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A Project Proposal for Financial Assistance under the NFSM-PULSES

ON

Enhancing grasspea production for safe human food, animal feed, and sustainable rice-based production systems in India
Submitted to

National Food Security Mission Department of Agriculture and Cooperation (Crop Division) Ministry of Agriculture, govt. of India

By International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA), Syria In collaboration with Indian Grassland and Fodder Research Institute, Jhansi Indian Institute of Pulses Research, Kanpur Indira Gandhi Krishi Vishwa Vidyalaya, Raipur, Chhattisgarh October 2010

Enhancing grasspea production for safe human food, animal feed, and sustainable rice-based production systems in India
Submitted to: National Food Security Mission Department of Agriculture and Cooperation (Crop Division) Ministry of Agriculture, Government of India Name of the Proposer Dr. Mahmoud B. Solh Director General ICARDA, PO Box 5466, Aleppo, Syria, Phone: 963-21-2213433 Fax: 963-21-2213490; Email: M.Solh@cgiar.org Project Coordinator (ICARDA) Dr. Ashutosh Sarker Coordinator & Food Legume Breeder ICARDA South Asia and China Program NASC Complex, CGIAR Block, New Delhi 110012, India Tel: 91-11-25847500; Fax: 91-11-25847503; E mail: A.Sarker@cgiar.org Project Coordinator (India) Vice-Chancellor Indira Gandhi Krishi Vishwa Vidyalaya (IGKVV), Krishak Nagar, Raipur- 492006, Chhattisgarh Tel.:0771-2443419; Fax: 0771-2442302,2443121 Executing Agency ICARDA South Asia Program NASC Complex, CGIAR Complex New Delhi 110012, India Tel: 91-11-25847500; Fax: 91-11-25847503 E mail: A.Sarker@cgiar.org Collaborators: ICARDA South Asia Program, New Delhi Indian Grassland and Fodder Research Institute (IGFRI), Jhansi, UP Indian Institute of Pulses Research (IIPR), Kanpur, UP Indira Gandhi Krishi Vishwa Vidyalaya (IGKVV), Raipur, Chhattisgarh Society for Promotion of Agricultural Research and Knowledge, Patna, Bihar Uttar Banga Krishi Vishvidyalaya, Coach Bihar, West Bengal Project Duration: 3 years Budget : Rs 534.59lakh Project Start: October2010 Project Completion: Septembert 2013

1. Title

Enhancing grasspea production for safe human food, animal feed, and sustainable rice-based production systems in India 2. Name and designation of Proposer
Dr. Mahmoud B. Solh Director General ICARDA, PO Box 5466, Aleppo, Syria, Phone: 963-21-2213433 Fax: 963-21-2213490; Email: M.Solh@cgiar.org 3. Background Grasspea (Lathyrus sativus L.) also called Khesari/TeoraLakh/Lakhadi is a popular pulse crop in India, Bangladesh, China, Nepal and Pakistan. It is also grown in many countries of Europe, the Middle East, Northern Africa, Chile and Brazil mainly for animal feed and to a lesser extent as human food. Because of its easy and low-cost cultivation, and its resistance to drought, flood, salinity, diseases and insect pest attack, farmers are attracted to grow this crop despite of official discouragement. When other crops fail due to adverse conditions, grasspea can be the only available food source for the poorest section, and sometimes is a survival food in times of drought- induced famine. It is predominantly grown as a relay crop, popularly known as utera, in rice field, which is a well established popular rice-based cropping systems and farmers do not have a better alternative under such a harsh rainfed conditions. Grasspea is also grown as mixed and intercrop with other rabi crops, thus minimizes risk of total crop failure. It is a rich source of protein (up to 34%) and contains essential micronutrients, thus provides nutritional security to its consumers, who are mostly poor section of the society. Grasspea is mainly eaten as dal and used as besan in multitude of culinary purposes and also as adulterant with chickpea besan for various food preparations and with pigeonpea dal. It is commonly believed that the recipes become tastier with the blending of chickpea and khesari flour. It is also preferred for its good fodder and straw quality. Farmers feed their animals on paddy straw and grasspea straw, which being rich in nutritive value, serves as a good supplement to nutritionally poor paddy straw, since under rainfed situation growing of other quality fodder is not feasible. Grasspea being a leguminous crop fixes atmospheric nitrogen, improves soil carbon and organic matter, thus collectively improves soil health and provides sustainable production systems. In India, grasspea is grown in about 800,000 ha and is mainly cultivated in Chattishgarh, Madhya Pradesh, Bihar, Jharkhand, Maharashtra, Orissa, Assam, West Bengal and eastern Uttar Pradesh. However, being a minor crop its exact production statistics does not appear at national level. Chattishgarh (Raipur, Durg, Ranjandgaon, Kabirdham, Bilaspur, Dhamtari,Raigarh, Mahasamund, Champa-janjgir and Jaspur) and its adjoining areas of Vidarbha region of aamaharashtra and Madhya Pradesh and West Bengal are the major areas in India where its intensive cultivation and consumption is still continued. Its major cultivation is under Utera system where the seeds of grass pea are broadcasted on the standing water in the rice field about 10-15 days before the rice is ready for harvest.

The crop can be grown on a range of soil types and conditions of soil which can hardly sustain any other crop. Productivity of the crop under such harsh conditions where except seed no other inputs are being given is <400 kg/ha. This shows its production potential. Experimental findings have proven its yielding potential up to 30q/ha under recommended agronomy. Despite all these merits, grasspea has an ambivalent reputation. Its seed contains a toxin, Beta-ODAP ( -N-oxalyl L- -diaminopropionic acid), which causes neuro-lathyrism a nutritional curse if consumed excessive for a longer period of 4 to 5 months continuously. During 1960s, some cases of Neuro lathyrism disease were reported from various parts of India where it was consumed as staple food for survival but not as pulse. Neuro lathyrism may develop only on its excessive consumption (2/3 rd of daily diet) for a longer period of 4-5 months. In view point of this ban on sale of its produce is imposed by certain states but not on its cultivation in India. During the past decades, with the availability of wheat and rice, the food habits of the people have undergone considerable change. Moreover, the prices of grass pea which used to be low earlier are now more than cereals, and thus grass pea is no more staple food. Its intake is too low to cause lathyrism. Experimental evidence indicates that ODAP being water soluble and heat labial free amino acid, its large proportion is lost during traditional method of dal making, and cheaper methods of detoxification of grass pea seeds are also available. As indicated earlier, grasspea is largely being adulterant with other pulses; therefore cultivation of low-ODAP/ODAP-free cultivars is highly desirable. In this endeavor, lowtoxin (<0.1%) grasspea varieties with higher yield having desirable attributes like disease and pest resistance along with matching production technologies have been developed by various Indian institutions. Dissemination of these technologies are urgently needed to ensure the supply of cheaper source of protein, valuable fodder/forage and better returns to farmers in a less favorable environments in India. The International center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) has the world mandate for grasspea improvement, and holds >3000 accessions of grasspea germplasm from about 45 countries. Through their utilization on genetic detoxification, the Center has developed low-ODAP lines (<0.1%) along with high biomass for grain and fodder, which will be made available under the project activities. Additionally, useful primitive germplasm from ICARDA gene bank will be imported to India for future use. . As indicated earlier, grasspea is largely being adulterant with other pulses; therefore cultivation of low-ODAP/ODAP-free cultivars is highly desirable. In this endeavor, lowtoxin (<0.1%) grasspea varieties with higher yield having desirable attributes like disease and pest resistance along with matching production technologies have been developed by various Indian institutions and ICARDA: Variety Toxin level P24 0.2% (duel) Ratan 0.06% Moti 0.03%

Prateek Mahateora Bio L212 Nirmal

0.08% 0.07% 0.01 0.15% (duel)

Dissemination of high yielding low-toxin varieties with toxin level <0.1% with relevant technologies are urgently needed to ensure the supply of cheaper source of protein, valuable fodder/forage and better returns to farmers in a less favorable environments in India. This would ensure high production and low amount of ODAP intake by consumers, thus, reducing health hazards, if any. The International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) has the world mandate for grasspea improvement, and holds >3000 accessions of grasspea germplasm from about 45 countries. Through their utilization on genetic detoxification, the Center has developed low-ODAP lines (<0.1%) along with high biomass for grain and fodder, which will be made available under the project activities. 4. Goal The overall goal of the project is to deliver nutritionally enhanced high yielding grasspea varieties for safe consumption and higher income by farmers; higher fodder and forage production for animal feed; and provide sustainable rice-based production systems under rainfed conditions. Thus, ultimately boosting national pulse production by encouraging under utilize crop like Khesari. 5. Objectives i. Enhancing fodder and straw yields through introduction of high- biomass and low toxin grass pea varieties to support nutritional feed & fodder where only paddy straw is available as cattle feed. Replacement of indigenous high toxin grass pea varieties available with farmers with low toxin & high biomass varieties through farmers participatory approach. Identification of new grass pea varieties through adaptive research, multilocational testing by farmers participatory selection. Developing strong seed production and distribution system of quality dual purpose seeds of farmers-preferred varieties along with matching production technologies. Capacity building of farmers , extension personnel etc. for farmer-participatory adaptive research and technology transfer for adoption and expansion of improved production technologies, quality seed production through training, visits, workshops, seminars et. Back-up research (farmers participatory) for further identification of grass pea varieties and refinement of production technologies.

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6. Target Areas:

No replacement of any other pulses, cereal or any other remunerative crop To be taken up in the area where no resources are available to grow any other crop Only in the existing areas where cultivation is continuing it to be targeted Rice-fallow(where any other crop may not be grown) Mainly culturable waste viz. 27804.65 ha to be targeted in target area
Target States Chhattisgarh (Raipur, Durg/ Bilaspur) Uttar Pradesh (Budelkhand: Jhansi; Lalitpur/hamirpur) Mirzapur, Chandauli Bihar (Patna; Nalanda) West Bengal (Cooch Behar/ Nadia)

Components to be promoted
Replacement of high-ODAP grasspea varieties with low-ODAP grasspea varieties for safe consumption of food Introduction of high biomass varieties of grasspea for fodder/feed to cattle Development of dual purpose (safe food and fodder/feed) low-ODAP grasspea varieties through farmers participation Farmers participatory low-ODAP dual purpose seed production scheme Capacity building

7. National and International Endeavour:


The centre of origin and distribution of Lathyrus species gene pool is mainly in the Mediterranean region, while it is predominant in Asia and Africa. Out of 150 species in the world, four species, viz., Lathyrus sativus, lathyrus odoratus, Lathyrus ochyrous and Lathyrus aphaca are found in India. Lathyrus sativus is cultivated for grain and fodder, while others grow in nature as weeds. During seventies, a lot of work was initiated in India. IARI,New Delhi; IGKVV,Raipur; IIPR, Kanpur, were the major centre related to development of low-toxin and high yielding varieties. Even the Coordinated Project started during that period on grasspea (Lathyrus). Through molecular breeding, several line were developed at IARI, New Delhi resulting into development of several lowODAP and high yielding cultivars. But unfortunately, after nineties, this crop lost the sight and hardly any work is continuing anywhere in the country except at IGKVV, Raipur where some varietal improvement work is going on as a routine and majority of material developed earlier could not be exploited. Presently no University, any Govt., institution/ NATP, NAIP or even DAC programme on NFSM or RKVY is working on this crop which has tremendous potential in future because of the global warming. It is important to mention that the unique qualities of grasspea as resistance to biotic and

abiotic stress, high nitrogen fixation and adaptable to high and low elevation and poor or contaminated soil (considered for phytoremediation) should be better exploited by breeding to arm against climatic changes and pollution. At international level, the crop is still getting importance and one of the CGIAR institution, the International center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) has the world mandate for grasspea improvement, and holds >3000 accessions of grasspea germplasm from about 45 countries. Through their utilization on genetic detoxification, the Center has developed low-ODAP lines (<0.1%) along with high biomass for grain and fodder. Several quality cultivars (low-toxin and high yield) have been developed at Ethiopia, Bangladesh and Syria by ICARDA and NARS of these countries and introduction of these materials will be done in India. In a recent International Conference held in Belgium, promotion of grasspea has been strongly recommended.

8. Justification
Grasspea is an old member of sustainable crop production systems of central and eastern India, where no other crops can be grown. It is a staple pulse crop for the poor consumers, and its green fodder and straw is a valued animal feed. Although the crop is important in India due to its contribution to food, feed and farming systems, grasspea received less attention for its research and development. Majority of population in these parts of India are vegetarians and their major source of energy is plant protein for which grasspea is an important source. Grasspea fodder also brings cash and it has been reported that farmers can earn Rs.30,000/ha in 3-months time by selling green fodder used mainly to feed milking cows. Characterized by water scarcity, the dry areas are also challenged by rapid population growth, frequent droughts, high climatic variability, land degradation and widespread poverty, and in this context, grasspea is an important component in production systems. A farmer-participatory approach will be adopted to ensure involvement of farmers, extension agents, researchers, policy makers, NGOs, and other concerned partners at various levels of planning, programming and implementing of the activities. Low-ODAP varieties like Prateek, Ratan, Mahatewara developed by various Indian research institutions will be included in the project activities. It has been noticed that none of these varieties and improved production technologies for grain yield and fodder production have been adopted by farmers in a large scale. Additionally, promising varieties/lines from ICARDA will be tested in Indian conditions to select pheonologically adapted materials for eventual release in India. This will ensure replacement of local and traditional varieties with high ODAP, which are being consumed in various ways. It is experienced by Indian researchers that differentiation of improved varieties from local cultivars is difficult therefore; an improved variety MAHATEORA with morphological marker has been developed and notified for general cultivation in India. As stated earlier, the productivity of grasspea is quite low. This is mainly associated with cultivation of low yielding local varieties, lack of quality seeds, inadequate plant stand in farmers fields, lack of integrated crop management, etc. Generally the crop is grown by

marginal and sub-marginal farmers who are unable to provide any input. Therefore, widespread cultivation and adoption of high yielding low-ODAP improved varieties and crop management technologies will ensure reduction of health hazards and increased grain and fodder yields which will lead to more income to farmers. In addition, genetic detoxification and high biomass production will also be given due emphasis for animal feed. The removal of ODAP compound of grasspea grains can also be done by boiling, roasting or by soaking overnight and draining out the supernatant. These techniques will be made available to consumers through mass media and by hands-on training of housewives. It is essential to produce the quality seeds of these improved varieties at village level by farmers themselves (seed village concept) avoiding the transportation cost and storage losses. Therefore, the project aims quality seed production, train farmers, farmers associations/ groups in this regard. 9. Strategy and Approach To exploit the potential of rainfed rice-fallows and to achieve the desired goal, a holistic approach involving farmers, local and international institutions is warranted. The project proposal seeks to capitalize on the already existing improved technologies of grasspea for rice fallows, a vast niche for horizontal expansion of grasspea cultivation and employing integrated approach to increase and sustain its production in the country. This will not only add to increased pulses production in the country, but also improve long-term soil productivity, minimize soil nutrient depletion, increase incomes of large number of subsistence farmers and also contribute to safe food and nutritional security to the people in the rainfed areas which are well endowed with good soils and rainfall and capable of growing rice during rainy season and grasspea in the Rabi season on the residual soil moisture. This endeavor will help to harvest an extra crop of grasspea in these states. The project would be farmers centered with their active involvement in selection of varieties and technologies, and their demonstrations. The project will empower farmers in taking decision on selection of appropriate technologies and self sufficient in seed production of improved varieties. The researchers will provide viable technological options to farmers and helping them to make their appropriate choices. Wherever necessary, technical backstopping and on-station and on-farm research will be taken up by the participating institutions on the basis of feedback from the farming community. The research and development process would aim to integrate locally adapted improved cultivars of low-ODAP grasspea, improved crop production technologies, and integrated crop management practices including CA which would be farmer friendly and compatible with local growing and socio-economic conditions. The Project would give equal weight to strengthening partners capacities on one hand and to the availability of better-adapted cultivars and improved production technologies on the other. The project will employ a farmer participatory research and development approach through empowerment of the farmers, where three pronged strategy would be followed to enhance the productivity of low-ODAP grasspea suitable for fodder and safe feed and improving rural livelihoods.

The 3-pronged strategy

Main elements of the strategy and approach will be as follows: On the basis of the available information and secondary data, potential districts in each state would be selected as pilot districts for technology interventions during post-rainy season. A participatory rural appraisal (PRA) will be conducted through local institutions, NGOs, SHG/farmers associations/groups to identify constraints and opportunities to establish low-ODAP grasspea cultivation in each of the pilot districts and 5 villages in each of the districts as pilot sites. In each village, 15-20 farmers will form a cluster to involve in establishing demonstrations, farmers field schools for testing and transfer of technologies. At each cluster site, specific components such as improved varieties of lentil and ICM (Integrated Crop Management) will be provided to farmers to demonstrate profitable lentil production. To establish low-ODAP grasspea on time in the rice fallows without loosing the soil moisture, custom-hire of tractors and specifically made low-cost local made seed drills suitable for rice fallows (Pantnagar/IGAU model-Zero Tillage) will be introduced during the post- rainy season. This will enhance the establishment of grasspea and generate employment at village level. Monitoring of project trials in each village will be organized with farmers participation to share the results of the pilot farmers with non-participating farmers,

farmers from the non-pilot villages and districts through farmers visits, field days and Kisan Mela in the project operational area. The pilot farmers will also be organized and trained as seed producers and organized into village-based seed enterprises [1 in each district/village] to ensure production and marketing of quality low-ODAP and high biomass seed in the pilot villages and for further expansion of grasspea production. Pilot farmers will be trained as lead trainers to train farmers from surrounding villages as well as from other districts to enable them to serve as effective trainers Farmers-friendly-fliers, posters, booklets will be prepared and distributed to pilot and non-pilot farmers. Production technologies, such as seed priming and seed treatment, application of compatible Rhizobium, foliar spray of urea, components of relay cropping along with appropriate varieties of lentil will be introduced to enhance soil physical properties and soil health in order to have long-term gains in lentil production. Farmers from all districts in each of the rice fallow states will be exposed to the dual purpose low-ODAP grasspea pilot villages by organizing farmers visits for dissemination of results from farmers to farmers so that all the districts will be covered during third year of the project. Conducting on-farm trials in these districts, establishments of village seed enterprises, lead farmers as trainers, availability of training material and most importantly empowerment of extension, local organization staff and establishment of linkages to ensure further expansion of lentil areas in these states of India. Each household would be demonstrated how the consumption of grasspea may be safe to humanbeings and animals.

Providing advice in policy reforms in these states to further increase low-ODAP grasspea production and increasing farmers incomes, improving household pulse consumption and nutritional security, and protection of the environment 10.Components and Activities to Develop low- ODAP seed systems Availability of quality seeds in pulse crops is minimal. To date the contribution of formal sector (public/private) in pulses is very low and estimated at only 5% of potential seed requirement. Farmers generally keep their own seed or purchase from local market before planting, which are of poor qualityand having high-ODAP, thus making it unsuitable for consumption as food.. An informal seed system operates through farmer-to-farmer distribution with a fragile and weak mechanism. One of the key activities of the project would be to strengthen both formal and informal (village-based) seed systems with enhanced capacity and knowledge of the farmers to promote a sustainable low-ODAP and high biomass grasspea production in rainfed areas. This would also add to coping mechanism for adverse effects of climate change. 11. Project Operation and Methodology A Work-shop involving all stakeholders (State Universities, National Seed Corporation, National Crop Coordinator, NGOs, local governments, ICAR and

ICARDA) will be organized to develop work-plans for the entire period of the project. Annual review and planning meeting and impact study will be conducted at the end of project period. Demonstration of 3-5 improved low-ODAP and high biomass (for fodder) varieties (as appropriate in various production environments) along with matching production technologies will be taken up in farmers fields in five villages of the each selected district under the project in the first year. The Village-based seed system matching with the socio-economic profiles of the farmers in the project area will be demonstrated and implemented for the farmers preferred low-ODAP and high biomass grasspea varieties in the second year. Farmers will be involved in variety selection and demonstration as well as seed production and marketing for rapid spread and adoption of the improved lowODAP and high biomass varieties and production technologies. The project will also provide opportunity for the farmers to get training on quality seed production and seed storage in the project areas including partner institutions. In the remaining period of the project, the model seed system will be strengthened and up-scaled not only in the project area but also out-scaled (replicated) in the adjoining villages for faster spread of the improved low-ODAP and high biomass varieties for safe consumption. A revolving fund will be creating for strengthening the model seed system in the project area. The project will have good liaison with informal and formal seed sectors involving national and state seed corporation and local self-help groups and NGOs. 12. Project Monitoring, evaluation and Management A eleven member Steering Committee headed by Agriculture Commissioner, DAC will monitor the implementation and evaluate the progress of project. The committee may visit the project implementation sites for Half yearly evaluation and monitoring of various components of project implementation Farmers feedback on technology adoption and quality seed availability Mid-term evaluation and if required modification in programme for implementation Recommendation for policy interventions and strategy for expansion of program

Steering Committee 1. Agriculture Commissioner, DAC 2. Joint Secretary (Crops), DAC 3. Director (Crops) DAC 4. Director (wheat)/(Pulses),DAC(as the case may be) 5. ADG(OP), ICAR 6. Director, IIPR, Kanpur 7. Director, IGFRI, Jhansi 8. Director (Research), IGKVV, Raipur 9. Regional Coordinator, ICARDA, SACRP, New Delhi 10. Director, BIGM, ICARDA, Syria 11. Project Coordinator, MULLaRP, IIPR, Kanpur Chairman Co-Chairman Member Member Member member Member Member Member Member Member Secretary

Schedule for Steering Committee Meeting :


October February/March 2010 2011 Evaluation, Planning and Technical Programme Review Field Monitoring, Farmers feedback, Recommendation for Intervention Evaluation, Planning and Technical Programme Review Field Monitoring, Farmers feedback, Recommendation for Intervention Evaluation, Planning and Technical Programme Review Field Monitoring, Farmers feedback, Recommendation for Intervention

September February/March September February/March

2011 2012 2012 2013

13. Activities Milestone The year wise activities of technological interventions are given below: 1st Year i. Project launching workshop for partners and stakeholders (State Universities, National Seed Corporation, National Crop Coordinator, NGOs, local governments, ICARDA) to develop work-plans for the entire period of the project. Bench mark survey through PRA and selection of 10-15 farmers/farmers group in intensive grasspea-growing areas in the selected districts/villages of states involved in the project. Supply of inputs and verification and demonstration of low-ODAP varieties (Nirmal, Prateek, Ratan, P-24, Mahateora) and improved technology (seed rate, time of planting, priming and weeding schedules etc.) will be conducted in farmers fields. This will lead to select farmer-preferred varieties, which will enable faster technology dissemination, adoption and farmer-to-farmer seed diffusion.

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IGFRI, Janshi will evaluate grasspea lines for high biomass and quality for fodder and feed and value addition. To develop new varieties, a farmer-participatory varietal selection approach (PVS) will be followed. All available low-toxin lines will be planted in farmers fields at several sites in each state. Individual farmers, groups of farmers, extensionists, NGO staff and the breeders will participate in selection of promising lines for eventual release. ODAP analysis will be carried out at IGKVV and at ICARDA before release of a variety. ICARDA and IGKVV will develop and supply new low-ODAP lines with higher grain and fodder yields to test in various agro-ecologies of project areas. Women/house-wives will be specifically trained on removal of toxic compounds before consumption by various methods. This information will also be broadcasted by mass media, poster, leaflets, etc Traveling workshops, field days, training research, extension and NGO staff will be conducted as a part of human resources development. Besides, farmers will be empowered through post and pre-harvest trainings through Farmers field school, On farm farmers fair, Workshop, training Arranging visit of scientists & research/development managers to Syria and India (as the case may be) for field evaluation and selection of lines suitable to Indian conditions for incorporation in project areas and beyond Annual workshop

2nd Year i. ii. Selection of 2-3 other Villages in each selected districts with retention of 50% earlier selected farmers Bench mark survey through PRA and Selection of 10-15 farmers/farmers group in intensive grasspea-growing areas in the selected districts/villages of states involved in the project Supply of inputs and Verification and demonstration of low-ODAP varieties (Nirmal, Prateek, Ratan, P-24, Mahateora) and improved technology (seed rate, time of planting, priming and weeding schedules etc.) will be conducted in farmers fields. This will lead to select farmer-preferred varieties, which will enable faster technology dissemination, adoption and farmer-to-farmer seed diffusion. IGFRI, Janshi will evaluate grasspea lines for high biomass and quality for fodder and feed and value addition. ICARDA and IGKVV will develop and supply new low-ODAP lines with higher grain and fodder yields to test in various agro-ecologies of project areas, importing from Ethiopia, Bangladesh and Syria, if need be. Quality/certified seed production of improved varieties will primarily be carried out by public organizations. In addition to that, seed production will be carried out through contract farmers and NGOs, if necessary. To develop new varieties, a farmer-participatory varietal selection approach (PVS) will be followed. All available low-toxin lines will be planted in farmers fields at several sites in each state. Individual farmers, groups of farmers, extensionists, NGO staff and the breeders will participate in selection of promising lines for eventual release. ODAP analysis will be carried out at IGKVV and at ICARDA before release of a variety.

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Traveling workshops, field days, training research, extension and NGO staff will be conducted as a part of human resources development. Besides, farmers will be empowered through post and pre-harvest trainings through Farmers field school, On farm farmers fair, Workshop, training. ix. Women/house-wives will be specifically trained on removal of toxic compounds before consumption by various methods. This information will also be broadcasted by mass media, poster, leaflets, etc. x. Arranging visit of scientists & research/development managers to Syria and India (as the case may be) for field evaluation and selection of lines suitable to Indian conditions for incorporation in project areas and beyond xi. Annual workshop, publication of training materials and midterm evaluation xii. Seed production of selected varieties by farmers and creation of Village seed hub 3rd Year i. Selection of 2-3 other Villages in each selected districts with retention of 25% from 1st year, 50% from 2nd year selected farmers with interested in seed multiplication and farmers participatory research Bench mark survey through PRA and Selection of 10-15 farmers/farmers group in intensive grasspea-growing areas in the selected districts/villages of states involved in the project Supply of inputs and Verification and demonstration of low-ODAP varieties (Nirmal, Prateek, Ratan, P-24, Mahateora) and improved technology (seed rate, time of planting, priming and weeding schedules etc.) will be conducted in farmers fields. This will lead to select farmer-preferred varieties, which will enable faster technology dissemination, adoption and farmer-to-farmer seed diffusion. IGFRI, Janshi will evaluate grasspea lines for high biomass and quality for fodder and feed and value addition. ICARDA and IGKVV will develop and supply new low-ODAP lines with higher grain and fodder yields to test in various agro-ecologies of project areas, importing from Ethiopia, Bangladesh and Syria, if need be. To develop new varieties, a farmer-participatory varietal selection approach (PVS) will be followed. All available low-toxin lines will be planted in farmers fields at several sites in each state. Individual farmers, groups of farmers, extensionists, NGO staff and the breeders will participate in selection of promising lines for eventual release. ODAP analysis will be carried out at IGKVV and at ICARDA before release of a variety. Quality/certified seed production of improved varieties will primarily be carried out by public organizations. In addition to that, seed production will be carried out through contract farmers and NGOs, if necessary Traveling workshops, field days, training research, extension and NGO staff will be conducted as a part of human resources development. Besides, farmers will be empowered through post and pre-harvest trainings through Farmers field school, On farm farmers fair, Workshop, training Women/house-wives will be specifically trained on removal of toxic compounds before consumption by various methods. This information will also be broadcasted by mass media, poster, leaflets, etc

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Arranging visit of scientists & research/development managers to Syria and India (as the case may be) for field evaluation and selection of lines suitable to Indian conditions for incorporation in project areas and beyond Travelling seminars for farmers and govt. officials showing the outstanding lentils fields in different states and interacting with farmers. Adoption and impact studies will be conducted at the end of the project period. Annual workshop, publication of training materials and final evaluation of project Seed production of selected varieties by farmers and creation of Village seed hub Submission of final report and joint publications in referred journal, book chapters, Symposia/workshop proceedings, leaflets, extension message etc.

14. Project Partners and their Responsibilities ICARDA Overall coordination and project implementation. Project implementation in Bihar, Bengal, UP and Chhattisgarh, Introduction of ICARDA developed and supply of new lowODAP lines with higher grain and fodder yields to test in various agro-ecologies of project areas Introduction of jointly developed proved technology suited for rice fallow under Indian condition duly refined and tested in countries like Bangladesh. Involve in Farmer Participatory Varietal Selection. Technical backstopping, Publication, Procuring and supply of equipments, Monitoring and Reporting, Annual review meeting/Workshop. Demonstration of the technologies for grasspea fodder and feed production and storage. Pre and Post evaluation of Project for socio-economic Impact Assessment Analysis. Farmers Seed processing and training to women in removal of toxic compounds before consumption. Project implementation in Chhattisgarh, supply of IGKVV developed new low-ODAP lines with higher grain and fodder yields to test in various agro-ecologies of project areas, capacity building in quality seed production, breeder seed production of improved varieties and demonstration of crop management technologies, Farmer Participatory varietal selection. Capacity building ,Strengthening of the seed production chain involving Foundation and Certified seed and its marketing. Demonstration of the technologies for grasspea fodder and feed production and storage Technical backstopping. Evaluate grasspea lines for high biomass and quality for fodder and feed and value addition, demonstration in Bundelkhand areasthe technologies for grasspea fodder and feed development and storage, Farmers grasspea fodder Seed processing and training to women in removal of toxic compounds before consumption Evaluate grasspea lines for high biomass and low toxin (dual purpose), demonstration in Uttar Pradesh areas-the technologies for grasspea fodder and low toxin varieties, Farmers grasspea low

IGKVV, Raipur

IGFRI, Jhansi

IIPR, Kanpur

SPARK, Patna, Bihar

UBKVV, Cooch Behar, West Bengal

toxin and fodder Seed production and processing through farmers participatory research, capacity building and training to women in removal of toxic compounds before consumption Project implementation in Bihar, supply of IGKVV and ICARDA developed new low-ODAP lines with higher grain and fodder yields to test in various agro-ecologies of project areas, demonstration of crop management technologies, Farmer Participatory varietal selection. Demonstration of the technologies for grasspea fodder and feed production and storage, Capacity building, Technical backstopping and training to women in removal of toxic compounds before consumption Project implementation in bengal, supply of IGKVV and ICARDA developed new low-ODAP lines with higher grain and fodder yields to test in various agro-ecologies of project areas, demonstration of crop management technologies, Farmer Participatory varietal selection. Demonstration of the technologies for grasspea fodder and feed production and storage, Capacity building, Technical backstopping and training to women in removal of toxic compounds before consumption

15. Technical interventions of Partners

Partners Existing practices (Institutions)


ICARDA Coordination Cell
-

Technology Interventions
Overall coordination and project implementation. Introduction of lowtoxin high biomass developed material from Ethiopia, Bangladeh & Syria. Monitoring and Reporting, Annual review meeting/Workshop.

Local Cultivar with high ODAP Utera & rice fallow broadcasting No seed treatment or priming Nalanda Centre No weed/nutrient management Chandauli Centre Farmers use their own stored seed which Supply of low-ODAP material suited are not safe for grain consumption for rice fallow developed in India. Farmer Participatory Varietal Selection, Improved technology viz. seed priming/seed treatment& ICM. Seed and fodder production and processing IGFRI, Jhansi Local Cultivar with high ODAP Supply of low-ODAP material suited (UP) Utera & rice fallow broadcasting for rice fallow developed in India. Bundelkhand No seed treatment or priming Improved technology viz. seed (Jhansi, lalitpur/ No weed/nutrient management priming/seed treatment& ICM. Hamirpur) Farmers use their own stored seed which Evaluation of Fodder yeld potential are not safe for grain consumption and quality Evaluation of Material received from ICARDA for dual purpose varietal selection through farmers participatory approach

SPARK (Bihar) Patna

Local Cultivar with high ODAP In Tal Area, broadcasting in receding water; Utera & rice fallow broadcasting; No seed treatment or priming; No weed/nutrient management; Farmers use their own stored seed which are not safe for grain consumption UBKVV (West Local Cultivar with high ODAP Bengal) Utera & rice fallow broadcasting Cooch No seed treatment or priming Behar/Nadia No weed/nutrient management Farmers use their own stored seed which are not safe for grain consumption

Supply of low-ODAP material suited for rice fallow developed in India. Farmer Participatory Varietal Selection, Improved technology viz. seed priming/seed treatment& ICM. Seed and fodder production and processing Supply of low-ODAP material suited for rice fallow developed in India. Farmer Participatory Varietal Selection, Improved technology viz. seed priming/seed treatment& ICM. Seed and fodder production and processing IGKVV, Local Cultivar with high ODAP Evaluation of ODAP of Introduced (Chhattisgarh) Utera & rice fallow broadcasting selected exotic cultivars. Supply of Raipur, Durg/ No seed treatment or priming low-ODAP material suited for rice Bilaspur No weed/nutrient management fallow developed in India. Farmers use their own stored seed which Improved technology viz. seed are not safe for grain consumption priming/seed treatment& ICM. Evaluation of dual purpose varieties. Evaluation of Material received from ICARDA for dual purpose varietal selection through farmers participatory approach; development of material for rice-fallow IIPR (UP) Local Cultivar with high ODAP Supply of low-ODAP material suited Mirzapur Utera & rice fallow broadcasting for rice fallow developed in India. No seed treatment or priming Improved technology viz. seed No weed/nutrient management priming/seed treatment& ICM. Farmers use their own stored seed which Evaluation of Material received from are not safe for grain consumption ICARDA for dual purpose varietal selection through farmers participatory approach

All the partners would also be responsible for attending/organising : Benchmark Survey/PRA; Farmers field day/ Training ; Seminar/workshop; Publication; Reporting & Impact assessment.

16. Human Resources for execution of the Project:

COORDINATING UNIT AT ICARDA, New Delhi [PI (Principal Investigator] & skilled worker

Nalanda Centre

Chnadauli Centre

IGFRI Jhansi; Lalitpur/ Hamirpur CCPI (Res. Assoc. & skilled Worker)

UBKVV SPARK Cooch Behar/ Patna Nadia

IGKVV Raipur; Durg/ Bilaspur CCPI (Res. Assoc. & Res. Fell./ skilled Worker)

IIPR Mirzapur

CCPI (Res. Assoc. & skilled Worker)

CCPI (Res. Assoc. & skilled worker

CCPI (Res. Assoc. & skilled Worker)

CCPI (Res. Assoc. & skilled Worker)

CCPI (Res. Assoc. & skilled Worker)

17. Seed Flow( Production)


Seed Flow

1st Year

5 acres.X10 Clust.X200 Kg= 10,000 Kg Sufficient for 400 acres cultivation & replacement

2nd Year

10acres X10 Clust.X200Kg=20,000 Kg Sufficient for another 800 acres cultivation and replacement + 3200 acres from the seed diffusion among farmers

3rd

year

20 acres X 10 clustersX200 Kg= 40,000 Kg Sufficient for another 1600 acres cultivation and replacement + 32000 acres from the seed diffusion among farmers

18. Beneficiaries
The main beneficiaries would be the marginal farmers of rainfed areas of central and eastern India by increasing their income from higher production. Increased production and productivity of low-ODAP grasspea varieties will also mean more availability of safe

food to consumers. Quality for fodder and feed will be available in higher quantity during the period and places where there existed deficit of quality fodder and feed. The poorest of poor farmers would be directly benefitted, while the entire nation will benefitted by the safe consumption of grasspea. Overall, the country will benefit from increased pulse production, thus reduces deficit of pulses in the country. 19. Duration Three years (October 2010 to September 2013) 20. Expected Outcome At least 20 vibrant and sustainable model farmers based seed production sites established 3875 demonstrations of improved cultivars and production technologies apart from 150 demonstrations for seed production. Higher cropping intensity: improve land- use efficiency, more return and sustainable production system through improved soil health achieved, phytoremediation, etc. Grasspea area expansion in rice-fallow to increase availability of fodder and safe grain to low income consumers Production of about 20,000 kg seed during 2nd year and 40,000 Kg seed during 3rd year for continuity of seed chain. Increased seed replacement rate (SSR) with low-ODAP cultivars Insuring safe foods and availability of fodder in dry areas

21. Budget: A total budget of 534.59lakhs for three years Budget: head-wise tentative break-up estimates (Rs. In Lakhs)
S. No. 1. 2. 2010-11 Yr.-I Salary of contractual staff 27.04 Operational Expenses (supply of input, Labour, hiring 70.02 implements, soil test etc.), Overhead, Miscellaneous-exp, Import of Seeds from Ethiopia, Bangladesh & Syria Non-recurr. Equipments 14.2 PRA, Farmers Training, Field Schools, Field day, Seminar &Workshop etc Travel, monitoring & evaluation, data processing and publication Exchange of scientists & managers for evaluation & selection of material Total 25.5 26.55 10.08 173.39 Head of Expenditure 2011-12 Yr.-II 27.04 78.87 2012-13 Yr.-III 27.35 71.26 Total 81.43 220.15

3. 4. 5. 6.

13.7 29.0 29.95 10.08 188.64

2.5 30.0 34.25 7.2 172.56

30.4 84.5 90.75 27.36 534.59

Tentative breakup estimates (Year-wise and Institute wise) (in Rs. Lakh) Sl. No 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.
6. 7.

Name of Centre/Institution
ICARDA, South Asia Program, New Delhi, (Including two project work centres at Nalanda & Chandauli and import of seeds from Ethiopia, Syria and Bangladesh)) IGFRI, Jhansi IGKVV, Raipur, Chhattisgarh IIPR, Kanpur SPARK, Patna, Bihar UBKVV, Cooch Behar, West Bengal Exchange of scientists & managers for evaluation & selection of material to Syria and India (as the case may be) Total

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

Total 234.6 7 54.54 79.23 46.84 46.26 45.69 27.36 (19)*


534.59

Yr.-I 75.14 19.1 26.14 14.5 14.5 13.93 10.08 (7)*


173.39

Yr.-II 85.58 19.56 26.94 15.88 15.3 15.3 10.08 (7)*


188.64

Yr.-III 73.95 15.88 26.15 16.46 16.46 16.46 7.2 (5)*


172.56

*No. of scientists and development officials visiting Syria/India

1. ICARDA, South Asia Office (in Rs. lakhs) Recurring Head (A) Salary (i) Principal Investigator coordination (Coordinating Unit) @Rs.0.35L/m+ 30% HRA (ii) CCPI (Res. Associate) Nalanda Centre @ Rs. 0.18 L/m#+ 30% HRA (iii) CCPI (Res. Associate) Chandauli Centre @ Rs. 0.18 L/m#+ 30% HRA Sub Total No. of post Year I One One One Three 5.5 2.81 2.81 11.12 3.0 3.0 10.0 Year II 5.5 2.81 2.81 11.12 4.0 4.0 11.5 Year III 5.5 2.81 2.81 11.12 4.0. 4.0 4.5 Total 16.5 8.43 8.43 33.36

(B) Project Work Centre Nalanda (Bihar) Project Work Centre Chandauli (UPr) ICARDA Coordinating Unit(incl. Import of exotic seed from Ethiopia, Bangladesh & Syria) (i) Operational Cost (Supplies of inputs for on-farm expt., import of seeds from Syria, skilled worker /contractual labourers, and farmers seed processing etc.)

---16.0

--19.5 5.5 4.5 5.5 6.2 7.3 4.5 2.0 55.0

---12.5 5.0 5.0 6.5 6.0 7.5 5.0 2.0 49.5

48.0 15.00 14.10 16.50 18.00 21.0 13.0 6.0 151.6

(ii) POL & Hiring of vehicle (Nalanda centre, Chandauli 4.5 centre & Coord.Unit) (iii)T.A. for Project work at national level , monitoring 4.6 etc.(Nalanda centre, Chandauli centre & Coord.Unit) (iv) Workshop for farmers, SHG etc. Traveling Seminar etc 4.5 (v) Training of trainers/farmers/Training materials etc. 5.8 (vi) On-farm workshops/FarmersFair (Nalanda centre, 6.2 Chandauli centre & Coord.Unit)& Annual Workshop (vii) Data Processing ,communication and Publications 3.5 (viii)Miscellaneous 2.0 Sub Total 47.1 Non-Recurring (C) Equipment & vehicle (i) Seed Bins (Five Nos.) 1.0 (ii) Plant Prot. Equip. & other need based equipments (less 3.4 than 0.25L each) (iii) Portable Data Processing Unit (One) (iv) digital Camera (One Nos.) Sub Total 4.4 62.62 Total A+B+C+D 12.52 Institutional Charges @20% Grand Total 75.14 (D) Exchange of scientists & managers for evaluation & 10.08 selection of material to Syria and India (as the case may be) (7)* *No. of Scientists and development officials visiting Syria and India

1.5 1.5 1.5 0.7 5.2 71.32 14.26 85.58 10.08 (7)*

1.0

2.5 5.9 1.5 0.7 10.6 195.56 39.11 234.67 27.36 (19)*

1.0 61.62 12.33 73.95 7.2 (5)*

# Present Pay scale of R.A. is as approved by ICAR, as and when rates are revised, the same may be applicable to them

2. Indian Grassland Fodder Research Institute (ICAR), Jhansi (in Rs. lakh) Recurring Head (A) Salary (i) CCPI (Res. Associate) @ Rs. 0.18 L/m#+ 30% HRA Sub Total

No. of post Year I

Year II 2.81 2.81 5.0

Year III 2.81 2.81 4.5

Total

One

2.81 2.81 4.5

8.43 8.43 14.0

(B) (i) Operational Cost (Supplies of inputs for on-farm expt., import of seeds from Syria, skilled worker /contractual labourers, and farmers seed processing, seed by back etc (ii) POL & Hiring of vehicle (iii)T.A. for Project work at national level, monitoring etc. (iv) On-farm workshops/FarmersFair (v) Training of trainers/farmers/Training materials etc. (vi) Data Processing ,communication and Publications (vii)Miscellaneous Sub Total Non-Recurring (C) Equipment & vehicle (i) Seed Bins (two Nos.) (ii) Plant Prot. Equip. & other need based equipments Sub Total Total A+B+C Overhead(Institutional) Charges @15% Grand Total

0.80 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.5 1.0 9.8

1.2 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.5 1.0 10.7

1.5 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 11.0

3.5 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 3.0 31.5

0.5 3.5 4.0 16.61 2.49 19.1

0.5 3.0 3.5 17.01 2.55 19.56

13.81 2.07 15.88

1.0 6.5 7.5 47.43 7.11 54.54

3. Indian institute of Pulses Research, (ICAR), Kanpur (in Rs. lakh) Recurring Head (A) Salary (i) CCPI (Res. Associate) @ Rs. 0.18 L/m#+ 30% HRA Sub Total

No. of post Year I One 2.81 2.81 3.0

Year II 2.81 2.81 3.5

Year III 2.81 2.81 4.0

Total 8.43 8.43 10.5

(B) (i) Operational Cost (Supplies of inputs for on-farm expt., contractual labourers, and farmers seed processing etc.) (ii) POL & Hiring of vehicle (iii)T.A. for Project work at national level, monitoring etc. (iv) On-farm workshops/FarmersFair (v) Training of trainers/farmers/Training materials etc. (vi) Data Processing ,communication and Publications (vii)Miscellaneous Sub Total Non-Recurring (C) Equipment & vehicle (i) Seed Bins (Two Nos.) (ii) Plant Prot. Equip. & other need based equipments Sub Total Total A+B+C Institutional Charges @15% Grand Total

1.0 1.3 1.0 1.0 0.5 1.0 8.8

1.5 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.5 1.0 9.5

2.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 11.0

4.5 3.3 3.0 3.0 2.0 3.0 29.3

0.5 0.5 1.0 12.61 1.89 14.5

0.5 1.0 1.5 13.81 2.07 15.88

0.5 0.5 14.31 2.15 16.46

1.0 2.0 3.0 40.73 6.11 46.84

4. Indira Gandhi Krishi Vishwa Vidyalaya (IGKVV), Raipur (in Rs. lakh) Recurring Head (A) Salary (i) CCPI (Res. Associate) @ Rs. 0.18 L/m#+ 30% HRA (ii) Sr. ResFell. @ Rs. 0.12L/m#+ 30% HRA for two year and 3rd year @ Rs. 0.14L/m#+ 30% HRA Sub Total No. of post Year I One One 2.81 1.87 Year II 2.81 1.87 Year III 2.81 2.18 Total 8.43 5.92

4.68 8.5

4.68 9.0

4.99 9.5

14.35 27.0

(B) (i) Operational Cost (Supplies of inputs for on-farm expt, chemicals & glassware for lab.,Skilled worker., contractual labourers, and farmers seed processing etc.) (ii) POL & Hiring of vehicle (iii)T.A. for Project work at national level , monitoring etc. (iv) On-farm workshops/FarmersFair (v) Training of trainers/farmers/Training materials etc. (vi) Data Processing ,communication and Publications (viii)Miscellaneous Sub Total Non-Recurring C. Equipment & vehicle (i) Seed Bins (Two Nos.) (ii) Plant Prot. Equip. & other need based equipments Sub Total Total A+B+C Institutional Charges @15% Grand Total

1.00 1.25 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 14.75

1.25 1.5 1.0 2.0 1.0 1.5 17.25

1.25 1.5 1.0 2.0 1.0 1.5 17.75

3.5 4.25 3.0 5.0 3.0 4.0 49.75

0.5 2.8 3.3 22.73 3.41 26.14

0.5 1.0 1.5 23.43 3.51 26.94

22.74 3.41 26.15

1.0 3.8 4.8 68.9 10.33 79.23

5. Society for Promotion of Agricultural Research & Knowledge(SPARK), Patna Recurring Head (A) Salary (i) (i) CCPI (Res. Associate) @ Rs. 0.18 L/m#+ 30% HRA Sub Total

No. of post Year I One 2.81 2.81 4.0

Year II 2.81 2.81 4.5

Year III 2.81 2.81 5.0

Total 8.43 8.43 13.5

(B) (i) Operational Cost (Supplies of inputs for on-farm expt., contractual labourers, and farmers seed processing etc.) (ii) POL & Hiring of vehicle (iii)T.A. for Project work at national level, monitoring etc. (iv) On-farm workshops/FarmersFair (v) Data Processing ,communication and Publications (vi)Miscellaneous Sub Total Non-Recurring (C) Equipment & vehicle (i) Seed Bins (One Nos.) (ii) Plant Prot. Equip. & other need based equipments Sub Total Total A+B+C Institutional Charges @15% Grand Total

1.0 1.3 1.0 0.5 1.0 8.8

1.5 1.0 1.0 0.5 1.0 9.5

2.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 11.0

4.5 3.3 3.0 2.0 3.0 29.3

0.5 0.5 1.0 12.61 1.89 14.5

0.5 0.5 1.0 13.31 1.99 15.3

0.5 0.5 14.31 2.15 16.46

1.0 1.5 2.5 40.23 6.03 46.26

6. Uttar Banga Krishi Vishwa Vidyalaya (UBKVV), Cooch Behar, W.B. (in Rs. lakhs) Recurring Head (A) Salary (i) (i) CCPI (Res. Associate) @ Rs. 0.18 L/m#+ 30% HRA Sub Total

No. of post Year I One 2.81 2.81 3.0

Year II 2.81 2.81 3.5

Year III 2.81 2.81 4.0

Total 8.43 8.43 10.5

(B) (i) Operational Cost (Supplies of inputs for on-farm expt., contractual labourers, and farmers seed processing etc.) (ii) POL & Hiring of vehicle (iii)T.A. for Project work at national level, monitoring etc. (iv) On-farm workshops/FarmersFair (v) Training of trainers/farmers/Training materials etc. (vi) Data Processing ,communication and Publications (vii)Miscellaneous Sub Total Non-Recurring (C) Equipment & vehicle (i) Seed Bins (One Nos.) (ii) Plant Prot. Equip. & other need based equipments Sub Total Total A+B+C Institutional Charges @15% Grand Total

1.0 1.3 1.0 1.0 0.5 1.0 8.8

1.5 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.5 1.0 9.5

2.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 11.0

4.5 3.3 3.0 3.0 2.0 3.0 29.3

0.5 0.5 12.11 1.82 13.93

0.5 0.5 1.0 13.31 1.99 15.3

0.5 0.5 14.31 2.15 16.46

0.5 1.5 2.0 39.73 5.96 45.69

A. Budget: Exchange of scientists & managers for evaluation and selection of materials (Rs. in Lakhs) S. Particulars No. 1. Research & development managers from DAC(visit to Syria) 2. Scientists from participating institutions (visit to Syria) 2. Participating scientists from ICARDA H.Q. (visit to India) Total 2010-11 2.88 (2) 4.32 (3) 2.88 (2) 10.08 (7) 201112 2.88 (2) 4.32 (3) 2.88 (2) 10.08 (7) 2012-13 2.88 (2) 2.88 (2) 1.44 (1) 7.2 (5) Total 8.64 (6) 11.52 (8) 7.2 (5) 27.36 (19)

Purpose: Visit of scientists & research/development managers to Syria and India (as the case may be) for field evaluation and selection of lines suitable to Indian conditions for incorporation in project areas and beyond

22. Partnership and linkages The Project will have collaboration with State Agricultural Universities (SAUs) and Department of Agriculture (DOA) in the targeted states and staff associated in grasspeal production, research and extension. The main project institutions and partner scientists associated in the project are as follows: ICARDA, Aleppo, Syria Ashutosh Sarker Dr. Z Bishaw Coordinator, South Asia & China Program Seed Specialist NASC Complex, CGIAR Block ICARDA, PO Box 5466, Aleppo, Syria New Delhi 110012, India Phone: 963-21-2213433; Fax: 963-21-2213490 Tel: 91-11-25847500; Fax: 91-11-25847503 E.mail: A.Sarker@cgiar.org Dr Shiv Kumar Lentil Breeder ICARDA, PO Box 5466, Aleppo, Syria Phone: 963-21-2213433 Fax: 963-21-2213490 Dr Aden Aw-Hassan Socio-Economist ICARDA, PO Box 5466, Aleppo, Syria Phone: 963-21-2213433 Fax: 963-21-2213490

IGFRI, Jhansi UP Dr. K.A. Singh Director Indian Grassland and Fodder Research Institute of Pulses Research (IGFRI) Near Pahuj Dam, Gwalior Road, Jhansi-284003 UP Phone: 0510-2730666; (M) 09415503499 Fax:091-0510-2730833 IIPR, Kanpur, UP Dr. B. B. Singh Project Coordinator, MULLaRP AICRP, IIPR, Kalyanpur, Kanpur-208 024 UP Phone: 0512-2570163; 09450156207 (M); Fax: 0512-2572582, IGKVV, Raipur, Chhattisgarh Dr. M.P.Pandey Vice-Chancellor, Indira Gandhi Krishi Vishwa Vidyalaya Krishak Nagar, Raipur-492006, Chhattisgarh Phone: 0771-2443419; Fax: 0771-2442302,2443121

SPARK, Bihar Dr. Pawan Kumar Pulse and Oilseed Breeder Society for Promotion of Agricultural Research and Knowledge (SPARK) A-7, Krishi Nagar; P.O. Ashiana Nagar; Patna-800025 (Bihar) Phone: 0612-2281619, 09431851105 UBKVV, Cooch Behar Dr. A. C. Sinha Director (Research) Uttar Banga Krishi Viswavidyalaya P.O.Pundbari, Cooch Behar-736165, West Bengal Phone: 03582-270246; (M): 09434685513; Fax: 03582-270246