 lbf K x = R x Kx = 12.9 lbf on the pipe to the right

The force on the supply pipe is then

Problem 6.66

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Flow nozzle Mass flow rate in terms of p, T1 and D1 and D2

p V + + g z = const 2

Q = V A

Assumptions: 1) Incompressible flow 2) Inviscid 3) Steady 4) Along a streamline Hence, applying Bernoulli between the inlet (1) and exit (2) p1 But we have + V1 2
2

p2 V2 = + 2

where we ignore gravity effects


2

Q = V1 A1 = V1

D 1 4

= V 2

D 2 4

so

D2 V 1 = V 2 D1

Note that we assume the flow at D2 is at the same pressure as the entire section 2; this will be true if there is turbulent mixing Hence V2 V2 V2 =
2 2 D2 4

= D1

2 p2 p1

2 p1 p2

D 4 2 1 D1
D 2 4
2

Then the mass flow rate is mflow = V2 A2 =

2 p1 p2

)
4

D 2 1 D1
D 2
2

D 2

2 2

D 4 2 1 D 1

Using

p = R T

mflow =

2 2

p p1

D 4 2 R T1 1 D1
k= D 2
2

For a flow nozzle

mflow = k p

where

2 2

p1

D 4 2 R T 1 1 D1

We can expect the actual flow will be less because there is actually significant loss in the device. Also the flow will experience a vena co that the minimum diameter is actually smaller than D2. We will discuss this device in Chapter 8.

Problem 6.67

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Flow through branching blood vessel Blood pressure in each branch; force at branch

p V + + g z = const 2

Q=0
CV

Q = V A

p = g h

Assumptions: 1) Incompressible flow 2) Inviscid 3) Steady 4) Along a streamline For Q3 we have

Q = Q 1 + Q 2 + Q 3 = 0
CV

so

Q3 = Q1 Q2

Q3 = 1.5

L min

We will need each velocity V1 = Q1 A1 = 4 Q1 D 1


2

4 L 0.001 m 1 min 1 V1 = 4 1 L min 60 s 0.01 m V2 = 0.943 m s V3 = 4 Q3 D 3


2

V1 = 0.849

m s

Similarly

V2 =

4 Q2 D 2
2 2

V3 = 5.09

m s

Hence, applying Bernoulli between the inlet (1) and exit (2) p1 + V1 2 = p2 + V2 2
2

where we ignore gravity effects

2 2 p2 = p1 + V1 V2 2 p1 = SGHg g h1 p1 = 13.6 1000 kg m


3

where h1 = 100 mm Hg 9.81 m s


2

0.1 m

N s kg m

p1 = 13.3 kPa

Hence

p2 = 13300

N m
2

1 kg N s 2 2 m 1000 0.849 0.943 3 2 s kg m m h2 = 1 m 1 s N kg m 13200 2 2 13.6 1000 kg 9.81 m m s N


3 2

p2 = 13.2 kPa

In mm Hg Similarly for exit (3)

h2 =

p2 SGHg g

h2 = 98.9 mm

2 2 p3 = p1 + V1 V3 2 p3 = 13300 N m
2

1 kg N s 2 2 m 1000 0.849 5.09 3 2 s kg m m h3 = 1 m 1 s N kg m 706 2 2 13.6 1000 kg 9.81 m m s N


3 2

p3 = 706 Pa

In mm Hg

h3 =

p3 SGHg g

h3 = 5.29 mm

Note that all pressures are gage. For x momentum Rx + p3 A3 cos ( 60 deg) p2 A2 cos ( 45 deg) = u3 Q3 + u2 Q2

) )

Rx = p2 A2 cos ( 45 deg) p3 A3 cos ( 60 deg) + Q2 V2 cos ( 45 deg) Q3 V3 cos ( 60 deg) Rx = 13200 N m


2

( 0.0075 m) N ( 0.0025 m) cos ( 45 deg) 706 cos ( 60 deg) ... 2 4 4 m


3 3 2

L m L m 10 m 1 min N s kg + 1000 2.5 0.943 cos ( 45 deg) 1.5 5.09 cos ( 60 deg) 3 1 L kg m min s min s 60 s m For y momentum Ry p3 A3 sin ( 60 deg) p2 A2 sin ( 45 deg) = v3 Q3 + v2 Q2

Rx = 0.375 N

) )

Ry = p2 A2 sin ( 45 deg) + p3 A3 sin ( 60 deg) + Q2 V2 sin ( 45 deg) + Q3 V3 sin ( 60 deg) Ry = 13200 N m


2

( 0.0075 m) N ( 0.0025 m) sin ( 45 deg) + 706 sin ( 60 deg) ... 2 4 4 m


3 3 2

L m L m kg 10 m 1 min N s + 1000 2.5 0.943 sin ( 45 deg) + 1.5 5.09 sin ( 60 deg) 3 1 L kg m min s min s 60 s m

Ry = 0.553 N

Problem 6.68

[3]

Problem 6.69

[3] Part 1/2

Problem 6.69

[3] Part 2/2

Problem 6.70

[4]

V CS

W y x

Ry

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equation

Flow through kitchen faucet Area variation with height; force to hold plate as function of height

p V + + g z = const 2

Q = V A

Assumptions: 1) Incompressible flow 2) Inviscid 3) Steady 4) Along a streamline Hence, applying Bernoulli between the faucet (1) and any height y V1 2 Hence
2

+ g H =

V + g y 2
2

where we assume the water is at patm

V ( y) =

V1 + 2 g ( H y) V1 = 0.815 m s V ( 0 m) = 3.08 m s

The problem doesn't require a plot, but it looks like


5 4

V (m/s)

3 2 1 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45

y (cm)
The speed increases as y decreases because the fluid particles "trade" potential energy for kinetic, just as a falling solid particle does! But we have Hence Q = V1 A1 = V1 A = V1 A1 V D = V A 4 A ( y) =
2 2

D 1 V 1 4 V1 + 2 g ( H y)

The problem doesn't require a plot, but it looks like

45 30 15

A ( H) = 1.23 cm

A ( 0) = 0.325 cm

2 0 0.5 1 1.5

y (cm)

A (cm2)
The area decreases as the speed increases. If the stream falls far enough the flow will change to turbulent. For the CV above Ry W = uin Vin Ain = V ( Q) Ry = W + V A = W + Q V1 + 2 g ( H y) Hence Ry increases in the same way as V as the height y varies; the maximum force is when y = Hymax = W + Q V1 + 2 g H R
2 2 2

Problem 6.71

[4]

An old magic trick uses an empty thread spool and a playing card. The playing card is placed against the bottom of the spool. Contrary to intuition, when one blows downward through the central hole in the spool, the card is not blown away. Instead it is sucked up against the spool. Explain.

Open-Ended Problem Statement: An old magic trick uses an empty thread spool and a playing card. The playing card is placed against the bottom of the spool. Contrary to intuition, when one blows downward through the central hole in the spool, the card is not blown away. Instead it is sucked up against the spool. Explain. Discussion: The secret to this parlor trick lies in the velocity distribution, and hence the pressure distribution, that exists between the spool and the playing cards. Neglect viscous effects for the purposes of discussion. Consider the space between the end of the spool and the playing card as a pair of parallel disks. Air from the hole in the spool enters the annular space surrounding the hole, and then flows radially outward between the parallel disks. For a given flow rate of air the edge of the hole is the crosssection of minimum flow area and therefore the location of maximum air speed. After entering the space between the parallel disks, air flows radially outward. The flow area becomes larger as the radius increases. Thus the air slows and its pressure increases. The largest flow area, slowest air speed, and highest pressure between the disks occur at the outer periphery of the spool where the air is discharged from an annular area. The air leaving the annular space between the disk and card must be at atmospheric pressure. This is the location of the highest pressure in the space between the parallel disks. Therefore pressure at smaller radii between the disks must be lower, and hence the pressure between the disks is sub-atmospheric. Pressure above the card is less than atmospheric pressure; pressure beneath the card is atmospheric. Each portion of the card experiences a pressure difference acting upward. This causes a net pressure force to act upward on the whole card. The upward pressure force acting on the card tends to keep it from blowing off the spool when air is introduced through the central hole in the spool. Viscous effects are present in the narrow space between the disk and card. However, they only reduce the pressure rise as the air flows outward, they do not dominate the flow behavior.

Problem 6.72

[4] Part 1/2

Problem 6.72

[4] Part 2/2

Problem 6.73
CS

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:

Air jet striking disk Manometer deflection; Force to hold disk; Force assuming p0 on entire disk; plot pressure distribution

Basic equations: Hydrostatic pressure, Bernoulli, and momentum flux in x direction p = SG g h p V + + g z = constant 2
2

Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible 3) No friction 4) Flow along streamline 5) Uniform flow 6) Horizontal flow (gx = 0) Applying Bernoulli between jet exit and stagnation point patm air But from hydrostatics +
2 p0 V = +0 2 air

p0 patm = SG g h h = 0.002377 slug

so
2

1 2 p0 patm = air V 2 1 2 2 V air V 2 air h = = 2 SG g SG g


3 2

ft 1 ft s 225 3 s 2 1.75 1.94 slug 32.2 ft ft

h = 0.55 ft

h = 6.60 in

For x momentum

2 d Rx = V air A V = air V 4

0.4 ft 2 2 slug ft 12 lbf s Rx = 0.002377 225 3 slug ft s 4 ft


The force of the jet on the plate is then F = Rx 1 2 p0 = patm + air V 2

Rx = 0.105 lbf F = 0.105 lbf

The stagnation pressure is

The force on the plate, assuming stagnation pressure on the front face, is 1 2 D F = p0 p A = air V 4 2

F =

slug ft 7.5 ft lbf s 0.002377 225 3 8 s 12 slug ft ft

F = 18.5 lbf

Obviously this is a huge overestimate! For the pressure distribution on the disk, we use Bernoulli between the disk outside edge any radius r for radial flow patm 1 1 2 p 2 + vedge = + v 2 air air 2 We need to obtain the speed v as a function of radius. If we assume the flow remains constant thickness h, then Q = v 2 r h = V d 4
2

v ( r) = V

d 8 h r

We need an estimate for h. As an approximation, we assume that h = d (this assumption will change the scale of p(r) but not the basic shap Hence v ( r) = V d 8 r
2 2

Using this in Bernoulli

Expressed as a gage pressure

air V d 4 1 1 2 2 p ( r) = patm + air vedge v ( r) = patm + 2 2 128 2 D r 2 2 air V d 4 1 p ( r) = 2 2 128 D r

0.25

0.5

0.75

1.25

1.5

1.75

2.25

2.5

2.75

3.25

3.5

3.75

p (psi)

0.1 0.2 0.3

r (in)

Problem 6.74

[4] Part 1/2

Problem 6.74

[4] Part 2/2

Problem 6.75

[4]

Problem 6.76

[4]

Problem 6.77

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:

Water flow out of tube Pressure indicated by gage; force to hold body in place

Basic equations: Bernoulli, and momentum flux in x direction p V + + g z = constant 2


2

Q = V A

Assumptions: 1) Steady flow 2) Incompressible 3) No friction 4) Flow along streamline 5) Uniform flow 6) Horizontal flow (gx = 0) Applying Bernoulli between jet exit and stagnation point p1 + V1 2
2 2 2

p2 V2 V2 = + = 2 2

where we work in gage pressure

p1 =

2 2 V2 V1 2
2 A1 D V2 = V1 = V1 2 2 A2 D d

But from continuity Q = V1 A1 = V2 A2

where D = 2 in and d = 1.5 in

ft 2 V2 = 20 s 22 1.52
2

V2 = 45.7

ft s

Hence

p1 =

1 slug 2 2 1.94 45.7 20 3 2 ft

) ft
s

lbf s slugft

p1 = 1638

lbf ft
2

p1 = 11.4 psi

(gage)

The x mometum is

F + p1 A1 p2 A2 = u1 V1 A1 + u2 V2 A2 F = p1 A1 + V1 A1 V2 A2
2 2

)
2 2 2 2

using gage pressures


2 2

F = 11.4

lbf in
2

( 2 in) ( 2 in) ( 1.5 in) ( 2 in) slug ft ft + 1.94 20 45.7 3 4 4 4 s s ft


2 2

1 ft lbf s 12 in slugft

F = 14.1 lbf

in the direction shown

Problem 6.78

[4] Part 1/2

Problem 6.78

[4] Part 2/2

Problem 6.79

[4] Part 1/2

Problem 6.79

[4] Part 2/2

Problem 6.80

[5]

Describe the pressure distribution on the exterior of a multistory building in a steady wind. Identify the locations of the maximum and minimum pressures on the outside of the building. Discuss the effect of these pressures on infiltration of outside air into the building.

Open-Ended Problem Statement: Describe the pressure distribution on the exterior of a multistory building in a steady wind. Identify the locations of the maximum and minimum pressures on the outside of the building. Discuss the effect of these pressures on infiltration of outside air into the building. Discussion: A multi-story building acts as a bluff-body obstruction in a thick atmospheric boundary layer. The boundary-layer velocity profile causes the air speed near the top of the building to be highest and that toward the ground to be lower. Obstruction of air flow by the building causes regions of stagnation pressure on upwind surfaces. The stagnation pressure is highest where the air speed is highest. Therefore the maximum surface pressure occurs near the roof on the upwind side of the building. Minimum pressure on the upwind surface of the building occurs near the ground where the air speed is lowest. The minimum pressure on the entire building will likely be in the low-speed, lowpressure wake region on the downwind side of the building. Static pressure inside the building will tend to be an average of all the surface pressures that act on the outside of the building. It is never possible to seal all openings completely. Therefore air will tend to infiltrate into the building in regions where the outside surface pressure is above the interior pressure, and will tend to pass out of the building in regions where the outside surface pressure is below the interior pressure. Thus generally air will tend to move through the building from the upper floors toward the lower floors, and from the upwind side to the downwind side.

Problem 6.81

[5]

Imagine a garden hose with a stream of water flowing out through a nozzle. Explain why the end of the hose may be unstable when held a half meter or so from the nozzle end.

Open-Ended Problem Statement: Imagine a garden hose with a stream of water flowing out through a nozzle. Explain why the end of the hose may be unstable when held a half meter or so from the nozzle end. Discussion: Water flowing out of the nozzle tends to exert a thrust force on the end of the hose. The thrust force is aligned with the flow from the nozzle and is directed toward the hose. Any misalignment of the hose will lead to a tendency for the thrust force to bend the hose further. This will quickly become unstable, with the result that the free end of the hose will flail about, spraying water from the nozzle in all directions. This instability phenomenon can be demonstrated easily in the backyard. However, it will tend to do least damage when the person demonstrating it is wearing a bathing suit!

Problem 6.82

[5]

An aspirator provides suction by using a stream of water flowing through a venturi. Analyze the shape and dimensions of such a device. Comment on any limitations on its use.

Open-Ended Problem Statement: An aspirator provides suction by using a stream of water flowing through a venturi. Analyze the shape and dimensions of such a device. Comment on any limitations on its use. Discussion: The basic shape of the aspirator channel should be a converging nozzle section to reduce pressure followed by a diverging diffuser section to promote pressure recovery. The basic shape is that of a venturi flow meter. If the diffuser exhausts to atmosphere, the exit pressure will be atmospheric. The pressure rise in the diffuser will cause the pressure at the diffuser inlet (venturi throat) to be below atmospheric. A small tube can be brought in from the side of the throat to aspirate another liquid or gas into the throat as a result of the reduced pressure there. The following comments can be made about limitations on the aspirator: 1. It is desirable to minimize the area of the aspirator tube compared to the flow area of the venturi throat. This minimizes the disturbance of the main flow through the venturi and promotes the best possible pressure recovery in the diffuser. 2. It is desirable to avoid cavitation in the throat of the venturi. Cavitation alters the effective shape of the flow channel and destroys the pressure recovery in the diffuser. To avoid cavitation, the reduced pressure must always be above the vapor pressure of the driver liquid. 3. It is desirable to limit the flow rate of gas into the venturi throat. A large amount of gas can alter the flow pattern and adversely affect pressure recovery in the diffuser. The best combination of specific dimensions could be determined experimentally by a systematic study of aspirator performance. A good starting point probably would be to use dimensions similar to those of a commercially available venturi flow meter.

Problem 6.83

[5]

Problem 6.84

[2]

Carefully sketch the energy grade lines (EGL) and hydraulic grade lines (HGL) for the system shown in Fig. 6.6 if the pipe is horizontal (i.e., the outlet is at the base of the reservoir), and a water turbine (extracting energy) is located at (a) point , or (b) at point . In Chapter 8 we will investigate the effects of friction on internal flows. Can you anticipate and sketch the effect of friction on the EGL and HGL for cases (a) and (b)?

(a)

Note that the effect of friction would be that the EGL would tend to drop: suddenly at the contraction, gradually in the large pipe, more steeply in the small pipe. The HGL would then hang below the HGL in a manner similar to that shown.

EGL

Turbine

HGL

(b)

Note that the effect of friction would be that the EGL would tend to drop: suddenly at the contraction, gradually in the large pipe, more steeply in the small pipe. The HGL would then hang below the HGL in a manner similar to that shown.

EGL

Turbine

HGL

Problem 6.85

[2]

Carefully sketch the energy grade lines (EGL) and hydraulic grade lines (HGL) for the system shown in Fig. 6.6 if a pump (adding energy to the fluid) is located at (a) point , or (b) at point , such that flow is into the reservoir. In Chapter 8 we will investigate the effects of friction on internal flows. Can you anticipate and sketch the effect of friction on the EGL and HGL for cases (a) and (b)?

(a)

Note that the effect of friction would be that the EGL would tend to drop from right to left: steeply in the small pipe, gradually in the large pipe, and suddenly at the expansion. The HGL would then hang below the HGL in a manner similar to that shown.

EGL

Flow

Pump

HGL

(b)

Note that the effect of friction would be that the EGL would tend to drop from right to left: steeply in the small pipe, gradually in the large pipe, and suddenly at the expansion. The HGL would then hang below the HGL in a manner similar to that shown.

EGL

Flow

HGL Pump

Problem *6.86

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Unsteady water flow out of tube Pressure in the tank

Basic equation: Unsteady Bernoulli Assumptions: 1) Unsteady flow 2) Incompressible 3) No friction 4) Flow along streamline 5) Uniform flow 6) Horizontal flow (gx = 0) Applying unsteady Bernoulli between reservoir and tube exit
2 2 2 p V dV V + + g h = V ds = + 1 ds t 2 2 dt 1 1 2

where we work in gage pressure

Hence

p =

V2 2

g h +

dV L dt

Hence

p = 1.94

2 ft 2 lbf s2 slug 6 32.2 4.5 + 7.5 35 3 2 s slugft ft

p = 263

lbf ft
2

p = 1.83 psi

(gage)

Problem *6.87

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Unsteady water flow out of tube Initial acceleration

Basic equation: Unsteady Bernoulli Assumptions: 1) Unsteady flow 2) Incompressible 3) No friction 4) Flow along streamline 5) Uniform flow 6) Horizontal flow (gx = 0) Applying unsteady Bernoulli between reservoir and tube exit
2 p V ds = dV 1 ds = a L + g h = x t dt 1 1 2

where we work in gage pressure

Hence

1 p ax = + g h L

Hence

lbf 12 in 1 ft slugft ft ax = 3 + 32.2 4.5 ft 2 1.94 slug 2 lbf 35 ft in2 1 ft s s


2 3

ft ax = 10.5 2 s

Note that we obtain the same result if we treat the water in the pipe as a single body at rest with gage pressure p + gh at the left end!

Problem *6.88

[5]

Problem *6.89

[4]

Problem *6.90

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:

Unsteady water flow out of tube Differential equation for velocity; Integrate; Plot v versus time

Basic equation: Unsteady Bernoulli Assumptions: 1) Unsteady flow 2) Incompressible 3) No friction 4) Flow along streamline 5) Uniform flow 6) Horizontal flow (gx = 0) Applying unsteady Bernoulli between reservoir and tube exit
2 2 2 2 V p dV dV V V + + g h = V ds = + 1 ds = + L t 2 2 dt 1 2 dt 1 2

where we work in gage pressure

Hence Separating variables

dV V 1 p + = + g h dt 2 L L L dV = dt 2 p V + g h 2

is the differential equation for the flow

Integrating and using limits V(0) = 0 and V(t) = V

V ( t) =
25 20

p + g h p 2 + g h tanh t 2 L2

V (ft/s)

15 10 5 0 1 2 3 4 5

t (s)

This graph is suitable for plotting in Excel For large times V = 2 p

+ g h

V = 22.6

ft s

Problem *6.91

[5] Part 1/2

Problem *6.91

[5] Part 2/2

4.44

Problem *6.92

[5]

Problem *6.93

[2]

Problem *6.94

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Stream function If the flow is irrotational; Pressure difference between points (1,4) and (2,1)

Basic equations: Incompressibility because exists ( x , y) = A x y u ( x , y) = y x y ( x , y) = y


2

u=

v=

Irrotationality

u =0

(A x2 y)
x

u ( x , y) = A x

v ( x , y) = x

( x , y) =

(A x2 y)

v ( x , y) = 2 A x y x y

Hence

v ( x , y)

u ( x , y) 2 A y

u 0

so flow is NOT IRROTATIONAL

Since flow is rotational, we must be on same streamline to be able to use Bernoulli At point (1,4) ( 1 , 4) = 4 A and at point (2,1) ( 2 , 1) = 4 A V ( x , y) = V1 = 20.2
2

Hence these points are on same streamline so Bernoulli can be used. The velocity at a point is Hence at (1,4) V1 = V2 = p1 +

u ( x , y) + v ( x , y) m s m s

2.5 ( 1 m) 2 + 2 2.5 1 m 4 m m s m s 2.5 ( 2 m) 2 + 2 2.5 2 m 1 m m s m s


p2 1 1 2 2 V1 = + V2 2 2 1 2 1200 kg m
3 2

Hence at (2,1)

V2 = 14.1 p =

Using Bernoulli

2 2 V2 V1 2

p =

14.1 20.2
2 2

N s kg m

p = 126 kPa

Problem *6.95

[2]

Problem *6.96

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data from Table 6.2 Stream function and velocity potential for a source in a corner; plot; velocity along one plane

From Table 6.2, for a source at the origin

( r , ) =

q 2 q y atan 2 x

( r , ) =

q ln ( r) 2 q 2 2 ln x + y 4

Expressed in Cartesian coordinates

( x , y) =

( x , y) =

To build flow in a corner, we need image sources at three locations so that there is symmetry about both axes. We need sources at (h,h), (h,- h), (- h,h), and (- h,- h) Hence the composite stream function and velocity potential are ( x , y) = q y h y + h + atan y + h + atan y h atan + atan 2 x h x h x + h x + h q q 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 ln ( x h) + ( y h) ( x h) + ( y + h) ( x + h) + ( y + h) ( x + h) + ( y h) 4 4

( x , y) =

By a similar reasoning the horizontal velocity is given by u= q ( x h) 2 ( x h) + ( y h)


2 2

q ( x h) 2 ( x h) + ( y + h)
2 2

q ( x + h) 2 ( x + h) + ( y + h)
2 2

q ( x + h)
2 2 2 ( x + h) + ( y + h)

Along the horizontal wall (y = 0) u= q ( x h) 2 ( x h) + h


2 2

q ( x h) 2 ( x h) + h
2 2

q ( x + h) 2 ( x + h) + h
2 2

q ( x + h) 2 ( x + h) + h
2 2

or

u ( x) =

xh x+h q + ( x h) 2 + h2 ( x + h) 2 + h2

Stream Function

#NAME?

Stream Function

Velocity Potential

#NAME? Note that the plot is from x = 0 to 5 and y = 0 to 5

Velocity Potential

Problem *6.97

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:


The velocity field is

Velocity field of irrotational and incompressible flow Stream function and velocity potential; plot

u =

qx 2 x + ( y h )
2 2

qx 2 x + ( y + h )
2 2

v =

q (y h ) 2 x + ( y h )
2 2

q (y + h )
2 2 2 x + ( y + h )

The governing equations are

u=

v=

u =

v =

Hence for the stream function

q yh y + h + f ( x) = u ( x , y) dy = atan + atan 2 x x q yh y + h + g( y) = v ( x , y) dx = atan + atan 2 x x

The simplest expression for is

( x , y) =

q y h y + h atan + atan 2 x x

For the stream function

q 2 2 2 2 u ( x , y) dx = ln x + ( y h) x + ( y + h) + f ( y) 4 q 2 2 2 2 v ( x , y) dy = ln x + ( y h) x + ( y + h) + g ( x) 4 q 4
2 2 2 2 ln x + ( y h) x + ( y + h)

The simplest expression for is

( x , y) =

Stream Function

Velocity Potential
#NAME? Stream Function

#NAME? Note that the plot is from x = -2.5 to 2.5 and y = 0 to 5

Velocity Potential

Problem *6.98

[3]

Given: Find: Solution:

Data from Table 6.2 Stream function and velocity potential for a vortex in a corner; plot; velocity along one plane

From Table 6.2, for a vortex at the origin

( r , ) =

K 2 q y atan 2 x

( r , ) =

K ln ( r ) 2 q 2 2 ln x + y 4

Expressed in Cartesian coordinates

( x , y) =

( x , y) =

To build flow in a corner, we need image vortices at three locations so that there is symmetry about both axes. We need vortices at (h,h), (h,- h), (- h,h), and (- h,- h). Note that some of them must have strengths of - K! Hence the composite velocity potential and stream function are ( x , y) = K yh y + h + atan y + h atan y h atan atan 2 xh xh x+h x + h

( x , y) =

(x h ) + (y h ) (x + h ) + (y + h ) K ln 4 ( x h ) 2 + ( y + h ) 2 ( x + h ) 2 + ( y h ) 2
2 2 2 2

By a similar reasoning the horizontal velocity is given by u= K ( y h) 2 ( x h) + ( y h)


2 2

K ( y + h) 2 ( x h) + ( y + h)
2 2

K ( y + h) 2 ( x + h) + ( y + h)
2 2

K ( y h)
2 2 2 ( x + h) + ( y h)

Along the horizontal wall (y = 0) u= K h 2 ( x h) + h


2 2

K h 2 ( x h) + h
2 2

K h 2 ( x + h) + h
2 2

K h 2 ( x + h) + h
2 2

or

u ( x) =

1 1 K h ( x h) 2 + h2 ( x + h) 2 + h2

y Stream Function

Velocity Potential
#NAME? Stream Function #NAME?

#NAME? Note that the plot is from x = -5 to 5 and y = -5 to 5

Velocity Potential

Problem *6.99 [NOTE: Typographical Error - Wrong Function!]

[2]

Problem *6.100

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Stream function Velocity field; Show flow is irrotational; Velocity potential

Basic equations: Incompressibility because exists Irrotationality


5

u=

v=

u=

v=

x
3 2

u =0
4 3 3

( x , y) = x 10 x y + 5 x y u ( x , y) = y x y ( x , y)

u ( x , y) 20 x y 20 x y
2 2 4 4

v ( x , y) =

( x , y)

v ( x , y) 30 x y 5 x 5 y

x Hence

v ( x , y) x y

u ( x , y) 0

Hence flow is IRROTATIONAL 4 2 3 ( x , y) = u ( x , y) dx + f ( y) = 5 x y 10 x y + f ( y) 4 2 3 5 ( x , y) = v ( x , y) dy + g ( x) = 5 x y 10 x y + y + g ( x) ( x , y) = 5 x y 10 x y + y


4 2 3 5

u=

so

v=

so

Comparing, the simplest velocity potential is then

Problem *6.101

[2]

Problem *6.102

[2]

Given: Find: Solution:

Velocity potential Show flow is incompressible; Stream function

Basic equations: Irrotationality because exists Incompressibility


6

u = v =0
6

v =

u =

v =

x
4 2

u+

( x , y) = x 15 x y + 15 x y y u ( x , y) = x y y ( x , y)

2 4

u ( x , y) 60 x y 6 x 30 x y
4 2 3

3 2

v ( x , y) = x

( x , y)

v ( x , y) 30 x y 60 x y + 6 y

Hence

u ( x , y) + y x

v ( x , y) 0

Hence flow is INCOMPRESSIBLE 3 3 5 5 ( x , y) = u ( x , y) dy + f ( x) = 20 x y 6 x y 6 x y + f ( x) 3 3 5 5 ( x , y) = v ( x , y) dx + g ( y) = 20 x y 6 x y 6 x y + g ( y) ( x , y) = 20 x y 6 x y 6 x y


3 3 5 5

Hence

u=

so

v=

so

Comparing, the simplest stream function is then

Problem *6.103

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:

Complex function Show it leads to velocity potential and stream function of irrotational incompressible flow; Show that df/dz leads to u and v u= y v= x x y u= x v= y

Basic equations: Irrotationality because exists x


6 2 4 6

Incompressibility f ( z) = z = ( x + i y) Expanding
6 4 2 6

u+

v =0

Irrotationality

u =0

f ( z) = x 15 x y + 15 x y y + i 6 x y + 6 x y 20 x y
6 4 2 2 4 6

3 3

)
5 5 3 3

We are thus to check the following ( x , y) = x 15 x y + 15 x y y u ( x , y) = x ( x , y) ( x , y) = 6 x y + 6 x y 20 x y u ( x , y) 60 x y 6 x 30 x y


4 2 3 3 2 5 4

y An alternative derivation of u and v is u ( x , y) = y

v ( x , y) =

( x , y)

v ( x , y) 30 x y 60 x y + 6 y

( x , y)

u ( x , y) 6 x 60 x y + 30 x y
2 3 4

3 2

x Note that the values of u and v are of opposite sign using and !different which is the same result using ! To resolve this we could either let f = -+i; altenatively we could use a different definition of that many authors use: u= x x x y y v= y

v ( x , y) =

( x , y)

v ( x , y) 60 x y 30 x y 6 y

Hence

v ( x , y)

u ( x , y) 0

Hence flow is IRROTATIONAL

Hence

u ( x , y) +

v ( x , y) 0

Hence flow is INCOMPRESSIBLE

Next we find Hence we see

df d z = dz dz

( 6) = 6 z5 = 6 (x + i y)5 = (6 x5 60 x3 y2 + 30 x y4) + i (30 x4 y + 6 y5 60 x2 y3)


Hence the results are verified; u = Re

df = u i v dz

dz

df

and

v = Im

dz

df

These interesting results are explained in Problem 6.104!

Problem *6.104

[4]

Given: Find: Solution:


Basic equations:

Complex function Show it leads to velocity potential and stream function of irrotational incompressible flow; Show that df/dz leads to u and v

u= x

v=

u=

v=

y d d d f = i f = i f dz dz y dz z

First consider

f =

d d d f = 1 f = f dz dz x dz z

(1)
2

and also

f =

(2)
2

2 2

Hence

x Combining

f =

x x
2 2

f =
2 2

d d d f = 2f dz dz dz f d
2 2

2 2

and

f =

y y

f = i

d d d i f = 2 f dz dz dz

2 2

f +

f =

f =0

dz

dz

Any differentiable function f(z) automatically satisfies the Laplace Equation; so do its real and imaginary parts!

We demonstrate derivation of velocities u and v From Eq 1 d d f = ( + i ) = ( + i ) = + i = u i v dz dz x x x 1 d d f = ( + i ) = ( + i ) = i + = i v + u i y dz dz y y u = x v = y or in other words, as the negative of our definition

From Eq 2

There appears to be an incompatibilty here, but many authors define as Alternatively, we can use out but set Then From Eq 1

f = + i

d d f = ( + i ) = ( + i ) = + i = u i v dz dz x x x 1 d d f = ( + i ) = ( + i ) = i + = i v + u i y dz dz y y df = u i v dz if we set u = x v = y

From Eq 2

Hence we have demonstrated that

Problem *6.105

[2]

Problem *6.106

[3]

Problem *6.107

[2] Part 1/2

Problem *6.107

[2] Part 2/2

Problem *6.108

[3]

Problem *6.109

[3] Part 1/2

Problem *6.109

[3] Part 2/2

Problem *6.110

[2]

Problem *6.111

[3]

Consider flow around a circular cylinder with freestream velocity from right to left and a counterclockwise free vortex. Show that the lift force on the cylinder can be expressed as FL = U, as illustrated in Example 6.12. Open-Ended Problem Statement: Consider flow around a circular cylinder with freestream velocity from right to left and a counterclockwise free vortex. Show that the lift force on the cylinder can be expressed as FL = U, as illustrated in Example 6.12. Discussion: The only change in this flow from the flow of Example 6.12 is that the directions of the freestream velocity and the vortex are changed. This changes the sign of the freestream velocity from U to U and the sign of the vortex strength from K to K. Consequently the signs of both terms in the equation for lift are changed. Therefore the direction of the lift force remains unchanged. The analysis of Example 6.12 shows that only the term involving the vortex strength contributes to the lift force. Therefore the expression for lift obtained with the changed freestream velocity and vortex strength is identical to that derived in Example 6.12. Thus the general solution of Example 6.12 holds for any orientation of the freestream and vortex velocities. For the present case, FL = U, as shown for the general case in Example 6.12.

Problem *6.112

[3]

Problem *6.113

[3]

Problem *6.114

[3]

Problem *6.115

[3] Part 1/2

Problem *6.115

[3] Part 2/2

Problem *6.116

[4]

Problem *6.117

[4] Part 1/2

Problem *6.117

[4] Part 2/2

Problem *6.118

[3] Part 1/2

Problem *6.118

[3] Part 2/2