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VOLKSWAGEN

EMS IN THE COMPANY

EMS INDIVIDUAL ASSIGNMENT E&E 11-13 | Yogi Agarwal 11020243031

Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION TO THE BRAND ................................................................................................... 3 Volkswagens Environmental Policy ....................................................................................................... 4 EMS at Volkswagen ................................................................................................................................. 6 Organisation........................................................................................................................................ 6 Group-level responsibilities ................................................................................................................ 6 Plant-level responsibilities .................................................................................................................. 8 Information and ideas ......................................................................................................................... 9 External aspects .................................................................................................................................. 9 The tasks and responsibilities in the vehicle development process ................................................. 11 The tools................................................................................................................................................ 11 Internal tools ..................................................................................................................................... 11 Raw materials analyses ..................................................................................................................... 12 Material data systems....................................................................................................................... 12 Life Cycle Analyses ............................................................................................................................ 12 Environmental aspects of road tax models ...................................................................................... 12 Environmental Product Descriptions ................................................................................................ 12 External tools .................................................................................................................................... 13 Environmental Commendations ................................................................................................... 13 Fuel-saving brochures for customers............................................................................................ 13 COMPANY PLANT .................................................................................................................................. 14 The Wolfsburg plant ......................................................................................................................... 14 Diversified activities .......................................................................................................................... 14 Events and developments ................................................................................................................. 15 Coordination requirements .............................................................................................................. 15 Completed projects........................................................................................................................... 15 Production volume............................................................................................................................ 16 Waste management.......................................................................................................................... 17 Energy consumption and air quality ................................................................................................. 17 Noise ................................................................................................................................................. 19 Water management .......................................................................................................................... 19 Service providers............................................................................................................................... 20 Hazard potential ............................................................................................................................... 20 Blue motion........................................................................................................................................... 23 Volkswagen Page 1

Customer information....................................................................................................................... 24 Electro mobility ................................................................................................................................. 25 Resource efficiency ........................................................................................................................... 26 Vehicle recycling ........................................................................................................................... 26 Recycled materials ........................................................................................................................ 27 Efficient production .......................................................................................................................... 27 Environmental technology ................................................................................................................ 28 Water ............................................................................................................................................ 28 Air quality ...................................................................................................................................... 28 Biodiversity ................................................................................................................................... 29 Green Logistics .............................................................................................................................. 29 Green IT......................................................................................................................................... 30 Mobility concepts.......................................................................................................................... 30 Urban micro-mobility .................................................................................................................... 31 FUTURE FOR VW ................................................................................................................................... 32 Audi Urban Future Award ................................................................................................................. 32 BIBLOGRAPHY ....................................................................................................................................... 33

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INTRODUCTION TO THE BRAND


The group was founded in 1937 by Ferdinand Porsche. The Volkswagen Group with its headquarters in Wolfsburg Germany is one of the worlds leading automobile manufacturers and the largest carmaker in Europe. The group corresponds to a 9.8 percent share of the world passenger car market. The Group is made up of nine brands from seven European countries: Volkswagen, Audi, Bentley, Bugatti, Lamborghini, SEAT, Skoda, Scania and Volkswagen Commercial Vehicles. Each brand has its own character and operates as an independent entity on the market. The product range extends from low-consumption small cars to luxury class vehicles. In the commercial vehicle sector, the product offering spans pick-ups, busses and heavy trucks. The Group operates 48 production plants in thirteen European countries and a further six countries in the Americas, Asia and Africa. Around the world, more than 360,000 employees produce almost 25,400 vehicles or are involved in vehiclerelated services each working day. The Volkswagen Group sells its vehicles in more than 150 countries. It is the goal of the Group to offer attractive, safe and environmentally sound vehicles which are competitive on an increasingly tough market and which set world standards in their respective classes. The Group consists of eight brands: Volkswagen, Audi, Bentley, Bugatti, Lamborghini, SEAT, Skoda and Volkswagen Commercial Vehicles. Volkswagen means "people's car" in German. Its current tagline is Das Auto (in English The Car). Key people: Martin Winterkorn (Chairman of the Board of Management) Ferdinand Pich: (Chairman of Volkswagen Supervisory Board)

In 1996, Volkswagen was the first automobile manufacturer in the world to introduce a consistent environmental management system in its Technical Development department. At that time, even the ISO 14001standard was still at the draft stage. Ever since then, the system has been audited annually by the TV NORD inspectorate in line with EN ISO 14001, and since 2009 in line with the new DIN ISO/TR 14062 standard as well.

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Volkswagens Environmental Policy


Volkswagen develops, manufactures and markets motor vehicles worldwide with the aim of safeguarding personal mobility. The company accepts responsibility for the continuous improvement of the environmental compatibility of its products and for the increasingly conservative use of natural resources and energy, with due regard to economic aspects. Accordingly, the company makes environmentally efficient, advanced technology available worldwide and brings this technology to bear over the full life cycle of its products. At all its corporate locations, Volkswagen works hand-inhand with society and policy-makers to shape a development process that will bring sustainable social and ecological benefits. 1. It is the declared aim of Volkswagen in all its activities to restrict the environmental impact to a minimum and to make its own contribution to resolving environmental problems at regional and global level. 2. It is Volkswagens aim to offer high quality automobiles which take equal account of the expectations of its customers with regard to environmental compatibility, economy, safety, quality and comfort. 3. In order to safeguard the long term future of the company and enhance its competitive position, Volkswagen is researching into and developing ecologically efficient products, processes and concepts for personal mobility. 4. Those responsible for environmental management at Volkswagen shall, on the basis of the companys environmental policy, ensure that in conjunction with suppliers, service providers, retailers and recycling companies, the environmental compatibility of its vehicles and production plants is subject to a process of continuous improvement. 5. The Volkswagen Board of Management shall, at regular intervals, check that the companys environmental policy and objectives are being observed and that the Environmental Management System is working properly. This shall include evaluation of the recorded environmentally relevant data. 6. Providing frank and clear information and entering into dialogue with customers, dealers and the public is a matter of course for Volkswagen. Cooperation with policymakers and the authorities is based on a fundamentally proactive approach founded on mutual trust and includes provision for emergencies at each production site. 7. In keeping with their duties, all Volkswagen employees are informed, trained and motivated in respect of environmental protection. They are under obligation to implement these principles and to comply with statutory provisions and official regulations as these apply to their respective activities.

In line with this Policy, the Company have derived concrete goals in three areas:
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1. Climate protection Reduce greenhouse gas emissions Reduce fuel consumption in the driving cycle and over the vehicles service life with the customer Be fuel-efficiency leader in each class of vehicle Support fuel-efficient styles of driving Contribute to/assess eco-compatible traffic management measures

2. Resource conservation Improve resource efficiency Pursue best possible recyclability and identification of the materials used Use renewable and secondary raw materials Develop and make available alternative powertrain technologies Enable the use of alternative fuels

3. Healthcare Reduce regulated and non-regulated emissions Avoid the use of hazardous and harmful materials Minimise interior emissions including odours Attain best possible exterior and interior noise levels

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EMS at Volkswagen
The aim of the Volkswagen environmental management system is as the official wording puts it the development of Volkswagen brand vehicles with continuously improved environmental properties all based on Volkswagens Environmental Policy. The guiding principle behind the Environmental Policy is for Volkswagen as a global provider of active mobility services to offer environmentally optimised vehicles built in an environmentally optimised production process. All activities and processes are designed for sustainability and to ease the load on the environment, as we strive to live up to our responsibility towards customers, society and the environment. One key element of Environmental Policy is to engage in an on-going dialogue with employees and external stakeholders Environmental protection is firmly anchored in the overall management framework of Volkswagen. Effective organisational structures that comply with EMAS requirements help to ensure the sustainability of the companys research, planning and production operations. Structures are first defined for all plants and then adapted to the specific requirements of each plant.

Organisation
The requirements laid down in the environmental management system (EMS) and the environmental management manuals of the Volkswagen brand are binding for all plants. The manual identifies the key processes and responsibilities and defines the requirements for environmental management at the plants. Each chapter begins by setting out the general requirements for all plants and then describes the special rulings, responsibilities and procedures for each individual location.

Group-level responsibilities
Ultimate responsibility for the operation of installations subject to licensing under pollution control legislation is borne by the Board Member Research and Development (cf. article 52a of the Federal Immission Control Act and article 53 of the German Waste Management and Product Recycling Act). To improve groupwide coordination of all environmental protection activities, group-level responsibilities for environmental matters were reorganised in 2006. There are now two main areas of focus. One is on product and production-related aspects which ensures that policy in this area (including performance of internal environmental audits) is centralised and closely coordinated. Secondly, further teams focus on future-oriented environmental strategies and concepts for safeguarding mobility despite increasing traffic volumes.

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The Environmental Management Officer has overall responsibility for maintaining the environmental management system. He is Environmental Management Officer of the Volkswagen brand and is responsible for coordinating the activities of the Plant Environment Officers. Vehicles of the Volkswagen and Volkswagen Commercial Vehicles brands are designed and engineered almost exclusively by the approximately 9,000 employees of the Technical Development (TD) department in Wolfsburg. An Environment Officer Product ensures that environmental considerations are taken into account even at this early stage of the product life cycle. His or her staffs has the task of defining and ensuring compliance with environmental requirements for every new project, based on the Technical Development departments environmental goals mentioned above. Environmental mentors supervise the environmental aspects of vehicle projects from the preliminary planning stage right through to the start of production. A current example of the successful results achieved by cooperation between the specialist departments, with the Environment Officer Product acting as advisor, is the BlueMotion models, which are in each case the most fuel-efficient and lowestemission version of a Volkswagen model series. The POLO BlueMotion, with emissions of 99 g CO2 /km, is the most economical five-seater in Europe. In 1996, the Technical Development department was certified to ISO 14001. This was one of the first certifications ever awarded under this international standard. The Group Task Force Environment (GTFE) develops group-wide environmental strategies and ensures that the Volkswagen Environmental Principles are adhered to in all business units and at all plants. The Task Force includes representatives of the corporate brands, the regions and experts from Group headquarters. Environmental goals and action plans for achieving them are developed and monitored jointly by the Task Force. The GTFE is chaired by the Head of Group Research, with the Environmental Management Officer acting as Secretary. A further important instrument in the environmental management system is the Regional Conferences, which facilitate practice-sharing between Group headquarters and the Environment Officers at the Latin American, South African and East- Asian plants. By promoting employee awareness and know-how transfer, and by formulating target agreements, these conferences serve as a catalyst for concrete environmental protection measures. The position of Dangerous Goods Advisor is a staff function reporting to the Board of Management of Volkswagen Logistics GmbH. The Dangerous Goods Advisor is responsible for central monitoring of compliance with the regulations on the transport of dangerous goods. He is assisted in this capacity by Plant Coordinators and by Plant Dangerous Goods Advisors.

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Plant-level responsibilities
At the plants, the Plant Manager has overall organisational responsibility for ensuring compliance with company environmental policy and with environmental legislation. He establishes and implements organisational structures and reporting lines, and delegates authority as necessary. At the same time notification channels are established for reporting any deviations from normal operation. Each plant has a Plant Environment Officer, who is responsible for air quality, waste management and the protection of water resources. The Plant Environment Officer and his staff monitor the effectiveness of productionrelated environmental protection measures, advise plant and equipment operators and record and evaluate environmental data relating to the plant. The Plant Environment Officer also acts as Plant Environmental Management Officer, responsible for the plant environmental management system, and shares top-level management responsibility on environmental matters. The Environmental Management Officers monitor compliance with environmental regulations and policies and are responsible for overseeing the implementation of plant-level Environment programmes. They regularly brief both top management and the workforce, thereby helping to promote compliance with Volkswagens environmental policy.

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Within their own sectors, the Environmental Specialists assist the Environment Officer and the operators of environmentally relevant plant and equipment in implementing process-oriented environmental protection measures. Specially trained for this task, they work in their own particular sectors to ensure that environmental legislation and Volkswagens environmental policy are followed in the day-to-day operation of the plant. At the same time, they promote commitment to continuous improvement in environmental protection.

Information and ideas


Employees at all plants receive regular briefings, training and information on environmental issues. They are constantly urged to contribute, through the ideas management system, to improved workplace design, more efficient working and improved process-oriented environmental protection. In 2001, Volkswagen introduced an internal environmental award. The purpose of this award, which is presented every two years, is to reward employees who demonstrate a high level of personal commitment and initiative by developing and implementing pro environmental ideas in their own particular sector. The following were some of the initiatives chosen to receive awards in 2007: - Development and implementation of an intelligent energy-demand management system in the Zwickau paintshop, which has resulted in reduced CO2 emissions. The use of oils derived from renewables in lifts and lifting platforms, with the aim of further improving groundwater protection. Production of a set of waste management guidelines by apprentices, for apprentices at the Hanover plant, to provide further support on issues relating to process-oriented environmental management. In late 2007, the third Volkswagen Group Environmental Conference, attended by large contingents from all Group plants, took place in Wolfsburg to discuss progress on environmental issues, action plans and the outcome of the Regional Conferences.

External aspects
Environmental protection also extends to relationships with suppliers. Based on existing guidelines for suppliers for example recommendations or bans on the use of materials, environmental specifications etc. a sustainability policy based on environmentally-related and social principles was developed in consultation with Volkswagens business partners. Its provisions are based on internal Volkswagen guidelines and modelled on international standards to which Volkswagen, as a multinational company, subscribes. Important elements include supplier self-check questionnaires, a supplier support service provided by an expert team, ad hoc onthe-spot checks and communication of detailed information via the B2B Internet supplier platform. Volkswagen has been offering supplier training for many years, as a way of meeting its social and environmental responsibilities. Over the past ten years, more than 150 training events have taken place, involving more than 1,500 participants, under the logo Priority A partners for the environment and sustainability.
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Product-related principles of the Volkswagen Environmental Policy: It is Volkswagens aim to offer high-quality automobiles which take equal account of the expectations of its customers with regard to environmental compatibility, economy, safety, quality and comfort. In order to safeguard the long-term future of the company and enhance its competitive position, Volkswagen is researching into and developing ecologically efficient products, processes and concepts for personal mobility. Those responsible for environmental management at Volkswagen shall, on the basis of the companys environmental policy, ensure that in conjunction with suppliers, service providers, retailers and recycling companies, the environmental compatibility of its vehicles and production plants is subject to a process of continuous improvement. 22 Environmental Standards for the production process have also been derived from the Volkswagen Environmental Policy. These can be found online at www.mobilityandsustainability.com in the download section. The Environmental Policy also laid the foundations for the Environmental Goals of the Technical Development department To attain the highest possible environmental goals, the Technical Development department is intensifying the continuous improvement of Volkswagen products in respect of environmental compatibility and resource conservation. Our activities and processes are designed for sustainability and to ease the load on the environment. In this way we aim to live up to our responsibilities towards our customers, society and the environment. In future, we will develop each model in such a way that, in its entirety, it presents better environmental properties than its predecessor. As we do so, we will always make sure that the entire life cycle is taken into account during the development of our products. The environmental goals set out above also serve to differentiate us from the competition to the benefit of our customers. In addition, we aim to place selected models in various environmental rankings.

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The tasks and responsibilities in the vehicle development process


At Volkswagen environmental protection is a matter for top management. This is reflected by structures that assign environmental protection to Group Research, firmly integrating it into the top management level. The Corporate Environmental Steering Group is chaired by the Head of Group Research and directs and networks environmental protection activities worldwide. Operational management is handled by the Head of Environment. The Steering Group develops Group and brand strategies, goals and measures and adapts them to ensure regional feasibility. Within these tight structures, the roles and responsibilities are clearly defined: the Head of Environment manages the three environmental affairs departments Strategy, Product and Production. Volkswagen Brand and Environment Officer Product and Production, As environment Officer Production he is responsible for all Group production facilities, although on site the relevant duties are handled by the Plant Environment, Officer as Environment Officer Product he is responsible for ensuring environmentally compatible product development. That includes supervision of product and vehicle development activities by environmental sponsors; the on-going development of environmental management tools; updating the environmental goals; and developing methods of evaluating environmental risks.

The tools
Internal tools
Environmental specification and specific environmental profiles for vehicles The foundations for continuously improving the environmental properties of products are laid by the General Environmental Specification, which sets out basic
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environmental protection requirements such as major environmental legislation, environmental standards, strategic requirements and general recommendations. Specific environmental requirements for individual vehicle models are integrated via the appropriate development tools.
Raw materials analyses

Raw materials analyses allow detailed, long-term assessments of raw materials risks. The objective is to support innovative technical approaches such as electric vehicles and new materials concepts (for example, lightweight design in body production). Raw materials and risks are assessed in cooperation with BGR, the Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources, which fleshes the methodological framework out with data for specific raw materials.
Material data systems

The International Material Data System is a system used by carmakers and suppliers throughout the world for recording, managing and communicating the material data of specific components. Thanks to these material data, Volkswagen is in a position to ensure compliance with the bans in force on certain materials and to minimise the use of critical substances.
Life Cycle Analyses

A Life Cycle Analysis assesses the environmental impact of a specific vehicle model over its entire life cycle, from production to use and disposal. This holistic approach has shown that it can make sense in some cases to change to more energyintensive production processes. For example, the hot stamping process uses more energy, in the form of heat, than conventional forming processes. However, the parts produced are stronger, require less steel and are therefore lighter. The reduction in steel alone already compensates for the higher energy input and carbon dioxide emissions during production.

Environmental aspects of road tax models

A program for calculating the environmental aspects of road tax models and energy labels has been developed with a view to assessing tax systems and supporting the positioning of vehicle models. This allows current tax systems and energy efficiency labels to be taken into consideration when defining emission and fuel consumption targets.
Environmental Product Descriptions

Environmental Product Descriptions list the environmental highlights of a model with reference to the goals defined in three areas by Technical Development to help Volkswagen square up to the environmental challenges of the future. The Descriptions also assess the environmental performance of the respective model compared with its predecessor and competitors. Finally, the Environmental Product Description provides a tool for monitoring the achievement of environmental goals.
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Other internal tools include environmental standards and newsletters as well as a comprehensive intranet presentation that keeps employees up to date with the latest environmental targets and strategies.

External tools Environmental Commendations


Volkswagen has produced Environmental Commendations on the basis of Life Cycle Assessments since 2007. Environmental Commendations for vehicles and technologies highlight ecological progress compared with predecessor or reference models. We use Environmental Commendations to inform our customers, our shareholders and other stakeholders how we are making our products and production processes more environmentally compatible and what we have achieved in this respect. The underlying Life Cycle Assessment covers the entire life cycle of a vehicle from production through to use and disposal. The information in an Environmental Commendation is based on a Life Cycle Assessment which has been verified and certified by the technical inspectorate TV NORD.

Fuel-saving brochures for customers


VW also provide detailed information on environmentally aware driving with a view to saving fuel so that customers make the best possible use of our innovative products in this respect. These can also be downloaded at www.mobilityandsustainability.com. Volkswagen also makes environmental information available on the Internet (www.mobility-and-sustainability.com, www.volkswagenag.com/sustainability).

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COMPANY PLANT
Out of many plants the company has we are considering there biggest plant Wolfsburg plant From the beginning, the history of Wolfsburg has been closely connected with the history of Volkswagen itself. After all, the factory was the reason the city was built in the first place, back in 1938. Since then, the Wolfsburg plant the headquarters of Volkswagen AG has been the biggest employer both in the city and in the surrounding region, which borders on Lneburg Heath in the State of Lower Saxony. To the north, the site is bounded by the Wolfsburg suburb of Kstorf, and to the south by the Mittelland canal and Wolfsburg city centre. Road and rail links include numerous trunk roads, the A39 motorway, which lies immediately to the west of the plant, the company rail freight station and the ICE mainline rail station.

The Wolfsburg plant


The Wolfsburg plant is the central manufacturing plant for the VW Golf and the Golf Plus derivative. For some years it has also been home to Auto 5000 GmbH, an autonomous factory which moved into existing production shops on the site. Auto 5000 produces the Touran and, since late 2006, has also built the new Tiguan. A total of 554,740 vehicles were produced at the Wolfsburg plant in 2006. The Wolfsburg plant also includes the Ehra-Lessien proving grounds, the Barnbruch company landfill site, the decommissioned Essenrode landfill site and the subsidiaries VW Logistics and VW Coaching. It does not include Volkswagen Kraftwerk GmbH and its facilities, including the two combined heat and power (CHP) plants, or Autostadt GmbH. In terms of EMAS, these rank as separate organisations. Any development proposals relating to the plant are referred to joint consultative meetings between Volkswagen and the City of Wolfsburg. The planning process then seeks to strike a balance between different interests and land uses (e.g. expansion of residential development or expansion of production areas, taking into account issues such as noise).

Diversified activities
Roughly half the Wolfsburg plants employees work in the production sector. In addition to producing some 2,800 vehicles a day, the Wolfsburg plant also builds large quantities of parts kits and components on its press and machining lines, both for its own use and for other Group plants. Plastic components are also produced here, including fuel tanks, instrument panels and complete bumpers. The remainder of the workforce performs central functions for the Volkswagen brand or steering and coordinating functions for example in research and development, purchasing or production planning for the other seven brands of the Group, which operates more than 45 production plants worldwide. Ever since it was founded, the Wolfsburg plant has grown steadily, keeping pace with technical progress. The most important construction project in recent years was the building of a large logistics centre (Hall 55). The majority of the vast quantities of goods and materials
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arriving in Wolfsburg every day pass through this receiving and distribution point on their way to the production line.

Events and developments


Responsibility for maintaining the environmental management system lies with the Plant Manager, who is regularly informed about new developments and any problems by the Plant Environment Officer, who is also Head of Facility Management and Environmental Protection. The Environment Officer and his staff are assigned to the Group Department Environment Production. They monitor the effectiveness of production-related environmental protection measures and advise plant and equipment operators and planning staff. They are currently assisted by 156 environmental specialists working on the ground in the various organisational units.

Coordination requirements
The fact that not all environmentally relevant facilities and processes are now operated solely by Wolfsburg plant employees has led to an increase in the monitoring and coordination workload of the Plant Environment Officer in recent years. For example, operational responsibility for the various wastewater treatment facilities has been transferred, along with the relevant specialist personnel, to the Groups subsidiary VW Kraftwerk GmbH. Coordination is also required with VW Logistics and VW Coaching, two further subsidiaries operating on site. The Tiguan and Touran models are built in a number of production shops belonging to the Auto 5000 GmbH company mentioned above. This autonomous company is contractually integrated into the Environmental Management and Audit System of the Wolfsburg plant, and again it is the Plant Environment Officer who is responsible for coordination. In order to coordinate the environmentally relevant activities of these various companies and in order to present one face to public authorities, since 2002 the Environment Officer has when necessary convened ad hoc meetings of the Plant Committee, whose members include representatives of the subsidiaries, research and development managers and members of the Works Council.

Completed projects
Work to implement the since updated 2006 environment programme is continuing on schedule. Of the 27 projects listed in the last Environmental Statement,16 have already been implemented and work on the others is continuing (for details, see pp. W14 ff.). This year, three new projects have been added to the Programme. Over the last fifteen years, various natural areas at the plant (grassland, forest, etc.) have been lost as a result of new construction work. Under Germanys nature conservation laws, this must be remedied by environmental compensatory measures, either on- or off-site.

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the Wolfsburg plant acquired an approximately 40-hectare site in the Barnbruch wetlands, where it has introduced large mammals as part of a grazing project. Reverse-bred aurochs, which have now grown into a herd of twenty- two animals, are sharing this site with five wild horses (Konik ponies). The aim is for the animals to have an extensive year-round beneficial effect on the landscape. As a further compensation measure, renaturalisation work is currently being carried out in the Aller river valley. A previously canalised section of the Aller directly adjacent to the Wolfsburg plant has been restored as a semi-natural flowing watercourse. A parallel channel was created, ditches were redesigned and shallow areas were created. After the area has been planted with oaks and willow scrub, wild cattle and horses will be introduced, as at Barnbruch. In November 2006, the new 5,400 square-metre Cold and Climate Test Centre, designed for comprehensive testing under a wide variety of climatic conditions at temperatures ranging from -40C to +150C, went into service at the Wolfsburg plant. The centres refrigeration requirements are met using ammonia, which is nonozone-depleting and has no greenhouse effect. The simultaneous decommissioning of old facilities meant that it was possible to appropriately dispose of more than 2,000 kg of hydrofluorocarbons, a refrigerant criticised for its contribution to the greenhouse effect. A more than 20-year-old evaporator in Shop 6 was replaced by a new system that separates oily wastewater into its water and oil fractions by distillation. As well as reducing organic substance concentrations in the wastewater, this project also cuts energy consumption. The decommissioning and dismantling of the old evaporator has also created space for production of the new Tiguan. Environmental aspects and data Significant environmental aspects at the plant are identified using a system developed by the Environment Production unit. The way in which environmental aspects change over time is determined to an important extent by changes in production output, although an increase in production does not automatically lead to an increase in environmental impacts, Conversely, a drop in production output does not necessarily lead to a corresponding reduction in the key environmental aspects. For example, energy consumption includes a fixed component which remains constant regardless of actual production activity. The following overview shows figures and trends for the Wolfsburg plant and its environmental aspects.

Production volume
In 2006, production at the plant totalled 554,740 vehicles, slightly below the previous years level. The figures for Golf/Bora models comprise the Golf, Golf Plus, Golf A4 Estate and smaller numbers of the Bora Estate, which is no longer in production. Production by AUTO 5000 GmbH again consisted almost entirely of Touran models. The slight fall in production of the Touran was due to the rolling changeover to simultaneous production of the Touran and the new Tiguan model.

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The press and machining lines also built other products(such as driveshafts and transmission parts)for the Groups integrated production network.

Waste management
Waste is rated as a significantenvironmental aspect in many different production sectors at the Wolfsburg plant, though in no case as a very significant aspect. As a result of the introduction of numerous measures, the entire waste management system is now operating successfully and efficiently. Waste separation, with recycling wherever possible, has been practised for a long time now, and most materials are delivered to the plant in reusable containers. Waste streams are managed by a comprehensive IT system, for maximum waste disposal security. To promote resource- and environment-friendly reuse of used materials, in 2005 the Wolfsburg plant opened a Materials Reuse Centre (MVZ). Here, items no longer required from stores at the VW plants, ranging from simple seals to complex tools, are inventoried, valued and offered for sale to potential users, initially via internal newsletters and the Intranet. After three months, the items are then offered for sale through external channels. In 2006, the total waste volume fell by approximately 4,800 tonnes compared with 2005, due to a reduction of approximately 6,000 tonnes in the volume of waste sent for disposal. As well as implementing waste prevention measures, the plant has also developed and implemented new waste recovery solutions. For example, road sweepings are now recycled rather than being sent for disposal. And waste from plastic parts production is now recycled and returned to the production process, rather than being landfilled.

Energy consumption and air quality


Since the plant consumes both electricity and heat in relatively large quantities, this environmental aspect is predominantly rated as very significant. Both types of energy are supplied by Volkswagens subsidiary VW Kraftwerk GmbH (VWK), which operates on-site hardcoal and natural-gas-fired combined heat and power stations. To increase energy efficiency even further, these plants have for some time also been converting waste process heat into cooling energy. VWK operates its own environmental management system and takes part in the EMAS scheme as a separate entity. Thanks to the committed efforts from the entire workforce assisted and motivated by the Energy Officers in the various production sectors energy consumption was again reduced compared with the previous year.
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Since late 2004, energy audits have been performed throughout the Wolfsburg plant. Interviews and site inspections reveal the audited sectors strong points and also indicate where there is room for improvement. Armed with this transparent information, the responsible staff can identify and make use of potential for reducing energy consumption. The audit ratings ranged from satisfactory to excellent. Various goals and action plans have been drawn up to improve the ratings by the time of the next audit. In the paintshops in Hall, use of an improved clearcoat has allowed drying temperatures to be reduced from 140C to 80C, which has also reduced natural gas consumption. Consumption of heating energy is largely dependent on weather conditions, so the scope for intervention is limited. Nevertheless, by reducing temperatures in the production shops in line with the Workplaces Ordinance, it has been possible to reduce CO2 emissions by 30,000 tonnes annually. Airborne emissions are generated mainly in the paintshops and on numerous test rigs used by the Technical Development department for testing newly designed engines and transmissions. The tests take place in sound-insulated chambers and, as in the vehicles, the exhaust emissions pass through catalytic converters. The vehicle body paintshops in production halls 9, 12, 15B and 104 use mainly water-dilutable, low-solvent paints, and the highly polluted waste air from the driers is thermally treated, so that the air actually released to the atmosphere meets the relevant emissions standards by a wide margin. A series of measures carried out in recent years have resulted in a significant reduction in emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Among these measures are continuous improvements in paint application technology, computercontrolled block painting and replacement of the solvent-based and odourintensive rinsing agent butyl glycol by a solvent-free product. A new application technique used on topcoat lines 1 to 5 and filler lines 1 to 3 reduces consumption of both paint and rinsing agents. This has reduced average paint consumption per defect-free body from 5.3 kg in 2004 to 3.4 kg today. In the year under review, emissions of solvent per square metre of bodywork were almost 45 percent below the legal limit of 35 grams. The arithmetically calculated average emissions were 17.35 g/m2. Emissions of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide and dust which, like those of volatile organic compounds, are partly measured and partly calculatedarithmetically, were largely unchanged from the previous year.
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Intensive research is under way to ascertain what technical measures need to be carried out to meet the future carbon monoxide limit of 100 mg/m3. At present, tests are being conducted on a catalyst for fitting in paintshop waste air treatment systems that would allow afterburning temperatures to be significantly reduced, thereby reducing natural gas consumption and at the same time ensuring uniform compliance with the emissions limit. During the second half of 2006, a specialist firm performed periodic odour measurements on the body painting lines in Hall 15B and Hall 9, and in the bumper paintshop in Hall 53A. These odour measurements are an operating licence requirement and must be carried out every three years. According to the odour report for the Wolfsburg plant, the measurements are now well inside the air quality advisory levels for residential, mixed-used, commercial and industrial areas specified by the Directive on Odour in Ambient Air.

Both the Freight Distribution Centre at the western entrance to the plant, and the large logistics building that supplies the Golf V production lines and helps to ensure more efficient materials management and distribution, play an important part in reducing truck traffic and the associated emissions.

Noise
At many points, the site borders on residential areas of Wolfsburg, in particular Kstorf and Kreuzheide. When one isolated complaint was received about excessive noise levels at night, technical and organisational measures were implemented immediately to remedy the problem. Experts from the Corporate Health and Safety Department are involved in the planning of all new projects. With the help of the regularly updated noise register, they assess the impact of proposed projects on the factorys surroundings, and make recommendations on how to minimise resulting noise.

Water management
A factory site as large as Wolfsburg naturally produces large volumes of wastewater, which necessitates an elaborate system of treatment measures. After the oil fraction has been separated out, industrial wastewater originating for example from the painting and machining lines undergoes physical/chemical pretreatment at the Central wastewater centre andat the Western wastewater centres substream treatment facilities, Before being processed together with the sanitary wastewater at the biological treatment plant, It is then discharged into a process water retention basin measuring 30 hectares in area and up to 13 metres in depth. From here, one substream is continuously released into the Aller, which acts as a receiving stream. Another substream is filtered and fed into a separate internal water supply network which provides water for flushing toilets etc. An analysis of substance concentrations at the outlet to the Aller demonstrates the success of measures carried out in 2005 to improve and modernise wastewater processing at the treatment plant, showing a fall in wastewater loads for all
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measured contaminants. Phosphorus levels have been halved and nitrogen levels reduced to one third the previous level. In no case were the relevant legal limits exceeded at the outlet to the Aller. A fall was also recorded in the annual mean for nickel, although official monitoring data showed two substream exceedances for this parameter at the outlet from the Central wastewater centre. As in the previous year, repeated exceedances of the standards for nickel were revealed by in-house monitoring too. So although the measures taken in 2005 have led to an overall reduction in nickel levels, they have not beenable to prevent short-term exceedances. Possible technical and organisational solutions to ensure uniform compliance with the monitoring standards are currently being explored. Freshwater consumption was substantially reduced compared with the previous year. Continuing water conservation measures had a positive impact, as did wastewater-minimising process design, which has in the meantime been introduced in all the plants paintshops. Another reason for the reduction in water consumption compared with previous years was the repair of a fractured water pipe to the north of Hall 6. This had been causing approximately 50,000 m of drinking water a month to take a short-cut into the rainwater drainage system. The repair was completed in August 2005.

Service providers
A variety of environment-related services are performed at the plant by autonomous VW subsidiaries, and also by external service providers (operation of wastewater facilities, compressed air generation, cleaning, etc.). Prior to starting work, all firms are issued with a technical bulletin listing the most important environmental regulations and policies which must be complied with, and giving details of the relevant contact persons. Compliance with these regulations and policies is monitored by on-the-spot checks, and if necessary practical recommendations are made. The most important service providers are included in the regular environmental audits carried out by internal and external verifiers. The environmental requirements for external suppliers are described in the general section.

Hazard potential
Inevitably, a certain hazard potential is posed by the use of potentially water-polluting substances in all production sectors, for a wide variety of purposes, and the handling of hazardous materials and substances. Employee training in this area, in particular training of employees who have a multiplier function, is taken very seriously. In addition to the training of environmental specialists already mentioned, training has also been provided for supervisors and planning staff. A detailed register is maintained of all facilities at the plant which handle water-hazardous liquids. The register contains all the most important data about these facilities and reminds operators of due inspection dates. In 2006, assessors carried out 209 inspections on such facilities and assisted the operators in rectifying any deficiencies. Almost 60% of installations were found to be without deficiencies. The overwhelming majority of weaknesses were classified by the experts as minor. When new installations or modification of existing installations is planned, initial meetings are held with planning
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staff and future operators to allow important technical and organisational safety requirements to be defined before construction work begins. In a number of lifting platforms used at the plant, conventional hydraulic fluids have been replaced by nonwater-hazardous biodegradable hydraulic fluids, thereby significantly reducing the soil and groundwater risks associated with such equipment. These measures have resulted in a significant reduction in administrative workload, which has in turn reduced operating costs. It would be desirable to increase the use of such fluids in underground and mobile equipment subject to low-level operating leakage. To reduce risk in the event of an operating incident, solutions were developed and implemented in cooperation with fire safety staff (use of ventilation ducts, provision of mobile skips) to contain releases of hazardous substances and contaminated extinguishing water. The training and coordination programme organised by the Volkswagen AG Hazardous Substances Officer is designed to ensure that hazardous substances and materials are correctly handled.

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Blue motion

BlueMotionTechnologies is the umbrella brand for all products and technologies of the Volkswagen brand that save fuel and reduce emissions of CO2 and pollutants. Four sub-brands come under this label: BlueMotion: for the most economical Volkswagen model in its particular class. All BlueMotiontechnology measures are combined in one special model with distinctive visuals. The Polo BlueMotion, for example, with a combined fuel consumption of 3.3 litres/100 km and 87 g CO2/km, is the most economical 5-seater in the world. BlueMotion Technology: Here, the customer chooses between various models, engines and equipment levels and can add an optional BlueMotionTechnology package. TSI EcoFuel identifies Volkswagens natural gas-powered models with TSI, achieving CO2 emissions that are almost one quarter less than their petrol-engined counterparts. BlueTDI with exhaust gas treatment designates vehicles with the lowest nitrogen oxide emissions (up to 90 percent reduction), ensuring early compliance with the Euro 6 exhaust emissions standard (category N) that will come into effect in 2014. In 2010, production of the Passat BlueTDI in Germany reached 2,800 units, compared to 1,800 units in 2009; up by a factor of 1.5. At koda, cars with particularly low fuel consumption are badged as GreenLine models. The new second generation is available in all koda models. The koda Fabia GreenLine, with CO2 emissions of 89 grams per kilometre, is the koda model with the lowest consumption and emissions. koda also offers the GreenLine Technology equipment package for the Octavia, aimed at environmentally aware customers with their own specific requirements in terms of the comfort and convenience features and equipment level of their car. At SEAT, the Ecomotive and E-Ecomotive labels (for the lowest-consumption SEAT model) designate particularly economical models. The SEAT Ibiza E-Ecomotive, with emissions of only 89 grams of CO2 per kilometre, is the vehicle with the lowest consumption and emissions. Ecomotive means that
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SEAT offers various models and engine options with a start/stop system and recuperation. In addition, SEAT offers market-specific models such as bi-fuel (LPG) and multi-fuel (E85) vehicles with lower CO2 emissions. True to the notion of Vorsprung durch Technik. Efficiency: standard in every Audi, all vehicles at Audi are equipped with fuel-saving technologies. The new Audi A1, for example, is already fitted with the start/stop system, recuperation and an on-board computer with an efficiency program. Audi now offers 54 models with a CO2 value of less than 140 g/km. Of these, 17 fall within the range up to a maximum of 120 g/km. In addition, Audi offers flex-fuel vehicles, which can be run on fuel ontaining 85% ethanol, as well as TDI Clean Diesel technologies. The customary economy of the TDI and the efficient minimisation of the emissions of the ultra-low emission system ensure both economical and clean motoring.

Customer information
Sustainable mobility calls for a joint effort on the part of the manufacturer and the driver. Reducing the CO2 emissions of the vehicles we build is a goal that keeps us motivated in our everyday work. With BlueMotion Technologies we are already setting the standards out on the road. And through a combination of such leadingedge automotive technology and an eco-friendly style of driving, our vehicles can become even more efficient. Its an approach we call Think Blue. Think Blue. stands for a brand mindset that goes beyond products and technologies, its a reminder to join with our customers and employees to act in an even more environmentally compatible way. As an integral approach, Think Blue. is fully aligned with the core values of the Volkswagen brand innovative, valuable and responsible. In terms of content, Think Blue. rests on three conceptual pillars: development of eco-friendly products and solutions; fostering of environmentally compatible personal behaviour; and supporting environmental initiatives. We began presenting Think Blue. to a wider public at the end of February 2010. As part of an integrated campaign, the underlying mind-set is being conveyed not only in classical brochures or flyers but also through social networks, clearing the way for a targeted engagement in dialogue with our customers. When we know in which areas of ecological sustainability our customers see room for improvement and know which way their thoughts are turning, we are even better placed to join forces with them to drive sustainable change. One special focus is on the involvement of our employees through a range of internal measures designed to heighten awareness of the way each individual deals with energy in their own sphere of influence. And because we think acting sustainably should also be fun, we have also added game elements to Think Blue. In addition to the existing activities, through progressive internationalisation, stakeholder involvement and integration measures along the value chain, we will be working to permanently establish Think Blue. as the mind-set of the Volkswagen brand.

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Electro mobility
In future, Volkswagens heart will also beat with an electric pulse. According to our roadmap, the recently-introduced Touareg Hybrid will be followed in 2012 by the Jetta Hybrid and, in the following year, by the E-Up!, just ahead of the Golf blue-e-motion. One of these models will also be the brands first all-electric vehicle in the USA. Volkswagen will be the first vehicle manufacturer to offer an electric car that is accessible to every customer. Engineers in America, Europe and Asia are creating the platform for this initiative. In this worldwide research and pre-development network, Volkswagen is investigating modular options for new electrical components and is also researching a variety of energy storage concepts. The company regards not only the bodywork, but also the electric motor the electric heart of the e-car along with the battery system and power electronics as a core competence. The electric motors, for example, will be manufactured at the Kassel plant and the battery system in Braunschweig. With the development of an electrical module that allows flexible and efficient integration of the electric motor into the various vehicle platforms, Volkswagen also plans to forge ahead with the electrification of further models. The five-door and five-seater version of the Golf blue-e-motion study will be driven by an electric motor built into the front of the engine compartment, delivering a maximum output of 85 kW/115 hp. It has a continuous power output of 50 kW/69 hp. The electricity used to drive the motor is stored in a lithium-ion battery with a capacity of 26.5 kilowatt-hours. Depending on driving style and other factors, such as use of the air conditioning and heating, ranges of up to 150 kilometres can be achieved. The Volkswagen Group is aiming to become the market leader in e-mobility by 2018. The focus will initially be on Europe, China, Japan and the USA as the main world markets, and the success of e-mobility in these areas will be vital to the global implementation of the Volkswagen Groups e-mobility strategy.

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Resource efficiency
Volkswagen is constantly striving to improve its resource efficiency. This is not simply measured as the ratio of resource input to product output in a process but taken in a holistic context. Consequently, resource efficiency is not only a top priority in product design and production but is also fostered by efficient product use and recycling. Volkswagen is committed to the systematic enhancement of its resource efficiency. So when innovative vehicle and component production processes were recently selected, The Company reviewed the effectiveness of materials flow management and this approach is now being introduced. The examples under the heading of Environmental Technology highlight the specific effects of resource efficiency at Volkswagen. In addition, energy and material consumption for component production are being reduced. Volkswagen is tackling the key issue of base load consumption, for example by packages of measures designed to reduce the standby energy consumption of its plants. To ensure more efficient material use, processes with minimum lubrication and dry machining are used. This also includes orbital cold forming, an innovative forming method that replaces the machining processes previously used. As the blanks for orbital forming are near to the shape of the final part, the quantity of waste produced is reduced significantly.
Vehicle recycling

Volkswagen has developed and introduced a number of processes to ensure that 85% of new vehicles by weight can be recycled and 95% recycled or recovered. These figures are regularly reviewed by the Kraftfahrtbundesamt, Germanys Federal Motor Vehicle Bureau. Thanks to the processing of shredder residue with the Volkswagen SiCon process, it is now possible to recycle or recover 95% of an end-of-life vehicle in a way that is both environmentally compatible and economically viable. Normally, end-oflife Volkswagen vehicles are taken back free of charge in the EU. These vehicles are then recycled by a tightly meshed network of mediumsized partner companies. Many used components (some 13,000 different parts in all) are remanufactured and tested by Volkswagen, and offered for sale as reprocessed parts. These parts meet the same quality requirements and benefit from the same warranties as new parts. Recycling activities are also being gradually extended

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to markets outside the EU. For example, from 2011, major components are to be remanufactured in China. Recycled materials Reducing the use of primary raw materials is a top priority for Volkswagen. This is why the use of quality-assured recycled materials is not only permitted in almost all vehicle components but explicitly required by Volkswagens general environmental specification that applies to all projects. The share of all recycled materials in the weight of the current Golf, Polo and Sharan series is about 40%. Apart from a large number of metals, recycled plastics are also used. One example is the underbody tray, which is made from 100% recycled plastics. These positive results are confirmed by test certificates issued by TV NORD.

Efficient production
Energy management in the production sector In the production sector, all measures geared to efficient energy use are coordinated by the Energy Management team. The team supports Group-wide best practice-sharing and organises workshops and events at the plants such as the recent Energy and Environment Day, which included an exhibition with examples and information about efficiency-enhancing measures. In addition, the Energy Management team develops Group-wide standards on energy efficiency. These standards are rigorously implemented both at existing sites and when constructing new production plants. For example the new plant in Chattanooga, USA, has set a benchmark in energy efficiency with its use of energy-saving ventilation systems and efficient lighting systems with specular reflectors. In total, energy consumption has been reduced by 522,000 MWh since central energy management was introduced, corresponding to a saving of around 296,000 metric tons of CO2 since 2008. To unlock even more potential in the future, the Energy Management team recently began systematically analysing energy flows in specific production sectors. In addition, the Energy Management System has been integrated into the Environmental Management System. In 2010 the Polkowice, Pamplona, Emden, Dresden and Kassel plants all achieved DIN EN 16001 certification. The first Volkswagen plant in the world to be certified to this standard, in 2009, was the Braunschweig plant. Savings of around 10,000 metric tons of CO2 per year are now expected at these plants. The European production sites which operate their own energy-generating plants will face a major challenge when new emissions trading rules come into force in 2013. Under the allocation rules, power- and heat-generating plants will have to buy emissions permits to emit CO2. The percentage of free allowances will be reduced annually.

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Environmental technology
Using environmental technology from Volkswagen, opportunities for improved resource efficiency are identified and the necessary concrete actions are implemented. In the paintshop for example, where the paint tools have to be rinsed with solvents when changing to a new colour, new colour change systems have now been installed which reduce paint loss during changeover by 85%. In the paint booth itself, a new air recirculation system has reduced the amount of intensively pretreated intake air required to just a fifth of previous levels. In the bodyshop meanwhile, the use of new disc lasers can result in a tenfold improvement in energy efficiency.
Water

Water quality and water availability are not only key challenges for humanity, they are also an important issue for the Volkswagen Group. In order to identify which processes in the life cycle of our products are responsible for the highest water consumption, we have calculated water footprints for selected models, based on the extensive data collected for our Life Cycle Assessments. These calculations show that in the case of water consumption unlike CO2 emissions the vehicles service life plays only a minor role. By far the largest proportion of water consumption is accounted for by processes in the upstream material supply chain. Volkswagen takes its responsibilities in this area very seriously, and makes every effort to be economical in its use of water. Volkswagens initiatives extend far beyond simply reducing water consumption. For example at Volkswagen Mexicos Puebla site, 300 hectares of land was afforested during 2008 and 2009 to reduce soil erosion and improve rainwater infiltration into the groundwater. This will increase local water resources by retaining an additional 1.6 million m of water a year for regional use. In the second stage of this project, we are now getting together with 39 local suppliers to plant an additional 200 hectares with native mountain pines.
Air quality

In line with European air quality policy, Volkswagen is making significant reductions in its emissions of key pollutants such s particulates, nitrogen oxides, ammonia, sulphur dioxide and volatile organic compounds. For example in the body shop, all laser welding fumes are captured and filtered out. In the paintshop, overspray from spray-painting already greatly reduced by the use of electrostatic application techniques is further reduced by highly efficient separator systems. New paint booths are now fitted with state-of-the-art particle separators that reduce particle emissions by a factor of 50. At Kassel plant, a modern gas-fired gas-andsteam power plant will soon replace the previous coal-fired system, and this will reduce particulate and nitrogen oxide emissions.

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Biodiversity

Under the heading of Volkswagen connects habitats Volkswagen has begun to develop a global biodiversity management strategy. Clear responsibilities have been defined, and the issue of biodiversity is regularly discussed during the environmental audits of our plants around the world. At many German and European sites, reports have been prepared cataloguing all species meriting conservation in the vicinity of the plant, along with the emissions produced by the plant. Volkswagen is also involved in the international business and biodiversity initiative Biodiversity in Good Company. The German Environment Ministry launched this multi-sector intercompany network in 2007, with the aim of involving industry more closely in implementation of the national biodiversity strategy. 2010 saw the onset of the Aller Project. As part of Volkswagens conservation programme for the Wolfsburg region, this year work is starting on creating habitats for indigenous flora and fauna including the otter, the salmon and the river lamprey. Volkswagen AGs requirements for a modern biodiversity management approach are also communicated to our suppliers, via a B2B platform. In parallel with this, the company is also systematically extending its own expertise in the field through a dialogue with competent partners in Germany that means primarily the German Nature and Biodiversity Conservation Union (NABU).

Green Logistics

Green Logistics is all about increasing the efficiency of transport, container and real estate management with an environment-friendly approach. One example of sustainable transport management is the Multimode Logistics Concept Wolfsburg (MLW), where a regional logistics site is being set up right next to the Mittelland Canal, integrating road, rail and waterway transport systems at one location. The overall concept offers potential savings for finished vehicle transportation in the order of 1.26 million truck-kilometres and a CO2 reduction of around 2,000 metric tons per annum. In the logistics domain, the number of different bulk container types used for the shipment of large components was reduced from 31 to 17 between 2003 and 2010 as a result of increased standardisation. This simplifies container control and reduces the number of empty-load kilometres travelled, resulting in a significant reduction in transport-related CO2 emissions. Sustainability in real estate management is evident in the SEAT al Sol project. The Martorell plant in Spain has been generating power using photovoltaic systems since March 2008. In 2010, the existing logistics areas were integrated into the power generation system. Photovoltaic systems covering a surface area of 135,000 m were installed on roofs and on a covered parking area. The installation is expected to reach a total maximum output of 10.6 MW of green energy by the beginning of 2012. Audis Green Train is another example. In August 2010, Audi became the first company in Germany to use trains powered by green electricity to transport its vehicles from Ingolstadt to the North Sea port of loading in Emden. In doing so, Audi avoids the emission of around 5,250 metric tons of CO2 per annum, equivalent to more than 35 kilograms for each transported vehicle.
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Green IT

The principles of sustainability must also be applied to information and communication technology. Green IT is particularly important for our employees when it comes to their workstations. Here, energy consumption is well below the levels required for ecolabel certification. When selecting IT suppliers and products, we look particularly for the Energy Star or Blue Angel labels. The products we use not only meet but exceed the requirements of European environmental legislation. Another important aspect of Green IT policy at Volkswagen is to use no more equipment than absolutely necessary. By bringing the use of notebooks, monitors, printers and other terminals into line with actual needs, we have been able to reduce the number of items of IT equipment in use within the Group by 66%, resulting in an 86% reduction in energy consumption and CO2 emissions. To improve transparency within the organisation the Sustainable IT research project was launched, as part of an IT-based CSR indicator system. With a focus both on the sustainability of IT itself and on the sustainability achieved by IT, the aim is to develop performance indicators and metrics for a sustainable IT policy. To make the business value of IT transparent across the whole Group, a system of objectives and indicators will be defined which will be embedded, along with the relevant responsibilities, in the IT organisations structures, processes and tools.

Mobility concepts

Mobility is a multidimensional topic that is impacted by many different factors, from climate and energy aspects through globalisation to demographics and urbanisation. In 2010, Volkswagen Group Research developed a strategy that addresses these various aspects and focuses all the Groups activities on the vision of sustainable mobility. The aim is to maximise our Innovation capability to meet the diverse challenges in the many and various regions around the world, For example in densely populated areas it will be essential to ensure more efficient use of scarce infrastructure. Intelligent vehicles, as components in an efficient traffic management system, will provide an effective approach to reducing congestion and accidents.
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With assistance systems that deliver accurate navigation information, help drivers maintain the correct following distance, and help them cross intersections safely or park their vehicle quickly, we are working step by step to develop new ways of promoting intelligent cooperation in urban traffic. Our researchers are working on systems that will make driving less stressful and so ensure safer and more efficient traffic flow for example at roadworks. Particularly in highly urbanised environments, however, no one form of transport, be it the private car or public transport, is capable of meeting all the demand. The bigger the city, the more important it is to integrate a number of different modes of transport. In line with this co-modal approach, our cars of the future will feature car-to-X technologies that will keep drivers informed and in touch and assist them when changing to other modes of transport. And evolution is taking place not only on the technology front but also in attitudes and behaviour. For example the dont own it, just use it philosophy is spawning a range of new mobility services. In its work on flexible hire and leasing concepts, Volkswagen can also draw on its own pioneering efforts in the field of car sharing from the 1990s. Urban micro-mobility E-mobility must be affordable and it must cater uncompromisingly to everyday needs. Volkswagen therefore takes a complete end-to-end approach in its development work. For the last short part of the way into the city centre after drivers have parked their car, the Volkswagen Urban Micro-Mobility ConceptTeam is developing zero-emission micro-vehicles such as the ultra-compact Kickstep folding scooter. After charging up in the boot of the E-Up!, the Kickstep can be unfolded for use as soon as the driver has gone as far as possible by car. Another example of a sub-car complementary mobility solution is the Bik.e. This battery-powered electric bike, with its innovative folding system, fits neatly into the spare wheel well. Lifted out of the car, it unfolds into a full-size bike which provides safe transport at speeds of up to 20 km/h and has a range of at least 20 km.

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FUTURE FOR VW

Audi Urban Future Award


What sort of world awaits city-dwellers of tomorrow? And how can our future urban lifestyles promote sustainable energy management and sustainable mobility? These are the questions being studied by the participants in the Audi Urban Future Award, an architectural competition dedicated to developing architectural and urban planning visions for the future. The aim is to take a serious look into the future and discuss the relationship between mobility, architecture and urban planning.

A quote from VW

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BIBLOGRAPHY
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