U pdate for 2009 from the d irec tor G eneral

It’s better than first class, it’s IRRI class

I

n the face of unrelenting pressure on rice production in Asia and other parts of the world and as we prepare for our second half century of innovation and achievement, 2009 was a year of rapid and unprecedented growth at IRRI. For a long period during the year, we were hiring 14 new persons every month and a new member of the Institute staff was joining every 0.65 working day. This sudden growth spurt took place, in part, to sustain our efforts with such exciting projects as Stress-Tolerant Rice for Poor Farmers in Africa and South Asia (STRASA), the Cereal Systems Initiative for South Asia (CSISA), and using the sun to end hunger (C4). However, to keep these and other projects on course, we need to chart our future very carefully. That is why, in late November, we launched a US$300 million fund-raising campaign at our IRRI Fund Singapore office to support our critical rice research mandate. Organized to mark our 50th anniversary in 2010, the 5-year campaign has already raised $59 million, with just over $50 million being provided by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) to support the three specific projects I just mentioned. Although we obviously have a long way to go, we are very grateful to BMGF for giving the campaign such a strong phil-

anthropic launch. During the special launch program, Mr. Mah Bow Tan, Singapore’s minister for national development, stated: “We look forward to more collaboration and greater synergy with IRRI’s expertise in rice research to contribute towards the sustainability of rice production in Asia.” Also on the funding front, during the first-ever meeting in Japan of the IRRI Board of Trustees, 28 September-2 October, which was held at the Tsukuba International Congress Center and hosted by the Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences (JIRCAS), it was announced that Japan was pledging $20 million for international rice breeding efforts. An additional $5 million was earmarked for extension training of African rice specialists. So, all in all, I am quite optimistic about the current funding trend for the Institute. The final phase of IRRI’s External Program and Management Review (EPMR7) concluded on 13 February with a summary of the final report to IRRI staff presented by review panel chair Greg Edmeades. In short, Dr. Edmeades said that the bottom line of the panel’s findings was that IRRI meets high standards in the conduct and management of science, partnerships with national agricultural research and extension systems and advanced research insti-

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 3

U pdate for 2009 from the d irec tor G eneral
tutes, financial management, and leadership within and outside, and that, overall, the Institute does things well. Shortly after the conclusion of the EPMR, I; Achim Dobermann, our deputy director general for research; and the staff began to think about how rice research everywhere on the planet might fit into what is becoming the new CGIAR (Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research). The thinking continued well into 2010 and blossomed into what has become the Global Rice Science Partnership (GRiSP), which most likely will become the first mega-project of the revitalized CGIAR starting in 2011. In Vatican City during my 18 May presentation at the Pontifical Academy of Sciences Study Week on Transgenic Plants for Food Security in the Context of Development, I pointed out that the recent food crisis and looming future ones have renewed the call for a second Green Revolution that would revitalize yield growth in the face of growing population and a shrinking land base. However, for a second Green Revolution to be successful, the centers of the new CGIAR will have to play a complex role by expanding productivity in a sustainable manner with fewer resources. I am confident that GRiSP will be making a major contribution to the rejuvenated CGIAR. In partnership with AfricaRice, CIAT, and a host of other rice stakeholders, you’ll be hearing much more about this exciting global endeavor in the years to come. There are many exciting research achievements to report on for 2009, including our “assault” on salt in our breeding program; making the most of Bangladesh’s rice-maize system; increasing the food supply and stabilizing prices in South Asia’s grain basket through the new CSISA, which I mentioned earlier; our eco-smart stand against that persistent insect pest of rice, the rice planthopper; and bringing agriculture in East and Southern Africa up to speed with the rest of the world. The details of these and some other thrilling research thrusts are highlighted in both the following pages of this printed version of the annual report and the award-winning DVD and Web formats that have become acclaimed digital standards over the last couple of years. Although all of our major events and activities in 2009 are covered in detail in the “Milestones” section of the DVD and Web versions of this report, I would like to call special attention to several here. In New York City on 20 February, I participated in the Asia Society-Oxfam America panel discussion The global food crisis—time for another Green Revolution? I emphasized that we need to be more proactive in communicating that it is not all gloom and doom as some media would like us to believe, but that we have to transform mind-sets into a “can do” attitude. I also participated in the Summer Davos 2009 in Dalian, China, on 10 September, during which I warned of rising sea levels as a result of climate change. I pointed out that this is not a one- or twoyear issue, but one that has long-term impact and needs urgent attention. On 25 October, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack visited IRRI (in photo with Kristie Kenney, U.S. Ambassador to the Philippines; me; and Arthur Yap, Philippine Secretary of Agriculture). Secretary Vilsack said he appreciated the work being done at IRRI and called it “extraordinarily important.” He emphasized the opportunities science offered to helping farmers increase productivity “not only to tend to their families but to have sufficient amounts of rice to trade to create wealth and bring about prosperity to rural communities throughout the world.” He personally thanked everyone who had been part of giving him the opportunity to visit the Institute, saying, “I will not long forget my experience here.” Hopefully, he relayed his IRRI experience to President Obama. Unfortunately, it seems that, almost every year, the Philippines are visited by a devastating weather event or two. In 2009, it was Typhoon Ondoy (Ketsana) that brought the heaviest rainfall to Metro Manila among recorded typhoons since the start of rainfall record keeping. It caused much

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

2 of 3

U pdate for 2009 from the d irec tor G eneral
damage not only in Manila but also locally around IRRI as 15 barangays in the towns of Los Baños and Bay were underwater. Images taken by the IRRI photography team of the local devastation received half a million views from around the world via IRRI’s presence on flickr. Again, I was proud to see how the IRRI community pitched in to assist those in the region who were hit with terrible losses by donating more than 300,000 pesos and in-kind items, especially food, blankets, boots, medicines, and bottled water. I had my first Royal audience with His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej of Thailand on 26 August at the King’s Klai Kangwan Palace. Subsequently, Her Royal Highness Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn of Thailand (in the photo with me discussing floodtolerant rice) came to the Philippines to officially open the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium on 16 November at the Manila Hotel and then the next day to IRRI headquarters to formally launch our year-long 50th anniversary activities. of the host country agreement with the government of the Philippines that created IRRI. Luminaries who came to mingle with IRRI staff included Philippine President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo; former Philippine President Fidel V. Ramos; ambassadors to the Philippines from Asia, Europe, and North America; Philippine government officials; and donors. And finally, on 13 December, all of the 3,400 IRRI staff and family members who attended will never forget the grand fiesta 50th birthday party held at IRRI headquarters. In closing, I would like to comment on IRRI’s values and how these promote excellence in everything we do. This is exemplified in an email I received from Laura Guyer-Miller, consultant for the Training Resources Group, Inc., who conducted the CGIAR Women’s Leadership and Management Development Course held at IRRI headquarters, 6-12 September 2009. Ms. Guyer-Miller acknowledged the “extraordinary customer service” offered by the IRRI staff, which she cited as a major reason for the success of the course. She added that the staff “was so gracious and accommodating, my colleagues and I wanted to ensure you heard from us. I have delivered this course 14 times at various CG centers around the world, and, while each center hosts us with particular care and thoughtfulness, the range of activities and endless support provided last week by IRRI was remarkable.” This is a noteworthy characteristic that has permeated the IRRI fiber from the early days and has helped us stay viable and relevant over the last 50 years even as the world and challenges facing us have changed. It brings to mind the term “IRRI class,”

which has been around for quite some time and has come to mean better than first class. This was nicely expressed by former IRRI Director General (1973-81) Nyle Brady in a story he told during his IRRI 50th Anniversary Pioneer Interview: “I’ll tell one story that relates to not the scientists but to a member of the support staff at the Institute, a Filipino. The CGIAR was holding one of its annual meetings in Manila and the participants decided to visit IRRI on a Sunday. When checking to see that everything was prepared for the luncheon to be served to this group, I approached one of the young ladies who was helping with the service. ‘Well, do you think it is first class?’ I asked. ‘No, sir,’ she said, ‘it’s better than that. It’s IRRI class.’ This indicated to me that she had pride in IRRI and in being associated with the Institute, which I thought was just great.” And I think it is great, too—as this long, grand tradition continues!

We hosted another anniversary event on 10 December at the Ramon Magsaysay Center in Manila to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the signing

Robert S. Zeigler Director General

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

3 of 3

M anaging R ice L andscapes in the M aRginaL U pLands

Leaving poverty behind in marginal uplands

T

his completed project funded by the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) in marginal rice uplands of India, Lao PDR, Nepal, and Vietnam shows that new technologies can successfully transform landscapes and improve living conditions even in the poorest regions of the world.

M

Agents of change. Poverty is a vicious cycle that is difficult but not impossible to break. By participating in the project, these Lao farmers have taken the first step in improving their future.

arginal uplands have served as a cradle of poverty that spans from generation to generation in many countries. Many communities are left with no choice and have struggled to survive in these unfavorable and less productive environments that have trapped them in the cycle of poverty for many years. These marginal lands are vulnerable to soil and water loss, erosion, and moisture deficiency. Their relatively shallow and infertile soils deny farmers better yields. Unfortunately, more than 50 million people in South and Southeast Asia depend directly on these lands for their primary food—rice. More often than not, these communities are isolated from the mainstream economy and current information—another shackle that chains them to poverty. A case in point: the marginal uplands in Vietnam. Sushil Pandey, senior economist at IRRI, explained that though the country is the second largest exporter of rice in the world, many poor upland farmers are not able to produce enough to feed themselves and their families. They cannot buy rice in the market because they do not have enough money or the rice brought in from these surplus deltas becomes quite expensive due to high cost of transportation to these remote uplands.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 3

M anaging R ice L andscapes in the M aRginaL U pLands
Simply put, marginal uplands are trapped in a vicious cycle of low food productivity, poverty, and environmental degradation. So, the nagging issue is, “How could one break the shackle of hunger brought by poverty in marginal uplands?” The project Managing Landscapes in the Marginal Uplands for Household Food Security and Environmental Sustainability (IFAD TAG706) was conceived by the team, led by Dr. Pandey, for finding solutions to the dire conditions in the uplands. Its goal was crystal clear: to improve household food security of poor farmers in the marginal uplands of South and Southeast Asia through more productive technologies, thereby contributing to poverty alleviation while protecting these fragile environments. “When farmers’ household food security is achieved, then they can start to consider options that will increase and diversify their income such as growing cash crops and raising livestock,” said Dr. Pandey. The rice landscape in uplands consists of rice fields along the mountain slopes, terraced fields, and small pockets of fertile valley bottoms that are interspersed in the mountainous terrain. Since the project focuses on managing landscapes as a whole, the research effort is not restricted to rice fields alone. So, aside from introducing new higher-yielding rice varieties, the team sets its eyes on improving the way farmers use their land and water resources. Instead of simply enforcing innovation, the IRRIled research project, in collaboration with national research organizations, used two basic approaches, namely, farmer participatory research and rice landscape management. “Essentially, the project was designed to work with the farmers to develop options suited to their specific situation,” said Dr. Pandey. “From the beginning, they were involved in identifying, testing, and selecting the different technologies, crop management practices, and rice varieties.” Rice landscape management was an innovative conceptual framework for developing technologies that can enable farmers to produce more rice on less land with less labor while conserving natural resources. To achieve this, technologies were developed to use efficiently all components of the rice

Dr. Sushil Pandey, IRRI senior economist, talks about the project Landscapes in the Marginal Uplands for Household Food and Environmental Sustainability.

Managing rice landscapes. The use of improved rice technologies on terraces and on adjoining slopes in a complementary manner enables upland farmers to produce more rice on less land with less labor while conserving water and other natural resources.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

2 of 3

M anaging R ice L andscapes in the M aRginaL U pLands
And, to preserve the delicate upland ecosystem, the project team introduced earth-friendly crop and weed, water, and land management practices that can renew the productivity of the fields. Some farmers are already replacing their slash-andburn agricultural practices with sustainable practices. Hopefully, more will follow Farmers’ opinions count. Farmers are involved in technology validation from the beginning in their footsteps. until the end. At the very core of the project’s achievements is the strong institutional collaboration formed landscape and produce enough rice for the houseamong the national agricultural research institutions. hold. These institutions will serve as engines to power the Within the project’s four-year lifespan, researchseries of transformations that are continually being ers and farmers were able to evaluate hundreds of sought in their respective regions in the future. Little appropriate technologies in project areas. They identified modern and traditional rice varieties that are not only suited to lowland and upland fields, but meet farmers’ needs as well. Farmers welcomed these varieties for their ability to produce more grains than the ones they previously planted. Farmers also received training on the proper way to select and produce seeds to ensure that high-quality seeds would be available continually for farmers to sow, share with other communities, and even sell. Watch related videos. by little, changes such as higher crop yields that lead to higher household income; improved food security that can shorten or maybe even eradicate periods of hunger; and farmers’ active participation that leads to empowerment will be part of their social landscape. When the farmers’ living conditions in these pilot areas improve, they themselves could play the role of catalysts for changes that move outward from research sites to nearby areas. “The goal is to spread the benefits from the technologies and rice varieties that our participating farmers have validated,” said Dr. Casiana Vera Cruz, IRRI senior scientist. “We want to reach more farmers beyond our pilot villages through them.” It is hoped that these interventions will finally break the hardened chain of poverty and environmental damage that imprison poor farmers, their families, their land, and their future in marginal areas.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

3 of 3

D issemination of stress - tolerant varieties

Fast-tracking the seeds of survival

“W

hat good is the grass if the horse is already dead?” says an old proverb on the folly of providing too few solutions too late. When food security of millions of people is at stake, a timely response is critical. To provide faster access to its stakeholders, IRRI and its partners are ensuring that seeds of promising rice varieties get to farmers using the quickest routes possible.

D

Swarna-Sub1 Swarna

Flood-proof genes. After more than 2 weeks of submergence in a field trial, variety Swarna-Sub1 clearly shows its ability to survive flooding better than Swarna.

roughts and floods, among other environmental threats, can literally obliterate rice production in a matter of days. The repercussions of such destruction can be heart-rending, from starvation within the affected areas to food shortages in places thousands of kilometers away. Too much is at stake when it comes to delivering the seeds of stress-tolerant rice varieties to where and when they are needed the most. IRRI has taken a catalytic approach toward working with research institutions, government agencies, nonprofit organizations, the public and private sector, seed corporations and companies, as well as small seed growers in multiplying and disseminating seeds of promising rice varieties to farmers. This ensures that technology transfer is faster and tracking of diffusion is easier. In 2008, with the help of partners in national agricultural research and extension systems (NARES), IRRI began intensive prerelease seed multiplication of the submergence-tolerant Sub1 varieties. These were developed by marker-assisted backcrossing of the SUB1 gene into mega-varieties that are popular in India, Bangladesh, and Nepal (see Scuba rice on pages 26-31 of Rice Today, Vol. 8, No. 2). SwarnaSub1 was released in India in June 2009 whereas Swarna-Sub1 and BR11-Sub1 were set for release

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 2

D issemination of stress - tolerant varieties
Uttar Pradesh in eastern India. The national government’s mega-scheme, known as the National Food Security Mission (NFSM), and the state government distributed 16,000 minikits (5-kilogram seed packets) of submergence-tolerant Swarna Sub1 to these villages. Each village received 5–10 minikits. As more seeds become available in 2011, this variety will be distributed further to less flash-flood-prone villages to replace the traditional Swarna. During the kharif 2010, the state government has launched a program for seed multiplication of Swarna Sub1 in 1,500 hectares area. At national level, NFSM has approved the distribution of 69,000 minikits for kharif 2010 for planting on more than 11,000 hectares. Through government support and farmer-tofarmer diffusion, Swarna-Sub1 is likely to reach a million hectares in Uttar Pradesh by 2014. Farmers said that the improved variety retains the desirable traits of the original variety but yields more than the traditional Swarna by 1 ton per hectare under submergence. One ton of paddy is worth around US$250. Swarna is widely cultivated on more than six million hectares in India, Bangladesh, and Nepal. Drought-tolerant rice line IR74371-70-1-1 was released in 2009 in India as Sahbhagi dhan and is awaiting final notification (see Making rice less thirsty on pages 12-15 of Rice Today, Vol. 8, No. 3). In Nepal, two drought-tolerant lines were set to be released in early 2010, namely, IR80411-B-49-1 or Tarhara 1 and IR6144F-MR-6-0-0 or Hardinath 2. The state government of Uttar Pradesh and NFSM, through seed corporations and research institutions, have undertaken large-scale seed multiplication for kharif 2010. During boro or winter season, more than 200 tons of seed of salinity-tolerant rice variety BRRI dhan 47 were distributed in south coastal Bangladesh. Moreover, BRRI dhan 47 seeds were also given to six farmers in Noakhali District in southeast Bangladesh, where boro rice had never been cultivated. The farmers harvested an average yield of 5 tons per hectare, which heightened awareness and interest among other farmers to adopt BRRI dhan 47 in the next boro season. In the next two years, IRRI foresees the release of more stress-tolerant rice varieties in India, Bangladesh, and Nepal, including two submergence-tolerant varieties, four salinity-tolerant varieties, and two drought-tolerant varieties. Until science finds a way to be in command of the forces of Mother Nature, farmers will remain at her mercy. We hope that providing them with ready access to these stress-tolerant seeds will enable them to get back on their feet a lot faster than before.

Ready for delivery. Dr. David Bergvinson, program officer at Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (second from the right), and Dr. U.S. Singh, Stress-Tolerant Rice for Poor Farmers in Africa and South Asia coordinator (third from the right), show a sack of Swarna-Sub1 certified seed that is ready for distribution, while Dr. Jagdamba Singh, head of the Plant Breeding Division (extreme left), and Dr. P.K. Singh, rice breeder at Banaras Hindu University (extreme right), look on.

in Bangladesh in March 2010. In kharif (monsoon) 2009, farmers started planting Sub1 varieties in flood-prone areas in India at an unprecedented rate. More than 4,000 tons of quality seed of already released stress-tolerant rice varieties were produced in 2009 through IRRI’s seed network partners. This included 180 tons of breeder seed and 380 tons of truthfully labeled seed of the submergence-tolerant Swarna-Sub1, an improved version of popular variety Swarna. IRRI has linked more than 55 seed companies, government agencies, nonprofit organizations, and research institutions to multiply Swarna Sub1 seed in time for kharif 2010. Through targeted dissemination, IRRI has identified more than 2,000 flash-flood-prone villages in

Bred to survive and thrive. BRRI dhan 47 in a farmer’s field in Noakhali District in Bangladesh shows excellent growth despite high soil salinity.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

2 of 2

M apping genes for salt tolerance

An assault on salt

S

oil salinity is a global problem that affects approximately 7% of the world’s land area. But, it is of major importance in some countries in Asia and Africa especially under the threat of rising sea levels due to global warming, because it has a direct impact on millions of lives. Using conventional and nonconventional tools, plant breeders are launching a counteroffensive by developing tolerant varieties that can thrive on salty soils.

S

An unwanted side effect. A gradual switch to rice production and consequent increased irrigation has led to an additional problem of soil salinity in Timbuktu, Mali.

ea-level rise due to climate change brings about a frightening scenario of sea water intruding into the once-productive agricultural coastal areas, which will definitely add to the many million hectares of unproductive lands that are already affected by salinity in Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, and Vietnam, just to name a few countries. In Bangladesh alone, salinity affects about 1 million hectares in coastal areas. Considered by some as a silent disaster, salinity has been making rice farmers poor and hungry because salinity-affected lands are unwilling to produce yields, especially of rice. In 1997, IRRI’s rice breeding program for salinity tolerance, currently led by plant breeder Glenn Gregorio, was able to locate a major quantitative trait locus (QTL, or a genome region) that confers salt tolerance in rice on chromosome 1. It is known as Saltol (see Less salt, please in Rice Today, Vol. 6, No. 2). Since salinity is a complex abiotic stress, it entails a concerted effort of scientists with different expertise such as Abdelbagi Ismail, a plant physiologist; Mike Thomson, a molecular biologist; and R.K. Singh, a plant breeder, who is now based in Tanzania, Africa. Through molecular-assisted breeding, the IRRI salinity tolerance team and its partners in Bangladesh and at the Africa Rice Center were able to introgress Saltol into popular rice varieties in Asia such as BRRI dhan 28, BRRI dhan 29, IR64, BRRI dhan

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 3

M apping genes for salt tolerance
11, Rassie, BG90-2, NERICA L19, and Sahel 108. Each of these varieties has helped translate some unproductive lands in South Asia and Africa into productive ones, making farmers more secure and unafraid to invest in saline-prone areas. For instance, BRRI dhan 47, which has Saltol, was released in Bangladesh in 2007 and has assured farmers of a harvest even during high tide when salinity intrusion is at its peak. In comparison, sensitive varieties yield almost nothing at all. BRRI dhan 28-Saltol is now being field-tested in Bangladesh. Moreover, salinity-tolerant BINA dhan 8 (IR66946-3R-149-1-1) is expected to be released in late 2010. This variety is suited for planting during boro and aman seasons. Saltol contributes about 45% of the salinity tolerance in rice. But, even with this quantifiable success, the work of IRRI plant breeders does not stop here. Dr. Gregorio explained that, in the world of breeding, it is important to pinpoint the location of the gene on the chromosome in order to improve the performance of salinity-tolerant varieties and minimize trial and error in breeding. Thus, Dr. Gregorio and his team have embarked on fine-mapping and marker-assisted backcrossing for the Saltol gene. They have been combing every recess of the 12 chromosomes of rice in order to locate other genes that can make the plant tolerant at both the seedling and booting stages. In addition, the team was able to identify 33 simple sequence repeat markers and gene-based markers (easily detectable stretches of DNA) across the Saltol region. And, in collaboration with advanced research institutes, they were able to identify three putative candidate genes, SKC1, SalT, and pectinesterase. Fine-mapping using recombinant inbred lines and near-isogenic lines showed that some markers are closely linked to the salinity trait. These identified markers are being validated using a number of different breeding populations and the efficiency of the markers is being quantified. Aside from Pokkali, the team used new sources of germplasm such as FL478, Cheriviruppu, Capsule, and Kalarata, among others, in mapping more QTLs for salinity tolerance and discovered major QTLs on chromosomes 1, 7, 8, and 10. “More efforts in research are geared toward identifying and combining more genes related to salinity for more stable tolerance,” Dr. Gregorio said.

Manuel Rutaquio

Rising global concern. Filipino farmers living near the coastal areas in Quezon Province are devastated by salt- water intrusion. They are among the farmers who will benefit the most from salt-tolerant rice varieties.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

2 of 3

M apping genes for salt tolerance
Currently, more than 100 salinity-tolerant elite lines have been developed. Lines can be called elite if they exhibit a combination of superior traits such as high yield, good eating quality, resistance to pests and diseases, and tolerance of stresses. Generally, these lines can survive a high salinity of electrical conductivity of up to 12 deci-Siemens per meter, a degree of salt stress at which an ordinary variety simply can’t survive. Moreover, these elite lines have been categorized according to their agronomic characteristics and they are now ready to cater to the specific needs of farmers in salinity-prone areas. In Bangladesh, for example, aside from better grain quality, farmers prefer varieties with less shattering because they transport newly harvested rice to their homes for threshing. Aside from planning the sowing time to avoid salt water intrusion during the critical stage of the plant, farmers prefer late-maturing varieties so that the plants will have more time to recover once affected by salinity. That is why, a trait such as days to maturity is also important. With all these efforts, it is hoped that, in the future, rice farmers in saline-prone areas can sleep well and will be unafraid to invest in rice production because a combination of genes in the plant fights against salinity and assures farmers of a bountiful harvest whenever salinity strikes.

Survival of the fittest. Rice varieties are tested for salt tolerance in an artificially salinized experimental plot at IRRI.

Spot the difference. IRRI plant breeder Dr. Glenn Gregorio shows the difference between susceptible (left) and tolerant varieties (right).

Screening for promising varieties. Dr. Glenn Gregorio and his team assess the effects of salinity on the plants at IRRI’s phytotron facility.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

3 of 3

C ereal S yStemS I nItIatIve for S outh a SIa

Gaining momentum in food security
M
ore than two centuries ago, Thomas Malthus predicted a global famine as a result of the world’s population increasing much faster than food production. Despite the early success of the Green Revolution in the second half of the 20th century, cereal production appears to have lost its momentum in South Asia. Since the 1990s, the annual growth rate of cereal production has slowed down, threatening millions with hunger. Overwhelmed by mounting demand, prices soared sharply. Many people found it challenging to get adequate food to meet their needs. The Cereal Systems Initiative for South Asia (CSISA) has its work cut out in South Asia’s grain basket: to improve food productivity and enhance farmer incomes and thereby stabilize the prices of staple cereals for the benefit of hundreds of millions of rural and urban landless poor.

From state to state. Farmers from the states of Uttar Pradesh and Bihar visit the well established zero-tillage wheat crop in Ramba village, Karnal District, Haryana.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 2

C ereal S yStemS I nItIatIve for S outh a SIa
n April 2009, IRRI, in partnership with the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center, International Food Policy Research Institute, and International Livestock Research Institute, launched CSISA. Funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, United States Agency for International Development, and World Bank, the project was a calculated move to reverse the deteriorating food security in South Asia. Using a value chain approach, CSISA rolled out “conservation agriculture” practices and technologies, access to information, market linkages that

I

develop partnerships and investments, and policies based on good business models to solve the complex problems related to crop productivity, resource management, and farmer incomes. The initiative brings together a range of public- and private-sector organizations to enable sustainable cereal production in nine key “hubs” located across South Asia that work directly with small farmers in deploying existing varieties, hybrids, crop management technologies, the latest market information, new breeding programs, and capacity building, among other activities.

Reversing a downtrend. CSISA brings together public- and private-sector organizations, and small farmers to enable sustainable cereal production and reverse declining annual cereal yield growth of recent years in South Asia.

In the next 10 years, CSISA is setting its sight on helping four million farmers to increase their yield by at least half a ton per hectare, and another two million farmers to raise yield by at least 1 ton per hectare. These figures definitely mean at least 5 million tons of additional grain valued at around US$1.5 billion produced annually from 7.5 million hectares of cereal farms in the region as well as other substantial savings in energy, environmental benefits, and a reduction in production costs. The project is also expected to augment efforts to alleviate poverty and hunger in other parts of the world. The lessons learned in South Asia will be transferred to smallholder farmers in sub-Saharan Africa through new models and strategies applicable to the region. In its first year, CSISA forged over 200 partnerships across the region. These partnerships cover the entire value chain, including government and nongovernment organizations, agricultural equipment manufacturers, financial institutions, the public and private sector, and national and local media. More importantly, CSISA has already made a difference in the lives of more than 50,000 farmers and their families. Initial reports indicated the environment-friendly and sustainable technologies that used fewer resources while producing better yields were gaining acceptance in the target farming communities. For these people, the odds that they will not end up as casualties of the war against hunger have been tipped decidedly in their favor.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

2 of 2

S uStainable i ntenSification of R ice -M aize P Roduc tion S ySteMS in b angladeSh

Ground zero for food security. Scientists and farmers interact in a rice field in Rangpur, Bangladesh.

he rice-maize system has become a trend among farmers in Bangladesh to meet the demand for the two cereals. But, despite their hard work and determination, overall production remains modest. Rural farmers cannot hope to prosper when they do not have improved technology, and IRRI and its collaborators are working together with the farmers so they can produce much more on their land with less effort.

T

Grains of opportunity

M

aize is a fairly new crop, yet demand for it is increasing as feed for poultry and fish in Bangladesh. Maize needs to be incorporated with rice, which is still the country’s preferred staple food. Consequently, the rice-maize (R-M) system has become popular as farmers scramble to supply the increasing demand for maize in the local market. However, R-M farming in Bangladesh is far below its yield potential. IRRI and the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) therefore joined together in a project, Sustainable

Intensification of R-M Production Systems in Bangladesh, to assist farmers with this need in 2008. Taking advantage of the leverage brought about by effective collaboration, the 5-year project enlisted several partners to share proven research and technology on R-M systems in Comilla, Gazipur, Rajshahi, and Rangpur districts in Bangladesh. Institutes such as the Bangladesh Rice Research Institute, Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute, Bangladesh Academy for Rural Development, Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee, and Rangpur-Dinajpur Rural Services serve as partners and contribute their

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 3

S uStainable i ntenSification of R ice -M aize P Roduc tion S ySteMS in b angladeSh
organizations’ expertise and resources to the cause. The Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR) has financed the project. The International Plant Nutrition Institute also joined in to collaborate on site-specific nutrient management (SSNM) under the overall umbrella of the project, which is formally linked to the Cereal Systems Initiative for South Asia (CSISA) led by IRRI, CIMMYT, the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), and the International Livestock Research Institute. After fully understanding the challenges faced by R-M systems, the project focuses on elite maize germplasm tolerant of excess moisture during rabi and kharif seasons; locally adapted management solutions for high-yielding, profitable, resource-efficient, and sustainable R-M systems through on-farm and on-station trials; how improved management options in R-M systems could be useful to and be adopted by farmers; and capacity building. For instance, the two crops each have their own required soil environment. Excessive tillage for maize can degrade the soil—depleting it of organic matter and nutrients. The project team operates under the principles of conservation agriculture (CA) and SSNM technology. A key principle of CA is the practice of minimum mechanical soil disturbance so as to maintain nutrients and prevent water loss in the soil, and avoid erosion. For example, the project advocates the use of appropriate and affordable machinery to establish crops under CA-based tillage systems, which include zero tillage, strip tillage, minimum tillage, and raised beds; dry direct-seeded rice (DSR) and unpuddled transplanted rice (TPR); and maize, mungbean, and potato under reduced tillage in flat and permanent raised beds. CA-based practices such as zero-tillage farming can save much organic matter in the soil for a long time. Thus, SSNM, a tandem technology to CA, will help farmers apply only the necessary amount of fertilizers or they may even need not apply any fertilizer at all. “Hearing only about these practices and principles in rice farming is not sufficient for farmers to adopt the technology,” said Jagadish Timsina, IRRICIMMYT senior scientist and project leader. “Farmers need to experience the technology and choose from the options that are presented to them.” He added, “Farmers’ participation is a key component of the project because resources, opportunities, and constraints vary from farmer to farmer. In other words, a technology that works with one group of farmers does not necessarily work with all farmers.” So, the project has brought the technologies to the farmers through farmers’ field trials. This allows farmers to look for components or ingredients that they can put together suit their needs.

Machines of progress. Farmers, machinery operators, and service providers try their hands at operating machinery during training in Dinajpur, Bangladesh.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

2 of 3

S uStainable i ntenSification of R ice -M aize P Roduc tion S ySteMS in b angladeSh
In 2009, the project made considerable progress in this direction. For example, DSR and unpuddled TPR have been tried in about 40 farmers’ fields; researcher-managed Nutrient Manager (NM) for Rice evaluation trials were conducted on puddled TPR in about 50 farmers’ fields; and CA-based trials on the rice-maize-mungbean system were conducted in about 55 farmers’ fields and on the rice-potatomaize system in 10 farmers’ fields. To test the usefulness of SSNM, the project conducted trials on rabi maize and on kharif maize in farmers’ fields. Some SSNM trials with omission plots (meaning no fertilizer was applied) are being conducted in rice and maize to better understand nutrient responses, and evaluate NM for Rice and Maize software to provide quick, reliable, and profitable fertilizer recommendations to the farmers. Aside from conducting farmers’ field days, the project team has trained more than a hundred researchers, machine manufacturers and operators, extension workers, and farmers on how to use different machinery for sowing DSR, unpuddled TPR, and maize across project sites. All these capacity-building activities and participatory approaches are useful for wider dissemination of technologies that can be adopted or adapted by Asian R-M farmers. It is expected that, through this project, Bangladeshi farmers will have better chances to benefit more from the opportunities brought about by the growing demand for maize. IFPRI estimates that 60% of the global demand for maize will come from Asia in 2020.

Playing an active role. Farmers gather for discussions during the farmers’ field day in Borura, Comilla, Bangladesh.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

3 of 3

C ombatting the R iCe P lanthoPPeR

An eco-smart solution against a swarm of destruction
umans and insects are locked in a love-hate relationship. At their best, both species share mutually beneficial partnerships, many of them important to agriculture. And then there are the rice planthoppers. These tiny insects can inflict tremendous crop losses—up to millions of tons each year. Additional damages come from their payload of disease-causing viruses that attack with such ferocity that farmers are often left emptyhanded and heavily in debt. So, the Rice Planthopper Project is coming to the rescue.

H

A farmer’s nightmare. Hopperburn, the trademark of rice planthoppers, is perhaps one of the most heartbreaking sights for farmers across Asia.

n 2009, Vichian Insawang, a 50-year-old farmer, planted 3.7 hectares of his land to Pathum Tani 1, a variety of Thai rice. When news of planthopper assaults in the northern provinces of Thailand reached him, Mr. Insawang reacted like most farmers desperate to save their crops from being chewed up by the oncoming swarm. Resorting to what he thought was his only recourse, Mr. Insawang sprayed his field 10 times with a cocktail of insecticides. Despite his efforts, he still lost more than 70% of his crop to the planthoppers and the viral diseases the insects carried. His gross earnings from his remaining harvest were just US$1,250—not enough to cover the cost of pesticides that set him back $3,200, of which $3,100 was

I

Dr. K.L. Heong, insect ecologist, explains why maintaining a healthy ecosystem is the key in effectively controlling planthopper infestation.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 3

C ombatting the R iCe P lanthoPPeR
loaned from a bank at 6% interest per year. And now, he has no means to repay the loan. Mr. Insawang is one of the thousands of farmers in Thailand affected by planthoppers that also plague many parts of Asia’s rice bowl. Although he and other Thai farmers received a temporary reprieve from their financial obligation from their government, thousands more are not as fortunate. Among rice planthoppers, brown planthoppers and whitebacked planthoppers are the two main species feared by most farmers. Long-winged forms of the two planthoppers may develop when food is scarce or when there are too many of them. These longwinged planthoppers can travel along with wind currents for hundreds of kilometers in search of food. Heavy rice planthopper infestations can cause the plants to dry out and turn brown (hopperburn). While feeding, the insects also help spread pernicious viruses that leave infected rice plants severely stunted, discolored, and barren. Ironically, planthopper infestations are often triggered by the heavy use of pesticides. Like many insect species, planthoppers are masters of shortterm evolution. It has been reported that current generations of planthoppers can withstand up to 100 times the level of insecticides that used to kill their ancestors only a few years back. They have also quickly breached the natural resistance offered by certain rice varieties. The rampant use of pesticides can also bring about secondary pest outbreaks. Farmers inadvertently kill off natural predators such as spiders when they use insecticides to control primary pests such as leaffolders and stem borers. Without the predators, invading planthoppers, which would otherwise be unable to reproduce in sufficient numbers to cause any real damage, easily multiply and reach a critical mass to cause a second wave of crop destruction. In the past few years, planthopper attacks have seToxic cocktail. Desperation, fear, and lack of proper information often drive farmers to fight primary insect pests with a brew of different insecticides. In the process, they kill off natural predators and make their crops more susceptible to planthopper attacks.

Killer traps. Like a sea of lace, these spider webs are an indication of a healthy ecosystem. Conserving biodiversity, particularly of predators and parasitoids, is the best way to deal with planthoppers.

verely affected rice production across several Asian countries. In 2005, an estimated 7 million hectares of rice farms in China were devastated and farmers reportedly lost nearly 3 million tons of rice to the pest—enough to feed more than 30 million Chinese. Planthoppers continue to be the biggest threat to the sustainability of rice production in the country. In 2009, planthopper outbreaks in central Thailand damaged more than 128,000 hectares of rice lands. The spread of the threat shows no signs of slowing down despite state efforts to control the situation. In response to the threat to the region’s food security, IRRI and the Asian Development Bank initiated the Rice Planthopper Project, a collaborative research network with national scientists in Asia in 2008. Rather than engaging the swarm in a furious yet ineffective and unsustainable chemical warfare, the Rice Planthopper Project is taking a different strat-

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

2 of 3

A. Saad

C ombatting the R iCe P lanthoPPeR
egy for preventing pest outbreaks. It is pushing ecologically driven research and practices collectively known as ecological engineering tools. “Ecological engineering mainly aims to restore or build up ecosystem services and resilience in order to build crop health or system immunity,” said K.L. Heong, insect ecologist at IRRI and the project’s principal investigator. “Planthopper outbreaks are symptoms of ecosystem breakdown and they are preventable. The best way to deal with them is to restore biodiversity, particularly of predators and parasitoids, rather than destroy it.” For instance, the sowing of rice can be adjusted to avoid the peak pest migration period. Another method, though not always popular with farmers, is leaving rice fields empty for at least 30 days to cut off the planthoppers’ food supply, thereby interrupting their life cycle. High rice prices often motivate farmers to grow rice continuously, but they need to rest their paddies to allow a natural balance to return, Dr. Heong explained. The Rice Planthopper Project is sending out the message that farmers need to lessen their use of pesticides. “An important impact of ecological engineering will be a reduction in insecticide use by about 50%,” said Dr. Heong. “Not only will this lessen the pressure on the environment and the ecosystem, but it will also lessen the risk to the health of farmers and wildlife.”

Flower power. Wild flowers that produce nectar are very good at attracting predators and parasites that attack planthoppers.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

3 of 3

G reen S uper r ice for the r eSource - poor of A fricA And A SiA

A revolution gets a green makeover

A

lthough the Green Revolution was a huge success, it inadvertently had some adverse effects on the environment such as fertilizer runoff and pesticide accumulation and resistance. But, as the recent food crisis illustrated, the world can barely survive without these intensified agricultural practices. Enter the Green Super Rice Project. This Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS)-IRRI initiative aims to develop new varieties that promise high yield and at the same time are gentler on the planet.

Doing more with less. A Green Super Rice variety retains its yield potential even with less use of expensive agrochemical inputs.

he Green Revolution is arguably the greatest triumph of modern agriculture. Through the development and introduction of new varieties of cereals and technologies, it helped feed millions of people that would have otherwise been casualties of a global food shortage. But, the revolution had unintended far-reaching consequences. High-yielding varieties performed best with large quantities of costly nitrogen-rich fertilizers that eventually drained into and polluted ponds, lakes, and underground water. The widespread use of agrochemicals for controlling pests and diseases in some crops has affected ecosystems and human health. Additionally, many farmers do not have the resources to buy agrochemicals. If they use highyielding varieties without using appropriate fertilizers, those varieties will fail. This can push already cash-strapped farmers into bankruptcy.

T

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 3

G reen S uper r ice for the r eSource - poor of A fricA And A SiA
Can agriculture continue to feed the world without these trade-offs? The answer could already be growing on several trial farms in South and Southeast Asia through an CAAS-IRRI project, Green Super Rice (GSR) for the Resource-poor of Africa and Asia, which is funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Dr. Zhikang Li, IRRI senior molecular geneticist who is based at CAAS, is the project director. But, the research work for developing GSR materials is being carried out both in China and at IRRI. Unlike most modern varieties, strains of GSR retain their high yield potential even with less use of costly chemical inputs. Depending on the trait, GSR can thrive under environmental conditions that would make other varieties somewhat less productive. “The GSR breeding technology is very important,” said Jauhar Ali, plant breeder and GSR project coordinator for Asia. “We never did this kind of activity in the past. Now, we are assessing the entire breeding population and we screen for particular traits such as lower chemical fertilizer and pesticide requirements; tolerance of drought, salinity, and floods; and resistance to serious pests and diseases such as blast and planthoppers.” For instance, a GSR variety with a high ability to grow fast can compete strongly with weeds. “It establishes itself much faster than the weeds,” said Dr. Ali. “What happens is that farmers do not have to use chemicals to control weeds.” This weed-tolerant rice variety performed well in Bangladesh and is being further tested. 2 of 3

Setting the green standard. Dr. Jauhar Ali, IRRI plant breeder and Green Super Rice (GSR) project coordinator for Asia, shows that an early-duration GSR hybrid variety out performs the regular hybrid in Sri Lanka.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

G reen S uper r ice for the r eSource - poor of A fricA And A SiA
In 2009, field trials conducted in Indonesia, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and China showed some promising GSR varieties. The project has identified five GSR strains in an IR64 varietal background that perform well under low-input and severe drought conditions. Moreover, their yields are comparable with those of checks under irrigated conditions. Another 10 salinitytolerant varieties are ready for seed exchange and germplasm distribution through the International Network for the Genetic Evaluation of Rice. Seeds of 56 GSR varieties with multiple disease and insect resistance were distributed to the GSR trial countries. Forty-one GSR varieties that have been identified as best-performing lines under drought, salty soils, and flooded conditions are being multiplied and shared with the project’s national agricultural research and extension system partners. The GSR project is not limited to producing hardy, environment-friendly lines. It also promotes the GSR concept to encourage adoption in target countries. Rice production has an effect seen across the globe because rice production and consumption patterns are not linked within a country, Dr. Ali explained. If rice production in India goes down, this will affect countries in Europe and the Middle East because India exports rice there. If Thailand stops exporting rice, many countries will be affected. “It is global, so we have to think in a global way,” he said. “This kind of concept is very important. We have to think from this perspective and GSR has to be taken into this perspective.” In this regard, the GSR project has held several discussions with policymakers and researchers, and training courses and workshops that focused on GSR technology. In Sri Lanka, extension agents have already received training from the project on how GSR varieties can fill the needs of farmers from the target sites. To ensure that farmers will have a sufficient and steady source of GSR materials, the project has provided training to small- and medium-sized private-sector companies in Bangladesh, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Vietnam, and Pakistan. In recent years, rice scientists were forced to face the additional challenge of balancing food security with preserving natural resources and protecting the environment. For IRRI, the key is a doubly green revolution: the development and diffusion of conventional environment-friendly agricultural practices and innovative varieties such as GSR.

Ciherang check variety GSR hybrid

Growing evidence. A field trial shows that a Green Super Rice hybrid variety performs better than Ciherang, a popular variety in Indonesia.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

3 of 3

H ybrid r ice d evelopment c onsor tium

The power of many
ybrid rice helped significantly increase domestic rice production in China, where 20% of the global population depends on a mere 7% of the world’s farmland. But, this miracle plant is no random accident. Originally developed in the 1970s by China’s Yuan Longping, hybrid rice technologies are the fruit of years of work in fields conducted all around the world by public entities and private corporations working together to eliminate hunger on the planet.

H

U

Sea of potential. Dr. Fangming Xie, IRRI hybrid rice breeder, selects promising hybrid lines in the field.

ndeniably, hybrid rice technology has been a key tool in increasing rice production. It gave China food security during the Green Revolution, which confounded predictions of famine in the 1970s. In 2008 alone, the area covered by hybrid rice reached 20 million hectares globally, including 3 million hectares in countries outside China. IRRI’s collaboration with public and private partners has been crucial in hybrid rice research and development in the tropics for 30 years. Because of this collaboration, many hybrid rice varieties and parental lines have already been shared with partners and have been released for commercial production. To further improve hybrid rice research and development, the Hybrid Rice Development Consortium (HRDC) was established by IRRI with 38 public and private organizations in 2008. In 2009, its membership expanded to 47 organizations as it aimed to renew and strengthen collaboration between the private and public sector and to disseminate hybrid rice technology more effectively and efficiently. Both the public and the private sector are working together complementarily. The public sector has expertise in scientific research, product assessment, germplasm development, technology dissemination, and capacity building. On the other hand, the private sector has the comparative advantage in large-scale commercial seed production, seed processing, and

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 2

H ybrid r ice d evelopment c onsor tium
IRRI’s hybrid rice program recognizes the importance of accessing IRRI’s hybrid rice products and information. That’s why it has embraced a productoriented approach—a focus on both product development and delivery. In terms of product development, the HRDC has built a regional hybrid testing network to assess its members’ hybrid rice in varying environments across different countries and locations. Members can now evaluate products they could not assess before. They can select hybrid rice breeding lines developed at IRRI and further evaluate these lines in their own conditions. And then, they can integrate them into their own breeding programs. At the farmers’ level, the latest generation of rice hybrids has considerably outperformed existing inbred rice varieties in yield gain and profitability in eastern India. For example, in the states of Chattisgarh and Uttar Pradesh, hybrid rice yields more than inbred rice varieties by 36 and 24%, respectively,

Architects of change. HRDC members come together to discuss hybrid rice development and objectives.

Fruits of collaboration. Hybrid rice varieties, the result of international scientific efforts, show great yield potential under field conditions.

marketing—areas in which IRRI and public institutes have no direct involvement. This public–private sector partnership helps shift hybrid rice from academic research to commercialization. It makes the stream of innovation and research outputs steadier and the product more accessible and, in the end, used by rice farmers. During the past 2 years, HRDC members, like architects of change, painstakingly identified research areas that are urgently needed to be improved such as the yield of hybrid rice seed production and yield vigor. They also identified the importance of resistance to biotic stresses (bacterial leaf blight, blast, sheath blight, brown planthopper, and stem borer) for sustainable growth of hybrid rice. Having a resolve to meet these goals, the hybrid rice group at IRRI developed more specific hybrid crosses. As more breeding populations are being developed, more breeding lines as well as new hybrids are shared with HRDC members.

Hybrid rice technology in action. HRDC members compare IRRI hybrid rice lines.

with 13 and 34% of additional profit economically. The condition of India’s hybrid rice seed production may no longer pose a constraint to further upscaling hybrid rice because seed growers in the country can produce 1.5–2.5 tons of seed per hectare. To promote the commercial release of IRRI’s rice hybrids through national partners and private companies, joint release protocols and licensing models have already been developed. For example, IRRI and the Philippine Rice Research Institute have developed a joint licensing protocol for hybrids, through which a first, nonexclusive hybrid license was issued to a private company. This protocol and the concrete licenses have become models for future IRRI hybrid rice development and promotion in collaboration with other national research and extension systems. At the end of all this, farmers are the ones who will benefit the most because they can obtain more and better rice hybrids that can increase their rice yield at reduced costs in the fastest time possible.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

2 of 2

E cologically B asEd R odEnt M anagEMEnt

Outracing rats on their own turf
eing cunning, adaptive, and tenacious are egarded as pests by ancient traits that enable rats to thrive in a world where other species face extinction because Egyptians as far back as 4000 of human activity. It is in rice fields where rats and BC, rats continue to wreak havoc farmers cross paths, where preharvest losses of rice across the rice fields and grain stores alone range from a low of 5% in Malaysia to a stagof Asia to this day. In a single year, gering 17% in Indonesia. “It is not uncommon for 25 adult rats can eat and contaminate farmers or villagers to lose half of their entire rice about half a ton of grain. In Asia, rocrop to rats,” said Dr. Grant Singleton, coordinator of dents can destroy rice that could feed the Irrigated Rice Research Consortium (IRRC) that 400 million people for 12 months. oversees a project on ecologically based rodent management (EBRM). “Many Asian farmers do not rate rats among their most important pests simply because they believe—misguidedly—that rats are a problem they have least control over and therefore they have to accept the losses.” Rats can also spread alarming health risks through their urine, feces, fleas, and mites. These include hantaviruses, typhus, salmonella, meningitis, leptospirosis, and, of course, bubonic plague. In 2009, Dr. Singleton co-authored a major review on the diseases that rodents can pass on to humans. Rodent control has no Good rodents, bad rodents. EBRM encourages specific rodent management that magic bullet because rodents have targets pest species of rats (top right) while conserving beneficial species of rodents,

R

B

more than 200 pest species and most behave differently. Some species prefer to eat immature grains; others do damage at the later stages of rice production. The rodent population also gets a boost from both humans and Mother Nature. For instance, studies conducted in 2003 in Indonesia and Vietnam revealed that spikes in rat populations occur when fields are planted with rice. If only one rice crop is planted in a year, then the rats will have one breeding season; if there are two crops, then they have two breeding seasons; and three crops have three breeding seasons.

such as the “good rats” (above).

Dr. Grant Singleton, IRRC coordinator, discusses the principles behind ecologically based rodent management—a concept that is gaining momentum in many countries in Asia, Africa, and Europe.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 2

E cologically B asEd R odEnt M anagEMEnt
Female rats give birth 21 days after mating and then mate again the day after they give birth. In a breeding season, the female bandicoot rat can give birth to three litters of eight, producing 24 rats in a single rice crop. Normally, this generation will not breed until the next crop unless neighboring farmers plant more than 2 weeks apart. From 2007 to 2009, subsistence smallholder farmers in the hill tracts of Bangladesh, India, Lao PDR, and Myanmar experienced severe food shortages because of rodent populations responding to the masting of bamboo. These masting events occur when bamboo of the same species produces blossoms and fruits en masse, which also triggers rat floods. The fruits are a steady supply of food that enables the rats to start breeding a few months earlier than usual. When farmers fight back, it is usually too little and too late. They rely heavily on chemical poisons, which became the de facto standard since their introduction in the 1960s. But sometimes farmers use rodenticides incorrectly, presenting risks to the rodents’ natural predators such as wild and domesticated cats, dogs, and birds of prey, Dr. Singleton said. When these chemicals enter the food chain, they eventually find their way to humans. Like most pests, rats have ramped up their tolerance of rodenticides. Generally, research activities have focused on increasing the toxicity of rodenticides and making them more palatable to rats but less attractive to nontarget species. However, many, including the IRRC, have questioned the effectiveness of relying primarily on pesticides to control rats. In 2003, the IRRC, together with the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation in Australia and national agricultural research and extension system partners in Indonesia and Vietnam, launched a rodent management approach that requires an ecological, not a chemical, approach. EBRM focuses on reducing the economic losses of smallholder farmers, improving health through reducing rodent-borne diseases, and reducing the use of chemical poisons. “The objective was to enter the fascinating secret world of rats and work closely with farmers to develop cheap, environment-friendly management strategies,” Dr. Singleton said. The trap barrier system is one simple but effective technology if losses are chronic and greater than 10%. It uses a plastic fence, with traps set into the plastic, surrounding a small rice crop planted 2–3 weeks earlier than the surrounding crop. Rats follow the line of the plastic until they reach a hole, which they enter to reach the rice and are subsequently caught. Studies in Indonesia and Vietnam have clearly shown that rat populations can be successfully managed if farmers work together as a community and if they apply their control at the right time and in the right habitats. In Vietnam, EBRM has reduced rodent damage by 50% and farmers have lessened their use of chemicals by more than 60%. Also, because it requires community action, EBRM fostered more social cohesion among farmers in their communities. In 2009, EBRM was adopted nationally in rice programs in Indonesia, the Philippines, and Vietnam. About 100,000 rice farmers in Vietnam and 75,000 farmers in Indonesia have adopted it. EBRM is now expanding to Bangladesh, Laos, Myanmar, Tanzania, and Namibia. Adoption of EBRM is expected to halve the average annual loss to rodents across Asia, thus saving enough rice to feed roughly the entire population of Indonesia for a year. Finally, humans are getting a head start in this rat race.
In October 2009, IRRI held an international conference on rodent outbreaks in the rice-based uplands and lowland agroecosystems. For the first time, a book will document these outbreaks, where and why they occur, their impacts, and management options. Some key findings of this conference have been reported in Science magazine.

It takes a village. Community action is a key management strategy in EBRM. In An Giang province in the Mekong River Delta of Vietnam, villagers are working together to control pest species of rats during the monsoon season.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

2 of 2

E litE linEs for irrigatEd EnvironmEnts

New rice for the masses
P
lant breeding, the art and science of improving the hereditary traits of crops, has enabled agriculture to meet the growing world demand for food. But, by 2025, the growing need of the human population will require 25% more rice. At the forefront of this challenge are IRRI elite lines—rice varieties that combine high yield and other multiple superior characteristics to meet the challenges of increased rice productivity and sustainability.

N

ew rice varieties have transformed rice production around the world. Annual world rice production increased from about 250 million tons in 1966 to more than 640 million tons in 2009, mostly through the development and adoption of new high-yielding, fertilizer-responsive varieties with a high degree of resistance to insects, pests, and diseases, accompanied by appropriate production technologies. “The most significant technological accomplishment of this century in international agriculture is the development of high-yielding cereal crop varieties,” Dr. Nyle C. Brady, IRRI director general (197381), once wrote. “They have given rise to the Green Revolution, which has helped many nations increase their food production in the face of a substantial increase in human population.”

Art and science of rice breeding. Through crossbreeding, Dr. Parminder Virk, IRRI plant breeder (right), Benito Romena, associate scientist, among other members of the team put together a mosaic of genes to develop varieties with desirable traits such as high yield, good eating quality, and resistance to pests and disease.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 2

E litE linEs for irrigatEd EnvironmEnts
However, rice production is continually threatened by pests, diseases, erratic weather, drought, floods, salinity, and soil toxicities, among other stresses. The major challenge is to overcome these stresses and produce more rice with less land, less water, fewer chemicals, and less labor in the context of global climate change. This is where breeding new and adaptive elite lines of rice varieties comes in. Recent advances in molecular marker technology and genomics have offered plant breeders a new suite of tools to move at a faster clip and accelerate the release of superior varieties to farmers. But, typically, it takes plant breeders such as Parminder Virk of IRRI’s Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division (PBGB) many years to develop elite lines. Essentially, Dr. Virk and his team of researchers create a new line by putting together a mosaic of genes by crossbreeding plants that exhibit particular desirable traits. These hereditary traits are high yield, good eating quality, and resistance to insects, diseases, and environmental stresses. IRRI-developed elite breeding lines are released as cultivars by national programs if they perform well in at least 2 years of yield trials at various locations that represent target ecosystems. In 2009, three IRRI-bred superior rice lines, IRRI150 (IR77495-10-2-6-2), IRRI151 (IR78566-1-2-1), and IRRI154 (IR78581-12-3-2-2), were recommended by the Philippine National Rice Technical Working Group to the National Seed Industry Council (NSIC) for release as commercial national rice varieties, namely, NSIC Rc212 (Tubigan 15), NSIC Rc214 (Tubigan 16), and NSIC Rc222 (Tubigan 18), respectively. These three IRRI-bred lines have high yield, wide adaptability and tolerance of major rice pests, and acceptable grain quality. Comprehensive evaluation of these lines was carried out under the National Cooperative Testing Project during 2005-08. The results of adaptive trials across various locations in the Philippines showed that these varieties outyielded the most popular check variety by an average of 11.5% for IRRI154, 10.1% for IRRI150, and 9.1% for IRRI151 as against the 5% benchmark for releasing a variety. Breeding line IRRI154 yielded more than 1 ton per hectare more than the check variety in a rainfed lowland dry-seeded multilocational trial during the 2008 wet season and has been identified for rainfed environments in the Philippines. It has also shown a promising performance under other environmental stresses such as stagnant water and low solar radiation during the rainy season. “Many more IRRI elite lines are in the pipeline that would significantly enhance rice productivity in different ecosystems,” Dr. Darshan Brar, PBGB head, said. “The Institute’s plant breeding program will continue to focus on improving rice for human benefit and as international public goods.”

The next elite class. Plant breeders are constantly developing elite breeding lines of rice in response to the challenge of feeding the growing global population.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

2 of 2

G ood A GriculturAl P rAc tices

GAPs fill the gap L

ack of information is the true adversary of most Asian rice farmers. It leads to practices that harm, not nurture, their land; outdated technologies that result in low gains and high losses; and insufficient market knowledge that puts them at an economic disadvantage. IRRI, through the Irrigated Rice Research Consortium (IRRC), strives to fill this gap in knowledge with GAPs—good agricultural practices— to ensure that farmers benefit from technologies arising through research.

I

n recent years, the food industry, producers’ organizations, governments, and nongovernment organizations have developed good agricultural practices (GAPs) with codes, standards, and regulations that aim to classify agricultural practices at the farm level for a range of commodities. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Good Agricultural Practices are those that address environmental, economic, and social sustainability for on-farm processes, and result in safe and quality food and nonfood agricultural products. Those practices aim to capture new market advantages by modifying supply chain governance; improve natural resource use, workers’ health, and working conditions; and create new market opportunities for farmers and exporters in developing countries.

Getting the farmers on board. This billboard is one of the 20 that were put up around the province of An Giang. These, along with thousands of brochures and booklets, provide farmers with information on best management practices for irrigated rice.

Dr. Grant Singleton, IRRC coordinator, speaks about Good Agricultural Practices in rice that are being developed in Southeast Asian countries.

Countries in Southeast Asia such as Thailand and Vietnam are already exploring GAPs for rice. Research is being done to support rice GAPs and facilitate the diffusion and adoption of GAPs. In Vietnam, IRRI, through the IRRC, is working with the An Giang People’s Committee and the Plant Protection Department in developing An Giang as a model province

for sustainable rice GAPs in the lowlands by incorporating emerging new technologies for production. These technologies are validated through adaptive research with farmer partners. Sociological studies are also conducted on the factors that influence farmers’ adoption, to give feedback to scientists and extension workers. The emerging technologies are being diffused through the Mot Phai, Nam Giam (1 Must Do, 5

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 2

G ood A GriculturAl P rAc tices
applied some or all of the technologies over an area of 609 hectares. For the summer-autumn crop in the wet season, four districts reported increases in yield of 0.2 to 0.4 ton per hectare from a mean of 5.3 tons per hectare. In general, farmers’ profit increased by US$208 per hectare. The IRRC has developed a Web site for GAPs for lowland irrigated rice that can be accessed via the Rice Knowledge Bank. The site provides practical solutions to help rice farmers boost yields, and improve grain quality and production efficiency. “Adopting efficient and effective farming practices promoted on the Web site will help lift farmers and their communities out of poverty and hardship, and provide a clear pathway for environmentally sustainable production of rice,” said Dr. Grant Singleton, IRRC coordinator. “Women in particular will benefit from labor-saving technologies, such as improved direct seeding, that reduce the drudgery in tasks such as transplanting and weeding.” The Web site also aims to help farmers reduce pesticide, fertilizer, and water use. “By providing information on integrated and conservation agriculture, and ecologically based pest, nutrient, and water management, the Web site will also enhance the ecosystem services and resilience of rice environments,” said Dr. Bas Bouman, who led the development of the Web site. The Web site synthesizes decades of collaborative research and development from IRRI and its many partners on best management practices for irrigated rice, and it will continue to incorporate new knowledge in the future. Future plans for the IRRC include the development of a Rice GAPs network in Asia. Thailand, Laos, the Philippines, and Vietnam have already expressed strong support for a network that will enable countries to share their experiences in establishing and promoting “Rice GAPs.” The social scientists of the IRRC will also work closely with in-country partners in assessing the benefits to smallholder farmers and in identifying possible hurdles to adoption.

Media buzz. Members of the local press interview IRRI scientists about their collaboration with Vietnamese partners in An Giang, the model province for sustainable rice GAPs.

Reductions) program. It builds on Vietnam’s Three Reductions, Three Gains policy, and encourages farmers to reduce seed rate, fertilizer use, pesticide use, water use, and postharvest losses. These practices build on the “1 must do”—to use certified seeds. In May 2009, the IRRC assisted in a message design workshop conducted in An Giang, which resulted in a well-publicized campaign launch of “1 Must Do, 5 Reductions” in November. Some 20 billboards were erected around the province, plus 2,000 posters displayed at public sites such as schools, coffee shops, farmers’ clubs, and hospitals, and the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development distributed 17,000 brochures and 8,000 booklets. The communication campaign was supported by the establishment of 1-hectare demonstration fields in each of the 11 districts of An Giang. After undergoing training on the technologies, about 335 farmers

Campaign of knowledge. A formal ceremony at the An Giang People’s Committee Office kicked off GAPs that will bridge farmers with information derived from decades of collaborative research and development from IRRI and its many partners.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

2 of 2

R ice in e ast and s outheRn a fRica

R

ice cultivation in Africa started about 500 years ago but only recently has rice gained importance as a staple crop. In partnership with researchers and farmers, IRRI’s East and southern Africa (ESA) program is bringing agriculture in the region up to speed with the rest of the world.

Reviving African fields. On average, typical rainfed rice area in the ESA region yields less than 1 ton per hectare and irrigated land yields less than 3 tons per hectare. The introduction of new varieties, technologies, and crop management practices is expected to make rice production more bountiful.

A Green Revolution on red earth

A
Mr. Joseph Rickman, IRRI representative for East and Southern Africa, and his colleagues talk about their activities in getting technologies to the farmers in the region.

lthough the annual consumption of rice in ESA is approximately 2.2 million tons—and growing at 6% per annum—the more than 2 million rice farmers in the region produce only approximately 1.4 million tons of rice both for their own consumption and as a cash crop for the local market. This has created a gap between demand and supply, forcing ESA countries to import more than 800,000 tons of rice from Asia every year.

Rice yields have remained low and stagnant because of inadequate research and extension support, poor crop management, and a lack of effective and efficient national mechanisms for developing rice production. On average, most rice farmers grow rice on less than 0.5 hectare of land. The typical rainfed rice area yields less than 1 ton per hectare and irrigated land yields less than 3 tons per hectare. Studies across the region have found that farm operations are rarely completed in a timely and efficient manner, said Joseph Rickman, IRRI representative for the ESA. In most areas, farmers wait for rain before they begin land preparation, resulting in poorly prepared and uneven seedbeds. More often than not, farmers plant the crop 1–2 months late and use a very high seeding rate of up to 200 kilograms per hectare. Crops that are planted late are more prone to disease problems and often run into dry spells during grain filling. Mr. Rickman noted that very few new lowland rice varieties have been released in the last 20 years

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 2

R ice in e ast and s outheRn a fRica
A combination of on-farm demonstrations, participatory variety selection (PVS) trials, and farmer field schools has proven to be a very successful way of getting all players involved and technologies quickly evaluated. In the regional breeding program, PVS trials are now an integral component of the whole program. In Mozambique, Tanzania, and Burundi, more than 25 PVS trials were conducted in 2009-10. Using many PVS trials across each country effectively reduces the cost and the time of registration by 2–3 years, with the added bonus that farmers are well positioned to adopt and multiply new varieties after registration. PVS trials are also being used to develop linkages among players in the rice industry such as extension officers, researchers, farmers, NGOs, the private sector, and other institutes such as universities. Field days and on-farm demonstrations have proven to be effective in bringing them together. Farmers involved in PVS studies are also being given the opportunity to use and assess equipment such as 2-wheel tractors, peddle threshers, mechanical threshers, and hermetic storage bags. Local rice millers are also becoming involved to help in the testing and dissemination of new varieties and other technologies. In each of the ESA countries, IRRI is helping to establish a local Rice Knowledge Bank that will gather all of the relevant rice information for that country at one site. A major effort is being undertaken to generate associated extension material in a format that can be readily used by extension officers, private companies, NGOs, and farmers. With all these efforts, farmers in the ESA region are beginning to see the dawn of modern agriculture slowly move across their lands through more vibrant rice production.

People-powered technology. Women farmers in Mozambique test a pedal thresher, one of the low-cost technologies that is expected to improve rice production in the region.

because varietal release procedures across most ESA countries are slow and cumbersome. Most of the varieties being grown are no longer true-to-type, lack early vigor, and have growth cycles of 140–160 days. These varieties also lack resistance to major rice diseases such as bacterial leaf blight, blast, and rice yellow mottle virus, and are susceptible to drought, cold, and iron toxicity, among other stresses. To jump-start improvement, IRRI’s R&D program in ESA adopted an integrated approach, in which IRRI scientists and technicians work closely with national researchers, extension officers, nongovernment organizations (NGOs), the private sector, and, most importantly, farmers. “By including farmers in the very early stages of development, we are now trying to reduce the time by improving the relevance of research, involving all of the necessary players early in the process as well as trying to better understand other constraints that may not be agriculturally based,” Mr. Rickman said.

Hands-on classroom. Joseph Bigirimana of the IRRI office in Burundi conducts a farmer field school, a proven way of getting participants involved and technologies quickly evaluated.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

2 of 2

R ice G enetic D iveRsity

The silence of the genes
ice plants that are resistant to multiple strains of a pathogen and, even better, to multiple diseases have been the Holy Grail of plant pathologists and breeders. After nearly a decade of searching, scientists from China, the U.S., Canada, and IRRI have made significant progress in revealing the specific genes—and understanding the mechanism—that would give rice the highly desirable but elusive trait known as broad-spectrum resistance.

R

loci (or QTLs) are associated with a number of host defense genes in the rice genome. Two QTLs, one on chromosome 8 and the other on chromosome 3, contain members of the germin-like protein (GLP) gene family and the oxalate oxidase (OXO) gene family. These two gene families play a role in host defense against fungal attack by producing hydrogen peroxide, forming papillae on the leaf surface, and

M

anipulating the genes of the rice plant to create varieties with broad-spectrum resistance to diseases has been a longsought goal of crop scientists. However, it is a goal that’s hard to achieve because broad-spectrum resistance is usually quantitative in its effect. This means that the trait is controlled by a combination of sets of genes while the effect of individual genes is small. Through international collaboration, scientists have moved closer to understanding the genetic basis of quantitative disease resistance. It started with a rice variety called Shan-Huang-Zhan Number 2 (SHZ-2). This variety was widely grown in southern China and exhibited durable resistance to rice blast, which is one of the most destructive and infectious fungal diseases in the world. On the basis of genetic mapping of SHZ-2, the research team has shown that the quantitative trait

Resistance from within. Through genetic manipulation, breeders are hoping to develop rice varieties with broad-spectrum resistance to diseases that will lessen dependence on costly toxic agrochemicals.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 2

R ice G enetic D iveRsity

Genetic wonder. Shan-Huang-Zhan Number 2 (SHZ-2) exhibits a natural, heavy-duty resistance to rice blast, one of the most destructive and infectious fungal diseases in the world. This variety has inspired rice breeders to explore the genetic basis of multiple disease resistance.

An international effort. Scientists from China, the U.S., Canada, and IRRI are working together in understanding the genetic mechanism that would give rice resistance against multiple diseases.

strengthening cell walls. Together, they act as barriers that restrict the invasion of the pathogens that cause diseases. Using gene-silencing technology, scientists switched off the GLP genes one by one and measured the change in resistance to pathogens. Transgenic plants became more susceptible to rice blast as more GLP gene family members were silenced. Additionally, silencing these genes increased the susceptibility of the plant to a second fungal disease, known as sheath blight, another serious disease of rice that affects yield and grain quality.

For the OXO gene family, only one of the four gene members was expressed upon fungal infection and its effect is validated by gene silencing. This collaborative effort showed, for the first time, that a complex QTL containing multiple gene members can confer resistance to two different diseases, blast and sheath blight, caused by pathogens with different life styles. The genetic effect shown against sheath blight is of special interest because breeding for sheath blight resistance has been hampered by a lack of effective resistance. By knowing the genetic basis of the

quantitative resistance, rice scientists are now in a position to combine these defense genes precisely. By selecting these genes, plant breeders and pathologists can start building up the level of quantitative resistance in rice breeding lines with resistance to multiple diseases. For poor and subsistence rice farmers around the world, manipulating these genes could mean less dependence on toxic agrochemicals, less cost, less harm to their health and the environment, and less threat to their food security.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

2 of 2

R ice G enetic D iscoveRy

Serendipity in the science behind submergence tolerance
onsidering the important role of a study that partly failed to meet its objective uncovers interesting details on SUB1A−the “scuba rice” gene that enables plants to survive seasonal flooding that affects 10–15 million hectares of lowland areas in South and Southeast Asia and causes about a billion dollars of rice crop losses per year.
t all depends on genes when plant breeders create rice varieties that help improve the lives of millions of the poorest people in the world. One such gene, SUB1A, discovered by a team of scientists from IRRI and University of Davis in an Indian rice variety, enables rice to survive submergence in water for 2 weeks. Through conventional breeding, the SUB1 gene has been successfully transferred into popular high-yielding varieties (see Scuba rice: stemming the tide in flood-prone South Asia on pages 26-31 of Rice Today, Vol. 8, No. 2). The availability of new breeding technologies such as marker-assisted backcrossing (MABC) has shortened the breeding process and greatly improved the precision with which specific traits can be passed on from one variety to another (see On your mark, get set, select on pages 28-29 of Rice Today, Vol. 3, No. 3). MABC enables breeders to transfer a specific trait without changing other desirable features of the variety, for example, adding flood tolerance to a flood-intolerant but high-yielding rice

C

I

Gene in action. Rice varieties with the SUB1A gene that is switched on can survive submerged conditions.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 2

R ice G enetic D iscoveRy
variety such as IR64. Thus, the discovery of new stress-related genes for designing stress-specific varieties has become a major goal in plant breeding. In 2007, a team of researchers headed by Sigrid Heuer, IRRI molecular biologist, started exploring IRRI germplasm to find submergence-tolerant rice that does not have SUB1A or that has the intolerant variant of this gene. Since rice fields are often flooded for more than 2 weeks, Dr. Heuer’s team was hoping that these new genes could be used to make rice plants survive underwater for more than 14 days. Indeed, one variety with intermediate submergence tolerance that had the intolerant version of SUB1A was identified. “We were quite happy with this; however, we also found that some of the genetic data didn’t really match our expectations because some of the screened varieties that have the tolerant type of the SUB1A gene were actually intolerant of submergence,” Dr. Heuer related. Studies have shown that the SUB1A gene is switched on when plants are submerged underwater. Using genetic analysis of leaf tissue samples, members of the team shifted their focus to whether flood tolerance was actually determined, not by the type of gene present, but whether the gene was switched on or off. Then, they found that, in the variety with intermediate tolerance, the intolerant variant of SUB1A was switched on to about the same level as the tolerant variant. “It is therefore likely that the intermediate tolerance of this variety is not conferred by novel genes but rather by high expression of the SUB1A variant that we had considered to be ‘intolerant’,” Dr. Heuer noted. “However, there were still too many exceptions to the rule in our data. We were still puzzled and we moved on to tackle those issues in more detail.” Because of unanswered questions and inconsistent data, the team examined each step. “If we wanted to know which varieties were tolerant or intolerant of flooding, we thought we could look at the gene sequence and, that’s it,” she said. “It turned out that everything was more complicated than we anticipated. Eventually, we gave up on analyzing leaves and looked at other tissues. Then, we found that high expression of SUB1A in stem nodes and internodes correlated well with submergence tolerance.” However, these data were derived from mature plants because nodes and internodes develop only when plants are about to flower. A question then remained, What is going on in young rice plants that do not have a stem yet? Thus, the team used transgenic technology to examine the expression of the gene in yet more detail. They discovered that SUB1A is switched on specifically only in parts of the leaves that are actively growing. Likewise, in young seedlings, the gene is switched on only in the central part where new leaves are formed. “These findings agree with the function of SUB1A in suppressing elongation of plants underwater,” explained Dr. Heuer. “After analyzing the data, we understood why our initial data were so confusing. We realized that these specific regions were not always included in our samples that we had analyzed when we had started the project.” Although the team failed to find what they were looking for—new genes for submergence tolerance— they learned important lessons from their studies. “We have to be more careful and specific when we get tissue samples for molecular analyses,” Dr. Heuer said, “and we have to take inconsistent data seriously because a lot of information might be hidden in them, as we know now. “Most importantly, with what we learned along the way, we can now do a much more specific screening for novel submergence tolerance genes,” she added.

node

leaf base internode

leaf blade

leaf collar leaf sheath

Eureka moment. Dr. Sigrid Heuer, IRRI molecular biologist, and her team found that high expression of SUB1A in leaves is restricted to the growing parts (leaf base and leaf collar).

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

2 of 2

R ice K nowledge B anK

The focal point of rice knowledge
onsidering the important role of the Rice Knowledge Bank (RKB) in bringing research and extension closer together, the IRRI science community ensures that content in the RKB is comprehensive, accurate, and up-to-date.

C

S

Information across borders. National collaborators like these Tanzanians participate in the development of country-specific rice technology for the Rice Knowledge Bank.

ince its establishment in 2002, the RKB has come a long way. It is now well established as the focal point for IRRI’s rice-farming knowledge relevant to farmers and the extension community, which includes government extension workers, nongovernment organizations, universities, the private sector, and farmer associations. The IRRI RKB team, which has worked initially and extensively in Asia, has recently expanded its operations in Africa in facilitating the development of national rice knowledge banks for each participating country. Over the past 2 years, the IRRI RKB has undergone a major revision to see to it that its content is comprehensive and up-to-date. To attain this, the IRRI science community has contributed much time and effort in revising the content to ensure that the “messages” keep up with standards in terms of accuracy. To improve the comprehensiveness of the IRRI RKB, the Irrigated Rice Research Consortium (IRRC) has integrated “good agricultural practices” into the RKB, which now complements the original seed-to-market strategy. Importantly, quality control

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 2

R ice K nowledge B anK
of the content of the IRRI RKB is a responsibility of the senior scientists in each area. In this way, the content remains up-to-date as rice science evolves. A significant activity is working with countries in establishing their own national RKBs. This includes all Asian rice-producing countries as well as the six countries in East and southern Africa (Mozambique, Burundi, Kenya, Tanzania, Rwanda, and Uganda). This process has enabled countries to build a coherent RKB that reflects their own local research and indigenous knowledge, and has made IRRI communication materials more appropriate. The outcome is a tool for each country to facilitate national knowledge management of rice-farming knowhow. A major outcome of this work has been to bring research and extension closer together in the quest to deliver the latest rice-farming knowledge to farmers. The challenges for the coming years are to continue to nurture the quality control of the IRRI RKB so that all users can have confidence in what they find there, support the on-going development of national RKBs, and link between the IRRI RKB and each country’s RKB. The outcome for rice research is an effective channel for reaching the needs of farmers. Meeting these two challenges will ensure that the impact of the global rice research agenda is maximized.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

2 of 2

IRRI Web

A human face on the Web

I

n the Internet universe, with an estimated 62 million site domains and subdomains, it is easy to disappear in the crowd. Through social media sites, IRRI is exploring opportunities to get a much larger slice of the Internet pie while putting a human face on the Institute online.

RRI is continuously transforming its Web site  as a primary medium for providing relevant  information to the multiple types of users of IRRI.ORG. Over the years, IRRI’s Web team has been  finding ways to maximize IRRI.ORG’s full potential.  But, the Web site alone cannot do the job of expanding IRRI’s Internet footprint. Using social media sites  for collaborating, sharing information, or continuing  conversations about ideas, causes, and issues with  its communities of stakeholders can extend IRRI’s  Internet presence further.    The massive popularity of social media sites  cannot be denied. Social media sites have racked up  some staggering accomplishments. A middle-aged  woman named Susan Boyle, then totally unknown,  got more than 120 million views on YouTube. Facebook has 500 million users worldwide. If it were a 

I

No Web site is an island. IRRI uses social media sites for collaborating, sharing information, or continuing conversations about ideas, causes, and issues with the its communities of stakeholders. Click on the spheres to see the different “faces” of IRRI.

  “Social media sites have a lot  of potential for sharing information,” according to Sophie  Clayton, IRRI’s public relations  manager. “These are an important communication tool for us to  promote the Institute’s missions  and goals and share our research  with more donors, philanthropists, policymakers, scientists,  agronomists, farming groups, and  other key audiences.”    The Institute’s initial encounters with social media sites clearly  demonstrated their potential for  building communities. Images  of the destruction caused by  typhoon Ketsana taken by IRRI 

country, Facebook’s population would be the third  highest after China and India. Twitter became a channel for over 105 million people to read about breaking news without turning on the radio, watching  TV, or reading a newspaper. People could respond  to events as they occurred. With application, IRRI’s  developmental messages and topics can be further  diffused to interested communities on the Internet. 

Ms. Sophie Clayton, public relations manager, explores the important role of social networks in connecting IRRI’s rice research and technologies to people’s lives.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 2

IRRI Web
photographers, and uploaded to flickr, helped genersocial networking is to transform the Institute’s Web    IRRI can build up online followers among the  ate around half a million hits over a few days. The  site into a dynamic channel of information and an  people who are present on any of the pervasive  massive interest in the photos proves that sharing  engaging vehicle of communication with its public  social media platforms on the Internet today by  via a social network is a good platform for highlightaudiences. effectively engaging them around the core agenda  ing the plight of rice farmers around the world and    “In addition to providing the opportunity for IRRI  of IRRI. Although participating in social networking  the challenges they face―whether they be from  to cast its message and what it is doing to a wider  is not without risks, it is better to actively engage  natural calamities, the effects of global warming, or  audience, social media sites open up direct, two-way  in social media rather than sit on the sidelines, Ms.  pests and diseases―and how IRRI is finding solutions  dialogues with interested people and communities  Clayton added. This can show that IRRI is made up of  to mitigate the effects of these events. For instance,  all over the globe,” said Ms. Clayton. “The Institute  real people and it puts a human face on the Institute.  the submergence-tolerant rice varieties that IRRI has  needs to be a part of relevant online communities to  developed can survive floods brought by typhoons. watch, listen, and respond.”  However, there is more to  it than simply generating  a certain number of hits  for the IRRI Web. Social  media sites have made  a genuine impact on  people’s lives. They have  blurred the boundary between online and offline  communities. They have  become places for meaningful discussions and debates. They have turned  into powerful tools for  raising awareness. They  have become the eyes,  ears, voice, and, in some  cases, the only link to the  rest of the world.    For the purposes of  Rice science in the real world. Social networking provides IRRI with an information and communication channel to showcase its relevance outside its research facilities, for instance, how breeding flood-tolerant rice varieties can help reduce the impact of extreme weather conditions, such as Typhoon Ketsana, on food production. IRRI, the ultimate goal of 

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

2 of 2

S ocial S cienceS D atabaSe

Living, growing grains of knowledge
“I
nformation is a source of learning,” according to 19th century Quaker Minister William Pollard. “But unless it is organized, processed, and available to the right people in a format for decision making, it is a burden, not a benefit.” Over the years, IRRI’s Social Sciences Division (SSD) has amassed a vast database of rice facts and figures. However, scattered and isolated, they served no real purpose. Now, SSD is creating a digital knowledge base in which users and researchers can easily find precisely what information is available.
he huge amount of invaluable and irreplaceable information in SSD’s database is divided into three components: household survey data, world rice statistics (WRS), and geographic information systems (GIS) data. But, in this random assortment of information, far too many worthy data ended up unused and wasted. The household survey database holds actual farm- and household-level data on rice production collected through personal farmer interviews, farm record keeping, and periodic monitoring of farm activities from various sites in different rice-growing countries of Asia. However, the SSD survey data sets are all over the place, according to Piedad Moya, senior research manager at IRRI. Each researcher kept his or her own project data set in a format known only to the researcher. No single person kept a tab on all the research results. No standard system for collecting and organizing the data sets was available. The lack of standard protocol for the repository of data collected by SSD and its collaborators from different national agricultural research and extension systems aggravated the situation. In 2009, SSD began transforming its database into a comprehensive digital knowledge base—a centralized data warehouse that serves as an author-

T

Window to a world of information. SSD has organized its vast database of rice facts and figures from around the globe, making them available to anyone with a computer and an Internet connection.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 2

S ocial S cienceS D atabaSe
ized single source of all the data sets collected by SSD. Developing a standard format applicable for all completed data sets and ongoing projects was the first step in establishing the master database. Different and often disparate survey data are also being compiled and linked. To date, SSD has finished work on 20 data sets (or 566,710 records), which were collected from nine countries between 1993 and 2008. These include inputs and outputs of rice production, demographics, income, land profile, water use, and variety planted, among hundreds of variables. The WRS and GIS data also underwent a major overhaul. The WRS is a compilation of national and regional data on rice area, production, and yield over time for the major rice-producing countries of the world from various international and national statistical sources such as the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the United States Department of Agriculture, and the World Bank. It also includes information on rice imports, exports, national farm-level and world rice prices, and other related statistics on rice supply and demand. Prior to its restructuring, the WRS was not exactly user-friendly and its archive of information was frequently outdated. The data were packaged in static form available only as either spreadsheet or PDF files. The WRS database is now available in digital form and can be easily retrieved by Internet users. The WRS has a dedicated Web site that features three interactive applications. It gives users the ability not only to query, view, and download data and global rice outlooks, but also to visualize the data in the form of dynamic maps, making this a useful tool for monitoring and forecasting trends in the global rice market. For example, a researcher could map the distribution of rough rice Taking care of business. The SSD knowledge base is a never-ending task production or arable land of collecting, organizing, and updating information. over time across countries. The GIS database consists of a collection of spatial locations, tabular data, and maps and geographic “It will be a gold mine of information on what features recorded as points, lines, and polygons on is actually happening in a farmer’s field,” Ms. Moya a global, national, and local scale. GIS data are also said. “It will be the first comprehensive digital socioaccessible through their own dynamic Web site that economic database on farm-level rice production in allows users to manipulate and display geographical the rice-growing areas of Asia done by SSD and its knowledge in new and exciting ways. The informacollaborators.” tion can be used for reports, posters, and presentaMaintaining the SSD knowledge base is a nevertion materials. ending task. It is a living library that grows with every The new, improved SSD knowledge base is exnew fact it acquires. This is the key to keep it from pected to reduce funding and efforts that are wasted becoming irrelevant, says Samarendu Mohanty, senwhen a scientist mistakenly repeats research that ior economist and head of SSD. someone else has already painstakingly conducted “This is just the start,” Dr. Mohanty said. ”It and completed. The knowledge base can also be an gets better over time. The success of this initiative effective tool for research and strategic planning. Its depends on the continuing commitment of the Insticontents will be available to IRRI staff while a large tute to keep it going.” portion of it will be accessible to academic institutions, donors, and the public to view and download. 2 of 2

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

B oar d

of

T r us T ee s 2009

Prof. Elizabeth J. Woods (chair)

Dr. Mutsuo Iwamoto

Assistant Director General, Innovation Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries Primary Industries Building 80 Ann St., Brisbane, QLD GPO Box 46, Brisbane, QLD 4001 Australia Tel: +61 7 3239 0511 Fax: +61 7 3239 3074 E-mail: beth.woods@dpi.qld.gov.au

President Society for Techno-Innovation of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries Sankaido Bldg. 7F Akasaka 1-9-13, Minato-ku Tokyo 107-0052, Japan Tel: +81 3 3586 8644 Fax: +81 3 3586 8277 E-mail: iwamoto@staff.or.jp; nqb02120@nifty.com

Dr. Jillian Lenné

Consultant, Agricultural Research for Development, DFID Research Into Use Program Co-Editor-in-Chief, Field Crops Research Visiting Professor in Agrobiodiversity, University of Greenwich North Old Moss Croft, Fyvie, Turriff Aberdeenshire AB53 8NA, UK Tel: +44 0 1651 806153 E-mail: jillian.lenne@btopenworld.com

Dr. Ralph Anthony Fischer
Visiting Scientist and Crawford Fund ACT Coordinator CSIRO Division of Plant Industry GPO Box 1600 Canberra, ACT 2601 Australia Tel: +61 2 6246 5244 Fax: +61 2 6246 5000 E-mail: tony.fischer@csiro.au

Dr. Seong-Hee Lee

Consultant B-1605 Pyeongchon Acro Tower Kwanyang-Dong, Dongan-Gu Anyang City, Kyeonggi-do 431-060 Republic of Korea Tel: +82 31 478 1957; 735 6811 E-mail: lees_korea@hanmail.net

Prof. Ruth K. Oniang’o

Founder, Rural Outreach Program (ROP) Editor-in-Chief, African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development (AJFAND; formerly: African Journal of Food and Nutritional Sciences, or AJFNS) KARI-NARL Complex Westlands, Off Waiyaki Way PO Box 29086-00625 Nairobi, Kenya Tel/fax: +254 20 4444030 E-mail: oniango@iconnect.co.ke

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of2

B oar d

of

T r us T ee s 2009
Mr. Mohammed Syeduzzaman Dr. Usha Barwale Zehr
Joint Director of Research and Deputy Director of Biotechnology MAHYCO Seeds Ltd. Resham Bhavan, 4th Floor 78 Veer Nariman Road Mumbai 400 020, India Tel: +91 2230 273007 Fax: +91 2483 262002 E-mail: usha.zehr@mahyco.com

Dr. Ronald L. Phillips

Regents Professor and McKnight Presidential Chair in Genomics Department of Agronomy and Plant Genetics Director, Center for Microbial and Plant Genomics Plant Molecular Genetics Institute University of Minnesota 1991 Upper Buford Circle St. Paul, MN 55108, USA Tel: +1 612 625 1213; 612 625 7773 Fax: +1 612 625 1268 E-mail: phill005@umn.edu

Chairman, BOC Bangladesh Ltd. Chairman, Bangladesh Rice Foundation Chairman, Credit Rating Agency of Bangladesh Vice Chairman, Infrastructure and Industrial Development Finance Company Apartment 401/402 Concord Windsor House No. 7, Road No. 59 Gulshan-2, Dhaka 1212, Bangladesh Tel: +880 2 8127568 Fax: +880 2 8127568 E-mail: syeduzzaman@bocbangladesh. com

Dr. Mangala Rai

Dr. Achmad Suryana

Secretary, Department of Agricultural Research and Education Director General, Indian Council for Agricultural Research Krishi Bhavan, New Delhi 110 001 India Tel: +91 11 2338 2629; 2338 6711 Fax: +91 11 2584 3301 E-mail: mrai@icar.delhi.nic.in

Director General Indonesian Agency for Food Security Kantor Pusat Deptan Ministry of Agriculture Jl. Harsono Rm. No. 3, Gedung E-Lantai 4 Ragunan, Jakarta, Selatan 12550 Indonesia Tel: +62 21 780 1242, 780 6205 Fax: +62 21 788 30228 E-mail: suryana@deptan.go.id

Dr. Robert S. Zeigler (ex officio)

Director General International Rice Research Institute DAPO Box 7777 Metro Manila, Philippines Tel: +63 2 818 1926; 810 5337; 892 0354; 580 5600 Fax: +63 2 891 1292; 580 5699 E-mail: r.zeigler@cgiar.org

Dr. Emerlinda R. Roman (ex officio)

President University of the Philippines Diliman 1100 Quezon City, Philippines Tel: +63 2 928 3014; 928 0110; 924 2725 Fax: +63 2 920 6882 E-mail: emerlinda.roman@up.edu.ph

Hon. Arthur C. Yap (ex officio)

Prof. Baowen Zhang
Deputy Minister Ministry of Agriculture No. 11 Nongzhanguan Nanli Beijing 100026 People’s Republic of China Tel: +86 10 6419 2338 Fax: +86 10 6500 1869 E-mail: bwz46111@sohu.com; bgt338@agri.gov.cn

Secretary, Department of Agriculture Elliptical Road, Diliman 1100 Quezon City, Philippines Tel: +63 2 920 4323; 920 4358 Fax: +63 2 929 8183; 928 5140

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

2 of2

P ersonnel list
Administrative staff
Robert S. Zeigler, PhD, director general William G. Padolina, PhD, deputy director general for operations and support services Achim Dobermann, PhD, deputy director general for research Norman A. Macdonald, CCA, director for management services Michael T. Jackson, PhD, director for program planning and communications Fiona C. Farrell, MSD, head, human resource services Gelia Castillo, PhD, consultant Benito Vergara, PhD, consultant Fernando A. Bernardo, PhD, consultant Keijiro Otsuka, PhD, consultant Zaff Bozkurt, consultant1, 2 Judith Buresh, consultant, human resource services Rizalina Gonzalez, consultant, human resource services2 Chris Vaughan, consultant, human resource services1 Lucia V. Gamel, BS, executive secretary Adonna M. Robles, MS, executive assistant I Jagadish Timsina, PhD, senior scientist, cropping system agronomy To Phuc Tuong, PhD, senior scientist, water management engineer Reiner Wassmann, PhD, coordinator, Rice and Climate Change Consortium2 Bhagirath Chauhan, PhD, postdoctoral fellow Georgina Vergara, PhD, postdoctoral fellow Amelia Henry, PhD, postdoctoral fellow Florencia Palis, PhD, postdoctoral fellow2 Dong-Jin Kang, PhD, postdoctoral fellow4 Sarah Covshoff, PhD, postdoctoral fellow2 Madonna Casimero, PhD, project scientist Impa Somayanda, PhD, postdoctoral fellow1 Yashpal Saharawat, PhD, postdoctoral fellow1 Jolly Chatterjee, PhD, postdoctoral fellow1 Sharta Karki, PhD, postdoctoral fellow1 Andrew Cal, PhD, postdoctoral fellow1 John Damien Platten, PhD, postdoctoral fellow1 Yolanda Chen, PhD, collaborative research scientist1, 2 Gail Langellotto, PhD, collaborative research scientist1, 2 Bjoern Ole Sander, PhD, collaborative research scientist1, 2 Kay Sumfleth, PhD, visiting research fellow Nobuko Katanayagi, PhD, visiting research fellow Guifu Liu, PhD, visiting research fellow1, 2 S.M.A. Jabbar, PhD, visiting research fellow1 A. Senthil, PhD, visiting research fellow1 Dirk de Waele, PhD, consultant1 Edgar Paski, PhD, consultant1, 2 Truong Ngoc Chi, consultant1 Jason Beebout, MS, consultant1 Steve Klassen, MS, consultant1 Peter Mitchell, PhD, consultant1, 2 Zhongxian Lu, PhD, consultant1, 2 Aye Myint Thwe, PhD, consultant1, 2 Keng-Hong Tan, PhD, consultant1, 2

Crop and Environmental Sciences Division
Bas A.M. Bouman, PhD, senior scientist, water science and head Sarah Johnson Beebout, PhD, scientist, soil chemist13 Roland J. Buresh, PhD, senior scientist, soil science Jill Cairns, PhD, international research fellow4 Stephan M. Haefele, PhD, senior scientist, soil science/agronomy Kong Luen Heong, PhD, senior scientist, entomology/ IPM specialist Finbarr Horgan, PhD, scientist, entomology Yasukazu Hosen, PhD, scientist, soil science Elizabeth Humphreys, PhD, senior scientist, water management specialist13 Abdelbagi M. Ismail, PhD, senior scientist, plant physiology David E. Johnson, PhD, senior scientist, weed science Jagdish K. Ladha, PhD, senior scientist, soil science; coordinator, Rice-Wheat Consortium; and IRRI representative for India Tanguy Lafarge, PhD, senior scientist, crop physiology and deputy division head Rubenito Lampayan, PhD, postdoctoral fellow2; scientist, water science13 Tao Li, PhD, scientist, crop modeler1 Shaobing Peng, PhD, senior scientist, crop physiology Paul Quick, PhD, principal scientist and head of Applied Photosynthesis and Systems Modeling Team, C4 Rice1 Benjamin K. Samson, PhD, scientist, agronomy Rachid Serraj, PhD, senior scientist, crop physiology Grant Singleton, PhD, coordinator, Irrigated Rice Research Consortium

Office of the Director General
Sylvia R. Arellano, BS, executive assistant II Marichu A. Bernardo, MS, senior manager, risk management and quality assurance Rosalinda D. Del Rosario, BS, executive secretary Cristina T. San Jose, BS, officer - administrative coordination1

Office of the Deputy Director General for Research
Mangina Srinivas Rao, MBM, chief executive officer, Cereal Systems Initiative for South Asia (CSISA) project1 Twng W. Mew, PhD, consultant John Sheehy, PhD, consultant1

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 14

P ersonnel list
R. Chandrababu, PhD, consultant1, 2 John Lucas, BS, consultant1, 2 Ngo Dang Phong, PhD, consultant1, 2 Nguyen Thi Duong Nga, PhD, consultant1 Monina Escalada, PhD, consultant1 Jiaang Cheng, PhD, consultant1, 2 Rodante R. Abas, technician III - research Kelvin T. Acebron, BS, researcher1,3 Lolita L. Adriano, secretary III Ruth A. Agbisit, BS, assistant scientist3 Ma. Carmelita R. Alberto, MS, assistant scientist Ma. Liberty P. Almazan, BS, associate scientist Jennine Rose L. Altoveros, BS, researcher Maximo N. Alumaga, BS, technician III - research Jorge L. Alvarez, technician III - research Myrish V. Alvarez, BS, technician II - research3 Serafin T. Amarante, MS, associate scientist Edgar O. Amoloza, technician III - research Olivyn R. Angeles, MS, assistant scientist Rechelle B. Angeles, BS, technician II - research3 Melencio J. Apostol, BS, technician II - research3 Eugenio P. Aquino, BS, assistant scientist3 Erwin R. Arcillas, BS, technician III - research Arriza H. Arida, BS, researcher1 Hernan P. Austriaco, technician I - research1,3 Manolo S. Balanial, technician II - research Corazon E. Bambase, BS, secretary III Emiliano M. Barcial, technician III - research Angel M. Bautista, technician II - research3 Ruvicyn S. Bayot, MS, assistant manager II - program coordination3 Jesus S. Belen, technician III - research Carmencita C. Bernal, MS, assistant scientist Anita A. Boling, PhD, associate scientist Aniceto B. Boncajes, BS, technician III - research Osmundo C. Bondad, technician II - research Nadialin J. Borje, BS, researcher1 Crisanta S. Bueno, MS, assistant scientist Nonnie P. Bunyi, BS, secretary III Mary Ann E. Burac, BS, technician III - research3 Romeo J. Cabangon, PhD, associate scientist Siena B. Calibo, BS, technician II - research Modesto A. Calica, technician III - research Irma A. Canicosa, BS, technician II - research1,3 Lucio N. Caramihan, technician III - research Rene B. Carandang, BS, technician III - research Ambrocio R. Castaneda, MS, assistant scientist Oliver B. Castillo, BS, assistant scientist3 Rowena L. Castillo, MS, assistant scientist1,3 Ricardo S. Catangay, technician II - research Josie Lynn A. Catindig, MS, assistant scientist Helen Grace S. Centeno, MS, associate scientist Ruben G. Chavez, officer - ASL Mishel M. Ciceron, BS, secretary III1 Jeanaflor Crystal T. Concepcion, BS, technician III research1,3 Ferdinand G. Corcuera, BS, technician III - research Teodoro Q. Correa, Jr., BS, assistant scientist Arturo L. Crisostomo, technician II - research3 Ramon Gil C. Cuyat, technician I - research1,3 Florence R. Danila, BS, assistant scientist3 Cesario B. De Mesa, Jr, technician II - research Marjorie P. De Ocampo, MS, assistant scientist3 Dindo L. Defontorum, technician I - research1,3 Macario W. Del Valle, technician II - research Leodegario O. Dela Rosa, technician II - research Teodoro M. Delgado, technician III - research Rodolfo M. Delos Reyes, technician II - research1,3 Glenn D. Dimayuga, BS, assistant scientist3 Mary Jacqueline A. Dionora, MS, senior associate scientist - C4 project3 Deomides M. Dizon, technician III - research Roland N. Dizon, technician II - research3 Edwin P. Dizon, technician II - research Nilo G. Driz, technician III - research Elmer Q. Duque, Jr., technician II - research1,3 James A. Egdane, BS, researcher Natalia D. Elayda, technician I - research1,3 Evangelina S. Ella, MS, associate scientist Eunice C. Escandor, BS, researcher3 Manuel Q. Esguerra, MS, assistant scientist1,3 Maria Elena A. Estrada, MS, assistant scientist3 Ricardo L. Eugenio, technician III - research Jacinta I. Evangelista, secretary III Joel P. Evangelista, technician II - research1,3 Emma A. Fabian, BS, secretary III Jaime E. Faronilo, MS, researcher Luzviminda C. Fernandez, BS, assistant scientist Jedeliza B. Ferrater, MS, researcher4 Anaida B. Ferrer, BS, assistant manager II Rica Joy B. Flor, MS, researcher3 Pedro N. Gapas, BS, technician III - research Charle Patrick F. Garcia, BS, researcher1 Elena G. Genil, BS, secretary III1,3 Ireneo M. Gibas, BS, secretary III Marlon C. Guerra, BS, programmer1,3 Ruben M. Guevarra, technician II - research3 Jennifer D. Hernandez, BS, secretary III Leonardo R. Holongbayan, technician III - research Evelyn V. Inocencio, BS, assistant manager I - project coordination3,9 Joel D. Janiya, MS, senior associate scientist - extension agronomist Pauline T. Jasmin, BS, officer - administrative coordination1,3 Feriano T. Javier, technician III - research Nole B. Javier, data encoder1,3 Florencia G. Junsay, BS, secretary III

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

2 of 14

P ersonnel list
Meggy Lou B. Katimbang, BS, researcher Donato V. Lanwang, technician III - research Rogelio T. Lapastora, Jr., technician II - research3 Angelito T. Lape, BS, specialist - instrument3,4 Wenceslao M. Larazo, BS, assistant scientist3 Eufrocino V. Laureles, MS, assistant scientist Ma. Rebecca C. Laza, PhD, associate scientist Lamberto V. Licardo, technician III - research Leanilyn C. Lim, BS, technician II - research3 Evelyn A. Liwanag, technician III - research3 Lizzida P. Llorca, BS, researcher3 Allan P. Los Añes, technician II - research3 Victor H. Lubigan, technician II - research Abigail E. Mabilangan, BS, assistant scientist Anicio P. Macahia, technician III - research Arelene Julia B. Malabayabas, MS, assistant scientist 1 Luis L. Malabayabas, technician II - research Marlon A. Malabrigo, BS, technician III - research3,4 Rona M. Managat, technician I - research1,3 Rufino D. Manuel, technician III - research Ramon B. Masajo, technician III - research Trina Leah T. Mendoza, MA, senior specialist communication3 Onofre A. Mendoza, technician III - research Zorayda T. Menguito, BS, secretary III3 Maricar R. Mercado, technician II - research1,3 Victor R. Micosa, technician III - research4 Teodoro R. Migo, BS, assistant scientist Reychelle T. Mogul, BS, assistant scientist1,3 Lilia R. Molina, BS, assistant manager II - ASL Apollo Neil R. Monroy, BS, researcher1,3 Enrique F. Monserrat, technician II - research Edsel T. Moscoso, BS, technician III - research3 Ofelia S. Namuco, MS, associate scientist Alberto I. Naredo, technician III - research Katharine C. Ng, BS, associate - database management3 Rowena Z. Noblejas, BS, technician II - research3 Carmelito S. Oca, technician II - research3 Jerone R. Onoya, technician III - research Jan Michael D. Orlina, BS, technician II - research3 Paquito P. Pablico, MS, associate scientist Jocelyn B. Pacia, BS, researcher 4 Agnes T. Padre, PhD, associate scientist3 Anny Ruth P. Pame, BS, researcher1,3 Roselle M. Pamulaklakin, BS, associate - weather database administration3 Rene M. Panopio, technician III - research Sonny C. Pantoja, technician III - research Rexie Jane D. Parreño, MS, officer - project coordination3 Zenaida P. Pascual, BS, researcher Estela M. Pasuquin, MS, assistant scientist Maximo L. Pelagio, BS, technician III - research Maria Theresa R. Pucio, BS, secretary III3,4 Bermenito R. Punzalan, BS, researcher2,3 Emma D. Quicho, BS, researcher3 Ma. Angeles M. Quilloy, MS, assistant manager II (associate program manager) Reyuel C. Quintana, technician III - research Guido M. Ramos, technician II - research Jastin Edrian C. Revilleza, BS, researcher1,3 Eva Corazon P. Reyes, BS, secretary III3 Edna R. Reyes, BS, secretary III4 Enrique M. Reyes, technician III - research Ariston V. Reyes, technician II - research3 Juan B. Reyes, technician II - research Errol T. Rico, technician III - research Reynaldo C. Rodriguez, MS, assistant scientist Rona Niña Mae C. Rojas, BS, officer - communication and extension1,3 Angelita M. Romena, MS, assistant scientist Jose G. Rosales, technician III - research Francis Hennel C. Rubianes, BS, researcher1,3 Nancy O. Sadiasa, technician II - research3 Antonio M. Salamatin, technician III - research Briccio C. Salisi, technician III - research Joana Marie A. Salonga, BS, technician I - research1,3 Marianne I. Samson, MS, associate scientist3 Rosalie L. San Antonio, BS, secretary III Marie Jeremy B. San Pedro, BS, researcher1,3 Marnol V. Santos, BS, specialist - instrument Flor Adrian C. Simborio, BS, researcher3,4 Philip Joshua O. Sinohin, BS, specialist - applications programmer1,3 Joel D. Siopongco, PhD, assistant scientist4 Rizalina V. Sulabo, BS, officer - database administration3 Gaudencio A. Sulit, technician III - research Elisa M. Tabaquero, BS, specialist - administrative coordination Katherine Grace R. Tan, BS, researcher3,4 Eduardo V. Tandang, technician III - research Lino B. Tatad, technician II - research Isidro M. Tolentino, technician I - research Rolando O. Torres, MS, associate scientist Jo Anne Holly T. Torres, BS, secretary III3 Nicanor L. Turingan, technician III - research Efren J. Turla, technician II - research Dennis S. Tuyogon, MS, assistant scientist1 Jaika H. Ulilang, BS, researcher3,4 Danilo D. Vasquez, technician III - research Sergio G. Velasco, BS, technician III - research Joselito E. Villa, PhD, assistant scientist3 Sylvia C. Villareal, BS, researcher Romeo M. Visperas, MS, senior associate scientist Chenie S. Zamora, BS, researcher2,3 Rochelle E. Zantua, BS, technician III - research3

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

3 of 14

P ersonnel list
Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division
Darshan S. Brar, PhD, senior scientist, plant breeding and head5 David J. Mackill, PhD, leader, Raising Productivity in Rainfed Environments Program Jauhar Ali, PhD, scientist, regional project coordinator for Asia1 Il-Ryong Choi, Ph D, scientist, plant virology Glenn B. Gregorio, PhD, senior scientist, plant breeding, Deepinder Grewal, PhD, postdoctoral fellow2; scientist, rice breeder1 Sigrid Heuer, PhD, scientist, molecular biology Gregory Howell, PhD, scientist, plant physiology Kshirod Kumar Jena, PhD, senior scientist, plant breeding and IRRI representative for Korea Kyung-Ho Kang, PhD, senior scientist, plant breeding Nobuya Kobayashi, PhD, scientist, plant breeding Ajay Kohli, PhD, senior scientist, molecular biology Arvind Kumar, PhD, scientist, plant breeding Hei Leung, PhD, senior scientist, plant pathology, and leader, Rice Genetic Diversity and Discovery Program Jan Leach, PhD, adjunct scientist Zhikang Li, PhD, senior scientist, molecular geneticist and coordinator, International Network for Molecular Breeding M. S. Ramesha, PhD, scientist, rice breeder1 Edilberto Redoña, PhD, senior scientist, plant breeding and coordinator, INGER Inez Slamet-Loedin, PhD, scientist, plant biotechnology Serge Savary, PhD, senior scientist, plant pathology Endang Septiningsih, PhD, scientist, molecular genetics13 Rakesh K. Singh, PhD, senior scientist, regional plant breeding coordinator for Eastern and Southern Africa (ESA)12 Uma S. Singh, PhD, regional project coordinator, South Asia Michael Thomson, PhD, scientist, molecular genetics13 Casiana M. Vera Cruz, PhD, senior scientist, plant pathology Parminder S. Virk, PhD, senior scientist, plant breeding Laetitia Willocquet, PhD, scientist, plant pathology, and consultant Fangming Xie, PhD, senior scientist, hybrid rice breeder Dule Zhao, PhD, postdoctoral fellow Helal Uddin Ahmed, PhD, postdoctoral fellow Daisuke Fujita, PhD, postdoctoral fellow1,2 Joong-Hyoun Chin, PhD, postdoctoral fellow S.V. Krishna Jagadish, PhD, postdoctoral fellow Kurniawan Rudi Trijatmiko, PhD, postdoctoral fellow1 Jung-Hyun Shim, PhD, postdoctoral fellow,1 Wei Zhou, PhD, visiting research fellow1, 2; postdoctoral fellow1 B.P. Mallikarjuna Swamy, PhD, visiting research fellow1, 2; postdoctoral fellow1 Srinivasachary, PhD, postdoctoral fellow1 Changrong Ye, PhD, postdoctoral fellow1 Young-Chan Cho, PhD, visiting research fellow2 Yohei Koide, PhD, visiting research fellow Jong-Cheol Ko, PhD, visiting research fellow2 Yongming Gao, PhD, visiting research fellow1, 2, Jian-Long Xu. PhD, visiting research fellow1, 2, Nikolaos Tsakirpaloglou, MS, visiting research fellow1, 2 Pawan Khera, MS, visiting research fellow1, 2 So-Hyeon Baek, PhD, visiting research fellow 2 Dong-Jin Lee, PhD, visiting research fellow2 Satish Verulkar, PhD, visiting research fellow1, 2 Nimal P. Mandal, PhD, visiting research fellow2 Narendra Lakpale, PhD, visiting research fellow1, 2 Sang-Bok Lee, PhD, visiting research fellow1, 2 Hyeon-Jung Kang, PhD, visiting research fellow 1, 2 Dong-Jin Lee, PhD, visiting research fellow2 Jagjeet Lore, PhD, visiting research fellow2 Darshan S. Brar, PhD, consultant Romeo Labios, PhD, consultant Jing Tan, MS, consultant Tajinder S. Bharaj, PhD, consultant Prabhjit Chadha Mohanty, PhD, consultant Aldas Janaiah, PhD, consultant1, 2 Jing Li, collaborative research fellow1, 2 Woo-Jae Kim, collaborative research fellow1, 2 Shon Ji-Young, MS, collaborative research fellow1, 2 Kyung-Hwa- Han, PhD, collaborative research fellow1, 2 Isaac Kofi, PhD, collaborative research fellow1, 2 Jung-Jong Min, BS, collaborative research fellow1, 2 Jeong-Heui Lee, PhD, collaborative research fellow1, 2 Editha M. Abrigo, BS, assistant scientist Ruben C. Abuyo, technician II - research Jahleel Z. Acedo, BS, assistant scientist1,3 Emmanuel R. Adique, technician II - research3 Dante L. Adorada, MS, associate scientist3, 4 Victor P. Alcantara, BS, researcher3 Emily P. Alcantara, secretary II3 Vanessa Dyan R. Aldemita, BS, researcher3 Vina L. Alvarez, MS, assistant manager II Cenon P. Alvarez, technician II - research3 Modesto M. Amante, MS, assistant scientist Virgilio T. Ancheta, Jr., technician III - research Rona Xyra D. Andam, BS, associate - database administration1,3 Jose L. Angeles, BS, technician III - research Leonido M. Angeles, technician III - research Virgilio M. Angeles, technician II - research Evangeline A. Angeles, attendant - seed inventory3 Ma. Anna Lynn L. Apolinario, BS, researcher1,3 Marydee V. Arceta, BS, technician III - research3 May Anne O. Argayoso, BS, researcher1,3

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

4 of 14

P ersonnel list
Renel C. Aventurado, technician II - research3 Benvienido D. Bacani, technician I - research1,3 Esquirion A. Baguioso, technician III - research Florencio R. Balenson, technician III - research Jeanette L. Balindong, BS, researcher3, 4 Maria Rowena M. Baltazar, BS, specialist - research and extension3 Victor P. Banasihan, BS, technician II - research3 Maximino G. Banasihan, Jr., technician III - research Minerva B. Bandian, BS, secretary III Conrado P. Bandian, technician III - research Nonoy B. Bandillo, BS, researcher3 Marietta R. Baraoidan, MS, associate scientist Leeanne E. Bautista, BS, technician II - research1 Jerico Stefan R. Bigornia, BS, researcher1,3 Alicia A. Bordeos, MS, associate scientist Julius B. Borgonia, technician II - research3 Ma. Gina L. Borja, BS, technician II - research3 Ma. Ruby G. Burgos, BS, researcher Pepito Q. Cabauatan, PhD, senior associate scientist Rogelio C. Cabunagan, MS, associate scientist Jeffe O. Cadion, BS, technician III - research3 Joselito M. Calibo, technician II - research3 Ernesto M. Camangon, technician III - research3 Lorraine D. Cappleman, BS, researcher3 Luisito L. Caracuel, technician II - research Jerome J. Carandang, BS, researcher3,7 Socorro L. Carandang, BS, technician III - research Patricio M. Carandang, technician II - research3 Carlos L. Casal, Jr., BS, assistant scientist Cesar L. Caspillo, BS, technician II - research3 Nancy P. Castilla, PhD, senior associate scientist - plant pathology Liwayway V. Castillo, BS, technician II - research3 Edgardo L. Coloquio, BS, researcher Benedicto H. Consignado, technician III - research Ronaldo L. Cornista, technician II - research Anthony M. Cruz, technician II - research3 Maria Florida M. Cueto, BS, technician III - research1,3 Teodoro M. Cuevas, technician II - research3 Crisanta G. Culala, BS, secretary III Crispulo B. Cura, BS, technician III - research1,3 Cheryl O. Dalid, BS, researcher3 Felicidad S. Danglay, BS, secretary III Danilo C. De Ocampo, technician III - research Justina M. De Palma, MS, assistant scientist3 Marilyn M. Del Valle, BS, technician II - research3 Angelito D. Del Valle, technician II - research3,4 Reynaldo J. Dela Cueva, technician III - research Madonna Angelita G. Dela Paz, MS, assistant scientist3 Nelie M. Delos Reyes, BS, secretary III Rollin V. Deocampo, BS, technician III - research3 Christine Jade A. Dilla, BS, researcher3 Crisostomo C. Dizon, technician II - research3 Panfilo T. Domingo, Jr, BS, technician III - research Conrado N. Dueñas, Jr., BS, researcher3 Mercy R. Dy, technician II - research Venus H. Elec, MS, assistant scientist3 Blesilda A. Enriquez, technician III - research Carlito A. Escosura, Jr., technician I - research3 Marcelo J. Espiritu, BS, assistant scientist3, 4 Leonardo S. Estenor, BS, technician III - research William H. Eusebio, senior specialist - database administration Antonio A. Evangelista, BS, senior associate scientistbreeding nurseries Ana Barbara S. Evangelista, MS, assistant manager I1,3 Anchilie G. Francisco, BS, researcher1 Angelito S. Francisco, technician III - research Epifania F. Garcia, BS, technician III - research Reynaldo (Abdullah) P. Garcia, technician III - research Mario A. Garcia, technician II - research Ruby S. Gonzales, BS, researcher3 Oscar A. Gonzales, technician II - research Jocelyn O. Guevarra, BS, associate - stock inventory3 Ronilo C. Guevarra, technician II - research1 Francisco V. Gulay, technician II - research Sherry Lou S. Hechanova, MS, researcher Lourdes A. Herrero, BS, secretary III1,3 Mary Ann S. Inabangan, BS, researcher3 Mario R. Izon, technician III - research Vanica R. Lacorte, BS, researcher Jojee H. Lales, BS, researcher1,3 Virginia M. Laluz, BS, technician II - research3 Daisy Corazon R. Lampayan, MS, assistant manager I - program coordination3 Cenon L. Lanao, technician II - research Wilfredo M. Lanip, BS, technician III - research Mario A. Lapiz, technician II - research1,3 Lovely Mae F. Lawas, BS, researcher1,3 Marcelino A. Laza, BS, assistant scientist Nestor P. Leron, technician II - research Noel P. Llanza, technician II - research3,4 Vitaliano L. Lopena, MS, associate scientist Ma. Concepcion F. Lotho, BS, technician II - research Orlando T. Lucero, technician II - research Joel T. Macabenta, technician III - research3 Ma. Reina Suzette B. Madamba, MS, researcher2 Virgilio P. Magat, technician III - research Nicole F. Magculia, BS, assistant scientist1 Flavio A. Maghirang, technician III - research Paul Benny D. Malabanan, technician II - research3 Carmela D. Malabanan, technician II - research3 Christopher G. Maligalig, technician III - research1,3 Apolonio N. Mamiit, technician III - research3 Ismael P. Mamiit, technician II - research1,3

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

5 of 14

P ersonnel list
Eleazar O. Manalaysay, technician III - research3 Christine A. Manito, BS, technician II - research3 Marina C. Manzanilla, technician II - research3 Jose M. Marasigan, technician II - research Leovino B. Matundan, technician II - research Paul Cornelio T. Maturan, BS, assistant scientist1,3 Lolita C. Mendoza, BS, technician III - research3 Josefina G. Mendoza, BS, technician III - research Enrico Francisco L. Mercado, BS, researcher1,3 Florencia A. Montecillo, BS, technician II - research3 Arsenio R. Morales, technician II - research Pauline Andrea M. Muyco, BS, researcher3 Leonida P. Nazarea, BS, secretary II5 Elma N. Nicolas, BS, specialist - administrative coordination Michael R. Noel, BS, researcher1,3 Rodante M. Nuevo, technician I - research3 Rowena H. Oane, BS, assistant scientist Honorio M. Oboza, technician II - research Norman P. Oliva, MS, assistant scientist Lorelie S. Olivo, BS, secretary III Isabelita P. Oña, MS, associate scientist Alvaro M. Pamplona, BS, senior associate scientistbreeding for abiotic stress Ireneo B. Pangga, PhD, associate scientist3, 4 Marcial C. Panting, technician I - research3 Eric L. Paragas, BS, assistant manager II3 Daniel L. Pasuquin, technician II - research Miladie P. Peñarubia, technician II - research3 Godofredo B. Perez, technician II - research Macario S. Perez, Sr., technician II - research Marita S. Pinili, MS, assistant scientist2,3 Eufrocino M. Pizarra, technician III - research Renato T. Pizon, Sr., technician II - research Mar Aristeo G. Poncio, BS, researcher3, 4 Lenie A. Quiatchon, MS, researcher3 Norberto T. Quilloy, BS, technician III - research Marilyn A. Rala, secretary III Joie M. Ramos, MS, assistant scientist Nestor D. Ramos, technician III - research Alexander G. Ramos, technician III - research Eraño G. Ramos, technician I - research3 Czarina Mae P. Realubit, BS, researcher1,3 Pedro F. Reaño, technician III - research Shayne S. Reaño, BS, technician II - research3 Maria Ymber V. Reveche, BS, assistant scientist Andrew O. Revilleza, technician II - research3 Jeanette Carolyn C. Reyes, BS, researcher1,3 Juvy G. Reyes, technician II - research3 Marino G. Reyes, technician II - research3 Andres Godwin C. Sajise, MS, assistant scientist Allan P. Salabsabin, BS, researcher Noel S. Salac, technician III - research3 Cecilia L. Salonga, BS, secretary III Mercy Q. Samia, MS, assistant scientist3 Darlene L. Sanchez, BS, assistant scientist Janice A. Sapin, technician II - research Pamella Marie D. Sendon, BS, researcher1,3 Sheryl N. Sierra, BS, assistant scientist3 Elenita T. Silab, technician III - research Nadine Marie Y. Singson, MS, officer - database administration1 Noel L. Sosa, secretary I Ma. Teresa G. Sta. Cruz, BS, assistant scientist Eloisa B. Suiton, technician II - research3 Ernesto C. Sumague, technician III - research Analiza G. Tagle, BS, researcher3 Julito P. Talay, technician II - research2 Rodolfo S. Toledo, MS, senior associate scientist - hybrid rice breeding4 Ma. Concepcion U. Toledo, BS, associate scientist Lina B. Torrizo, MS, associate scientist Jennylyn L. Trinidad, MS, assistant scientist3 Allan P. Trinidad, technician II - researcher3 Holden N. Verdeprado, BS, researcher1,3 Naireen Aiza G. Vispo, BS, researcher3 Mary Jeanie T. Yanoria, BS, assistant scientist3 Jose Kenneth C. Yap, BS, researcher3, 4 Chenie S. Zamora, BS, researcher1,3

Social Sciences Division
Samarendu Mohanty, PhD, senior economist and head Sushil Pandey, PhD, senior scientist, agricultural economics and leader, Rice Policy Support and Impact Assessment Program Robert J. Hijmans, PhD, senior scientist, geographic information systems specialist4 Damien Jourdain, PhD, senior scientist, agricultural economics Kei Kajisa, PhD, senior scientist, agricultural economics Andrew Nelson, PhD, scientist, geographic information systems specialist1 Florencia Palis, PhD, scientist, agricultural anthropology13 Thelma R. Paris, PhD, senior scientist, gender specialist and deputy division head Valerien Pede, PhD, scientist, economist1 David Raitzer, MS, scientist, impact assessment and strategic planning specialist1 Shigeki Yokoyama, MS, IRS seconded from JIRCAS Hari Gurung, PhD, international research fellow, farming systems2 Digna Manzanilla, PhD, postdoctoral fellow Humnath Bhandari, PhD, postdoctoral fellow Hari Nath Singh, PhD, postdoctoral fellow Yuko Nakano, PhD, postdoctoral fellow1 Huaiyu Wang, PhD, postdoctoral fellow1 Yann H. Chemin, PhD, postdoctoral fellow2

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

6 of 14

P ersonnel list
Jacob van Etten, PhD, postdoctoral fellow4 Devendra Gauchan, PhD, postdoctoral fellow Amrendra N. Singh, PhD, consultant Chun K. Lai, consultant2 Yolanda Garcia, PhD, consultant1,2 Arnold Garcia, PhD, consultant1,2 Suwen Pan, PhD, consultant1,2 Seth Meyer, consultant1,2 Renato Villano, PhD, consultant1,2 Renando Solis, PhD, consultant1,2 Sonia L. Asilo, MS, senior specialist - remote sensing3 Jocelyn G. Barba, BS, secretary III Ma. Romilee L. Bool, MS, associate scientist3 Ellanie R. Cabrera, BS, researcher, Amelia D. Cueno, MS, associate scientist3 Lydia B. Damian, BS, secretary III Dehner M. De Leon, BS, officer - database administration Catalina P. Diaz, MS, associate scientist Anna Christine A. Doctolero, BS, secretary III Mirla D. Domingo, BS, officer - administrative coordination Lolita L. Garcia, MS, associate scientist1,3 Cornelia A. Garcia, BS, associate - graphics Rosendo G. Gutierrez, BS, secretary III Zenaida M. Huelgas, MS, associate scientist Alice G. Laborte, PhD, associate scientist4 Joyce S. Luis, MS, associate scientist Teodora D. Malabanan, BS, associate - statistics Maria Luz L. Malabayabas, MS, assistant scientist3 Angelina A. Malabrigo, BS, secretary III Rio L. Maligalig, BS, associate scientist1,3 Esther B. Marciano, BS, assistant scientist Aileen A. Maunahan, BS, researcher Imelda R. Molina, PhD, associate scientist Piedad F. Moya, MS, senior research manager Josephine H. Narciso, BS, assistant scientist Ma. Cristina L. Obusan, BS, associate - database administration3 Leo Angelo L. Ocampo, BS, researcher Arnel B. Rala, BS, associate scientist Joel E. Reano, BS, associate - statistics Ma. Victoria C. Rodriguez, MA, researcher1,3 Gerlie T. Tatlonghari, BS, assistant scientist Ma. Shiela D. Valencia, BS, researcher Orlee P. Velarde, MA, assistant scientist Maria Lourdes E. Velasco, MS, associate scientist Lorena S. Villano, BS, researcher Donald B. Villanueva, BS, researcher3 Gina E. Zarsadias, MA, assistant manager I - assistant program manager Genevieve Mae B. Aquino, MS, associate scientist3 Maria Socorro S. Arboleda, BS, assistant manager I Lord Hendrix A. Barboza, BS, systems analyst/ programmer3 Violeta I. Bartolome, BS, senior associate scientistbiometrics Frances Nikki N. Borja, BS, officer - molecular breeding biologist1,3 Alexander A. Cañeda, BS, officer - platform software engineer3 Manfred Carlo R. Cardenas, BS, programmer - web services3 Franjel C. Consolacion, MS, specialist - systems/database administration3 Warren Vincent E. Constantino, BS, associate scientist Jeffrey A. Detras, BS, assistant scientist3 Maria Corina D. Habito, BS, systems analyst/ programmer Edward P. Legaspi, BS, systems analyst/programmer1 Emmali A. Manalo, BS, specialist - institutional research data & information systems Kevin L. Manansala, BS, specialist - platform software engineer3,4 Jeffrey B. Morales, BS, specialist - platform software engineer3 Leilani A. Nora, BS, assistant scientist Carlos N. Ortiz, BS, systems analyst/programmer3 Lourdes C. Paunlagui, BS, officer - administrative coordination Barry C. Peralta, BS, systems analyst/programmer2,3 Clarissa I. Pimentel, BS, specialist - database administration4 Arllet M. Portugal, MS, associate scientist 4 Jean Robelle D. Sabado, BS, specialist - information systems developer3 Veritas Morena R. Salazar, BS, researcher

Crop Research Informatics Laboratory
Richard Bruskiewich, PhD, senior scientist, computational and systems biology Chengzhi Liang, PhD, scientist, crop information systems specialist1 Ramil Mauleon, PhD, postdoctoral fellow4; scientist, bioinformatics specialist1 Thomas Metz, PhD, senior scientist, research informatics and acting head Martin Senger, bioinformatics software project manager2 Guoyou Ye, PhD, senior scientist, breeding informatics specialist1 Samart Wanchana, PhD, postdoctoral fellow Matthieu Conte, PhD, postdoctoral fellow4 Vivek Thakur, PhD, postdoctoral fellow 1 Ryan Carlo B. Alamban, BS, specialist - platform software engineer3,4 Mylah Rystie U. Anacleto, BS, associate scientist

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

7 of 14

P ersonnel list
Ma. Luisa T. Tabada, BS, systems analyst/programmer1,3 Rowena V. Tulod, BS, systems analyst/programmer3,4 Victor Jun M. Ulat, MS, associate scientist Michael B. Gamalinda, BS, researcher3, 4 Arnold B. Gonzales, technician II - research Minerva C. Gulde, technician I - research3 Emerlinda E. Hernandez, technician III - research Edwin H. Jarabejo, technician I - research3 Nora M. Kuroda, technician I - research3 Melencio R. Lalap, technician III - research Alicia A. Lapis, BS, technician I - research Felix R. Llanes, technician III - research Wilma L. Lumaybay, technician I - research Yolanda P. Malatag, BS, technician II - research Gilbert G. Mamiit, technician I - research Emmanuel T. Manaig, technician I - research3 Veronica V. Mangubat, technician I - research Violeta T. Manila, technician I - research3 Sheila Mae Q. Mercado, BS, assistant scientist Gregorio M. Mercado, technician III - research Bernardo P. Mercado, technician III - research Mae C. Merluza, technician I - research3 Chromewell Agustin R. Mojica, BS, researcher1,3 Ma. Elizabeth B. Naredo, BS, associate scientist Romulo R. Quilantang, technician II - research3 Jacqueline M. Ragudo, technician I - research Joseph M. Ramos, technician II - research Janice A. Rayco, BS, technician III - research3 Renato A. Reano, MS, associate scientist Nelia A. Resurreccion, BS, officer - database administration Mario A. Rodriguez, technician III - research Digna I. Salisi, BS, secretary III12 Teresita C. Santos, BS, officer - administrative coordination Lilibeth M. Sison, BS, specialist - information technology3 Anthony N. Telosa, BS, assistant Jocelyn B. Torres, technician I - research1,3 Florencio F. Villegas, technician II - research Liza B. Yonzon, technician I - research3 Grain Quality, Nutrition, and Postharvest Center Melissa A. Fitzgerald, PhD, head Martin Gummert, BS, senior scientist, postharvest specialist Xiangqian Zhao, PhD, postdoctoral fellow Meas Pyseth, consultant Sorn Vichet, consultant Sann Sovann, consultant Boru Douthwaite, PhD, consultant1, 2 Alfred Schmidley, consultant1, 2, Tonya Schuetz, consultant1, 2, Juan L. Alzona, technician II - research Roslen S. Anacleto, MS, senior associate scientist10 Romulo N. Aquino, technician II - research Teodoro L. Atienza, technician II - research Carlito B. Balingbing, BS, assistant scientist Paterno C. Borlagdan, PhD, assistant scientist Mariafe N. Calingacion, MS, researcher Venea Dara A. Daygon, BS, assistant scientist3 Ana Lyn J. Genil, BS, secretary II Rosario R. Jimenez, BS, assistant scientist Artemio V. Madrid, Jr., technician III - research Reianne M. Quilloy, BS, officer - administrative coordination1,3 Adoracion P. Resurreccion, PhD, associate scientist Fernando C. Salisi, technician II - research Lucena C. Samadio, technician II - research3 Eduardo L. Secretario, technician III - research Elenita C. Sunaz, BS, officer - administrative coordination Harold Glenn A. Valera, MS, assistant scientist3,4 Lilia O. Villanueva, technician II - research, 1 Dennis F. Villegas, technician II - research1,3

T.T. Chang Genetic Resources Center
Nigel Ruaraidh Sackville Hamilton, PhD, senior scientist, evolutionary biology, and head Fiona Hay, PhD, scientist, genetics resource expert1 Kenneth L. McNally, PhD, senior scientist, molecular genetics/molecular taxonomy Tom Hazekamp, PhD, consultant Jessica Rey, PhD, postdoctoral fellow Remegio L. Aguilar, technician II - research Mauro G. Alcaraz, technician I - research1,3 Ma. Socorro R. Almazan, BS, associate scientist Lydia G. Angeles, BS, technician I - research Ricardo A. Apolinario, Jr., BS, technician II - research3 Vicente M. Arcillas, technician III - research Maria Celeste N. Banaticla-Hilario, MS, assistant scientist3 Adrian C. Barrion, technician I - research1,3 Rancy M. Bauyon, technician II - research3 Imelda P. Boncajes, technician I - research Nerissa L. Boongaling, technician I - research3 Grace Lee S. Capilit, MS, senior specialist - database administration1 Jane D. Carandang, technician I - research3 Belinda R. Caspillo, technician II - research Flora C. De Guzman, MS, senior research manager Isabelita P. De Mesa, technician II - research Lyruth S. Domagsang, BS, technician II - research3 Hipolito M. Elec, technician II - research Jenniffer P. Eleuterio, BS, assistant - database administration3 Minerva N. Eloria, technician II - research

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

8 of 14

P ersonnel list
Training Center Noel P. Magor, PhD, head and interim program leader, Information and Communication Program Yoke Sau Metz, consultant1, 2 David Shires, consultant Kate Cadman, PhD, consultant1, 2 Margaret Cargill, consultant1, 2 Ahmad Salahuddin, consultant2 Lauro M. Atienza, BS, specialist - IT development Eugenio C. Castro, Jr., MS, senior research manager Ma. Teresa A. Clabita, BS, officer Priscilla P. Comia, BS, secretary II Juanito F. Goloyugo, MS, senior associate scientist - RKB coordination6 Maria Angeli G. Maghuyop, MS, senior specialist course coordination Anilyn D. Maningas, MS, assistant manager II Macario B. Montecillo, associate - logistics Melanie M. Quinto, officer - administrative coordination Arnold Joseph S. Reyes, BS, officer - web development1 Harris L. Tumawis, officer - database administration11 Southern Africa Regional Office Carlos Zandamela, consultant, IRRI-East and Southern Africa Regional Office (ESARO) Joseph Bigirimana, PhD, consultant, ESARO (based in Mozambique)1 Mofarahus Sattar, consultant, IRRI-Bangladesh Office1, 2, Rajeshwar Nath Mallick, consultant, IRRI-Bangladesh Office2 Country offices Bangladesh Ahsanullah, Md, driver2, 3 Md. Jafar Alam, MS, secretary II4 Muhammed Murshedul Alam, PhD, senior scientistresearch platform coordinator3 Md. Yusuf Ali, PhD, hub manager-Gazipur1, 3 Ruhul Amin, office attendant2, 3 Wahidul Amin, MS, research-cum-administrative assistant1,3 Md. Abul Kalam Azad, hub support staff (secretary III)1, 3 Tahmina Banu, MS, assistant manager I - finance and administration Md. Latiful Bari, MS, assistant agriculture engineer (farm, power and machinery)1,3 Jopinath Bazi, motor vehicle operator3 Linas Dibra, motor vehicle operator1,3 Md. Zahed Firoj, BS, accountant I1, 4 Md. Abdul Hamid, guard2, 3 Md. Anarul Haque, assistant extension agronomist1,3 M. Rafiqul Islam, PhD, senior research manager1,3 Nurul Islam, guard2, 3 Shofiqul Islam, MS, delivery cum research assistant1,3 Mannan, Md Abdul, information technology officer2,3 Md. Abdul Mazid, PhD, hub manager (northwest Bangladesh)1,3 Fazlu Miah, guard2, 3 Md. Nazimmuddin Mondal, extension agronomist (central Bangladesh hub)1,3 Mohammad Ashfaqur Rahman, BA, secretary III1,3 Tauhidur Rahman, BCom, accountant I1,3 Albert Sangma, motor vehicle operator1,3 Anthony Sarder, motor vehicle operator4 Sheikh Md. Abdus Sattar, PhD, senior research manager1,3 Shamima Sultana, MA, secretary III3 S.M. Suzat, office attendant2, 3 Abutaher M. Ziauddin, PhD, monitoring and evaluation specialist2,3 Cambodia Marie Kim Leng, BS, assistant manager I China Yonghong Sun, BA, officer-administrative coordination Zhongqiu Wang, BA, assistant manager II India Gopal Krishna Agarwal, BCom, administrative officer (finance and accounts) Govind S. Bhadoriya, field assistant -central Bihar hub1,3 Gurwinder Singh Brar, MS, research associate - delivery and adoptive research1,3 Parvesh Kumar Chandna, MS, scientist, remote sensing and geographic information systems3 Ankush Chopra, BA, finance and administration assistant1,3 Tara Chand Dhoundiyal, BS, project officer1,3 Mahesh Kumar Gathala, PhD, senior scientist - research platform coordinator ML Jat, PhD, hub manager – Haryana1,3 Rohit Kumar Katara, MSE, administrative associate1,3

International Programs Management Office
Country-based Mohammed Zainul Abedin, PhD, IRRI representative for Bangladesh and FoSHoL project leader Joseph F. Rickman, MS, leader, Rice in East and Southern Africa, and IRRI representative for the East and Southern Africa region Zakaria L. Kanyeka, PhD, regional plant breeder for East and Southern Africa region M.A. Hamid Miah, PhD, liaison scientist for Bangladesh Mahyuddin Syam, MPS, liaison scientist for Indonesia/ Malaysia/Brunei Darussalam Surapong Sarkarung, PhD, consultant, IRRI-East and

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

9 of 14

P ersonnel list
Puneet Khurana, BCom, administrative associate Deeksha Krishna, PhD, scientist, soil and plant analysis1,3 Ajay Kumar, MS, research associate-delivery and adoptive research1,3 Anil Kumar, BS, finance and administration assistantcentral Bihar hub1,3 Varinder Kumar, field assistant - Punjab hub1,3 Vipin Kumar, BS, research associate1,3 Virender Kumar, PhD, scientist, Rice-Wheat Consortium co-facilitator3 Ayodhya Lodhi, driver cum gen. assistant P.P. Madhusoodanan, BA, secretary1,3 Ram Kanwar Malik, PhD, hub manager-eastern Uttar Pradesh1,3 Vijaya Kumar Marthi, MBA, administrative officer liaison and coordination Amit Mishra, PhD, scientist, soil and plant analysis1,3 Krishna Murari, PhD, research associate1, Rachna Pahwa, MS, finance and administration assistant - Punjab hub1,3 Himanshu Pathak, PhD, Rice-Wheat Consortium cofacilitator and agronomist3,4 Prempal, assistant (housekeeping)3 Savita Sharma, BA, administrative officer - logistics Sharma Sheetal, PhD, scientist,-soil health3 Harminder Singh Sidhu, PhD, hub manager-Punjab1,3 Anurudh Singh, assistant (housekeeping)3 Bhanu Pratap Singh, office assistant1,3 Diwakar Singh, field assistant1,3 Kuldeep Singh, BA, field assistant1,3 Kundan Singh, driver-cum-utility assistant1,3 Ravi Gopal Singh, PhD, hub manager-central Bihar1,3 Vicky Singh, MS, research associate-delivery and adoptive research-Punjab hub1,3 Vijay Singh, MS, extension agronomist-Haryana1,3 Atul Singhal, CA, accounts and finance officer1,3 Kanwar Singh Yadav, PhD, crop advisor program manager1,3 Rajan Kumar Yadav, driver cum utility assistant Indonesia Iwan Adidharmawan, BS, accounting supervisor/ administrative coordinator I Made Agus Mahardhika, driver3 Diah Wurjandari Soegondo, BS, researcher Korea Seung-Hee Han, BS, administrative coordinator3 Jung Pil Suh, PhD, senior research scientist3 Lao PDR Kham Souk Mosky, driver cum office assistant Sone Mosky, BS, administrative coordinator Ounheuane Phouthachit, administrative coordinator Sommai Yasongkua, researcher Mozambique Mahamudo Ismael Jala, technician III-research3 Ivone Henrique Custodio Lopes, officer-administrative coordination1,3 David Jose Muhale, technician III-research3 Myanmar Nanda Soe Myint, driver/office aide Ohnmar Tun, BAg, assistant manager II Nepal Lal Prasad Amgain, extension agronomist (central Nepal hub)1, 3, 4 Krishna Prasad Devkota, extension agronomist (central Nepal hub)1,3 Ram Prasad Kharel, officer-administration and accounts1, 3 Anant Prasad Regmi, PhD, extension agronomist (central Nepal hub)1,3 Dil Prasad Sherchan, PhD, hub manager (central Nepal)1, 3 Bhaba Prasad Tripathi, PhD, senior associate scientist3 Pakistan Abdul Hamid, BS, research associate1,3 Muhammad Aqil Khan, hub manager and country coordinator1,3 Ghulam Murtaza, research associate1,3 Tanzania Mohamed Selemani Mkuya, research technician3 Anna Kato Nyacho, administrative coordinator3 Ezekiel Joachim Shilili, driver3 Thailand Vitchu Chowanapong, BS, office clerk Amporn Limsorn, office assistant Apinporn Phuengwattanapanich, MS, assistant manager II Punjama Tasana, BA, senior accountant Vietnam Nguyen Thanh Huyen, BS, assistant manager II Nguyen Van Khang, driver Do Phuong Thao, BS, accounting assistant

Office of the Director for Program Planning and Communications
Zenaida M. Federico, BS, executive secretary

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

10 of 14

P ersonnel list
Program Planning and Coordination Marileth U. Enriquez, MS, assistant manager I Corinta Q. Guerta, MS, senior manager Ma. Velinda H. Ilao, BS, secretary III Communication and Publications Services Eugene P. Hettel, MA, editor and head Sophie Clayton, BS, spokesperson and medial relations manager1 William J. Hardy, Jr., PhD, senior science editor/publisher Adam Barclay, Grad Dip Science, consultant1, 2 Robert Hill, consultant1, 2 Alexis Faulkner, consultant1 Albert A. Borrero, manager Antonette Abigail E. Caballero, MS, assistant manager II Priscilla Grace F. Cañas, BS, assistant - editorial1 Lourdes B. Columbres, MBA, assistant - product development and distribution1 Maria Leah B. Cruz, BS, specialist - writer/editor1 Jose M. Ibabao, officer - video production Juan V. Lazaro, IV, officer - graphics design Grant L. Leceta, BS, associate - graphics design1,3 Diadema I. Martinez, BS, assistant - editorial4 Jessieca C. Narciso, BS, associate - video production1 Emmanuel A. Panisales, BS, associate - graphics design Chrisanto G. Quintana, specialist - photography/video Rogelio R. Quintos, BS, secretary III Cynthia C. Quintos, BS, secretary II Lanie C. Reyes, MS, assistant manager II1 Teresita V. Rola, MPS, specialist - editorial Isagani P. Serrano, BS, associate - photography1 Darell D. Sison, BS, specialist - web designer/developer1 Development Office Duncan I. Macintosh, BA, head Adam Barclay, Grad Dip Science, consultant1 Marie Antoinette P. De Jesus, MA, officer3 Noreen N. Mira, BS, secretary III3 Library and Documentation Services Rowena M. Andaya, BS, assistant - library4 Carmelita S. Austria, MS, assistant chief librarian library information4 Maria Aisa M. Atienza, BS, assistant - library Marilyn O. Bonador, BS, assistant - library Jonnel G. De Jesus, BS, associate - Library Natalia V. Delos Reyes, BS, senior librarian Isagani P. Garcia, assistant - library Ernesto G. Gibe, assistant - library1 Emerald L. Lansangan, BS, senior librarian Mauro T. Malabrigo, Jr., assistant - library Emmanuel P. Mendoza, BS, assistant - library Maria Consuelo S. Parducho, BS, associate4 Mila M. Ramos, MS, chief librarian Information Technology Services Marinus Cornelis van den Berg, head Victor L. Alarcon, BS, systems analyst/programmer Rogelio P. Alvarez, Jr, BS, manager Eric B. Clutario, BS, assistant manager II - MIS Ildefonso B. Cosico, BS, officer - systems administration Bonifacio C. De Ocampo, technician III - IT Sergio R. Magadia, BS, assistant manager II - network and telecommunications engineering Nestor D. Marcelo, Jr, BS, assistant manager I - MIS Bayani N. Perido, technician III - IT Loreto R. Puyod, BS, assistant manager II Analiza R. Ramos, BS, secretary III Noreen L. Ramos, BS, associate - telecom administrator1 Reynaldo L. Stevens, printer

Office of the Director for Management Services
David Swain, consultant1, 2 Vilma T. Ramos, BS, executive secretary Financial Operations Grace P. Abanto, BS, officer4 Desiree E. Acuña, BS, officer1 Lily G. Aquino, BS, officer - treasury Mary Grace R. Bautista, BS, assistant manager4 Cynthia R. Borbe, BS, officer4 Julie C. Carreon, BS, assistant manager II - treasury Betty Sarah R. Carreon, BS, assistant manager I Ferdinand B. Comia, BS, officer Michelle V. Ella, BS, assistant manager I Maricel I. Encanto, BS, officer1 Fernando P. Florece, BS, assistant manager I1 Noemi T. Izon, BS, assistant1 Grace D. Javier, BS, officer Visitacion A. Labog, BS, officer Janet T. Lazarte, BS, officer1 Ma. Donnina S. Lopez, BS, assistant manager II Jelo D. Magat, BS, assistant Richard N. Malaiba, BS, associate - property and assets Paulito J. Oleta, BS, officer Vernadette Kristen A. Ordoño, BS, officer Elisa S. Panes, BS, senior manager Marianne G. Pizarra, BS, officer Miriam M. Telosa, BS, assistant manager I Gladys G. Tolentino, BS, officer1 Marilyn I. Villegas, associate Financial Planning and Reporting Eunice S. Andarin, BS, assistant manager I Melba M. Aquino, BS, senior manager Fernando B. Artates, BS, officer Maria Zenaida V. Borra, BS, assistant manager I4

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

11 of 14

P ersonnel list
Jane B. Carlos, associate Iris M. Ferrer, BS, assistant manager I Jerome S. Gelacio, BS, officer1,3 Maria Kristina M. Lumactod, BS, officer1 Floridel M. Macalalad, BS, officer1 Annie C. Magcamit, BS, officer Mae Christine I. Maghirang, BS, officer4 Rodelita D. Panergalin, BS, assistant manager II Rosemarie P. San Gabriel, BS, officer1,3 Luisa D. Urriza, BS, officer Anabel V. Valdenarro, BS, officer Human Resource Services Hershey V. Aquino, BS, assistant - HRS Sylvia P. Avance, MS, specialist - HRS Maria Liza R. Milante, BS, officer - administrative coordination Larry A. Montermoso, associate - HRS April Jane D. Muere, BS, secretary II Maria Charina Asuncion G. Ocampo, BA, BL, manager Selene M. Ocampo, BS, officer - HRS coordination Iluminada B. Oleta, BS, associate - HRS Alfredo R. Reyes, BS, officer - HRS coordination Nida E. Reyes, BS, officer - HRS coordination Jhea Laurish S. Solis, BS, associate - HRS Kathryn Rose V. Villanueva, BS, officer - HRS coordination Procurement and Materials Management Services Conception Elybeth A. Alcantara, BS, officer Fred B. Angeles, warehouseman Remedios E. Ballesfin, BS, assistant manager I - CRS Lourdes A. Belison, BS, officer - purchasing Priscilla T. Cabral, BS, officer - shipping Felix C. Estipona, assistant - makati office William M. Estrellado, warehouseman Norvin O. Fortuna, data encoder Hiram D. Gomez, Jr., MS, senior manager Wilmer B. Jacob, assistant - mailroom Felicisimo N. Kalaw, BS, assistant manager I Delfin M. Lacandula, Jr., attendant Anicia R. Malabanan, data encoder Mari Joyce N. Maningas, BS, officer - purchasing Ernesto L. Nimedez, Jr, BS, warehouseman Luzviminda G. Oleta, BS, officer - purchasing Fortunato L. Parducho, driver Fortunato P. Presto, attendant - MMS Francisco T. Quilloy, materials expediter Jose L. Sibal, warehouseman Louell R. Tanzo, BS, assistant - central files Angelica P. Valintos, BS, officer - administrative coordination International Schools Relations Malaya S. Capiña, BS, officer - administrative coordination3 Ria Anna B. Dimapilis, BS, officer - visitors Ruth Ann C. Felismino, BS, officer - events1 Pinky C. Pahud, BS, associate1 Host Country and Community Relations Office Joselito A. Platon, BS, associate - community project Intellectual Property Management Unit Jill Kuehnert, consultant1, 2 Raul M. Boncodin, BS, assistant manager II Frances Florifel B. Tesoro, BS, secretary III Legal Services Cherryl C. Breva, BS, secretary III, Ildefonso R. Jimenez, BS, senior counsel Riceworld Museum and Exhibits Office Paul Benjamin R. Hilario, BS, assistant manager I - riceworld Seed Health Unit Myra C. Almodiel, MS, assistant scientist Jay A. Angeles, technician I - research Jose F. Banasihan, technician I - research Salome P. Bulaquiña, data encoder Aurelio A. Gamba, technician II - research Patria G. Gonzales, MS, manager Evangeline G. Gonzales, BS, secretary III Carlos C. Huelma, BS, assistant scientist Florencio I. Lapiz, BS, technician II - research Atanacio B. Orence, technician III - research Isabel L. Penales, technician III - research Operations Terry B. Jacobsen, BA, head2 Mark Jones, consultant2

Office of the Deputy Director General for Operations and Support Services
Gerard F. Barry, PhD, coordinator, Golden Rice Network; head, Intellectual Property Management Unit; and program leader, Rice and Human Health Aurora Hettel, consultant1 Pramjit Sachdeva, PhD, consultant1, 2 Luigi Concetti, consultant1 Salvie F. Mariñas, BS, executive secretary Ramon A. Oliveros, MS, executive assistant I Events and Visitors Office Bita S. Avendaño, MS, assistant manager II Arvin A. Benavente, BS, officer - audio/visual Iris D. Bugayong, BS, officer - public relations1,3

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

12 of 14

P ersonnel list
Experiment Station Pedro C. Aala, technician II - research Isaias C. Abuyo, BS, technician III - research Benedicto S. Alborida, technician III - research3 Fabian L. Alcachupas, Jr., technician II - research Carlos P. Alforja, technician II - research Danilo O. Amoloza, technician II - research Nestor M. Angeles, technician II - research Anthony L. Aquino, technician II - research3 Virginia G. Aranda, BS, secretary III Melecio J. Arcillas, technician II - research Quirino L. Atienza, technician I - research Efren A. Bagui, technician II - research Jesse C. Banasihan, technician III - research Restituto M. Bandoy, technician II - research Policarpio S. Barbadillo, technician II - research Rogelio V. Bargola, technician II - research Efren P. Bautista, technician II - research Efren L. Blanco, technician II - research Pedro G. Cabrera, Sr., technician II - research Francisco G. Calibo, technician III - equipment Luis M. Calma, technician II - research Vicente E. Carandang, technician II - research Lino M. Carandang, technician II - research Oscar L. Caspillo, technician II - research Aurelio M. Catangay, technician II - research Bonifacio B. Chavez, technician II - research Tomas P. Clemeno, BS, senior manager Abraham G. Dalid, BS, technician III - research Edgardo T. Diaz, technician II - research Ariel R. Dimapilis, technician II - research Rogelio M. Elbo, technician II - research Roberto P. Escandor, BS, officer Cesar Z. Esguerra, technician II - research William C. Fortuna, technician II - research Benjamin C. Garcia, technician II - research Danilo O. Gonzaga, technician II - research Rolando G. Guevarra, technician III - mechanic Ricardo M. Hernandez, BS, assistant manager I Jose F. Hernandez, technician III - equipment Delfin M. Ilagan, technician II - equipment Nestor L. Ilaw, technician II - research Abraham G. Javier, technician II - research Eduardo A. Lajarca, technician II - research Virgilio T. Lalap, technician II - research Fidel G. Lanorio, technician II - research Enrico A. Lucero, secretary III Sulpicio J. Malabanan, technician III - research Nicasio V. Malabanan, technician II - equipment Mario M. Malbataan, technician II - research Lucas M. Malbataan, technician I - research John Mark C. Mamiit, technician II - welder Mario A. Mandilag, Sr., officer Bienvenido B. Manimtim, BS, assistant manager I Leopoldo P. Manito, technician II - research12 Jose D. Manuel, BS, technician III - research Mateo F. Manzanilla, technician II - research Pedro C. Mendoza, technician II - research Andres M. Mercado, technician II - research Godofredo M. Mercado, technician II - research Gelardo R. Morales, technician II - research Edwin B. Nuevo, BS, assistant manager I3 Gregorio S. Oca, technician II - research Erlinda A. Oracion, MS, officer - administrative coordination Pablito M. Pabalate, technician II - mechanic Rolando R. Pacion, associate - stock inventory Rogelio R. Pamulaklakin, technician III - mechanic Ramiro C. Panting, technician II - research Reynaldo A. Pelegrina, technician II - research Alfredo G. Regalado, attendant - grounds maintenance Roberto B. Revilleza, technician II - research Antonio B. Rivera, technician III - research Nestor G. Rizaldo, technician II - research Juanito M. Rosario, technician III - mechanic Nazario B. Timbol, technician III - research Celso L. Varron, technician III - research Cecilio L. Villamayor, secretary II Mario F. Villegas, technician I - research Efren E. Viquiera, technician III - mechanic Food and Housing Services Priscilla S. Argosino, MS, officer - FHS Ricardo L. Bejosano, Jr., assistant - stock inventory Rolly M. Camayudo, assistant - recreation Cristina E. Cauntay, attendant - housing Fe C. De Ocampo, BS, associate - food service Irene S. Escoses, attendant - housing Laureano M. Escuadra, attendant - housing Edgardo S. Estenor, BS, attendant - housing Aurelio C. Garcia, attendant - housing Leody M. Genil, BS, assistant manager I Ma. Obdulia B. Jolejole, BS, senior manager4 Francisca O. Oro, attendant - housing Benita M. Pañgan, BS, officer Janeth P. Par, BS, attendant - riceworld bookstore1 Anselmo R. Reyes, assistant - recreation Gina A. Ypil, BS, secretary II Physical Plant Services Regalado Q. Alcachupas, technician II - plumbing Fidel L. Alvarez, technician III - carpentry Apolinario T. Armia, technician III - welding Douglas D. Avila, BS, senior manager Danilo F. Banasihan, technician III – instrument and telephone Enrique D. Baterina, technician III - electrical Antonio A. Biasong, technician III - electrical1

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

13 of 14

P ersonnel list
Rodolfo G. Calibo, technician III - physical plant Chrisol U. Capuno, BS, assistant manager I1 Teodoro G. Carreon, assistant manager I, Manolo M. De Guia, technician III - refrigeration and airconditioning Enrique O. Delos Reyes, BS, manager Roberto E. Escueta, BS, technician III - electrical Kathryn Sheila C. Felismino, BS, technician III - drafting1 Jaime A. Fojas, BS, assistant manager I1 Mario C. Garcia, technician III - electrical Rufino R. Gibe, BS, technician III - electrical Hilarion A. Hibek, technician II - plumbing Jennifer R. Jarlego, BS, secretary I Fermin L. Junsay, BS, assistant - stock inventory Benjamin C. Libutan, technician III - electrical Anito Q. Mabalhin, technician III - welding Fernando B. Madriaga, BS, assistant manager I Nestor A. Malabuyoc, BS, assistant manager I Levi C. Malijan, technician III - carpentry Leonardo S. Mangubat, technician III - refrigeration and airconditioning Alfredo M. Mazaredo, BS, manager Marcelino M. Navasero, Jr., technician III - electronics and instrument repair Dionisio A. Ng, technician III - refrigeration and airconditioning Domingo M. Ortiz, technician III - telephone Juan L. Petrasanta, technician III - refrigeration and airconditioning Mario S. Pinero, painter Dorina L. Rebong, BS, technician III - drafting Rolando N. Simon, technician III - electrical Ramon R. Suarez, technician III - electronics and telephone Ricardo C. Tabilangon, technician III - refrigeration and airconditioning Roberto N. Tamio, technician II - masonry Melencio E. Tapia, technician III - plumbing Marissa E. Templanza, BS, officer - administrative coordination Virgilio V. Verano, technician III - carpentry Joseph C. Vicente, BS, officer - mechanical engineer1 Luisito R. Vitan, technician III - civil Safety and Security Services William G. Amador, BS, core guard Maria Cristina B. Andaya, BS, assistant manager II (pollution control officer) Crisostomo M. Dela Rueda, core guard Rodelo M. Empalmado, core guard Glenn A. Enriquez, BS, senior manager Pablo C. Erasga, core guard Roberto M. Espinosa, Jr., core guard Juanito C. Exconde, BS, core guard Bionico R. Malacad, security investigator Fancia Indira V. Olivar, BS, officer - occupational safety and health Esteban C. Palis, core guard Macario C. Punzalan, BS, core guard Ernesto S. Regulacion, core guard Salvador T. Zaragoza, Jr., security investigator Transport Services Danilo G. Abrenilla, driver Martheen Francis O. Aquino, BS, technician II - mechanic Carlos Levy C. Banasihan, driver Edwin S. Cabarrubias, technician III - mechanic Carlito C. Cabral, BS, officer - administrative coordination Roger M. Cuevas, technician III - mechanic Amador L. De Jesus, driver Reynaldo G. Elmido, associate - MPDS dispatch Rodrigo M. Fule, driver Emilio R. Gonzalez, Jr., technician III - ac mechanic Romeo L. Jarmin, technician III - mechanic Perlita E. Malabayabas, BS, secretary III Armando E. Malveda, technician III - mechanic Diosdado D. Mamaril, BS, driver Hernani M. Moreno, driver Jomar P. Ofrecio, BS, technician II - mechanic Bonifacio M. Palis, associate - MPDS dispatch Eduardo L. Pua, driver Roduardo S. Quintos, technician III - mechanic Rolando L. Santos, associate - MVRS service advisor Oscar A. Templanza, associate - MPDS dispatch Manuel F. Vergara, MS, senior manager Ronilo M. Villanueva, BS, technician II - mechanic Crisostomo D. Vitonio, technician II - automotive aircon1,3 Renato C. Vivas, driver Argyll D. Viyar, BS, technician II - mechanic
___________________________________________________

Joined during the year Left during the year 3 On project appointment 4 Resigned during the year 5 Retired during the year 6 Transferred from Community and Employee Relations Services 7 Transferred from Crop and Environmental Sciences Division 8 Transferred from Experiment Station 9 Transferred from Financial Planning and Reporting Services 10 Transferred from Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division 11 Transferred from Riceworld Museum and Exhibit Office 12 Died during the year 13 Promoted
1 2

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

14 of 14

S taff C hangeS
January
• Dr. Sarah J. Beebout was appointed scientist, soil chemist, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. • Ms. Sophie Clayton joined as spokesperson and media relations manager, Communication and Publications Services. • Dr. Tao Li joined as scientist, crop modeler, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. • Dr. Endang Septiningsih was appointed scientist, molecular genetics, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division. • Dr. Michael Thomson was appointed scientist, molecular genetics, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division. • Dr. Peter Mitchell joined as consultant, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. • Mr. Adam Barclay joined as consultant, Communication and Publications Services. • Ms. Shon Ji-Young joined as collaborative research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division. • Ms. Jing Li joined as collaborative research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division. • Dr. John Sheehy joined as consultant, Office of the Deputy Director General for Research. • Mr. Pawan Khera joined as visiting research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division. • Dr. Satish Verulkar joined as visiting research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division. • Dr. Nimal Mandal joined as visiting research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division. • Dr. Kurniawan Rudi Trijatmiko joined as postdoctoral fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division. • Dr. Dirk de Waele joined as consultant, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. • Dr. Young-Chan Cho, visiting research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division, left after completion of his assignment. • Dr. Roberto Lampayan, postdoctoral fellow, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division, completed his assignment. • Dr. Florencia Palis, postdoctoral fellow, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division, completed her assignment. • Dr. Kate Cadman joined as consultant, Training Center, and left after completion of her assignment. • Ms. Margaret Cargill joined as consultant, Training Center, and left after completion of her assignment. • Dr. Peter Mitchell, consultant, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division, left after completion of his assignment. • Mr. David Swain joined as consultant, Office of the Director for Management Services, and left after completion of his assignment. • Mr. Adam Barclay, consultant, Communication and Publications Services, left after completion of his assignment. • Ms. Jing Li, collaborative research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division, left after completion of her assignment. • Dr. Dong-Jin Lee, visiting research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division, left after completion of his assignment. • Mr. Mark Jones, consultant, Operations Management Unit, left after completion of his assignment. • Dr. Satish Verulkar, visiting research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division, left after completion of his assignment.

February
• Dr. Rubenito Lampayan was appointed scientist, water science, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. • Dr. Florencia Palis was appointed scientist, agricultural anthropology, Social Sciences Division • Dr. Paramjit Sachdeva joined as consultant, Office of the Deputy Director General for Research. • Dr. Zhongxian Lu joined as consultant, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. • Mr. Wei Zhou joined as visiting research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division.

March
• Dr. Darshan S. Brar, senior scientist, plant breeding and head, Plant Breeding, Genetics and Biotechnology Division, retired. • Dr. Elizabeth Humphreys was appointed senior scientist, water management specialist, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. • Dr. Darshan Brar joined as consultant, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 5

S taff C hangeS
• Dr. John Damien Platten joined as postdoctoral fellow, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. • Dr. Guifu Liu joined as visiting research fellow, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. • Mr. Woo-Jae Kim joined as collaborative research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division. • Ms. Kyung-Hwa Han joined as collaborative research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division. • Mr. San Sovann joined as consultant, Grain Quality, Nutrition, and Postharvest Center. • Dr. Aye Myint Thwe joined as consultant, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. • Mr. Nimal P. Mandal, visiting research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division, left after completion of his assignment. • Dr. Matthieu Conte, postdoctoral fellow, Crop Research Informatics Laboratory, resigned. • Dr. Yann Chemin, postdoctoral fellow, Social Sciences Division, left after completion of his assignment. • Ms. Rizalina Gonzalez, consultant, Human Resources Services, left after completion of her assignment. • Ms. Shon Ji-Young, collaborative research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division, left after completion of her assignment.

April
• Mr. Jason Beebout joined as consultant, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. • Ms. Tonya Schuetz joined as consultant, Grain Quality, Nutrition, and Postharvest Center. • Dr. Keng-Hong Tan joined as consultant, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. • Mr. Zaff Bozkurt joined as consultant, Office of the Director General, and left after completion of his assignment. • Dr. Mofarahus Sattar joined as consultant, IRRI-Bangladesh Office. • Mr. Jung-Jong Min joined as collaborative research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division. • Dr. Boru Douthwaite joined as consultant, Grain Quality, Nutrition, and Postharvest Center, and left after completion of his assignment. • Mr. Alfred Schmidley joined as consultant, Grain Quality, Nutrition, and Postharvest Center. • Dr. Edgar Paski joined as consultant, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. • Ms. Jill Kuehnert joined as consultant, Intellectual Property Management Unit. • Mr. Pawan Khera, visiting research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division, left after completion of his assignment. • Mr. So-Hyeon Baek, visiting research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division, left after completion of his assignment.

• Dr. Ramil Mauleon, postdoctoral fellow, Crop Research Informatics Laboratory, completed his assignment. • Dr. Paramjit Sachdeva, consultant, Office of the Deputy Director General for Research, left after completion of his assignment.

May
• Dr. Ramil Mauleon joined as scientist, bioinformatics specialist, Crop Research Informatics Laboratory. • Dr. Jauhar Ali joined as scientist, regional project coordinator for Asia, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division. • Dr. Yashpal Saharawat joined as postdoctoral fellow, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. • Dr. R. Chandrababu joined as visiting research fellow, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division, and left after completion of his assignment. • Mr. John Lucas joined as consultant, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. • Dr. Daisuke Fujita, postdoctoral fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division, completed his assignment. He later rejoined as postdoctoral fellow in another project in the same division. • Mr. Steve Klassen joined as consultant, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. • Dr. Jagjeet S. Lore joined as visiting research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division. • Dr. Jeong-Heui Lee joined as collaborative research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

2 of 5

S taff C hangeS
• Dr. Yolanda Chen joined as collaborative research scientist, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. • Dr. Alastair Orr joined as consultant, Training Center, and left after completion of his assignment. • Ms. Tonya Schuetz, consultant, Grain Quality, Nutrition, and Postharvest Center, left after completion of her assignment. • Dr. Keng-Hong Tan, consultant, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division, left after completion of his assignment. • Dr. Edgar Paski, consultant, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division, left after completion of his assignment. • Mr. Woo-Jae Kim, collaborative research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division, left after completion of his assignment. • Mr. Kyung-Hwa Han, collaborative research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division, left after completion of his assignment. • Ms. Jill Kuehnert, consultant, Intellectual Property Management Unit, left after completion of her assignment. • Dr. Gail Langelotto joined as collaborative research scientist, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. • Dr. Alexis Ndayiragije joined as postdoctoral fellow, East and Southern Africa Regional Office. • Dr. Shanta Karki joined as postdoctoral fellow, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. • Ms. Truong Ngoc Chi joined as consultant, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. • Mr. Denis Diaz Maco joined as consultant, Information Technology Services. • Dr. Aye Myint Thwe, consultant, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division, left after completion of his assignment. • Mr. Jung-Jong Min, collaborative research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division, left after completion of his assignment. • Dr. Zhongxian Lu, consultant, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division, left after completion of his assignment. • Mr. Jongmin Lee, collaborative research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division, left after completion of his assignment. • Dr. Jeong-Heui Lee, collaborative research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division, left after completion of his assignment. • Dr. Sarah Covshoff, postdoctoral fellow, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division, left. • Dr. Yolanda Chen, collaborative research scientist, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division, left after completion of her assignment.

July
• Mr. David Raitzer joined as scientist, impact assessment and strategic planning specialist, Social Sciences Division. • Dr. Rakesh K. Singh, senior scientist, regional plant breeding coordinator for East and Southern Africa, transferred to the IRRITanzania Office. • Dr. Guoyou Ye joined as senior scientist, breeding informatics specialist, Crop Research Informatics Laboratory. • Dr. Rajeshwar Nath Mallick joined as consultant, IRRI-Bangladesh Office. • Ms. Tonya Schuetz rejoined as consultant, Grain Quality, Nutrition, and Postharvest Center. • Dr. Amrendra N. Singh joined as consultant, Social Sciences Division. • Mr. B.P. Mallikarjuna Swamy joined as visiting research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division. • Dr. Yuko Nakano joined as postdoctoral fellow, Social Sciences Division. • Dr. Aldas Janaiah joined as consultant, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division. • Prof. Jiaan Cheng joined as consultant, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division, and left after completion of his assignment. • Dr. Gail Langelotto, collaborative research scientist, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division, left after completion of her assignment. • Ms. Yoke Sau Cheng Metz, consultant, Training Center, left after completion of her assignment.

June
• Dr. Jill Cairns, international research fellow, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division, resigned. • Dr. Robert Hijmans, senior scientist, geographic information systems specialist, Social Sciences Division, resigned. • Ms. Alexis Faulkner joined as consultant, Communication and Publications Services.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

3 of 5

S taff C hangeS
• Dr. Jacob van Etten, postdoctoral fellow, Social Sciences Division, resigned. • Dr. Guifu Liu, visiting research fellow, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division, left after completion of his assignment. • Dr. Mofarahus Sattar, consultant, IRRIBangladesh Office, left after completion of his assignment. • Dr. Jeong-Heui Lee, collaborative research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division, left after completion of his assignment. • Division, left after completion of his assignment. Dr. Joseph Bigirimana joined as consultant, East and Southern Africa Regional Office (based in Mozambique). Mr. Nikolaus Tsakirpaloglou joined as visiting research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division. Mr. Seth Meyer joined as consultant, Social Sciences Division. Dr. Renato Villano joined as visiting research fellow, Social Sciences Division. Dr. Suwen Pan joined as consultant, Social Sciences Division. Dr. Jolly Chatterjee joined as postdoctoral fellow, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. Dr. Arnold Garcia and Dr. Yolanda Garcia joined as consultants, Social Sciences Division. Dr. Rajeshwar Nath Mallick, consultant, IRRIBangladesh Office, left after completion of his assignment. Mr. Wei Zhou, visiting research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division, left after completion of his assignment, Mr. Wei Zhou rejoined as postdoctoral fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division. Dr. Deepinder Grewal, postdoctoral fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division, left after completion of her assignment. Ms. Tonya Schuetz, consultant, Grain Quality, Nutrition, and Postharvest Center, left after completion of her assignment. • Dr. Aldas Janaiah, consultant, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division, left after completion of his assignment. • Dr. Ngo Dang Phong joined as consultant, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division, and left after completion of his assignment.

September
• Dr. Hari Gurung, international research fellow, Social Sciences Division, left after completion of his assignment. • Dr. Renando Solis joined as consultant, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division. • Dr. Andrew Cal joined as postdoctoral fellow, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. • Dr. Nguyen Thi Duong Nga joined as consultant, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. • Dr. Dong-Jin Kang, postdoctoral fellow, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division, resigned. • Mr. Seth Meyer, consultant, Social Sciences Division, left after completion of his assignment. • Dr. Suwen Pan, consultant, Social Sciences Division, left after completion of his assignment. • Dr. Chun Lai, consultant, Social Sciences Division, left after completion of his assignment. • Dr. B.P. Mallikarjuna Swamy, visiting research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division, left after completion of his assignment.

• • •

August
• Mr. M. Srinivas Rao joined as chief executive officer, Cereal Systems Initiative for South Asia project, Office of the Deputy Director General for Research. • Mr. Terry Jacobsen, head of the Facilities Management Unit, left after completion of his assignment. • Dr. Paul Quick joined as principal scientist, head of the Applied Photosynthesis and Systems Modeling Team, C4 Rice, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. • Dr. Deepinder Grewal joined as scientist, rice breeder, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division. • Dr. Fiona Hay joined as scientist, genetics resource expert, T.T.Chang Genetic Resources Center. • Dr. Jung-Hyun Shim joined as postdoctoral fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division. • Dr. Jagjeet S. Lore, visiting research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology •

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

4 of 5

S taff C hangeS
October
• Dr. S.M.A. Jabbar joined as visiting research fellow, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. • Dr. Impa Somayanda joined as postdoctoral fellow, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. • Dr. B.P. Mallikarjuna Swamy rejoined as postdoctoral fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division. • Dr. Yongming Gao joined as visiting research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division. • Mr. Chris Vaughan joined as consultant, Human Resource Services. • Dr. Jong-Cheol Ko, visiting research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division, left after completion of his assignment. • Dr. Renato Villano, visiting research fellow, Social Sciences Division, left after completion of his assignment. • Dr. Srinivasachary joined as postdoctoral fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division. • Dr. Changrong Yeh joined as postdoctoral fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division. • Dr. Huaiyu Wang joined as postdoctoral fellow, Social Sciences Division. • Dr. A. Senthil joined as visiting research fellow, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. • Mr. Robert Hill joined as consultant, Communication and Publications Services, and left after completion of his assignment. • Ms. Yoke Sau Cheng Metz rejoined as consultant, Training Center. • Mr. Adam Barclay re-joined as consultant, Development Office. • Dr. Naredra Lakpale joined as visiting research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division. • Dr. Edgar Paski re-joined as consultant, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. • Dr. Sang-Bok Lee joined as visiting research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division. • Dr. Monina Escalada, consultant, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division, left after completion of her assignment. • Dr. Yongming Gao, visiting research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division, left after completion of his assignment. Environmental Sciences Division. • Dr. Reiner Wassmann, joined as coordinator, Rice and Climate Change Consortium, Crop and Environmental Sciences Division. • Ms. Margaret Cargill rejoined as consultant, Training Center. • Mr. Hyeon-Jung Kang joined as visiting research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division. • Dr. Isaac Kofi Bimpong joined as collaborative research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division. • Dr. Renando Solis, consultant, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division, left after completion of his assignment. • Dr. Naredra Lakpale, visiting research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division, left after completion of his assignment. • Mr. Nikolaos Tsakirpaloglou, visiting research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division, left after completion of his assignment. • Ms. Yoke Sau Cheng Metz, consultant, Training Center, left after completion of her assignment. • Dr. Arnold Garcia and Dr. Yolanda Garcia, consultants, Social Sciences Division, left after completion of their assignment. • Mr. Ahmad Salahuddin, consultant, International Programs Management Office, left after completion of his assignment. • Mr. San Sovann, consultant, Grain Quality, Nutrition, and Postharvest Center, left after completion of his assignment.

November
• Dr. Andrew Nelson joined as scientist, geographic information systems specialist, Social Sciences Division. • Dr. Valerien Pede joined as scientist, economist, Social Sciences Division. • Mr. Luigi Concetti joined as consultant, Office of the Deputy Director General for Operations and Support Services. • Dr. Jianlong Xu joined as visiting research fellow, Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division, and left after completion of his assignment.

December
• Dr. Chengzhi Liang joined as scientist, crop information systems specialist, Crop and

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

5 of 5

H onors , AwArds , And A ppointments
Darshan S. Brar, head, PBGB
• Honored with the Yunnan Friendship Award for his contribution to the development of Yunnan Province, Yunnan, China, October. seedling and tillering stages using backcross introgression lines in rice, 20th Scientific Conference of the FCSSP, Dumaguete City, Philippines, May.

Syed M.A. Jabbar, research scholar, CESD
• Awarded a lifetime membership to the Gamma Sigma Delta Honor Society of Agriculture for outstanding academic achievement, UP Los Baños, Philippines, February.

Richard Bruskiewich, senior scientist, CRIL
• Appointed to an adjunct faculty position, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, B.C., Canada, January.

Venus Elec, assistant scientist, PBGB
• Appointed member of the Board of Directors of the CSSP, 20th Scientific Conference of the FCSSP, Dumaguete City, Philippines, May.

Tomas Clemeno, senior manager, ES
• Appointed member of the Board of Directors of the Crop Science Societies of the Philippines (CSSP), 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines (FCSSP), Dumaguete City, Philippines, May.

Monina Escalada, consultant, CESD
• Received the Distinguished Alumna in Research and Development Award from the College of Development Communications Alumni Association, 91st Loyalty Day, UP Los Baños, Philippines, October.

Michael Jackson, Emmanuel Panisales, Ariel Javellana, Gene Hettel, Joe Ibabao, Adam Barclay, Tess Rola, Jerby Auihon, Juan Lazaro IV, Bill Hardy, Raymond Panaligan, Gigi Caballero and Cynthia Quintos.
• Received for IRRI’s 2007 Annual Report on DVD, the Outstanding Professional Skill Award and the Gold Award in the Electronic Publications Class of the Publishing Category in the 2009 Critique and Awards Program of the U.S. –based Association for Communication Excellence (ACE), June.

Swappan Datta, former senior scientist, PBGB
• Joined the Indian Council of Agricultural Research as deputy director general of crop science, Delhi, India, June.

Hung-goo Hwang, former RDA seconded scientist, PBGB
• Appointed as director general, National Institute of Crop Science of the Rural Development Administration, Korea, August.

Gurdev Khush, former head, PBGB
• Appointed as eminent professor, Graduate School of Biotechnology of Kyung-Hee University, Suwon, South Korea, July. • Received the 2009 Award of Distinction from the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CA&ES) at the University of CaliforniaDavis, CA&ES 21st Annual College Celebration, California, USA, October.

S.K. de Datta, former IRRI agronomist and principal scientist
• Named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), Fellow Forum, Annual Meeting of the AAAS, Chicago, USA, February.

IRRI Rice Data base
• Received the 2009 Oberly Award for Bibliography in the Agricultural or Natural Sciences from the Association of College and Research Libraries Science and Technology Section, Annual Meeting of the American Library Association, Chicago, USA, July.

Jagdish K. Ladha, principal scientist, CESD
• Named Fellow of the AAAS, Fellows Forum, Annual Meeting of the AAAS, Chicago, USA, February. • Won the 2009 International Plant Nutrition Institute Science Award, Georgia, USA, December.

Venus Elec, assistant scientist, PBGB; Jessica Rey, postdoctoral fellow, GRC; Zang Jin Ping, Yong Sun, Jian Long Xu; and Zhikang Li, senior scientist, PBGB
• Won the Best Poster Award, Dissection of genetic overlap of salt tolerance QTLs at the

IRRI
• Given recognition by the UPLB College of Agriculture for its unwavering support to the programs of the College, which made it a center of excellence in agricultural education, March

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 2

H onors , AwArds , And A ppointments
Chromewell Agustin R. Mojica, researcher, GRC
• Won the Best Undergraduate Research Competition, Molecular mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for heat tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa L.) during reproductive stage using microsatellite markers, 10th National Genetics Symposium of the Philippine Society for the Advancement of Genetics, Lanao del Norte, Philippines, November.

Jessica D. Rey, postdoctoral fellow, GRC
• Won the 2009 Outstanding Thesis and Dissertation Award (Advanced S&T for Biology and Related Fields), Quantitative resistance loci (QRL) against bacterial blight (Xanthomonas oryzae pv oryzae) and leaf blast (Pyricularia oryzae Sacc.), Philippine Council for Advanced Science and Technology Research and Development, February. • Appointed vice president of the Board of Directors of the CSSP, 20th Scientific Conference of the FCSSP, Dumaguete City, Philippines, May.

Casiana M. Vera Cruz, senior scientist, PBGB
• Named Honorary Fellow of the CSSP, 20th Scientific Conference of the FCSSP, Dumaguete City, Philippines, May.

Ramon Oliveros, executive assistant, DDG-OSS
• Appointed secretary of the Board of Directors of the CSSP, 20th Scientific Conference of the FCSSP, Dumaguete City, Philippines, May.

Georgina Vergara, postdoctoral fellow, CESD; Romeo V. Labios; Alvaro Pamplona, senior associate scientist, PBGB; Nenita Desamero, Kuang Duangsila; Aris Hairmansis; Mauel Esquerra; Marlon Malabrigo; technician III, CESD; Adelbagi Ismail senior scientist, CESD; and David J. Mackill, principal scientist, PBGB
• Won the Best Paper Award (Downstream Category), Performance of submergence-tolerant rice [Sub1 lines] in adaptability trials in Indonesia, Laos, and the Philippines, 20th Scientific Conference of the FCSSP, Dumaguete City, Philippines, May.

William G. Padolina, deputy director general for Operations and Support Services
• Received the 2009 Communication Excellence in Organization Award from the International Association of Business Communicators, Makati City, Philippines, March.

Darlene Sanchez, assistant scientist, PBGB; Nurul Hidayatun, Pamella Marie Seldon, Sagar Chawla, Alvaro Pamplona, senior associate scientist, PBGB; Endang Septiningsih (scientist, PBGB), and David Mackill principal scientist, PBGB
• Won second place, Best Poster Award, Singlebackcross approach to transfer submergence tolerance from IR64-Sub1 to related rice varieties, 20th Scientific Conference of the FCSSP, Dumaguete City, Philippines, May.

Robert Zeigler, director general
• Received the 2009 E.C. Stakman Award in recognition of his outstanding achievement in and contributions to plant pathology in the areas of research, teaching, outreach, and international development, Minnesota, USA, June. • Recognized as a Fellow of the American Phytopathological Society (APS), August.

Florencia Palis, Scientist, SSD
• Received the 2009 Distinguished Alumna in Extension Award from the College of Arts and Sciences, 91st Loyalty Day, UP Los Baños, Philippines, October.

Darlene Sanchez, assistant scientist, PBGB
• Appointed treasurer of the Board of Directors of the CSSP, 20th Scientific Conference of the FCSSP, Dumaguete City, Philippines, May.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

2 of 2

ReseaRch suppoRt seRvices
AnAlyticAl service lAborAtory (Asl)
IRRI’s centralized analytical facility, the Analytical Service Laboratory (ASL), continues to provide analytical services to its research programs and special projects and a facility for plant and soil sample preparation. It liaises with the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute on matters related to the use of radioactive materials.
ASL Table 2. Profile of samples and analyses completed in 2009 from different OU’s OU CESD 12,211 ES 7 GQNPC 233 PBGB 4,555 External Total 0.30 52 17,058 100 43,402 100 52 0.12 27 16,300 38 1.4 317 0.73 0.04 7 0.02 # of samples Percent 72 # of analyses 26,726 Percent 62

in support of the installation of the gassupport tubing lines needed for the newly purchased GCMS. A savings of P300,000 was realized.

non-routine client interaction service
ASL coped with the increasing nonroutine analytical requirements of its clients by providing one-on-one consultation meetings, on-line discussion and tutorials, and phone consultations. Some of the concerns addressed by ASL are as follows: 1. Soil sampling 2. Assessing Si content in rice plant 3. Use of water heater recirculator 4. XRF licensing requirements 5. Advice on what laboratory equipment to purchase 6. Use of 13C in IRRI experiment and licensing requirements 7. Technical advice on using flame photometer and ICP-OES 8. Total N and C analyses of samples from Vietnam

Analytical services
A total of 43,404 analyses were completed for routine plant, soil, and solution samples, including elemental C/N and stable isotope ratio analysis of 13 C and 15N. Of the total analyses, 83% were done on plant samples, 16% on soils, and 1% on solutions (ASL Table 1). About 72% of the total samples received came from the Crop and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD); the rest came from Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology Division (PBGB), Grain Quality, Nutrition, and Postharvest Center (GQNPC), World Agroforestry Center (ICRAF), and external clients from University of the Philippines Los Banos (UPLB), and the Ecosystem Research and Development Bureau (ERDB) (ASL Table 2).

equipment service support provided by Asl to other laboratories and oUs
ASL performs in-house repair and troubleshooting of all its analytical equipment and has extended its service support to other equipment in the CESD and PBGB laboratories. 1. Laser scanning microscope LSM510 (PBGB) provided support for the rehabilitation of their computer terminal functionality. ASL was able to help the laboratory save P615,000 for repair and replacement of parts. 2. Paint shaker (GQNPC) assessed and recommended the replacement of a defective main logic board; the replacement entailed only a fraction of the whole module (a new module costs about P100,000, while the component repair cost was only 10% at most). 3. FOSS Cervitec 1625 grain inspector (GQNPC) repaired the equipment and made it functional again. 4. Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometer, GCMS (CESD)upgraded the existing gas line

Joint Proficiency test by WePAl and iAeA
ASL participated in the First Joint Proficiency Test (PT) on total C, total N, 13C, and 15N initiated by the Wageningen Evaluating Programme for Analytical Laboratories (WEPAL) in The Netherlands and the FAO/IAEA Agricultural and Biotechnology Laboratory, Soil Science Unit in Austria. Of 24 participating laboratories from Latin America, Africa, Asia and Europe, only two laboratories, IRRI-ASL and a laboratory from Belgium, were found proficient to perform both 15 N/total N and 13C/total C analyses.

ASL Table 1. Total number of samples analyzed in 2009 Analysis PLANT SOIL SOLUTION Total ASL section PSL 14,146 1,452 128 15,726 MSL 108 1,224 1,332 14,254 2,676 128 17,058 83 16 1 100 Total Percent

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 25

ReseaRch suppoRt seRvices
ASL benefited from the PT participation as the comparison of its data with those of other laboratories worldwide provided high confidence in the laboratory’s analytical performance. This is an invaluable tool for external quality control.
ASL Table 3. Comparison of ASL’s previous and current data management system with respect to standard LIMS features. (ASTM E 1578-93,1999)

Participation to international symposium in soil and Plant Analysis (issPA)
ASL showcased the expanded features of its laboratory information management system (LIMS), which was developed in-house, at the 11th International Symposium on Soil and Plant Analysis in Santa Rosa, California, USA The salient features of the new LIMS are listed in ASL Table 3. Some of the significant improvements in the new ASL LIMS include: • Online sample tracking module, which allows easy access for tracking a sample and the progress of analysis • Quick processing of ICP-OES data, which reduces transcription errors and eliminates the need for manual proofreading of results • Easy evaluation of reference materials using the quality control module and control charts • User-friendly presentation of analytical report with quality control references and a guide for interpreting results • Data retrieval module, which allows the userfriendly formatting of e-copy of results • Sample charging system incorporated in the database The in-house-developed LIMS has greatly improved sample handling, data processing, and report generation at ASL. It was shown to be a cost-effective tool, resulting in shortened turnaround time and better analytical results. selenium metal analyses. Three ASL staff members attended a 3-day training on GF-AAS in Singapore in late 2009. Method development for trace cadmium and zinc analysis in fertilizer, soil (field-moist and airdried samples), rice plant, and rice grain (brown and milled rice) is ongoing using the new GF-AAS.

A paper on “Training clients to use laboratory services effectively in rice research” was also presented by Lily Molina, ASL assistant manager, during the symposium.

croP reseArcH inForMAtics lAborAtory
institutional framework
After the expiration of the first IRRI-CIMMYT CRIL Memorandum of Agreement (MoA) on 31 Dec 2008, a new MoA was signed covering the period 1 Jan 2009 to 31 Dec 2011. The following substantial changes in the institutional framework were made: 1. There is no longer a single head of the IRRICIMMYT CRIL funded by both institutes after

new equipment for heavy metal research
The ASL acquired a new Perkin Elmer (PE) graphite furnace-atomic absorption spectrophotometer (GFAAS) that will enable it to better meet client requests for cadmium and other heavy metal analyses. This machine, with its graphite furnace function, offers a hundredfold greater sensitivity for heavy metal analysis than the flame AAS. It is also compatible with the PE flow injection analyzer for arsenic and

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

2 of 25

ReseaRch suppoRt seRvices
the departure of the CRIL head (Graham McLaren) in September 2008. The two CRIL units are now managed operationally by the local CRIL heads (Guy Davenport at CIMMYT and Thomas Metz at IRRI). 2. There is no longer a common budget. Financial management and reporting are carried out by each local CRIL head according to the financial management and administrative systems of their respective institute. 3. Governance is through the Board of Trustees (BOT) of each institute and joint BOT members as part of the shared Alliance projects. The good linkage between the CRIL units is ensured by a committee led by the DDG-Rs of both institutes. These changes were made to reduce the administrative and organizational overhead of the IRRI-CIMMYT CRIL, thereby allowing the scaling up of CRIL into a Crop Research Informatics Network (CRIN) through agreements with other institutes. Although a possible expansion with new members coming in has been discussed informally, no concrete steps have been taken so far. Since the two CRIL units are now more loosely coupled under the new MoA, this report focuses on the joint projects, activities, and staff exchange, rather than a full account of each unit’s activities. • Guoyou Ye (IRS, breeding informatics specialist) joined CRIL in August 2009. • Chengzhi Liang (IRS, crop information systems specialist) joined CRIL in December 2009. He is 40% funded from CIMMYT. • Martin Senger (IRS, software project manager) left CRIL in December 2009. Among the nationally recruited staff (NRS), there were a number of internal reassignments and promotions, six IT staff were hired, and four departed in 2009. Compared with 2008, the staffing situation has stabilized. The focus of new recruitment was on fresh IT graduates, rather than on experienced IT staff as before. A recruitment and retention strategy for CRIL IT staff was developed with HR. The current world economic situation may have contributed to the slowing down of IT staff turnover. In 2009, IRRI CRIL hosted between three and five CIMMYT-funded nationally recruited staff. By the end of 2009, the IRRI CRIL staff complement was five IRS, two postdoctoral fellows, and 19 NRS. of SetGen, GMS Search, GMS Input, and In-Track into the ICIS workbook application; (2) the creation of the ICIS Administrator Tool; (3) an interface to run the scripts for uploading the contents of the ICIS local database to the central database; (4) the development of the ICIS Mobile–a handheld application that communicates with the ICIS workbook to give data collectors an electronic alternative to pen and paper in the field; and (5) the creation of data warehouse tables for fast execution of queries in the ICIS Web application. Significant progress was made on the “nextgeneration” Web interface for the ICIS through the introduction of browse features for germplasm and study information. The germplasm browse feature can now aid in the data curation of rice genebank data. The Germplasm Pedigree Viewer allows for visualization of parental pedigree trees as well as derivative and maintenance neighborhoods. StudyMart, a cross-study query interface, allows uses to interrogate pedigree and phenotypic data and query germplasm entries with associated evaluation information. These improvements have been applied to the IRIS database and are now available for public access at http://rice.generationcp.org/germplasm. The technology behind the IRIS Web interface was applied to wheat and maize data through collaborative projects of the IRRI-CIMMYT Alliance as well as the C4 rice project. IRRI CRIL provided significant technical support in the installation and update of these crop information resources. A web-based GCP Crop Ontology lookup service was made available online at http://cropontology. org/. IRRI CRIL was involved in the design and implementation of most GCP specific ontology manage-

Technical progress
IRRI CRIL staff conducted or assisted with 22 training courses in 2009 in addition to continued consultation on experimental design and statistical analysis, data management, bioinformatics, and the use of the International Rice Information System (IRIS). Bioinformatics support for convergent analyses of gene expression and gene/genomic information, leading to candidate gene nomination, has been provided to IRRI research groups and collaborating institutions working on disease resistance and drought tolerance. The major technical developments in ICIS development are (1) the launching of ICIS Lite–a one-stopshop application that integrates the functionalities

IRRI CRIL Staff situation

• Richard Bruskiewich (internationally recruited staff [IRS], bioinformatics specialist) moved full-time to the C4 project, while remaining a CRIL staff. • Ramil Mauleon (IRS, bioinformatics) was promoted from his previous Postdoctoral position in CRIL in May 2009.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

3 of 25

ReseaRch suppoRt seRvices
ment software utilities and is maintaining the Web site. A working draft of the IRRI online bioinformatics workbench is available in the intranet at http://pirurutong , where Open Source analyses software and genome sequence databases are available for use. The Bioinformatics Knowledgebase at http://cropwiki.irri.org/everest/index.php/Bioinformatics provides recipe-type solutions to frequently consulted bioinformatics problems. Online databases of the most recent rice genome builds are maintained internally at http://pirurutong. Draft development versions of the rice gene expression database (using maxd-maxdBrowse infrastructure) and the rice gene and marker catalog (using BioSQL & MediaWIKI technologies) are available, which will contain IRRIspecific datasets from microarray gene expression studies and a catalog of candidate genes of interest by IRRI scientists/researchers. A re-distributable, Open Source implementation of the IRRI bioinformatics workbench and databases (the IRRI Bioinformatics Toolbox – IBioT) is under development, using Sun Virtualbox technology.
Courses and workshops supported by CRIL in 2009 Course/Workshop Research Data Management Course Basic Experimental Designs and Data Analysis Basic Experimental Designs and Data Analysis Research Data Management Course Data Entry Training Course using MS Access database Data Entry Training Course using MS Access Database Research Data Management Course Introduction to R Course Introduction to R Course Basic Experimental Designs and Data Analysis Research Data Management Course General Data Management Course Rice Breeding Course by PBGB (CRIL staff served only as resource persons for IRIS and Biometrics) Experimental Designs and Data Analysis for Plant Breeders Research Data Management Course General Data Management Course ICIS Course for IPB and NCPC Staff Intro to R: Data Management and Statistical Analysis Basic Bioinformatics Course Research Data Management Course Basic Bioinformatics Course ICIS Developers’ Workshop ICIS Developers’ Mini-Workshop ICIS Breeders’ Training Course Date 27-29 Jan 2-6 Feb 16-20 Feb 24-26 Feb 9-10 Mar 12-13 Mar 17-19 Mar 28-29 Apr 26-28 May 22-26 Jun 30 June- 2 Jul 11-13 Aug 24 Aug - 8 Sept Participants (no.) 10 18 30 15 4 4 15 16 11 19 16 18 30

coMMUnicAtion AnD PUblicAtions services
traditional publishing
Through CPS, IRRI produced 12 titles in 2009, including six scientific books, limited proceedings, and technical bulletins; four issues of Rice Today; and the 2008 annual report on DVD and the Web. Also produced were four issues of Rice Research for Intensified Production and Prosperity in Lowland Ecosystems (RIPPLE). Currently, around eight scientific book titles are in the production queue for 2010 and beyond. As reported last year, the International Rice Research Notes (IRRN) went open access in 2008 using Open Journal Systems (OJS) and is available online only. New articles are added as soon as they have been reviewed, edited, and approved for publication. In 2009, IRRI continued its collaboration with The Rice Trader, the world’s leading trade publication dedicated to in-depth analysis of the global rice industry, which is now publishing the Institute’s award-winning flagship publication, Rice Today. IRRI retains full editorial control in this “marriage” and we anticipate an even better and more relevant publication that will serve the overall rice world. The October-December 2009 issue was the magazine’s largest issue ever with 60 pages, including paid advertising.

7-11 Sept 9-11 Sept 13-15 Oct 21-23 Oct 26-30 Oct 5-6 Nov 17-19 Nov 23-24 Nov 16-20 Feb 15-26 Jun 25-29 May

26 17 18 10 14 20 13 9

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

4 of 25

ReseaRch suppoRt seRvices
Web publishing
User traffic. Of 314,672 visits to IRRI.ORG, 29% of the traffic came from Southeast Asia, followed by South Asia with 22% (CPS Figs. 1a and 1b). Asian traffic accounted for 61% of the visits to the site during the 1-year period. Africa, a newly opened stake-holding region for IRRI, accounted for only 4% of the traffic but had a higher “new visit” percentage than Asia. Nearly 25% of the traffic came from the U.S., Europe, and East Asia. Traffic from the U.S. and Europe most likely came from donors and advanced research institutions that IRRI has partnerships with. The average daily number of visits to the site over the period was 862 (CPS Fig. 2). There was marked increase of traffic in 2009 compared with 2008. The spike was most likely because current content, primarily news, was constantly refreshed on the main or front page. Content and page views. Content on IRRI. ORG is spread across 6,713 pages that averaged 165.16 views for each page daily. Page views are the number of pages visitors viewed on the site. Multiple page views of the same page made by the same user on the same day are counted only once. Of these 1,108,748 page views (CPS Fig. 3), 100 pages accounted for 948,727 views. Hence, out of the total number of pages on the site, 100 pages accounted for 85% of the total views by users. Of the top 100 daily pages viewed, the range was from 122,090 views for the most read to 973 daily page views for the 100th page. There were approximately 48,913 information objects on the beta site at the date of this report, not counting objects IRRI has on 2nd party social and media repository sites, such as Google Books,

CPS Fig. 1a. Regional geo-locations where IRRI.ORG user traffic came from in 2009.

YouTube, Blip.tv, and flickr. Information objects that reside on IRRI.ORG are not pages themselves but are still “crawled” by Google Analytics. CPS exploited news as fresh content for IRRI. ORG. The top page viewed is the front page of IRRI. ORG. In the overhaul of the site in 2008, the intent was to use the front page as a landing page for news updates. Time on the site. Visitors to IRRI.ORG in 2009 spent an average of 3.48 minutes on the site (CPS Fig. 4). There was a relatively good ratio between time spent and page view (i.e., 3.48 minutes viewing 3.52 pages, about a minute per page). By comparison, users of the world’s #1 ranked Web site (www. google.com) during the same time period spent

an average of 9.3 minutes viewing 9.26 pages, also about 1 minute per page). Referrals from other sites. Referrals are vital to drive traffic to IRRI.ORG. Country entry points (upstream sites) to the site via Google are listed in CPS Figure 5. It is important to look into other reputable site referrals other than search engines such as Google and Yahoo (see CPS Figure 5). Google is the top referring (upstream) site and downstream site due to IRRI’s use of Google services, such as Google Books and YouTube. Another is IRRI’s use of flickr, a Yahoo! Service for photo viewing and distribution. Site upgrading. In 2009, to help meet objectives to expand IRRI’s presence on the Web, the CPS Web team together with Information Technology

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

5 of 25

ReseaRch suppoRt seRvices
Services (ITS) started an upgrade of the IRRI.ORG site’s content management system. Coupled with this upgrade, CPS is trying to make it easier for Web stakeholders at the Institute to access IRRI.ORG for putting up their own content and keeping it current. With the 2010 re-launch, IRRI.ORG will have 1. wWeb managers who have the capacity to publish their own content as will Web users working with each research program, project, and organization unit; 2. restructured dynamic content; 3. an integrated Web site, which has self-managed subsites or pages that feed into the main site: and • Standardized solutions for all Web users at the Institute. Web processes and solutions will be applicable for all sites in the IRRI Web system. In 2009, the CPS Web team also:In 2009. • identified a pool of staff members with Web-related tasks (Web administration and content generation) from across the Institute; • launched an online facility that allows and encourages feedback, collaboration, networking, and mentoring among these IRRI Web stakeholders; and • shared solutions and empowered members of the IRRI Web community through meetings and countless tech-support sessions.

CPS Fig. 4. Average time in minutes that each visitor spent on IRRI.ORG in 2009.

CPS Fig. 1b. Regional geo-location breakdown of user visits to IRRI.ORG.

CPS Fig. 5. IRRI.ORG upstream and downstream sites showing referring sites and link through sites

CPS Fig. 2. Average daily visits to IRRI.ORG in 2009.

Media
Media releases. In 2009, 26 media releases were prepared and distributed: • Rice science vision to feed the world marks 50 years, 11 Dec 2009 • US$300 million fund-raising campaign launched for rice food security in Asia, 25 Nov 2009 • Four ways to feed the world, New Scientist, 18 Nov 2009 • 50 years of rice science for a better worldand it's just the start, 17 Nov 2009

CPS Fig. 3. Content performance by page title on IRRI.ORG in 2009.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

6 of 25

ReseaRch suppoRt seRvices
• Entire genetic diversity of rice to be revealed and shared, 15 Nov 2009 • Aroma genes in Thai Jasmine rice abundant across Asia, 29 Oct 2009 • Rice trade supports rice research, 29 Oct 2009 • U.S. visit highlights the impact of rice science, 23 Oct 2009 • Climate change threatens rice production, 16 Oct 2009 • Rice farmers tap into good agricultural practices online, 14 Oct 2009 • IRRI and ADB launch book on rice and wheat research, 8 Oct 2009 • Japan commits $25 million to international rice research, 2 Oct 2009 • “Land grabs” for rice production due to supply threats, 28 Sep 2009 • Syngenta and IRRI collaborate to benefit Asia’s rice farmers, 8 Sep 2009 • 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium opens in November 2009, 18 Aug 2009 • Global team develops tools to unravel diversity of rice, 24 Jul 2009 • Early rice harvests ease annual famine in Bangladesh, 21 Jul 2009 • Rice defies its reputation as a thirsty crop, 20 Jul 2009 • TV soap opera helps Bangladeshi farmers, 24 Jun 2009 • Filipino farmers welcome new rice varieties, 4 Jun 2009 • "Scuba rice" makes a splash in India and Bangladesh, 14 Apr 2009 • 50 years of rice research helps feed the world, 12 Mar 2009 • NUS partners with IRRI, 17 Feb 2009 • New agreement opens avenues for strengthening Indian rice research, 20 Jan 2009 • New, higher yielding rice plant could ease threat of hunger for the poor, 14 Jan 2009 • Investing in the future: rice and the global financial crisis, 9 Jan 2009 • Major agricultural initiative to benefit millions of South Asian farmers, 6 Jan 2009 Media mentions. Mentions in the media of the “International Rice Research Institute” recorded in the IRRI News Database were 277, a drop from 389 in 2008 when the rice price crisis and corresponding media coverage were at their pinnacle. However, these figures exclude most radio, television, print that is not duplicated online, and non-English media coverage. Media mentions of IRRI throughout 2009 were included in numerous major news outlets including • Pricing water for the poor: Forbes magazine, 28 Dec • Super rice to feed the world: Straits Times, 25 Dec • Rice prices may return to record without investment, IRRI says: Bloomberg, 25 Nov • Is there such a thing as agro-imperialism?: New York Times magazine, 16 Nov • More investments in rice research needed to avoid panic over rice shortage: Channel News Asia, 7 Sep • The resistant rice of the future: Nature, 20 Aug • Drought-resistant rice in India: BBC news, 5 Aug • Bangladesh soap opera aims to help farmers: Agence France Presse, 23 Jun • Philippines: PhilRice eyes flood-tolerant rice: Philippine Daily Inquirer, 8 Jun • The global food crisis: the end of plenty: National Geographic magazine, 1 Jun • Drain rice fields to cut methane, say scientists: SciDev Net, 20 May • One year after a devastating cyclone, a bitter harvest, Science magazine, 8 May • World needs extra 10 million tons of rice for stable market: IRRI: Reuters, 14 Apr • Fighting hunger with flood-tolerant rice: CNN, 5 Feb • Credit crunch may lead to another rice crisis: Fox News, 9 Jan IRRI continued to receive regular media requests to interview scientists in 2009, particularly Dr. Mohanty, and the executive, namely Dr. Zeigler and Dr. Dobermann. In addition, IRRI hosted 18 media visitors and arranged media attendance at USDA Secretary Vilsack’s visit to IRRI, RG6, and the IRRI anniversary launch. IRRI staff now also have access to the “Tips for dealing with the media” kit which is available on the intranet, to assist them in handling media interviews. Media contacts database: Around 2,000 existing media contacts were updated and their complete contact details added to Salesforce in 2009. An additional 1,000 new media contacts were added, making the total number of IRRI media contacts at the end of 2009 around 3,000. Hot topics. To support accurate media coverage of IRRI science and provide the general public with information on current rice issues, IRRI has developed a “Hot Topics” section of the Web site where simple language explanations of our work are

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

7 of 25

ReseaRch suppoRt seRvices
presented. In 2009, eight hot topics were completed and published on the IRRI Web site: • Golden rice: fighting vitamin A deficiency, 22 Dec • Genetically modified (GM) rice at IRRI, 13 Nov • Sharing the genetic diversity of rice responsibly, 21 Oct • IRRI: working with the private sector, 22 Oct • IRRI: working with our local community in Los Baños, the Philippines, 9 Oct • Pesticides and rice production, 25 Sep • International land acquisition for rice production, 25 Sep • Why does the Philippines import rice?, 25 Sep

communications support
CPS provides communication support for the entire Institute, including editing, graphic design, art and illustration, audio-visual, photography, video, and printing. For example, in 2009, 60,384 new digital photographs were produced, 14 video programs were produced, and 74 shorter clips were provided for the Bulletin (IRRI’s weekly newsletter for staff, BOT, and alumni; http://bulletin.irri.org) and PowerPoint presentations. Also in 2009, graphic artists produced 93 illustrations, laid out 1,863 pages for publications, and prepared and printed 472 posters on the CPS large-format printer. IRRI editors worked on more than 1,900 pages for refereed journal articles, more than 1,000 pages appearing in IRRI’s scientific books, plus 87 pages for the International Rice Research Notes, four issues each of Rice Today, and the newsletter RIPPle, and more than 2,500 pages of additional conference papers, abstracts, proposals, posters, donor reports, concept notes, and press releases.

land use
In the 2009 dry and wet seasons, 323.18 ha were used. The biggest user groups are ES and PBGB. The ES used some 110.7 ha for field demonstration, seed increase, and rice production purposes. PBGB planted a total of 138.11 ha for their various experiments. Seedling requirements of the different field experiments were established and maintained by the ES in 13.95 ha of dry and wet nursery beds, using field nurseries covering 7.2 ha and 6.75 ha, respectively. The rest of the seedling requirements were grown on a 40 x 10-m pavement using modified dapog nurseries.
Division CESD ES GQNPC GRC PBGB TOTAL Dry season (ha) 38.85 56.64 0.26 7.29 72.26 175.30 Wet season (ha) 22.75 54.06 3.13 2.09 65.85 147.88 Total 61.60 110.70 3.39 9.38 1389.11 323.18

irri communications
Work on a communication strategy is under way with Part 1: Setting the foundation completed and Part 2: Assessment of communications at IRRI drafted. Both parts have been presented to the executive and discussed among communication staff at IRRI. Also, an updated IRRI brochure “Rice science for a better world” was produced and published online and in hard copy to promote and communicate the overarching mission, goals, and activities of IRRI. Effort has begun on better coordinating branding; a visual identity page on the IRRI Web site where accurate versions of the IRRI logo are available for download has been completed. In addition, a draft visual identity manual outlining guidelines for using the IRRI logo and the concept of IRRI colors is in development.

eXPeriMent stAtion
In 2009, the Experiment Station (ES) provided support services to some 303 field and greenhouse experiments. The Field Operations Unit served the requirements of 214 field experiments, while the Controlled Plant Growth Facility and Grounds Unit (CGFG) supported 30 experiments in the Phytotron and CL4 transgenic greenhouse facilities and 89 experiments in all other greenhouses. More than 11,921 maintenance and service requests were fully served by the various support units of the ES during the year.

crop production operations
ES seed increase and rice production operations in 2009 totaled 110.7 ha, equivalent to an 18.68% reduction compared with the previous year’s 136.13 ha. The currently established practice of producing rice on vacant fields resulted in more efficient and cost-effective maintenance operations, better use of land, and less maintenance cost. It helped the Institute recover cost with the added value of supplying low-cost but high-quality milled rice to Institute NRS. Farm operations remained focused on providing research support services to experiments

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

8 of 25

ReseaRch suppoRt seRvices
being conducted at ES. Rice production operations at the farm aim to efficiently maintain the fields not used for research, with less emphasis on getting high yields. As such, rice production operations are given lower priority over research requirements, thereby keeping production cost down and ensuring that resource requirements for the rice production component of ES operations do not compete with the Institute research needs and the farm’s research support mandate. Production crops were established mainly by direct seeding through manual broadcasting of pregerminated seeds, drum seeding on wet fields, and seed drilling on dry-prepared areas. The rest were established using manual and mechanical transplanting methods, particularly in deep plots and during wetter periods of the year when weather and field conditions did not favor direct seeding operations. ES harvested 328 t from ES-managed production plots. Another 78.7 t of mixed varieties and remnant grains from border rows and excess materials from finished experimental setups were harvested from researchers’ plots. Harvesting in large plots was mainly done with the use of mechanical combine harvesters. ES also planted maize as a buffer crop to break the cycle of tungro infestation in the dry season of 2009. The area planted to maize yielded 22 t. total amount reflected a 26.88% decrease in fertilizer application compared with 2008. Manual bird scaring remains the preferred method for avian pest control; the use of bird nets was the second option, with 1.03 ha of the field being covered with nets immediately after seeding or near harvest. Rat management practices, which mainly include installation of trap barrier systems, maintenance of fallow areas, burrow destruction, field sanitation and hygiene, and closed seasons, contributed well to zero incidence of severe rat damage in all rice crops. Rat control services included the installation of baiting stations and active barrier systems (29.4 and 29.6 ha covered, respectively). The rat traps yielded a total of 228 live catches for 2009.

land development and civil works
The coconut grove of UPLB was continuously maintained; backfilling was done in two blocks and in the perimeter roads of three blocks. The filling materials scraped from the 30-km main and access road in the IRRI farm were complemented by 900 m3 of base coarse and gravel materials were used in the rehabilitation and maintenance of the farm roads. Additional space for the soil depot was provided adjacent to the grinding area at the upland farm building. This will serve as covered stock pile area. Excavations were done and 500 m of PVC pipes were installed, serving as irrigation lines connecting the block 700 series to the 2000 series. Submersible pumps were installed at the 2000 series and in one other block. The transgenic experimental area at blocks F5 to F9 was backfilled with around 700 m3 of materials for the construction of a 300-m road preparatory to the installation of a fence line. Other routine maintenance activities included roadside mowing operations, reservoir maintenance, road grading, straw and field waste collection and turnover to soil rotation site, soil hauling, and delivery to the soil-grinding facility.

irrigation and drainage services
A team of research technicians maintained irrigation water supply to the entire IRRI farm to meet the needs of the different OUs. Twenty-one units of risers were installed in four blocks; 12 units of drainage outlets were constructed in two blocks. Three units of gate valve in three blocks were repaired and seven units of gate valve in the lowland area were installed. For some special irrigation setup, 200 m of flat hose were installed in one block and 50 m in another block. Continued support was also provided for road clearing and desilting, and cleaning of waterways in the upland, lowland, and old areas. To continuously provide irrigation water to all users, the pump perimeter and reservoir fences at the aforementioned area were promptly cleaned and repaired, and monitored regularly to augment water supply in all reservoirs.

equipment fabrication, repair and maintenance services
The ES Mechanical Shop provided repair, fabrication, and maintenance services for tractors, farm equipment, implements, machinery, and irrigation facilities. More than 2,919 requests for repair and maintenance of light and heavy equipment and farm implements from the different units and research divisions were accomplished. Different types of threshers, seed cleaners, and dryers were also repaired

Agrochemical applications and crop protection services
A total of 70.2 t of different kinds of fertilizers were served to various users of the farm in the form of ammonium sulfate, complete, muriate of potash, solophos, urea, zinc oxide, and zinc sulfate. This

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

9 of 25

ReseaRch suppoRt seRvices
and maintained. Routine maintenance and repair services were also provided to the Rice Mill Unit. tions, the Boot creek road side, the demonstration plots, entrance gate, ES complex, Pleasant Village apartments, the railroad lawns, the reservoirs, the Tabon marker, and block US. Likewise maintained are the landscape garden in front of the research center, the pond island, Chandler Hall, F.F. Hill, Cantrell Hall, Harrar Hall, Umali Hall, the pond area, NCBL, Kenzo Hemmi, main gate, logo area, and gate 2. The waste segregation schemes in the screenhouse area and staff housing were continuously implemented. organizations and institutions, ES continued to accommodate external requests for equipment and services following established protocols and guidelines. The ES, in coordination with the Office of the DDG-OSS and the Community Relations Unit of IRRI, continued to provide equipment assistance and associated technical support services to the surrounding communities. These included the conduct of field tours and demonstration for visitors endorsed by the Visitors and Information Services (VIS) office, as well as the orientation of new staff and scholars endorsed by the Training Center (TC). ES staff also participated in training course offerings, acting as facilitators and trainers, and provided planning and logistical support to the conduct of various field demonstrations and tours. Experimental plots and crops were established to serve as demonstration areas that highlight the important research projects and activities of the Institute. A number of trailers were conditioned for use in transporting the participants safely and comfortably during their tour of the IRRI fields. Several dry runs were organized, orchestrated, and coordinated through ES to help ensure the success of the field-day activities.

Post harvest services and rice mill operations
Postharvest support services provided by ES included threshing, cleaning, drying, and storage, among others. Majority of the drying requirements of researchers for plant samples and harvested grains were accommodated using oven dryers and flatbed dryers being maintained by the station. The Rice Mill Operations Unit processed 408 t of rice harvested from the IRRI farm for the year 2009. From a total of 236 t of milled rice produced, 226 t were supplied to the NRS, while the rest were distributed in response to various requests from the different OUs or sold to the highest bidder. The byproducts of the milling operations totaled 21 t of broken rice and 48 t of rice bran. The broken rice and rice bran were sold to the highest bidder through sealed bidding. Some of the rice bran was used for the ES fish production project. The rice hulls were also sold to regular buyers who use these for insulation, as animal beddings, and for landscaping/composting purposes. The total value of milled output is estimated at P8.3 million.

Kabesilya labor services
Performance monitoring of kabesilya services was continuously implemented by the ES Administrative Unit. The summary of performance data taken from Kabesilya services job completion feedback forms revealed 100% acceptability of contractual labor and bird-scaring services in 2009. Acceptability for all other task-based services remained high at 99.91%. Kabesilya services rendered by the agricultural manpower provider, as requested by various research divisions and support units in 2009, entailed 846,832 man-hours. This reflected an 8.3% increase in utilization compared with the previous year’s total of 781,484 manhours. Manual bird-scaring services had a slight increase, less than 1%, from 113,765 man-hours in 2008 to 120,995 man-hours this year. There was no wage increase for agricultural workers during the year.

CGFG (Controlled Growth Facility and Grounds)
The CGFG has processed 225 requests for space allocation for the Phytotron, greenhouse, and head house facilities. The unit also served 622 various job requests to meet the Phytotron, greenhouse, and ground requirements. Grounds services covered approximately 89,465 m2 at the research center and 86,796 m2 at the IRRI staff housing. Other areas included the agromet sta-

Environmental management system implementation
External audit With the ES Environmental Management System’s (ES EMS) successful certification to ISO 14001:2004 on 22 Jun 2007 by SGS, a world-renowned inspection, verification, testing, and certification company, came a mandatory external audit by SGS on 15 Apr 2009.

Partnership activities and other support services
As part of its role in maintaining harmonious relationships with neighboring communities and other

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

10 of 25

ReseaRch suppoRt seRvices
The objectives of the external audit were to confirm that 1. the ES EMS conforms to all the requirements of ISO 14001:2004, 2. the ES has effectively implemented the planned ES EMS, and 3. the ES EMS is capable of achieving the ES policy objectives. The external audit covered management of farm operations and other support services, which included waste management, grounds maintenance, and landscaping. The audit team conducted a process-based audit, focusing on significant aspects/ risks/objectives required by the standard(s). The audit methods used were interviews, observation of activities, and review of documentation and records. The structure of the audit was in accordance with the audit plan and audit planning matrix that were agreed upon with the ES EMS coordinator prior to the start of the audit. At the end of the audit period, the external audit team concluded that ES has established and maintained its EMS in line with the requirements of ISO14001:2004 and demonstrated the ability of the system to systematically achieve agreed requirements for products or services with the scope of the organization’s policy and objectives. No major nonconformities were identified. Thus, the audit team recommended that, based on the audit results and the ES EMS’ demonstrated state of development and maturity, the ES EMS certification to ISO 14001:2004 be continued. However, due to budget constraints, certification may not be extended after 22 Jun 2010; the plan is to still fulfill the requirements according to audit standards. Internal audit An internal audit was carried out in December 2009 in accordance with ISO14001. It aimed to review overall compliance with ISO14001-2004 and assess whether the current system of internal control ensures an effective EMS implementation. The audit included ocular inspection of the ES office and sites included in the EMS, review of EMS documentation and records, interviews of ES staff involved in the EMS, and a follow-up of past internal audit recommendations. The audit concluded that the ES-EMS complied with the standards and that internal controls were in place to ensure that the ES-EMS is operating effectively. It also concurred with the IRRI Management Committee’s decision not to renew the external certification for the ES-EMS as long as the Institute complies with the standards and maintains in-house discipline. The results of the audit were discussed with the coordinator and the Deputy Director General for Research who agreed on an action plan to address the related recommendations in the report. The status of the implementation of the action plan will be evaluated in the next internal audit cycle. tion sources, librarians strive to link researchers to the right information at the shortest time possible. Nowadays, the luxury of having more than enough resources to fulfill the needs of clients is seldom felt by many organizations. The transformation from a traditional library to one that is able to deliver instant access to information resources via remote desktops brought about impediments that are not unique to IRRI alone. Coping with the increasing cost of information sources is a continuous, uphill battle. But this does not prevent the IRRI Library from being a proactive partner in improving the quality of information resources and services available. Despite the many challenges, it was able to fulfill IRRI scientists’ requests on the same day or at a reasonable time, when the item requested is not available in the Library or in the Web. Likewise, requests from other institutions were fulfilled promptly. Prioritizing, multitasking, team endeavor, and active partnerships with librarians, scientists, and friends facilitated these accomplishments.

librAry AnD DocUMentAtion services
Present-day researchers are fortunate to have huge volumes of increasingly accessible information within their reach. While access to a wider range of information via the WWW is growing, this proliferation compels users to spend more time in searching and getting the right information. This is where libraries come into the picture. Through systematic evaluation, selection, and organization of informa-

The IRRI Library staff continues to facilitate knowledge sharing with clients

As staff changes took place during the year, shortage of human resources was one of the major

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

11 of 25

ReseaRch suppoRt seRvices
hurdles dealt with. Multitasking was used to keep basic operations at high gear. to use the collection. The IRRI Library is a favorite site visited by faculty and students of Library and Information Science in the country. In the words of an instructor in the University of the Philippines, IRRI serves as her “benchmark or standard on how an information center should be.”

library clients
In support of IRRI’s objectives, the Library links rice knowledge to scientists all over the world. There were 3,651 IRRI staff and 7,102 others (students and faculty from various universities, researchers from other institutions, and the general public) who came

LDS Table 1. Collection Development in 2009. Publication type Monographs (books, pamphlets) Print Electronic Theses (print & electronic) DVDs/Videocassettes CDROM Rice articles (print) 10 Rice articles (pdf) 15,665 Total collection (print & digital) –excluding journals Journals (Current) Subscriptions : Print Electronic Gifts & Exchange ScienceDirect Freely available e- journals linked to the Library web site Total Active Current Journals Journals (ElectronicArchival) TEEAL ScienceDirect Online databases Linked to web site Subscribed 4 1 76 5 179,748 16,695 131 39 92 1,347 316 1,017 2,811 371 172 199 31,065 Added in 2009 842 658 184 114 8 56 4,802 244 240 27,886 Total collection 120,797

Knowledge resources
Collection development continued to focus on electronic resources, the format preferred by modernday researchers. As in the past, the upward trend of e-journal and book prices hampered the growth of the collection. Freely available electronic information sources on the Web were downloaded as soon as they are discovered. A summary of various information resources acquired is given in LDS Table 1. To augment access to electronic journals, investment was made on the back files of about 199 journals in the ScienceDirect Agricultural and Biological Sciences collection. With this purchase, free access to online journals in another subject suite, Biochemistry, Genetics, and Molecular Biology, was enjoyed for a year. Participation in the joint subscriptions deal of the CGIAR Libraries and Information Services Consortium (CGIARLISC) continued. While only paying in full for six titles, IRRI staff can read 43 titles through the payment of minimal cross-access fees.

The IRRI Library Reading Room.

linking resources with end-users
The Library’s Web site, which is the key access point to knowledge resources and services, continued to be available 24 hours a day to clients located in various parts of the world. It was visited 55,112 times by virtual worldwide clients, which shows an increase of 12,183 over last year’s number of visitors.

An IRRI library staff member assists clients in the use of online resources.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

12 of 25

ReseaRch suppoRt seRvices
machine, took place on 14 Sep 2009. Backup of the library’s e-files via a tape drive stopped in September. Daily remote backup of files is being undertaken by the ITS using the Millennium Enterprise Backup API application.

services to worldwide clients, 2009
Several knowledge-sharing activities were undertaken on-site or remotely by email to fulfill the needs of clients, regardless of geographical location. Institutions from 40 countries benefited from LDS services. The following tables give a summary of services rendered by Library staff to clients. IRRI scientists or walk-in clients can access literature directly from their computers. The figures in LDS Tables 2-4 do not include direct access to free full- text literature offered via the LDS Web site.

library projects: Major accomplishments
It is not possible for a library to have in its collection everything that the clients need. Sharing of resources and services is the most appropriate solution. Collaboration with local and international institutions and libraries enabled the LDS to fulfill the needs of clients and to improve access to rice information. Aside from the usual library services, projects aimed at improving the quality of services were initiated, some with support from other IRRI units or outside institutions. • The IRRI Rice Thesaurus was published on the WWW through a cooperative agreement with the National Agricultural Library, U.S. Department of Agriculture. The resource is now available worldwide at this link http:// agclass.nal.usda.gov/irri/rice_search.shtml. With support from the Communication and

The new look of the OPAC search interface.

The Rice Database IRRI’s rice database, strengthened with the addition of 4,539 citations in 2009, serves as a vital link between rice literature and scientists. As of year end, the total number of records reached 272,012, with 21,700 carrying hyperlinks to full-text documents. More links will be added in the future as digitization of rice articles is an ongoing project. The Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC) This platform for searching the IRRI Library collection is also available 24/7 to prospective users via the WWW. Eight hundred and sixty-five records were

added in 2009, for a total of 79,124. Currently, 5,546 electronic links to the full text are available. Non-IRRI Databases To facilitate literature searching, citation searching, and current awareness in fields other than rice, the Library subscribed to five major databases: Current Contents Connect, Web of Science, CAB Abstracts, library of Congress Classification Web, and TeeAl.

integrated library system
Migration of e-files from the old DEC-alpha server to a new Linux (RHEL) platform, running as a virtual

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

13 of 25

ReseaRch suppoRt seRvices
LDS Table 3. Requests Fulfilled from other CGIAR centers and outside institutions, 2009 Institution Bioversity LDS Table 2. Library services provided to worldwide clients, 2009 Service Electronic document delivery Reference services Literature searches Book loans processed Interlibrary loans Current awareness 1. Library corner in the IRRI Bulletin 2. IRRI announcements wiki/email 3. E-Alerts 4. Blogs 5. Featured lists Orientation/guided tours Database management hands-on instruction Procurement/cataloging of books for other units Bindery 47 12 1,923 28 12 405 Monthly updates Given to new IRRI staff, fellows, trainees, scholars, fellows, visitors IRRI staff and librarians of other institutions Weekly e-alerts Volume/ frequency 1,569 1,222 63 12,816 21 Checkouts, check-ins, renewals, and holds For UPLB Main and PhilRice libraries only Remarks Same day delivery of requested materials as email attachments Received by email, snail mail, phone or personally CIAT CIFOR CIMMYT CIP ICARDA ICRAF Articles delivered (no.) 23 1 12 5 77 6 52 15 12 52 18 27 Reference questions/ literature searches 9 Institution ICRISAT IFPRI ILRI IRRI IWMI WARDA Other institutions Total Articles Delivered (no.) 93 5 4 630 50 14 597 1569 Reference questions/ literature searches 41 12 9 391 16 8 611 1222

LDS Table 4. Library services rendered, by Country, 2009 Country 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Argentina Australia Bangladesh Belarus Belgium Benin Brazil Canada China Colombia Costa Rica Cuba Egypt Ethiopia France India Indonesia Iran Italy Japan Documents delivered (no.) 1 7 13 1 1 14 1 15 4 1 3 2 10 4 1 230 25 1 23 36 9 21 157 21 2 1 6 2 11 5 16 Reference questions/ literature searches 1 4 7 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 Country Kenya Korea Mexico Myanmar Netherlands Nigeria Pakistan Peru Philippines Singapore Spain Sri Lanka Switzerland Syria Taiwan Thailand UK Uruguay USA Vietnam Total Documents delivered (no.) 63 1 12 2 2 4 10 121 792 2 1 105 2 7 2 2 3 3 41 1 1569 1222 47 5 2 1 5 8 5 19 4 89 697 6 7 1 6 Reference questions /literature searches 57

8

67

4,839

Volumes bound plus special materials

15 16 17 18 19 20

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

14 of 25

ReseaRch suppoRt seRvices
Publications Services (CPS), 583 terms were added to the thesaurus, for a total of 3,912. • The International Directory of Rice Workers, with 1,683 names, now carries an interactive platform at http://spreadsheets.google. com/viewform?formkey=dEdCT09sNDYtTn AxbmZBMzZVQVJhWnc6MA for rice scientists to add new or to revise existing data. • Pertinent pages from IRRI-Assisted Theses and Dissertations were scanned and linked to bibliographic records in the rice database and the OPAC. There are 1,466 titles in this collection. • The Rice Archives now carries 21,700 pdf files, which are linked to citations in the rice database. • The Dspace Repository has 1,315 electronic files of IRRI publications available for local and remote access via the Internet. • Support from Program 6 enabled the downloading of 15,665 pdf files from the Web. • The directory of recent IRRI staff publications, which is available via the LDS Web site, contains 698 entries. • Inputs to the AGRIS and PhilAgriNet databases continued with 81 items added for a total of 1,676 records. Superseded editions and duplicate copies of books and journals were shared with local libraries: the Municipal Library of Sangguniang Bayan, Dinapigue, Isabela; the Florencio Urot Memorial High School Library, Cebu City; the Philippine Carabao Center Library; the Quezon National Agricultural School Library; Camarines Sur State University, and the Romblon State College Library.

EVENTS AND VISITORS OFFICE
The Institute, through the Events and Visitors Office (EVO), welcomed some 37,543 visitors in 2009 (EVO Table 1). These included distinguished guests such as Her Royal Highness Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn of the Royal Kingdom of Thailand and Hon. Thomas Vilsack, US secretary of agriculture; five ambassadors; three ministers; 2, 924 government officials; various members of the diplomatic community and representatives of donor and international organizations, including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Kellogg, Asia Society, Bank of the Philippine Islands, ACIAR, ADB, AusAID, GTZ, DevGen, Syngenta and the US Embassy. Students comprised the majority of the visitors and a significant number of farmers also visited the Institute. EVO also facilitated 142 institute-wide seminars and special events (EVO Table 2). IRRI hosted or cohosted 25 regional and international workshops, which attracted nearly 1,700 delegates from 50 countries. Programs for visits, interviews, and filming of various Philippine and international media were also arranged.

Recognition
The IRRI Library’s rice database was given the Oberly Award for the best English-language bibliography in the field of agriculture by the Association of College and Research Libraries of the American Library Association during the Annual Meeting of ALA in Chicago, Illinois, on 13 July 2009. Librarian Mila Ramos received the STRLC Distinguished Librarian Award from the Philippine Librarians Association, Inc., Southern Tagalog Regional Librarians’ Council on 9 Oct 2009 at the Eastern Manila Hotel and Training Center, Antipolo City.

IRRI’s distinguished VIPs in 2009 visitors
Members of the diplomatic corps H.E. Rishi Raj Adhikari, ambassador of Nepal to the Philippines, and party, 19 Jan H.E. Kulkumut Singhara Na Ayudhaya, ambassador of Thailand to the Philippines, and party, 5 Feb Delegates from the European Union, 18 Mar H.E. Liu Jianchao, ambassador of the People’s Republic of China to the Philippines, and party, 21 Apr

Outreach Activities
IRRI librarians shared their expertise to colleagues as they engaged in various outreach activities such as serving as officers of library associations, participation in international consultation meetings, coordinating the CGIARLISC joint subscriptions, and acting as lecturers/resource persons in various local and international fora.

The Oberly Award for the Best English language bibliography in agriculture.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

15 of 25

ReseaRch suppoRt seRvices
EVO Table 1. IRRI visitors, by group, in 2009. Visitor group Students Conference participants Non government Organization Donors Government officials/politicians/officers Farmers Faculty members/university Staff/parents Scientists, researchers Private Sector UN agencies, CGIAR, TAC, etc. Media Religious group Tourists Others Total Philippines 23,297 792 697 13 2,500 1,863 2,328 99 870 16 15 56 90 1,004 33,640 Asia 612 531 24 47 262 246 85 329 154 151 56 45 126 100 2768 Africa 0 30 1 0 12 0 0 13 11 1 0 5 0 0 73 Australia 1 17 0 5 0 10 3 4 3 0 1 0 6 6 56 Europe 144 77 4 8 5 3 9 16 21 2 21 8 13 35 366 Latin America 0 8 0 0 0 0 0 1 7 0 0 0 0 0 16 North America 6 4 0 0 1 1 0 5 0 0 0 6 3 10 36 USA 53 71 36 14 111 1 13 19 25 2 10 13 13 47 428 Others 0 124 0 3 33 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 160 Total 24,113 1,654 762 90 2,924 2124 2,438 486 1,091 172 103 133 251 1202 37,543

Hon. Thomas Vilsack, secretary of agriculture, United States of America, and party, 25 Oct Government officials from Papua New Guinea and party, 26 Oct Her Royal Highness, Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn of the Royal Kingdom of Thailand, 17 Nov Hon. Zhang Taolin, vice minister, Ministry of Agriculture, China, and party, 20 Nov Hon. Jurin Laksanawisit, minister of education, The Royal Kingdom of Thailand and president of the Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization, SEARCA Council, and party, 19 Dec Representatives from various organizations Prof. Jeffrey D. Sachs, director, The Earth Institute, Columbia University, 7 Jan Mrs. Linda Costello-Baker, Independent Monitor for Entry Clearance Refusals (without the right of appeal), UK Border Agency International Group, Visa Services Directorate, 11 Jan Dr. John Skerritt, deputy chief executive, Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research, 14 Jan Mr. Ryotaro Suzuki, director, International Research Division, and Ms. Tomoyo Kobayashi, Research Council Secretariat, International Research Division, Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Japan, 5 Feb Mr. Seong-Ho Lee, director general, Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Bureau, and Mr. Kwang-Han Lee, team leader, Environment Friendly Agriculture, Chung-Nam Province, South Korea, 20 Feb Mr. Nagavara Ramarao Narayana Murthy, chairman and chief mentor, Infosys Technologies Ltd., 18 Mar

H.E. A. Selverajah, ambassador of the Republic of Singapore to the Philippines. and party, 16 Jun H.E. Andrew Matheson, ambassador of New Zealand to the Philippines, and Ms. Sue Cotton, spouse of the ambassador, 19 Aug Ms. Emiko Purdy, agricultural counselor; Mr. Brian Doherty, economic counselor; and Mr. Perfecto Corpuz, agricultural specialist, Agriculture Affairs Office, Embassy of the United States of America, 11 Sep Representatives/diplomats from the ASEAN national offices of Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, and Vietnam, 26 Sep

Legislators and government officials President Joseph Ejercito Estrada, former president, Republic of the Philippines, and party, 19 Feb Delegation from the Government of Brunei Darussalam, 30 Mar Hon. Wondwossen Kiflu, state minister, Ministry of Education, Ethiopia, and party, 22 Apr Delegation from the Nigerian House of Representatives, 4 May Government officials from the province of North Sulawesi, Indonesia, 4 Aug Delegation from the Agricultural Science Institute of North Central Vietnam and Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, 28-29 Sep

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

16 of 25

ReseaRch suppoRt seRvices
Prof. Kirpa Ram Koundal, joint director (research), Indian Agriculture Research, 19 Mar Board members of the Asian Development Bank, 12 Mar Ms. Judith Hushagen, managing director, MANNET (Managing Network), 20-23 Mar Dr. Md. Firoze Shah Sikder, director general, Bangladesh Rice Research Institute, 19 Mar Dr. Ren Wang, director, Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR), 20 Mar Dr. Victoria Henson-Apollonio, senior scientist, manager, and Ms. Guat Hong The, CGIAR Central Advisory Science on Intellectual Property, 23 Mar Delegation from Asia 21 Young Leaders Forum Society, 27 Mar Delegation from the National University of Singapore and Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory, 19 Apr Delegation from Kellogg Company, 21 May Ms. Doris Magsaysay-Ho, president/chief executive oficer, Magsaysay Group of Companies, and party, 15 Jun Delegation from GrainPro Philippines, Inc., 25 Jun Ms. Francisca Delgado, director general, National Institute of Fishing Investigation, and Mr. Agostinho Duarte, director general, Institute for Development of Artisanal Fishing and Aquaculture, Republic of Angola, 7 Jul Dr. Gamini Keerthisinghe, research program manager for soil management and crop nutrition, Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR), 9 Jul Delegation from Greenpeace Southeast Asia, 17 Jul Mr. Aurelio Montinola III, president and chief executive officer, Bank of the Philippine Islands, 24 Jul Mr. Wilfrido G. Tirona, president and general manager, Kubota Agro-Industrial Machinery, Philippines Inc., and party, 28 Jul Dr. John Skerritt, deputy chief executive, and Dr. Gamini Keerthisinghe, research program manager for soil management and crop nutrition, ACIAR, 5 Aug Dr. Bernd Haase, president/chief executive officer, 5 PRIME GmbH, 10 Aug Delegation from the International Finance Corporation and Bank of the Philippine Islands, 14 Aug Dr. Joe Dewbre and Dr. Dalila Cervantes-Godoy, Development Division, Trade and Agriculture Directorate, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, 18 Aug Dr. Swapan K. Datta, deputy director general (crop science), Indian Council for Agricultural Research, 19-20 Aug Delegation from the Asia Society Philippines 21 Class of 2009, 28 Aug Mr. Richard Moore, deputy director general, Australian Agency for International Development, 10 Sep Mr. Jochem Lange, country director, and Dr. Walter Salzer, GTZ Philippines, 15 Sep Dr. Rick Parod, president and chief executive officer, and Dr. Blake Onken, director, Application Engineering and Education, Lindsay Corporation, 17-18 Sep Prof. Rowan Sage, C4 Rice Consortium Steering Committee member and managerial advisor to the BMGF C4 Rice Project, 6-8 Oct Mr. Daniel Tan, director for Exhibitions, Singapore Science Centre, 14-15 Oct Dr. Simon Best, member of the Board of Trustees, International Potato Center, 26-27 Oct Mr. Lionel Stanbrook, head of Issue Management and Crisis Communications, Syngenta International AG, 12 Nov Dr. Zhongjin Lu, director for product development and plant breeding, Arcadia Biosciences, Inc., 14-17 Nov Ms. Bridget Knaus, information manager, ACIAR, and party, 23 Nov Mr. Thierry Bogaert, chief executive officer, Devgen NV, 20 Nov Dr. Phuay-Yee Goh, head, Devgen Singapore Laboratory, and Dr. David Hamelin, head, logistics manager, Devgen NV, 11 Dec Media Mr. Wolfgang Hirn, German business journalist, Manager Magazine, 9 Jan Mr. Sébastien Farcis, correspondent, Radio France Internationale, and Mr. Alastair MacIndoe, correspondent, Straits Times of Singapore, 28 Jan Mr. Tonishi Toshihiro, Manila Bureau chief of Nikkei, Japanese newspaper, 9 Feb Mr. Carsten Stormer, German journalist, Zeitenspiegel - Agentur für Reportagen, 9 Feb Ms. Shiow Chin Tan, science journalist, Science and Development Network, 12 Feb Mr. Jaime Pozuelo-Monfort, 23-24 Feb Mr. Marcel Glen Longdong, senior reporter, CampusAsia Magazine, 26 Feb Mr. Hermanto Lim, assistant editor, CampusAsia Magazine, 9 Mar Mr. Jun-deok Lee, reporter, DongaScience, 9 Mar Ms. Luzi Ann Javier, journalist, Bloomberg News in Singapore, 19 Mar Reporters from Arte TV Channel, 1 Apr Journalists from Matchframe Video, 27 Apr Ms. Christiane Oelrich, Bureau Chief correspondent – Asia Pacific, Deutsche Presse-Agentur, 1 May

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

17 of 25

ReseaRch suppoRt seRvices

EVO Table 2. International and regional conferences, workshops, symposia, and meetings hosted or cosponsored by IRRI in 2009. Date 14 Jan 15 Jan 4-7 Feb 19-20 Feb 16-20 Mar 23-24 Mar 6-8 Apr 13-17 Apr 23 Apr 27-30 Apr 19 May 17-18 Aug 24-27 Aug 6-12 Sept 28 Sept- 2 Oct 29-30 Sep 26-28 Oct 3-4 Nov 16-19 Nov 23 Nov 25 Nov 23 Nov- 4 Dec 24-26 Nov 8-10 Dec 16-17 Dec Title IRRI -PhilRice Joint Meeting Seminar on Modern Biotechnology for the Distinguished Ulamas 4th World Congress on Conservation Agriculture 3rd Annual Review and Planning Meeting of the ADB-supported Project: Development and Dissemination of Water-Saving Rice Technologies in South Asia Golden Rice Meetings CSISA Objective 2: Workshop on Strategic Experimental Platforms for Future Cereal System C4 Rice Project Launching and Planning Meeting IRRI BOT Program Committee Meeting and Annual Program Meeting 2nd Annual Review and Planning Meeting of the GCP and BMZ projects in Bangladesh Toxicology and Insecticide Resistance Monitoring Workshop Conference Workshop on Climate Change Adaptation through Agroforestry Syngenta-IRRI Meeting IFAD-CURE Workshop CGIAR: Women’s Leadership and Management Development Course IRRI Board of Trustees Meeting PCARRD-FFTC International Workshop Impacts of Rodent Outbreaks on Food Security in Asia Improving Rice Productivity in South and Southeast Sulawesi 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium Strengthening Linkages on the Ground for GSR-STRASA Activities in Africa and Asia Launch of the 50th Anniversary Fund- Raising Campaign Social Science Concepts and Tools for Technology Evaluation and Impact Assessment IRRI-ACIAR Project Review International Workshop on Improving Guidelines for the Testing and Release of New Varieties C4 Rice Planning Meeting Venue IRRI IRRI India IRRI IRRI IRRI IRRI IRRI Bangladesh IRRI IRRI IRRI IRRI IRRI Japan IRRI IRRI IRRI Philippines IRRI Singapore IRRI IRRI IRRI IRRI 25 10 50 42 1,471 23 9 9 13 133 28 55 26 15 47 45 15 702 40 6 2 2 6 8 11 6 10 1 36 6 30 45 40 37 15 5 5 3 8 11 Participants (no.) 28 30 Countries represented (no.) 1 1

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

18 of 25

ReseaRch suppoRt seRvices
Mr. Carsten Stormer, German journalist, Zeitenspiegel - Agentur für Reportagen, 7 May Mr. Thilo Thielke, correspondent, Der Spiegel, 12 May BachFilm correspondents, 29 May–1 Jun Ms. Catherine Jones, freelance food writer, and party, 5 Jun Ms. Kate Tighe, journalist, expat Newspaper, 30 Jun Reporters from Choon Chun MBC Broadcasting Station, 17 Aug Members of the Thai Government’s media, 23 Sep Mr. Oliver Höflinger, journalist, Germany Trade and Investment Office of Taiwan and the Philippines, 8 Dec Mr. Alastair McIndoe, Straits Times, Singapore, Mr. Karl Wilson, The National and The Daily Telegraph and Mr. Sebastian Fercis, French international media, 11 Dec Mr. Beat Gerber, special consultant to the president for public relations, ETH Zurich, 22 Dec 2. The Grain that Sustains a Nation: Rice in China Permanent exhibition at IRRI Riceworld Museum and Learning Center Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines Opened 21 Apr 2009 Rice Genetics Symposium 6 Exhibit Manila Hotel, Manila, Philippines 6-19 Nov 2009 IRRI 50th Anniversary Main Exhibit Harrar Hall, IRRI Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines 15 Nov 2009-15 Nov 2010 IRRI Fund Launch Exhibit Asian Civilizations Museum Singapore 25 Nov 2009 IRRI participated in eight other exhibitions organized by other institutions. The information presented focused on the history and achievements of IRRI in the past 50 years, the partnership between IRRI and the Philippines, and general information on rice. Exhibits presented at: 1. College of Agriculture Centennial Foundation Day Mga Iskolar Para sa Bayan: One Hundred Years of Distinctive Excellence in the Service of the People UPLB, Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines 2-9 Mar2009 2. Bañamos Los Baños Municipal Hall Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines 16-20 Sep 2009 3. United Nations Day Brent International School St. Rosa, Laguna, Philippines 29 Oct 2009 4. Post Harvest 2009 Bangkok, Thailand 15-17 Jul 2009 5. Cereal Systems Initiative for South Asia New Delhi, India 19 Jul 2009 6. SyenSaya 2 Organized by the Los Baños Science Community Foundation, Inc. in celebration of the Philippines’ National Science and Technology Week. Baker Hall, UPLB Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines 21-24 Jul 2009

3.

4.

5.

riceworld Museum and exhibits office
In 2009, IRRI, through the Riceworld Museum and Exhibits Office (RMEO), organized and participated in 13 exhibitions. IRRI organized five exhibits: one permanent museum exhibit, three 50th anniversary-themed exhibits, and one art exhibit. Exhibits organized 1. Rice-Life Photo exhibit by Mr. Agus Kama Loedin IRRI Riceworld Museum and Learning Center Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines 13-14 Apr 2009

The Rice in China permanent exhibit at Riceworld Museum, funded by a donation from Mr. George and Ms. Sarah Liang and built in honor of Mr. Liang’s mother, Ms. Sophia Sun, was formally opened on 21 April 2010. The exhibit includes 35 authentic Chinese traditional rice farming implements and tools. The year-long IRRI 50th anniversary activities were formally launched by the opening of the IRRI 50th anniversary main exhibit by Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn of Thailand on 15 Nov 2009. The IRRI Fund launch in Singapore also used duplicate information materials from the IRRI 50th anniversary main exhibit located at Harrar Hall. The lone art exhibit held during the BOT meeting in April 2009 featured Mr. Agus Kama Loedin, an Indonesian artist, who used cut-up rice photographs in producing geometric art works.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

19 of 25

ReseaRch suppoRt seRvices
7. Experience Rice Organized by the Philippine Rice Research Institute in celebration of the Philippines’ National Rice Month Mall of Asia, Pasay City, Philippines 23-26 Nov 2009 Asia Pacific Jamboree Baker Hall, UPLB Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines 28 Dec 2009-3 Jan 2010 seedlots weighing 185.09 kg), Southeast Asia received 178 rice seed shipments (10,052 seedlots weighing 949.05 kg), Sub-Sahara Africa received 23 rice seed shipments (1,686 seedlots weighing 40.48 kg), West Africa received 12 rice seed shipments (1,194 seedlots weighing 10.79 kg), and West Asia and North Africa received 21 rice seed shipments (2,627 seedlots weighing 14.89 kg). Of the 572 phytosanitary certificates issued, 441 shipments (covering 52,260 seedlots and weighing 1,420.96 kg) were exported as rice seeds (SHU Table 2). On the other hand, there were only two shipments of transgenic seeds (covering 119 seedlots and weighing 0.67 kg). The exported rice seeds originated from different organizational units: CESD, 27shipments (418 seedlots weighing 18.11 kg); T.T. Chang Genetic Resources Center, 202 shipments (13,787 seedlots weighing 206.011 kg); GQNPC, 59 shipments (2,869 seedlots weighing 10.04 kg), Intellectual Property Management Unit (IPMU), 1 shipment (66 seedlots weighing 0.49 kg), and PBGB, 283 shipments (47,131 seedlots weighing 1,331.87 kg) (SHU Table 3). The different pathogens detected with corresponding detection level and affected seedlots are shown in SHU Table 4. Routine seed health tests conducted on 7,096 nontreated, outgoing seedlots showed that Curvularia spp. affected 96.93% of the seedlots, followed by Phoma spp. (90.73%), Trichoconis padwickii (85.23%), Nigrospora spp. (61.32%), Sarocladium oryzae (47.70%), Bipolaris oryzae (36.16%), Fusarium moniliforme (31.50%), Microdochium oryzae (9.77%) Tilletia barclayana (4.35%), Aphelenchoides besseyi (1.69%), and Pyricularia oryzae (1.68%). All exported rice seeds were cleaned for objects of quarantine importance, tested for health, and treated with prescribed ASEAN standard seed treatment for rice–hot water 52-57 °C/15 min. This was followed by fungicide slurry treatment with benomyl and mancozeb both at 0.1% by seed weight. All procedures were done on all seeds, except on those coming from countries that do not allow seed treatment. Fumigation with phosphine was also administered to all outgoing seeds. Sixty-eight phytosanitary certificates covering 46,419 seedlots (1,115.900 kg) were also issued to the International Network for Genetic Evaluation of Rice (INGER) for their nursery rice seed distribution to 34 countries worldwide (SHU Table 5). By region, East Asia received 20 shipments (6,075 seedlots weighing 141.40 kg), Europe and Central Asia received 1 shipment (213 seedlots weighing 5.70 kg), Latin America received 6 shipments (1,445 seedlots weighing 39.30 kg), and Oceania received 2 shipments (6,035 seedlots weighing 81.50 kg), South Asia received 14 shipments (18,308 seedlots weighing 529.00 kg), Southeast Asia received 13 shipments (11,060 seedlots weighing 237.00 kg), Sub-Sahara Africa received 7 shipments (1,561 seedlots weighing 30.70 kg), and West Asia and North Africa received 5 shipments (1,722 seedlots weighing 51.30 kg).

8.

Riceworld Museum improvements included the development and setup of the Irrigated Rice Research Consortium exhibit, refurbishment of the Training Center exhibit, deployment of multipurpose interactive kiosks, repair and improvement of cultural displays, and the use of motion sensors to reduce electrical consumption.

seeD HeAltH Unit
Phytosanitary certification
The Seed Health Unit (SHU) issued 572 phytosanitary certificates covering 64,271 seedlots (1,566.52 kg) and sent to 62 countries worldwide from January to December 2009 (SHU Table 1). By region, East Asia received 97 rice seed shipments (18,874 seedlots weighing 231.35 kg), Europe and Central Asia received 65 rice seed shipments (1,107 seedlots weighing 20.06 kg), Latin America received 18 rice seed shipments (1,106 seedlots weighing 8.84 kg), North America received 35 rice seed shipments (16,584 seedlots weighing 98.36 kg), Oceania received 15 rice seed shipments (486 seedlots weighing 7.61kg), South Asia received 108 rice seed shipments (10,555

Post-entry clearance
One hundred and three incoming shipments (covering 8,910 seedlots and weighing 881.024 kg) from 32 countries worldwide were also processed for postentry clearance (SHU Table 6). The highest number of rice seed shipment originated from Southeast Asia with 29 (covering 1,629 seedlots and weighing 173.007 kg), whereas the highest number of seed-

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

20 of 25

ReseaRch suppoRt seRvices
lots and total weight originated from East Asia with 3,534 seedlots weighing 231.507 kg. Of the 103 incoming shipments, 95 shipments were rice seeds (8,634 seedlots weighing 875.353 kg), 3 shipments were milled rice (200 seedlots weighing 5.498 kg), 2 shipments were rice flour (63 sedlots weighing 0.134 kg), 1 shipment was transgenic seeds (10 seedlots weighing 0.38 kg), and 1 shipment was wild rice (1 seedlot weighing 0.001 kg) (SHU Table 7). The consignees of these incoming shipments are shown in SHU Table 8. PBGB received the highest number of incoming shipments with 66 shipments (5,269 seedlots weighing 457.64 kg), followed by CESD with 23 shipments (2,126 weighing 95.763 kg), GQNPC with 7 shipments (389 seedlots weighing 12.33 kg), Genetic Resources Center (GRC) with 6 shipments (1,123 seedlots weighing 315.037 kg), and SHU with 1 shipment (3 seedlots weighing 0.254 kg). The results of post-entry examination conducted on 3,524 incoming seedlots showed that none of the visually inspected seedlots were contaminated with weed seeds or damaged by insect pests. In terms of general quality, 3,453 (97.986%) were under Category 3 (SHU Table9). The seed health tests on 1,175 incoming nontreated rice seedlots showed that Curvularia spp. affected 92.02% seedlots, followed by T. padwickii (82.30%), B. oryzae (67.83%), Phoma spp. (63.66%), Nigrospora spp. (33.11%), and S. oryzae (17.87%), Fusarium moniliforme (15.06%), T. barclayana (10.04%), M. oryzae (8.68%), A. besseyi (2.04%), and P. oryzae (0.94%) (SHU Table 10). The prescribed ASEAN standard treatments were applied to all incoming seeds. fore storage. The different fungi detected, along with the corresponding detection level and number of affected seedlots, are shown in SHU Table 11. Routine seed health testing of 1,268 untreated seedlots revealed that Curvularia spp. affected 99.84% of the seedlots, followed by Phoma spp. (89.43%), T. padwickii (72.32%), Nigrospora spp. (38.09%), B. oryzae (20.19%), A. besseyi (14.35%), S. oryzae (11.99%), F. moniliforme (5.68%), P. oryzae (0.87%), M. oryzae (0.24%), and T. barclayana (0.16%). streak (14.06% and 23.62%, respectively). On the other hand, among materials planted in the multiplication plots during the dry season, the most prevalent disease at the seedling stage was Sclerotium seedling blight with 1.42%. The most prevalent disease noted during tillering was tungro (2.50%), while that during the maturity stage was false smut (3.65%). During the wet season, the most prevalent seedling disease was bacterial stripe (0.06%). The most prevalent disease observed during the tillering and maturity stages was bacterial leaf streak with 50.01% and 45.13%, respectively.

Material transfer agreements
Of the 506 rice seed/grain shipments exported to different countries worldwide, 537 shipments covering 55,589 seedlots (1,209.268 kg) were distributed using the standard material transfer agreement (SMTA) (SHU Table 12). On the other hand, out of 103 incoming rice seed shipments, 57 covering 5,695 seedlots (371.262 kg) from various countries were accompanied by SMTA (SHU Table 13). Crop health inspections were conducted at the post-entry quarantine areas and TTCGRC, PBGB, CESD, and GQNPC seed multiplication plots during the 2009 dry and wet seasons at three different crop stages. SHU Table 14 shows the different diseases observed at different crop stages with corresponding percent prevalence. For incoming materials planted during the dry season, the most prevalent disease observed at the seedling stage was Sclerotium seedling blight (0.13%), while the most prevalent disease observed at tillering and maturity stages was tungro, with 14.83% and 10.74%, respectively. During the wet season, the most prevalent disease observed during the seedling stage was bacterial stripe (0.06%), while the most prevalent disease observed at tillering and maturity stages was bacterial leaf

nonseed biological materials (nsbM) and soil samples
Outgoing (exported) Through the SHU, a total of 68 shipments covering 5,039 various samples were processed for phytosanitary certification and sent to 21 countries worldwide (SHU Table 15). Of the 68 shipments exported, 13 (covering 1,752 samples) comprised DNA extracted from rice. By region, East Asia received 17 shipments covering 1,991 samples; Europe and Central Asia received 20 shipments covering 707 samples; North America received 9 shipments covering 533 samples; Oceania received 2 shipments covering 14 samples; South Asia received 2 shipments covering 1,050 samples; Southeast Asia received 13 shipments covering 235 samples; West Africa received 2 shipments covering 22 samples, and West Asia and North Africa received 3 shipments covering 487 samples. SHU Table 16 shows the sending organizational units and the nature of NSBM/soil samples sent with the corresponding number of samples. CESD sent 13

Advance testing for Grc seeds
The health status of 3,844 seedlots was assessed be-

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

21 of 25

ReseaRch suppoRt seRvices
shipments covering 448 samples, majority of which were DNA and RNA from soil; GQNPC sent 6 shipments covering 384 samples, majority of which were DNA extracted from rice; TTCGRC sent 5 shipments covering 156 samples, majority of which were DNA extracted from rice; and PBGB sent 44 shipments covering 4,051 samples, most of which were primers. Incoming (imported) Twenty-eight shipments covering 6,538 samples coming from 11 countries were also processed for post-entry clearance (SHU Table 17). The highest number of shipments originated from Europe and Central Asia with 11 shipments, whereas the highest number of samples originated from East Asia with 5,307 samples, majority of which were rice leaves. SHU Table 18 shows the receiving organizational unit, the nature of incoming materials with corresponding total number of shipments, and the total number of samples. The recipients of the incoming materials were CESD with 18 shipments covering 5,407 samples, which consisted mainly of rice leaves; GQNPC with 2 shipments covering 795 samples of rice leaves, and PBGB with 8 shipments covering 336 samples, majority of which are DNA extracted from rice. tion, with 28 participants from 10 countries; Variety Selection Techniques (for African countries) with 13 African researchers, 2 Koreans, 1 JICA staff; and orientation activities for five interns, six affiliate MS thesis scholars, eight PhD research scholars, two affiliate scholars, one affiliate BS thesis research scholar, one affiliate PhD thesis research scholar, and five on-the-job trainees from PBGB, CESD, IPMO, and SSD. SHU also conducted the following activities: lecture on aspects of seed health testing (detection and identification of seedborne pathogens, methods of pathogen detection, principles of these methods and seed treatment) to 33 UPLB students (Agronomy 170–Fundamentals of Seed Technology); lecture on seed detection, control of seedborne diseases, and procedures on seed certification to Central Luzon State University students (Crop Protection); and training on seed health operations of three plant quarantine officers. Other visitors included Ed Paski, RMQA consultant, Ms. Menchu Bernardo, RMQA senior manager, Yoke Sau Cheng Metz, consultant in E-learning and distance education; Dr. Etienne Duvellier, head, Wheat Pathology, CIMMYT; Mr. Sastry, lead scientific officer, ICRISAT; Mr. Daniel Tan, director for exhibitions of the Singapore Science Centre; Ola Karpik, legal intern, IPMU; and Daniela Horna, IFPRI. develop IRRI germplasm and collect data on quality traits.

Developing the business plan
In 2009, a business plan for the QES of the GQNPC was developed as one of IRRI’s test cases for its full-cost recovery (FCR) program. To be initially implemented in 2010, FCR is being explored by IRRI management for a number of reasons. Previously, unrestricted funding was allocated to the GQNPC by the DDG-R. This funded the direct operation of the QES as well as the research and development that continually improve the QES. The overall proportion of unrestricted funding relative to restricted funding at IRRI has been steadily decreasing, along with the realization that restricted grants often do not recover sufficient infrastructure cost. Furthermore, restricted grants involving germplasm improvement have not included the cost of quality evaluation in their budgets. These different financial elements led to the QES being selected to test FCR. The financial aim of the FCR system is that, each year, sufficient samples are submitted to allow the unit to run, maintain, and improve the QES, while returning neither a surplus nor a deficit. Financial projections are based on a number of assumptions supported by records kept over the past 5 years of operation of the GQNPC. The number of samples submitted for quality evaluation has increased steadily each year over the last 4–5 years (GQNPC Fig. 1). Figure 1 shows the relative contribution of each client per year. The reason for the increase in sample number was the increasing number of samples from breeding programs as well as a growing number from other programs.

Workshops, training courses, visitors
SHU also participated in various trainings/workshops/orientation programs coordinated by the Training Center: Rice Research to Production Training Course, with 28 participants (55% are MS and PhD students and 45% are researchers/scientists) from USA, Japan, Australia, Africa, Malaysia, India, the Philippines, and Indonesia; Rice Breeding Course: laying the Foundation for the Second Green Revolu-

GrAin QUAlity, nUtrition, AnD PostHArvest center
Quality evaluation services
The Quality Evaluation Services (QES) is a discrete component of the GQNPC that assists those who

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

22 of 25

ReseaRch suppoRt seRvices
40000 35000 30000 25000 20000 15000 10000 5000 0 2006 2007 2008 2009
24,000 26,000 Total Sam ples 33,000 35,000

U s e rs o f P a in ts h a ke r o n ly P O S TH AR VE S T C ESD VIS ITO R S C H AL K P R O J FL O O D P R O N E L ATE G E N S AL IN ITY H YB R ID IZATIO N B L O C K G E N E B AN K IN G E R H YB R ID R IC E G U VA FL O O D P R O N E P N R YT R AIN FE D /AE R O B IC IR R IG ATE D P N

40000 35000 30000 25000 20000 15000 10000 5000 0
H Sa B lin ity FP H yb RY rid T ric e G U VA c VI ha SI lk TO R C S ES D PN G R C FP PN IN G R E F LL R IR , A R er IG . RY T PH

RRRV A HRY

Ma rke rs R VA HRY GC C e rvite c MP S AC GT

AC

GT

MPS

GC

Cerv itec

GQNPC Fig. 1. Number of samples analyzed per year by the QES and the distribution of clients.

GQNPC Fig. 2. Assays conducted in the different programs in 2009.

GQNPC Fig. 3. The proportion of samples analyzed by the different assays in 2009. AC = amylose content; GT = gelatinization temperature; GC = gel consistency; MPS = milling potential score; HRY = head rice yield; RVA = rapid Visco analysis.

Quality evaluation statistics
In 2009, 16 programs submitted different amounts of samples totaling 35,000 to the QES (GQNPC Fig. 1). The irrigated pedigree nursery accounted for just over half of the samples submitted. The second largest segment was the Genebank, followed by the flood-prone program. INGER was the fourth largest user, while samples that were brought by visitors accounted for just 2%. GQNPC Figure 2 shows the number and type of each assay requested by the 16 programs in 2009. Half of the requests from the Irrigated PN were for MPS, which is a visual assessment to determine whether a breeding line should be progressed. This assay is presently carried out in an inefficient way; significant gains will be made once barcoding is implemented in 2010. The GRC requested equal proportions of each test of cooking quality, as did INGER, visitors, and the projects on salinity and chalk. Molecular markers to genotype AC, GT, and GC are available and are being offered in the QES. However, only the FP PN program requested for AC and GT markers for 115 samples.

GQNPC Figure 3 shows the distribution of the main types of assays performed in 2009. The major analyses (MPS, physical traits using Cervitec, AC, GT, and GC) were performed on both early- and late-generation material. On the other hand, HRY and RVA were only carried out for late-generation material, for which sufficient samples were available from the breeding lines after selection through at least six generations. Analysis of physical traits of quality using the Cervitec accounted for 20% of the assays in 2009. The accuracy and speed of the Cervitec mean that large-sample sets can be analyzed for physical traits. The size of that segment indicates that clients appreciate rapid and accurate data. Assays indicating traits of sensory quality (AC, GT, and GC) accounted for 65% in 2009. This indicates that research should focus on finding the structural and genetic basis of sensory quality.

IR

R IG

head rice yield. A population of introgression lines made by crossing Lemont (low chalk) and Te-qing (high chalk) was exposed to different temperatures during the flowering stage. Genotyping and phenotyping data indicate that chalk is controlled genetically. Aroma Fragrance is one of the desired traits by most rice consumers. The genetics behind the fragrant compound 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline (2-AP) has been extensively studied. A novel mutation in the BADH2 gene has been identified in near-isogenic lines of Lao fragrant variety Kai Noi Leuang. Despite having the same main aromatic compound, basmati- and jasmine-type rices are distinguishable among consumers. To determine other compounds that contribute to fragrance, samples of aromatic rice varieties obtained from the International Network for Quality Rice (INQR) were subjected to metabolite profiling using high-technological platforms at the Wageningen University.

research
Chalk High environmental temperature elevates the amount of chalkiness in rice, leading to reduced

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

23 of 25

ReseaRch suppoRt seRvices
Gelatinization temperature GT is one of the most measured traits in the QES (GQNPC Fig. 3). It is routinely assessed by alkalispreading value (ASV) and less commonly by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). This trait has been associated with the chain-length distributions of amylopectin, which in turn, is associated with single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the alk (SSIIa) gene that affect the activity of starch synthase IIa. Using a highly diverse set of samples and measuring GT by DSC, it was determined that GT values by DSC correlate poorly with ASV, are not correlated with AC, and correlate with cooking time. GT classes by ASV are high, intermediate, and low. However, the distribution of GT in this diverse set of samples showed only high and low classes; there was no intermediate class. On the other hand, improved varieties classified by ASV as having intermediate GT were determined to belong to either high or low GT class, indicating that enzyme(s) other than SSIIa may be involved in intermediate GT. Amylose content Amylose in rice is often referred to as “apparent amylose” in various literature on rice quality and is considered one of the most important indicators of cooking quality. For over half a century, it is believed that the amylose content of rice explained everything that has to do with the texture of cooked rice. Rice types are classified as high (>25%), intermediate (20-25%), and low (<20%) amylose. The higher the amylose content, the more firm, flaky, springy, and chewy cooked rice is when eaten. Typically, waxy or sticky rice is considered to have 0-2% amylose. However, over time, as more rice varieties were developed with different quality traits as well as with the increasing global exchange of germplasm, it became more evident that amylose is not always consistent in predicting the cooking properties of rice. Some rice varieties with equally high amylose content were found to have varying degrees of firmness or softness when cooked. Likewise, two rice varieties highly priced for their unique sensory properties have the same low amylose content, but their textures are totally different. These are just some of the reasons that have baffled many cereal scientists. This led to numerous studies on the role of amylose in predicting the cooking quality of rice. Despite this dilemma, rice quality evaluation programs all over the world continue to rely on “apparent amylose” to select and develop lines that possess certain sensory traits targeted for specific markets. At GQNPC, the number of rice samples that went through amylose evaluation increased from 8,000 to 21,000 in the last 4 years. We saw the need to address the issues to avoid confusion when germplasm is exchanged between breeding programs. In 2006, members of the newly launched INQR, composed of quality evaluation programs from the different rice-growing regions of the world, embarked on a project to reexamine the conventional “apparent amylose” method, compare and evaluate results, and identify the sources of variability. Using their customary amylose-iodine complex assay, the 27 quality evaluation laboratories each evaluated the amylose content of flour subsamples from each of 17 rice varieties, representing the whole range of amylose classes, including some popular varieties exchanged in the global market. Part 1 of the survey showed that different laboratories reported very different values for each sample. The range of values reported for each cultivar covered at least two classes of amylose, making no clear distinction among the four major types of rice. The major sources of variability were identified and tested in another round (Part 2) of the collaborative amylose project. In 2009, the best way to measure amylose, as determined in Part 2, was evaluated by more (44) quality evaluation programs across the world and statistical analyses were performed at IRRI to assess expected reproducibility across and repeatability within laboratories when all used the same standardized method. Starch structure For varieties with similar amylose contents, this parameter becomes a poor indicator of cooked rice texture. It becomes important, therefore, to find other components of the rice grain that contribute to their texture. Several publications have alluded to hot-water-soluble (HWS) hyper-branched molecules and their effects on rheological properties of starch. The studies demonstrated that the soluble fraction, which was long believed to be solely composed of amylose, also contains hyper-branched molecules. To further characterize these HWS components without the complications of amylose, waxy rice varieties were used. These varieties do not have detectable amounts of amylose due to a mutation in the Waxy gene, rendering the enzyme that synthesizes amylose, granule-bound starch synthase 1 (GBSS1), nonfunctional. Debranched chain-length distributions and degree of branching of traditional waxy rice varieties are distinct from those of phytoglycogen, a water-soluble hyper-branched polysaccharide, but are similar to the chain-length distributions of amylopectin found in the hot-water-insoluble fraction (HWI). However, HWI molecules carry longer

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

24 of 25

ReseaRch suppoRt seRvices
amylopectin chains not found in the HWS fraction. The HWS exhibit higher degrees of branching than the HWI. The HWS is composed of molecules smaller than those in the HWI. These structural differences possibly hamper the solubility of the HWI fraction. On the other hand, the solubility of the HWS molecules is determined to be controlled by thermodynamic effects rather than slow dissolution (kinetic effects). Chain-length distributions of amylopectin affect the GT of rice. By transforming the data using the “log (number) distribution approach,” a technique performed on synthetic polymers, new information about the kinetics and processes of starch synthesis can potentially be elucidated. By applying this technique to samples whose GT and SSIIa haplotypes are known, it was determined that the log (number) distribution plots showed features that associate with genotype and phenotype and has discriminative capacity to detect mutations. Training, students, and visitors In 2009, GQNPC staff trained with collaborators. Ms. Dara Daygon, assistant scientist, conducted genotyping experiments on the near-isogenic lines of Kai Noi Leuang in Cornell University under the supervision of Prof. Susan McCouch. Ms. Mariafe Calingacion, researcher, conducted metabolite profiling of different aromatic rice varieties at the Wageningen University under the supervision of Dr. Robert Hall. Also in 2009, affiliate PhD scholar Rosa Paula Cuevas obtained her PhD at the University of Queensland. The GQNPC welcomed visitors in 2009. Lauren Schefter, a World Food Prize Borlaug-Ruan international intern, conducted experiments on GT and starch structure. Dr. John Manful, an IFAR fellow, studied the diversity of quality traits in Oryza glaberrima. Dr. Lee conducted DNA sequencing experiments on a Korean variety, Goami 2. Summer St. Pierre, intern, genotyped and phenotyped the highamylose samples from the Generation Challenge Program set. Dr. Sae-Kwan Oh, from NICS RDA Korea, studied quality traits for breeding programs.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

25 of 25

D egree anD post Degree training
Scholars, by country and type, who completed their training in 2009.
Country Africa Ghana Zimbabwe Asia Bangladesh China India Indonesia Iran Japan Korea Lao PDR Myanmar Nepal Philippines Sri Lanka Thailand Vietnam Europe Belgium France Spain United Kingdom North America United States Total 5 65 2 1 1 1 2 5 10 2 1 2 8 1 1 1 16 1 1 2 Type III - OJT/nondegree trainees OJT/nondegree trainees and interns 28 Type II - PhD and MS scholars, coursework and thesis research at IRRI PhD MS 1 4 PhD MS 13 12 1 1 Type I - PhD and MS scholars, thesis research at IRRI SUMMARY Type

Japan-CGIAR fellow India-IRRI resident fellow Total

2 5 65

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 6

D egree anD post Degree training

Scholars on board in 2009, by country and type.
Country Africa Tanzania Asia Bangladesh China India Indonesia Iran Japan Korea Lao PDR Myanmar Nepal Netherlands Philippines Thailand Vietnam North America United States Pacific Islands and Australia Australia Total 1 113 Total 113 2 1 4 3 2 4 12 1 40 2 8 PhD MS BS Type III - OJT/nondegree trainees OJT/nondegree trainees and interns Japan-CGIAR fellow 15 3 54 15 7 Type II - PhD, MS, and BS scholars, coursework and thesis research at IRRI 8 14 10 PhD MS 8 11 1 SUMMARY Type I - PhD and MS scholars, thesis research at IRRI Type

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

2 of 6

D egree anD post Degree training
Group training courses conducted in 2009
Course title Duration Participants (no.) Total I. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 International/technical, Training Center Ecological Management of Rodents, Weeds, and Rice Diseases–biological and social dimensions Rice: Research to Production Rice Breeding Course Quality Rice Seed Course Rice Technnology Transfer Systems in Asia Refresher Course on Adaptive Research Rice Post Production Upland Rice Variety SelectionTechniques Subtotal II. 1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Skills development courses, Training Center Advanced Writing Workshop English fo Rice Scientists 1 Scientific Writing Workshop NPR (former IPMO) Training of Trainors on PalayCheck System for Agricultural Extension Workers Technical Briefing on Nutrient Manager for Rice and Provincial Quick Guide Training Workshop on Nutrient Management for Rice Training of Rice Coordinators on the Use of Nutrient Manager Decision Tools for Rice Technical Briefing on Nutrient Manager for Rice and Provincial Quick Guide for DA-UPLB Farmer Cooperators Introduction to Different Innovative Tools on Nutrient Management for Agriculturists DA-FAO Project in Increasing Rice Supply Second Quarterly National GMA Rice Meeting Technology Updates on Nutrient Management in the Philippines Farmers’ Field School on the PalayCheck System Technical Briefing on Nutrient Manager for Rice and Provincial Quick Guide 8-17 Dec 5-May 9-Dec 3-Mar 10-Dec 22-May 5-Oct 13-15 May 2009 12-14 Aug 2009 19-Aug Oct 15 & 28, Nov 5 & 12 21 60 77 53 31 17 60 130 135 42 907 7 14 19-23 Jan 12 May - 4 Jun 4-7 Aug 23 18 20 10 6 8 14 16-27 Mar 18 May - 5 Jun 24 Aug - 11 Sep 31 Aug - 11 Sep 14-25 Sep 11-18 Oct 19-30 Oct 9-13 Nov 17 27 30 18 14 28 24 12 170 13 14 27 16 10 16 19 10 4 13 3 2 4 12 5 2 M W

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

3 of 6

D egree anD post Degree training
Course title Duration Participants (no.) Total 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Basic Experimental Designs and Data Analysis Data EntryTraining Course using MS Access Database Data EntryTraining Course using MS Access Database Experimental Designs and Data Analysis for Plant Breeders Research Data Management Course Basic Experimental Designs and Data Analysis Research Data Management Course Research Data Management Course Introduction to R Course Introduction to R Course Basic Experimental Designs and Data Analysis Research Data Management Course General Data Management Course Research Data Management Course General Data Management Course Intro to R:Data Management and Statistical Analysis Basic Bioinformatics Course Research Data Management Course Subtotal III. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 In-country/technical, CESD Refresher Training Course on “Controlled Irrigation Water-Saving Technology in Rice Production” for NIA-UPRIIS Personnel Training and Workshop for the Adoption of Controlled Irrigation for Rice in Ilocos Water-Saving Technologies in Rice Production Training Course (linked to PalayCheck System and Technology for Problem Areas, Training of Trainors [T o T] Course) Water-Saving Technologies in Rice Production Training Course for LGUs and Farmer Leaders in Region VI Water-Saving Technologies in Rice Production Training Course Water-Saving Technologies in Rice Production Training Course for the Rice Sufficiency Officers from Visayas and Mindanao Areas Water-Saving Technologies in Rice Production for Rice Sufficiency Officers, Luzon Area 14 Jan 24-25 Mar 24-Mar 7-May 16-Jul 2-3 Aug 1-Sep 30 54 40 40 40 40 40 20 20 20 20 25 15 25 40 5 14 16-20 Feb 9-10 Mar 12-13 Mar 7-11 Sep 27-29 Jan 2-6 Feb 24-26 Feb 17-19 Mar 28-29 Apr 26-28 May 22-26 Jun 30 Jun- 2 Jul 11-13 Aug 9-11 Sep 13-15 Oct 26-30 Oct 5-6 Nov 17-19 Nov 30 4 4 27 10 18 15 15 16 11 19 16 18 17 18 14 20 18 1884 10 7 10 11 5 2 7 1 11 16 10 17 6 4 10 4 9 11 6 7 26 3 1 7 M W

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

4 of 6

D egree anD post Degree training
Course title Duration Participants (no.) Total 8 9 10 11 Water-Saving Technologies in Rice Production Training Course for Region IV-A Trainors and Extension Workers Training on Water-Saving Technologies in Rice Production for the Department of Agriculture Extension Leaders in Bangladesh Aerobic Rice Technology Training Course for LGUs in Aurora Province Water-Saving Technologies in Rice Production Training Course for Region IV-B Trainors and Extension Workers In-country/technical, ESA Regional Office 1 2 3 4 5 6 Plant Breeder Workshop ICIS Training Rice Knowledge Bank Training Course Rice Knowledge Bank Training Course Rice Knowledge Bank Training Course Quality Rice Seed Course Rice Knowledge Bank Training Course In-country/technical, STRASA 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Database Management for Household Surveys Database Management for Household Surveys Seed Training Seed Training Training on Quality Rice Seed Production Training on Quality Rice Seed Production Training on Quality Rice Seed Production Training on Quality Rice Seed Production Training on Quality Rice Seed Production Training on Quality Rice Seed Production T o T on Quality Seed Production, Preservation, and Marketing of Rice T o T on Quality Seed Production, Preservation, and Marketing of Rice Farmers’ Training on Rice Seed Production and Storage Techniques Farmers’ Training on Quality Seed Production, Preservation, and Marketing of Rice Farmers’ Training on Quality Seed Production, Preservation, and Marketing of Rice 7-Nov 13-Oct 16-Oct 1-Nov 2-Nov 3-Nov 7-Nov 3-Jun 4-Jun 5-Jul 1-Aug 16-Oct 62 50 35 34 31 95 25 29 26 20 20 55 45 30 32 30 95 25 29 26 20 18 0 0 2 7 5 5 2 1 0 23-25 Mar 14-16 Apr 10 11 9 2 25-27 May 27-28 May 1-5 Jun 8-12 Jun 26-28 Aug 31 Aug-11 Sep 9-11 Sep 24 24 12 18 18 18 17 21 21 9 14 14 16 13 3 3 3 4 4 2 4 23-Sep 18-25 Oct 3-4 Dec 11-Dec 40 200 50 25 M 20 200 24 19 W 20 0 26 11

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

5 of 6

D egree anD post Degree training
Course title Duration Participants (no.) Total 16 17 18 Training on Foundation Seed Production, Storage, and Marketing of Rice Training Workshop on Foundation Seed Production, Preservation, and Marketing of Rice Rice Seed Production Training In-country/technical, CSISA 1 Phenotyping Methods for Host Plant Resistance to Rice Sheath Blight In-country/technical, Other programs 1 2 Training on Flood-Tolerant Rice Cultivation Seed Production Technology for Stress-Tolerant Rice Subtotal IV. 1 2 3 In-country technical training workshops Workshop on the Assessment of Rice Health for Better Management of Rice Diseases and Insects Workshop on the Assessment of Rice Health for Better Management of Rice Diseases and Insects CSISA Experimental Platform Meeting Subtotal 1-4 Jun 4-7 Aug 14-16 Dec 23 28 42 93 8 15 37 15 13 5 27-28 Jul 24-Jun 84 150 1674 90 60 31 Aug-1 Sep 12 12 0 19-Oct 24-Oct 15-Nov 20 30 200 M 20 30 140 W 0 0 60

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

6 of 6

Weather S ummary

nnual rainfall for year 2009 was 2,674 mm for the IRRI dryland (upland) site and 2,697 mm for the wetland (lowland) site (Table 1, Fig. 1). These values were 616 mm higher than the long-term average rainfall for the dryland site and 713 mm higher for the wetland site. In terms of monthly rainfall, Los Baños experienced exceptionally high rainfall (more than twice of the long-term average) in March and April and exceptionally low rainfall (more than half of the average) in December. The wettest day at IRRI was 30 Oct with more than 180 mm rainfall per day due to typhoon Santi. The longest recorded continuous wet spell was 14 d (25 Jul–7 Aug) at the dryland site and 13 d (25 Jul–6 Aug) at the wetland site. The longest continuous dry spell was 10 d (22–31 Dec) at the dryland site and 12 d (24 Jan–4 Feb) at the wetland site. Mean monthly solar radiation peaked in March (more than 19 MJ m-2 d-1) the lowest value was seen in January (10.8 MJ m-2 d-1) (Fig. 2). January and September had exceptionally low records of solar radiation. The annual average duration of bright sunshine was about 5.8 h d-1 (Table 1). The highest monthly mean value was 7.7 h d-1 in March, declining to 3.1 h d-1 in September. The longest record of sunshine at Los Baños was on 10 June with 12.3 h of bright sunshine. Maximum temperature reached its highest monthly mean value (31.9 oC) in May and June at the dryland and wetland site, respectively, whereas the lowest was recorded in January (27.0 oC) at both sites (Fig. 3). The hottest day in 2009 was 15 Apr with a recorded maximum temperature at the dryland site of 35.1 oC; it was 34.5 oC at the wetland site. The seasonal pattern of minimum temperatures was more stable than that of maximum

A

temperatures. The coldest days were 3 Dec (19.4 oC at the dryland site) and 16 Jan (19.5 oC at the wetland site). Midday vapor pressure deficit was consistently lower at the dryland site than at the wetland site (Fig. 4). Mean early morning relative humidity ranged from 85 to 92% at the dryland site and from 83 to 90% at the wetland site (Table 1). Daily mean windspeed (measured at 2-m height) was 1.7 m s-1 at the dryland site and 1.4 m s-1 at the wetland site (Table 1). Windspeed was generally low (<2.0 m s-1), except during typhoons. The highest windspeed was recorded during Typhoon Santi (4.8 m s-1 at the dryland site on 30 Oct), which exceeded that of Typhoon Kiko on 8 Aug (4.2 m s-1 at the dryland site and 4.5 m s-1 at the wetland site). Because of slightly higher air temperature, higher amount of rainfall, and lower vapor pressure deficit at midday, free water evaporation at the dryland site was slightly higher than at the wetland site (Table 1). Openpan evaporation totals were 1,678 mm at the dryland site and 1,604 mm at the wetland site. These values were 145 mm lower than the long-term evaporation total at the dryland site and 61 mm lower at the wetland site. Twenty-two cyclones (including seven typhoons) passed through the Philippines’ area of responsibility (PAR). These included one event with two overlapping cyclones entering the PAR―Typhoon Pepeng (30 Sep–10 Oct) and Quedan (5–6 Oct). Five cyclones directly affected Los Baños: Typhoon Emong (6–9 May), Tropical Storm Feria (22–25 Jun), Tropical Storm Isang (14–18 Jul), Tropical Storm Ondoy (24–27 Sep), and Typhoon Santi (28 Oct–1 Nov). Tropical Storm Ondoy brought massive damage, flooding, and high accumulated rainfall in Los Baños.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 3

Weather S ummary
Table 1. Monthly weather data for IRRI Dryland Site (14º08’N, 121º15’E) and Wetland Site (14º11’N, 121º15 ‘E), 2009; long-term averages for Dryland and Wetland Sites from 1979 to 2008. Site IRRI, dryland site (14º 08’ N, 121º 15’ E) Long-term average (1979-2008) IRRI, wetland site (14º 11’ N, 121º 15’ E) Long-term average (1979-2008) Jan 63 46 113 46 Feb 59 27 52 27 Mar 132 40 124 38 Apr 353 42 341 39 May Jun
-1

Jul 358 315 366 299

Aug 134 252 141 234

Sep 435 245 482 236

Oct 362 286 387 295

Nov 164 242 167 235

Dec 18 177 24 168

Annual total or average Total (mm yr1) 2674 2058 2697 1984 Total (mm yr1) 1678 1823 1604 1665 Av (ºC) 30.8 23.7 31.6 23.4 30.6 24.0 30.7 23.5 Av (%) 88 84 86 83 Av (m s1) 1.7 1.5 1.4 1.5 Daily av (MJ m-2) 15.1 16.7 14.9 16.6 Daily av (h) 5.7 6.1

Rainfall (mm mo ) 239 358 148 239 209 292 137 227 Evaporation (mm mo-1) 153 164 199 158 143 157 180 149 Temperature (°C) 31.9 31.8 24.3 24.0 34.1 32.9 24.4 24.2 31.7 31.9 24.6 24.7 33.0 32.2 24.6 24.6 Relative humidity ( %) 86 87 79 83 85 85 79 82 Windspeed (m s-1) 1.3 1.7 1.5 1.4 1.2 1.4 1.4 1.3

IRRI, dryland site Long-term average (1979-2008) IRRI, wetland site Long-term average (1979-2008)

107 132 104 119

124 148 117 130

165 202 159 175

160 216 152 192

143 144 138 139

139 142 141 133

112 132 101 123

132 125 129 118

134 115 126 107

144 111 137 102

IRRI, dryland site Long-term average IRRI, wetland site Long-term average

Max Min Max Min Max Min Max Min

27.0 22.5 29.4 22.1 27.0 22.7 28.4 22.1

29.5 23.5 30.5 22.0 29.4 23.4 29.1 22.0

31.4 23.4 32.1 22.5 31.2 23.6 30.4 22.6

31.8 24.0 33.9 23.8 31.6 24.4 32.3 23.8

31.8 23.9 31.9 23.8 31.7 24.6 31.3 24.3

31.8 24.8 31.7 23.8 31.7 25.3 31.1 24.2

31.0 24.3 31.7 23.7 30.9 24.7 31.2 24.0

30.9 24.0 31.2 23.7 31.1 24.4 30.7 23.9

30.5 23.8 30.4 23.5 30.1 23.8 29.9 23.6

29.7 22.3 29.1 22.7 29.1 22.3 28.4 22.7

IRRI, dryland site Long-term average (1979-2008) IRRI, wetland site Long-term average (1979-2008)

85 85 83 84

85 83 85 84

88 80 87 81

89 78 88 80

90 85 87 84

88 86 87 85

92 87 90 86

89 86 86 85

88 86 87 85

86 84 84 85

IRRI, dryland site Long-term average (1979-2008) IRRI, wetland site Long-term average (1979-2008)

2.3 1.7 2.0 1.8

1.8 1.7 1.6 1.7

1.6 1.8 1.2 1.7

1.5 1.6 1.1 1.6

1.5 1.4 1.2 1.3

1.9 1.5 1.4 1.3

1.7 1.3 1.1 1.1

1.9 1.3 1.4 1.2

1.5 1.5 1.4 1.5

1.8 1.7 1.8 1.8

Solar radiation (MJ m-2 d-1) IRRI, dryland site Long-term average (1979-2008) IRRI, wetland site Long-term average (1979-2008) 10.8 14.3 10.3 14.0 15.1 17.2 14.8 17.1 19.2 19.9 18.9 20.2 16.5 21.5 16.3 21.8 16.3 19.7 16.0 19.8 16.5 17.6 16.3 17.7 14.7 16.4 14.5 16.5 14.8 15.9 14.6 15.8 12.7 16.0 12.4 15.9 14.6 15.1 14.6 15.0 15.0 13.8 14.7 13.5 15.5 12.5 15.1 12.1

IRRI, wetland site Long-term average (1979-2008)

3.3 5.5

6.1 7.1

7.7 8.1

6.3 9.0

Sunshine (h d-1) 6.2 6.6 7.6 6.1

5.1 5.2

5.2 4.8

3.1 4.8

5.5 5.1

6.8 5.2

7.0 4.4

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

2 of 3

Weather S ummary
Amount (mm mo-1) 600
Rainfall PET

500 400 300 200 100 0

2009 1979-2008

Solar radiation (MJ m–2 d-1) 30 2009 28 90% 26 10% 24 22 20 18 16 14 12 10

J

F

M A M

J J Month

A

S

O N D

J

F

M

A

M

J J Month

A

S

O

N

D

Fig. 1. Monthly rainfall and potential evapotranspiration in 2009 and long-term average. IRRI, 1979-2009.

Fig. 2. Mean monthly solar radiation with 10 and 90% probability of occurrence derived from long-term averages. IRRI, 2009. Vapor pressure deficit (kPa) 4 Dryland Wetland 3

Air temperature (ºC) 40
2009 1979-2008

35 30

Maximum

Minimum

2

25 20 15 1

J

F

M

A

M

J J Month

A

S

O

N

D

0

J

F

M A M

J J Month

A

S

O

N

D

Fig. 3. Monthly maximum and minimum air temperature in 2009 and long-term averages. IRRI, 1979–2009.

Fig. 4. Midday vapor pressure deficit at the dryland and wetland sites. IRRI, 2009.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

3 of 3

Publications and seminars
Journal articles (refereed)
Affholder F, Jourdain D, Quang DD, Tuong TP, Morize M, Ricome A. 2009. Constraints to farmers’ adoption of direct-seeding mulch-based cropping systems: a farm-scale modeling approach applied to the mountainous slopes of Vietnam. Agric. Syst. 103(1): 51-62. Alberto MCR, Wassmann R, Hirano T, Miyata A, Kumar A, Padre A, Amante M. 2009. CO2/heat fluxes in rice fields: comparative assessment of flooded and non-flooded fields in the Philippines. Agric. For. Meteorol. 149(10): 1737-1750. Alpuerto VLEB, Norton GW, Alwang J, Ismail AM. 2009. Economic impact analysis of marker-assisted breeding for tolerance to salinity and phosphorous deficiency in rice. Rev. Agric. Econ. 31(4): 779-792. Ali MY, Waddington SR, Timsina J, Hodson D, Dixon J. 2009. Maize-rice cropping systems in Bangladesh: status and research opportunities. J. Agric. Sci. Technol. 3(6):35-53. Ammar MHM, Pandit A, Singh RK, Sameena S, Chauhan MS, Singh AK, Sharma PC, Gaikwad K, Sharma TR, Mohapatra T, Singh NK. 2009. Mapping of QTLs controlling Na+, K+ and Cl– ion concentrations in salttolerant indica rice variety CSR27. J. Plant Biochem. Biotechnol. 18(2):139-150. Arimune R, Ishida A, Yokoyama S, Satoh N. 2009. An analysis on background factors determining breakfast skipping and faddiness of elementary school children. J. Rural Econ. (special issue): 310-317. (in Japanese) Arthur AD, Krebs C.J, Pech RP, Farroway LN, Singleton GR. 2009. The transmission rate of MCMV in house mice in pens: implications for virally vectored immunocontraception. Wildlife Res. 36: 386-393. Asai H, Samson BK, Haefele SM, Songyikhangsuthor K, Homma K, Kiyono Y, Inoue Y, Shiraiwa T, Horie T. 2009. Biochar amendment techniques for upland rice production in Northern Laos. 1. Soil physical properties, leaf SPAD and grain yield. Field Crops Res. 111(1/2): 81-84. Reprint 2009/2019 Asai H, Saito K, Samson B, Songyikhangsuthor K, Homma K, Shiraiwa T, Kiyono Y, Inoue Y, Horie T. 2009. Yield response of indica and tropical japonica genotypes to soil fertility conditions under rainfed uplands in northern Laos. Field Crops Res. 112(2/3): 141-148. Berenyi M, Mauleon RP, Kopecky D, Wandl S, Friedl R, Fluch S, Boonruangrod R, Muge E, Burg K. 2009. Isolation of plant gene space-related sequence elements by high C+G patch (HCGP) filtration: model study on rice. Plant Mol. Biol. Rep. 27(1): 79-85. Bernier J, Serraj R, Kumar A, Venuprasad R, Impa S, Gowda RPV, Oane R, Spaner D, Atlin G. 2009. The large-effect drought-resistance QTL qtl12.1 increases water uptake in upland rice. Field Crops Res. 110(2): 139-146. Bernier J, Kumar A, Venuprasad R, Spaner D, Verulkar S, Mandal NP, Sinha PK, Peeraju P, Dongre PR, Mahto RN, Atlin G. 2009. Characterization of the effect of a QTL for drought resistance in rice, qtl12.1, over a range of environments in the Philippines and eastern India. Euphytica 166(2): 207-217.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 36

Publications and seminars
Bhandari H, Yasunobu K. 2009. What is social capital? A comprehensive review of the concept. Asian J. Soc. Sci. 37(3): 480-510. Bruce M, Hess A, Bai JF, Mauleon R, Diaz MG, Sugiyama N, Bordeos A, Wang GL, Leung H, Leach JE. 2009. Detection of genomic deletions in rice using oligonucleotide microarrays. BMC Genomics 10(129): 11. Bueno CS, Lafarge T. 2009. Higher crop performance of rice hybrids than of elite inbreds in the tropics: 1. Hybrids accumulate more biomass during each phenological phase. Field Crops Res. 112(2/3): 229-237. Bueno CS, Ladha JK. 2009. Comparison of soil properties between continuously cultivated and adjacent uncultivated soils in rice-based systems. Biol. Fertil. Soils 45(5): 499-509. Cairns JE, Acuna TLB, Simborio FA, Dimayuga G, Praba ML, Leung H, Torres R, Lafitte HR. 2009. Identification of deletion mutants with improved performance under water-limited environments in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Field Crops Res. 114(1): 159-168. Cairns JE, Namuco OS, Torres R, Simborio FA, Courtois B, Aquino GA, Johnson DE. 2009. Investigating early vigour in upland rice (Oryza sativa L.): Part II. Identification of QTLs controlling early vigour under greenhouse and field conditions. Field Crops Res. 113(3): 207-217. Centritto M, Lauteri M, Monteverdi MC, Serraj R. 2009. Leaf gas exchange, carbon isotope discrimination and grain yield in contrasting rice genotypes subjected to water deficits during reproductive stage. J. Exp. Bot. 60: 2325-2339. Champagne ET, Bett-Garber KL, Thomson JL, Fitzgerald MA. 2009. Unraveling the impact of nitrogen nutrition on cooked rice flavor and texture. Cereal Chem. 86(3): 274-280. Chauhan BS, Johnson DE. 2009. Germination, emergence, and dormancy of Mimosa pudica. Weed Biol. Manage. 9(1): 38-45. Chauhan BS, Johnson DE. 2009. Seed germination ecology of junglerice (Echinochloa colona): a major weed of rice. Weed Sci. 57(3): 235-240. Chauhan BS, Johnson DE. 2009. Ecological studies on Cyperus difformis, Cyperus iria and Fimbristylis miliacea: three troublesome annual sedge weeds of rice. Ann. Appl. Biol. 155(1): 103-112. Chauhan BS, Johnson DE. 2009. Germination ecology of spiny (Amaranthus spinosus) and slender amaranth (A. viridis): troublesome weeds of direct-seeded rice. Weed Sci. 57(4): 379-385. Chauhan BS, Johnson DE. 2009. Seed germination ecology of Portulaca oleracea L.: an important weed of rice and upland crops. Ann. Appl. Biol. 155(1): 61-69. Chauhan BS, Johnson DE. 2009. Ludwigia hyssopifolia emergence and growth as affected by light, burial depth and water management. Crop Prot. 28(10): 887-890. Chauhan, BS, Johnson DE. 2009. Seed germination and seedling emergence of synedrella (Synedrella nodiflora) in a tropical environment. Weed Sci. 57(1): 36-42. Chin J-H, Lu X, Haefele SM, Gamuyao R, Ismail AM, Wissuwa M, Heuer S. 2009. Development and application of gene-based markers for the major rice QTL phosphorus uptake 1. Theor. Appl. Genet. DOI 10.1007/s00122-009-1235-7 Chung HK, Kim KW, Chung JW, Lee JR, Lee SY, Dixit A, Kang HK, Zhao WG, McNally KL, Hamilton RS, Gwag JG, Park YJ. 2009. Development of a core set from a large rice collection using a modified heuristic algorithm to retain maximum diversity. J. Integr. Plant Biol. 51(12): 1116-1125. Collard BCY, Mackill DJ. 2009. Conserved DNA-derived polymorphism (CDDP): a simple and novel method for generating DNA markers in plants. Plant Mol. Biol. Rep. 27(4): 558-562. Collard BCY, Mackill DJ. 2009. Start codon targeted (SCoT) polymorphism: a simple, novel DNA marker technique for generating gene-targeted markers in plants. Plant Mol. Biol. Rep. 27(1): 86-93. Cottyn B, Debode J, Regalado E, Mew TW, Swings J. 2009. Phenotypic and genetic diversity of rice seedassociated bacteria and their role in pathogenicity and biological control. J. Appl. Microbiol. 107(3): 885-897. Das DK, Maiti D, Pathak H. 2009.Site-specific nutrient management in rice in Eastern India using a modeling approach. Nutr. Cycl. Agroecosyst. 83(1): 85-94. Das KK, Panda D, Sarkar RK, Reddy JN, Ismail A.M. 2009. Submergence tolerance in relation to variable floodwater conditions in rice. Environ. Exp.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

2 of 36

Publications and seminars
Bot. 2009 (e-first): 10 p. 2009. DOI: 10.1016/ j.envexpbot.2009.02.015 Das KK, Panda D, Sarkar RK, Reddy JN, Ismail AM. 2009. Submergence tolerance in relation to variable floodwater conditions in rice. Environ. Exp. Bot. 66(3): 425-434. Dawe D, Moya P, Valencia S. 2009. Institutional, policy and farmer responses to drought: El Nino events and rice in the Philippines. Disasters 33(2): 291-307. Encabo JR, Cabauatan, PQ, Cabunagan RC, Satoh K, Lee JH, Kwak DY, De Leon TB, Macalalad RJA, Kondo H, Kikuchi S, Choi IR. 2009. Suppression of two tungro viruses in rice by separable traits originating from cultivar Utri Merah. Mol. Plant Microbe Interactions 22(10): 1268-1281. Farooq M, Kobayashi N, Wahid A, Ito O, Basra SMA. 2009. Strategies for producing more rice with less water. Adv. Agron. 101: 351-388. Fitzgerald MA, Bergman CJ, Resurreccion AP, Moller J, Jimenez R, Reinke RF, Martin M, Blanco P, Molina F, Chen MH, Kuri V, Romero MV, Habibi F, Umemoto T, Jongdee S, Graterol E, Reddy KR, Bassinello PZ, Sivakami R, Rani NS, Das S, Wang YJ, Indrasari S D, Ramli A, Ahmad R, Dipti SS, Xie LH, Nguyen Thi Lang, Singh P, Castillo Toro D, Tavasoli F, Mestres C. 2009. Addressing the dilemmas of measuring amylose in rice. Cereal Chem. 86(5): 492-498. Fitzgerald MA, McCouch SR, Hall RD. 2009. Not just a grain of rice: the quest for quality. Trends Plant Sci. 14(3): 133-139. Fitzgerald MA, Resurreccion AP. 2009. Maintaining the yield of edible rice in a warming world. Funct. Plant Biol. 36(12): 1037-1045. Ford-Lloyd BV, Brar D, Khush GS, Jackson MT, Virk PS. 2009. Genetic erosion over time of rice landrace agrobiodiversity. Plant Genet. Res. Charact. Util. 7(2): 163-168. Frei M, Wang Y, Ismail AM, Wissuwa M. 2009. Biochemical factors conferring shoot tolerance to oxidative stress in rice grown in low zinc soil. Funct. Plant Biol. 37: 74-84. Fujita D, Santos RE, Ebron LA, Telebanco-Yanoria MJ, Kato H, Kobayashi S, Uga Y, Araki E, Takai T, Tsunematsu H, Imbe T, Khush GS, Brar DS, Fukuta Y, Kobayashi N. 2009. Development of introgression lines of an Indica-type rice variety, IR64, for unique agronomic traits and detection of the responsible chromosomal regions. Field Crops Res. 114(2): 244254. Furbank RT, Caemmerer S von, Sheehy J, Edwards G. 2009. C4 rice: a challenge for plant phenomics. Funct. Plant Biol. 36(10/11): 845-856. Gadde B, Menke C, Wassmann R. 2009. Rice straw as a renewable energy source in India, Thailand, and the Philippines: overall potential and limitations for energy contribution and greenhouse gas mitigation. Biomass Bioenergy 33(11): 1532-1546. Gadoury DM, Andrews J, Baumgartner K, Burr TJ, Kennelly MM, Lichens-Park A, MacDonald J, Savary S, Scherm H, Tally A, Wang G-L. 2009. Disciplinary, institutional, funding, and demographic trends in plant pathology: what does the future hold for the profession? Plant Dis. 93(12): 1228-1237. Haefele SM, Siopongco JDLC, Boling AA, Bouman BAM, Tuong TP. 2009. Transpiration efficiency of rice (Oryza sativa L.). Field Crops Res. 111(1/2): 1-10. Reprint 2009/2018 Haefele SM, Konboon Y. 2009. Nutrient management for rainfed lowland rice in northeast Thailand. Field Crops Res. 114(3): 374-385. He H, Serraj R, Yang Q. 2009. Changes in OsXTH gene expression, ABA content, and peduncle elongation in rice subjected to drought at the reproductive stage. Acta Physiol. Plant. 31(4): 749-756. He YX, Zheng TQ, Hao XB, Wang LF, Gao YM, Hua ZT, Zhai HQ, Xu JL, Xu ZJ, Zhu LH, Li ZK. 2009. Yield performances of japonica introgression lines selected for drought tolerance in a BC breeding programme. Plant Breed. (DOI) 10.1111/j.14390523.2099.01683. Hervé P, Serraj R. 2009. Gene technology and drought: a simple solution for a complex trait? Afr. J. Biotechnol. 8 (9): 1740-1749. Heuer S, Lu XC, Chin JH, Tanaka JP, Kanamori H, Matsumoto T, De Leon T, Ulat VJ, Ismail AM, Yano M, Wissuwa M. 2009. Comparative sequence analyses of the major quantitative trait locus phosphorus uptake 1 (Pup1) reveal a complex genetic structure. Plant Biotechnol. J. 7(5): 456-471. Hoehndorf R, Bacher J, Backhaus M, Gregorio SE Jr., Loebe F, Prüfer K, Uciteli A, Visagie J, Herre H, Kelso J. 2009. BOWiki: an ontology-based wiki for

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

3 of 36

Publications and seminars
annotation of data and integration of knowledge in biology. BMC Bioinformatics 10 (suppl 5): S5. Horgan FG. 2009. Invasion and retreat: shifting assemblages of dung beetles amidst changing agricultural landscapes of central Peru. Biodiversity Conserv. 18: 3519-3541. Horgan FG, Quiring DT, Lagnaoui A, Pelletier Y. 2009. Trade-off between foliage and tuber resistance to Phthorimaea operculella in two wild potatoes. Entomol. Exp. Appl. 131: 130-137. Huguenin-Elie O, Kirk GJD, Frossard E. 2009. The effects of water regime on phosphorus responses of rainfed lowland rice cultivars. Ann. Bot. 103(2): 211-220. Reprint 2009/1932 Ismail AM, Ella ES, Vergara GV, Mackill DJ. 2009. Mechanisms associated with tolerance to flooding during germination and early seedling growth in rice (Oryza sativa). Ann. Bot. 103(2): 197-209. Reprint 2009/1930 Jabbar SMA, Sta. Cruz PC, Siopongco JDLC, Cosico WC, Sanchez PB, Amarante ST, Haefele SM. 2009. Genotypic differences in grain yield and nitrogen uptake of lowland rice (Oryza sativa L.) under irrigated and rainfed conditions. Philipp. J. Crop Sci. 34(1): 22-37. Jat ML, Gathala MK, Ladha JK, Saharawat YS, Jat AS, Kumar V, Sharma SK, Kumar V, Gupta R. 2009. Evaluation of precision land leveling and double zero-till systems in the rice-wheat rotation: water use, productivity, profitability and soil physical properties. Soil Tillage Res. 105(1): 112-121. Johnson-Beebout SE, Angeles OR, Alberto MCR, Buresh RJ. 2009. Simultaneous minimization of nitrous oxide and methane emission from rice paddy soils is improbable due to redox potential changes with depth in a greenhouse experiment without plants. Geoderma 149: 45-53. Johnson-Beebout SE, Lauren JG, Duxbury JM. 2009. Immobilization of zinc fertilizer in flooded soils monitored by adapted DTPA soil test. Commun. Soil Sci. Plant Anal. 40(11/12): 1842-1861. Jourdain D, Dang, D.Q., Tran, P. V. C., Jamin, J-Y. 2009. Différenciation des exploitations agricoles dans les petits bassins versants de montagne au Nord du Vietnam: le rôle clé de l’accès à l’eau ? Cahiers Agric. (IF 0.22). Jourdain D, Tai DA, Quang DD, Pandey S. 2009. Payments for environmental services in upper-catchments of Vietnam: will it help the poorest? Int. J. Commons 3(1): 64-81. Jing Xiang, Haden Van Ryan, Peng S, Bouman B, Visperas R, Nie Lixiao, Huang Jianliang, Cui Kehui. 2009. Improvement in nitrogen availability, nitrogen uptake and growth of aerobic rice following soil acidification. Soil Sci. Plant Nutr. 55: 705-714. Jones HG, Serraj R, Loveys BR, Xiong LZ, Wheaton A, Price AH. 2009. Thermal infrared imaging of crop canopies for the remote diagnosis and quantification of plant responses to water stress in the field. Funct. Plant Biol. 36(10/11): 978-989. Juliano BO, Perez CM, Resurreccion AP. 2009. Apparent amylose content and gelatinization temperature types of Philippine rice accessions in the IRRI gene bank. Philipp. Agric. Sci. 92(1): 106-109. Katayanagi N, Sawamoto T, Hayakawa A, Hatano R. 2009. New method for the estimation of nitrous oxide emission rates from an agricultural watershed. Soil Sci. Plant Nutr. 55(4): 590-598. Kim SH, Bhat PR, Cui XP, Walia H, Xu J, Wanamaker S, Ismail AM, Wilson C, Close T.J. 2009. Detection and validation of single feature polymorphisms using RNA expression data from a rice genome array. BMC Plant Biol. 9(65): 10. DOI: 10.1186/1471-22299-65 Kovach MJ, Calingacion MN, Fitzgerald MA, McCouch SR. 2009. The origin and evolution of fragrance in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 106(34): 14444-14449. Kreye, C., Bouman, B. A. M., Castañeda, A. R., Lampayan, R. M., Faronilo, J. E., Lactaoen, A. T., Fernandez, L. 2009. Possible causes of yield failure in tropical aerobic rice. Field Crops Res. 111(3): 197-206. Kreye C, Bouman BAM, Faronilo JE, Llorca L. 2009. Causes for soil sickness affecting early plant growth in aerobic rice. Field Crops Res. 114(2): 182-187. Kreye C, Bouman BAM, Reversat G, Fernandez L, Vera Cruz C, Elazegui F, Faronilo JE, Llorca L. 2009. Biotic and abiotic causes of yield failure in tropical aerobic rice. Field Crops Res. 112(1): 97-106. Krishnan A, Guiderdoni E, An GH, Hsing YC, Han CD, Lee MC, Yu SM, Upadhyaya N, Ramachandran S, Zhang QF, Sundaresan V, Hirochika H, Leung H, Pereira A. 2009. Mutant resources in rice for functional

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

4 of 36

Publications and seminars
genomics of the grasses. Plant Physiol. 149(1): 165-170. Kumar A, Verulkar S, Dixit S, Chauhan B, Bernier J, Venuprasad R, Zhao D, Shrivastava MN. 2009. Yield and yield-attributing traits of rice (Oryza sativa L.) under lowland drought and suitability of early vigor as a selection criterion. Field Crops Res. 114(1): 99-107. Laborte AG, Schipper RA, Van Ittersum MK, Van Den Berg MM, Van Keulen H, Prins AG, Hossain M. 2009. Farmers’ welfare, food production and the environment: a model-based assessment of the effects of new technologies in the northern Philippines. NJAS Wageningen J. Life Sci. 56(4): 345-373. Lafarge T, Bueno CS. 2009. Higher crop performance of rice hybrids than of elite inbreds in the tropics: 2. Does sink regulation, rather than sink size, play a major role? Field Crops Res. 112 (2/3): 238-244. Lafarge T, Bueno CS. 2009. Higher crop performance of rice hybrids than of elite inbreds in the tropics: 1. Hybrids accumulate more biomass during each phonological phase. Field Crops Res. 112 (2/3): 229-237. Lang NT, Tu1 PTB, Thanh NC, Buu BC, Ismail AM. 2009. Genetic diversity of salt- tolerant rice landraces in Vietnam. J. Plant Breed. Crop. Sci. 1: 230-243. Lapitan VC, Redoña ED, Abe T, Brar DS. 2009. Mapping of quantitative trait loci using a doubled-haploid population from the cross of indica and japonica cultivars of rice. Crop Sci. 49(5): 1620-1628. Lapitan VC, Redona ED, Abe T, Brar DS. 2009. Molecular characterization and agronomic performance of DH lines from the F1 of indica and japonica cultivars of rice (Oryza sativa L.). Field Crops Res. 112(2/3): 222-228. Litsinger JA, Canapi BL, Bandong JP, Lumaban MD, Raymundo FD, Barrion AT. 2009. Insect pests of rainfed wetland rice in the Philippines: population densities, yield loss, and insecticide management. Int. J. Pest Manage. 55(3): 221-242. Litsinger J.A, Libetario EM, Barrion AT, Apostol RP. 2009. Comparison of insect pest complexes in different Philippine dryland rice environments: population densities, yield loss, and management. Int. J. Pest Manage. 55(2): 129-149. Mahajan G, Bharaj TS, Timsina J. 2009. Yield and water productivity of rice as affected by time of transplanting in Punjab, India. Agric. Water Manage. 96(3): 525-532. Manosalva PM, Davidson RM, Liu B, Zhu XY, Hulbert SH, Leung H, Leach JE. 2009. A germin-like protein gene family functions as a complex quantitative trait locus conferring broad-spectrum disease resistance in rice. Plant Physiol. 149(1): 286-296. Matsumoto H, Ishida A, Yokoyama S, Itoh Y. 2009. A consideration concerning success or failure of shared resource management: with special reference to fishery resource [in Japanese]. J. Rural Econ. (special issue): 467-474. Matsumura K, Hijmans RJ, Chemin Y, Elvidge CD, Sugimoto K, Wu WB, Lee YW, Shibasaki R. 2009. Mapping the global supply and demand structure of rice. Sustainability Sci. 4(2): 301-313. McNally KL, Childs KL, Bohnert R, Davidson RM, Zhao KY, Ulat VJ, Zeller G, Clark RM, Hoen DR, Bureau TE, Stokowski R, Ballinger DG, Frazer KA, Cox DR, Padhukasahasram B, Bustamante CD, Weigel D, Mackill DJ, Bruskiewich RM, Ratsch G, Buell CR, Leung H, Leach JE. 2009. Genomewide SNP variation reveals relationships among landraces and modern varieties of rice. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 2009 (e-first): 6 p.; 106(30): 12273-12278. Meerburg BG, Singleton GR, Leirs H. 2009. The Year of the Rat endstime to fight hunger! Pest Manage. Sci. 65(4): 351-352. Meerburg BG, Singleton GR, Kijlstra A. 2009. Rodent-borne diseases and their risks for public health. Crit. Rev. Microbiol. 35(3): 221-270. Reprint 2010/0330 Miranda GJ, Choi SH, Kim JS, Choi IR, Kim KH. 2009. Complete genome sequence of the RNAs 3 and 4 segments of rice stripe virus isolates in Korea and their phylogenetic relationships with Japan and China isolates. Plant Pathol. J. 25(2): 142-150. Miranda GJ, Choi SH, Kim JS, Choi IR, Kim KH. 2009. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the RNA1 and RNA2 segments of Korean rice stripe virus isolates and comparison with those of China and Japan. Arch. Virol. 154(10): 1705-1708. Namuco OS, Cairns JE, Johnson DE. 2009. Investigating early vigour in upland rice (Oryza sativa L.): Part I. Seedling growth and grain yield in competition with weeds. Field Crops Res. 113(3): 197-206.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

5 of 36

Publications and seminars
Navabi A, Mather DE, Bernier J, Spaner DM, Atlin GN. 2009. QTL detection with bidirectional and unidirectional selective genotyping: marker-based and trait-based analyses. Theor. Appl. Genet. 118(2): 347-358. Reprint 2009/1901 Nayak SN, Balaji J, Upadhyaya HD, Hash CT, Kishor PBK, Chattopadhyay D, Rodriquez LM, Blair MW, Baum M, McNally K, This D, Hoisington DA, Varshney RK. 2009. Isolation and sequence analysis of DREB2A homologues in three cereal and two legume species. Plant Sci. 177(1): 460-467. Nie LX, Peng SB, Bouman BAM, Huang JL, Cui KH, Visperas RM, Xiang J. 2009. Alleviating soil sickness caused by aerobic monocropping: responses of aerobic rice to various nitrogen sources. Soil Sci. Plant Nutr. 55(1): 150-159. Nie LX, Xiang J, Peng SB, Bouman BAM, Huang JL, Cui KH, Visperas RM. 2009. Alleviating soil sickness caused by aerobic monocropping: responses of aerobic rice to fallow, flooding and crop rotation. J. Food Agric. Environ. 7(3/4): 723-727. Noriega JA, Gillet CPDT, Sandoval-Mojica A, Horgan FG, Blanco JI, Valencia G, Pardo LC, Santibanez AS. 2009. New records and distributional range extension for Phanaeus haroldi Kirsch, 1871 (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae): a consolidation of biological and biogeographical information. Lambillionea 109: 403-414. Olk DC, Jimenez RR, Moscoso E, Gapas P. 2009. Phenol accumulation in a young humic fraction following anaerobic decomposition of rice crop residues. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 73(3): 943-951. Pan S, Mohanty S, Welch M. 2009. India’s edible oil consumption: a censored incomplete demand approach. J. Agric. Appl. Econ. 40(3): 821-835. Pena-Fronteras JT, Villalobos MC, Baltazar AM, Merca FE, Ismail AM, Johnson DE. 2009. Adaptation to flooding in upland and lowland ecotypes of Cyperus rotundus, a troublesome sedge weed of rice: tuber morphology and carbohydrate metabolism. Ann. Bot. 103(2): 295-302. Reprint 2009/1929 Peng SB, Tang QY, Zou YB. 2009. Current status and challenges of rice production in China. Plant Prod. Sci. 12(1): 3-8. Pheng S, Olofsdotter M, Jahn G, Adkins SW. 2009. Potential allelopathic rice lines for weed management in Cambodian rice production. Weed Biol. Manage. 9(4): 259-266. Pheng S, Olofsdotter M, Jahn G, Nesbitt H, Adkins SW. 2009. Allelopathic potential of Cambodian rice lines under field conditions. Weed Biol. Manage. 9(4): 267-275. Praba ML, Cairns JE, Babu RC, Lafitte HR. 2009. Identification of physiological traits underlying cultivar differences in drought tolerance in rice and wheat. J. Agron. Crop Sci. 195(1): 30-46. Reprint 2009/2107 Rahman ML, Jiang WZ, Chu SH, Qiao YL, Ham TH, Woo MO, Lee JH, Khanam MS, Chin JH, Jeung JU, Brar DS, Jena KK, Koh HJ. 2009. High-resolution mapping of two rice brown planthopper resistance genes, Bph20(t) and Bph21(t), originating from Oryza minuta. Theor. Appl. Genet. 119(7): 1237-1246. Rangan L, Rout A, Sudarshan M, Gregorio G.B. 2009. Molecular cloning, expression and mapping of the translational initiation factor eIF1 gene in Oryza sativa. Funct. Plant. Biol. 36:442-452. Rao MVR, Behera KS, Baisakh N, Datta SK, Rao GJN. 2009. Transgenic indica rice cultivar ‘Swarna’ expressing a potato chymotrypsin inhibitor pin2 gene show enhanced levels of resistance to yellow stem borer. Plant Cell Tissue Organ Cult. 99(3): 277-285. Rashid MH, Alam MM, Khan MAH, Ladha JK. 2009. Productivity and resource use of direct-(drum)-seeded and transplanted rice in puddled soils in rice-rice and rice-wheat ecosystems. Field Crops Res. 113(3): 274-281. Rejesus RM, Palis FG, Lapitan AV, Chi TTN, Hossain M. 2009. The impact of integrated pest management information dissemination methods on insecticide use and efficiency: evidence from rice producers in South Vietnam. Rev. Agric. Econ. 31(4): 814-833. Revilla-Molina IM, Bastiaans L, Keulen H Van, Kropff MJ, Hui F, Castilla NP, Mew TW, Zhu YY, Leung H. 2009. Does resource complementarity or prevention of lodging contribute to the increased productivity of rice varietal mixtures in Yunnan, China? Field Crops Res. 111(3): 303-307. Rodenburg J, Johnson DE. 2009. Weed management in rice-based cropping systems in Africa. Adv. Agron. 103: 149-218. Saharawat YS, Malik RS, Jhorar BS, Streck T, Chaudhary N, Jat ML. 2009. Changes in the recoverable fractions during successive cycles of aquifer

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

6 of 36

Publications and seminars
storage and recovery system in North-West India. Curr. Sci. 97 (9): 1369-1374. Salvagiotti F, Specht JE, Cassman KG, Walters DT, Weiss A, Dobermann A. 2009. Growth and nitrogen fixation in high-yielding soybean: impact of nitrogen fertilization. Agron. J. 101 (4): 958-970. Samal P, Paris T, Rao K. 2009. Impact of modern rice varieties in submergence-prone lowlands: a case study. Oryza 46(1): 61-66. Sarkar RK, Panda D, Reddy JN, Patnaik SSC, Mackill DJ, Ismail AM. 2009. Performance of submergencetolerant rice (Oryza sativa) genotypes carrying the Sub1 quantitative trait locus under stressed and non-stressed natural field conditions. Indian J. Agric. Sci. 79(11): 876-883. Savary S, Delbac L, Rochas A, Taisant G, Willocquet L. 2009. Analysis of nonlinear relationships in dual epidemics and its application to the management of grapevine downy and powdery mildews. Phytopathology 99(8): 930-942. Senadheera P, Singh RK, Maathuis FJM. 2009. Differentially expressed membrane transporters in rice roots may contribute to cultivar-dependent salt tolerance. J. Exp. Bot. 60(9): 2553-2563. Septiningsih EM, Pamplona AM, Sanchez DL, Neeraja CN, Vergara GV, Heuer S, Ismail AM, Mackill DJ. 2009. Development of submergence-tolerant rice cultivars: the Sub1 locus and beyond. Ann. Bot. 103 (2): 151-160. Reprint 2009/1931 Serraj R, Kumar A, McNally KL, Slamet-Loedin I, Bruskiewich R, Mauleon R, Cairns J, Hijmans RJ. 2009. Improvement of drought resistance in rice. Adv. Agron. 103: 41-99. Serraj R, Gowda V, Henry A, Mabesa RC, Kano M, Kato Y, Kobayashi N, Yamauchi A. 2009. Drought phenotyping and dehydration avoidance root traits for rice improvement under water-limited conditions. Jpn. J. Crop Sci. 78 (1): 400-401. Sexcion FSH, Egdane JA, Ismail AM, Dionisio-Sese ML. 2009. Morpho-physiological traits associated with tolerance of salinity during seedling stage in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Philipp. J. Crop Sci. 34(2): 27-37. Shi YF, Chen J, Liu WQ, Huang QN, Shen B, Leung H, Wu JL. 2009. Genetic analysis and gene mapping of a new rolled-leaf mutant in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Sci. Chi. Ser. C: Life Sci. 52(9): 885-890. Singh S, Mackill DJ, Ismail AM. 2009. Responses of SUB1 rice introgression lines to submergence in the field: yield and grain quality. Field Crops Res. 113(1): 12-23. Singh Y, Gupta RK, Thind HS, Singh B, Singh V, Singh G, Singh J, Ladha JK. 2009. Poultry litter as a nitrogen and phosphorous source for the rice-wheat cropping system. Biol. Fertil. Soils 45(7): 701-710. Singh Y, Humphreys E, Kukal SS, Singh B, Kaur A, Thaman S, Prashar A, Yadav S, Timsina J, Dhillon SS, Kaur N, Smith DJ, Gajri PR. 2009. Crop performance in permanent raised bed rice-wheat cropping system in Punjab, India. Field Crops Res. 110(1): 1-20. Siopongco JDLC, Sekiya K, Yamauchi A, Egdane J, Ismail AM, Wade LJ. 2009. Stomatal responses in rainfed lowland rice to partial soil drying; comparison of two lines. Plant Prod. Sci. 12(1): 17-28. Suh JP, Roh JH, Cho YC, Han SS, Kim YG, Jena KK. 2009. The Pi40 gene for durable resistance to rice blast and molecular analysis of Pi40-advanced backcross breeding lines. Phytopathology 99(3): 243-250. Takai T, Ohsumi A, San-oh Y, Laza MRC, Kondo M, Yamamoto T, Yano M. 2009. Detection of a quantitative trait locus controlling carbon isotope discrimination and its contribution to stomatal conductance in japonica rice. Theor. Appl. Genet. 118(7): 1401-1410. Takehisa H, Yasuda M, Fukuta Y, Kobayashi N, Hayashi N, Nakashita H, Abe T, Sato T. 2009. Genetic analysis of resistance genes in an Indica-type rice (Oryza sativa L.), Kasalath, using DNA markers. Breed. Sci. 59(3):253-260. Thongjuea S, Ruanjaichon V, Bruskiewich R, Vanavichit A. 2009. RiceGeneThresher: a web-based application for mining genes underlying QTL in rice genome. Nucl. Acids Res. 37(special issue): D996D1000. Reprint 2009/2017 Torabi S, Wissuwa M, Heidari M, Naghavi MR, Gilany K, Hajirezaei MR, Omidi M, Yazdi-Samadi B, Ismail AM, Salekdeh GH. 2009. A comparative proteome approach to decipher the mechanism of rice adaptation to phosphorous deficiency. Proteomics 9(1): 159-170. Jan. 2009. Reprint 2009/1757 Toure A, Becker, M., Johnson, D. E., Kone, B., Kossou, D. K., Kiepe, P. 2009. Response of lowland rice to agronomic management under different hydrological regimes in an inland valley of Ivory Coast. Field Crops Res. 114(2): 304-310. 7 of 36

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

Publications and seminars
Venuprasad R, Bool ME, Dalid CO, Bernier J, Kumar A, Atlin GN. 2009. Genetic loci responding to two cycles of divergent selection for grain yield under drought stress in a rice breeding population. Euphytica 167(2): 261-269. Venuprasad R, Dalid CO, Del Valle M, Zhao D, Espiritu M, Sta Cruz MT, Amante M, Kumar A, Atlin GN. 2009. Identification and characterization of large-effect quantitative trait loci for grain yield under lowland drought stress in rice using bulk-segregant analysis. Theor. Appl. Genet. 120(1): 177-190. Virk P, Barry G. 2009. Biofortified rice—towards combating human micronutrient deficiencies. SABRAO J. Breed. Genet. 41. (special supplement, on CD rom) Walia H, Wilson G, Ismail AM, Close TJ, Cui X. 2009. Comparing genomic expression patterns across plant species reveals highly diverged transcriptional dynamics in response to salt stress. BMC Genomics 10: 398. Wassmann R, Jagadish SVK, Heuer S, Ismail A, Redona E, Serraj R, Singh RK, Howell G, Pathak H, Sumfleth K. 2009. Climate change affecting rice production: the physiological and agronomic basis for possible adaptation strategies. Adv. Agron. 101: 59-122. Wassmann R, Jagadish SVK, Sumfleth K, Pathak H, Howell G, Ismail A, Serraj R, Redona E, Singh RK, Heuer S. 2009. Regional vulnerability of climate change impacts on Asian rice production and scope for adaptation. Adv. Agron. 102: 91-133. Way MJ, Heong KL. 2009. Significance of the tropical fire ant Solenopsis geminata (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) as part of the natural enemy complex responsible for successful biological control of many tropical irrigated rice pests. Bull. Entomol. Res. 99(5): 503-512. Xangsayasane P, Xie FM, Hernandez JE, Borromeo TH. 2009. Grain and eating qualities of waxy hybrid rice (Oryza sativa L.) derived from non-waxy and waxy parents. Philipp. J. Crop Sci. 34(3): 59-67. Xiang J, Haden VR, Peng SB, Bouman BAM, Visperas RM, Nie LX, Huang JL, Cui KH. 2009. Improvement in nitrogen availability, nitrogen uptake and growth of aerobic rice following soil acidification. Soil Sci. Plant Nutr. 55(5): 705-714. Xu CW, Wang XF, Li ZK, Xu SZ. 2009. Mapping QTL for multiple traits using Bayesian statistics. Genet. Res. 91(1): 23-37. Yokoyama S, Ali AK. 2009. Social capital and farmer welfare in Malaysia. Jpn. Agric. Res. Q. 43(4): 323-328. Yokoyama S, Zakaria AK. 2009. Technological characteristics of organic SRI: case in West Java, Indonesia [in Japanese]. J. Rural Econ. (special issue): 648-655. Zhang LM, Lin S, Bouman BAM, Xue CY, Wei FT, Tao HB, Yang XG, Wang HQ, Zhao D, Dittert K. 2009. Response of aerobic rice growth and grain yield to N fertilizer at two contrasting sites near Beijing, China. Field Crops Res. 114(1): 45-53. Zhang YB, Tang QY, Zou YB, Li DQ, Qin JQ, Yang SH, Chen LJ, Xia B, Peng SB. 2009. Yield potential and radiation use efficiency of “super” hybrid rice grown under subtropical conditions. Field Crops Res. 114(1): 91-98. Zhou YL, Xu JL, Zhou SC, Yu J, Xie XW, Xu MR, Sun Y, Zhu LH, Fu BY, Gao YM, Li ZK. 2009. Pyramiding Xa23 and Rxo1 for resistance to two bacterial diseases into an elite indica rice variety using molecular approaches. Mol. Breed. 23(2): 279-287. Reprint 2009/2016

Books (Monographs)
Ladha JK, Singh Y, Erenstein O, Hardy B. 2009. Integrated crop and resource management in the ricewheat system of South Asia. Manila (Philippines): International Rice Research Institute. 356 p. Revilla-Molina, I. M. 2009. Genetic diversity for sustainable rice blast management in China: adoption and impact. PhD thesis, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands. 130 p. [with summaries in English, Dutch, and Chinese]. ISBN: 978-90-8585255-1.

Book chapters
Baisakh N, Kumar I. 2009. Stem borer resistance: Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) rice. In: Datta SK, editor. Rice improvement in the genomics era. Boca Raton: CRC Press. p 139-177. SB226.R535.2009 Chandna P, Ladha JK, Singh UP, Punia M, Erenstein O, Pathak H, Gupta Raj. 2009. Technology targeting in underused lands in the Gangetic Plains of South Asia. In: Ladha JK, Singh Y, Erenstein O, editors. Integrated crop and resource management in the ricewheat system of South Asia. Manila (Philippines): International Rice Research Institute. p 335-353.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

8 of 36

Publications and seminars
Datta SK, Torrizo LB, Gregorio GB, Moon HP. 2009. Haploid breeding in rice improvement. In: Datta SK, editor. Rice improvement in the genomics era. Boca Raton: CRC Press. p 71-103. SB226.R535.2009 Douthwaite B, Gummert M. 2009. Learning selection revisited. In: Scoones I, Thompson J, editors. Farmer first revisited: innovation for agricultural research and development. Rugby (UK): Practical Action Pub. p 198-202. S542.D44F37.2009 Fujita D, Ebron LA, Kobayashi N, Fukuta Y. 2009. DNA marker analysis of blast resistance genes Pib and Pita in IRRI-bred rice varieties comparing with gene estimation by a differential system. In: Wang GL, Valent B, editors. Advances in genetics, genomics and control of rice blast disease. New York: Springer. p. 315-324. Fukuta Y, Xu DH, Yanoria MJT, Hairmansis A, Hayashi N, Kobayashi N. 2009. Genetic characterization of universal differential variety sets developed under the IRRI-Japan collaborative research project. In: Wang GL, Valent B, editors. Advances in genetics, genomics and control of rice blast disease. New York: Springer. p 325-335. Gowda CLL, Serraj R, Srinivasan G, Nigam SN, Upadhyaya HD, Gaur PM, Rai KN, Reddy LJ, Reddy BS. 2009. Opportunities for improving crop-water productivity through genetic enhancement of dryland crops In: Wani SP, Rockstrom J, Oweis T, editors. Rainfed agriculture–unlocking the potential. UK: CABI Publishing. p 133-163. Gregorio GB, Tin Htut, Cabuslay GS. 2009. Breeding for micronutrient-enriched rice. In: Bañuelos GS, Lin ZQ, editors. Development and uses of biofortified agricultural products. Boca Raton: CRC Press. p 171-180. Haefele SM, Bouman BAM. 2009. Drought-prone rainfed lowland rice in Asia: limitations and management options. In: Serraj J, Bennett J, Hardy B. editors. Drought frontiers in rice: crop improvement for increased rainfed production. Singapore: World Scientific Publishing and Los Baños (Philippines): International Rice Research Institute. p 211-232. Haefele SM, Knoblauch C, Gummert M, Konboon Y, Koyama S. 2009. Black carbon (biochar) in ricebased systems: characteristics and opportunities. In: Woods WI, Teixeira WG, Lehmann J, Steiner C, WinklerPrins A, Rebellato L, editors. Amazonian dark earths: Wim Sombroek’s vision. Springer Science + Business Media B.V. p 445-463. Heong KL, Hijmans RJ, Villareal S, Catindig J. 2009. Biological control ecosystem services in tropical rice. Chapter 10. In: Settele J, Grabaum R, Grobelnick V, Hammen V, Klotz S, Penev L, Kühn I, editors. Atlas of biodiversity risk. Pensoft, Sofia, Moscow. Hervé P, Serraj R. 2009. GM technology and drought. In: Serraj R, Bennett J, Hardy B, editors. Drought frontiers in rice: crop improvement for increased rainfed production. Singapore: World Scientific Publishing and Los Baños (Philippines): International Rice Research Institute. p 333-350. Hijmans RJ, Serraj R. 2009. Modeling spatial and temporal variation of drought in rice production. In: Serraj R, Bennett J, Hardy B, editors. Drought frontiers in rice: crop improvement for increased rainfed production. Singapore: World Scientific Publishing and Los Baños (Philippines): International Rice Research Institute. p 19-31. Jagadish SVK, Pal M. 2009. Response of rice (Oryza sativa L.) to increasing temperature and atmospheric CO2. In: Singh SN, editor. Climate change and crops. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag. p 63-80. Jat ML, Gupta Raj, Ramasundaram P, Gathala MK, Sidhu HS, Singh Samar, Singh Ravi G, Saharawat YS, Kumar V, Chandna P, Ladha JK. 2009. Laser-assisted precision land leveling: a potential technology for resource conservation in irrigated intensive production systems of the Indo-Gangetic Plains. In: Ladha JK, Yadvinder-Singh, Erenstein O, Hardy B, editors. Integrated crop and resource management in the rice-wheat system of South Asia. Manila (Philippines): International Rice Research Institute. p 223-237. Khan Akhter Hossain M, Alam Murshedul M, Hossain Israil M, Rashid Harunur M, Mollah Islam Uddin M, Quddus Abdul M, Miah Ismail Bhuiyan M, Abbas Ali Sikder M, Ladha JK. 2009. Validation and delivery of improved technologies in the rice-wheat ecosystem in Bangladesh. In: Ladha JK, Yadvinder-Singh, Erenstein O, Hardy B, editors. Integrated crop and resource management in the rice-wheat system of South Asia. Manila (Philippines): International Rice Research Institute. p 197-220. Khush GS, Jena KK. 2009. Current status and future prospects for research on blast resistance in rice (Oryza sativa L.). In: Wang GL, Valent B, editors. Advances in genetics, genomics and control of rice blast disease. New York: Springer. p 1-10.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

9 of 36

Publications and seminars
Ladha JK, Kumar V, Alam MM, Sharma S, Gathala M, Chandna P, Balasubramanian V. 2009. Integrating crop and resource management technologies for enhanced productivity, profitability, and sustainability of the rice-wheat system in South Asia. In: Ladha JK, Yadvinder-Singh, Erenstein O, Hardy B, editors. Integrated crop and resource management in the rice-wheat system of South Asia. Manila (Philippines): International Rice Research Institute. p 69-108. Liu B, Zhu XY, Zhang SH, Wu JL, Han SS, Cho YC, Roh JH, Leach J, Liu Y, Madamba S, Bordeos A, Baraoidan M, Oña I, Vera Cruz CM, Leung H. 2009. What it takes to achieve durable resistance to rice blast? In: Wang GL, Valent B, editors. Advances in genetics, genomics and control of rice blast disease. New York: Springer. p 385-402. Mackill DJ 2009. Rice improvement: taking advantage of new technologies. In: Datta SK, editor. Rice improvement in the genomics era. Boca Raton: CRC Press. p 59-60. SB226.R535.2009 Mandal SN, Regmi AP, Ladha JK, Tuong TP. 2009. Crop establishment, tillage, and water management effects on crop and water productivity in the ricewheat rotation in Nepal. In: Ladha JK, YadvinderSingh, Erenstein O, Hardy B, editors. Integrated crop and resource management in the rice-wheat system of South Asia. Manila (Philippines): International Rice Research Institute. p 239-259. McLaren CG, Metz T, van den Berg M, Bruskiewich RM, Magor NP, Shires D. 2009. Informatics in agricultural research for development. Chapter 4. In: Advances in agronomy. Vol. 102. D. Sparks, London: Academic Press. Parsad R, Crossa J, Gupta VK, Gupta Raj K, Ladha JK, Anitha Raman K. 2009. Statistical tools for farmers’ participatory trials for conservation agriculture. In: Ladha JK, Yadvinder-Singh, Erenstein O, Hardy B, editors. Integrated crop and resource management in the rice-wheat system of South Asia. Manila (Philippines): International Rice Research Institute. p 279-296. Pathak H, Ladha JK, Singh Yadvinder, Hussain A, Hussain F, Munankarmy R, Gathala MK, Verma S, Singh UK, Nguyen Minh-Long. 2009. Resource-conserving technologies in the ricewheat system of South Asia: field evaluation and simulation analysis. In: Ladha JK, Yadvinder-Singh, Erenstein O, Hardy B, editors. Integrated crop and resource management in the rice-wheat system of South Asia. Manila (Philippines): International Rice Research Institute. p 297-318. Pathak H, Saharawat YS, Gathala M, Mohanty S, Ladha JK. 2009. Simulating environmental impact of resource-conserving technologies in the rice-wheat system of the Indo-Gangetic Plains In: Ladha JK, Yadvinder-Singh, Erenstein O, Hardy B, editors. Integrated crop and resource management in the ricewheat system of South Asia. Manila (Philippines): International Rice Research Institute. p 321-333. Regmi AP, Tripathi J, Giri GS, Bhatta MR, Sherchan DP, Karki KB, Tripathi BP, Kumar Virender, Ladha JK. 2009. Improving food security through integrated crop and resource management in the rice-wheat system in Nepal. In: Ladha JK, Yadvinder-Singh, Erenstein O, Hardy B, editors. Integrated crop and resource management in the rice-wheat system of South Asia. Manila (Philippines): International Rice Research Institute. p 177-195. Rehman Hafiz Mujeeb ur, Gill MA, Awan NA, Ladha JK. 2009. Evaluation and promotion of integrated crop and resource management technologies in ricewheat systems in Pakistan. In: Ladha JK, YadvinderSingh, Erenstein O, Hardy B, editors. Integrated crop and resource management in the rice-wheat system of South Asia. Manila (Philippines): International Rice Research Institute. p 111-132. Saharawat YS, Gathala M, Ladha JK, Malik RK, Singh S, Jat ML, Gupta Raj K, Pathak H, Singh K. 2009. Evaluation and promotion of integrated crop and resource management in the rice-wheat system in northwest India. In: Ladha JK, Yadvinder- Singh, Erenstein O, Hardy B, editors. Integrated crop and resource management in the rice-wheat system of South Asia. Manila (Philippines): International Rice Research Institute. p 133-150. Salahuddin A, Van Mele P, Magor NP. 2009. Institutionalizing values-based research: lessons from the PETRRA project, Bangladesh. In: Scoones I, Thompson J, editors. Farmer first revisited: innovation for agricultural research and development. Rugby (UK): Practical Action Pub. p 212-215. Sawada Y, Estudillo JP, Fuwa N, Kajisa K. 2009. How do people cope with a natural disaster? In: Cabanilla LS, Carnaje GP, editors. Development, natural resources, and the environment. Los Banos (Philippines): Department of Economics, University of the Philippines. Serraj R. 2009. Drought resistant rice: physiological framework for an integrated research strategy. In: Serraj R, Bennett J, Hardy B, editors. Drought frontiers in rice–crop improvement for increased rainfed production. Singapore: World Scientific Publishing 10 of 36

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

Publications and seminars
and Los Banos (Philippines): International Rice Research Institute. Serraj R, Atlin G. 2009. Drought-resistant rice for increased rainfed production and poverty alleviation: a concept note. In: Serraj R, Bennett J, Hardy B, editors. Drought frontiers in rice–crop improvement for increased rainfed production. Singapore: World Scientific Publishing and Los Banos (Philippines): International Rice Research Institute. Singh RK, Redoña ED, Refuerzo L. 2009. Varietal improvement for abiotic stress tolerance in crop plants: special reference to salinity in rice. In: Pareek A, Sopory SK, Bohnert HJ, Govindjee. Abiotic stress adaptation in plants: physiological, molecular and genomic foundation. Dordrecht (The Netherlands): Springer. p 387-416. Singh S, Chhokar RS, Gopal R, Ladha JK, Gupta RK, Kumar V, Singh M. 2009. Integrated weed management: a key to success for direct-seeded rice in the Indo-Gangetic Plains. In: Ladha JK, Yadvinder-Singh, Erenstein O, Hardy B, editors. Integrated crop and resource management in the rice-wheat system of South Asia. Manila (Philippines): International Rice Research Institute. p 261-277. Singh UP, Singh Y, Kumar V, Ladha JK. 2009. Evaluation and promotion of resource-conserving tillage and crop establishment techniques in the rice-wheat system of eastern India. In: Ladha JK, YadvinderSingh, Erenstein O, Hardy B, editors. Integrated crop and resource management in the rice-wheat system of South Asia. Manila (Philippines): International Rice Research Institute. p 151-176. Slamet-Loedin IH, Purwantomo S, Ouwerkerk PBF, Nugroho S, Serraj R. 2009. Biotechnology and transposon-tagging for improving drought-resistance in rice for Indonesia. In: Serraj R, Bennett J, Hardy B, editors. Drought frontiers in rice–crop improvement for increased rainfed production. Singapore: World Scientific Publishing and Los Banos (Philippines): International Rice Research Institute. Thomson MJ, Ismail AM, McCouch SR, Mackill DJ. 2009. Marker-assisted breeding. In: Pareek A, Sopory SK, Bohnert HJ, Govindjee. Abiotic stress adaptation in plants: physiological, molecular and genomic foundation. p 451-470. Dordrecht (The Netherlands): Springer. Variar M, Vera Cruz, CM, Carillo MG, Bhatt JC, Sangar RBS. 2009. Rice blast in India and strategies to develop durably resistant cultivars. In: Wang GL, Valent B, editors. Advances in genetics, genomics and control of rice blast disease. New York: Springer. p 359-373. Virk P. 2009. Golden Rice as new varieties. In: Golden Rice and other biofortified food crops for developing countries—challenges and potential. Stockholm: The Royal Swedish Academy of Agriculture and Forestry. p 17-21. Virmani SS, Kumar I. 2009. Hybrid rice technology. In: Datta SK, editor. Rice improvement in the genomics era. Boca Raton: CRC Press. p 105-137. Zeigler RS, Savary S. 2009. Plant diseases and the world’s dependence on rice. In: Gullino ML, Strange RN, editors. Chapter 1: Role of plant pathology and food safety. New York: Springer-Verlag. p 3-9. Zhao DL, Atlin GN, Bastiaans L, Spiertz JHJ. 2009. Opportunities for ecologically based aerobic rice cropping systems: weed competitiveness of genotypes. In: Kingely RV, editor. Weeds: management, economic impacts and biology. Hauppauge New York: Nova Science Publ. p 23-39.

Others
Alam MM, Sikder Md. Abbas Ali, Islam Md. Saiful, Kumar V, Ladha JK. 2009. Integrated crop management: a potential agronomic technique for increased productivity and profit of rice cultivation in Bangladesh. In: Abstracts. 4th World Congress on Conservation Agriculture, 4-7 Feb 2009, New Delhi, India. p 106. Chandna P, Khurana ML, Ladha JK, Punia M, Gupta R. 2009. Demarcating the nitrate polluted groundwater areas and identifying the contributing factors in the fresh water zone of Haryana, India. In: Abstracts. ASA/CSSA/SSSA annual meetings 1-5 Nov 2009, Pittsburgh, USA. Gathala M, Ladha JK, Kumar V, Saharawat YS, Kumar V, Sharma S. 2009. Short to medium-term performance of rice-wheat system without tillage and direct seeding. In: Abstracts. ASA/CSSA/SSSA annual meetings, 1-5 Nov 2009, Pittsburgh, USA. Carillo MGC, Goodwin PH, Leach JE, Leung H, Vera Cruz CM. 2009. Phylogenomic relationships of rice oxalate oxidases to the cupin superfamily and their association with disease resistance QTL. Rice 2(1): 67-79. Douangboupha B, Brown PR, Khamphoukeo K, Aplin KP, Singleton GR. 2009. Population dynamics of rodent

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

11 of 36

Publications and seminars
pest species in upland farming systems of Lao PDR. Kasetsart J. (Nat. Sci.) 43(1): 125-131. Fujita D, Ebron LA, Kobayashi N, Fukuta Y. 2009. Comparison of DNA marker analysis of the blast resistance genes Pib and Pita in IRRI-bred rice varieties with gene estimation by conventional genetic analysis. JIRCAS Work. Rep. 63. p 87-94. Fukuta Y, Xu, D, Kobayashi N, Telebanco-Yanoria MJ, Hairmansis A, Hayashi, N. 2009. Genetic characterization of universal differential varieties for blast resistance developed under the IRRI-Japan Collaborative Research Project using DNA markers in rice (Oryza sativa L.). JIRCAS Work. Rep. 63. p 35-68. Fukuta Y, Xu D, Yanoria MJ, Hairmansis A, Hayashi N, Kobayashi N. 2009. Genetic characterization of universal differential variety sets developed under the IRRI-Japan Collaborative Research Project. JIRCAS Work. Rep. 63. p 325-335. Gathala MK, Pathak H, Ladha JK, Kumar Vivek, Mishra Deepika, Blackwell J, Roth C, Kumar V, Kumar Vipin, Sharma Sheetal. 2009. Happy Seeder technology provides an alternate to burning for managing rice. Abstracts. 4th World Congress on Conservation Agriculture. 4-7 Feb 2009. New Delhi, India. p 75 Gummert M, Balingbing CB, Barry G, Estevez LA. 2009. Management options, technologies and strategies for minimised mycotoxin contamination of rice. World Mycotoxin J. 2(2): 151-159. Hairmansis A., Wurjandari D, Syam M. 2009. Padi Toleran Rendaman. Pusat Penelitian danPengembangan Tanaman Pangan and International Rice Research Institute. 12 p. Hayashi N, Kobayashi N, Vera Cruz CM, Fukuta Y. 2009. Protocols for the sampling of diseased specimens and evaluation of blast disease in rice. JIRCAS Work. Rep. 63. p 17-33. Hoanh CT, Phong ND, Gowing JW, Tuong TP, Ngoc NV, Hien NX. 2009. Hydraulic and water quality modeling: a tool for managing land use conflicts in inland coastal zones. Water Policy 11: 106-120. Horgan FG, Quiring DT, Lagnaoui A, Pelletier Y. 2009. Effects of altitude of origin on trichome-mediated antiherbivore resistance in wild Andean potatoes. Flora 204: 49-62. Ismail AM. 2009. Sub1 Fact sheet no. 4: Management options in flood-prone areas. Ismail AM, Thomson MJ, Mackill DJ, Paris TR, Salam MA, Seraj ZI, Islam MM. 2009. Speeding the development of salt-tolerant rice varieties through marker-assisted selection and their dissemination in salt-affected areas of Bangladesh. In: Generation Challenge Programme (GCP) of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research. July 2009 project updates. p 103-104. Ismail AM, Thomson MJ, Wissuwa M, Blumwald E, Seraj ZI, Bustaman M, Close TJ, 2009 Revitalising marginal lands: Discovery of genes for tolerance of saline and phosphorus-deficient soils to enhance and sustain productivity. In: Generation Challenge Programme (GCP) of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research. July 2009 project updates. p 14-16. Khippal A, Singh S, Lal R, Singh R, Gupta RK, Ladha JK. 2009. Intercropping of winter vegetables on beds in autumn-planted sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) for resource conservation in irrigated systems. Abstracts. 4th World Congress on Conservation Agriculture. 4-7 Feb 2009, New Delhi, India. Kobayashi N. 2009. Utilization of rice genetic resources and future perspective. Rice breeding programs abroad and possibility of utilizing exotic germplasm. Breed. Res. 11(2): 24. Kobayashi N, Ebron LA, Fujita D, Fukuta Y. 2009. Identification of blast resistance genes in IRRI-bred rice varieties by segregation analysis based on a differential system. JIRCAS Work. Rep. 63. p 69-86. Koide Y, Hayashi N, Ando I, Kawasaki A, TelebancoYanoria MJ, Kobayashi N, Fukuta Y. 2009. Genetic analysis of rice blast resistance genes, Pia and Pi7(t), using near- isogenic lines with US-2 genetic background. Breed. Res. 11(1): 104. Koide Y, Kobayashi N, Xu DH, Fukuta Y. 2009. Blast resistance genes and their selection markers in rice (Oryza sativa L.). JIRCAS Work. Rep. 63. p 95-122. Koide Y, Kobayashi N, Xu DH, Fukuta Y. 2009. Resistance genes and selection DNA markers for blast disease in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Jpn. Agric. Res. Q. 43(4): 255-280. Koide Y, Telebanco-Yanoria MJ, Fukuta Y, Kobayashi n. 2009. Identification of a gene conferring broadspectrum resistance to standard differential blast isolates from the Philippines in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Breed. Res. 11(2): 39. Kumar V, Ladha JK, Gathala M. 2009. Direct-drill-seeded rice: a need of the day. In: Abstracts. ASA/CSSA/

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

12 of 36

Publications and seminars
SSSA Annual Meetings, 1-5 Nov 2009, Pittsburgh, USA. Kumar V, Ladha JK, Gathala MK, Bellinder RR. 2009. Role of herbicide-tolerant rice in promoting conservation agriculture in the Indo-Gangetic Plains of South Asia. Abstracts. 4th World Congress on Conservation Agriculture, 4-7 Feb 2009, New Delhi, India. p 380. Ladha JK, Sharma S, Gathala M, Agnes P, Saharawat YS. 2009. Cropping system effects on soil health indicators in the Indo-Gangetic Plains. In: Abstracts. ASA/CSSA/SSSA Annual Meetings, 1-5 Nov 2009, Pittsburgh, USA. Li F, Cheng LR, Xu MR, Zhou Z, Zhang F, Sun Y, Zhou YL, Zhu LH, Xu JL, Li ZK. 2009. QTL mining for sheath blight resistance using the backcross-selected introgression lines for grain quality in rice. Acta Agron. Sin. 35(9): 1729-1737. Mackill DJ, Labios RV, Hardy B, Baltazar RM. 2009. Sub1 rice news. 2-3(1-3). Mackill DJ, Labios RV, Baltazar RM. 2009. Sub1 kit: increasing rice productivity in submergence-prone areas of Southeast Asia. Mackill DJ, Ismail AM, Baltazar RM. 2009. Sub1 Fact sheet no. 1. Frequently asked questions on submergence-tolerant rice. Mackill DJ, Pamplona AM. 2009. Sub1 Fact sheet no. 2. Currently available submergence-tolerant rice. Madamba MRS, Sugiyama N, Bordeos A, Mauleon R, Satoh K, Baraoidan M, Kikuchi S, Shimamoto K, Leung H. 2009. A recessive mutation in rice conferring non-race-specific resistance to bacterial blight and blast. Rice 2(2/3): 104-114. Reprint 2010/1275 Mohanty Sangita, Ladha JK, Gathala MK, Pathak H, Jain Niveta, Sharma Sheetal. 2009. Emission of N20 from soil with different resource-conserving technologies. Abstracts. 4th World Congress on Conservation Agriculture, 4-7 Feb 2009, New Delhi, India. Murray T, Horgan FG, Kehoe E, Kakouli-Duarte T. 2009. Bumblebee importation: balancing risks and benefits. T-Res. 4: 30-33. Pan YH, Wang D, Zhu LH, Fu BY, Li ZK. 2009. Differential expression of rice two-component element genes under drought stress. Acta Agron. Sin. 35(9): 16281636. Pan YH, Fu BY, Wang D, Zhu LH, Li ZK. 2009. Spatial and temporal profiling of DNA methylation induced by drought stress in rice. Sci. Agric. Sin. 42(9): 30093018. Pariasca-Tanaka J, Satoh K, Rose T, Mauleon R, Wissuwa M. 2009. Stress response versus stress tolerance: a transcriptome analysis of two rice lines contrasting in tolerance to phosphorus deficiency. Rice 2(4): 167-185. Paris TR. 2009. Sub1 Fact sheet no. 3. Participatory varietal selection. Pathak H, Jain N, Bhatia A, Mohanty S, Gupta N. 2009. Global warming mitigation potential of biogas plants in India. Environ. Monit. Assess. 157(1/4): 407-418. Pathak H, Ladha JK, Singh Yadvinder, Hussian A, Hussain F, Munankarmy R, Gathala MK, Verma S, Singh UK, Nguyen Minh-Long. 2009. Resource-conserving technologies in rice-wheat systems of South Asia: field evaluation and simulation analysis. Abstracts. 4th World Congress on Conservation Agriculture, 4-7 Feb 2009, New Delhi, India. Punia M, Chandna P, Ladha JK, Gupta RK. 2009. Estimation of rice residue burring areas using remote sensing technologies. Abstracts. 4th World Congress on Conservation Agriculture, 4-7 Feb 2009, New Delhi, India. Qian YL, Wang H, Chen MY, Zhang LK, Chen BX, Cui JT, Liu HY, Zhu LH, Shi YY, Gao YM, Li ZK. 2009. Detection of salt-tolerant QTL using BC2F3 yield selected introgression lines of rice (Oryza sativa L.). Mol. Plant Breed. 7(2): 224-232. Raitzer DA, Roseboom J, Maredia MK, Huelgas Z, Ferino MI. 2009. Southeast Asia subregional review: prioritizing the agricultural research agenda for Southeast Asia: refocusing investments to benefit the poor. Final subregional report under ADB S-RDTA No. 7316. 107 p. Rakotofiringa A, Jourdain D, Quang DD, Jamin J-Y, Valony M-J. 2009. Diagnosis and typology of mountainous irrigated systems: Van Chan District, Yen Bai Province, Vietnam. IRRI/CIRAD/TUEBA/NOMAFSI, Hanoi. Ramos MM, Alvare LM, Shelton P, Besemer H. 2009. The CGIAR virtual library: a vital tool to enhance access to agricultural research. J. Agric. Food Inf. 10(1): 27-36. Ramos MM, Austria CS. 2009. Enabling electronic access to the world’s rice literature. Agric. Inf. Worldwide 2(1): 33-35.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

13 of 36

Publications and seminars
Redoña ED, Sierra S, Laza M. 2009. Identifying genetic donors for heat tolerance in rice. Abstracts. Plant Abiotic Stress Tolerance Conference, 8-11 Feb 2009, Vienna, Austria. Regmi AP, Tripathi J, Giri GS, Bhatta MR, Sherchan DP, Karki DP, Tripathi BP, Kumar Virender, Ladha JK. 2009. Integrated crop and resource management for enhancing productivity and profitability of ricewheat System in Nepal’s Tarai. Abstracts. 4th World Congress on Conservation Agriculture, 4-7 Feb 2009, New Delhi, India. Rejesus RM, Palis FG, Lapitan AV, Truong Thi Ngoc Chi, Hossain M. 2009. The impact of Integrated Pest Management information dissemination methods on insecticide use and efficiency: evidence from rice producers in South Vietnam. Rev. Agric. Econ. 31(4): 814-833. Revilla-Molina IM. 2009. Genetic diversity for sustainable rice blast management in Yunnan, China: adoption and impact. Crop and Weed Ecology Group Lunch Seminar, 9 Jan 2009, Wageningen University, The Netherlands. Rizwana, Paris TR. 2009. Knowledge of paddy growers. Int. J. Rural Stud. 16(2): 8-12. Saharawat YS, Singh Bhagat, Malik RK, Gathala M, Jat ML, Gupta RK, Ladha JK. 2009. Productivity, water use and income of the rice-wheat systems with alternative tillage and crop establishment methods in a rice-wheat rotation in northwestern IGP. Abstracts. 4th World Congress on Conservation Agriculture, 4-7 Feb 2009, New Delhi, India. Sanni KA, Ariyo OJ, Ojo DK, Gregorio G, Somado EA, Sanchez I, Sie M, Futakuchi K, Ogunbayo SA, Guei RG, Wopereis MCS. 2009. Additive main effects and multiplicative interaction analysis of grain yield performance in rice genotypes across environments. Asian J. Plant Sci. 8(1): 48-53. Serraj R, Gowda V, Henry A, Mabesa RC, Kano M, Kato Y, Kobayashi N, Yamauchi A. 2009. Drought phenotyping and dehydration avoidance root traits for rice improvement under water-limited conditions. Jpn. J. Crop Sci. 78(1): 4-5. Singleton GR. 2009. Irrigated Rice Research Consortium (Phase III) (IRRI Ref. No. DPPC2004-30). Final report submitted to the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, May 2009. 80 p. Smith DJ, Humphreys E, Godwin D. 2009. Simulating the effect of management, site and seasonal conditions on yield of wheat using SWAGMAN® Destiny. CSIRO Land and Water Science Report 30/09. Suh J, Jeung J, Lee J, Choi Y, Yea J, Virk P, Mackill DJ, Jena KK. 2009. Identification of QTLs for cold tolerance at reproductive stage of rice. Presented at Plant and Animal Genome XVII Conference, 10-14 Jan 2009, San Diego, USA. http://www.intl-pag.org/17/abstracts/P05b_PAGXVII_247.html Suh JP, Noh TH, Kim KY, Kim JJ, Kim YG, Jena KK. 2009. Expression levels of three bacterial blight resistance genes against K3, a race of Korea by molecular and phenotype analysis in japonica rice (O. sativa L.). J. Crop Sci. Biotechnol. 12(3): 103-108. Tewari AN, Pathak H, Ladha JK. 2009. No-till direct-seeded rice in the eastern Gangetic Plains: potentials and prospects. Abstracts. 4th World Congress on Conservation Agriculture, 4-7 Feb 2009, New Delhi, India. Thomson MJ, Polato NR, Prasetiyono J, Trijatmiko KR, Silitonga TS, McCouch SR. 2009. Genetic diversity of isolated populations of Indonesian landraces of rice (Oryza sativa L.) collected in East Kalimantan on the island of Borneo. Rice 2(1): 80-92. Virk P, Barry G. 2009. Biofortified ricetowards combating human micronutrient deficiencies. SABRAO J. Breed. Genet. Vol. 41, special supplement. (on CD rom). Virk P. 2008. Golden rice as new varieties. In: Golden rice and other biofortified food crops for developing countries-challenges and potential. The Royal Swedish Academy of Agriculture and Forestry. Issue number 7. p 17-21 Wang H, Siopongco J, Wade LJ, Yamauchi A. 2009. Fractal analysis on root systems of rice plants in response to drought stress. Environ. Exp. Bot. 65(2/3): 338-344. Wang Y, Cheng LR, Sun Y, Zhou Z, Zhu LH, Xu ZJ, Xu JL, Li ZK. 2009. Genetic background effect on QTL expression of heading date and plant height and their interaction with environment in reciprocal introgression lines of rice. Acta Agron. Sin. 35(8): 1386-1394. Wang Y, Cheng LR, Zheng TQ, Sun Y, Zhou Z, Yang J, Xu ZJ, Xu JL, Li ZK. 2009. Response of main effect QTL for plant height and flag leaf width to artificial selection in rice. Chin. J. Rice Sci. 23(4): 363-370.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

14 of 36

Publications and seminars
Wassmann R, Hosen Y, Sumfleth K. 2009. Agriculture and climate change: an agenda for negotiation in Copenhagen. Reducing methane emission from irrigated rice. IFPRI Focus 16. Brief 3. 2 p. Yang J, Sun Y, Cheng LR, Zhou Z, Wang Y, Zhu LH, Cang J, Xu JL, Li ZK. 2009. Genetic background effect on QTL mapping for salt tolerance revealed by a set of reciprocal introgression line populations in rice. Acta Agron. Sin. 35(6):974-982. Yokoyama S, Rodriguez MVC, Yasunobu K. 2009. Technology adoption and social networks: introducing alternate wetting and drying (AWD) technology in deep well irrigation systems, Tarlac, Philippines. J. Agric. Ext. Res. 14(1): 81-97. Yokoyama S, Sakurai S. 2009. Local production for local consumption and social capitals: a case of Awa region, Chiba Prefecture in Japan [in Japanese]. Ann. Jpn. Assoc. Econ. Geogr. 55(2): 39-51. Humphreys E, Bayot RS, editors. 2009. Increasing the productivity and sustainability of rainfed cropping systems of poor smallholder farmers. Proceedings of the CGIAR Challenge Program on Water and Food International Workshop on Rainfed Cropping Systems, 22-25 Sep 2008, Tamale, Ghana. Colombo (Sri Lanka): CGIAR Challenge Programme on Water and Food. 311 p. Humphreys E, Tuong TP, Gomez-Macpherson H, Tabo R, Awulachew SB, Bediako J. 2009. Increasing the productivity and sustainability of rainfed cropping systems of poor smallholder farmers: overview of recent findings from the Challenge Program on Water and Food. In: Humphreys E, Bayot RS, editors. Increasing the productivity and sustainability of rainfed cropping systems of poor smallholder farmers. Proceedings of the CGIAR Challenge Program on Water and Food International Workshop on Rainfed Cropping Systems, Tamale, Ghana, 22-25 Sep 2008. Colombo (Sri Lanka): CGIAR Challenge Programme on Water and Food. p 1-24. Molina AB, Molina IR. 2009. The use of genetic diversity in managing diseases of crops: experiences in rice and bananas. In: Ku Te-Yeh, Bejosano CP, Buendia LJ, editors. Development and adoption of green technology for sustainable agriculture. Proceedings of the international seminar on green technology for sustainable agriculture and enhancement of rural entrepreneurship. Taipei, Taiwan (ROC): Food and Fertilizer Technology Center. Paris T. 2009. Addressing gender concerns in rice research and technology development: challenges and opportunities to make a difference. In: Rola AC, Peñalba LM, Carada WB, Paunlagui MM, editors. The social sciences in agriculture and community development: a changing paradigm. Proceedings of the Symposium on the Changing Role of Applied Social Sciences in Agriculture and Community Development, 2930 Jan 2008, Los Banos, Laguna, Philippines. Ramos MM, Alvare LM, Shelton P, Soeripto Y. 2009. The CGIAR virtual library: harnessing new technologies for scholarly access to agricultural information. In: Towards dynamic libraries and information services in Southeast Asian countries: conference proceedings. 14th Congress of Southeast Asian Librarians, Hanoi, Vietnam, 20-23 Apr 2009. p 248 -257. Redoña ED, Manigbas NL, Laza MA, Sierra SN, Bartolome VI, Nora LA, Barroga WV, Noriel JM. 2009. Identifying heat-tolerant rice genotypes under different environments. In: Proceedings of the 14th Australasian Plant Breeding Conference and 11th SABRAO Conference, 6-8 Aug 2009, Australia. Septiningsih EM, Sanchez DL, Angaji SA, Vergara GV, Ismail AM, Mackill DJ. 2009. Fine mapping a QTL for tolerance to flooding during germination derived from Khao Hlan On. In: Proceedings of the SABRAO Conference, 6-8 Aug 2009, Australia. Serraj R. 2009. Drought frontiers in rice: recent progress in phenotyping and crop improvement. In: “Estresses e sustentabilidade: desafios para a lavoura arrozeira.” Proceedings of the 6th Brazilian Congress of Irrigated Rice, August 2009, Porto Alegre. p 561563. Sharifullah AK, Tuong TP, Mondal MK, Fanco DT. 2009. Assessing water supply and demand for dry season

Conference and workshop papers— proceedings
Beebout SEJ, Castillo OB, Jacob JDC, Laureles EV, Larazo WM, Buresh RJ. 2009. Managing paddy soil zinc to improve micronutrient nutrition for rice (Oryza sativa) plants and humans. In: Suh JS, Kim KH, Yoo JH, Kim JK, Paik MK, Kim WI, editors. Proceedings of the 9th International Conference of the East and Southeast Asian Federation of Soil Science Societies, 27-30 Oct 2009, Seoul, Korea. Suwon (Korea): Korean Society of Soil Science and Fertilizer. p 292-299.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

15 of 36

Publications and seminars
rice in coastal polders of Bangladesh. In: Humphreys E, Bayot R, editors. Increasing the productivity and sustainability of rainfed cropping systems of poor smallholder farmers. Proceedings of the CGIAR Challenge Programme on Water and Food International Workshop on Rainfed Cropping Systems, 2225 Sep 2008, Tamale, Ghana. Colombo (Sri Lanka): The CGIAR Challenge Program on Water and Food. p 199-208. Singh RK, Mishra B, Ismail AM, Gregorio B. 2009. Breeding rice for salt-affected areas of India. In: Hossain M, Bennett J, Mackill D, Hardy B, editors. Progress in crop improvement research. Limited Proceedings No. 14. Los Banos (Philippines): International Rice Research Institute. p 78-90. Timsina J, Jat ML, Majumder K. 2009. Challenges for nutrient management for rice-maize systems in South Asia. In: Proceedings of the International Symposium on Potassium Role and Benefits in Improving Nutrient Management for Food Production, Quality and Reduced Environmental Damage, 5-7 Nov 2009, OUAT, Bhubaneswor, Orissa, India. Vergara GV, Labios RL, Pamplona AM, Desamero N, Duongsila K, Hairmansis A, Esguerra MQ, Malabrigo MA, Ismail AM, Mackill DJ. 2009. Performance of submergence-tolerant rice (Sub1 lines) in adaptability trials in Indonesia, Laos and the Philippines. In: Proceedings of the 39th Crop Science Society Scientific Conference, 18-21 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. (abstr.)

Conference and workshop posters
Ali AJ, Gao YM, Bazrkar L, Soroush HR, Li ZK. 2009. Molecular genetic strategy to develop super restorer lines in rice (Oryza sativa L.) using micro satellite markers. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Banaay CGB, Fernandez LC, Pinili MS, Das K, Dule Z, Kumar A, De Waele D, Vera Cruz CM. 2009. Evaluating the response of selected aerobic and upland rice varieties to simultaneous inoculation with Pythium arrhenomanes and Meloidogyne graminicola. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Banaticla-Hilario MCN, Almazan MSR, Naredo MEB, van den Berg RG, McNally KL, Sackville Hamilton NR. 2009. Crossability within and between the wild species of Oryza series Sativae in Asia and Australia. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Bandillo N, Muyco PA, Laza M, Sajise AG, Caspillo C, Gregorio G, Singh RK, Redoña E, Leung H. 2009. Developing multiparent advanced generation intercross (MAGIC) populations using diverse genotypes to facilitate gene discovery for multiple traits in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Barraquias JS, Vera Cruz CM, Goodwin PH, Mauleon RP, Diaz MGQ, Choi IR, Satoh K, Kikuchi S. 2009. Transcriptome profiling of rice in response to bacterial blight pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv.

oryzae. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Beebout JT, Buresh RJ. 2009. E-learning modules for delivering current agronomic knowledge of rice production on submerged soils. Poster presented at the Annual Meeting of the Soil Science Society of America, 1-5 Nov 2008, Pittsburgh, USA. Bimpong K, Mendoza ET, Serraj R, Chin JH, Hernandez JE, Mendioro MS, Ramos JM, Brar DS. 2009. Identification and mapping of QTLs for agronomic traits in crosses of rice (Oryza sativa x O. glaberrima) under upland drought stress. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Bimpong K, Mendoza ET, Serraj R, Mendioro MS, Ramos JM, Hernandez JE, Brar DS. 2009. Identification of QTLs for agronomic traits under lowland drought stress in crosses of Oryza sativa x O. glaberrima. Poster presented at the 39th Crop Science Society Scientific Conference, 18-21 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Biswas P, Hossain A, Thanda T, Inabangan M, Evangelista A, Das Padalkar A, Joseph M, Macabenta J, Aldemita V, Lacorte V, Torrizo L, Samia M, Tan J, Boncodin R, Barry G, Virk P. 2009. Enhancing the nutritional value of indica rice varieties by introgressing beta carotene (golden rice) gene. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 1619 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Bueno C, Bucourt M, Lafarge T. 2009. Evaluating the performance of contrasting rice genotypes grown under water-saving irrigation to identify traits for

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

16 of 36

Publications and seminars
genetic improvement. Poster presented at the International Conference Interdrought III, 11-17 Oct 2009, Shanghai, China. Burgos MRG, Banu S, Dela Paz M, Beligan G, Katimbang ML, Goodwin PH, Oña I, Acedo J, Reveche MY, Ardales EY, Shukla VD, Leung H, Brar DS, Vera Cruz CM. 2009. Genetic variability of Bipolaris oryzae and molecular mapping for resistance to brown spot in rice. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Burgos MRG, Dela Paz M, Beligan G, Katimbang ML, Goodwin PH, Oña I, Reveche MY, Ardales EY, Vera Cruz CM. 2009. Morphological and genetic variation of the brown spot pathogen (Bipolaris oryzae) of rice in the Philippines. Poster presented at the Crop Science Society Scientific Conference, 18-21 May, 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Burgos MRG, Dela Paz M, Beligan G, Katimbang ML, Goodwin PH, Oña I, Reveche MY, Ardales EY, Vera Cruz CM. 2009. Genetic variability of Bipolaris oryzae in the Philippines. Poster presented at the APS Meeting, 28 Jul-1 Aug 2009, San Diego, USA. Bustaman M, Prasetiyono J, Somantri IH, Suhartini T, Abdulrahman S, Moeljopawiro S, Chin JH, Wissuwa M, Ismail AM, Heuer S. 2009. Introgression of the Pup1 major QTL into modern Indonesian upland rice varieties using marker-assisted backcrossing. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Calapit-Palao CDO, de la Viña CB, Mendoza EMT, Gregorio GB, Singh RK. 2009. Reproductive-stage salinity tolerance QTL in rice. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Capilit GLS, Sison LM, Resurreccion NA, Almazan MSR, Reaño RA, de Guzman FC, Sackville Hamilton NR. 2009. Enhancing the value of conserved rice germplasm: open access to International Rice Genebank information. Poster presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Carrillo MGC, Goodwin PH, Variar M, Han SS, Roh JH, Cho YC, Burgos MRG, Mauleon R, Leach JE, Leung H,Vera Cruz CM. 2009. Dissection and utilization of defense response QTLs for quantitative resistance to rice blast. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Carrillo MGC, Oña I, Variar M, Bhatt JC, Courtois B, Goodwin PH, Leach JE, Leung H, Vera Cruz CM. 2009. Accumulating candidate genes for broadspectrum resistance to rice blast in a drought-tolerant rice cultivar. Poster presented at the APS Meeting, 28 Jul-1 Aug 2009, San Diego, USA. Chin JH, Dalid C, Gamuyao R, Amarante S, Siopongco J, Trinidad J, Wissuwa M, Haefele S, Heuer S. 2009. Development and application of gene-based markers for the major QTL Phosphorus uptake 1 (Pup1). Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Chin JH, Thomson MJ, Jiang W, van Etten J, Chu SH, Brar DS, Koh HJ. 2009. Indica-japonica subspecies-specific InDel loci: a novel approach for understanding evolutionary relationships in genus Oryza. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Dalid CO, Chin JH, Trinidad JL, Gamuyao RL, Haefele S, Ismail AM, Wissuwa M, Heuer S. 2009. Application of the major QTL Phosphate uptake 1 (Pup1). Poster presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Davidson RM, Manosalva PM, Vera Cruz CM, Leung H, Leach JE. 2009. Functional analyses of germin-like proteins and oxalate oxidases; contributors to basal disease resistance in rice. Poster presented at the Plant & Animal Genome XVII International Conference on the Status of Plant & Animal Genome Research, 10-14 Jan 2009, San Diego, USA. Desamero NV, Bagarra JC, Manigbas NL, Angeles AT, Malabayabas MD, Labios RV, Ismail AM, Mackill DJ. 2009. Agronomic response of submergence-tolerant rice under normal condition and controlled submergence. Poster presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Desamero NV, Bagarra J, Manigbas NL, Angeles AT, Malabayabas MD, Ravelo GB, Labios RV, Pamplona AM, Ismail AM, Mackill DJ. 2009. Phenotypic expression of introgressed SUB1 QTL varies with genetic background. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

17 of 36

Publications and seminars
Desamero NV, Diocton RF, Manigbas NL, Malabayabas MD, Angeles AT, Labios RV, Ismail AM, Mackill DJ. 2009. On-farm performance of submergence-tolerant rice. Poster presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Dilla CJ, Redoña E, Tabanao DA. 2009. Genetic variation among INGER germplasm introductions released as varieties in various countries. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Dixit S, Bernier J, Venuprasad R, Amante M, Mallikarjuna Swamy BP, Quiatchon L, Atri DK, Kumar A. 2009. Large-effect QTLs for grain yield under drought: what is within them? Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Domingo J, Pastor H, Ticman H, Bagarra J, Camus M, Babaldo R, Desamero NV, Sanchez D, Pamplona AM, Mackill DJ, Perez L. 2009. Marker-assisted breeding for submergence tolerance of Philippine cultivar PSBRc82. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Egdane JA, Katimbang MB, De Ocampo MP, Zantua RP, Concepcion JCT, Singh RK, Thomson MJ, Ismail AM. 2009. Developing near-isogenic lines for multiple QTLs associated with salinity tolerance in rice. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Ella ES, Dionisio-Sese MJ, Ismail AM. 2009. Effect of seed age and seed storage temperature on tolerance for flooding during germination in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Estrada M, Kang DJ, Zaidem M, Liwanag E, SallanGonzales R, Egdane J, Ismail A, Slamet-Loedin IH, Serraj R. 2009. Enhanced tolerance for abiotic stresses in rice through biotechnology. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Evangelista A, Lopena V, Romena B, Khush GS, Virk P. 2009. Utilization of tropical japonica germplasm to enhance genetic diversity of indica rice varieties. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Faronilo JE, Burac M, Dizon R, Tuong TP, Lafarge T, Bouman B, Lampayan R, Furukawa Y, Hosen Y. 2009. Transplanting old seedlings to shorten crop duration in the main field and to reduce irrigation water: effects of nursery management on crop development. Poster presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Fujita D, Tagle AG. Ebron LA, Telebanco-Yanoria MJ, Fukuta Y, Kobayashi N. 2009. Genetic and breeding studies on introgression lines with unique agronomic traits in the genetic background of rice variety IR64: detection and validation of QTLs related to high spikelet number. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Fujita D, Santos RE, Ebron LA, Telebanco-Yanoria MJ, Fukuta Y, Kobayashi N. 2009. Genetic and breeding studies on introgression lines with unique agronomic traits in the genetic background of rice variety IR64: detection of four QTLs related to heading. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Gamuyao R, Trinidad J, Chin JH, Wissuwa M, Heuer S. 2009. Towards the functional validation of genes at the major rice QTL Phosphorus Uptake 1 (Pup1). Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Ganotisi ND, Batuac, RA, Castro RC, Lampayan RM. 2009. Performance of aerobic rice as affected by seeding rate and crop establishment under Ilocos conditions. Poster presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Gowda VRP, Vadez V, Ram T, Shashidhar HE, Rai V, Kumar A, Serraj R. 2009. Studies on water uptake and drought-avoidance root traits in advanced droughtadapted breeding lines in India. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Grewal D, Virk PS, Barry G, Samia M, Inabangan M, Bharaj T, Lopena V. 2009. Micronutrient enrichment of rice grain through dihaploid breeding. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

18 of 36

Publications and seminars
Gurjeet M, Jhutty O, Singh N, Kaur R, Sahi G, Singh K, Virk P, Bharaj T. 2009. Assessment of genetic variability of rice genotypes under aerobic conditions. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Hechanova SS, Diaz MQ, Hernandez JE, Mendioro MS, Ramos JM, Brar DS. 2009. Molecular characterization of introgression and identification of putative genes for bacterial blight resistance in wide-cross derivatives of rice (Oryza sativa L.). Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Hossain H, Rahman MA, Alam MS, De Ocampo MP, Saijse AG, Vispo AN, Refuerzo L, Arceta M, Mercado EFC, Thomson MJ, Ismail AM, Gregorio GB, Singh RK. 2009. QTL identification for reproductive-stage salinity tolerance in rice. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Jagadish SVK, Rang Z, Lawas L, Howell G, Redoña E, Craufurd PQ, Heuer S. 2009. Developing rice that maintains high yield in a warmer climate. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Kang KH, Ko JC, Choi SH, Yap JK, Oh YL, Jeong KH, Park JH, Lee SM. 2009. Broadening Japonica rice germplasm for enhancing yield potential in the tropical conditions by dihaploid breeding. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Kang KH, Yap JKC, Ko JC. 2009. Effects of delayed leaf senescence on yield and yield components of rice in near-isogenic line populations. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Koide Y, Telebanco MJ, Fukuta Y, Kobayashi. 2009. A genetic study on broad-spectrum resistance of rice landrace Haoru to standard differential rice blast (Magnaporthe oryzae (Couch and Kohn) isolates from the Philippines. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Lang J, Hamilton J, Van Sluys MA, Burgos MRB, Vera Cruz CM, Tisserat N, Robin Buell C, Leach JE. 2009. Genomics-based diagnostic marker development for Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and X. oryzae pv. oryzicola. Poster presented at the Xanthomonas Genomics Conference, 13-16 Jul 2009, Colorado State University, USA. Lang NT, Luy TT, Binh TT, Thuan ND, Canh TV, Bang NV, Buu BC, Labios RV, Ismail AM, Mackill DJ. 2009. Dissemination of submergence-tolerant varieties in Southern Vietnam. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. (abstr.) Lee JH, Muhsin M, Atienza GA, Kwak DY. Kim SM, De Leon TB, Angeles ER, Coloquio E, Kondoh H, Satoh K, Cabunagan RC, Cabauatan PQ, Kikuchi S, Leung H, Choi IR. 2009. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in a gene for translation initiation factor (eIF4G) of rice (Oryza sativa) associated with resistance to rice tungro spherical virus. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Liu Y, Zhu XY, Zhang SH, Leach JE, Liu B, Leung H. 2009. NBS-LRR gene clusters contributing to durable resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae in rice variety SHZ-2. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Lore JS, Oña I, Castilla NP, Reyes JC, Burgos MRG, Willocquet L, Savary S, Vera Cruz CM. 2009. Genotypic and phenotypic variations in Rhizoctonia species associated with rice sheath blight complex in the Philippines. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Mabesa R, Henry A, Serraj R. 2009. Genetic variation of shoot and root dynamics under different soil moisture levels. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Mazuduzzaman ASM, Shamsudin AKM, Salam MA, Septiningsih EM, Sanchez DL, Pamplona AM, Heuer S, Mackill DJ. 2009. Molecular diversity and expression studies of SUB1 gene haplotypes of rice, differing in tolerance for submergence. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. McNally KL, Childs KL, Bohnert R, Davidson R, Zhao K, Ulat VJ, Zeller G, Clark R, Hoen D, Bureau T, Stokowski R, Ballinger D, Frazer K, Cox D, Padhukasahasram B, Bustamante CD, Weigel D, Ratsch G, Bruskiewich R, Buell CR, Leung H, Leach J. 2009. Poster presented at the Plant & Animal Genome XVII International Conference on the Status of Plant & Animal Genome Research, 10-14 Jan 2009, San Diego, USA. 19 of 36

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

Publications and seminars
Min A, Mendioro MS, Hernandez JE, Kang KH, Brar DS. 2009. Mapping genes for bacterial blight resistance transferred from wild species, Oryza rufipogon Griff. into rice (O. sativa L.). Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Molina LR, Santos MV, Beebout SEJ. 2009. In-house developed laboratory data management system. Poster presented at the 11th International Symposium on Soil and Plant Analysis, 20-24 Jul 2009, Santa Rosa, CA, USA. Nakhoda B, Walia H, Cui X, Close T, Mendioro MS, KLeung H, Ismail A. 2009. Comparative transcriptional profiling of two contrasting IR64 mutants and wild type parent under control and salt stress treatments during vegetative stage. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Naredo MEB, Cairns J, Gamalinda M, Wang H, Atienza G, Sanciangco MD, Melgar RA, Kumar A, Ramaiah V, Serraj R, McNally KL. 2009. EcoTILLING the Oryza germplasm: utility in targeted genotyping and phylogenetic analysis. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009. Manila Philippines. Nugraha Y, Vergara GV, Mackill DJ, Ismail AM. 2009. Performance of Sub1 lines and their parental types under complete submergence and stagnant flooded conditions. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Oane RH, Dixit S, Bernier J, Kohli A, Kumar A. 2009. Drought tolerance conferred by DTY12.1 allele is linked to increased total root length resulting in higher relative water content and spikelet fertility. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Oliva N. 2009. Bioinformatic assessment of any potential allergenicity of proteins being used to develop high lysine and high iron transgenic rice grains. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Oña I, Roh JH, Han SS, Cho YC, Tagle A, Yanoria J, Kobayashi N, Fukuta Y, Koide Y, Burgos R, Chin JH, Vera Cruz CM. 2009. Broad-spectrum resistance of blast monogenic lines to Magnaporthe oryzae. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Oña I, Roh JH, Han SS,Yanoria J, Kobayashi N, Fukuta Y, Koide Y, Burgos R, Chin JH, Vera Cruz CM. 2009. 2009. Resistance spectrum of blast monogenic lines. Poster presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Pamplona AM, Sanchez DL, Septiningsih EM, Mackill DJ. 2009. Moving beyond SUB1: combining tolerance for submergence and water stagnation. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Pasuquin E, Lafarge T, Reinke R, Eberbach P, Hasegawa T, Wade LJ. 2009. Response of rice to changing climatic conditions. I. Genotypic variation in growth responses to elevated temperature. Poster presented at the International Symposium on Crop Production under Heat Stress, 6-9 Oct 2009, Tsukuba, Japan. Pasuquin E, Sakai H, Yoshimoto M, Hasegawa T, Lafarge T, Reinke R, Eberbach P, Wade LJ. 2009. Response of rice to changing climatic conditions. II. Genotypic variation in growth responses to vapor pressure deficit. Poster presented at the International Symposium on Crop Production under Heat Stress, 6-9 Oct 2009, Tsukuba, Japan. Pinili M, Banaay CG, Elazegui F, Steelandt A, Das K, Kreye C, Kumar A, Bouman B, Hofte M, Cuevas VC, Vera Cruz CM. 2009. Population dynamics of Pythium sp. and Meloidogyne graminicola from an aerobic rice field planted to variety Apo. Poster presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philiipines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Ramos JM, Oña IP, Torres GR, Hechanova SS, Vera Cruz CM, Brar DS. 2009. Introgression of genes for blast resistance from African rice (Oryza glaberrima Steud.) into indica rice (O. sativa L.). Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Rang Z, Lawas L, Jagadish SVK, Craufurd PQ, Heuer S. 2009. Effect of combined drought and heat stress on anthesis in rice. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Rangan L, Rout A, Sudarshan M, Gregorio G. 2009. Molecular cloning, expression and mapping of translational initiation factor eIF1 gene in Oryza sativa.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

20 of 36

Publications and seminars
Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Rubianes FHC, Beebout SEJ. 2009. Fate of zinc fertilizer in rice soils. Poster presented at the 12th Annual Meeting and Scientific Conference of the Philippine Society of Soil Science and Technology, 21-22 May 2009, Davao, Philippines. Sajise AC, Reza M, Vispo AN, Mamiit A, Cueto MF, Mercado, Arceta M, Singh RK, Gregorio G. 2009. Screening of salinity elite lines under extremely zinc-deficient soil. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Sanchez DL, Hidayatun N, Sendon PE, Chawla S, Pamplona AM, Septiningsih EM, Mackill DJ. 2009. Single-backcross approach to transfer submergence tolerance from IR64-Sub1 to related rice. Poster presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Sanchez DL, Sendon PD, Pamplona AM, Septiningsih EM, Mackill DJ. 2009. Mapping of submergence tolerance QTLs in rice using a population derived from IR72/Madabaru. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Sandro JM, Correa TQ, Mendoza TLT, Samson MI, Buresh RJ. 2009. Videos enhance training and dissemination of site-specific nutrient management (SSNM) for rice. Poster presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Satoh K, Venuprasad R, Kumar A, Mauleon R, Bartolome V, Serraj R, Leung H, Kikuchi S. 2009. Transcriptomes of near-isogenic lines with contrasting responses to drought stress revealed developmentdependent, drought-tolerant candidate genes. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Sendon PD, Sanchez DL, Ismail AM, Mackil DJ, Septiningsih EM. 2009. Identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) in rice or tolerance to submergence during germination derived from a tolerant variety, Ma-Zhan Red. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Septiningsih EM, Sanchez DL, Sendon PD, Trijatmiko KR, Torrizo LB, Balindong, Vergara GV, Slamet-Loedin IH, Ismail AM, Mackill DJ. 2009. Toward identification of the gene(s) underlying a QTL for tolerance to flooding during germination derived from the rice variety Khao Hlan On. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Sierra SN, Redoña ED, Galela HS, Adefuin AMD, Punongbayan AS, Reamillo MCS, Mendoza JC. 2009. Genetic diversity of elite varieties of rice (Oryza sativa L.) identified from international trials. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Singh N, Trang DTM, Mackill DJ, Heuer S. 2009. Regulation of tissue-specific expression of the submergence-tolerance gene SUB1A. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Shim J, Panaud O, Vitte C, Mendioro MS, Brar DS. 2009. Exploring of genomic conservation across wild Oryza species using RDA clones. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Slamet-Loedin IH, Trijatmiko KR, Balindong J, Oliva N, Abrigo E, Manzanilla M, Duenas C, Chadha-Mohanty P, Barry G. 2009. Enhancing lysine content in IR64 endosperm. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Suh JP, Lee JI, Yea JD, Virk PS, Mackill D, Kim YG, Jena KK. 2009. Identification of QTLs for cold tolerance at reproductive stage of rice. Poster presented at the XVII Plant & Animal Genome Conference, 10-14 Jan 2010, San Diego, USA. Susanto U, Lopena V, Torrizo L, Aswidinnoor H, Virk PS. 2009. QTL mapping for iron and zinc content in polished rice grains using SSR markers. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Swain P, Baig MJ, Mall AK, Singh ON, Kumar A, Serraj R. 2009. Morpho-physiological and biochemical changes in rice varieties as affected by early stage drought. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Tagle AG, Fujita D, Santos RE, Ebron LA, Telebanco-Yanoria MJ, Fukuta Y, Kobayashi N. 2009. Genetic

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

21 of 36

Publications and seminars
and breeding studies on introgression lines with unique agronomic traits in the genetic background of rice variety IR64: detection of QTLs for agronomic traits introgressed from a new plant type variety, IR66215-44-2-3. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Telebanco-Yanoria MJ, Koide Y, dela Peña F, Fukuta Y, Kobayashi N. 2009. Characterization of new blast Magnaporthe oryzae (Couch and Kohn) isolates from the Philippines by international blast designation system and application to genetic studies on rice resistance. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Thein SZM, Hernandez JE, Borromeo TH, Sajise AG, Mendoza R, Refuerzo L, Gregorio GB, Singh RK. 2009. Integrating salinity and submergence tolerance in one genetic background through MAS in rice. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Thomson MJ, Rahman MA, de Ocampo M, Egdane J, Singh RK, McCouch SR, Ismail AM. 2009. Allelic variation from the salt tolerant landrace Pokkali for improved salinity tolerance in rice. Poster presented at the International Plant & Animal Genome XVII Conference, 10-14 Jan 2009, San Diego, CA, USA. Thomson MJ, Zhao K, Wright M, Reveche MY, Rey J, Rahman MA, McNally KL, Leung H, McCouch SR. 2009. Development and application of 96 and 384plex SNP sets for diversity analysis and mapping in rice. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Torres JAHT, Sinohin PJO, Castillo RL, Samson MI, Buresh RJ. 2009. Web site for facilitating dissemination of site-specific nutrient management (SSNM) for rice. Poster presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Trinidad J, Gamuyao RL, Chin JH, Dalid CO, Haefele S, Wissuwa M, Heuer S. 2009. Candidate genes in the major rice QTL Phosphate uptake 1 (Pup1). Poster presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Tsakirpaloglou NK, Gatehouse AMR, Kohli A. 2009. A multifunctional rice germin like protein. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Vergara GV, Labios RV, Manzanilla DO, Pamplona AM, Esguerra MQ, Paris TR, Ismail AM, Mackill DJ. 2009. Performance of submergence-tolerant rice (Sub1 lines) in flood-prone areas of Southeast Asia. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Wang W, Vergara GV, Li Z, Mackill DJ, Ismail AM. 2009. Survival and grain yield of two Sub1 introgression lines as affected by variable duration of submergence. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Webb KM, Oña I, Bai J, Garrett KA, Mew T, Vera Cruz CM, Leach JE. 2009. Increased temperature favors effectiveness of a rice bacterial blight disease resistance gene. Poster presented at the Xanthomonas Genomics Conference, 13-16 Jul 2009, Colorado State University, USA. Zaidem M, Laluz V, Montecillo F, Lacsama M, TecsonMendoza EM, Slamet-Loedin IH, Herve P. 2009. Validation of candidate reference genes for accurate quantitative gene expression assays. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Zenna N, Satoh K, Kikuchi S, Cabauatan PQ, Baraoidan M, Leung H, Choi IR. 2009. QTL mapping of tolerant reactions to rice tungro disease in a putative IR64 rice mutant. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Zhou W, Abrigo E, Dueñas CC, Oliva N, Malabanan PB, Sallan-Gonzales R, Serraj R, Ouwerkerk PBF, Slamet-Loedin IH. 2009. Overexpression of rice Oshox4 gene affects plant size and tiller number and enhances plant water status and growth under drought stress. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Zhou W, Dueñas C, Oliva N, de Palma J, Manzanilla M, Borja G, Torrizo L, Poletti S, Chadha-Mohanty P, Huixia S, Herve P, Barry G, Slamet-Loedin I. 2009. Analysis of IR64 transgenic ferritin homozygous lines for iron fortification. Poster presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

22 of 36

Publications and seminars
Conference and workshop papers— presented
Adamchuk VI, Villa J, Serraj R. 2009. Application of electromagnetic sensing to delineate spatially variable soil characteristics and drought susceptibility in field-managed screening of rice under rainfed lowland conditions. Paper presented at the Biennial Meeting of Commission Pedometrics of the International Union of Soil Science, 25-28 Aug 2009, Agricultural University Beijing, China. Asilo S, Chemin Y, Phupak S, Hijmans R. 2009. Determining spatial and temporal patterns of flooding in rice. Paper presented at the IRRI-MOFA Japan Project’s 2nd Planning Meeting and Workshop, 23-25 Mar 2009, Bogor City, Indonesia. Bailey-Serres J, Takeshi F, Heuer S, Ismail A, Ronald P, Mackill DJ. 2009. Submergence-tolerant rice. Paper presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 November 2009, Manila, Philippines. Bandillo, N, Muyco PA, Caspillo M, Laza M, Sajise A, Redona E, Singh RK, Leung H. 2009. Population development through multiparent advanced generation intercrosses (MAGIC) among diverse genotypes to facilitate gene discovery for various traits in rice. Paper presented at the Crop Science Society of the Philippines’ Annual Meeting, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Barry GF. 2009. Biofortification of rice. Paper presented at the TWAS Regional Young Scientists Conference, 3-5 Nov 2009, Selangor, Malaysia. Barry GF. 2009. Coexistence, challenges and opportunities for rice. Paper presented at the Genetically Modified Crops Co-existence Conference 2009, 9-12 Nov 2009, Victoria, Australia. Barry GF. 2009. The GM crop pipeline contributing to sustainability of global food, feed and fibre productivity. Paper presented at the Genetically Modified Crops Co-existence Conference 2009, 9-12 Nov 2009, Victoria, Australia. Barry GF. 2009. Golden Rice: event choice; bioavailability data, and consumer and stakeholder studies. Paper presented at the IRRI Board Program Committee Meeting, 29-30 Sep 2009, Tsukuba International Congress Center, Tsukuba, Japan. Barry GF. 2009. Improvement of nutrient content in rice. Paper presented at a lecture, 8 Jul 2009, Seminar Hall, Directorate of Rice Research, Hyderabad, India. Barry GF. 2009. Improving the nutritional content of rice. Paper presented at the Tropical Crop Biotechnology Conference, 21-25 Jul 2009, Mpumalanga, South Africa. Barry GF. 2009. Mechanisms, modalities, and partners for cooperation in Asia: options and alternatives. Paper presented at the 4th Asian Conference on Biotechnology and Development, 11-13 Feb 2009, Kathmandu, Nepal. Barry GF. 2009. Prospects of GM rice technology. Paper presented at the 2009 Rice Breeding Course, 24 Aug-8 Sep 2009, International Rice Research Institute, Los Banos, Laguna, Philippines. Barry GF. 2009. Recent progress in the development of GM crop products in developing countries. Paper presented at the 8th Meeting of the APEC HighLevel Policy Dialogue on Agricultural Biotechnology, 17-21 Feb, APEC Secretariat, Singapore. Barry GF. 2009. The role of agricultural biotechnology for developing countries. Paper presented at a mini symposium, 5 May 2009, Science Centre, Institute of Plant Molecular Biology and Agricultural Biotechnology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. Hong Kong. Barry GF. 2009. Ten years of GM development in rice what will the next 10 years bring? Paper presented at the 17th Eurofins International Seminar 2009: An Outlook on Next-Generation Biotech Crops, 25-26 Feb 2009, Paris, France. Barry GF. 2009. Update on the progress toward commercialization of GM rice. Paper presented at the Biotechnology Alliances Association Anniversary and Annual Meeting 2009, 21 December 2009, Kasetsart University, Bangkok. Beebout SEJ. 2009. Zinc fertilizer trials at IRRI: agronomic management for rice Zn biofortification. Paper presented at the HarvestPlus Zinc Fertilizer Meeting, 28 May 2009, Shanghai, China. Beebout SEJ, Castillo OB, Jacob JDC, Laureles EV, Buresh RJ. 2009. Agronomic management for rice zinc biofortification. Paper presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

23 of 36

Publications and seminars
Beebout SEJ, Castillo OB, Laureles EV, Rubianes FHC, Buresh RJB. 2009. Enhanced Zn biofortification of rice through Zn fertilizer and water management. Paper presented at the American Society of Agronomy Annual Meeting, 2-5 Nov 2009, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. Beebout SEJ, Rubianes FCH, Tuyogon D, Larazo WM. 2009. Zinc in rice: shedding some light on E, with speculation about G x E mechanisms. Paper presented at the HarvestPlus Rice Team Meeting, 1-3 Dec 2009, Singapore. Bernal CC, Letana SD, Horgan FG. 2009. Effects of molluscicides on decomposer and parasitoid communities in rice ecosystems. Paper presented at the Pest Management Council of the Philippines’ 40th Annual Scientific Conference, 5-8 May 2009, Baguio City, Philippines. Bimpong IK, Mendoza EMT, Serraj R, Hernandez J, Mendioro MS, Ramos J, Brar DS. 2009. Identification of QTLs for agronomic traits in crosses of rice (Oryza sativa x O. glaberrima) under drought stress. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on Integrated Approaches to Improve Crop Production under Drought-Prone Environments (InterDrought), 11-16 Oct, Shanghai, China. Bimpong IK, Mendoza EMT, Serraj R, Mendioro MS, Ramos J, Hernandez J, Kumar A, Brar DS. 2009. Identification of QTLs for agronomic traits under lowland drought stress in interspecific crosses of rice (Oryza sativa cv IR64) x O. glaberrima. Paper presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Bin D, Qing’an Z, Kajisa K, Jinshan C, Jianzhang W, Xinqiao W, Chuanju Z. 2009. Accounting for water use performance in the context of diversification of water sources and institutions in the Zhanghe Irrigation System, Hubei, China. Paper presented at the International Forum on Water Resource and Sustainable Development, 22-24 Sep 2009, Wuhan University, Wuhan, China. Buresh RJ. 2009. The SSNM concept and its implementation in rice. Paper presented at International Fertilizer Industry Association Crossroads AsiaPacific Conference, 8-10 Dec 2009, Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia. Buresh RJ, Gabinete G. 2009. An approach for disseminating improved nutrient management for rice in the Philippines. Paper presented at the International Symposium on Potassium Role and Benefits in Improving Nutrient Management for Food Production, Quality and Reduced Environmental Damages, 5-7 Nov 2009, Bhubaneswar, India. Buresh RJ, Pampolino MF, Witt C. 2009. Implementing site-specific potassium management for rice-based cropping systems. Paper presented at the International Symposium on Potassium Role and Benefits in Improving Nutrient Management for Food Production, Quality and Reduced Environmental Damages, 5-7 Nov 2009, Bhubaneswar, India. Bustaman M, Prasetiyono J, Somatri IH, Suhartini T, Abdulrahman S, Moeljopawiro S, Chin JH. 2009. Introgression of the Pup 1 major QTL into modern Indonesian upland rice varieties using marker-assisted backcrossing. Paper presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Cabangon RJ, Castillo EG, Corcuera FG, Tuong TP. 2009. SPAD-based N management of rice under alternate wetting and drying irrigation saves water and nitrogen fertilizer. Paper presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Cabangon RJ, Tuong TP. 2009. Comparing water use and water productivity between farmer-managed pump irrigation and publicly managed surface irrigation system. Paper presented at the Regional R&D Workshop on “Water-Saving Irrigation Practices in Rice-Based Canal Systems,” 8-9 Oct 2009, Bangkok, Thailand. Cabrera E, Paris T. 2009. Identifying the needs and opportunities for women leaders: a case study in Luzon, Philippines. Paper presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philiipines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Castillo OB, Beebout SEJ. 2009. Critical redox potential at which zinc is most available for plants. Paper presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Castillo OB, Beebout SEJ. 2009. Soil Zn availability decreases with redox potential in anaerobic stirred slurries. Paper presented at the American Society of Agronomy Annual Meeting, 2-5 Nov 2009, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. Castillo RL, Sinohin PJO, Pampolino MF, Samson MI, Cruz RT, Badayos RB, Paningbatan EP, Sanchez PB, Buresh RJ. 2009. Nutrient Manager for Rice: an

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

24 of 36

Publications and seminars
innovative tool helps farmers optimize nutrient inputs. Paper presented at the 12th Annual Meeting and Scientific Conference of the Philippine Society of Soil Science and Technology, 20-22 May 2009, Davao City, Philippines. Cook FJ, Knight J H, Humphreys E, McHugh AD, Tisdall J, Hamilton G, Roth CH. 2009. Modelling of water and solutes in permanently raised beds. Paper presented at the 18th World IMACS/MODSIM Congress, 13-17 Jul 2009, Cairns, Australia. Correa TQ, Laureles EV, Jayme NV, Buresh RJ. 2009. Sustainability of intensive rice production as determined from a long-term experiment. Paper presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Cui X, Walia H, Wilson C, Ismail AM, Close TJ. 2009. Transcriptome-based analysis of genetic variation for salt tolerance in cereals with specific focus on rice. Paper presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. De la Cruz IA, Baldedara LS, del Rosario CD, Ablaza SMF, Padolina TF, Cruz RT, Redoña ED, de Leon JC. 2009. Development of new-generation parental lines from a high-yielding hybrid. Paper presented at the Crop Science Society of the Philippines’ Annual Meeting, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. De Ocampo MP, Thomson MJ, Egdane J, Rahman MA, Zantua RE, Concepcion JCT, Ismail AM. 2009. Genetic dissection of seedling-stage salt tolerance in rice using an indica-japonica population. Paper presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. De Ocampo MP, Thomson MJ, Egdane J, Zantua RE, Concepcion JCT, Ismail AM. 2009. Mapping quantitative trait loci for salinity tolerance in rice using an indica-japonica population. Paper presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Dilla CJ, Oboza HM, Redoña ED. 2009. Genetic diversity of rice (Oryza sativa L.) varieties directly released thru INGER. Paper presented at the Crop Science Society of the Philippines’ Annual Meeting, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Dixit S, Amante M, Zhao D, Atlin G, Kumar A. 2009. Detecting and fine mapping QTLs with major effects on rice yield under drought stress for deployment via marker-aided breeding. Paper presented at the Annual Review of the Generation Challenge Programme 20-23 Sep 2009, Bamako, Mali. Gabinete GG, Buresh RJ. 2009. Site-specific nutrient management (SSNM): profitability to farmers, current level of adoption, and constraints to wider adoption in Iloilo Province, the Philippines. Paper presented at the International Fertilizer Industry Association Crossroads Asia-Pacific Conference, 8-10 Dec 2009, Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia. Gabinete GG, Gabinete AZ, Samson MI, Buresh RJ. 2009. Dissemination and on-farm benefits of sitespecific nutrient management (SSNM) for rice in Iloilo Province. Paper presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Ganotisi ND, Batuac RA, Castro RC, Lampayan RM. 2009. Evaluation of the growth and yield performance of aerobic rice as affected by crop establishment and seeding rate under Ilocos conditions. Paper presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Garrett KA., Forbes G, Pande D, Savary D, Sparks A, Valdivia C, Vera Cruz C, Willocquet L. 2009. Anticipating and responding to biological complexity in the effects of climate change on agriculture. Paper presented at the IOP Conference SeriesClimate Change: Global Risks, Challenges and Decisions, 1012 Mar 2009, Copenhagen, Denmark. Gaydon DS, Buresh RJ, Probert ME. 2009. Simulating rice in farming systems – modelling transitions between aerobic and ponded soil environments in APSIM. Paper presented at the Farming Systems Design Symposium, 23-26 Aug 2009, Monterey, CA, USA. Gowda VRP, Serraj R, Henry A, Shashidhar HE. 2009. Assessing the role of root traits in water uptake and maintenance of plant growth in the rice OryzaSNP accessions. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on Integrated Approaches to Improve Crop Production under Drought-Prone Environments (InterDrought), 11-16 Oct 2009, Shanghai, China. Guan Y, Zhikang Li, Serraj R. 2009. Morpho-physiological traits and yield performance of droughtresistant

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

25 of 36

Publications and seminars
rice lines developed by designed QTL pyramiding. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on Integrated Approaches to Improve Crop Production under Drought-Prone Environments (InterDrought), 11-16 Oct 2009, Shanghai, China. Gupta V, Singh S, Chandna P, Tewari A, Kumar K, Ladha JK, Gupta RK, Gupta PK. 2009. Mitigating methane emission in rice with resources-conserving technologies. Abstracts. 4th World Congress on Conservation Agriculture, 4-7 Feb 2009, New Delhi, India. Henry A, Gowda VRP, Serraj R. 2009. Dissecting the role of root architecture in dehydration avoidance mechanisms in rice. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on Integrated Approaches to Improve Crop Production under Drought-Prone Environments (InterDrought), 11-16 Oct 2009, Shanghai, China. Henry A, Torres R, Serraj R. 2009. Dissecting the role of root architecture in drought avoidance mechanisms in rice. Paper presented at the 20th Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Heuer S. 2009. Marker-assisted breeding and molecular characterization of the rice QTLs Sub1 and Pup1. Paper presented at the 36th Annual Convention of the Philippine Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bukidnon, Philippines. Heuer S. 2009. Marker-assisted breeding and molecular characterization of the rice QTLs Sub1 and Pup1. Paper presented at the 9th International Plant Molecular Biology Congress, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. Heuer S. 2009. Suitable rice for unsuitable environments molecular breeding to improve food security of poor farmers and consumers. Paper presented at the University of Milano, Italy. Hong He, Sellamuthu R, Serraj R. 2009 Physiological and biochemical regulation of rice spikelet sterility under reproductive-stage water deficit. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on Integrated Approaches to Improve Crop Production under Drought-Prone Environments (InterDrought), 11-16 Oct 2009, Shanghai, China. Hossain H, Rahman MA, Alam MS, De Ocampo M, Sajise AG, Vispo AN, Refuerzo L, Arceta M, Thomson MJ, Ismail AM, Gregorio GB, Singh RK. 2009. QTL identification for reproductive-stage salinity tolerance in rice. Paper presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Humphreys E, Kukal SS, Thaman S, Balwinder-Singh, Yadav S. 2009. Resource- conserving technologies in irrigated rice-wheat systems in north west India–what are the real water savings? In: Proceedings of the International Commission on Irrigation and Drainage 5th Asian Regional Conference, 6-11 Dec 2009, New Delhi, India. Islam MM, Ismail AM, Begum SN, Emon RM, Halder J, Manidas AC. 2009. Screening of salt-tolerant rice lines using carbon isotope discrimination technique. Paper presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Ismail AM, Vergara GV, Labios RV, Pamplona AM, Septiningsih E, Mackill DJ. 2009. Flood-prone ecosystems: tolerance tactics and scenarios of good agricultural practices. Paper presented at the IRRI-MOFA Japan Project 2nd Planning Meeting and Workshop, 23-25 Mar 2009, Bogor City, Indonesia. Ismail AM, Vergara GV, Manuel M, Nugraha Y, Labios RV, Pamplona AM, Mackill DJ. 2009. How rice defies too much water: adaptive strategies and prospects for high and secure productivity. Paper presented at the IRRI-MOFA Japan Project Completion Workshop, 2-4 Dec 2009, Bangkok, Thailand. Jena KK. 2009. Abiotic stress breeding in rice: drought, salinity, cold and submergence. Paper presented at the RTTS Training Course, 16 Sep 2009, RDA, Republic of Korea. Jena KK. 2009. Genes from wild species of Oryza and their use by molecular breeding for improvement of temperate Japonica rice. Paper presented at the Jilin Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 19 Jun 2009, Changchun, China. Jena KK, Kim YG. 2009. New resistance genes and durable resistance breeding to control diseases of rice. Paper presented at the Yunnan Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 12 Oct 2009, Kunming, China. Jena KK, Suh JP, Yang SJ, Kim YG. 2009. Development of brown planthopper (BPH)- resistant breeding lines using marker-assisted selection in rice. Paper presented at the 14th Conference of the Australian Society of Plant Breeding and 11th SABRAO Conference, 10-14 Aug 2009, Cairns, Australia.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

26 of 36

Publications and seminars
Kajisa K, Bin D. 2009. Success and failure of induced institutional innovation and its economic impact: the case of a water user association in an irrigation scheme in Hubei, China. Paper presented at the Institute for Social Science Conference on Institutions, Behavior, and the Escape from Persistent Poverty, Oct 2009, Cornell University, Ithaca, USA. Kajisa K, Bin D, Moya PF, Valencia MS, Rala AB, Ocampo LA. 2009. How can we induce farmers’ water-saving behavior ? Role of pricing policy, institutions and infrastructure in Zhanghe Irrigation System, Hubei, China. Paper presented at the International Forum on Water Resource and Sustainable Development, 22-24 Sep 2009, Wuhan University, China. Kajisa K, Palanichamy V. 2009. Impacts of organic farming in a developing country: evidence from Tamil Nadu, India, from 1993 to 2003. Paper presented at the 27th International Conference of Agricultural Economists, 16-22 Aug 2009, Beijing, China. Kijoji AA, Nchimbi-Msolla S, Serraj R, Kanyeka ZL. 2009. Screening Oryza glaberrima and O. sativa interspecific progenies for drought resistance in fieldmanaged nurseries. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on Integrated Approaches to Improve Crop Production under Drought-Prone Environments (InterDrought), 11-16 Oct 2009, Shanghai, China. Kumar A. 2009. Making rice less thirsty to tackle climate change: strategies and progress. Paper presented at the National Seminar on Designing Crops for the Changing Climate, 30-31 Oct 2009, BAU, Ranchi. Kumar A, Singh RK, Gregorio G, Singh US, Mackill DJ. 2009. Improving yield under abiotic stresses in rainfed areas: raising rice production to feed future generations. Paper presented at the 14th Conference of the Australian Society of Plant Breeding and 11th SABRAO Conference, 10-14 Aug 2009, Cairns, Australia. Kumar A, Venuprasad R, Zhao D, Espiritu M, Sta Cruz MT, Atlin G. 2009. Large-effect QTLs for grain yield under drought stress in the background of mega varieties to improve drought tolerance using MAB. Paper presented at the 14th Conference of the Australian Society of Plant Breeding and 11th SABRAO Conference, 10-14 Aug, 2009, Cairns, Australia. Kumar A, Verulkar SB, Mandal NP, Dwivedi JL, Singh BN, Sinha PK, Mahato RN, Swain P, Dongre P, Singh ON, Bose LK, Robin S, Chandrababu R, Senthil S, Jain A, Shashidhar HE, Hittalmani S, Raman A,. Haefele S, Serraj R, Hijmans R, Atlin G, Singh US, Mackill D. 2009. Network approach to breeding resilient and productive genotypes adapted to drought-prone rainfed ecosystems: achievements for 2005-08. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on Integrated Approaches to Improve Crop Production under Drought-Prone Environments (InterDrought), 11-16 Oct 2009, Shanghai, China. Labios RV, Mackill DJ, Ismail AM. 2009. Submergenceand drought-tolerant rice adaptive yield trials in the Philippines: DA-IRRI collaborative project. Paper presented at the Department of Agriculture GMA Rice Program 3rd Quarterly Assessment and Planning Workshop, 12-14 Aug 2009, Davao City, Philippines. Ladha JK, Alam MM, Chandna P, Gathala M, Gupta RK, Kumar V, Pathak H, Prasad R, Raman A, Regmi AP, Rehman H, Saharawat Y, Sharma S, Singh UP. 2009. Developing alternate tillage and crop establishment strategies for higher resource use efficiencies in the rice-wheat system. Paper presented at the 4th World Congress on Conservation Agriculture, 4-7 Feb 2009, New Delhi, India. Lafarge T, Fitzgerald M, Heuer S, Howell G, Krishna J, Li T, Peng S, Redoña E, Sumfleth K, Wassmann R. 2009. Adapting the rice crop to hotter environments: current and future activities at IRRI. Paper presented at the International Symposium on Crop Production under Heat Stress: Monitoring, Impact Assessment and Adaptation, 6-9 October 2009, Tsukuba, Japan. Lakra V, Rahman M, Jaim WMH. 2009. Diversity and diffusion of rice varieties in Jharkhand, India. Paper presented at the Final Workshop on Adoption and Diffusion of Modern Rice Varieties in Bangladesh and eastern India, 3-4 Oct 2009 , BRAC, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Lal R, Khippal A, Singh S, Chand M, Bir D, Ladha JK. 2009. Intercropping of rabi crops with bed-planter in autumn-planted sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) for higher net returns in irrigated systems. Abstracts. 4th World Congress on Conservation Agriculture, 4-7 Feb 2009, New Delhi, India. Lampayan RM, Bouman BAM, Flor RB, Palis FG, Cabangon RJ, Manalili MM, Sibayan EB, de Dios JL. 2009. Dissemination of alternate wetting and drying technology in the Philippines: status and lessons. Paper presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

27 of 36

Publications and seminars
Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Lampayan RM, Bouman BAM, Quicho ED, Flor RB, Palis FG, Cabangon RJ, Manalili MM, Sibayan EB, de Dios JL. 2009. Outscaling of safe alternate wetting and drying in the Philippines: status and lessons. Paper presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Lang NT, Luy TT, Binh TT, Thuan ND, Canh TV, Bang NV, Buu BC, Labios RV, Ismail AM, Mackill DJ. 2009. Dissemination of submergence-tolerant varieties in Southern Vietnam. Paper presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Larazo W, Labios J, Medina S, Buresh RJ. 2009. Establishment and nitrogen management for maize rotated with irrigated rice. Paper presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Laureles EV, Samson MI, San Gabriel RC, Suplido MEAA, Gabinete, GG, Cruz, RT, Buresh RJ. 2009. Fast-tracking the delivery of improved nutrient management practices to rice farmers. Paper presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Leung H, Redoña E, Singh RK, Laza M, Sajise AG, Bandillo N, Muyco PA, Caspillo C. 2009. Developing multiparent advanced generation inter-cross (MAGIC) populations using diverse genotypes to facilitate gene discovery for multiple traits in rice. Paper presented at the Annual Review Meeting of the Generation Challenge Programme, 19-23 Sep 2009, Bamako, Mali. Luquet D, Soulié JC, Rebolledo MC, Lafarge T, Dingkuhn M. 2009. Modeling rice phenotypic plasticity in diverse climates using EcoMeristem: model evolution and application to rice improvement. Paper presented at the International Workshop on Crop Production under Heat Stress: Monitoring, Impact Assessment and Adaptation, 6-9 Oct 2009, Tsukuba, Japan. Mackill DJ, Septiningsih EM, Pamplona AM, Sanchez DL, Vergara GV, Heuer S, Ismail AM. 2009. Practical applications of the Sub1A gene in developing improved, submergence-tolerant rice. Paper presented at the Plant & Animal Genome XVII Conference, 10-14 Jan 2009, San Diego, CA, USA. Majumdar K, Pampolino MF, Buresh RJ. 2009. Site-specific nutrient management: a simplified approach. Paper presented at the RSC/RTCC Meeting for RiceWheat Consortium, 2-3 Feb 2009, New Delhi, India. Manzanilla DO, Acda RD, Mariano JM, Loresca KB, Velasco LE, Velarde OP, Tatlonghari GM, Desamero NV, Labios RV, Paris TR, Pandey S. 2009. Reducing production losses through participatory varietal selection in submergence-prone rice areas in the Philippines. Paper presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Manzanilla DO, Pandey S, Paris TR, Velasco L, Tatlonghari GT, Velarde O. 2009. Socioeconomic dimensions of developing submergence-tolerant varieties: insights from the field. Paper presented at the IRRIMOFA JAPAN Project Completion Workshop, 2-4 Dec 2009, Bangkok, Thailand. Manzanilla DO, Pandey S, Paris TR, Velasco L, Tatlonghari GT, Velarde O. 2009. Socioeconomic research component. Implementation plans to disseminate submergence-tolerant varieties and new production practices to Southeast Asia. Paper presented at the 8th CURE Review and Steering Committee Meeting, 27-29 May 2009, Hanoi, Vietnam. Manzanilla DO, Paris TR, Pandey S, Velasco L, Tatlonghari GT, Velarde O. 2009. Socioeconomic research: its importance in the validation and dissemination of submergence-tolerant rice to Southeast Asia. Paper presented at the IRRI-MOFA Japan Project 2nd Planning Meeting and Workshop, 23-25 Mar 2009, Bogor City, Indonesia. Mataia A, Jamora N, Moya P, Dawe D. 2009. What are the sources of rice yield growth? Changes in crop management practices, input use, and technology adoption in the Philippines. Paper presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Mazuduzzaman ASM, Shamsudin AKM, Salam MA, Septiningsih EM, Sanchez DL, Pamplona AM, Heuer S, Mackill DJ. 2009. Molecular diversity and expression studies of SUB1 gene haplotypes of rice, differing in tolerance for submergence. Paper presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

28 of 36

Publications and seminars
Meinke H, Bastiaans L, Bouman B, Dingkuhn M, Gaydon D, Hasegawa T, Heinemann AB, Kiepe P, Lafarge T, Luquet D, Masood A, van Oort P, Rodenburg J, Yan J, Yin X. 2009. An international collaborative research network helps to design climate robust rice systems. Paper presented at the International Symposium on Crop Production under Heat Stress: Monitoring, Impact Assessment and Adaptation, 6-9 Oct 2009, Tsukuba, Japan. Molina LR, Santos MV, Beebout SEJ. 2009. Training clients to use laboratory services effectively in rice research. Paper presented at the 11th International Symposium on Soil and Plant Analysis, 20-24 Jul 2009, Santa Rosa, CA, USA. Moreira SA, Murray T, Kehoe E, Horgan F, KakouliDuarte T. 2009. Population structure of European Bombus terrestris. Paper presented at the 19th Environmental Colloquium of the Environmental Sciences Association of Ireland, 18-20 Feb 2009, Waterford. Ireland. Naredo MEB, Cairns J, Wang H, Atienza G, Sanciangpco MD, Melgar RJA, Venuprasad R, Serraj R, McNally KL. 2009. Ecotilling as a SNP discovery tool for drought candidate genes in Oryza sativa germplasm. Paper presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Palis FG. 2009. Social capital and the diffusion of agricultural technologies: the case of integrated pest management. Proceedings of the UPLB Centennial Symposium on the Changing Role of the Applied Social Sciences in Agriculture and Community Development, College of Public Affairs, UPLB, and SEARCA, 29-30 Jan 2008, Los Baños, Philippines. Pamplona AM, Sanchez DL, Mackill DJ. 2009. Moving beyond SUB1: combining tolerance for submergence and water stagnation. Paper presented at the IRRI-MOFA Japan Project Completion Workshop, 2-4 Dec 2009, Bangkok, Thailand. Pandey S. 2009. Rice production in Cambodia: will exports continue to grow? Paper presented at the FAO Workshop on Rice Policies and Food Security in Asia: What Have We Learned from the 2008 Price Crisis and Can We Avoid Another One?, 10-12 Feb 2009, Chiang Mai, Thailand. Pandey S, Mohanty S. 2009. Changing rice policy landscape in the context of global agriculture. Paper presented at the 27th Conference of the International Association of Agricultural Economists, 16-22 Aug 2009, Beijing, China. Paris T. 2009. Gender considerations in strengthening partnerships and workshops. Paper presented at the IFAD Facility Grant Workshop on Strengthening Partnerships and Networks in Agricultural Research for Development, 22-23 Sep 2009, ICRISAT, Patancheru, Hyderabad, India. Paris T, Deka N. 2009. Gender roles in postharvest operations of paddy with reference to Assam. Paper presented at the Post Harvest Conference, 15-17 Jul 2009, Bangkok, Thailand. Paris TR, Rola-Rubzen MF, Luis J, Chi TTN, Wongsanum C, Villanueva D. 2009. Comparative analysis of the impact of labor outmigration and remittances on income and rice productivity in the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam. Paper presented at the 53rd Conference of the Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, 11-13 Feb 2009, Cairns, Australia. Paris T, Rola-Rubzen MF, Luis J, Chi TTN, Wongsanum C, Villanueva D. 2009. The impact of labor out migration on rice farming households and gender roles: synthesis of findings in Thailand, the Philippines, and Vietnam. Paper presented at the FAO-IFAD-ILO Workshop on Gaps, Trends and Current Research in Gender Dimensions of Agricultural and Rural Employment: Differentiated Pathways out of Poverty, 31 Mar-2 Apr 2009, Rome, Italy. Payapaya CB, Varquez RRA, Castillon EB, Malayao WC, Du MJC, Cahiles EC, Mendez E, Samson MI, Buresh RJ. 2009. Site-specific nutrient management (SSNM) benefits irrigated rice farmers in Bohol Province. Paper presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Quing’an Z, Bin D, Kajisa K, Jianzhang W, Chuanju Z, Xinqiao W. 2009. Impact of land dispersity upon farmers’ practices and agricultural input-output in the Zhanghe Irrigation System, Hubei, China. Paper presented at the International Forum on Water Resource and Sustainable Development, 22-24 Sep 2009, Wuhan University, Wuhan, China. Rahman AK, Thomson MJ, de Ocampo MP, Egdane J, Ismail AM. 2009. Marker-assisted backcrossing of Saltol and mapping novel QTLs associated with salinity tolerance in rice by selective genotyping.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

29 of 36

Publications and seminars
Paper presented at the Generation Challenge Programme’s Annual Review Meeting, 19-23 Sep 2009, Bamako, Mali. Rahman S, Ferdousi A, Islam R, Salam A, Thomson M, Ismail A, Seraj Z. 2009. Saltol introgression into Bangladesh mega rice variety BR11 through markerassisted backcrossing. Paper presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Rala AB, Kajisa K, Bin D, Moya PF. 2009. Using the topographic wetness index in analyzing the wetness pattern of the Zhanghe Irrigation System. Paper presented at the International Forum on Water Resource and Sustainable Development, 22-24 Sep 2009, Wuhan University, Wuhan, China. Redoña ED. 2009. Multilocation testing and varietal release. Paper presented at the BMGF Intensive Cereal Systems in South Asia Objective 3 (Breeding) Workshop, 23-24 Apr 2009, New Delhi, India. Redona ED. 2009. The revitalized INGER. Paper presented at the INGER Technical Advisory Committee Meeting, Sep 2009, Hangzhou, China. Redona ED. 2009. Towards the next level of development for INGER. Paper presented at the INGER Technical Advisory Committee Meeting, Sep 2009, Hangzhou, China. Redoña ED, Dilla CJ, Tabanao DA. 2009. Genetic diversity of released rice varieties derived from a global exchange and evaluation network. Paper presented at the Crop Science Society of America Annual Meeting, Nov 2009, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. Redoña ED, Laza MA, Sierra SN, Manangkil OE, Barroga WV. 2009. Identifying heat- tolerant rice genebank accessions. Paper presented at the Workshop on Crop Production under Heat Stress: Monitoring, Impact Assessment and Adaptation, Oct 2009, Tsukuba, Japan. Redoña ED, Rani NS, Haque M. 2009. Germplasm exchange. Paper presented at the Annual Review Meeting of the BMGF project on Abiotic Stresses, 16-18 Mar 2009, New Delhi, India. Redona ED, Toledo C. 2009. INGER: facilitating germplasm exchange in the TRRC. Paper presented at the Temperate Rice Research Consortium Meeting, Sep 2009, Liaoning, China. Revilla-Molina IR. 2009. Using genetic diversity for sustainable rice blast management in China. Paper presented at the 40th Anniversary and Annual Scientific Conference of the Pest Management Council of the Philippines, 5-8 May 2009, Baguio City, Philippines. Revilla-Molina IM, Zhu YY, Mew TW, Bastiaans L, Barker R. 2009. Farmers’ perceptions and adoption of rice varietal interplanting for rice blast disease: a case study of Yunnan Province. Paper presented at the 15th Annual International Sustainable Development Research Conference: Taking Up the Global Challenge, 5-8 Jul 2009, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands. Samson MI, Castillo RL, Sinohin PJO, Pampolino MF, Cruz RT, Badayos RB, Paningbatan EP, Sanchez PB, Buresh RJ. 2009. Science-based principles used to develop innovative tools on nutrient management for rice. Paper presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Sattar MAM, Hamid M, Tuong TP. 2009. Process of up-scaling the water-saving technology of alternate wetting and drying for rice irrigation in Bangladesh. Paper presented at the Regional R & D Workshop on Water-Saving Irrigation Practices in Rice-Based Canal Systems, Asian Institute of Technology, 8-9 Oct 2009, Bangkok, Thailand. Sellamuthu R, Hong H, Chandra Babu R, Serraj R. 2009. Phenotyping and genetic analysis of spikelet fertility and reproductive-stage traits in rice under water deficit. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on Integrated Approaches to Improve Crop Production under Drought-Prone Environments (InterDrought), 11-16 Oct 2009, Shanghai, China. Sendon PD, Sanchez DL, Ismail AM, Mackill DJ, Septiningsih EM. 2009. Identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) in rice or tolerance to submergence during germination derived from a tolerant variety, Ma-Zhan Red. Paper presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Septiningsih EM, Pamplona AM, Sanchez DL, Hidayatun A, Vergara GV, Heuer S, Ismail AM, Mackill DJ. 2009. Submergence: current status in breeding and genetics. Paper presented at the 2nd Planning Workshop on “Implementation Plans to Disseminate Submergence-Tolerant Rice Varieties and Associated New Production Practices to Southeast Asia,” 23-25 Mar 2009, Bogor, Indonesia.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

30 of 36

Publications and seminars
Septiningsih E, Pamplona AM, Sanchez DL, Sendon PM, Hidayatun N, Vergara GV, Heuer S, Ismail AM, Mackill DJ. 2009. Submergence: current status in breeding and genetics. Paper presented at the IRRIMOFA JAPAN Project 2nd Planning Meeting and Workshop, 23-25 Mar 2009, Bogor City, Indonesia. Septiningsih EM, Sanchez DL, Sendon PM, Trijatmiko KR, Torrizo LB, Balindong JL, Vergara GV, Slamet-Loedin IH, Ismail AM, Mackill DJ. 2009. Toward identification of the gene(s) underlying a QTL for tolerance to flooding during germination derived from the rice variety Khao Hlan On. Paper presented at the 6th Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Septiningsih EM, Sanchez DL, Vergara GV, Ismail AM, Mackill DJ. 2009. Fine mapping a QTL for tolerance to flooding during germination derived from the rice variety Khao Hlan On (KHO). Paper presented at the14th Australasian Plant Breeding and 11th SABRAO Conference, 10-14 Aug 2009, Cairns, Australia. Serraj R, Gowda VRP, Henry A, Shashidhar HE, Chandrababu R, Kumar A. 2009. Progress in phenotyping dehydration avoidance traits for drought resistance improvement in rice. Paper presented at the 3rd International Conference on Integrated Approaches to Improve Crop Production under Drought-Prone Environments (InterDrought), 11-16 Oct 2009, Shanghai, China. Sierra SN, Laza MA, Manigbas NL, Bartolome V, Nora L, Barroga W, Noriel J, Redoña E. 2009. Identifying heat-tolerant rice genotypes under different environments. Paper presented at the Crop Science Society of the Philippines’ Annual Meeting, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Singh N, Trang DTM, Mackill DJ, Heuer S. 2009. Regulation of tissue-specific expression of the submergence-tolerance gene SUB1A. Paper presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Singleton GR. 2009. Rodents in Southeast Asiacan ecology and fertility control of rats contribute to food security in the region? Paper presented at the 4th Annual CAOS Symposium, 27 Jul 2009, Flagstaff, Arizona, USA. Singleton GR, Hinds LA. 2009. Is there a role for genetic pest management in rodent pest management? Genetic manipulation of pest species: ecological and social challenges. Paper presented at North Carolina State University, 4 Mar 2009, North Carolina, USA. Singleton GR, Palis FG. 2009. Sustaining integrated ecologically based rodent management in Vietnam– adoption diffusion and impacts. Paper presented at a project review commissioned by the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research, 22 May 2009, Hanoi, Vietnam. Singleton GR, Stuart AM, Brown PR. 2009. Rodent communities and environmental change in agro-ecosystems in Southeast Asia. Paper presented at the 10th International Mammal Congress, 13 Aug 2009, Mendoza, Argentina. Smith DJ, Christen EW, Humphreys E, Godwin D. 2009. Managing stored soil moisture and irrigation frequency to benefit irrigated winter cereals. Paper presented at the Irrigation and Drainage Conference 2009, 18-21 Oct 2009, Swanhill, Victoria, Australia. Stuart AM, Prescott CV, and Singleton GR. 2009. Nest locations of R. tanezumi in lowland rice-coconut systems of the Philippines. Paper presented at the European Vertebrate Pest Conference, 7-9 Sep 2009, Lyon, France. Tagle AG, Fujita D, Santos RE, Ebron LA, Yanoria MJT, Fukuta Y, Kobayashi. N. 2009. Advance QTL analysis for five agronomic traits in introgression line from new plant type rice to an Indica-type cultivar, IR642009. Paper presented at the 14th Conference of the Australian Society of Plant Breeding & 11th SABRAO Conference, 10-14 Aug 2009, Australia. Timsina J. 2009. Crop simulation models: data requirements, model selection, and new challenges under climate change. Paper presented at the 4th Crop Growth Monitoring System (CGMS) Expert Meeting, 18-19 Mar 2009, Ispra, Milano, Italy. Tuong TP. 2009. Concept of alternate wetting and drying irrigation (AWD) for global rice production: from research to dissemination. Paper presented at the National Workshop on “Adoption and Success of AWD Technology for Rice Production in Bangladesh,” 15 Jul 2009, Bangladesh Rice Research Institute, Gazipur, Bangladesh. Tuong TP. 2009. Field-level water savings: implications for irrigation system and basin levels. Paper presented at the Regional R & D Workshop on Water-Saving Irrigation Practices in Rice-Based Canal Systems, 8-9 Oct 2009, Asian Institute of Technology, Bangkok, Thailand.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

31 of 36

Publications and seminars
Valencia MS, Moya PF, Kajisa K, Bin D, Ocampo L, Rala AB, Jianzhang W, Chuanju Z, Xinqiao W. 2009. Onfarm water saving practices in irrigated rice systems in China: its effect on yield, input use, and profitability. Paper presented at the International Forum on Water Resource and Sustainable Development, 22-24 Sep 2009, Wuhan University, Wuhan, China. Vergara GV, Labios RL, Manzanilla DO, Pamplona AM, Esguerra MQ, Paris TR, Ismail AM, Mackill DJ. 2009. Performance of submergence-tolerant rice (Sub1 lines) in flood-prone areas of Southeast Asia. Paper presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Vergara GV, Labios RV, Pamplona AM, Desamero NV, Duoangsila K, Hairmansis A, Esguerra MQ, Malabrigo MA, Ismail AM, Mackill DJ. 2009. Performance of submergence-tolerant rice (Sub1 lines) in adaptability trials in Indonesia, Laos, and the Philippines. Paper presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Wang W, Vergara GV, Li Z, Mackill DJ, Ismail AM. 2009. Survival and grain yield of two Sub1 introgression lines as affected by variable durations of submergence. Paper presented at the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium, 16-19 Nov 2009, Manila, Philippines. Zantua RE, Thomson MJ, De Ocampo MP, Egdane J, Concepcion JCT, Sajise AG, Singh RK, Ismail AM 2009. Development of near-isogenic lines for multiple QTLs associated with salinity tolerance. Paper presented at the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines, 18-23 May 2009, Dumaguete City, Philippines. Zhao D, Amante M, Atlin G, Kumar A. 2009. Advances in breeding for aerobic rice. Paper presented at the 44th All India Coordinated Rice Improvement Program Meeting,10-12 May 2009, DRR, Hyderabad, India. Clayton S. 2009. Banking our rice knowledge. Rice Today 8(3): 36-37. Grewal D. 2009. Doubled haploids: from Laboratory to field. Rice Today 8(3): 46. Gummert M. 2009. Working together to save grains. Rice Today 8(3): 20-21. Haefele S, Hijmans, R. 2009. Soil quality in rainfed lowland rice. Rice Today 8(1): 30-31 Heong KL, Hijmans R, Villareal S. 2009. Ecosystem services for biological control in tropical rice. Rice Today 8(3): 34-35. Hettel G. 2009. Dedicated scientists –a child’s inspiration. Rice Today 8(1): 20-21. Hettel G. 2009. In the Punjab—an outstanding farmer revisited. Rice Today 8(2): 34-35. Hettel G. 2009. Challenges for IRRI: a cross section of opinions. Rice Today 8(3): 26-29. Hettel G. 2009. “Rock” and Rice: The Rockefeller-IRRI technology saga. Rice Today 8(4): 36-38. Hilario P. 2009. More than meets your rice. Rice Today 8(1): 35. Jamora N, Moya P, Mataia A, Dawe D. 2009. What are the sources of rice yield growth in the Philippines? IRRI Research Brief 3. IRRI Social Sciences Division. Jamora N, Moya P, Mataia A, Dawe D. 2009. How has rice farming in the Philippines changed in the last 10 years? IRRI Research Brief 4. IRRI Social Sciences Division.

Magazines and newsletters
Alberto M, Hosen Y, Wassman R. 2009. Finding a balance. Rice Today 8(4): 15-16. Asilo S, Rala A, Pacheco A, Garcia C. 2009. South Asia’s twist of fate. Rice Today 8(4): 56-57. Bhandari H, Yasunobu K. 2009. Human values, social capital, and sustainable development: a crosscountry analysis from Asia. JIRCAS Work. Rep. 62. Tsukuba, Japan. Bouman B. 2009. How much water does rice use? Rice Today 8(1): 28-29. Bouman B, Aureus M. 2009. Every drop counts. Rice Today 8(3): 16-18. Castillo G. 2009. Can less favorable areas obtain food security? Rice Today 8(2): 46. Centeno G, Sumfleth K. Wassman R. 2009. A clearer picture. Rice Today 8(4): 14. Chemin Y, Hijmans R. 2009. Water mapping with satellites. Rice Today 8(2): 38-39.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

32 of 36

Publications and seminars
Lampayan RM, Mendoza T. 2009. Farmers reap rewards of AWD. RIPPLE 4(2): . Lampayan RM, Quicho ED, Quilloy MA. 2009. Institutionalization of AWD pushed in the Philippines. RIPPLE 4(3): . Lampayan RM, Quicho ED. 2009. eWater up for release. RIPPLE 4(3): . Leung H, Leach J, Zeigler R. 2009. Michael Gale: scientist, mentor, and humanist. Rice Today 8(4): 35. Mendoza TL, Johnson D. 2009. Easing the plight of the hungry. Rice Today 8(2): 32-33. Mendoza TL. 2009. When rats attack. Rice Today 8(4): 44-45. Mendoza TL. 2009. Rat trap. Rice Today 8(4): 45-47. Mohanty S. 2009. Rice and the global financial crisis: what are the short- and long-term impacts on rice production and food security? Rice Today 8(1): 40. Mohanty S. 2009. Global rice trade: What does it mean for future food security? Rice Today 8(2): 44-45. Mohanty S. 2009. A look at India. Rice Today 8(3): 43-45. Mohanty S. 2009. The global rice market pauses. Rice Today 8(3): 54-55. Palis F, Gabinete G. 2009. Love at first site. Rice Today 8(1): 32-34. Pandey S, Rosegrant MW, Sulser T, Bhandari H. 2009. How future investment in agriculture affects rice prices. Rice Today 8(1): 41. Pandey S, Bhandari H. 2009. Drought, coping mechanisms and poverty: insights from rainfed rice farming in Asia. IFAD Occasional Paper No. 7. Paris TR. 2009. Women’s roles and needs in changing rural Asia with emphasis on rice-based agriculture. FFTC Ext. Bull. March issue. Priyadarshani SR, Thach TNA, Siopongco JDLC, Amarante ST, Sanchez PB, Haefele SM, 2009. The effect of plant nutrition on water balance components and crop growth in rainfed lowland rice. Int. Rice Res. Note, available on-line. Reyes L. 2009. Making rice less thirsty. Rice Today 8(3): 12-15. Reyes L. 2009. Overcoming the toughest stress in rice: drought. Rice Today 8(3): 30-32. Reyes L. 2009. The new frontier. Rice Today 8(4): 28-29. Rickman J. 2009. Mechanical self-sufficiency. Rice Today 8(4): 50-51. Sackville Hamilton R. 2009. Rice science in the digital age. Rice Today 8(2): 13-16. Sheehy J. 2009. Buy a house on a hill. Rice Today 8(1): 38-39. Tuong TP, Bouman BAM, Lampayan R. 2009. A simple tool to effectively implement water-saving alternate wetting and drying irrigation for rice. ICID Newsl. 4:5. Van den Berg M. 2009. 100 years of rice research. Rice Today 8(4): 53. Villers P, Gummert M. 2009. Sea of approval. Rice Today 8(1): 36-37. Wassmann R, Centeno G, Peng, SB. 2009. Odd seasons. Rice Today 8(4): 12-13. Wassmann R. 2009. Food vs. gas. Rice Today 8(4): 17.

Thursday rice research seminars
Writing improvement with SCODA—searchable collections of discipline-specific articles. Dr. Margaret Cargill and Dr. Kate Cadman, Schools of Social Sciences and Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Adelaide, Australia. Genetic diversity for sustainable rice blast management in China: adoption and impact. Dr. Imelda Molina. Audio and powerpoint. Rice tungro disease—old scenes through alternative windows. Dr. Il-ryong Choi. Audio and powerpoint. What’s in a name: systemic acquired resistance and induced systemic resistance against foliar diseases in dicot and monocot plants. Dr. Paul Goodwin, Environmental Biology, University of Guelph. A review and rethinking of the productivity potential of agriculture and the role of R&D. Dr. Phil Pardey, Department of Applied Economics, University of Minnesota. Community-based seed banking: thwarting biopiracy and ensuring food security. Dr. Michael Bengwayan, Cordillera Ecological Education, Research and Information Center, Philippines.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

33 of 36

Publications and seminars
Ecologists as problem solvers. Dr. Charles J. Krebs, University of Canberra and University of British Columbia. Plant disease epidemiology for a sustainable future: making decisions in a noisy world. Dr. Neil McRoberts, Systems Ecology, Scottish Agricultural College, UK. Minimizing potential arsenic hazard in rice by genetics and crop management—experiences in South Asia and the US. Dr. Richard H. Loeppert,Texas A&M University. Crop biotechnology—improving precision and mitigating risk. Dr. David Ow and Dr. Roger Thilmony, Plant Gene Expression Center and Crop Improvement and Utilization, ARS, U.S. Department of Agriculture. Trends and variation in rice yield. Dr. Robert Hijmans. Pathways from poverty: the process of graduation in rural Bangladesh. Dr. Alastair William Orr, Natural Resources Institute, UK. Application of physiology in breeding for improved productivity in water-limited environments. Dr. Jill Cairns. Audio and powerpoint. Myths and misconceptions on the management of the invasive rice black bugs (RBB) Scotinophara spp. in the Philippines. Dr Alberto T. Barrion, Philippine Rice Research Institute. Global rice food security: what does it mean and how can we achieve it? Dr. Samarendu Mohanty. The DG’s midyear report. Dr. Robert Zeigler. Quantitative resistance loci (QRL) against bacterial blight (Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and leaf blast (Pyricularia oryzae Sacc.) and quantitative trait loci for (QTL) for grain qualities in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Dr. Jessica D. Rey. Audio and powerpoint. Impact assessment of hybrid rice adoption in India: farm-level impacts and challenges. Dr. Aldah Janaiah,ANGR Agricultural University, India. Does transgenic rice have a role in future food security? Possibilities in complex trait modification. Dr. Inez Slamet-Loedin. Audio and powerpoint. Feeding the growing world population: Yara’s approach and strategies for improvement. Dr. Joachim Lammel, Yara International, Germany. Epidemiology and plant resistance. Dr. Laetitia Willocquet. Audio and powerpoint. Climate change, agriculture, and food security: impacts and costs of adaptation. Dr. Gerald C. Nelson, International Food Policy Research Institute. IRRI networking: on pushing bowling balls and herding cats. Mr. Marco van den Berg. Audio. CGIAR change developments. Dr. Achim Dobermann. Mechanisms of tolerance of O. sativa and its Australian relatives to abiotic stresses. Dr. Brian J. Atwell, Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Australia. The DG’s year-end report. Dr. Robert Zeigler. Hopper adaptation: an inconvenient truth. Dr. Finbarr Horgan. Audio and powerpoint. Beyond tillering: yield slipping down the sink? Dr. Tanguy Lafarge. Audio and powerpoint. Public-private partnerships, learning alliances, and impact pathways: enabling millions of farmers to reduce postharvest losses. Engr. Martin Gummert and Dr. Philippe Villers. GQNPC, IRRI and Grainpro, Inc. Audio and powerpoint.

Division seminars
Crop and Environmental Sciences
Physiological studies on higher yield and drought resistance in rice under upland conditions. Dr. Yoichiro Kato. Developing and evaluating the use and impact of the Thai Rice Knowledge Bank. Dr. Suwanna Praneetvatakul, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Faculty of Economics, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand. Analysis of leaf-associated bacteria by genomic and proteomic approaches. Dr. Claudia Knief, postdoctoral fellow, Institute of Microbiology, ETH Zurich, Switzerland. (CESD-PBGB joint seminar) Capabilities and limitations of regional climate modelling for hydrological impact analysis. Dr. Harald Kunstmann, Institute for Meteorology and Climate Research, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany. How has climate change affected rice yields in China?: a reality check. Mr. Tianyi Zhang, collaborator, Rice and Climate Change Consortium.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

34 of 36

Publications and seminars
Developing drought-resistant rice: physiological and genetic considerations. Dr. R. Chandra Babu, Department of Biotechnology Centre for Molecular Biology, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, India. (CESD-PBGB joint seminar) Assessing management-induced changes in soil physical properties of paddy fields and their influences on the agro-environment. Dr. Kyung-Hwa Han. Production and use of biochar in agriculture. Dr. Bernardo D. Tadeo, Full Advantage Philippines International, Inc. and the Philippine Society of Agricultural Engineers Development of rice NILs conferring resistance to brown planthopper (BPH) and their practical use for monitoring virulence of Asian BPH populations. Dr. Hideshi Yasui, Plant Breeding Laboratory, Faculty of Agriculture, Graduate School, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan. Rice nematodes: IRRI’s research program targeting a hidden enemy. Prof. Dirk de Waele, Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium. Sowing date effects on flowering in sorghum: interaction with plant structure, growth and panicle size. Dr. Benoît Clerget, Agro-Ecology Adaptation and Crop Improvement Group, Centre de coopération internationale en recherche agronomique pour le développement, France. Rice yellowing syndrome in South Vietnam. Mr. Rogelio C. Cabunagan. (CESD-PBGB joint seminar) Increasing rice productivity in South and Southeast Sulawesi: working with farmers through adaptive management. Dr. Madonna C. Casimero and Dr. Grant Singleton. A decade of study on carbon budgets in rice-paddy fields. A. Miyata, M. Mano, and K. Ono, National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences, Tsukuba, Japan. Anthropology of science: a field study of the C4 group. Mr. Chris Kortright, Department of Anthropology, University of California-Davis, USA. Biotic causes of yield decline in aerobic rice and evaluation of rice germplasm for resistance and tolerance to these stresses. Mr. Kuntal Das. A role for SAL1 in regulating drought tolerance. Professor Barry Pogson, ARC Center of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia. Genomic strategies to enhance abiotic stress tolerance in cereals. Dr. Ravindra Chibbar, Crop Quality, Molecular Biology and Genetics, Department of Plant Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Canada. The rice pathology coordinated programme in India. Dr. C. S. Reddy, Directorate of Rice Research, India. Allergenicity assessment in transgenic plants. Mr. Norman Oliva. Landscape epidemiology: could it be useful for disease management? Dr. Asimina L. Mila, North Carolina State University, USA. Breeding for yield under drought stress in rice-lessons learnt at IRRI. Dr. Ramaiah Venuprasad, ICRISAT. Insect resistance in transgenic PA1 rice: from postharvest protection against Sitophilus oryzae to evaluation of resistance to vegetative insect pests. Dr. Julie Petit, CIRAD, France. Isolation and characterization of a novel variant of HMW glutenin subunit gene from the St genome of Pseudoroegneria stipifolia. Dr. Zhi-Xin Li, Yangtze University, Jingzhou City, Hubei Province, China. Digital image analysis: applications in rice research. Dr. Vladimir Y. Mariano,. Institute of Computer Science,

Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Biotechnology
Heterosis and quality evaluation of waxy hybrid rice. Mr. P. Xangsayasane. Breeding high-yielding rice varieties for intensive cultivation under irrigated ecosystem. Dr. C. Cheralu and Dr. P.V. Satyanarayana. Studies on ancient rice–where the botanists, agronomists, archaeologists, linguists, and ethnologists meet. Dr. Yue Le Hsing. Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan. Uncertainty and risk–did Asian soybean rust and biofuels change current management of maize diseases in the U.S.? A study at different scales. Dr. Paul D. Esker, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin at Madison, USA. Iron biofortification of rice grains by enhancing iron uptake and translocation with various transgenic approaches. Dr. Hiroshi Masuda, Laboratory of Plant Biotechnology, Department of Global Agricultural Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Japan.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

35 of 36

Publications and seminars
University of the Philippines Los Baños. (PBGB-CRIL joint seminar) Serpins in rice: discovering functions for a family of highly adaptable proteins. Dr. Tom Roberts, Macquire University, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences, Sydney, Australia. (CESD-PBGB joint seminar) Transcript profiling to elucidate biochemical pathways involved in complex agronomic traits. Dr. Nora Lapitan, Department of Soil and Crop Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. Functional genomics of plant resistance to insect pests. Dr. Nora Lapitan, Department of Soil and Crop Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA.

Social Sciences
U.S. cotton acreage response due to subsidized crop insurance. Ms. Romilee Bool. Agricultural productivity and biodiversity. Dr. Jean-Paul Chavas, Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, University of Wisconsin-Madison. Archaeobotanical advances in the study of rice domestication: from pre-domestication cultivation to paddy fields in China and India. Dorian Q Fuller, Institute of Archaeology, University College London. Sustainable development some techno-socioeconomic perspectives to ponder. Dr. Hari Gurung. Sources of rice yield growth in the Philippines: a panel data analysis. Ms. Nelissa Jamora. Rice cultivation landscape and land use. Dr. Alice Laborte.

Price transmission mechanism in the Philippine rice industry. Ms. Maria Joanne Matriz, National Economic Development Authority, Pasig City, Philippines. Farm retail price spread of rice in Nepal. Mr. Rudra Bahadur Shrestha. The geographic distribution of crop genetic diversity, whodunit? Dr. Jacob van Etten. A brief overview of an application of stochastics in PE policy modeling. Dr. Seth Meyer, FAPRI, University of Missouri, USA. Using MS Access in managing household survey data: data entry, validation, and analysis. Orlee P. Velarde Plans and progress on data analysis of FoSHol projects. Dr. Abutaher M. Ziauddin.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

36 of 36

IRRI’s R eseaRch P aR tneRs
National agricultural research and extension systems

Bangladesh

Agricultural Advisory Society Bangladesh Academy for Rural Development Bangladesh Agricultural Research Council Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute Bangladesh Agricultural University Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics Bangladesh Fisheries Research Institute Bangladesh Institute of Nuclear Agriculture Bangladesh Institute of Development Studies Bangladesh Rice Exporters Association Bangladesh Rice Research Institute Bangladesh Water Development Board Bangladesh Rehabilitation Assistance Committee (BRAC) Department of Agricultural Extension Department of Agriculture -Karnal Government of Bangladesh Health Education and Economic Development Local Government Engineering Department Ministry of Agriculture - Bangladesh Rajshahi University Rural Development Academy University of Dhaka National Institute of Agricultural Research of Benin Ministry of Agriculture - National Biodiversity Center Royal Government of Bhutan

Brazil

Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária

Burundi

Government of the Republic of Burundi University of Burundi

Cambodia

Battambang Provincial Department of Agriculture Cambodia Agricultural Research and Develop ment Institute Department of Agricultural Extension Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries Prek Leap National School of Agriculture Prey Veng Provincial Department of Agriculture Royal University of Agriculture - Cambodia Anhui Academy of Agricultural Sciences China Agricultural University China National Rice Research Institute Chinese Academy of Sciences Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences Fudan University Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences Guangxi Academy of Agricultural Sciences Huazhong Agricultural University Hunan Agricultural University Hunan Rice Research Institute Institute of Insect Sciences, Zhejiang University Jiangxi Academy of Agricultural Sciences Liaoning Academy of Agricultural Sciences

China

Benin

Bhutan

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 7

IRRI’s R eseaRch P aR tneRs
Lixiahe Agricultural Research Institute Ministry of Agriculture of the People’s Republic of China Nanjing Agricultural University National Agro Technology and Extension Services Center National Center of Irrigation and Drainage Development National Natural Science Foundation of China Northeast Agricultural University Peking University Sichuan Academy of Agricultural Sciences South China Institute of Botany Wuhan University Yangzhou University Yunnan Academy of Agricultural Sciences Yunnan Agricultural University Zhejiang Academy of Agricultural Sciences Zhejiang University Zhongnan University of Economics and Law Instituto de Investigaciones del Arroz

Ghana

Crop Research Institute

Guatemala India

Institute de Ciencia y Tecnologia Agricolas

Cuba

Dominican Republic

Instituto Dominicano de Investigaciones Agro pecuarias y Forestales

Egypt

Agricultural Research Center Egypt Rice Research Center Ministry of Agriculture and Land Reclamation Rice Research and Training Center Gambia Horticultural Enterprises

Gambia

Acharya NG Ranga Agricultural University Anand Agricultural University Assam Agricultural University Banaras Hindu University Birsa Agricultural University CCS Haryana Agricultural University, Rice Research Station, Kaul (Kaithal), India Central Rainfed Upland Rice Research Station (Hazaribagh) Central Rice Research Institute Central Soil Salinity Research Institute Chandra Shekhar Azad University of Agriculture and Technology Chinsurah Rice Research Station College of Agriculture, REWA Department of Agricultural Research and Education Department of Agriculture India Directorate of Rice Research Dr. B. Sawani Konkan Krishi Vidyapeeth Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agriculture and Technology Indian Agricultural Research Institute Indian Council of Agricultural Research Indira Gandhi Agricultural University Jawaharlal Nehru Krishi Vishwa Vidyalaya Kerala Agricultural University Krishi Vigyan Kendra - Ara Krishi Vigyan Kendra - Jamui Krishi Vigyan Kendra - Nawada Maharana Pratap University of Agriculture and Technology

Majaraha Sayajirao University of Baroda Narendra Deva University of Agriculture and Technology Orissa University of Agricultural Technology Pandit Jawarharlal Nehru College of Agriculture and Research Institute Punjab Agricultural University Raja Dinesh Singh Krishi Vigyan Kendra Rajendra Agricultural University Sardar Vallabh Bhai Patel University of Agricul- ture and Technology Soil and Water Management Research Insti tute Tamil Nadu Agricultural University University of Agricultural Sciences University of Calcutta University of Delhi University of Hyderabad University of Madras West Bengal Directorate of Agriculture Assessment Institute for Agricultural Technology - Central Java Assessment Insitute for Agricultural Technology - South Sumatra Assessment Insitute for Agricultural Technology - Southeast Sulawesi Assessment Institute for Agricultural Technology - West Java Bogor Agricultural University (Institut Pertanian Bogor) BPTP Sulawesi Selatan Central Research Institute for Animal Sciences Indonesian Agency for Agricultural Research and Development Indonesian Center for Agricultural Biotechnol- ogy and Genetic Resources and Research Development

Indonesia

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

2 of 7

IRRI’s R eseaRch P aR tneRs
Indonesian Center for Agricultural Land Re sources Research and Development Indonesian Center for Agricultural Post Harvest Research and Development Indonesian Center for Agricultural Technology Assessment and Development Indonesian Center for Food Crop Research and Development Indonesian Center for Rice Research Indonesian Institute of Sciences Kuvempu University Provincial Agricultural Services (Dinas Perta nian Tanaman Pangan Propinsi) Research Institute for Food Crops Biotechnology Rice Research Institute - Indonesia Agricultural Biotechnology Research Institute of Iran Rice Research Institute of Iran Shahid Bahonar University of Kerman University of Mazandaran National Agriculture and Forestry Research Institute Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry

Mali

Institut d’Economie Rurale

Mozambique

Government of the Republic of Mozambique National Institute of Agricultural Research National Institute for Agronomic Research Central Agricultural Research Institute Department of Agricultural Research Myanma Agriculture Service

Myanmar

Nepal

Iran

Department of Agriculture Nepal Agricultural Research Council Regional Agriculture Station (RAS), Bhairahwa Tribhuvan University National Agricultural Research Centre National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering On-Farm Water Management Pakistan Agricultural Research Council Instituto de Biologia Experimental e Tecnologia

Pakistan

Bureau of Agricultural Research Bureau of Postharvest Research and Exten sion- Department of Agriculture (formerly known as NAPHIRE) Bureau of Soil and Water Management - De partment of Environment and Natural Resources Central Luzon State University Department of Environment and Natural Resources National Crop Protection Center National Irrigation Administration Pampanga Agricultural College Philippine Rice Post-Production Consortium Philippine Rice Research Institute Provincial Government of Laguna University of Southern Mindanao University of the Philippines Diliman University of the Philippines Los Baños Leyte State University (Visayas State University) Western Mindanao State University Western Visayas State University All Russian Rice Research Institute

Lao PDR

Russia

Portugal

Madagascar

Rwanda

Institut des sciences agronomiques du Rwanda Institut Sénégalais de Recherches Agricoles African Centre for Gene Technologies Department of Agriculture, Sri Lanka Rice Research and Development Institute 3 of 7

Ministry of Scientific Research and Technology Development

Philippines

Senegal

Malaysia

Malaysian Agricultural Research and Develop- ment Institute Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia

Advanced Science and Technology Institute Agricultural Productivity Center for Bohol for the Visayas Agricultural Training Institute (ATI)-VII Central Visayas Bohol Agricultural Promotion Center Bulacan Agricultural State College

South Africa Sri Lanka

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

IRRI’s R eseaRch P aR tneRs
Tanzania Government of the United Republic of Tanzania Taiwan Academia Sinica National Taiwan University Hue University of Agriculture and Forestry Integrated Resource Mapping Center Mekong Delta Development Research Institute Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development National Agricultural Extension Center Vietnam National Institute of Plant Protection National Institute of Soils and Fertilizers Nong Lam University Northern Mountainous Agriculture and Forestry Plant Protection Department Post Harvest Technology Institute Research Institute for Aquaculture No. 1 and No. 2 Southern Plant Protection Center Southern Sub-Institute of Agricultural Engineering and Post-harvest Technology Sub-Institute of Water Resource Planning Thai Nguyen University University of Hanoi Vietnam Agricultural Science Institute Vietnam Institute of Agricultural Engineering and Post-Harvest Vietnamese Academy of Agricultural Science Vietnam National University New South Wales Department of Primary Industries-Agriculture Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation The University of Queensland University of Sydney Yangco Agricultural Insitute ARC Seibersdorf Research (under ARC)

Thailand

Bureau of Rice Research and Development Chainat Rice Research Center Chainat Rice Seed Center Chiang Mai University Department of Agriculture, Thailand Department of Rice Khon Kaen Plant Material and Technical Service Center Khon Kaen University National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Pathum Thani Rice Research Center Rice Research Institute - Thailand Ubon Ratchathani Rice Research Center Agricultural Science Institute for Southern Coastal Central of Vietnam An Giang Department of Agriculture and Rural Development An Giang University Bac Lieu People’s Committee Can Tho University Cuu Long Delta Rice Research Institute Department of Agriculture and Rural Develop- ment-Bac Lieu Province Vietnam Food Crops Research Institute (Gia Loc) Hanoi Agricultural University

Austria

Belgium

Universite Catholique de Louvain-Unite de Physiologie Vegetale Ghent University Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada McGill University Plant Biotechnology Institute, National Research Council Simon Fraser University University of Alberta University of Ottawa University of Toronto Danish Institute of Agricultural Sciences Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University University of Aarhus

Vietnam

Canada

Denmark

Advanced research institutes

Australia

Charles Sturt University Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Curtin University of Technology Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry - Commonwealth

France

Agropolis Centre de coopération internationale en recherche agronomique pour le developpement

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

4 of 7

IRRI’s R eseaRch P aR tneRs
Institut de recherche pour le developpement Institut national de la recherche agronomique Christian Albrecht University - Kiel Fraunhofer Gesellschaft Zur Forderung Der AngewAndten Forschung E.V. Fraunhofer-Institute for Atmospheric Environ mental Research Garmisch Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GMBH Heinrich-Heine University Dusseldorf Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg Max Planck Institute University of Bremen University of Freiburg Universität of Göttingen University of Hamburg University of Hannover University of Hohenheim Technische Universitat Darmstadt Chiba University Foundation for Advanced Studies in International Development Japan International Cooperation Agency Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Nagoya University National Agricultural Research Center National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences National Institute of Agro-Environmental Sciences National Institute of Genetics Hebrew University of Jerusalem (The) Italy University of Milano John Innes Centre National Institute of Agricultural Botany Natural Resources Institute Rothamsted Research The Norman Borlaug Institute for Crop Improvement University of Aberdeen University of Cambridge University of Dundee University of East Anglia University of Liverpool University of Oxford University of Nottingham University of Reading University of Sheffield University of Sussex WARWICK-HRI (Integration of HRI and the University of Warwick) Clemson University Colorado State University Cornell University Donald Danforth Plant Science Center Iowa State University Kansas State University Louisiana State University National Center for Genome Resources Michigan State University Ohio State University Pennsylvania State University Purdue University RiceTec Texas Tech University USDA-Agricultural Research Service University of Arizona University of Arkansas University of California-Berkeley University of California-Davis

Germany

Korea

Chonnam National University Honam Agricultural Research Institute (for merly National Honam Agricultural Experi ment Station- under the National Institute for Crop Science) International Crop Science Congress Organizing Committee National Institute of Crop Science (formerly NCES) Pohang University of Science and Technology Rice Research Institute-Academy of Agricul tural Sciences Rural Development Administration Yeongnam Agricultural Research Institute (formerly National Yeongnam Agricultural Experiment Station) Plant Research International Wageningen University and Research Centre National University of Singapore Swedish International Development Coopera tion Agency Swiss Federal Institute of Technology

United States of America

Japan

Netherlands

Singapore Sweden

Switzerland

United Kingdom

Israel

Department for International Development European Bioinformatics Institute

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

5of 7

IRRI’s R eseaRch P aR tneRs
University of California-Riverside University of Hawaii University of Florida University of Georgia University of Illinois University of Maine University of Minnesota University of Missouri University of Washington University of Tennessee University of Utah USDA Cereal Rust Laboratory Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Washington State University Western Michigan University Yale University International Food Policy Research Institute International Institute of Tropical Agriculture International Livestock Research Institute International Plant Nutrition Institute International Potato Center International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications International Water Management Institute Plan International SEAMEO Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture The Africa Rice Center The WorldFish Center World Agroforestry Center World Vegetable Center Myanmar Myanmar Rice and Paddy Traders Association

Philippines

Diliman Computer Science Foundation, Inc. Infanta Integrated Community Development Assistance, Inc. University of the Philippines Los Banos Foundation, Inc. Asia and Pacific Seed Association Chamnien Saranaga Foundation Thailand Rice Foundation

Thailand

Nongovernment organizations

United States of America

International centers/organizations
Association for Strengthening Agricultural Research in Eastern and Central Africa Bioversity International Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo CGIAR Challenge Program on Water and Food Fondo Latinoamericano de Arroz de Riego Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Gramene: A Comparative Mapping Resource for Grains International Atomic Energy Agency International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas International Center for Biosaline Agriculture International Center for Research in the SemiArid Tropics

Bangladesh

Center for Policy Dialogue Proshika Manobik Unnayan Kendra Rangpur-Dinajpur Rural Services (RDRS) Shushilan Wave Foundation Federation of Cambodia Rice Millers Association Srer Khmer Barwale Foundation MS Swaminathan Research Foundation Nadia Zilla Farmer’s Development Organization Nand Educational Foundation For Rural Development SAMRUDHI

American Society of Agronomy Ohio State University Research Foundation Public Intellectual Property Resource for Agriculture The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Inc. World Vision Vietnam

Cambodia

Vietnam

Private organizations

Australia

BCM Software Tools PTY LTD Lal Teer Seed Limited MARK Industries (Pvt.) Ltd. Socioconsult Ltd. Devgen NV

India

Bangladesh

Belgium

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

6 of 7

IRRI’s R eseaRch P aR tneRs

Bolivia

Agricomseeds S.R.L.

Cambodia

Crenn and Associates Small and Medium Enterprises Cambodia Yuang Longping High-Tech Agriculture Co., Ltd.

China

Denmark

FOSS Medicult Bayer CropScience

Association for Integrated Development DCM Shriram Consolidated Ltd. Ganga Kaveri Seeds P Ltd. Indo American Hybrid Seeds (I) Pvt. Ltd. ITC Limited JK Agri Genetics Ltd. Maharashtra Hybrid Seed Company Metahelix Life Sciences Private Limited Nuziveedu Seeds Ltd. Rasi Seeds ( P) Ltd Safal Seeds and Biotech Ltd. Seedworks India Pvt. Ltd. Tata Energy Research Institute Vibha Agrotech Ltd. BOSHIMA-SHS R&D Office PT BISI International Tbk Google Sime Darby Technology Centre Sdn. Bhd. Malaysia

Singapore

IIR Exhibitions Pte Ltd. Seed Stories (formerly Kuehnert Communica- tions) Syngenta Asia Pacific Pte. Ltd ITAD Limited

United Kingdom United States of America

Germany Japan

Indonesia

India

Domer, Inc. Overseas Agricultural Development Association Advanta India Limited Ankur Seeds Pvt. Ltd.

Ireland

AWHERE Inc. CGN Business Performance Consulting Exelixis Plant Sciences Nabisco Research and Development Perlegen Sciences, Inc Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc. ( A Du Pont Company) Rice Tec Inc. USA Voice of Ho Chi Minh Radio Broadcasting

Vietnam

Malaysia

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

7 of 7

M eMoranda of a greeMent with P ar tners and i nstitutions
Australia
• Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR). Review of the project ADP/2003/060 Contract No. C2008/163 Implementation of rodent management in intensive irrigated rice production systems in Indonesia and Vietnam (DPPC2005-67). 08 May 2009 • Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR). Variation No. 1 relating to financial limitation of the project Sustainable intensification of rice-maize production systems in Bangladesh (joint project with CIMMYT) (DPPC2008-04). 22 Jun 2009 • Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR). Variation No. 4 relating to ACIAR-funded Project No. CIM/2002/106 Fertilization-independent formation of embryo, endosperm, and pericarp for apomictic hybrid rice (DPPC2001-07). 18 Aug 2009 • Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR). Variation No. 2 relating to no-cost extension until 31 March 2010 of the project Implementation of rodent management in intensive irrigated rice production systems in Indonesia and Vietnam (DPPC2005-67). 15 Sep 2009 • Charles Sturt University (CSU). Letter of Agreement between CSU and IRRI for the ADB-funded project Bringing about a sustainable agronomic revolution in rice production in Asia by reducing preventable pre- and postharvest losses (DPPC2008-74). 08 Jul 2009 • Charles Sturt University (CSU). Letter of Agreement between CSU and IRRI for the GCP-funded project Targeting droughtavoidance root traits to enhance rice productivity under water-limited environments (DPPC2008-34). 17 Jun 2009 • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). Letter of Agreement between CSIRO and IRRI for the BMGF-funded project Creating the second Green Revolution by supercharging photosynthesis: C4-rice (DPPC2008-78). 18 Mar 2009 • Bangladesh Academy for Rural Development (BARD). Letter of Agreement between BARD and IRRI for the ACIAR-funded project Sustainable intensification of rice-maize production systems in Bangladesh (joint project with CIMMYT) (DPPC2008-04). 12 Feb 2009 • Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute (BARI). Letter of Agreement between BARI and IRRI for the ACIAR-funded project Sustainable intensification of rice-maize production systems in Bangladesh (joint project with CIMMYT) (DPPC2008-04). 12 Feb 2009 • Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute (BARI). Letter of Agreement between BARI and IRRI for the BMGF-funded project Cereal Systems Initiative for South Asia (CSISA) (DPPC2008-100). 08 Jun 2009 • Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute (BARI). Letter of Agreement between BARI and IRRI for the IFAD-funded project Support to agricultural research for climate change adaptation (SARCCAB) (DPPC2008-120). 01 Aug 2009 • Bangladesh Rice Research Institute (BRRI). Letter of Agreement between BRRI and IRRI for the IFAD-funded project Reducing risks from arsenic contamination for poor people (DPPC2008-07). 09 Jan 2009 • Bangladesh Rice Research Institute (BRRI). Letter of Agreement between BRRI and IRRI for the ACIAR-funded project Sustainable

Austria
• International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Renewal of Contract No. 73776/RO for the IAEA-funded project Dissecting drought tolerance mechanisms in rice through gain of function deletion mutants (DPPC2006-42). 04 Mar 2009

Bangladesh
• Agriculture Information System (AIS). Letter of Agreement between AIS and IRRI for the EC-funded project Coordinating NGO interventions for improving small and marginal farmer households’ livelihood and food security in Bangladesh (Food Security for Sustainable Household Livelihood – FoSHoL) (DPPC2003-71). 09 Sep 2009

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 4

M eMoranda of a greeMent with P ar tners and i nstitutions
intensification of rice-maize production systems in Bangladesh (DPPC2008-04). 16 Feb 2009 • Bangladesh Rice Research Institute (BRRI). Letter of Agreement between BRRI and IRRI for the BMGF-funded project Cereal Systems Initiative for South Asia (CSISA) (DPPC2008100). 08 Jun 2009 • Bangladesh Rice Research Institute (BRRI). Letter of Agreement between BRRI and IRRI for the SDC-funded project The Irrigated Rice Research Consortium (IRRC), Phase IV – platform for poverty alleviation (DPPC2008-45). 08 Jul 2009 • Bangladesh Rice Research Institute (BRRI). Letter of Agreement between BRRI and IRRI for the WB-funded project CGIAR Systemwide Ecoregional Program: funding to the Rice and Wheat Consortium (DPPC200839). 19 Jul 2009 • Bangladesh Rice Research Institute (BRRI). Letter of Agreement between BRRI and IRRI for the IFAD-funded project Support to agricultural research for climate change adaptation (SARCCAB) (DPPC2008-120). 01 Aug 2009 • Bangladesh Rice Research Institute (BRRI). Letter of Agreement between BRRI and IRRI for the IFAD-funded project Reducing risks from arsenic contamination for poor people (DPPC2008-07). 23 Aug 2009 • Bangladesh Rice Research Institute (BRRI). Letter of Agreement between BRRI and IRRI for the CAAS-funded project Green Super Rice (GSR) for the resource-poor of Africa and Asia (DPPC2008-66). 23 Aug 2009 • Bangladesh Rice Research Institute (BRRI). Letter of Agreement between BRRI and IRRI for the ADB-funded project Development and dissemination of water-saving rice technologies in South Asia (DPPC2005-38). 30 Aug 2009 • Bangladesh Rice Research Institute (BRRI). Letter of Agreement between BRRI and IRRI for the HarvestPlus Phase II project Rice partnership Bangladesh (DPPC2009-98). 31 Aug 2009 • Bangladesh Rice Research Institute (BRRI). Extension of the Memorandum of Understanding between BRRI and IRRI for scientific and technical cooperation in research on rice and rice-based cropping systems. 01 Dec 2009 – 30 Nov 2015 • BRAC (formerly known as Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee). Letter of Agreement between BRAC and IRRI on the importation of 20,000 units of leaf color chart by BRAC from IRRI. 06 Jan 2009 • BRAC. Letter of Agreement between BRAC and IRRI for the CAAS-funded project Green Super Rice (GSR) for the resource-poor of Africa and Asia (DPPC2008-66). 27 Sep 2009 • Department of Agricultural Extension (DAE). Letter of Agreement between DAE and IRRI on the importation of 100,000 units of leaf color chart by DAE from IRRI. 16 Feb 2009 • Palli Karma-Sahayak Foundation (PKSF). Letter of Agreement between PKSF and IRRI on the importation of 25,000 units of leaf color chart by PKSF from IRRI. 03 Aug 2009 • Rangpur Dinajpur Rural Services (RDRS). Letter of Agreement between RDRS and IRRI for the ACIAR-funded project Sustainable intensification of rice-maize production systems in Bangladesh (joint project with CIMMYT) (DPPC2008-04). 12 Feb 2009 • Rural Development Academy (RDA). Letter of Agreement between RDA and IRRI for the ADB-funded project Development and dissemination of water-saving rice technologies in South Asia (DPPC2005-38). 28 Jul 2009 • Socioconsult Ltd. Letter of Agreement between Socioconsult Ltd. and IRRI for the ICRISAT-funded project Tracking changes in rural puverty in household and village economies in South Asia (Gates village-level surveys) (DPPC2009-12). 17 Nov 2009

Belgium
• Devgen Nv. License Agreement between Devgen Nv and IRRI forthe Mestizo 7 Hybrid Rice. 23 Sep 2009 – 22 Sep 2019 • Devgen Nv. License Agreement between Devgen Nv and PhilRice and IRRI for the

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

2 of 4

M eMoranda of a greeMent with P ar tners and i nstitutions
Mestizo 7 Hybrid Rice. 23 Sep 2009 – 22 Sep 2019 • European Commission (EC). Grant Agreement between EC and IRRI relating to EC/IFAD CGIAR programs (DPPC2009-44). 12 Jan 2009 • University of Ghent (UG). Memorandum of Agreement between UG and IRRI for the project Interaction of rice with soilborne pathogens and nematodes involved in yield decline and resistance mechanisms against fungal leaf pathogens (DPPC2008-99). 13 Jan 2009 Agreement between CARDI and IRRI for the CAAS-funded project Green Super Rice (GSR) for the resource-poor of Africa and Asia (DPPC2008-66). 17 Aug 2009 • Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF). Amendment to the Letter of Agreement between MAFF-Cambodia and IRRI for the ADB-funded project Bringing about a sustainable agronomic revolution in rice production in Asia by reducing preventable pre- and postharvest losses (DPPC200874). 07 Nov 2009 • Plan International. Amendment to the Service Agreement among Plan International, CARDI, and IRRI for the project Poverty reduction options validated in drought environments (PROVIDE) – Phase 3 (DPPC200871). 02 Mar 2009 • Plan International. Service Agreement among Plan International, CARDI, and IRRI for the project Poverty reduction options validated in drought environments (PROVIDE) – Phase 4 (DPPC2009-70). 12 Jun 2009

China
• Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS). Sub-Grant Agreement between CAAS and IRRI for the project Green Super Rice (GSR) for the resource-poor of Africa and Asia (DPPC2008-66). 23 Jan 2009 • China National Rice Research Institute (CNRRI). Memorandum of Agreement between CNRRI and IRRI for collaboration in agricultural research and training. 17 Apr 2009 – 16 Apr 2014 • Institute of Insect Sciences (IIS), Zhejiang University. Letter of Agreement between IIS and IRRI for the ADB-funded project Bringing about a sustainable agronomic revolution in rice production in Asia by reducing preventable pre- and postharvest losses (DPPC2008-74). 01 Jul 2009 • Institute of Plant Protection (IPP), Zhejiang Academy of Agricultural Sciences. Letter of Agreement between IPP and IRRI for the ADB-funded project Bringing about a sustainable agronomic revolution in rice production in Asia by reducing preventable pre- and postharvest losses (DPPC2008-74). 10 Jul 2009 • Jilin Rice Research Institute. Letter of Agreement between Jilin Rice Research Institute for the collaborative project Development of cold-tolerant temperate rice cultivars with stable yield potential under Work Group 3

Benin
• Africa Rice Center (WARDA). Letter of Agreement between WARDA and IRRI for the GCPfunded project Targeting drought-avoidance root traits to enhance rice productivity under water-limited environments (DPPC2008-34). 10 Jul 2009

Burundi
• Care International in Burundi (CARE). Agreement between CARE and IRRI for the project New approaches to support women ex-combatants and women rice producers for economic and social empowerment (DPPC2009-67). 15 Jul 2009

Canada
• University of Saskatchewan. Memorandum of Agreement between the University of Saskatchewan and IRRI to promote research, training, and exchange of information and technology in areas of mutual concern related to rice and rice-based farming systems. 12 Feb 2009 – 11 Feb 2014

Cambodia
• Cambodian Agricultural Research and Development Institute (CARDI). Letter of

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

3 of 4

M eMoranda of a greeMent with P ar tners and i nstitutions
of the Temperate Rice Research Consortium (TRRC) (DPPC2007-13). 28 Aug 2009 • Food and Agriculture Organization of United Nations (FAO-China, DPR Korea, and Mongolia). Letter of Agreement between FAO and IRRI for the project Three-week on-the-job training course of two senior researchers from the Academy of Agricultural Science, DPR Korea (DPPC2009-133). 26 Nov 2009 • Liaoning Rice Research Institute (LRRI). Letter of Agreement between LRRI and IRRI for the collaborative project Development of superior temperate rice cultivars with high yield potential and grain quality under Work Group 1 of the Temperate Rice Research Consortium (TRRC) (DPPC2007-13). 22 May 2009 • Liaoning Rice Research Institute (LRRI). Letter of Agreement between LRRI and IRRI for the collaborative project Improving fertilizer N-use efficiency of temperate rice using SSNM and on nitrogen analysis under Work Group 4 of the Temperate Rice Reserch Consortium (DPPC2007-13). 08 Jun 2009 • Lixiahe Agricultural Research Institute. Letter of Agreement between Lixiahe Agricultural Research Institute and IRRI for membership in the Hybrid Rice Research and Development Consortium (HRDC) for Public Sector Member (DPPC2008-49). 18 May 2009 • National Agro Technology and Extension Services Center (NATESC). Letter of Agreement between NATESC and IRRI for the ADBfunded project Bringing about a sustainable agronomic revolution in rice production in Asia by reducing preventable pre- and postharvest losses (DPPC2008-74). 01 Jul 2009 • Zhejiang University (ZU). Amended Memorandum of Agreement between ZU and IRRI for collaboration in agricultural research and training. 10 Apr 2009 – 09 Apr 2014

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

4 of 4

F inancial S uppor t
Summary of financial support to IRRI research agenda ( in US$000)
2009 5 Prime Aquifer Limited Asian Development Bank Australia Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Bangladesh Bioversity Canada Canadian International Development Agency CARE Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT) Challenge Programs Generation Harvest Plus Water and Food China Cornell University European Commission Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Foundation for Advanced Studies on Agricultural Development (FASID) France Germany Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and and Development/ German Agency for Technical Cooperation Global Crop Diversity Trust Grand Challenges in Global Health through Albert - Ludwigs University of Friedburg India International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA) 27 17 468 594 853 419 234 483 537 549 328 483 549 353 22 1,397 614 245 1,107 114 1,421 40 1,752 51 1,494 382 920 170 93 8 29 1,191 1,397 1,614 1,415 15,103 105 68 105 2008 484 30 994 1,351 5,705 135 36 International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) International Crop Research Institute for Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) International Fertilizer Industry Association (IFA), International Plant Nutrition Institute (IPNI), International Potash Institute (IPI) International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) International Fund for Agricultural Research (IFAR) Iran Japan Kellogg Company Korea Malaysia Norway Nunza BV Philippines Plan International Cambodia Pioneer-Hi Bred International Portugal Rockefeller Foundation Sweden Switzerland Syngenta Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States of America United States Agency for International Development (USAID) United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Vietnam World Bank World Vision, Inc. Others TOTAL 15 2,458 87 794 48,055 544 37,268 101 15 1,836 5,073 4,867 2009 74 212 103 952 7 92 4,141 20 748 17 294 13 159 27 207 90 376 508 1,652 60 40 20 2,143 2,128 40 58 116 516 1,335 825 18 382 29 178 7 121 1,368 11 165 4,712 2008 83

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 3

F inancial S uppor t
Bayer Cropscience
• Scientific Know-how and Exchange Program (SKEP), (DPPC2008-108), 11/10/2009-11/9/2012 • Bayer Tabela Project (DPPC2009), 11/1/20092/28/2011

Centro Internacional De Mejoramiento de Maiz y Trigo
• GPG2 Activity 3.1: Development of a collaborative platform in support of best practices in safe movement of germplasm (DPPC2009-30), 3/23/2009-7/15/2009

Bioversity International
• Action for the rehabilitation of global public good in the CGIAR genetic resources system: Phase 2 – Activity 4: Assess knowledge and gaps in the diversity and genetic quality of the collection. Activity 4.1.1 Completion of passport data entry systemwide (DPPC2009-26), 3/2/20098/31/2009

Charles Sturt University
• Developing improved farming and marketing systems for rural livelihoods in rainfed southern Laos (funded by ACIAR), (DPPC2009-127), 12/1/2009-11/30/2013

• Development of data standards and community of practice enabling the capture of and access to GCP quality data sets (DPPC2009-56), 1/1/200912/31/2009 • A molecular breeding platform (Activities 2.1.1; 2.3.1 and 2.3.3), (DPPC2009-75), 7/15/20097/15/2014 • A molecular breeding platform (Activities 2.3.1 and 2.3.3), (DPPC2009-92), 9/15/20096/30/2011

HarvestPlus
• Development of high-iron rice (DPPC2009-145), 7/1/2009-7/1/2010 • Development of high-zinc rice for Bangladesh and eastern India (Phase 2), (DPPC2009-60), 1/1/2009• Rice Partnership Bangladesh (HarvestPlus Phase II), (DPPC2009-98), 1/1/2009-12/31/2009

CIAT/IFPRI/HarvestPlus
• Assessing the potential of biofortification to address micronutrient malnutrition in rice-based cropping systems of South and Southeast Asia (DPPC2009-102), 7/1/2009-12/31/2009

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
• Rice in the 21st century global economy: strategic research and policy issues for food security (DPPC2009-25), 6/23/2009-6/30/2010

Food and Agriculture Organization
• Three-week on-the-job training course of two senior researchers from the Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, (DPPC2009-133), 11/27/2009-12/18/2009 • Development of an application to implement protocols and transactions required for the management of the Standard Material Transfer Agreement of the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (IT-PGRFA), (DPPC2009-17), 01/01/200907/31/2009

Bundesministerium für wirtschaftliche Zusammenarbeit und Entwicklung (German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development) (BMZ)
• Spatial and temporal variability of greenhouse gas emissions from farmers’ rice fields under water-saving strategies in the Philippines (BMZ post-doc), (DPPC2008-130), 10/1/20099/30/2012

International Center for Research in the SemiArid Tropics
• Tracking changes in rural poverty in household and village economies in South Asia (DPPC200912), 5/1/2009-4/30/2014

International Fertilizer Industry Association/ International Potash Institute/ International Plant Nutrition Institute
• Enhancing the profitability of rice farming in Asia through improved nutrient and crop management (DPPC2008-116), 1/1/2009-12/31/2012

Care International In Burundi
• New approaches to support women ex-combatants and women rice producers for economic and social empowerment (DPPC2009-67), 7/15/2009-12/31/2010

Generation Challenge Program
• Provision of genotyping support services (DPPC2008-136), 1/17/2009-1/16/2010 • Next generation sequencing data – data analysis support (DPPC2009-55), 1/01/2009-12/31/2009

International Food Policy Research Institute
• Global futures for agriculture: integrated modeling and scenario assessment (DPPC2009-86), 12/1/2009-6/30/2012

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

2 of 3

F inancial S uppor t
International Fund for Agricultural Development
• Enabling poor rice farmers to improve livelihoods and overcome poverty in South and Southeast Asia through the Consortium for Unfavorable Rice Environments (CURE), (DPPC2008-111), 7/29/2009-9/30/2013 • Support to agricultural research for climate change adaptation in Bangladesh (SARCCAB), (DPPC2008-120), 7/23/2009-9/30/2012

National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies
• Mozambique survey (collect and analyze household-level data with the aim of understanding the determinants of income with particular focus on rice farming activities), (DPPC2009-02), 3/1/2009-3/15/2009

Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation
• The Irrigated Rice Research Consortium (IRRC), Phase IV – Platform For Poverty Alleviation (DPPC2008-45), 1/1/2009-/12/31/2012 • Healthy rice for healthy people: zinc biofortification of rice through environmentally targeted germplasm development and zinc management (Dr. Somayanda Impa Muthappa, RFPP Fellow), (DPPC2009-37), 8/24/2009-8/23/2011

National Institute of Agro-environmental Sciences
• Evaluation, adaptation, and mitigation of global warming in agriculture, forestry, and fisheries research and development (DPPC2009-136), 10/1/2009-3/5/2010 • Multisite monitoring of heat stresses and paddy micro-climate under various climates under the “Multilateral research exchange project for securing food and agriculture” (DRPC2010-06), 10/1/2009-3/8/2010

International Plant Nutrition Institute
• Nutrient management for maize (DPPC2009-139), 12/1/2009-2/28/2010 • Site-specific nutrient management (SSNM) for rice-maize cropping systems in Bangladesh (DPPC2009-141), 12/1/2009-12/31/2011

Syngenta Foundation for Sustainable Agriculture
• Improving guidelines for testing and release of breeding lines and marker-aided selection (MAS) Products (DPPC2009-63), 6/22/2009-12/31/2009

Japan International Cooperation Agency
• Area-focused training program on “Upland rice variety selection techniques” (DPPC2009-118), 10/29/2009-11/24/2009 • Socioeconomic survey in Tanzania (DPPC2009122), 10/30/2009-2/8/2010

United States Agency for International Development
• CSISA Component 3. High-yielding Abiotic Stresstolerant and disease- and insect-resistant rice varieties and hybrids for current and future cereal and mixed crop-livestock system (DPPC2009-53), 1/1/2009-12/31/2009 • Research-driven rice intensification in Mozambique: a model for sustainable improvement of rice production (DPPC2009-69), 9/3/20099/29/2012

Philippine Rice Research Institute
• Unified capability-building support (DPPC2008127), 10/8/2009-10/7/2010 • Strategic assessment of yield-limiting and -reducing factors in the Philippines (DPPC2008-128), 10/8/2009-10/7/2010 • Accelerating the development of high-yielding rice varieties for the major ecosystems of the Philippines (DPPC2008-129), 10/8/200910/7/2010

Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences
• Transformation of lowland rice and evaluation of transformed rice for environmental stress tolerance (part of the project “Development of abiotic stress-tolerant crops by DREB genes”), (DPPC2009-33), 4/1/2009-2/26/2010

Plan International
• Poverty reduction options validated in drought environments (PROVIDE) Phase 4 (DPPC2009-70), 6/12/2009-5/10/2010

United States Department of Agriculture
• Hosting of IRRI rice thesaurus Web site (DPPC2009-50), 4/1/2009-4/1/2012 • Quantifying the global warming potential of current and future rice-based cropping systems in South Asia (GHG project with Arcadia), (DPPC2009-99), 9/30/2009-5/1/2012

Kellogg Company
• Ecological intensification and sustainability in long-term rice-based cropping systems (DPPC2009-116), 10/14/2009-10/13/2013

Rockefeller Foundation
• Golden Rice product development and deployment (DPPC2008-115), 1/1/2009-12/31/2012

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

3 of 3

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t

PRINT

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009 AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

HOME

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t

Corporate information
Board of Trustees Members-at-large Dr. Ralph Anthony Fischer Dr. Mutsuo Iwamoto Dr. Seong-Hee Lee Dr. Jillian Lenné Prof. Ruth Oniang’o Dr. Ronald Phillips Dr. Mangala Rai Mr. Mohammed Syeduzzaman Dr. Achmad Suryana Dr. Elizabeth J. Woods Dr. Usha Barwale Zehr Prof. Baowen Zhang Ex officio members Dr. Emerlinda R. Roman President, University of the Philippines Mr. Arthur C. Yap Secretary, Philippine Department of Agriculture Dr. Robert S. Zeigler Director General Officers Dr. William G. Padolina Secretary to the Board Mr. Norman A. Macdonald Treasurer to the Board Los Baños Location/Address Headquarters

College, Los Baños 4031 Laguna Philippines Tel: (63-2) 580-5600; 845-0563 (63-49) 563-2701 to 2705 +1 (650) 833-6620 (USA direct) Fax: (63-2) 580-5699; 845-0606 (63-49) 536-7995 +1 (650) 833-6621 (USA direct) Email: irri@cgiar.org Web: www.irri.org IRRI Makati Office Location/Address 10th Floor, Suite 1009 Security Bank Center 6776 Ayala Avenue, Makati City 1226 Philippines Tel: (63-2) 856-6133; 856-6129 Fax: (63-2) 891-1236 External Auditors Manabat Sanagustin & Co., CPAs A member firm of KPMG

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t

Audit Committee
Membership The members of the Audit Committee are appointed by the Board. It assists the Board in fulfilling its oversight responsibilities by reviewing and auditing, from time to time, the accounts and financial condition as well as the risk management and operating systems and procedures of the Institute. The Committee may undertake other duties delegated to it by the Board. For the Institute’s audit and accounts, the Committee discharges its functions in consultation and coordination with the external auditors, the internal auditors, and appropriate consultants of the Institute. The Chairperson of the Audit Committee, who is customarily appointed by the Board at the time when the Board appoints members of the Committee, presides over all meetings of the Committee. In his/her absence or disability, the Vice Chairperson shall act as the Chairperson for that meeting. A vacancy in the Audit Committee is filled from among other members of the Board through election by the Board or election by the remaining members of the Audit Committee. Any person so elected by the Committee serves only until the next meeting of the Board. The Audit Committee shall meet at least once a year. Special meetings may be held upon call by its Chairman or upon request of at least one member. The Committee shall report to the Board, at least at the conclusion of each Committee meeting about Committee activities, issues, and related recommendations, confirming that all responsibilities outlined in the charter have been carried out. Authority The Audit Committee is authorized to commission investigations into matters within its scope of responsibility. It is empowered to seek any information it requires from Institute management and staff or external parties; meet with Institute management and staff, external auditors, or legal counsel, as necessary; and retain independent counsel, accountants, or others to advise the Committee or assist in the conduct of an investigation. The Composition in 2009 Designation of Audit Committee Dr. Emerlinda Roman Mr. M. Syeduzzaman Dr. Ronald Phillips Prof. Elizabeth Woods Prof. Baowen Zhang Dr. J. Lenné Dr. A. Suryana Dr. M. Iwamoto and

- Chairperson - Vice Chairperson - Member - Member - Member - Member - Member - Member

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t

Statement by the Board Chair

For the year ended 31 December 2009 The International Rice Research Institute plays a very significant role in reducing poverty and hunger, improving the health of rice farmers and consumers, and ensuring environmental sustainability through collaborative research, partnerships, and the strengthening of national agricultural research and extension systems. As IRRI celebrates its 50th Anniversary, I am pleased to report that the Institute continues to meet the high standards expected by our stakeholders. Resource Mobilization In 2009, IRRI’s revenue increased by 33% to US$49.90 million. IRRI continues to be successful in attracting significant new investments to further its mission and continue its important task of reducing poverty through rice science. Financial Status IRRI’s financial position remains stable, with total assets of US$81.72 million compared with US$71.47 million in 2008. The liquidity and long-term stability indicators remain above the CGIAR benchmarks. IRRI incurred a net deficit of US$0.23 million. The deficit resulted from the use of designated net assets for identified research and management initiatives within the new Strategic Plan, such as the Knowledge Pathways Initiative and Climate Change and Drought Frontier Projects (US$0.75 million), but this was offset by a surplus on recurring operations of $0.52 million. The deficit was still consistent with the Board-approved reserve plan. CGIAR Change Management Process The Board and management have been very much involved in this. The impact of the changes on the organizational and programmatic structure of the Institute is not yet established, but the Institute will maintain its flexibility in its planning so that it can adapt to the new situation. Fiduciary Responsibility The Board recognizes its fiduciary responsibility for the financial statements of the Institute as well as in setting its overall strategy and following up on its implementation in accordance with agreed policies, particularly on investments, procedures, timelines, and results. Risk Management The Board continuously monitors the risk management system and risk mitigation measures and is satisfied with the progress made on implementing the risk management framework.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t

External Program and Management Review The EPMR began in 2008 and a report was issued in early 2009. IRRI welcomed the recommendations and was pleased to note that the Institute’s finances were well managed and the internal control systems were functioning well. We have paid close attention to ensuring that IRRI’s already high standards of governance meet all the recommendations of the EPMR. Appreciation On behalf of the Board of Trustees, I would like to thank our partners and donors for their continued support and cooperation to fulfill IRRI’s mission. I would also like to recognize the dedication and perseverance of IRRI’s staff.

____________________ Prof. Elizabeth Woods Chair Board of Trustees

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t

International Rice Research Institute Financial statements December 31, 2009 and 2008

Management Statement of Responsibility for Financial Reporting The accompanying financial statements of the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) for the years ended December 31, 2009 and 2008, are the responsibility of management, including the substance and objectivity of the information contained therein. Our financial reporting practices follow the “Accounting Policies and Reporting Practices Manual – Financial Guidelines Series No. 2” of the CGIAR. IRRI maintains a system of internal control designed to provide reasonable assurance that assets are safeguarded and transactions are properly recorded and executed in accordance with management’s authorization. A system of reporting within the Institute presents management with an accurate view of the operations, enabling us to discern risks to our assets or fluctuations in the economic environment of the Institute at an early stage and at the same time providing a reliable basis for the financial statements and management reports. The Board of Trustees exercises its responsibility for these financial statements through its Audit Committee. This Committee meets regularly with management and representatives of the external and internal auditors to review matters relating to financial reporting, internal controls, and auditing.

Dr. Robert S. Zeigler Director General

Norman A. Macdonald Treasurer and Director for Management Services

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t

INTERNATIONAL RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE
(A Nonstock, Not-for-Profit Organization)

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION December 31, 2009 (With Comparative Figures for 2008)

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
INTERNATIONAL RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE
(A Nonstock, Not-for-Profit Organization)

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page/s

Report of Independent Auditors Statement of Financial Position Statement of Activities Statement of Changes in Net Assets Statement of Cash Flows Notes to the Financial Statements Schedule of Grants Revenues and Accounts Receivable/(Payable) – Donors Schedule of Restricted Agenda Funding Details of Operating Expenses Indirect Cost Calculation Statement of Expenditures - European Community Funding Statement of Expenditures - Germany Unrestricted Contribution 1 - 13 14-16 17-24 14-25 14-26 14-27 14-28

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
Manabat Sanagustin & Co., CPAs The KPMG Center, 9/F 6787 Ayala Avenue Makati City 1226, Metro Manila, Philippines Branches · Subic · Cebu · Bacolod · Iloilo Telephone Fax Internet E-Mail +63 (2) 885 7000 +63 (2) 894 1985 www.kpmg.com.ph manila@kpmg.com.ph

PRC-BOA Registration No. 0003 SEC Accreditation No. 0004-FR-2 BSP Accredited

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT AUDITORS The Board of Trustees International Rice Research Institute We have audited the accompanying financial statements of International Rice Research Institute (a nonstock, not-for-profit organization), which comprise the statement of financial position as at December 31, 2009, and the statement of activities, statement of changes in net assets and statement of cash flows for the year then ended, and notes, comprising a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information. The financial statements of International Rice Research Institute as of and for the year ended December 31, 2008, were audited by other auditors whose report dated April 17, 2009, expressed an unqualified opinion on those statements. Management’s Responsibility for the Financial Statements Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements and the supplementary schedules and statements in accordance with the basis of Accounting Policies and Reporting Practices Manual – Financial Guidelines Series No. 2 prescribed for international agricultural research centers under the auspices of Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR). This responsibility includes: designing, implementing and maintaining internal control relevant to the preparation and fair presentation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error; selecting and applying appropriate accounting policies; and making accounting estimates that are reasonable in the circumstances. Auditors’ Responsibility Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those standards require that we comply with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the financial statements are free from material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditors’ judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditors consider internal control relevant to the entity’s preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements.

Manabat Sanagustin & Co., CPAs, a Philippine partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t

We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion. Opinion In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of International Rice Research Institute (a nonstock, not-for-profit organization) as of December 31, 2009, and the results of its activities and its cash flows for the year then ended in accordance with CGIAR Accounting Policies and Reporting Practices Manual – Financial Guidelines Series No. 2 as prescribed for international agricultural research centers under the auspices of CGIAR. Our audit was made for the purpose of forming an opinion on the basic financial statements taken as a whole. The supplementary schedules of grants revenues and accounts receivable/ (payable) donors, restricted agenda funding, details of operating expenses and indirect cost calculation and the statements of expenditures for European Community Funding and Germany Unrestricted Contribution for the year ended December 31, 2009 are presented for the purposes of additional analyses and are not a required part of the basic financial statements. The information in such supplementary schedules and statements has been subjected to the auditing procedures applied in the audit of the basic financial statements and, in our opinion, is fairly stated in all material respects in relation to the basic financial statements taken as a whole. Other Matter This report, including the opinion, has been prepared for and only for the members of the Board of Trustees as a body. We do not, in giving this opinion, accept or assume responsibility for any other purpose or to any other person to whose knowledge this report may come to.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t

INTERNATIONAL RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE (A Nonstock, Not-for-Profit Organization) STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION DECEMBER 31, 2009 (With Comparative Figures for 2008) (All amounts in thousand US Dollars)

Note ASSETS Current Assets Cash and cash equivalents Short term investments Accounts receivable Donors Employees Others Inventories (net of allowance for obsolescence of $104 in 2009 and $262 in 2008) Prepaid expenses Total Current Assets Non-current Assets Property and equipment - net Long term investments Total Non-current Assets 3 4 5 6 7 8

2009

2008

29,429 9,260 4,789 671 1,894 574 182 46,799 10,515 24,410 34,925 81,724

28,524 2,790 5,613 213 873 543 89 38,645 10,577 22,246 32,823 71,468

9 4

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS Current Liabilities Accounts payable Donors Others Accruals and provisions Total Current Liabilities Net Assets Designated

10 11 12

34,150 805 9,766 44,721 37,003 81,724

23,602 1,546 8,939 34,087 37,381 71,468

See Notes to the Financial Statements.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t

INTERNATIONAL RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE (A Nonstock, Not-for-Profit Organization) STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2009 (With Comparative Figures for 2008) (All amounts in thousand US Dollars)

Note REVENUES Grants (Exhibit 1) Other revenues OPERATING EXPENSES Program related (Exhibit 3) Management and general (Exhibit 3) Recovery of indirect costs (Exhibit 4) NET DEFICIT FROM ORDINARY ACTIVITIES Unrealized foreign exchange translation gain (loss) NET DEFICIT MEMO ITEMS Operating expenses - by natural classification: Personnel costs Supplies and services Collaborators/Partners Operational travel Depreciation Sub-total Recovery of indirect costs

Unrestricted 13,415 1,849 15,264 12,327 6,453 18,780 (3,283) 15,497

2009 Restricted Challenge Temporary Programs 32,384 32,384 32,199 185 32,384 32,384 2,256 2,256 2,256 2,256 2,256

Total 48,055 1,849 49,904 46,782 6,638 53,420 (3,283) 50,137

2008 37,268 257 37,525 35,755 7,217 42,972 (2,782) 40,190

16

(233) 2 (231)

-

-

(233) 2 (231)

(2,665) (971) (3,636)

15 9

9,660 5,703 354 1,062 2,001 18,780 (3,283) 15,497

9,301 9,855 9,662 2,467 1,099 32,384 32,384

641 753 555 294 13 2,256 2,256

19,602 16,311 10,571 3,823 3,113 53,420 (3,283) 50,137

17,459 14,856 4,689 3,443 2,525 42,972 (2,782) 40,190

See Notes to the Financial Statements.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

Audited FinAnciAl RepoRt

INTERNATIONAL RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE (A Nonstock, Not-for-Profit Organization) STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN NET ASSETS FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2009 (With Comparative Figures for 2008) (All amounts in thousand US Dollars)

Note Balances, January 1, 2008 Board of trustees re-designation Capital reserve replenishment Acquisition of fixed assets Net deficit for the year Balances, December 31, 2008 Capital reserve replenishment Acquisition of fixed assets Net deficit for the year Balances, December 31, 2009 14 9

Vested Invested in Fixed Assets 11,113 (2,525) 2,039 (50) 10,577 (3,113) 3,202 (151) 10,515

Fixed Assets Risk Acquisition Management 3,651 2,525 (2,002) 4,174 3,113 (3,349) 3,938 1,408 1,706 (1,344) 1,770 670 2,440

Designated Non-Vested Unrealized Research Forex GRC Initiative Fund Translation Reserve (Note 14) 3,520 (1,706) (971) 843 2 845 10,000 10,000 10,000 11,288 (1,271) 10,017 (752) 9,265

Total Non-vested 29,867 2,525 (2,002) (3,586) 26,804 3,113 (3,349) (80) 26,488

Net Assets

T

40,980 37 (3,636) 37,381 (147) (231) 37,003

9

See Notes to the Financial Statements.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t

INTERNATIONAL RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE (A Nonstock, Not-for-Profit Organization) STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2009 (With Comparative Figures for 2008) (All amounts in thousand US Dollars)

Note CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES Net deficit Adjustments for: Depreciation of property and equipment Investment (gains) losses Loss on disposal of property and equipment Net surplus (deficit) before working capital changes Increase (decrease) in: Short term investments Accounts receivable Inventories Prepaid expenses Increase in: Accounts payable Accruals and provisions Cash generated from operations Interest received Net cash provided by operating activities CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES Increase in long term investments Net movement of fixed assets acquisition reserve Acquisition of property and equipment Net cash used in investing activities NET INCREASE IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS January 1 December 31

2009

2008

(231) 9 16 9 3,113 (1,556) 151 1,477 (6,470) (655) (31) (93) 9,807 827 4,862 1,556 6,418

(3,636) 2,525 183 50 (878) (726) 1,966 29 230 7,449 1,435 9,505 747 10,252

9

(2,164) (147) (3,202) (5,513) 905 28,524 29,429

(1,564) 37 (2,039) (3,566) 6,686 21,838 28,524

See Notes to the Financial Statements.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t

INTERNATIONAL RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE (A Nonstock, Not-for-Profit Organization) NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS DECEMBER 31, 2009
(With Comparative Figures for 2008) (All amounts in thousand US Dollars)

1. Reporting Entity International Rice Research Institute (the “Institute”) was established in 1960 to undertake basic research on the rice plant and applied research on all phases of rice production, management, distribution and utilization with the objective of attaining nutritive and economic advantage and benefit for the people of Asia and other major rice- growing areas. The Institute was first conferred the status of an international organization in the Philippines under Presidential Decree (PD) No. 1620. On May 19, 1995, a multi-lateral agreement recognizing the status of the Institute as an international organization was signed by representatives of 19 countries, including the Philippines. The 1995 Agreement allows the Institute to have a juridical status to more effectively pursue its international collaborative activities in rice research and training. Pursuant to the 1995 Agreement, the Institute and the Government of the Republic of the Philippines entered into a Headquarters (HQ) Agreement. The HQ Agreement was ratified by the Philippine President on May 23, 2006, was concurred by the Philippine Senate on April 28, 2008, and came into force on May 14, 2008. The Institute enjoys, among other privileges and prerogatives, the following tax exemptions: a. Exemption from the payment of gift, franchise, specific, percentage, real property, exchange, import, export, and all other taxes provided under existing laws or ordinances. This exemption shall extend to goods imported and owned by the Institute to be leased or used by members of its staff. b. All gifts, bequests, donations and contributions which may be received by the Institute from any source whatsoever, or which may be granted by the Institute to any individual or non-profit organization for educational or scientific purposes, shall be exempt from the payment of the taxes. All gifts, contributions and donations to the Institute shall be considered allowable deductions for purposes of determining the income tax of the donor. c. Non-Filipino citizens serving on the senior professional and administrative staff of the Institute shall be exempt from the payment of income tax on salaries and stipends in US dollars received solely and by reason of service rendered to the Institute. d. The Institute shall be exempt from the payment of all customs duties and related levies or any kind, except charges for storage, transport and services supplied, and from prohibitions and restrictions on the import or export of articles intended for its official use.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
The Institute receives support from various donor agencies and entities primarily through the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR). The CGIAR is a group of donors composed of governments of various nations, international organizations and foundations. The Institute’s major facilities are located in Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines. It has fifteen (15) offices, including Africa, outside the Philippines. The Institute owns an administrative office in Makati City, Philippines. As of December 31, 2009, the Institute has 1,055 employees (2008 - 976). The financial statements and supplementary schedules of the Institute were approved and authorized for issue by the Board of Trustees on April 17, 2010. 2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies The principal accounting policies applied in the preparation of these financial statements are set out below. These policies have been consistently applied to all the years presented. Basis of Financial Statements The financial statements, expressed in US dollars, are prepared on the basis of accounting practices prescribed for international agricultural research centers (Accounting Policies and Reporting Practices Manual - Financial Guidelines No. 2 or APRPM) under the auspices of the CGIAR. These accounting policies are applied consistently in dealing with items that are considered material in relation to the financial statements. The preparation of financial statements in conformity with CGIAR’s APRPM requires management to make judgments, estimates and assumptions that affect the application of policies and reported amounts of assets, liabilities, income and expenses. The estimates and associated assumptions are based on historical experience and various other factors that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis of making the judgments about carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates. Future events may occur which can cause the assumptions used in arriving at the estimates to change. The effects of any change in estimates are reflected in the financial statements as they become reasonably determinable. The estimates and underlying assumptions are reviewed on an ongoing basis. Revisions to accounting estimates are recognized in the period in which the estimate is revised if the revision affects only that period or in the period of the revision and future periods if the revision affects both current and future periods. Basis of Measurement The financial statements have been prepared on the historical cost basis. Functional and Presentation Currency The financial statements are prepared in US dollars, rounded to the nearest thousand, except when otherwise indicated.

-2-

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
Revenue Recognition Grants are recognized as revenue upon the substantial fulfillment of the conditions attached to them, regardless of the period when it is intended to be used, or when the donor has explicitly waived the conditions. Grants are classified according to the type of restrictions attached to them. Unrestricted grants are grants received which the Institute may freely use for its mandated activities. Unrestricted grants are recognized in full in the period specified by the donor. Restricted grants are grants received in support of specified projects or activities mutually agreed upon by the Institute and donors. Revenue is recognized to the extent of expenses actually incurred. Excess of grants received over expenses, representing grants applicable to succeeding years, are shown as “Accounts payable - donors” in the statement of financial position. Claims from donors for project expenses paid in advance are shown as Accounts receivable - donors in the statement of financial position. Grants in kind are recorded at the fair value of the assets (or services) received or promised while cash grants are recorded at its US dollar equivalent at the time of receipt. Expense Recognition Expenses are decreases in economic benefits during the accounting period in the form of outflows or depletion of assets or incurrence of liabilities that result in decreases in net assets. Expenses are recognized on the basis of a direct association between the costs incurred and the earning of specific items of revenue. The Institute presents on the face of the statement of activities an analysis of expenses using a classification based on the function and nature of expenses within the Institute. Program related expenses are activities that result in goods and services being distributed to beneficiaries, project proponents, and members that fulfill the purpose or mission for which the Institute exists. These expenses include advances to collaborators which will be subjected to liquidation at the end of the projects. Management and general expenses are all activities of Institute other than program-related activities. Cash and Cash Equivalents Cash includes cash on hand and in banks. Cash equivalents are short-term, highly liquid investments that are both: (a) readily convertible to known amounts of cash; and (b) so near their maturity date that they present insignificant risk of changes in value. These investments, as distinguished from short term investments, are those that are acquired with original maturities of three months or less. Investments Investments are initially recorded at their acquisition cost if they are purchased and at their fair market value if they are received as grants. Investments in equity securities and debt securities are re-measured at their market value as of the reporting date. Interest, dividends, losses and gains relating to a financial instrument is reported in the Statement of Activities as expense or revenue. Short-term investments consist of investments that are: (a) acquired with original maturity of more than three months but not exceeding one year; and (b) those that are originally long term in nature but are currently due to mature within one year as of the reporting date. -3-

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
Long-term investments are investments that are acquired with the intention of keeping the same for more than a year from the acquisition date and which are not maturing within one year as of the reporting date. Accounts Receivable Accounts receivable are carried at gross amount less an allowance for any uncollectible amounts. Allowance for doubtful accounts is based on past experience and on a continuous review of receivable aging reports and other relevant factors. When an accounts receivable is deemed doubtful of collection, the Institute provides an allowance for doubtful accounts during the year in which it is deemed doubtful. Any receivable or a portion thereof adjudged to be uncollectible is written off. The write-off is done after all efforts to collect have been exhausted. Receivables are classified as current or non-current. Current receivables are those collectible within one year from the reporting date. Non-current receivables are those collectible beyond one year. Inventories Inventories which consist of spare parts and supplies and other inventories are stated at the cost. Cost, which includes the purchase price plus cost of freight, installation and handling charges, is determined using the moving average method. Property and Equipment Property and equipment acquired prior to 1991 are carried at cost or estimated value; acquisitions starting 1991 are stated at cost. Capital expenditures with a minimum cost of US$500 or its equivalent and with an estimated life beyond one year are capitalized. Property and equipment which qualifies for recognition as an asset is initially measured at cost. The cost of an item of property and equipment comprises its purchase price and all other incidental cost in bringing the assets to its working condition for its intended use. Subsequent to initial recognition as an asset, an item of property and equipment are carried at its cost less any accumulated depreciation. Depreciation of all assets which are owned by the Institute is computed using the straightline method over the estimated useful lives of the related assets, as follows: Category description Physical facilities Building and improvements Infrastructure and leasehold improvements Furnishing and equipment Farm machinery and equipment Shop machinery and equipment Laboratory Office Auxiliary units Vehicles Computers Estimated life in years 60 25 7-10 7-10 5-10 5-10 5-10 4-7 3-5

-4-

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
Depreciation is charged from the month an asset was placed in operation and is continued until the asset has been fully depreciated or its use is discontinued. Property and equipment acquired through the use of grants restricted for a specific project are recorded as assets. Such assets are depreciated at a rate of 100% in the year of purchase. The depreciation expense is charged directly to the appropriate restricted project. An item of property and equipment is eliminated from the statement of financial position on disposal or when the asset is permanently withdrawn from use and no further economic benefits are expected from its disposal. Gains or losses arising from the retirement or disposal should be determined as the difference between the estimated net disposal proceeds and the carrying amount of the asset and should be recognized as revenue or expense in the statement of activities. Accounts Payable Accounts payable represent amounts due to donors, employees, and others for support, services and/or materials received prior to year-end, but not paid for as at financial position date. Accruals Accruals represent liabilities to pay for goods or services that have been received or supplied but have not been paid, invoiced or formally agreed with the supplier. Accordingly, a liability is recorded upon issuance of purchase orders to suppliers. Provisions Provisions are recognized when the Institute has: (a) a present obligation as a result of a past event; (b) it is probable that an outflow of resources will be required to settle the obligation; and (c) a reliable estimate of the amount can be made. Provisions are measured at the present value of management’s best estimate of the expenditure required to settle the present obligation at the reporting date. When there are a number of similar obligations, the likelihood that an outflow will be required in the settlement is determined by considering the class of obligations taken as a whole. A provision is recognized even if the likelihood of an outflow with respect to any one item included in the same class of obligations may be small. Net Assets Net assets are classified as either undesignated or designated. Undesignated is that part of net assets that is not designated by Institute’s management for specific purposes. Designated is that part of net assets that has been designated by Institute’s management for specific purposes, such as a reserve for the future acquisition of property and equipment. Leases A lease is an agreement whereby the lessor conveys to the lessee, in return for a payment or a series of payments, the right to use an asset for an agreed period of time. Leases of property where a significant portion of the risks and rewards of ownership is retained by the lessor are classified as operating leases. Payments made under operating leases are charged to operations on a straight-line basis over the period of the lease.

-5-

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
Foreign Currency Transactions And Translations Foreign currency denominated transactions are translated to US dollars for reporting purposes at standard bookkeeping rates which approximate the exchange rates prevailing at the dates of the transactions. Exchange differences arising from: (a) the settlement of foreign currency denominated monetary items at rates which are different from which they were originally booked; and (b) the translation of balances of foreign-currency denominated monetary items are credited or charged to operations during the year. Employee Benefits Employee benefits are given by the Institute in exchange for service rendered by all employees - whether internationally recruited staff (IRS) or nationally recruited staff (NRS). A defined contribution plan is a post-employment benefit plan under which the Institution pays fixed contributions into a separate entity and will have no legal or constructive obligation to pay further amounts. Obligations for contributions to defined contribution pension plans are recognized as “personnel costs” under the statement of activities in the periods during which services are rendered by employees. Recovery of Indirect Costs The pooling of direct and indirect costs is based on the principle of attribution and assignability. Expenditures are pooled to different resource user units (cost centers) by direct identification. Expenditures that are common to the different cost centers are allocated on the basis of resource drivers. Non-operating and non-recurring expenditures are excluded in the computation. Direct and indirect costs exclude capital expenditures but include depreciation in the case of unrestricted funded activities. For restricted grants, the indirect cost rates may include capital expenditures depending on the terms and conditions of the relevant agreements. The method of calculating the indirect cost recovery rate is prescribed in the CGIAR Financial Guidelines Series No. 5 (“CGIAR Indirect Cost Allocation Guidelines”). Subsequent Events Post year-end events that provide additional information about the Institute’s situation at the reporting date (adjusting events) are reflected in the financial statements, if any. Post yearend events that are not adjusting events are disclosed in the notes when material. 3. Cash and Cash Equivalents This account consists of: Cash equivalents Cash on hand and in banks 2009 22,415 7,014 29,429 2008 19,852 8,672 28,524

-6-

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
4. Investments This account consists of: 2009 Short term investments With original maturities of more than 3 months but less than one year Long term investments due to mature within one year Long term investments 3,183 6,077 9,260 24,410 33,670 2008 2,790 2,790 22,246 25,036

All the investments are principal protected, except for the US$1,140 equity investments under short term investments. The interest income from the investments included as part of “Other revenues” in the statement of activities is US$705,617 in 2009 (2008-US$713,759). Gains (losses) on investments amount to US$831,774 and US$929,809 in 2009 and 2008, respectively (see Note 16). 5. Accounts Receivable - Donors Receivables from donors arise from amounts due from grants or challenge programs that have been negotiated between a donor and the Institute which are yet to be collected or reimbursed by the donors (see Exhibit 1 for 2009 details). Unrestricted Restricted Temporary Challenge programs 2009 3,009 1,600 180 4,789 2008 3,191 2,317 105 5,613

Based on past experience and on continuous review of receivables from donors, donors usually pay the amount of grant pledged to the Institute. Therefore, no amount of allowance was provided against the receivables.

-7-

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
6. Accounts Receivable - Employees Receivables from employees are advances made to officers and employees for travel. The account consists of advances to: Internationally recruited staffs (IRS) Nationally recruited staffs (NRS) Trainees, scholars, post doctorate fellows (PDF) 2009 326 290 55 671 2008 108 83 22 213

7. Accounts Receivable - Others The account consists of advance payment to suppliers, consultants and other third parties. Advances to suppliers IRRI Fund Limited Funds-in trust Others 2009 976 310 278 330 1,894 2008 402 189 282 873

The IRRI Fund Limited is registered in Singapore as an international charitable organization that facilitates and encourages support for rice research particularly the works of the Institute from private and public donors in Singapore, Asia, and around the world. It was officially launched by the Institute in November 2009. 8. Inventories The account consists of: Spare parts Supplies and other inventories Allowance for obsolescence 2009 347 331 678 (104) 574 2008 506 299 805 (262) 543

The decrease in the allowance for obsolescence is included in “Management and general expenses - supplies and services” in the statement of activities.

-8-

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
9. Property and Equipment The details of property and equipment at December 31, 2009 and 2008, and their movements during the year consist of:
Physical Facilities At January 1, 2009 Cost Accumulated depreciation Net book value Opening net book value Cost Additions Disposal Accumulated depreciation Depreciation for the year Disposal Closing net book value At December 31, 2009 Cost Accumulated depreciation Net book value 123 (32) 91 91 (2) 89 123 (34) 89 Infrastructure and Leasehold Improvements 2,401 (621) 1,780 1,780 640 (389) 2,031 3,041 (1,010) 2,031 Infrastruct and Leaseho Improvemen 2,146 (514) 1,632 1,632 255 (2) 91 123 (32) 91 (107) 1,780 2,401 (621) 1,780 Furnishing and Equipment 36,027 (27,321) 8,706 8,706 2,562 (930) (2,722) 779 8,395 37,659 (29,264) 8,395

Total 38,551 (27,974) 10,577 10,577 3,202 (930) (3,113) 779 10,515 40,823 (30,308) 10,515

Physical Facilities At January 1, 2008 Cost Accumulated depreciation Net book value Opening net book value Cost Additions Disposal Accumulated depreciation Depreciation for the year Disposal Closing net book value At December 31, 2008 Cost Accumulated depreciation Net book value 123 (30) 93 93 -

Furnishing an Equip 34,859 (25,471) 9,388 9,388 1,784 (616) (2,416) 566 8,706 36,027 (27,321) 8,706

Total 37,128 (26,015) 11,113 11,113 2,039 (616) (2,525) 566 10,577 38,551 (27,974) 10,577

Total assets from restricted grants amounted to US$3,658 thousand and US$2,657 thousand as of December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively. Depreciation expense amounted to US$3,113 thousand and US$2,525 thousand in 2009 and 2008, respectively.

-9-

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
10. Accounts Payable - Donors Donor payables include grants received from donors for which conditions are not yet met and amounts payable to donors in respect of any unexpended funds received in advance for restricted grants (see Exhibit 1 for 2009 details). Unrestricted Restricted Temporary Challenge programs 2009 579 32,838 733 34,150 2008 736 21,735 1,131 23,602

11. Accounts Payable - Others Other payables include all other liabilities the Institute has incurred and has been billed for, which remain unpaid as at statements of financial position date. This account consists of: Deferred training charges Funds in trust Deferred salaries and benefits of post doctoral fellows Accounts payable - Other CGIAR Centers 2009 275 245 187 98 805 2008 185 1,092 172 97 1,546

Funds in trust (FIT) is provided by donors and managed by the Institute, with the ultimate beneficiary other than the CGIAR Centers. 12. Accruals and Provisions Accrual account consists of: 2009 Accruals Trade Others Provisions 3,078 3,164 6,242 3,524 9,766 2008 2,850 2,858 5,708 3,231 8,939

Provisions consist of accumulated leave credits due to staff as of December 31, 2009 and 2008 based on current personnel policy manual, in addition to repatriation costs of internationally recruited staff.

- 10 -

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
Movements on the provisions are as follows: Beginning balance Additional provisions Amount used during the period 2009 3,231 619 (326) 3,524 2008 3,306 364 (439) 3,231

13. Nationally Recruited Staff (NRS) Provident Fund The Institute maintains a non-contributory provident fund for the benefit of its nationally recruited staff. The monthly contribution to the fund is computed at 10.5% of an employee’s monthly basic salary which is remitted to the trustee-administered funds. The fund provides for lump sum payment to qualified employees/members upon their separation from the Institute, under certain conditions. The administration of fund by a Retirement Committee is based on approved investment guidelines as contained in the Trust Agreement. Based on the latest actuarial report dated February 18, 2008, the fund is considered adequate to cover for the minimum benefits as required by Philippine Laws. The Institute is responsible for any shortfall in the fund to comply with the minimum legal requirements. Contributions to the fund amounted to about US$438 thousand and US$425 thousand in 2009 and 2008, respectively. The contribution to provident fund is charged to “Personnel costs” under the statement of activities. 14. Research Initiative Fund The movements in Research Initiative Fund are shown below:
Strategic Research Initiative 221 (79) 142 (36) 106 Africa And Needy Countries 511 511 511 Knowledge Pathways Initiative 489 (166) 323 (112) 211

Frontier Projects Balances, December 31, 2007 Net deficit for the year Balances, December 31, 2008 Net deficit for the year Balances, December 31, 2009 8,712 (725) 7,987 (392) 7,595

Develop Office 1,355 (301) 1,054 (212) 842

Total 11,288 (1,271) 10,017 (752) 9,265

Designated On September 16, 2008, the Board of Trustees approved the re-designation of US$1,706 thousand from Reserve for Unrealized Foreign Exchange to Reserve for Risk Management. There was no re-designation of the reserves during 2009. Undesignated The Institute does not have undesignated net assets as of December 31, 2009 and 2008. - 11 -

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
15. Leases The Institute entered into several lease agreements which consists of: a. On September 7, 2001, the Institute renewed its lease agreement for research facilities with the University of the Philippines System (the University). The new lease agreement, which took effect on July 1, 2000, is for a period of 25 years up to June 30, 2025, and is renewable upon mutual agreement of the parties. Under the terms of the agreement, the following provisions apply: i. The Institute will pay a nominal rental of one peso every year for the parcels of land used as sites for its laboratories, office and service buildings and housing. In addition and continuing the past practice of providing the equivalent in cash of the approximate value of agricultural products that otherwise could be grown on this land, the Institute provided a lump sum, and non reimbursable financial assistance to the University in the amount of US$375,000.

ii. For the duration of the lease, the Institute will also contribute to the cost of development and maintenance of the roads, utilities and other support infrastructure at the University outside the leased land in the amount of US$12,500 per year from the 11th year to the 25th year. Upon signing of the agreement, the first 10-year payment (US$125,000) was paid as a lump-sum. iii. Pursuant to the Second Consolidated Renewal of Lease Contract between the University and the Institute, the latter shall execute documents necessary to facilitate the transfer of ownership of the buildings and permanent improvements to the former upon termination of the lease. Further, in Section 2 of Article XV of the Institute’s Charter, all the physical plant, equipment and other assets shall become the property of the University in case the Institute is terminated for any reason. As stated in both documents, the transfer of ownership shall not cover other assets such as the Institute’s Gene Bank and Genetic Resources, which have been assigned in trust to the Institute. Other assets donated to the Institute shall be subjected to other conditions in respect of their disposition upon dissolution of the Institute. iv. In support of any expansion of the agricultural research program of the Institute and the University, the Philippine Government authorized the University to acquire, by negotiated sale or by expropriation, private agricultural property under PD No. 457. b. The Institute also leases additional eight (8) hectares of land for experimental rice production and other related purposes for five (5) years beginning January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2009 for annual base rental of $10,000. It is renewable under such terms and conditions mutually agreed upon by both parties. c. The Institute signed a lease contract with Hewlett Packard (HP) for a seat management agreement involving the lease of computers and other bundled services. The lease covers 4 phases, each phase effective for 3 years. The first phase started in October 2004 and the last phase was extended up to December 31, 2009. Another extension up to March 31, 2010 was made to ensure an orderly transfer of contracted services to the Institution. The minimum payment (including consumables) under this contract is US$16,231 per month.

- 12 -

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
d. The Institute also leases land and other properties from third parties for project experimental sites with periods ranging from one to five years. As of December 31, 2009 and 2008, the Institute does not have any lease contracts classified as finance leases. The leases mentioned above are accounted for as operating lease. Rent expense shown as part of ‘Supplies and services’ in the statement of activities amounted to US$0.33 million for both years. The lease rental commitments of the Institute for the remaining term of the lease contract follow (amounts in thousands): Not later than one (1) year Later than one (1) year and not later than five (5) years Later than five (5) years 2009 89 50 125 264 2008 317 127 138 582

16. Other Revenues This account consists of: Investment gains (losses) Self-sustaining activities Miscellaneous, including realized gain on foreign exchange 2009 1,556 84 209 1,849 2008 (183) (91) 531 257

Self-sustaining activities of the Institute includes: (1) food and housing services, which includes operation and management of the Institute’s residences; and (2) rice mill operations, which provides the rice ration of Nationally Recruited Staff (NRS) as part of their monthly non-cash entitlement.

- 13 -

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
Exhibit 1

INTERNATIONAL RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE SCHEDULE OF GRANTS REVENUES AND ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE/(PAYABLE) - DONORS FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2009 (With Comparative Figures for 2008) (All amounts in thousand US Dollars)

Donors Unrestricted Australia Bangladesh Canada China France Germany India Japan Korea Norway Philippines Sweden Switzerland Thailand Turkey United Kingdom United States of America Vietnam World Bank Total Restricted 5 Prime Aquifer Limited Asian Development Bank (ADB) Australia Bangladesh Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Brazil Canada China Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS) Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) Centers and Secretariat Bioversity CGIAR/System-wide Genetic Resources programme (SGRP)/Special Program on Impact Assessment (SPIA) International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) International Crop Research Institute for Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) Centro Internacional de Mejoramiento de Maiz Y Trigo (CIMMYT)

Total Funds Available 1,158 104 853 150 267 294 78 508 669 40 20 2,004 2,625 15 2,200 10,985 105 927 980 (3) 36,546 20 32 132 3,037 -

2009 Accounts Receivable 100 1,191 140 1,186 17 375 3,009 687 8 -

Accounts Payable (432) (147) (579) (291) (21,443) (20) (32) (70) (2,132) (23)

Grant 726 100 1,191 140 104 853 150 1,186 120 294 95 508 669 40 20 2,004 3,000 15 2,200 13,415 105 1,614 689 5 15,103 62 905 -

2008 Grant 661 100 1,332 140 102 537 150 1,152 150 382 101 516 583 40 2,070 3,000 15 1,640 12,671 484 30 994 690 35 5,705 65 30 -

91

68

36

394 83 468 20 -

9

(9) (256) -

403 74 212 20

155 83 -

Forward

- 14 -

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
Exhibit 1
[

INTERNATIONAL RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE SCHEDULE OF GRANTS REVENUES AND ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE/(PAYABLE) - DONORS FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2009 (With Comparative Figures for 2008) (All amounts in thousand US Dollars)

Donors Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical – Information and Communications Technology/Knowledge Management Initiative (CIATICT/KM) International Fund for Agricultural Research (IFAR) International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) Cornell University European Community Funding Food and agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO) France Foundation for Advanced Studies on Agricultural Development (FASID) Gatsby Foundation Germany Global Crop Diversity Trust (GCDT) Grand Challenges in Global Health through Albert – Ludwigs University of Freiburg Hybrid Rice Research and Development Consortium (HRDC) International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA) India International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) International Fertilizer Association (IFA)/ International Plant Nutrition Institute (IPNI)/ International Potash Institute (IPI) Iran Japan Korea Kellogg Foundation Malaysia Mexico Nunhems BV Plan International Cambodia Philippines Pioneer Hi-bred International Portugal Rockefeller Foundation (RF) Switzerland Syngenta United Kingdom United States of America (USA) World Bank

Total Funds Available

2009 Accounts Receivable

Accounts Payable

Grant

2008 Grant

11 7 25 326 1,390 13 472 160 287 239 351 450 32 356 1,627

31 27 -

(3)

8 7 12 114 1,421 40 445 5 419 234 483 302 27 318 952 -

29 11 11 1,752 51 251 22 549 328 483 318 17 444 1,368

(13) (212) (27) (155) (5) (148) (5) (38) (675)

132 132 -

Forward

135 197 2,450 1,218 36 (10) 14 32 804 250 292 4,049 1,355 60 178 3,169 345

505 20 10 -

(32) (105) (590) (19) (1) (5) (740) (43) (202) (3,673) (372) (39) (1,096) (87)

103 92 2,955 628 20 17 13 27 64 207 90 376 983 60 139 2,073 258

121 165 3,560 675 18 29 7 77 58 116 752 58 1,968 196

- 15 -

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
Exhibit 1

INTERNATIONAL RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE SCHEDULE OF GRANTS REVENUES AND ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE/(PAYABLE) - DONORS FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2009 (With Comparative Figures for 2008) (All amounts in thousand US Dollars)

Donors World Vision Inc. Others Subtotal Challenge Programs Water and Food Generation Harvest Plus Subtotal Total Restricted Grants Total Grants

Total Funds Available 48 422 63,622 65 2,099 645 2,809 66,431 77,416

2009 Accounts Receivable 39 1,600 180 180 1,780 4,789

Accounts Payable (277) (32,838) (702) (31) (733) (33,571) (34,150)

Grant 87 145 32,384 245 1,397 614 2,256 34,640 48,055

2008 Grant 60 21,801 920 1,494 382 2,796 24,597 37,268

- 16 -

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
Exhibit 2

INTERNATIONAL RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE SCHEDULE OF RESTRICTED AGENDA FUNDING FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2009 (With Comparative Figures for 2008) (All amounts in thousand US Dollars)

Donors and program/project A. Temporary 5 prime Donation of Molecular Biology Products Asian Development Bank (ADB) Development and Dissemination of Water-Saving Rice Technologies in South Asia Bringing About Sustainable Rice Production in Asia by Reducing Preventable Pre-and-post harvest losses Improving Poor Farmer’s Livelihood Through PostHarvest Technology Total Australia Fine-tuning the Happy Seeder Technology for the Adoption in Northwest India Support for 6th International Rice Genetic Symposium Improving Rice Productivity in South and Southeast Sulawesi Implementation of Rodent Management in Intensive Irrigated Rice Production Systems in Indonesia and Vietnam Sustainable Intensification of Rice-Maize Productions Systems in Bangladesh Developing Molecular Markers to Enable Selection Against Chalk in Rice Total Bangladesh Enhancing MAS Capacity for Salt-Stress Rice Breeding in Bangladesh Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Stress-tolerant Rice for Poor Farmers in Africa and South Asia Cereal System Initiative for South Asia (CSISA) Creating the Second Green Revolution by Supercharging Photosynthesis: C4-rice Rice in the 21st Century Global Economy: Strategic Research and Policy Issues for Food Security Total China Development of Disease-resistant, Cold-tolerant Rice Variety in South China Throughout Genomic Tools China IRRI Collaboration Total Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences “Green Super Rice” for the Resource-Poor of Africa and Asia Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR Centers and Secretariat) Biodiversity System-wide Improvement of Location Data Quality System-wide Improvement of Location Data Quality Phase 2 Action for the Rehabilitation of Global Public Good in the CGIAR Genetic Resources System: Phase 2 Activity 4: Assess Knowledge and Gaps in the Diversity and Genetic Quality of the Collection. Activity 4.1.1 Completion of Passport Data Entry System-wide Total
Forward

GRANT PERIOD (DD/MM/YY)

Grant Pledged

Prior Years

EXPENDITURES 2009

Total

01/01/08-31/12/09

589

484

105

589

01/01/06-30/12/09 01/10/08-30/09/10 11/07/05-31/12/08

1,000 2,000 750 3,750

649 58 730 1,437

308 1,302 4 1,614

957 1,360 734 3,051

01/10/07-30/09/10 02/06/09-31/12/09 01/03/08-28/02/11 01/04/06-31/03/10 01/07/08-30/06/13 01/05/07-30/04/12

169 24 511 100 1,543 750 3,097

64 133 76 71 200 544

57 24 158 24 279 147 689

121 24 291 100 350 347 1,233

31/03/08-30/04/09

40

35

5

40

01/11/07-31/01/11 01/12/08-30/11/11 15/10/08-30/04/12 23/06/09-14/07/10

19,897 19,594 11,018 100 50,609

5,286 161 447 5,894

6,930 5,362 2,789 22 15,103

12,216 5,523 3,236 22 20,997

05/02/07-04/02/09 01/01/08-31/12/09

26 150 176

24 20 44

2 60 62

26 80 106

11/01/08-31/10/11

4,633

-

905

905

01/01/07-31/12/09 01/01/08-31/12/09

103 34

49 -

37 22

86 22

02/03/09-31/03/10

17 154

49

9 68

9 117

- 17 -

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
Exhibit 2

INTERNATIONAL RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE SCHEDULE OF RESTRICTED AGENDA FUNDING FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2009 (With Comparative Figures for 2008) (All amounts in thousand US Dollars)

Donors and program/project CGIAR/SGRP/SPIA Collective Action for the Rehabilitation of Global Public Goods in the CGIAR Genetic Resources System: Phase 2 Project - Genebank Upgrading Development and Implementation of Risk Management Procedures for Individual Genebanks and for Collections in Common Reducing and Managing the Loss of Genetic Integrity of Conserved Germplasm (Sub Activity Under the Collective Action for the Rehabilitation of Global Public Goods in the CGIAR Genetic Resources System: Phase 2 (GPG2)) Total ICARDA Establishment of the Global Crop Registers for Rice and Wheat

GRANT PERIOD (DD/MM/YY)

Grant Pledged

Prior Years

EXPENDITURES 2009

Total

01/01/07-31/12/09 31/10/07-31/03/10

337 84

316 62

21 18

337 80

01/01/07-31/03/10

457 878

45 423

364 403

409 826

01/01/08-31/03/10

180

83

74

157

CIAT-ICT/KM ICT KM-Knowledge Management Harmonizing Research Output in the Northern Uplands of Lao PDR 01/08/07-31/01/09 CIMMYT GPG2 ACT. 3.1 "Development of Collaborative Platform in Support of Best Practices in Safe Movement of Germplasm" ICRISAT Tracking Changes in Rural Poverty in Household and Village Economies in South Asia (Gates Village Level Surveys Gates-VLS) International Fund for Agricultural Research (IFAR) Transferring Sativa Knowledge to Glaberrima to Enable the Evaluation of Quality in Africa Rice International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) Scoping the Potential Futures for Rice in Asia: Exploring Alternatives Strategies and Policies International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) Supporting Strategic Investment Choices In Agricultural Technology Development Total Cornell University Cornell University -Durable Resistance in Wheat European Commission Coordinating NGO interventions for improving Small and Marginal Farmers’ Households, Livelihood and Food Security in Bangladesh Raising Productivity in Rainfed Environments; Attacking the Roots of Poverty Sustaining Productivity in Intensive Rice-Based Systems Metabolomic Technology Applications for Plants, Health and Outreach Total Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Development of an Application to Implement Protocols and Transactions Required for the Management of the Standard Material Transfer Agreement of the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (IT-PGRFA)
Forward

20

-

8

8

23/3/09 - 31/12/09

20

-

20

20

01/05/09-30/04/14

2,021

-

212

212

01/06/08-31/07/09

11

4

7

11

01/04/07-31/12/09 01/06/07-31/12/09

25 25 50

-

7 5 12

7 5 12

01/02-08-31/01/11

623

27

114

141

01/07/04-31/08/09 01/01/09-31/12/09 01/01/08-31/12/10 01/10/06-31/03/10

1,960 2,719 635 202 5,516

1,192 698 635 94 2,619

395 974 52 1,421

1,587 1,672 635 146 4,040

01/01/09-31/07/09

40

-

40

40

- 18 -

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
Exhibit 2

INTERNATIONAL RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE SCHEDULE OF RESTRICTED AGENDA FUNDING FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2009 (With Comparative Figures for 2008) (All amounts in thousand US Dollars)

Donors and program/project France France Attribution Decoding Rice Genetic Diversity (Oryza SNP Consortium Project) Diversity of Adaptive Traits to Water and Thermal Stress in Rice (Oryza sativa L.): High Throughout Phenotyping for Association Mapping Total Gatsby Foundation Collections of Landraces and Wild Species of Oryza in Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania and Uganda (in collaboration with WARDA) Germany Enhancing and Stabilizing the Productivity of SaltAffected Areas by Incorporating Genes for Tolerance of Abiotic Stresses in Rice Rice and Global Climate Change: Candidate Genes for Preventing Heat and Drought-Induced Yield Losses Due to Spikelet Sterility Transcriptome Profiling of Hybrid Rice Total Global Crop Diversity Trust (GCDT) Heat-Tolerant Rice to Combat Global Warming Long-term Funding of the EX Situ Collection of Rice Germplasm Held by IRRI Total Grand Challenges in Global Health through Albert – Ludwig’s University of Freiburg ALUF/GCGH - Engineering Rice for High BetaCarotene, Vitamin E and Enhanced Iron and Zinc Bioavailability Hybrid Rice Research and Development Consortium (HRDC) Hybrid Rice Research and Development Consortium (HRDC) International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA) Dissecting Drought Tolerance Mechanisms in Rice Through Gain of Function Deletion Mutants Selections of Greater Agronomic Water-Use Efficiency in Wheat and Rice Using Carbon Isotope Discrimination Total India ICAR RWC IRRI India Collaborative Grant Total International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Managing Rice Landscapes in the Marginal Uplands for Household Food Security and Environment Environmental Sustainability Accelerating Agricultural Technology Adoption to Enhance Rural Livelihoods in Disadvantaged Districts of India Reducing Risks from Arsenic Contamination of Poor People Programme for Alleviating Poverty Through Improving Rice Production in East and Southern Africa Support to Agricultural Research for Climate Change Adaptation (SARCCAB) in Bangladesh Total
Forward

GRANT PERIOD (DD/MM/YY) 01/01/09-31/12/09 01/12/08-31/12/10 01/01/08-31/12/10

Grant Pledged 366 1,300 59 1,725

Prior Years 6 6

EXPENDITURES 2009 366 45 34 445

Total 366 45 40 451

01/05/07-30/04/10

160

-

5

5

01/01/08-31/12/10 01/11/08-31/10/10 01/12/07-30/11/09

1,251 82 87 1,420

206 2 3 211 20 700 720

354 42 23 419 11 223 234

560 44 26 630 31 923 954

01/01/08-31/12/09 01/11/06-31/10/11

30 1,500 1,530

28/09/05-27/09/10

1,834

789

483

1,272

01/02-08-31/12/09

728

318

302

620

15/06/06-17/11/09 15/11/03-14/06/09

32 40 72

21 18 39 44 44

6 21 27 18 300 318

27 39 66 62 300 362

01/04/07-31/03/09 01/01/09-31/12/09

100 300 400

26/07/05-31/03/09 16/05/07-30/06/10 31/10/08-31/12/10 20/09/07-30/09/10 23/07/09-30/09/12

1,190 1,000 200 1,500 700 4,590

895 437 1 748 2,081

255 161 57 434 45 952

1,150 598 58 1,182 45 3,033

- 19 -

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
Exhibit 2

INTERNATIONAL RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE SCHEDULE OF RESTRICTED AGENDA FUNDING FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2009 (With Comparative Figures for 2008) (All amounts in thousand US Dollars)

Donors and program/project International Fertilizer Association (IFA)/International Plant Nutrition Institute (IPNI)/ International Potash Institute (IPI) The Irrigated Rice Research Consortium Phase III-Site Specific Nutrient Management The Irrigated Rice Research Consortium Phase IV Enhancing Profitability of Rice Farming in Asia through Improved Nutrient and Crop Management Total Iran IRRI-Iran Collaborative Project Japan Development of Integrated Rice Cultivation System Under Water Saving Conditions Raising Productivity in Rainfed Environments: Attacking the Roots of Poverty Sustaining Productivity in Intensive Rice-based Systems: Rice and the Environments East and Southern Africa: Rice for Rural Incomes and an Affordable Urban Staple Rice and Human Health: Overcoming the Consequences of Poverty Rice Genetic Diversity and Discovery: Meeting the Needs of Future Generations for Rice Genetic Resources Information and Communication: Convening a Global Rice Research Community NIAES - Assessing Heat Stresses of Rice Varieties Under the Tropical Open-Field Conditions Collaborative Research on Socioeconomic Constraints to Adoption of Technology and Farmer's Response Socioeconomic Survey in the Bohol Irrigation System, Philippines Upland Rice Variety Selection Techniques (for African Countries) Implementation Plans to Disseminate Submergence Tolerant Varieties and Associated New Production Practices to Southeast Asia Transformation of lowland Rice and Evaluation of Transformed Rice For Environmental Stress Tolerance - Year 2 Transformation of Lowland Rice and Evaluation of Transformed Rice for Environmental Stress Tolerance - Year 3 Japan-Transformation of Lowland Rice and Evaluation of Transformed Rice for Environmental Stress Tolerance - Year 1 Total Korea IRRI/Korea Office Wide Hybridization and Gene Introgression for Rice Improvement/Broadening Gene Pool of Rice: Wild Species Introgression and Marker Assisted Selection IRRI/Korea - Attribution Functional Genomics Approach to Identification of Broad-Spectrum Resistance Genes Against Rice Blast Disease in Korean Germplasm Development of Submergence Tolerant Japonica Rice Variety Cooperative Funding for Korea-IRRI Collaborative Projects Germplasm Utilization and Value-Added Project Korean Seed Multiplication Project Temperate Rice Research Consortium Total
Forward

GRANT PERIOD (DD/MM/YY)

Grant Pledged

Prior Years

EXPENDITURES 2009

Total

01/01/05-30/06/09 01/01/09-31/12/12

432 480 912

418 418 1,250

14 89 103 92

432 89 521 1,342

01/01/99-31/12/10

1,447

09/08/05-08/08/10 01/01/09-31/12/09 01/01/09-31/12/09 01/01/09-31/12/09 01/01/09-31/12/09 01/01/09-31/12/09 01/01/09-31/12/09 01/09/08-28/02//09 01/04/05-31/03/10 03/11/08-30/03/09 29/10/09-24/11/09 19/03/07-31/03/09 01/05/08-27/02/09 01/04/08- 26/02/10 21/05/07-29/02/08

1,638 330 217 53 20 268 31 20 119 14 20 4,236 358 384 312 8,020

1,133 77 2 3,031 106 302 4,651 1,765 216 189 4 140 90 390 238 3,032

287 330 217 53 20 268 31 20 39 12 20 1,204 252 192 10 2,955 230 23 50 50 30 45 28 40 132 628

1,420 330 217 53 20 268 31 20 116 14 20 4,235 358 192 312 7,606 1,995 239 50 239 34 185 118 430 370 3,660

17/11/01-31/12/09 01/07/03-31/08/09 01/01/09-31/12/09 01/07/03-31/08/09 01/04/08-31/03/11 01/01/99-31/12/09 01/01/01-31/12/09 01/07/91-31/12/09 08/02/07-31/12/09

2,530 240 50 240 90 525 345 443 402 4,865

- 20 -

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
Exhibit 2

INTERNATIONAL RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE SCHEDULE OF RESTRICTED AGENDA FUNDING FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2009 (With Comparative Figures for 2008) (All amounts in thousand US Dollars)

Donors and program/project Kellogg's Ecological Intensification and Sustainability in Longterm Rice-based Cropping Systems Malaysia MARDI-The Impact of Rice Production on Environmental Sustainability Nunhems BV Further Development of International Crop Information Systems (ICIS) in Collaboration with Nunhems - Phase II Plan International Cambodia Poverty Reduction Options Validated in Drought Environments Phase IV Poverty Reduction Options Validated in Drought Environments Phase III Total Philippines Improved Nutrient Management Options for Unfavorable Rainfed Lowlands in the Philippines Hybrid Nucleus and Breeder Seed Production Improving Knowledge Exchange and Decision Making Among Rice Stakeholders Through ICT-based Technology Promotion and Delivery Systems Accelerating the Development of High Yielding Rice Varieties for the Major Ecosystems of the Philippines Strategic Assessment of Yield Limiting and Reducing Factors in the Philippines Unified Capability Building Support Total Pioneer Support for 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium Scientific Know-How and Exchange Program bet IRRI & Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc. (DuPont) Total Portugal Village-Level Market-Driven Rice Intensification Rockefeller Foundation (RF) Developing and Disseminating Resilient and Productive Rice Varieties for Drought-Prone Environments in India Golden Rice Product Development and Deployment Total Switzerland The Irrigated Rice Research Consortium – Phase III Management Team Productivity Workgroup Water Saving Workgroup Labor Productivity Workgroup Post Production Workgroup The Irrigated Rice Research Consortium - Phase IV Labor Productivity and Community Ecology Work Group Productivity Workgroup Management Team Water Saving Workgroup Post Production Workgroup Crop Health Northern Uplands Rice Based Farming Systems Research (NURiFaR) Project Healthy Rice for Healthy People: Zinc Biofortification of Rice through Environmentally Targeted Germplasm Development and Zinc Management Total
Forward

GRANT PERIOD (DD/MM/YY)

Grant Pledged

Prior Years

EXPENDITURES 2009

Total

10/14/09-10/13/13

200

-

20

20

01/09/05-30/09/09

90

-

17

17

01/04/06-31/03/10

80

67

13

80

12/06/09-10/05/10 02/05/08-28/02/09

21 20 41

7 7

14 13 27

14 20 34

15/07/09-14/07/11 16/01/04-31/12/11 01/01/06-30/06/09 10/08/09-10/07/10 08/10/09-07/10/10 10/08/09-10/07/10

41 43 68 174 22 391 739

25 54 79

6 18 8 17 5 10 64

6 43 62 17 5 10 143

01/11/09-31/12/09 16/07/08-15/07/11

10 778 788

58

10 197 207 90

10 197 207 148

01/01/08-31/12/10

350

01/03/05-28/02/09 01/01/09-31/12/12

610 4,000 4,610

568 568

42 334 376

610 334 944

01/01/05-28/02/09 01/01/05-28/02/09 01/01/05-28/02/09 01/01/05-28/02/09 01/01/05-28/02/09 01/01/05-28/02/09 01/01/09-31/12/12 01/01/09-31/12/12 01/01/09-31/12/12 01/01/09-31/12/12 01/01/09-31/12/12 01/01/09-31/12/12 01/11/08-30/09/12

1,470 402 356 356 353 701 425 2,261 746 143 212 473

1,391 398 344 348 342 -

79 4 12 8 11 112 48 399 151 23 51 74

1,470 402 356 356 353 112 48 399 151 23 51 74

24/08/09-23/08/11

170 8,068

2,823

11 983

11 3,806

- 21 -

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
Exhibit 2

INTERNATIONAL RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE SCHEDULE OF RESTRICTED AGENDA FUNDING FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2009 (With Comparative Figures for 2008) (All amounts in thousand US Dollars)

Donors and program/project Syngenta Syngenta Foundation - Improving Guidelines for Testing and Release of Breeding Lines and MarkerAided Selection (MAS) Products United Kingdom/DFID Poverty Alleviation Through Rice Innovation Systems Characterizing Genetic and Soil Induced Variation in Arsenic Uptake, Translocation and Metabolism in Rice to Mitigate Arsenic Contamination in Asia Philippine Rice Security Under Climate Change: Building an Evidence Base to Inform Governmental Policy Options Cis-Acting Regulatory Elements in the Rice Genome: A Novel Source of Alleles for Rice Breeding (led by NIAB) Total United States of America USAID/RF-Workshop on the Impact on Research and Development of Sui Generis Approaches to Plant Protection of Rice in Developing Countries USDA Identification of genes that control biomass production using rice as a model system (led by Colorado State Univ.) USDA-Support for IRRI's Cereal Systems Initiative in South Asia (CSISA); and Rice Genetics Workshop and Monitoring GHG in Rice Production Areas Research-Driven Rice Intensification in Mozambique: A Model for Sustainable Improvement of Rice Production Revitalizing The Rice-Wheat Cropping Systems Of The Indo-Gangetic Plains: Adaptation And Adoption Of Resource-Conserving Technologies In India, Bangladesh And Nepal (Component 1 Of The Global Development Alliance) Modeling the Impacts of BT Transgene Flow on Lepidopteran Food Web Structure and Stability on Wild Rice in Vietnam (Led by CLRRI - Under Program for Biosafety System BBI) Advanced Breeding and Deployment of Abiotic Stress Tolerant Rice & Wheat and Expansion of Hybrid Rice USAID Asia Bureau CSISA Objective 3 The Development of Adapted Germplasm for India with High Levels of Pro Vitamins Carotenoids USAID Famine Fund-Accelerating Adoption of Resource Conserving Technologies in South Asia Under the Umbrella of Cereal System Initiative for South Asia Development of Rice Biotechnology Products for Asia: Technical and Pre-regulatory Components Total World Bank Rice Wheat Consortium - SWEP Rice Wheat Consortium - SWEP Year 2 Total World Vision World Vision, Inc.-Partnership for Innovation and Knowledge in Agriculture (PIKA) in India
Forward

GRANT PERIOD (DD/MM/YY)

Grant Pledged

Prior Years

EXPENDITURES 2009

Total

22/06/09-31/12/09 01/03/08-01/02/11 01/01/08-31/12/10 01/05/08-31/03/09 01/10/08-30/09/11

60 586 26 9 159 780

57 1 58

60 79 1 8 51 139

60 136 1 9 51 197

01/01/01-31/12/09 01/12/08-31/08/11 09/30/09-01/05/12 09/30/09-09/29/12

35 300 130 900

33 -

2 26 30 33

35 26 30 33

01/10/07-30/04/09

475

439

36

475

01/01/07-31/05/10 01/10/07-30/04/09 01/10/08-30/09/09 01/01/05-31/12/09

129 150 150 385

90 110 273

36 51 92 112

126 161 92 385

01/08/08-30/09/11 01/01/05-30/09/09

2,131 2,580 7,365

133 1,730 2,808 196 196

805 850 2,073 73 185 258

938 2,580 4,881 269 185 454

01/01/08-31/03/09 01/01/09-31/12/09

270 270 540

01/10/08-30/09/10

209

-

87

87

- 22 -

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
Exhibit 2

INTERNATIONAL RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE SCHEDULE OF RESTRICTED AGENDA FUNDING FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2009 (With Comparative Figures for 2008) (All amounts in thousand US Dollars)

Donors and program/project Others Univ. of Sydney-Molecular Marker Technologies for Faster Wheat Breeding in India Bayer – Development of ICIS CARE-Burundi New approaches to Support Women Ex-combatants and Women Rice Producers for Economic and Social Empowerment Ecological Based Participatory IPM for Southeast Asia (Led by Clemson University - IPM-CRSP) FOSS - Improving the Capacity of Indica RiceBreeding Programs to Measure the Traits of Physical Quality of Grain National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS) - Mozambique Survey (Collect and Analyze the Household-Level Data with the Aim of Understanding the Determinants of Income with Particular Focus on Rice Farming Activities) Total Subtotal B. Challenge Programs Water and Food Theme I Leadership Rice Landscape Management for Raising Water Productivity, Conserving Resources, and Improving Livelihoods in Upper Catchments of the Mekong and Red River Basins (PN#11) Total Generation Identifying Genes Responsible for Failure of Grain Formation in Rice and Wheat Under Drought Drought Tolerant Rice Cultivars for North China and South/Southeast Asia by Highly Efficient Pyramiding of QTLs from Diverse Origins Targeting Drought-Avoidance Root Traits to Enhance Rice Productivity Under Water-Limited Environments Speeding the Development of Salt Tolerant Rice Varieties through Marker Assisted Selection and their Dissemination in Salt Affected Areas of Bangladesh Delayed Senescence and Drought Tolerance in Rice Connecting Performance Under Drought with Genotypes Through Phenotype Associations Detecting and Fine-Mapping QTLs with Major Effects on Rice Yield under Drought Stress for Deployment via Marker Aided Breeding Drought from Different Perspective: Improved Tolerance through Phosphorus Acquisition Application and Validation of the Major QTL Phosphate Uptake 1 (Pup1) Application and Validation of the Major QTL Phosphate Uptake 1 (Pup1) Year 2
Forward

GRANT PERIOD (DD/MM/YY)

Grant Pledged

Prior Years

EXPENDITURES 2009

Total

26/06/08-30/04/12 01/01/07-31/12/09 15/07/09-31/12/10 01/10/05-30/09/09 01/01/08-31/12/09

139 53 250 64 20

14 39 46 12

11 6 93 17 9

25 45 93 63 21

01/03/0915/03//09

9 535 124,565

111 31,977

9 145 32,384

9 256 64,361

01/11/02-31/12/09

320

243

65

308

01/11/05-30/04/10

910 1,230

529 772

180 245

709 1,017

01/01/05-30/06/09 01/01/05-31/12/08 01/11/08-31/10/11

900 317 900

814 317 2

86 19 227

900 336 229

01/01/08-31/12/09 11/01/08-30/09/11 01/01/08-31/12/10 01/08/07-31/07/10 01/11/08-31/10/11 01/01/08-31/12/09 01/01/08-31/12/09

225 374 267 599 900 81 97

129 101 216 13 8 49

99 28 54 117 250 22 73

228 28 155 333 263 30 122

- 23 -

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
Exhibit 2

INTERNATIONAL RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE SCHEDULE OF RESTRICTED AGENDA FUNDING FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2009 (With Comparative Figures for 2008) (All amounts in thousand US Dollars)

Donors and program/project Developing and Disseminating Resilient and Productive Rice Varieties for Drought-Prone Environments in India Population development to underpin gene discovery and allele validation in rice: the Multiparent Advanced Generation Inter-Crosses (MAGIC) Validation of Drought-Response/Resistance Pathway Genes by Phenotypic Analysis of Mutants - Year 1 Transcriptome Analysis of Near-Isogenic Rice Lines to Identify Expression Signatures and Gene Combinations Conferring Stress Tolerance Transcriptome Analysis of Near-Isogenic Rice Lines to Identify Expression Signatures and Gene Combinations Conferring Stress Tolerance Provision of Genotyping Support Services Large Scale Phylogenomic Analyses to Gene Function Prediction for GCP Crops Next Generation Sequencing Data - Data Analysis Support GCP Quality Management and Data Quality Improvement Development of Data Standards & Community of Practice Enabling Capture of and Access to GCP Quality Data Sets A Molecular Breeding Platform A Molecular Breeding Platform () Development of Tools and Technology to Increase the Functionality of the GCP Information Platform Development of an Integrated GCP Platform Total Harvest Plus Biofortified Crops for Improved Human Nutrition Development of High-Zinc Rice for Bangladesh & Eastern India Ph2 Rice Partnership Bangladesh (Harvest Plus Phase II) Agreement 7204 Rice Partnership Bangladesh (Harvest Plus Phase II) Total Subtotal Grand Total

GRANT PERIOD (DD/MM/YY)

Grant Pledged

Prior Years

EXPENDITURES 2009

Total

01/03/05-28/02/09 01/01/08-31/12/09 01/08/08-31/07/09 01/01/08-31/12/09 01/01/08-31/12/09 07/03/08-06/03/09 01/01/08-31/12/09 01/01/09-31/12/09 01/01/08-30/06/09 01/01/09-31/12/09 15/09/09-30/06/11 15/07/09-15/07/14 01/01/08-31/12/09 01/01/09-31/12/09

120 113 65 73 120 12 97 6 46 29 571 964 81 144 7,101

98 56 65 67 73 9 73 27 130 52 56 81 2,436 1,960 1,960 5,168 37,145

22 47 4 (2) 36 3 19 6 35 28 32 65 (17) 144 1,397 182 361 20 51 614 2,256 34,640

120 103 69 65 109 12 92 6 62 158 84 121 64 144 3,833 2,142 361 20 51 2,574 7,424 71,785

01/01/03-31/12/09 01/01/09-31/12/09 01/07/09-31/12/09 01/01/09-31/12/09

2,203 490 20 124 2,837 11,168 135,733

- 24 -

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
Exhibit 3

INTERNATIONAL RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE DETAILS OF OPERATING EXPENSES FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2009 (With Comparative Figures for 2008) (All amounts in thousand US Dollars)

Research Programs Unrestricted Personnel costs Supplies & services Collaborator/Partners Operational travel Depreciation Total operating expenses Recovery of indirect cost Subtotal Restricted Temporary Personnel costs Supplies & services Collaborator/Partners Operational travel Depreciation Subtotal Challenge Programs Personnel costs Supplies & services Collaborator/Partners Operational travel Depreciation Subtotal Total restricted Grand Total Personnel costs Supplies and services Collaborator/Partners Operational travel Depreciation Subtotal Recovery of indirect cost Grand Total 9,252 9,670 9,662 2,349 1,097 32,030 641 753 555 294 13 2,256 34,286 43,168 14,123 13,328 10,571 3,270 1,876 43,168 43,168 4,230 2,905 354 627 766 8,882 8,882

Research Support & Operations 2,459 167 115 704 3,445 3,445

Sub-total 6,689 3,072 354 742 1,470 12,327 12,327

Management and General Administration 2,971 2,631 320 531 6,453 (3,283) 3,170

Total 9,660 5,703 354 1,062 2,001 18,780 (3,283) 15,497

2008 9,354 5,835 14 1,021 2,151 18,375 (2,782) 15,593

126 41 2 169 169 3,614 2,459 293 156 706 3,614 3,614

9,252 9,796 9,662 2,390 1,099 32,199 641 753 555 294 13 2,256 34,455 46,782 16,582 13,621 10,571 3,426 2,582 46,782 46,782

49 59 77 185 185 3,355 3,020 2,690 397 531 6,638 (3,283) 3,355

9,301 9,855 9,662 2,467 1,099 32,384 641 753 555 294 13 2,256 34,640 50,137 19,602 16,311 10,571 3,823 3,113 53,420 (3,283) 50,137

7,350 7,998 4,035 2,069 349 21,801 755 1,023 640 353 25 2,796 24,597 40,190 17,459 14,856 4,689 3,443 2,525 42,972 (2,782) 40,190

- 25 -

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
Exhibit 4

INTERNATIONAL RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE INDIRECT COST CALCULATION FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2009 (With Comparative Figures for 2008) (All amounts in thousand US Dollars)

2009 Direct Operating Expenses Research Research support Operations Subtotal Less: Overhead recovery Total Indirect Operating Expenses Management Common sustenance services Total Total Operating Expenses Cost Ratios Direct/Total Indirect/Total Indirect/Direct 43,175 3,116 1,590 47,881 3,283 44,598 3,224 2,315 5,539 50,137 88.95% 11.05% 12.42%

2008 32,340 3,168 1,733 37,241 2,782 34,459 3,218 2,513 5,731 40,190 85.74% 14.26% 16.63%

- 26 -

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
Exhibit 5

INTERNATIONAL RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE EUROPEAN COMMUNITY FUNDING STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2009 (With Comparative Figures for 2008) (All amounts in thousand)

Programme Raising Productivity in Rainfed Environments Sustaining Productivity in Intensive RiceBased System Total

Grant period

Grant Pledged In In EUR USD

In EUR

2009

In USD

Expenditures 2008 In In EUR USD

Total In In EUR USD

Balance In In EUR USD

01/01/08-31/12/10 01/01/08-31/12/10

1,957 455 2,412

2,719 635 3,354

728 728

974 974

501 455 956

69 63 1,333

1,229 455 1,684

1,672 635 2,307

728 728

1,047 1,047

- 27 -

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

A udited F inAnciAl R epoR t
Exhibit 6

INTERNATIONAL RICE RESEARCH INSTITUTE GERMANY UNRESTRICTED CONTRIBUTION CONTRACT NO. 81116609; PROJECT NO. 08.7860.3-001.00 STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2009 (All amounts in thousand)

Particulars Program 5. Rice genetic diversity and discovery: Meeting the needs of future generations for rice genetic resources Staff costs Operations Administrative costs Total Program 7. Rice policy support and impact assessment for rice research Staff costs Operations Administrative costs Total Grand Total

In Euro

TOTAL

In USD

202 121 81 404

295 176 118 589

91 54 36 181 585

133 79 52 264 853

- 28 -

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

C 2010 All rights reserved.

IRRI M Ilestones 2009

milestones during a fruitful 2009
he following sections highlight a cross-section of the significant events, media coverage, activities, and awards during 2009. More details on these and others can be found elsewhere on this DVD or via archival links to more comprehensive, all-inclusive details in IRRI’s weekly online Bulletin, which has been capturing the corporate memory of the Institute since 2000.

T

support for the campaign. Read full press release and keynote address of Mr. Mah Bow Tan, Singapore’s minister for national development.

1

IRRI kicks off 50th anniversary activities in late 2009
Thai Princess opens RG6 at Manila Hotel to a record-breaking audience Her Royal Highness Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn of Thailand officially opened the 6th International Rice Genetics Symposium (RG6) on 16 November at the Manila Hotel. The 3-day conference, which was designated as the first official event of

$300 million fund-raising campaign launched for rice food security in Asia
In the face of unrelenting pressure on Asian rice production, a $300 million fund-raising campaign was launched during a special program held in Singapore on 25 November to support rice research to help find sustainable solutions. Organized by IRRI to mark its 50th anniversary in 2010, the 5-year campaign has already raised $59 million, with just over $50 million being provided by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. “Although we obviously have a long way to go, we are very grateful to the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation for giving the campaign such a strong philanthropic start,” said IRRI DG Robert Zeigler. Via a special video prepared ahead of time for the event, Jeff Raikes, CEO of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (photo 1), gave a message of

2

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

HOME

1 of 29

IRRI M Ilestones 2009
IRRI’s year-long celebration of its 50th anniversary, was attended by nearly 800 scientists, researchers, exhibitors, and members of the media. It was the largest gathering of scientists ever hosted by IRRI in the Philippines. Photo 2 shows IRRI DDG-R Achim Dobermann (right) greeting Her Royal Highness upon her arrival at the Manila Hotel along with IRRI DG Robert Zeigler, Crissan Ziegler, and IRRI DDG-O Willy Padolina. to IRRI on 19 November for a tour of the research complex and experimental plots. Photo 3 shows the participants crowding into the IRRI bookstore to buy souvenirs. “The plight of over 1 billion people stricken with poverty, 70% of whom live in Asia and depend on rice as their staple food, is the driving force for our research,” said IRRI DG Robert Zeigler. “We must find solutions to help increase rice yields and improve the sustainability of rice production because as rice yields increase, the incidence of poverty decreases,” he added. See YouTube video. More ��th birthda�� in e�ents Manila and at headquarters

50 years of rice science for a better world
On 17 November, IRRI embarked on its 50th anniversary celebrations to acknowledge how rice science has helped address food security and to emphasize the ongoing need for rice science to tackle the challenges of poverty and climate change. HRH Princess Sirindhorn formally launched the anniversary at IRRI’s headquarters, which culminates in November 2010 with the International Rice Congress in Hanoi—to draw the world’s attention to rice and opportunities to achieve global food security. Photo 4 shows Her Royal Highness discussing submergence-tolerant rice with Dr. Zeigler at a headquarters exhibit.

3

5

Recognizing the significance of rice genetics in her special presentation, Her Royal Highness emphasized that genetics is an essential part of a solution to the problems in the rice industry. She also mentioned other important factors such as technology transfer and capacity building, handling of rice from farmers to end consumers, sociocultural aspects, and the policymaking process. Following her on the program, Dr. Zeigler gave his keynote presentation, Rice genetics and its impact in a changing world. See the related press release. See YouTube video. View the post-conference report. Around 370 RG6 participants came

4

On 9 December 1959, a turning point in agricultural research took place that helped launch a revolution in food production—the formation of IRRI. To celebrate this significant event in the annals of agricultural research history, a party was held on 10 December at the Ramon Magsaysay Center in Manila. Joining the celebration were President of the Republic of the Philippines Gloria MacapagalArroyo (in photo 5 being greeted by CESD head Bas Bouman); former Philippine President Fidel V. Ramos; ambassadors to the Philippines from Asia,

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

2 of 29

IRRI M Ilestones 2009
Europe, and North America; Philippine government officials; donors; members of the private sector; and IRRI staff. “Rice science has helped to more than double rice yields in the last 50 years,” said IRRI DG Robert Zeigler, who spoke at the event to celebrate the signing of the agreement establishing IRRI by the Ford and Rockefeller Foundations and the Philippine Government. See video on YouTube. At IRRI headquarters on Sunday, 13 December, about 3,400 tickets were issued for attendance to the IRRI Fiesta, a day-long affair that included a parade, street dancing, a bazaar, and a big show toward the evening that was hosted by local celebrities and featured homegrown talents. IRRI staff and members of the community around IRRI were also participants in the parade and variety show. The Fiesta, organized by IRRI-DPPC, ended shortly before 10 pm with a grand fireworks display (photo 6).

6

Other notable activities, media coverage, events
IRRC meets with the Rice Department of Thailand A 2-day Irrigated Rice Research and Extension workshop between Thailand’s Rice Department (RD) key staff and Irrigated Rice Research Consortium (IRRC) scientists was held in Bangkok, Thailand, 8-9 January. The workshop strengthened the cooperation between the IRRC and Thailand’s RD through sharing of experiences on research-to-impact pathways, learning alliances, and effective communication to end-users.

New agreement opens a�enues for strengthening Indian rice research An international agreement signed on 20 January (photo 7) between IRRI and the Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR) is supporting and facilitating India’s rice research for a 3-year period, helping the nation’s rice production at a time of unprecedented price volatility and subsequent need

for the revitalization of food production. The work plan includes agreements on three major projects supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation: Stress-tolerant rice for poor farmers in Africa and South Asia (STRASA), the Cereal Systems Initiative for South Asia (CSISA), and Creating the second green revolution by supercharging photosynthesis: C4 rice. Click here to read coverage in the Hindustan Times. Professional de�elopment programs for IRRI scholars Margaret Cargill and Kate Cadman, consultants from Researcher Development International (RDI), conducted a 2-week pilot training program and scoping exercise at IRRI, 19-30 January, to assess the effectiveness of the pilot scholar and

7

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

3 of 29

IRRI M Ilestones 2009
Participating in the signing ceremony were (photo 9, L-R) Finbarr Horgan, IRRI entomologist; Usha Barwale-Zehr, Barwale Foundation director and IRRI BOT member; Achim Dobermann, IRRI DDG-R; and Dinesh C. Joshi, Barwale Foundation executive director. The Barwale Foundation (earlier known as Mahyco Research Foundation) is a non-profit organization for public benefit. The Foundation was established in 1986 under Section 25 of the Companies Act 1956, by the chairman, B.R. Barwale, winner of the 1998 World Food Prize and recipient of the 2001 Padma Bhushan Award from the Government of India for his distinguished services of high order in the field of agricultural development, seed-related activities, trade, and economics. IRRI represented at the regional Creative Commons Conference in Manila IRRI staff members from CPS and the Legal Services Office participated in the Regional Conference on Creative Commons (CC) 5-6 February at the Pavilion Hotel in Manila. Entitled The Common Crossroads: Defining the Roadmap for Creative Commons in Asia and the Pacific, the conference showcased the various initiatives of CC in the region. It also gathered stakeholders together in a forum to define a course for the future following the 2008 iCommons

9

8

supervisor training initiatives. The program, Towards a Sustainable Professional Development Program for International Rice Scholars at IRRI, allowed collaboration with IRRI management in the design of a full proposal for a sustainable future program of scholar support and development. The program had three components: an advanced writing workshop involving thesis chapters and papers for international submission, in-service training for scholars’ supervisors, and assessment of English needs of scholars within the context of professional competency. Twenty-three participants (photo 8) including scholars, postdoctoral fellows, and nationally recruited staff (NRS) attended the writing workshop. IRRI and Barwale Foundation renew MOA The memorandom of agreement (MOA) between IRRI and the Barwale Foundation to continue and strengthen collaboration between both institutions in the areas of rice improvement, with emphasis on hybrid rice, biotechnology and training, was renewed 29 January in Hyderabad, India.

Summit in Sapporo, Japan. IRRI was invited to the conference to share its experiences with CC, following the Institute’s recent change in copyright policy from “all” rights reserved to “some” rights reserved. In a joint presentation with IRRI legal counsel Jim Jimenez, CPS Head Gene Hettel reported that during IRRI’s first 46 years, all publications, databases, multimedia, software, and other documents were protected by copyright in accordance with normal publishing practice―i.e., all rights reserved. “Then, the Institute’s Board of Trustees, in September 2006, issued a statement announcing the adoption of a new copyright policy,” Hettel pointed out, “that ‘IRRI is releasing its information products, as much

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

4 of 29

IRRI M Ilestones 2009
as possible, under a suitable open content license.’ Such a license allows copying, distribution, and (usually) the creation of derivative products; prohibits commercialization; and requires attribution as well as the release of derivative products under the same license as the original product. Hence, ‘some rights reserved.’” IRRI Fund holds its founding board meeting The International Rice Research Institute Fund Ltd. held its first board meeting on 10 February at IRRI. The IRRI Fund is a Singapore-based limited liability company that has been recognized as an international charity under Singapore legislation. The IRRI Fund was established to aid IRRI’s fund-raising efforts by interesting nontraditional donors, particularly wealthy Asians and corporations through their CSR windows, in the Institute’s important mandate. The IRRI Fund was officially incorporated on 10 December 2008. 7th EPMR of IRRI concludes with panel chair’s report: IRRI does things well The final phase of IRRI’s 7th External Program and Management Review (EPMR7) concluded on 13 February with a summary of the final report to IRRI staff presented by review panel chair Greg Edmeades (consultant, New Zealand). Dr. Edmeades (photo 11) discussed the TORs and procedures of the EPMR, information sources used by the panel, the state of IRRI, 11 recommendations of the panel, and ‘a look forward.’ He pointed out that the 11 changing research environment involves genomics, transgenics, cropping intensification, water, climate change, information and communications, the private sector, and the CGIAR change process. The bottom line of the panel’s findings were that IRRI meets high standards in the conduct and management of science, partnerships with NARES and advanced research institutes(ARIs), financial management, and leadership within and outside, and that overall the Institute does things well. Click here for more 7th EPMR background. Dr. Zeigler speaks at symposium during AAAS meeting On 15 February, during the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Chicago, IRRI DG Robert Zeigler spoke at a symposium entitled, Protecting our Planet against Food Riots in the Future. In his presentation, The rice crisis, why it happened and what to do, he talked about why rice prices rose, what IRRI’s response has been, and what the current situation is. Click here to view his PowerPoint presentation. IRRI signs MOU for joint research with Singapore uni�ersit�� In its first formal collaboration with a Singapore research institution, IRRI has partnered with the National University of Singapore (NUS) to address the global problem of food security. DDG-R Achim Dobermann (left in photo 12) signed the memorandum of understanding (MOU) with Professor Barry Halliwell, deputy president (research & technology) of NUS, on 16 in February Singapore. The MOU promotes joint research and scientific exchange between the two institutions, specifically in the biology of rice crops and the design of new rice strains. “The Department of Biological Sciences at NUS is one of the best in the region,” said Dr. Dobermann during the signing. “We are particularly looking forward to strong scientist interactions and hosting NUS students and young scientists at IRRI for conducting research on many aspects of rice improvement.”

10

The founding board (photo 10) approved a number of standard governance policies and elected Robert Zeigler as chair, Duncan Macintosh as executive director, and Norman Macdonald as chief financial officer. The other members of the board are lldefonso Jimenez and Noor Hasna d/o Jani, the current Singapore board member.

12

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

5 of 29

IRRI M Ilestones 2009
Asia Society-Oxfam America panel discussion: The global food crisis—time for another Green Revolution? On 20 February, IRRI DG 13 Robert Zeigler (photo 13) joined a 1-hour panel discussion in New York City that asked the question: Is it Time for another Green Revolution? Other panel members included Kevin L. Eblen, vice president, Public Policy and Sustainability Lead, Monsanto; Doug Gurian-Sherman, senior scientist, Food and Environment Program, Union of Concerned Scientists; and Raymond C. Offenheiser, president, Oxfam America. The event was sponsored jointly by the Asia Society and Oxfam America, an installment in their jointly conducted Food Crisis Series. Click photo 13 to watch a 10-minute segment of the discussion. ADB-supported water-saving project holds training and re�iew The (ADB)-supported project Development and Dissemination of Water-Saving Rice Technologies in South Asia held a Hands-on Training on Data Analysis followed by its Third Annual Review and Planning Meeting at IRRI on 16-18 and 19-20 February, respectively. Fourteen project scientists from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, and Pakistan were trained on experimental design and data analysis using Cropstat by IRRI’s Anitha Raman, who was assisted by Dule Zhao and Ma. Teresa Sta. Cruz. The trainees learned to analyze data that they have collected for the past 3 years under the ADB project and expressed “high satisfaction” with the training program. Thirty participants from the four countries mentioned and IRRI attended the Third Annual Review and Planning Meeting (photo 14). IRRC sponsors workshop on irrigated rice production in An Giang, Vietnam The Irrigated Rice Research Consortium (IRRC) sponsored a stakeholders’ workshop, Improving Rice Quality and Yield through Good Agricultural Practices—the Model of An Giang, on 23-24 February at Long Xuyen in An Giang Province, Vietnam. The workshop participants (photo 15) discussed good agricultural practices (GAPs) in irrigated rice production and developed a common vision for An Giang as a model province. GAPs in rice aim to promote the production of sufficient, safe, and nutritious rice in a sustainable manner, with practices that contribute to sustainable livelihoods.

15

14

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

6 of 29

IRRI M Ilestones 2009
IRRI figures in Bangladesh food security fair A national workshop and agricultural fair, Innovations in Food Security and Sustainable Livelihoods, was held on 25-26 February at the Bangladesh-China Friendship Conference Centre at Sher-e-Bangla Nagar in Dhaka. The event was organized by the IRRIBangladesh Office jointly with the Bangladesh Ministry of Agriculture and ActionAid Bangladesh, CARE, and Practical Action Bangladesh—all participant organizations in the FoSHoL Program (Food Security for Sustainable Household Livelihoods). IRRI-Cambodia postharvest project holds planning meeting Forty-one partners (photo 16) from agriculture-related ministries, the Provincial Department of Agriculture (PDA), IRRI, private institutions, and universities gathered on 27 February in Takeo, Cambodia, for the Project Planning Meeting of the IRRI-Cambodia Postharvest Project ADB-RETA 6489. The meeting brought together the major farmerintermediary stakeholders involved in project implementation to discuss activities carried over from the previous ADB/JFPR 9036 postharvest project into the new ADB-RETA 6489 project, as well as additional activities that can be started immediately in the new provinces. First Sub1 rice �ariet�� released in India The Uttar Pradesh State Varietal Release Committee officially released Swarna Sub1 (Improved Swarna; photo 17) on 27 February. David Mackill, IRRI Program 1 leader, said this achievement owes itself to the hard work of Umar Shankar 17 Singh, regional coordinator in IRRI’s Delhi office, and colleagues at Narendra Deva University of Agriculture and Technology (NDUAT) and elsewhere. “After the notification process, it can officially enter the seed chain in India,” he said in an emailed message to the Sub1 team in Asia and the U.S. Zeigler meets with government, finance leaders in Saudi Arabia IRRI DG Robert Zeigler met with leaders from the government and private sectors of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) when he traveled there 7-8 March. Dr. Zeigler, accompanied by BOT member Mohammed Syeduzzaman and IRRI scientist Abdelbagi Ismail, informed these sectors about IRRI and its work and looked at where collaboration with the oil-rich nation might be in order.

18

The IRRI team met with representatives of the Olayan Financing Company and with government officials and members of the private sector on 7 March. The following day, they met with HE Ahmad Mohamed Ali, President of the Islamic Development Bank (IDB), and technical staff of the IDB, and then with leaders of Foras International Investment Company. The IDB facilitated the trip of Dr. Zeigler and company to the Middle Eastern kingdom. In photo 18 are, from left, HE Mohamed Ali, Mr. Syeduzzaman, and Dr. Zeigler. Zeigler quoted in Reuters feature: Pressure off rice market, but problemarkets remain Reuters, Manila—Bulging global rice stocks and thin demand could save the world from a repeat of last year’s food crisis that drove

16

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

7 of 29

IRRI M Ilestones 2009
grain prices to record highs, but an industry expert warned on 16 March against the risk of the global recession curbing investments in agricultural infrastructure. IRRI DG Robert Zeigler estimated that billions of dollars a year need to be invested in infrastructure such as new irrigation systems and new technology to boost yields in rice fields. STRASA project enters year 2 The Stress-Tolerant Rice for Africa and South Asia (STRASA) project held a planning workshop for year 2 of its implementation at the NASC Complex in New Delhi, India, on 16-18 March (photo 19). The workshop included progress reports on each of the eight objectives under the STRASA project. Concurrent sessions on the different breeding networks (under drought, submergence, salinity, scaling up of seed production, and delivery of improved technologies) were conducted. David J. Mackill, STRASA project leader and IRRI Program 1 leader, welcomed the participants on 16 March. S.P. Tiwari, deputy director general of ICAR formally opened the gathering. HRDC holds 1st annual meeting The first annual meeting of the Hybrid Rice Development Consortium (HRDC) was held on 25 March at IRRI. The meeting (photo 20) brought together private companies and research institutions across the globe engaged in hybrid rice development. Con-

20

“I’m worried that we won’t make the necessary investments and we’re going to see continued pressure on the ability to meet global demand,” said Zeigler, speaking in Manila as part of the Reuters Food and Agriculture Summit. “We’re certainly relieved that the pressure is off the market to some extent, but let’s not suffer under the illusion that the problems have been solved, because, fundamentally, nothing’s changed.” Zeigler’s institute had projected global consumption of rice, a staple for nearly half the world’s population of 6.7 billion, to reach around 426 million tons in 2009, up 1 percent from the previous year. Even before rice prices hit record levels last year as countries scrambled to secure their supplies, prices had been rising steadily since 2001.

19

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

8 of 29

IRRI M Ilestones 2009
sortium member representatives of 12 public-sector institutions and 19 private companies attended the meeting. Observers from eight nonmember public- and private-sector organizations that joined the meeting have expressed their desire to become members of the Consortium. In all, 45 participants came to attend the meeting. It is clear that the public–private partnership initiated by the HRDC to jumpstart hybrid rice development has taken shape. The interest of many in membership in the Consortium is a good indicator that the partnership will eventually help increase rice production across Asia through the accelerated development and introduction of hybrid rice technologies. In Taiwan: s��mposium held on common use licensing of publicly funded scientific data and publications There are many issues and challenges in making publicly funded scientific data and publications freely available to all for unrestricted use. A symposium on this topic was held 27 March at Academia Sinica in Taipei, Taiwan. to Tyng-Ruey Chuang, associate fellow at Academia Sinica and associate professor at National Taiwan University, IRRI’s experiences in a research setting are very valuable to the scholarly communication and scientific research communities. C4 group meets to use the sun to end hunger The C4 Rice Project launch and planning meeting was held at IRRI headquarters, 5-8 April. Supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the project involves a consortium of scientific institutions (photo 21) that will work together to discover the cassette of plant genes responsible for the greatest known efficiency of solar energy conversion in plant photosynthesis. staff on the board meetings held at IRRI earlier in the week. She said that the Board focused on IRRI’s funding challenges and is aiming for a no-deficit budget in 2010. The BOT also focused on future infrastructure investment needs, funding for new research directions, and continuance of good management strategies and financial practices, and looked into the experiences of the increasing number of PhD students and postdoctoral fellows. China exhibit opens at Riceworld The exhibit, The Grain That Sustains a Nation: Rice in China, opened at the IRRI Riceworld Museum on 21 April. Opening events included a Chinese lion dance at the rotunda in front of Harrar Hall (photo 23). The exhibit, now a permanent part of the Riceworld Museum, features information on Chinese history as related to rice, supplemented by maps, other multimedia, and samples of old tools that the Chinese once used in working their rice paddies.

21

The objective is not merely to increase yields but to also enable crops to improve their efficiency of nitrogen fertilizer use and double their water-use efficiency. The scientists are attempting to install the cassette and functionalize it in prototypes of crops grown for food in the developing world to help eliminate hunger and poverty. Attending was CPS head Gene Hettel, who was invited to discuss IRRI’s experiences in adopting and using Creative Commons to facilitate the dissemination of rice knowledge and technology. According April BOT meeting On 17 April, BOT Chair Elizabeth Woods (photo 22) reported to

23

22

STRASA Bangladesh team gears up for year 2 The Bangladesh group under the STRASA project held a planning workshop on 21-22 April at the Bangladesh Rice Research Institute (BRRI) Complex in Joydebpur, Gazipur, Bangladesh. 9 of 29

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

IRRI M Ilestones 2009
light in BRRI’s hosting the event and in the partnership between IRRI and BRRI. IRRI’s rice planthopper project launches International Insecticide Resistance Monitoring Network

24

Highlights of the project and progress under each of the objectives under the STRASA project implemented in Bangladesh in year 1 were reported on the first day. Special sessions were held to discuss the performance and scaling up of stress-tolerant lines in Bangladesh and India. Dr. M. Zainul Abedin, IRRI representative for Bangladesh and team leader of the IRRI-FoSHoL Coordination Project, welcomed the participants (photo 24) during the inaugural session. Dr. David J. Mackill, project leader of STRASA and Program 1 leader at IRRI, gave the introductory remarks and presented the objectives and expected outputs of the workshop. Mr. C.Q.K. Mustaq Ahmed, secretary of the Ministry of Agriculture, and Dr. Firose Shah Sikder, BRRI director general, gave special messages. Projects on salt-tolerant varieties hold 2nd review and planning The Second Annual Review and Planning Workshop of two ongoing IRRI-led projects was held on 23 April at the BRRI in Gazipur, Bangladesh. These are the Generation Challenge Program (GCP)-funded project, Speeding up the Development of Salt-toler-

ant Rice Varieties through Marker-assisted Selection and their Dissemination in Salt-affected Areas of Bangladesh, and the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ)funded project, Enhancing and Stabilizing the Productivity of Salt-affected Areas by Incorporating Genes for Tolerance of Abiotic Stresses in Rice. Together with the Bangladeshi partners (photo 25), IRRI scientists discussed the projects’ progress in the first year and refined project activities for the second year. Program 1 Leader David J. Mackill welcomed the participants while BRRI’s director for research, M.A. Salam, gave the opening remarks. At the closing session, BRRI DG Sikder, expressed his de-

26

The ADB-funded IRRI project to reduce vulnerability of crops to preharvest losses caused by planthopper pest outbreaks has established a network of researchers to develop standard protocols in monitoring insecticide resistance of rice pests. The inaugural workshop and training was held at IRRI from 27 April to 1 May and involved participants from China, Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines, and Vietnam (photo 26). In his opening speech, IRRI DG Robert Zeigler welcomed the establishment of the network as a means for capacity building and mentoring of the young generation of national

25

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

10 of 29

IRRI M Ilestones 2009
scientists, saying that, “Entomological research has been in a state of neglect, probably due to budget cuts and other factors. We have taken our eyes off the ball and pests such as planthoppers are making a return. This network activity can contribute toward reviving entomology in rice research and building a new generation of rice scientists.” CSISA holds launch workshop in New Delhi The Cereal Systems Initiative for South Asia (CSISA) held its launch workshop on 29 April at the NASC Complex in New Delhi. The initiative brought together a range of public- and private-sector organizations to enable sustainable cereal production in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Nepal. Representing major players in the effort were Rob Bertram (USAID), David Bergvinson (Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation), S.P. Tiwari (DDG for Crop Science, Indian Council of Agricultural Research), and Achim Dobermann (IRRI DDG-R). CIMMYT, IFPRI, and ILRI are the other collaborating CGIAR centers. Photo 27 shows the participants. Executive Board of Global Crop Diversity Trust meets at IRRI The Executive Board of the Global Crop Diversity Trust met at IRRI last week (29-30 April) after IRRI DG 28 Robert Zeigler responded positively to a request from the Trust to do so. This was the first time that the Board had a meeting in a venue that had a crop gene bank, and it is fitting that they chose to hold their meeting at IRRI, the first recipient of a long-term grant from the Trust. In addition to normal business, Board members were given a tour of the laboratory and field facilities of the T.T. Chang Genetic Resources Center and of the National Plant Genetic Resources Laboratory in University of the Philippines, Los Baños, Institute of Plant Breeding. They also discussed strategic issues relating to genetic resources with Dr. Zeigler and with relevant international and national staff. The chair of the board, Mrs. Margaret Catley-Carlson, presented to the GRC a photograph of the Arctic Seed Vault in Svalbard (photo 28), in recognition of IRRI’s outstanding contribution to the opening of the Vault in 2008. 3rd Research to Production Course Twenty-eight participants from 16 countries (photo 29) in Asia, Africa, Oceania, Europe, and North America participated in the third offering of the Rice: Research to Production course of the Training Center, 18 May-5 June. The brainchild of IRRI DG Robert Zeigler, Cornell researcher Susan McCouch, and senior scientist Hei Leung, the 3-week

29

27

30

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

11 of 29

IRRI M Ilestones 2009
course is designed to “open young scientists and potential young scientists (photo 30) to the challenges and opportunities of rice science to meet the global challenge of rice food security and improve the livelihoods of resource-poor rice producers.” IRRI participates in TRT Rice Americas 2009 Development Director Duncan Macintosh (photo 31) represented IRRI at The Rice Trader’s Rice Americas 2009 held on 12-14 May in Miami, Florida. The conference, a gathering of leading 31 rice industry players and experts, was a venue for these stakeholders to exchange information and network with one another. Mr. Macintosh presented a report, Rice research and its implications for future production and trade, in which he discussed IRRI’s work and how the results of which have contributed to the steady growth in world rice production and helped reduce the real price of rice. IRRI staff attend 20th FCSSP Thirty-one IRRI staff members attended the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines (FCSSP) held at Silliman University, Dumaguete City, 18-22 May. More than 250 participants from across the country participated in the concurrent sessions, poster presentations, best paper and poster competitions, and farmers’ forum. Members of the IRRI contingent and NARES partners brought back a best paper award and two best poster awards (see awards section). Several IRRI staff members were elected to the Board of Directors of the CSSP: Jessica Rey, vicepresident; Ramon A. Oliveros, secretary; Darlene Sanchez, treasurer; and Tomas P. Clemeno and Venus Elec, board members. They and other officers were inducted into office by PBGB head Darshan Brar (photo 32). STRASA Annual Review and Planning Workshop in Nepal Rice Planthopper Project launches Ecological Engineering for Pest Management in China The planthopper project, initiated by IRRI in November 2008 and supported by the ADB, launched a Training Workshop on Ecological Engineering and Research Methods for Pest Management in Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China, on 25-29 May. The training workshop developed jointly with partners sustainable ways to prevent planthopper outbreaks by protecting ecosystem services using ecological engineering tools. Thirty participants from China, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam attended. Dr. Xia Jingyuan, director general of the National Agro-tech Extension and Service Center, gave the opening address. He emphasized that planthopper outbreaks are currently the major constraints to China’s rice production and the heavy use of pesticides is not a sustainable practice. Ecological engineering can offer practical ways to restore ecosystem services back into rice production systems. CURE meeting strengthens partnerships Long existing partnerships as well as new ones were strengthened during the 8th Review and Steering Committee Meeting of the Consortium for Unfa-

33

32

The Annual Review and Planning Workshop of the STRASA project for Nepal (photo 33) was jointly organized by IRRI and the Nepal Agriculture Research Council (NARC) in Kathmandu on 22 May. Inaugurating the workshop, Dr. Bhartendu Mishra, executive director, NARC, highlighted the importance of the STRASA project for Nepal. Most of the major rice-growing areas are rainfed and prone to abiotic stresses, particularly drought.
34

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

12 of 29

IRRI M Ilestones 2009
vorable Rice Environments (CURE) held on 27-29 May in Hanoi, Vietnam. Members from 10 countries attended and more than 30 institutions were represented in the meeting (photo 34). David Mackill, IRRI senior scientist, opened the event and welcomed participants and President Nguyen Van Bo of the Vietnam Academy of Agricultural Sciences, who gave the opening remarks. His Excellency, Dr. Bui Ba Bong, vice minister for the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, gave the keynote address, in which he highlighted the importance of improving productivity in the rice sector and introducing options to address constraints. IRRI and CGIAR featured in June National Geographic magazine IRRI and the CGIAR were featured in the June issue of National Geographic in the story on The global food crisis: the end of plenty. The genebank was featured in a full 2-page spread (photo 35) in the article. The caption read: Skilled fingers separate good seed from bad at the International Rice Research Institute in Los Baños. “Miracle rice” varieties developed here in the 1960s doubled yields in Asia. Further growth has stalled since the mid-1990s, as investment in agriculture has declined. “Governments thought we’d won the war on food security,” says IRRI DG Robert Zeigler. “So, they put money elsewhere.” IRRI-CIMMYT rice-maize project organizes hands-on training on conservation agriculture in Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute, Gazipur, on 14-15 June (photo 36), which was exclusively for 16 project personnel to build their skills and capacity in the operation and use of machinery as well as in sowing and establishment of major cereals such as rice, wheat, and maize. IRRI Fund opens Singapore office The keys to the new office of the IRRI Fund Singapore (IFS) were formally handed over on 15 June by a representative of Singapore’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA). Office space and renovations for the IFS were provided by the Singapore government—with the MFA acting as landlord—as part of its strong support for the IFS to be established in the island state. The IFS, a separate legal entity from IRRI, is the first of its kind established by the Institute—with its own Board and, in the future, management and operational structure. In the meantime, IRRI Development Director Duncan Macintosh is acting executive director, with Management Services Director Norman MacDonald, Lisa Panes, and Julie Carreon providing financial management support and Jim Jimenez legal advice and support. The Director for Program Planning (DPPC) provides support as funding is received, and the Development Office provides general administrative support and other tasks as needed. DG Robert Zeigler is the IFS Board chair. Photo 37 shows, L-R, Mr. Macdonald, IFS chief financial officer; Pema Han, economic development board Singapore; Cheryl Tiong, IFS staff; Ong Keng Yong, IFS board member; Leo Chen Ian, IFS board member; and Ang Bee Yan, MFA Singapore.

36

35

The joint IRRI-CIMMYT project, Sustainable Intensification of Rice-maize Systems in Bangladesh, funded by the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR) with national partners from governmental and nongovernment organizations (NGOs), has been running since November 2008 in three districts in Bangladesh. The project, with a major focus on conservation agriculture and nutrient management, is concentrating on research for 1-2 years and then will swiftly move towards dissemination of improved technologies to large numbers of farmers through training and capacitybuilding of researchers, farmers, extension workers, machinery manufacturers, and service providers. An example was the training at the Farm Machinery and Postharvest Division of Bangladesh

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

13 of 29

IRRI M Ilestones 2009
MOA signed with PhilPost Corporation to produce IRRI’s ��th anni�ersar�� stamps

40 37

DG gives mid-2009 update to IRRI community IRRI DG Robert Zeigler gave his annual mid-year update on 18 June. He discussed the recent meeting of the Executive Committee of the CGIAR (ExCo) held in Cali, Colombia, during which 1) IRRI’s 7th EPMR had an extraordinarily positive reception resulting in a strong endorsement of IRRI’s position and prospects; and 2) the CGIAR–change process: its status and implications. He also updated the large audience in Umali Hall (photo 38) on the recent growth and development of IRRI, particularly the Institute’s tremendous success in obtaining research grants— around US$100 million over the next 3 years or so.

39

Hector Villanueva, postmaster general and chief executive officer of the Philippine Postal Corporation (PhilPost), and party visited IRRI on 23 June to sign a MOA to begin the process to “issue, circulate, and sell commemorative stamps and other philatelic products to commemorate the 50th anniversary of IRRI in 2010.” In photo 39 are (from left): seated, DDG-OSS and acting DG Willy Padolina and Mr. Villanueva; and standing, DPPC Michael Jackson, CPS Head Gene Hettel, Juan Lazaro IV (stamp designer), Elenita San Diego (acting manager, Postage and Philatelic Department, PhilPost), and Danilo S. Pangan (member of the National Committee on Visual Arts for the PhilPost). Policy dialog for promoting validated technologies held in Nepal A Policy Dialog Meeting, jointly organized by NARC and IRRI, was held on 21 June at NARC in Kathmandu, Nepal. The participants (photo 40) apprised the senior Nepali agricultural policymakers and officials of the outputs and outcomes of the IRRI-led and IFAD-funded research grant project, Managing Rice

Landscapes in Marginal Uplands for Household Food Security and Environmental Sustainability, and discussed ways and strategies for promoting project-validated technologies and sharing knowledge products among stakeholders. The dialog was organized as a part of the completion process of the project, which began in mid-2005 and ended in September 2009. Submergence field evaluation held in Vietnam Field evaluation of a multilocation yield trial (MYT) under the submergence project coordinated by IRRI was conducted in Cuu Long Delta, Vietnam, 2427 June. Abdelbagi Ismail, senior scientist and plant

38

41

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

14 of 29

IRRI M Ilestones 2009
physiologist in Crop and Environmental Science Division (CESD) (left, photo 41), was among 40 scientists from different institutions who attended the event. The scientists evaluated the yield trials under control and following flooding and rated the entries based on the performance of each after flooding. Based on average rating by the scientists, OM4900 (a new variety developed by the Cuu Long Delta Rice Research Institute, [CLDRRI]) and PSBRc68 ranked first (67%), followed by BR11-Sub1 (65%), and then IR64-Sub1 and Samba Mahsuri-Sub1 (62% each). The scientists also observed that some lines in the control trial were seriously affected by pest and disease, particularly by the brown planthopper and bacterial leaf blight. They were surprised to see that the Sub1 lines, except IR64, performed better against disease in the flooded trial. Dr. Nguyen Thi Lang, plant geneticist at the CLDRRI (right, photo 41), said that submergence might help reduce the effects of some diseases. 3 Controls Technolog�� leads to healthier crops in Guangdong, China IRRI scientists Grant Singleton (at right in photo 42 talking to a Chinese farmer) and Shaobing Peng visited Guangdong Province, China, on 2-5 July to meet with partners at Guangdong Rice Research Institute (GRRI) and discuss IRRI’s Irrigated Rice Research Consortium collaboration with GRRI on the 3 Controls Technology, which was developed based on 1) more efficient use of nutrients by following the principles of site-specific nutrient management (SSNM), which often leads to more than 20% decrease in nitrogen (N) use; 2) reduced lodging of rice crop by avoiding excessive N uptake and better water management; and 3) reduced number of insecticide sprays since the crop is healthier. The collaboration has been very effective in influencing policy. In 2008 and 2009, the technology was included in recommendations by the provincial government for “high yield creation.” IRRI and AsiaCongress hold successful Postharvest 2009 in Bangkok IRRI in partnership with Asia Congress successfully held a 3-day Postharvest Rice Conference and Exhibition in Bangkok, Thailand, at Queen Sirikit National Convention Center, 15-17 July (photo 43). The event was fully supported by Thailand Convention and Exhibition Bureau (TCEB), the Thai Rice Exporters Association, the Thai Rice Millers Association, and various organizations and media. Postharvest 2009 gathered rice postharvest researchers, technology experts, equipment suppliers, and service providers. There were 24 technical presentations by researchers and scientists on various themes and topics in rice postharvest—from quality and markets, postharvest management technology to commercialization of research results. Hillar�� Clinton �isits India rice scene

44

42

43

US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (photo 44 with IRRI senior scientist J.K. Ladha to her left) named agriculture as a major part of renewed US-India collaborations and pledged assistance from the Obama administration that may be in part monetary. She announced this during her visit to the Indian Agricultural Research Institute (IARI) on 19 July. She noted that while India has 3% of the world’s crop land, it feeds almost a fifth of the world’s population. Clinton came to IARI to learn more about its programs and the work of the CGIAR centers. The program for the visit was organized by USAID-Delhi and the US Embassy there, with assistance from IARI. The US Embassy requested the presence of CG partners from CSISA, IRRI, CIMMYT, ILRI, and IFPRI. 15 of 29

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

IRRI M Ilestones 2009
IRRI mourns the passing of former Philippine President Corazon C. Aquino It was with a deep sense of loss that IRRI mourned the passing of former president Corazon C. Aquino (photo 45) on 1 August. She helped lead the nation through a perilous time and served as an example to many around the world. Her example of courage was an inspiration to many in the late 1980s. Looking back at the changes in the world since then, we see the emergence of democracy in many countries that previously were under the fist of dictatorships. To show our admi45 ration for her accomplishments and our gratitude for her contributions, a number of IRRI representatives attended President Aquino’s wake at the Manila Cathedral on 4 August. This is to show the Institute’s deepest sympathies to the Aquino family and to honor a beloved president who became an icon of Philippine democracy. President Aquino visited IRRI on 15 October 1986, when she dedicated IRRI’s new Biotechnology and Seed Health Building to the rice scientists and farmers of the world during her World Food Day visit. Also, in 1986, she conferred the rank and title of National Scientist of the Philippines to Dioscoro L. Umali, IRRI’s former part-time liaison scientist for China, and in 1987, she presented the Golden Heart Presidential Award to M.S. Swaminathan, former IRRI director general. PBGB scientists present papers at 14th APB and 11th SABRAO Conference A 12-member delegation from PBGB led by David Mackill (photo 46) attended the combined meeting of the 14th Australasian Plant Breeding Conference (APBC) and 11th Congress of the Society for the Advancement of Breeding Research in Asia and Oceania (SABRAO) held on 10-14 August at the Cairns Convention Centre in Tropical North Queensland, Australia. NPR radio feature: ‘Super Rice’ deploys ‘snorkel’ to survive floods An NPR radio feature on 20 August presented how scientists are racing to develop strains of “super rice” that can prevent the return of deadly famines to Asia. Researchers say tough, highly productive rice plants offer the best hope for feeding a world population that will reach 9 billion by 2050. And their quest to create these plants is producing an explosion of scientific papers on rice genetics—three of which appear in leading scientific journals this week. The push for new rice varieties comes four decades after scientists at the International Rice Research Institute in the Philippines developed a rice plant called IR8 that put its energy into making more rice grains, rather than longer stalks. “It has essentially doubled rice production in Asia,” said IRRI DG Robert Zeigler, during the broadcast. “It has allowed food supplies in Asia to grow faster, or at least as fast as, population. So we’ve averted the famines.” Rice breeding course helps develop the next generation of rice breeders A 16-day Rice Breeding Course was held at IRRI, 24 August-8 September, during which 27 breeders and agronomists from the public, private, and NGO sectors from Bangladesh, Chinese Taipei, India, Malaysia, Mauritius, Nepal, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Vietnam participated (photo 47). IRRI, being an educational and research institute, is dedicated to creating a better world for rice farmers and consumers through scientific discovery

46

The conference, which is held every 4 years, had the theme Contemporary Crop Improvement: A Tropical View and featured renowned speakers who addressed a wide spectrum of current crop improvement issues and challenges. Dr. Mackill, as SABRAO secretary general, played an important role as a member of the joint conference’s organizing committee and chair of a plenary session and of the SABRAO Congress.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

16 of 29

IRRI M Ilestones 2009
was joined in the Royal audience by IRRI’s Development Director Duncan Macintosh. Before the Royal audience, Dr. Zeigler also met with Dr. He Changchui, FAO’s assistant director general and regional representative for Asia and the Pacific based in Bangkok. Then, in Hua Hin, he met with Mr. Theera Wongsamut, Thai minister of agriculture and cooperatives (MOAC); Ms. Supatra Tanaseneewat, deputy permanent secretary of the MOAC; and Mr. Prasert Gosalvitra, DG of the MOAC’s Rice Department. CURE implements new IFAD-funded project The CURE began implementation of a new project funded by the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) after holding an inception workshop on 26-27 August at IRRI. The project, Enabling Poor Rice Farmers to Improve Livelihoods and Overcome Poverty in South and Southeast Asia through CURE, was launched and set to run for 4 years. Representatives from the 10 member
48

countries in South and Southeast Asia and IFAD project representatives from Nepal, India, Cambodia, Vietnam, and Laos were joined by members of the CURE working groups. The project focuses on the rural poor in the unfavorable rice environments of Asia. NARES, local authorities, and IFAD-supported investment projects in these rice environments will also be direct beneficiaries, as the project aims to build local capacity to effectively implement development options for the rural poor. Second SC meeting of the Temperate Rice Research Consortium The second meeting of the Steering Committee of the Temperate Rice Research Consortium (TRRC) was held at Shenyang, China on 2-4 September. Tao Chengguang, president of Liaoning Academy of Agricultural Sciences, welcomed 60 participants from 11 temperate rice-growing countries (photo 48). He underlined in his speech greater cooperation among scientists to increase rice production, in order that

47

of superior rice farming technologies. The Institute facilitates courses on rice breeding for trained professionals in the field. Rice breeders from various private companies participated in the training to get new and up-to-date techniques and develop an efficient rice breeding program to improve their own systems. They were given the opportunity to share experiences and lessons with breeders from other programs. Dr. Zeigler has audience with Thai King IRRI DG Robert Zeigler had his first Royal audience with His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej of Thailand on 26 August at the King’s Klai Kangwan Palace in the coastal resort city of Hua Hin about a 2-hour drive southwest of Bangkok. Discussions focused on a range of issues including the role of the International Rice Genebank and IRRI’s work in Thailand. His Majesty urged Dr. Zeigler to make sure IRRI communicated clearly its important role in managing the world’s rice varieties. Dr. Zeigler

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

17 of 29

IRRI M Ilestones 2009
rice yields may stabilize and countries may attain food security. Lee Seong-Hee, IRRI BOT member, delivered a welcome message on behalf of IRRI. K.K. Jena, TRRC coordinator, presented an overview of TRRC activities and outlined the objectives of the meeting. The leaders of the four working groups presented a progress report on the first year, particularly on yield potential and grain quality, blast disease resistance, cold tolerance and N use efficiency, and the work plan for the second year. Syngenta and IRRI collaborate to benefit Asia’s rice farmers Another lane on the research highway between the nonprofit and private sectors opened on 7 September to help deliver technology-driven solutions to rice farmers and the rice industry in the face of climate change and global food security challenges. The MOU was signed in Singapore between IRRI and Syngenta, which set out a commitment between the two organizations to closely collaborate in undertaking rice research, to build scientific capacity, and to establish a Scientific Know-how Exchange Program. Market assessment and communication strategies workshop held in Cambodia On 7-8 September, 44 participants (photo 49) gathered at the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries (MAFF) in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, to participate in their first Learning Alliance workshop, focused on market assessment and communication strategies. This activity was part of the new ADB-funded project, Bringing about a Sustainable Agronomic Revolution in Rice Production in Asia by Reducing Preventable Pre- and Postharvest Losses. The 2-day workshop was organized by the Postproduction Work Group of the Irrigated Rice Research Consortium (IRRC) led by Martin Gummert and MAFF led by Meas Pyseth. His Excellency, Sen Sovann, deputy secretary general of MAFF, gave the opening remarks. He emphasized the need to introduce new and suitable technologies to farmers through effective strategies to help improve their livelihood. “It has long-term impact.” Zeigler called for urgent attention to the issue. The 3-day conference, also known as the Annual Meeting of the New Champions, which was held last week in North China’s port city Dalian, gathered around 1,400 participants from 86 countries and regions to discuss ways to revive world economic growth. 28 finish quality rice seed course in Africa Twenty-eight seed field inspectors, rice breeders, and extension officers from seven African countries finished the training course Quality Rice Seed in Tanzania. The course, held 31 August-11 September, was sponsored by the Kilimanjaro Agricultural Training Center (KATC) and IRRI. The participants (photo 51), who gained knowledge and experience on the fundamentals and techniques of evaluating quality seeds that are “pure, clean, and viable,” were from Burundi, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda. The training was held under the East and Southern Africa (ESAP) project led by Regional Coordinator Joe Rickman, in coordination with KATC Principal Adam Pyuza, IRRI Training Center Head Noel Magor, and course coordinators Engineer Eugenio Castro, Jr. (IRRI-TC) and Hanif Nzullly (KATC).

49

At Summer Davos 2009, Zeigler warns of rising sea le�el Participants during the Summer Davos 2009 in Dalian, China on 10 September called for worldwide attention to global risks such as the A/H1N1 in50 fluenza outbreak and climate change. IRRI DG Robert Zeigler (photo 50) warned of rising sea level as a result of climate change. “Climate change is not a 1- or 2-year issue,” he said.

51

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

18 of 29

IRRI M Ilestones 2009
IRRI assists families in Los Baños and Bay affected by Typhoon Ondoy Typhoon Ondoy (Ketsana) caused much damage in late September locally and affected scores of families in Los Baños and Bay towns. Fifteen barangays in Los Baños and Bay were underwater. As many as 3,636 families in 52 Los Baños and 3,007 in Bay had their homes underwater. Donations (photo 52) started to come in and representatives from IFEA helped in the collection. IRRI turned over P20,500 of collected money from staff to Los Baños Mayor Caesar Perez, who was very appreciative of the immediate assistance because of the overwhelming number of residents seeking help. Through early November, more than P287,403 was raised to provide much-needed assistance to community residents—including some IRRI staff—affected by Ondoy. IRRI Fund Board meets in Japan The Board of Directors of the Singapore-based International Rice Research Institute Fund Ltd. (IRRI Fund) met in Tsukuba, Japan, on 28 September—its third meeting since the Fund was established and the first meeting of the full Board with both Singapore Board members present. Among the decisions made by the Board were the approval of investment policy guidelines for funds received and of the Fund’s first audited accounts. The first annual general meeting of the Fund was also convened after the conclusion of the Board Dobermann and CPS staff reviewed the list of books that the Institute has in its inventory, both past and present, which might have some relevance toward rebuilding the country’s agricultural research system. Photo 54 shows Dr. Dobermann with CPS staff (L-R) Daisy Columbres, Gene Hettel, and Gigi Caballero preparing a shipment of 86 books and CDs that were sent out via DHL to the Liberian Ministry of Agriculture in early October. We hope that, in some small way, this shipment will help bring Liberia’s agricultural infrastructure back on line to assist the country’s farmers and consumers.

53

meeting. IRRI DG Robert Zeigler, chair of the IRRI Fund, said he was very pleased with the meetings and the progress of the Fund so far. In photo 53 are (L-R) Ong Keng Yong, Ronald Phillips, Ralph Anthony Fischer, Dr. Zeigler, Elizabeth Woods, Emerlinda Roman, and Ian Leo Chen. IRRI sends selected books and CDs to Liberia Ministry of Agriculture In September when DDG-R Achim Dobermann visited the West African nation of Liberia, which is rebuilding after 14 years of civil war, he discovered that nothing is left there of the once quite flourishing agricultural research system and felt that IRRI needed to do something right away. So, as a start, Dr.

54

IRRI-ADB partnership lauded at book launch Fifteen years of research to help farmers conserve resources and manage their rice-wheat farms better in the Indo-Gangetic Plains of Bangladesh, India, Nepal, and Pakistan are captured in a new book (cover, photo 55) that was launched on 8 October at the 55 Asian Development Bank (ADB).

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

19 of 29

IRRI M Ilestones 2009
workshop was organized for the project-employed researchers and their supervisors from the four collaborating organizations: BARI; BRRI; Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC); and Rangpur Dinajpur Rural Services (RDRS) from the four districts (Rangpur, Rajshahi, Comilla, and Gazipur) where project activities were launched. Fourteen researchers from the collaborating organizations and two from IRRI and CIMMYT offices in Bangladesh participated in the workshop. Jagadish Timsina, IRRI-CIMMYT senior scientist and project leader, coordinated the workshop and led the team. The participants visited the ongoing activities on direct-seeded rice (photo 57) using conservation agriculture technologies and nutrient management trials in farmers’ fields and research stations in five upazillas in Rangpur and Rajshahi districts.

56

The event, attended by a joint IRRI-ADB audience of around 75 persons, provided the opportunity to emphasize the importance of the long-term partnership between IRRI and ADB. Participating in the event (from right in photo 56) were Katsuji Matsunami, advisor to ADB’s Regional and Sustainable Development Department; Ursula Schaefer-Preuss, ADB vice president of Knowledge Management and Sustainable Development; J.K. Ladha, (RWC) coordinator for IRRI and the book’s senior editor; IRRI DG Robert Zeigler; and Takashi Matsuo, ADB’s director of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Social Services, South Asia Department. Integrated Crop and Resource Management in the Rice-Wheat System of South Asia outlines the work and impact of the RWC—a network of international and national organizations working together to address issues of intensively cultivated and irrigated cropping systems in the semiarid agro-ecoregion of the Indo-Gangetic Plains in South Asia. Tra�eling workshop brings researchers together in farmers’ fields in Bangladesh The ACIAR-funded project, Sustainable Intensification of Rice-maize (R-M) Systems in Bangladesh, launched a Traveling Workshop on 4-8 October in Rajshahi and Rangpur districts in Bangladesh. The

58

ice (MAS), IRRC SC members, donor representatives, the Department of Agricultural Research (DAR), Yezin Agriculture University (YAU), Agricultural Mechanization Department, Food and Agriculture Organization, UNDP, and the private sector (photo 58). IRRC work group leaders and Myanma collaborators discussed the progress of the IRRC country outreach program in Myanmar and explored future linkages with DAR, YAU, and the private sector. International rodent conference An international conference on impacts of rodent outbreaks on food security in Asia was held at IRRI 26-28 October. Twenty-seven participants (photo 59) from advanced research institutions, national rice in-

57

IRRC Phase IV Steering Committee meeting The Irrigated Rice Research Consortium (IRRC) held its first Phase IV (2009-12) Steering Committee (SC) meeting on 12-15 October in Yangon, Myanmar. The high-profile meeting was attended by more than 70 participants from IRRI, the Myanma Agriculture Serv59

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

20 of 29

IRRI M Ilestones 2009
stitutes, universities, NGOs, and FAO attended. The conference participants documented the evidence and impact of rodent infestations in Asia that cause significant yield losses in rice production, reviewed the impact of ecologically based rodent management in both lowland and upland rice environments in Southeast Asia, and developed a framework for research on rodent management in agricultural systems of Asia and on the options to mitigate the effects of future outbreaks. Rice trade supports rice research IRRI confirmed its first support from the international rice trade when the California-based weekly publication The Rice Trader donated US$10,000 to the Institute at the World Rice Conference ‘09 held in Cebu, Philippines, 27-29 October. The Rice Trader’s publisher, Jeremy Zwinger, said he was inspired to give because of increased focus on agriculture and a desire to fund public research aimed at increasing production and alleviating poverty. “While rice trade has not been known for giving private dollars to fund public research, the example of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is particularly inspiring,” Mr. Zwinger said. “I hope others in the trade may also look at this example.” In photo 60, Mr. Zwinger (left), who is also now the publisher of Rice Today magazine, presented the $10,000 check to Michael Jackson. More than 300 rice trade executives and 200 officials from 33 nations attended the conference. First Friends of IRRI meeting held in Suwon, Korea outputs of IRRI-Korea research projects. Dr. SeongHee Lee spoke about the proposed CGIAR change process and events planned for IRRI’s upcoming 50th anniversary. Other discussions were on how RDAKorea will support IRRI for the 50th anniversary in 2010, keeping in view the role played by IRRI in the development of Korea’s rice R&D and making Korea self-sufficient in rice. The RDA has some events planned in support of IRRI. Postharvest training for NARES partners The IRRI GQNPC and Training Center jointly held Postharvest Training at headquarters on 19-30 October. Twenty-four participants from research institutions, extension systems, NGOs, and the private sector from the Philippines, Myanmar, Indonesia, Vietnam, and Cambodia came to the action-oriented training course (photo 62). All participants were partners of IRRI’s current projects—rice postharvest management funded by ADB, the IRRC by the SDC, and the ACIAR-SMAR

61

60

IRRI BOT member Seong-Hee Lee, in cooperation with the National Institute of Crop Science (NICS) of the Rural Development Administration (RDA)-Korea, organized the first Friends of IRRI meeting in Suwon on 27 October (photo 61). The meeting was well attended, with 30 scientists—including former IRRI BOT member Eun-Jong Lee, former and present director generals of NICS, seven former RDA scientists seconded to IRRI, and several former IRRI scholars. K.K. Jena, IRRI country representative for Korea, gave an introduction on RDA-IRRI collaboration and

62

project by ACIAR. Seeing the need to reduce postharvest losses in Asia and increase incomes of farmers through value-adding and use of improved

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

21 of 29

IRRI M Ilestones 2009
rice postharvest technologies, the training kicked-off with much appreciation and excitement from the participants. Seminar on agricultural development approaches held in Dhaka The coastal zone of Bangladesh is home to the poorest in the country. Agricultural production in this region is greatly hindered by salinity intrusion as well as by different forms of flooding. It is also vulnerable to cyclones, such as Sidr in November 2007 and Aila in May 2009. profitable agricultural systems with modern technologies and appropriate crop varieties. In response, IRRI, in collaboration with MoA and BRRI, held a seminar, Agricultural development approach in coastal areas of Bangladesh, on 5 November in Dhaka. Begum Matia Chowdhury, honorable minister of MoA (3rd from left in photo 63), was chief guest. She actively led the discussion following the presentations through to the end of the seminar. RAP 6 workshop held at Manila Hotel The Rice Annotation Project (RAP) 6 Workshop was held on 15 November at the Manila Hotel with 76 delegates in attendance (photo 64). IRRI played host to this sixth workshop that was a satellite meeting of the International Rice Genetics and Rice Functional Ge64 nomics Symposia. When DNA sequencing of the rice genome was completed in 2003, a follow-up rice genome data analysis project, called the Rice Annotation Project, led by Japan, was established. Since knowledge of the DNA “sequence” does not automatically establish biological functions, the RAP meetings were convened to develop the technical issues of computer-driven analysis and data management (bioinformatics) relating to inferring and cataloguing the identity and biological functions of the active elements (genes) in the genome. PAU-IRRI MOA signed at Manila Hotel during RG6 IRRI and Punjab Agricultural University (PAU) of India added to their current collaborative activities through a new MOA signed at the Manila Hotel 17 November during the International Rice Genetics Symposium. The MOA—being signed in photo 65 by Manjit Singh Kang, PAU vice chancellor (left), and IRRI DG Robert Zeigler—calls for additional collabo-

63

IRRI, in collaboration with many Bangladeshi institutions, has carried out several research activities and developed technologies to enhance agricultural production, improve the livelihood of farmers, and help cyclone victims recover from the devastation. These activities culminated in a proposal to the Government of Bangladesh to develop a project concept note for coastal development, for which diversified partners would be involved. The Ministry of Agriculture (MoA) appreciated the proposal and asked IRRI to arrange a seminar at which representatives of donors and probable national partners could exchange ideas on strategies for developing more effective and

65

ration in the following areas: 1) genetic enhancement and production techniques for irrigated rice, aerobic rice, and hybrid rice; 2) access to putative C4 rice germplasm/derived genotypes; 3) wide hybridization and allele mining for key productivity and plant protection traits; 4) advanced areas in genomics and genetic transformation; and 5) direct-seeded rice and natural resource management technologies. PBGB Head Darshan Brar observes the signing.

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

22 of 29

IRRI M Ilestones 2009
IRRI DG delivers Foundation Day Lecture at KIIT University of Orissa, India The 3rd Foundation Day Lecture of the KIIT School of Rural Management, a constituent of KIIT University, was delivered by IRRI DG Robert Zeigler on 20 November. An MOU was also signed between Dr. Zeigler and Dr. A. Samanta, KIIT founder, on behalf of IRRI and KIIT University, respectively, to promote collaborative research work for improving the rice production and marketing system in India and neighboring countries. Dr. Zeigler said in his lecture titled Orissa and Other Eastern States in the Midst of Global Rice Food Security that India requires a second Green Revolution, considering 21st century constraints such as declining agricultural land and water availability, rising input prices, and extreme weather. Zeigler �isits Bangladesh to obser�e submergencetolerant rice IRRI DG Robert Zeigler (center in photo 66) visited Bangladesh on 22-23 November to personally see the performance of various submergence-tolerant rice lines in farmers’ fields in Kurigram, Gaibandha, and Rangpur districts. The specific places that he visited were Tipamari, Kachirchar, and Jatrapur in Kurigram District; Palashbari in Gaibandha District; and Dorshona and the BRRI Regional Station in Rangpur District. With Dr. Zeigler were David Mackill, program leader of the STRASA project; U.S. Singh, regional coordinator of STRASA for South Asia; Noel Magor, head of IRRI Training Center; M.A. Hamid Miah, IRRI’s liaison scientist for Bangladesh; M.A. Bari, consultant of the STRASA project in Bangladesh; M.K. Bashar, head of the GRS Division of BRRI; M.A. Mazid, hub manager of CSISA (NW Hub) Bangladesh and former head of the Regional Station of BRRI Rangpur; and M.A. Jalil Mridha, head of the Regional Station of BRRI Rangpur. MAFF-funded project on DREB genes holds annual meeting and wheat for improved performance under abiotic stresses. The meeting was opened by IRRI DDG-R Achim Doberman; Dr M. Takano, representative of Japan Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Research Council secretariat (MAFF); and Dr. T. Kumashiro, JIRCAS project leader. The meeting was organized by the IRRI project research team (Inez Slamet-Loedin and Rachid Serraj) in collaboration with Dr. Kumashiro. It was attended by more than 25 participants (photo 67) representing the various partner institutions (CIMMYT, CIAT, IRRI, JIRCAS, RIKEN, and MAFF) involved in the project. Workshop on social science concepts and tools for technology evaluation and impact assessment The workshop on social science concepts and tools for technology evaluation and impact assessment ended on 4 December with 18 collaborators from 11 countries as graduates (photo 68). The 2-week workshop, jointly organized by IRRI and ACIAR, exposed participants to social and economic tools required for technology and impact evaluation. Participants were given hands-on exercises so they could apply

67

66

The third annual meeting of the MAFF-funded project Crops by DREB Genes was held in IRRI on 23-24 November. The project is a collaborative effort among JIRCAS and RIKEN, IRRI, CIMMYT, and CIAT, with main goals to identify stress-tolerance genes and promoters and evaluate transformed lines in rice

68

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

23 of 29

IRRI M Ilestones 2009
the concepts and use the tools in conducting impact assessments in their home institutions. Participants had the opportunity to listen to insights from IRRI Consultant Gelia Castillo on the roles of a social scientist and presented their plans for impact assessment in their home institutions, using what they had learned from the workshop. International workshop on improving guidelines for new breeding lines To meet the ever increasing global demand for food, rice breeders and scientists must provide a continuous supply of new and improved varieties required to raise average rice yields by more than 50 kg per hectare annually. Recent advances in biotechnology, such as marker-aided selection and marker-assisted backcrossing, have allowed the rapid development of new varieties and hybrids. The slow varietal release processes in many countries, however, have delayed farmers’ access to these new varieties and, thus, have prevented them from reaping the full benefits of modern technological developments. Rice breeders, scientists, and policymakers from 19 NARES (Australia, Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Iran, Japan, Korea, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Vietnam, and the US; photo 69) and high-level representatives from intergovernmental and NGOs, CGIAR centers (IRRI and the Africa Rice Center), and the private sector gathered at IRRI 8-10 December to participate in the International Workshop on Improving Guidelines for the Testing and Release of New Breeding Lines. personally thanked everyone who had been part of giving him the opportunity to visit IRRI, saying, “I will not long forget my experience here.” Click here for a 7:10 video on YouTube about his visit. On 7 January, Prof. Jeffrey D. Sachs visited IRRI to learn more about the Institute. He is director of The Earth Institute, Quetelet professor of sustainable development, and professor of health policy and management at Columbia University. While at IRRI, he had breakfast with IRRI DG Robert Zeigler; received an overview of the Institute’s research thrusts from DDG-R Achim Dobermann, including an inspection of the Long-term Continuous Cropping Experiment (photo 71).

Officials, ambassadors, ministers, visit IRRI to get research orientations US
Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack (photo 70) headed an impressive list of dignitaries to visit IRRI in 2009. During his visit 25 October, Secretary Vilsack said he appreciated the work being done at IRRI and called it 70 “extraordinarily important.” He emphasized the opportunities science offered to helping farmers increase productivity “not only to tend to their families but to have sufficient amounts of rice to trade to create wealth and bring about prosperity to rural communities throughout the world.” He

71

69

On 19 Janaury, Nepalese ambassador to the Philippines H.E. Rishi Raj Adhikari (center left in photo 72) and party (his spouse Shanta Adhikari and attaché Depak Babu Ghimire) visited IRRI to get a briefing on the Institute’s work, particularly IRRI-Nepal projects. H.E. Kulkumut Singhara Na Ayudhaya, Thai ambassador to the Philippines, visited the Institute 24 of 29

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

IRRI M Ilestones 2009
IRRI staff updates
New BOT members starting in 2010: P. Stephen Baenziger, a professor in the University of NebraskaLincoln Department of Agronomy and Horticulture; New international staff arrivals in late 2008 and throughout 2009 were Jagadish Timsina, senior scientist, Cropping System Agronomy, Dhaka, Bangladesh; Kurniawan Rudi Trijatmiko, postdoctoral fellow, PBGB; Tao Li, scientist, CESD; Sophie Clayton, IRRI spokesperson and media relations manager; Helal Uddin Ahmed, postdoctoral fellow, PBGB; John Damien Platten, postdoctoral fellow, CESD; Yashpal Saharawat, postdoctoral fellow, Intensive Cropping Systems Management-Cereal System Initiative for South Asia (CSISA), CESD and IRRI-India; Jauhar Ali, scientist, Regional Project Coordinator (Asia); Alexis Ndayiragije, postdoctoral fellow, IRRI-Africa Program; Shanta Karki, post-

S. Baenziger

J. Timsina

72

74

R. Trijatmiko

T. Li

on 5 February. The ambassador came to plan with IRRI management the upcoming visit of HRH Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn of Thailand. Joseph Ejercito Estrada, former Philippine president (1998-2001; left in photo 73), visited IRRI on 19 February. Originally only planning to pass through IRRI grounds, the former president and his guests decided to stop by at the invitation of DDGOSS Willy Padolina (right in photo) to learn a little bit about rice research.

A 19-member delegation from the government of Brunei Darussalam came to IRRI on 31 March to see IRRI’s experimental fields and facilities (photo 75 with PBGB Head Darshan Brar at right). They were accompanied by Ms. Celia Abadilla and Mr. Glenn Ilar, both of PhilRice. The visitors were officials from the sultanate’s Ministry of Industry and Primary Resources-Department of Agriculture and Bruneian farmers. Their visit to IRRI was part of their country’s week-long Rice Production Appreciation Tour in the Philippines, which partly fulfills the commitment of the Philippine government to help Brunei attain at least 20% rice self-sufficiency by 2010.

S. Clayton

H.U. Ahmed

J.D Platten

Y. Saharawat

J. Ali

A. Ndayiragije

73

Papua New Guinea Prime Minister Michael Somare visited IRRI on 30 March. Photo 74 shows him being briefed by senior scientist Roland Buresh on the sustainability of intensive rice cropping.

S. Karki

D. Raitzer

75

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

25 of 29

IRRI M Ilestones 2009
doctoral fellow, CESD; David Raitzer, scientist, impact assessment and strategic planning specialist, SSD; Yuko Nakano postdoctoral fellow under the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Project on stress-tolerant rice, SSD; Fiona Ruth Hay, scientist, GRC; William Paul Quick, principal scientist, CESD; Guoyou Ye, senior scientist, CRIL; Ramil Mauleon, postdoctoral fellow, CRIL; M.S. Ramesha, scientist-rice breeder, PBGB; Mark Boru Douthwaite, guest scientist, innovation and impact director for the Challenge Program on Water and Food (CPWF); Junghyun Shim, postdoctoral fellow, PBGB; Deepinder Grewal, scientist, rice breeder; PBGB; Jolly Chatterjee, postdoctoral fellow (Applied Photosynthesis and Systems Modeling in C4 Rice), CESD; Wei Zhou, postdoctoral fellow, PBGB; Andrew Cal, postdoctoral fellows, CESD; S.M.A. Jabbar, visiting research fellow, CESD; Amit Mishra, scientist, Soil and Plant Analysis at IRRI India Office under the RWC; Krishna Prasad Devkota, extension agronomist at Central Nepal Hub under the CSISA; Deeksha Krishna, scientist, soil and plant analysis, IRRI India Office under RWC; B.P. Mallikarjuna Swamy, postdoctoral fellow, PBGB under BMGF project on stress-tolerant rice; Andrew Nelson. scientist, GIS specialist; Huaiyu Wang, postdoctoral fellow, SSD; Srinivasachary and Changrong Ye, postdoctoral fellows, PBGB; Valerien O. Pede, scientist, economist, SSD; and Chengzhi Liang, scientist, crop information systems specialist, BMGF/ICIS. Three members of the Board whose terms concluded in 2009 were honored during a reception on 29 September: Ruth Oniang’o of Kenya, vice chair of the Nominating Committee; Ronald Phillips of the United States, vice chair of the Board and chair of the Program Committee; and Baowen Zhang of China. Departing international staff in 2009 were Somayanda Impa, postdoctoral fellow, CESD; Ramaiah Venuprasad, postdoctoral fellow, PBGB; Adam Barclay, international research fellow, science writer/editor, CPS; Matthieu Conte, postdoctoral fellow, CRIL; Yann Chemin, postdoctoral fellow, SSD; Jill Cairns, international research fellow, CESD; Robert Hijmans, senior scientist (GIS specialist), SSD; Hari Bhagat Gurung,

Y. Nakano

F. Hay

S.M.A. Jabbar

A. Mishra

B. Zhang

S. Impa

No photo available

W.P. Quick

G. Ye

K.P. Devkota

D. Krishna

R. Venuprasad

A. Barclay

R. Mauleon

M.S. Ramesha

B.P.M. Swamy

A. Nelson

M. Conte

Y. Chemin

M.B. Douthwaite J. Shim

H. Wang

C. Ye

J. Cairns

R. Hijmans

D. Grewal

J. Chatterjee

V. Pede

C. Liang

H.B. Gurung

J. van Etten

W. Zhou

A. Cal

R. Oniang’o

R. Philips

T. Jacobsen

D.J. Kang

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

26 of 29

IRRI M Ilestones 2009
international research fellow, SSD; Jacob van Etten, postdoctoral fellow, SSD; Terry Jacobsen, head of Facilities Management Unit, DDG-OSS; Dong-Jin Kang, postdoctoral fellow, CESD; Jong-Cheol Ko, visiting research fellow, PBGB; With the imminent departure of DPPC Mike Jackson, IRRI management did some reorganization effective 31 December. The Office of External Relations (OER) now incorporates public relations and nonhost-country external relations, including relations with traditional donors (former PPC), the Development Office, and national programs relations (old IPMO), and will coordinate the Director General’s Office with these external dimensions. Four subunits will compose this new office: (1) Public Relations (PR), (2) Donor Relations and Projects Coordination (DRPC), (3) National Programs Relations (NPR), and (4) Development Office (DO) for nontraditional fund raising. These units will work as a team to increase the visibility, relationships, and impact of IRRI before its traditional donors, nontraditional donors, and the public at large. The heads of these subunits will retain full responsibility for their functional areas. Given the nature of their work, often they will each be working directly and closely with the director general and other members of the senior management team and their staff. They will report to the head of the OER for coordinating workflow, budgeting, and human resource management. The following staff are providing leadership within the OER: Corinta Guerta—head of OER and donor relations and projects coordinator, Sophie Clayton—public relations manager, Julian Lapitan— national programs relations manager, and Duncan Technology Section Oberly Award for Bibliography in the Agricultural or Natural Sciences during the Annual Conference of the American Library Association (ALA) in Chicago, 9-15 July. The Oberly Award is given every two years to “the best English-language bibliography in the field of agriculture or a related science.” The ACRL is the largest division of the ALA, the oldest and largest library association in the world. IRRI’s entertainment education radio soap opera project won second place (US$5,000) in the 2008 Global Medal Development Awards, themed Societies and Natural Resource Management, during the 10th Annual Conference on Natural Resources and Development held in Kuwait City, 3-5 February. The event was sponsored by the Arab Fund for Economic and Social Development Arab and the Global Development Network. IRRI’s Vietnamese collaborator, Mr. Le Van Thiet, represented the team and presented the paper in the competition. The UPLB College of Agriculture (CA) recognized IRRI “for its continuous and unwavering support to the programs of the College, which contributed to the agricultural advancement in the country and UPLB-CA’s recognition as center of excellence in agricultural education.” CERS Manager Charina Ocampo (right in photo 76) received the certificate, 76 on behalf of the Institute, from CA

C. Guerta

S. Clayton

J. Lapitan

D. Macintosh

Macintosh—development director. More on the reorganization | New IRRI organogram

IRRI and staff recognition in 2009
2009 was another outstanding year of international recognition for research during which IRRI and many IRRI staff members were recognized for their recent achievements. Below is an accounting of some of them. Click here for a complete listing. On 26 January, during the opening ceremony of Sri Lanka’s new Rice Technology Training Centre at the Rice Research and Development Institute (RRDI) at Bathalagoda, Sri Lankan Agriculture Minister Hemakumara Nanayakkara presented an award to IRRI, which was accepted by DDG-R Achim Dobermann, for the cooperation it has extended in the country’s rice breeding efforts. J.K. Ladha, senior scientist, coordinator of the RWC, and IRRI representative for India (photo left); and S.K. De Datta, former IRRI agronomist and principal scientist (1964-91) were elected as fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) on 14 February in Chicago for their contributions to science and technology. IRRI’s Rice Database, or Rice Bibliography, maintained by the IRRI Library, was recognized as the 2009 recipient of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Science and

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

27 of 29

IRRI M Ilestones 2009
Dean Domingo Angeles during UPLB-CA’s Centennial foundation celebration on 6 March. DDG-OSS William G. Padolina (photo 77) received the 2009 Communication Excellence in Organization (CEO) Award from the International Association of Business Communicators (IABC) on 30 March at Petron MegaPlaza in Makati City. The CEO Excel Award, the local version of the world IABC Excel Award, 77 is given to senior executives who have successfully used communication in advancing the reputation, enhancing the profitability, or achieving major stakeholder objectives of their organizations. Dr. Padolina received the award in the academic, research, and training category. The award raises public awareness on the importance of communication in business and organizational management, recognize top-level executives or managers who have shown extraordinary skills as communicators, and present their accomplishments as models of best practices in organizational communication. IRRI recognized the following NRS as 2008 IRRI awardees: Anita “Annie” Boling (CESD) and Alvaro “Varoy” Pamplona (PBGB) for Outstanding Scientific Achievement, Anicio Macahia (CESD) for Outstanding Research Support, and the Program Planning and Coordination Team for Outstanding Administrative Support. The awarding ceremony was held on 17 April, right after the BOT chair’s report to IRRI staff (photo 78). IRRI’s 2007 Annual Report on DVD won a Gold Award (1st place) in the Electronic Publications Class of the Publishing Category in the 2009 Critique and Awards Program of the Association for Communication Excellence (ACE) in Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Life and Human Sciences. In addition to the Gold Award, the groundbreaking publication also picked up the Outstanding Professional Skill (OPS) Award, i.e., the Best of the Best across 10 classes in the Publishing Category, Sharing the award were DPPC and CPS production team members Michael Jackson, Emmanuel Panisales, Ariel Javellana, Gene Hettel, Joe Ibabao, Adam Barclay, Tess Rola, Jerby Auihon, Juan Lazaro IV, Bill Hardy, Raymond Panaligan, Gigi Caballero, and Cynthia Quintos. The award was presented at the ACE-NETC 2009 International Conference in Des Moines, Iowa, during the awards banquet on 7 June. Congratulations to the following during the 20th Scientific Conference of the Federation of Crop Science Societies of the Philippines (FCSSP) held at Silliman University, Dumaguete City, 18-22 May: Casiana M. Vera Cruz and Romeo V. Labios, 2009 CSSP Honorary Fellow Award; Georgina Vergara, Romeo Labios, Alvaro Pamplona, Nenita Desamero, Kuang Duangsila, Aris Hairmansis, Manuel Esquerra, Marlon Malabrigo, Abdelbagi Ismail, and David J. Mackill for Performance of submergence-tolerant rice [Sub1 lines] in adaptability trials in Indonesia, Laos and the Philippines, Best Paper Award, downstream category (poster version); Venus Elec, Jessica Rey, Zang JinPing, Yong Sun, JianLong Xu, and Zhikang Li for Dissection of genetic overlap of salt tolerance QTLs at the seedling and tillering stages using backcross introgression lines in rice, first place, Best Poster Award; and Darlene Sanchez, Nurul Hidayatun, Pamella Marie Seldon, Sagar Chawla, Alvaro Pamplona, Endang Septiningsih, and David Mackill for Single-backcross approach to transfer submergence tolerance from IR64-Sub1 to related rice varieties, second place, Best Poster Award. IRRI DG Robert Zeigler was chosen for the 2009 E.C. Stakman Award, which he received in person in late May at the Twin Cities Campus of the University of Minnesota (UM). The award was created in 1955 by Dr. E.C. Stakman to recognize individuals for outstanding achievements in and contributions to plant pathology in the areas of research, teaching, outreach, international development, or any combination of these. The award is administered by the UM Department of Plant Pathology. Past award winners include Norman Borlaug, George Harrar, E.J. Wellhausen, Sanjaya Rajaram, and Sir Bent Skovmand. Dr. Zeigler also was recognized as a Fellow of the American Phytopathological Society (APS) in 2009. Gurdev S. Khush, former principal plant breeder and head of PBGB at IRRI, was appointed as an eminent professor at the Graduate School of Biotechnology of Kyung-Hee University in Suwon, South Korea, from December 2008 through September 2013. Dr. Khush, who started his first year at Kyung Hee University on 22 June, is conducting academic and research activities there for 2 months each year.

78

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

28 of 29

IRRI M Ilestones 2009
On 28 September, the Academy of Science, Malaysia (ASM) honored Drs. Khush and K.L. Heong, senior scientist, CESD (photo 79 79). Dr. Khush received the 2008 Mahathir Science Award, Malaysia’s most prestigious Science Award for the tropical sciences. The RM 100,000, gold medal, and certificate were given to Dr. Khush in recognition of his perseverance, leadership, commitment, and revolutionary work in systematically pioneering and developing rice varieties that have overwhelmingly contributed toward the alleviation of world hunger. Dr. Heong was conferred the title Fellow of the Academy of Science for his contribution to rice insect ecology, the development of innovative approaches in rice IPM, and educating farmers through media. He was one of two elected fellows in the biological, agricultural, and environmental sciences category in 2009. Monina Escalada (photo 80) received the Distinguished Alumna in Research and Devel- 80 opment award from the College of Development Communication Alumni Association of the University of the Philippines (UPLB) during its 91st Loyalty Day celebrations on 9 October. Dr. Escalada was an international research fellow at IRRI in 2002-06 and has been a research collaborator of IRRI for the past 20 years. Also, on the same day, Florencia Palis, agricultural anthropologist at SSD, received the 2009 Distinguished Alumna in Extension Award from the UPLB College of Arts and Sciences. Darshan Brar, head of PBGB Division in IRRI, was honored with the Yunnan Friendship Award by the Yunnan Government, Republic of China. The award carried a medal, citation (honorary certificate), 81 and 10,000 RMB, and was handed to Dr. Brar by Ms. Jiang Li, vice-governor of Yunnan People’s Government (photo 81) at the Yunnan Friendship Award Ceremony for Foreign Experts held on 4 November at Lake Hotel in Kunming. The award recognizes the contribution of foreign experts in the development of Yunnan Province. Dr. Brar has been working for more than 10 years with scientists of the Yunnan Academy of Agricultural Sciences on rice improvement through wide hybridization. Dr. J.K. Ladha, senior soil scientist, coordinator of the RWC in Asia, and representative of IRRI in India, received the IPNI Science Award 2009 from Mr. M.K. Alagiri, union 82 minister for chemicals and fertilizers, Government of India, during the annual seminar of the Fertilizer Association of India on 3 December in Hyderabad, India (photo 82). “Dr. Ladha is a truly outstanding scientist and most deserving of this recognition due to the scope and breadth of his research, training, and extension activities,” said Dr. Terry L. Roberts, president of IPNI. Florencia Palis, scientist and agricultural anthropologist at SSD, won the Best Poster Award during the International Meeting on Health and Environment: Challenges for the Future held at the National Institute of Health in Rome, Italy, on 9-11 December.

Passing on
Former IRRI Board of Trustees member (2001-2003) Mike Gale passed away on 18 July. He was attending a music festival with his wife, Sue, when he suddenly collapsed and died. Dr. Gale was a John Innes Foundation Emeritus Fellow, a Professorial Fellow in the School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, and a Member of the CGIAR Science Council. Remedios C. Corral, former matron of FHS, passed away on 3 March at age 74. Ms. Corral served IRRI for more than 29 years, retiring in November 1999 and extending to May 2000 as a consultant in FHS. She is survived by her husband, Tito, their son Louie (another son, Francis, died two years ago), and 6 grandchildren. IRRI was sad to report that Yothin Konboon, soil scientist at the Ubon Ratchathani Rice Research Center (URRC), passed away of unknown causes early on 27 August in his room at IRRI while attending the inception workshop for the CURE IFAD project, 26-27 August. Dr. Yothin was a long-standing CURE collaborator from the URRC in northeastern Thailand, working mainly on various aspects of resource management with a focus on nutrient management. He is survived by his wife, Sirikul Konboon, and two sons, nicknamed Boom and Nut. Digna I. Salisi, 47, Secretary III in TTC-GRC, passed away 10 December, after battling cancer. Digna worked at IRRI for 18 years (1991-2009).

AnnuAl RepoRt 2009

29 of 29

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful