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Instructions

Things You'll Need:

Russian/English, English/Russian dictionary. Russian language CD's A means to record your voice for playback. Paper and Pen Internet Connection

1. 1 I highly recommend going to a bookstore that has a good foreign language section where you can browse what they have. Purchase a good dictionary. You won't need a giant one but one that is Russian/English, English/Russian that is easy to see and hold. Purchase some Russian language CD's as well. Don't get any that have only one or two CD's. Those are designed mainly for those flying in planes and traveling in cars. There are many programs that come with 4-5 CD's as well as a language book for the lessons. Start on lesson one and only move onto the next lesson when you feel you have mastered the previous one. 2. 2 Determine how much of the language you want to learn. Do you want to know a few phrases or do you want total fluency? It is far better to learn more Russian than you think you need in case you ever find yourself in a situation where you need to speak or write Russian. Start out by learning the Russian that you would use on an everyday basis as you do your current language. There is no need to debate Physics in Russian if you don't do it in your native language either. 3. 3 You will need a pen and paper handy when you start studying Russian. Looking at a word and saying it out loud about 20-25 times will make it easier to remember the word than just read it silently 100 times. As an added bonus, writing the words down will make remembering them even easier. Russians write in cursive and you can learn to write in Cyrillic cursive as well. It will take practice and time but you can do things such as writing your grocery list out in English but in the cursive Cyrillic text. As you learn the alphabet and words, use Russian words such as and instead of milk and butter. 4. 4 When you speak, you usually sound much different than how others hear you. If you have a computer you likely have a recording device (Windows has one in the Accessories area) where you can record your voice saying the words. Play them back until you feel your Russian sounds authentic. If you have an internet connection you can listen to Russian on YouTube or on Russian news

sites. Don't be upset if you don't know what they are seeing. The key to learning any language is learning not just how to speak, read and write it, but how to comprehend it when you hear it spoken. You may never sound like a native Russian and this is fine. Russians love foreign accents as much as Americans do. It also makes for an excellent conversation starter when you meet Russians for the first time! 5. 5 Let's say you have a desire to practice your Russian but don't have any Russian friends or a Russian community near you and are unable to travel to Russia. No problem! The southern section of New York (Brighton Beach, Coney Island) as well as Sacramento, CA and Eugene, OR have large Russian communities. You can travel there and practice your Russian and many Russians will also help you out!

Tips & Warnings

Rome wasn't built in a day and nobody can learn Russian in a day either. It will take daily practice (about 15-20 minutes) and if you can convince a friend to learn it with you then you will make it even more fun! If you miss a day, don't worry, you can pick up where you left off. Every few months go back to the basic words and practice them. Russia, like the United States, has many social customs that are different than the rest of the world. Russians consider it impolite to put your elbows on the table, far more than Americans do. It is also considered impolite to show someone the bottom of your show so if you cross your legs a lot, then cross them at the knee. When speaking to Russians, do you put your hands in your pockets or fold your arms. This is considered rude, especially to older Russians. When visiting Russians, be prepared to eat and spend a lot of time there, even several hours if necessary. Russians are very hospitable and many older Russian women love to make a snack for their guests.

Instructions
Things You'll Need:

Study-abroad language program Russian language software or CDs

1. 1 Enroll in a study-abroad program in a Russian city such a Saint Petersburg or Moscow. Make sure the study-abroad program will provide accommodations with a Russian host family and will give you at least half a day or more of classes, five days a week. 2. 2 Learn the alphabet and useful Russian phrases of travel by purchasing a critically acclaimed foreign language software or CDs such as Pimsleur or Rossetta Stone. You don't want to enter Russia without any vocabulary or ability to express yourself. 3. 3

Practice with your software or CDs daily until you leave for Russia. Keep building your vocabulary and learning new phrases and practicing old ones. 4. 4 Go to classes daily once you arrive in Russia. Participate and complete your homework. Bring to class any questions that you have. 5. 5 Spend your free time with your host family, talking to them as best as you can in Russian. Don't worry too much about making mistakes; the key is to try to communicate. Listen to them when they speak and don't worry if you don't understand every word. 6. 6 Continue to use your language CDs or software while you're in Russia. You can still increase your vocabulary and improve your pronunciation by doing concentrated study by yourself.

Tips & Warnings


If possible, if you're a young student request a host family in Russia that has children that are close to your age as you'll have more things to talk about. It helps to make friends with ex-pats who speak English as there will be times when you'll become over-saturated and need a break.

Instructions
Things You'll Need:

Russian reading material Russian listening material Conversation partner

1. 1 Read and listen to Russian every day to review vocabulary and discover new words. Keep a list of new words, including the sentence or context in which you found each word. Russian has some false cognates with English, so noting the context will help you learn the how native speakers use the word. Build a more native vocabulary by using material meant for native speakers such as newspapers and radio from Russia. 2. 2 Use new vocabulary in your own writing. Move words into your active vocabulary by using them in a variety of creative ways. Since the spelling of Russian words changes according to grammatical rules, using words in complete sentences is essential. Try writing three different sentences using a new word or writing down a random selection of words and trying to use any two of them in one sentence. 3. 3

Play vocabulary building games. Add interest to your review sessions with word games like crosswords, scrambled words and anagrams. Games are ideal for learning Russian vocabulary because they help you remember small yet significant attributes of words like the placement of soft signs and stress-based shifts in vowel pronunciation. 4. 4 Experiment with mnemonic devices. Memory tricks work well for English speakers learning Russian because many sounds are similar to English sounds. Use mental images to connect Russian words with similar sounding words you already know. For example, to remember the word "stol" means "table," envision a burglar who stole a table or create a sentence like "Who stole my table?" 5. 5 Find a native Russian conversation partner. A native or near-native Russian speaker has a large enough vocabulary that they can help you build yours during the conversation. They can also explain the nuances and cultural connotations of words. Choose conversation topics relevant to your needs, such as grocery shopping or talking with co-workers. Write down new words along with information you learn about their usage.

Tips & Warnings

Try to speak and write as grammatically as you can, but don't avoid the chance to communicate just because you make mistakes. Some elements of Russian grammar, such as knowing which prepositions take which cases, require continual practice to master. Using transliterated flash cards will make it harder for you to read authentic Russian texts. If you use flash cards, make sure the Russian words are printed in Cyrillic. Russian is widely spoken throughout the former Soviet Union, but there are many distinct regional accents. Before you work long term with a conversion partner who isn't from Russia, think about whether or not you'd mind picking up some of their accent.

Instructions

1. 1 Immerse yourself in Russian culture. Listen and speak Russian as often as possible. Practice real conversations rather than classroom exercises. Living in a Russian neighborhood or community is highly recommended. 2. 2 Read Russian literature and popular publications on a daily basis to become more familiar with common words and phrases. Well-known books you can read in the original Russian include "Doctor Zhivago" by Boris Pasternak and "Crime and Punishment" by Fyodor Dostoevsky. 3. 3

Establish friendships with Russian people and spend time communicating in their native tongue. Talking to Russian people can help you understand contemporary phrases and slang that may not be taught in a classroom setting or on audio compact disks. 4. 4 Frequently review your grammar and vocabulary lessons. Before you can learn advanced Russian, you need a solid grasp of basic and intermediate Russian. 5. 5 Enroll in an advanced Russian language course at a college, community college or language school in your area. Also do a search of the Ask Edu website to find Russian training programs and schools in the United States. Or check out international cultural centers in your area