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Retailer in a Rural Region

Visits in Co. Donegal, Ireland in January 2011 McGee's Service Station

Our first shop visit was at the McGees Service Station in Falcarragh, Co. Donegal. It was established in 1959 by the current owner Seamus McGees father. Seamus daughter, Meabh, is gradually taking over this successful family business. McGees Service Station is open 7 days a week from 7:30am to 9pm and employs, besides Seamus and Meabh , also 3 part-time employees. As it is located in a Gaeltacht district, both Irish and English are spoken in the store. McGees Service Station is a good example of a multifunctional business, besides the more common gas station services, fuel, car wash and tyre services, the convenience store comprises of groceries, newspapers, stationeries, confectioneries, specialty ice creams and car accessories. Additional services include bill pay/PayPoint, mobile phone top-up, laser cash back service, public service forms, free local newspapers, currency exchange, angling licences, tourist information and ticket sales for local charitable organizations. They also receive and store deliveries for the local community and offer implement parts & accessories for farmers and new car & tractor batteries including battery charge service. There are three other supermarkets in Falcarragh and another service station. After meeting Seamus and Meabh and visiting the store, it is evident that besides the wide range of services and products, their strength lies in providing excellent customer service.

Ballybofey Florist The second shop visit was to Ballybofey Florist. This business was established in 1996 and is operated by husband and wife team, John Griffin and Edel Neely. In addition to being a florist (they are an agent for Interflora) the store also carries a range of products including cards, occasional and seasonal gifts plus a selection of childrens toys. Interflora provides product training and guidance on quality control. They deal with up to 20 suppliers of which 10 are local seasonal suppliers. Some suppliers are even in Holland with whom they deal directly. New products and ideas are sourced by attending trade shows which take place in Dublin and the UK.

Peak season is Christmas and the summer months when most weddings take place. Being located in Ballybofey and only a few miles from N. Ireland means the business has felt the presence of the big supermarket retailers across the border who also stock flowers. There is also competition from people who do floristry from their own home and therefore are not subject to costs associated with operating a shop premises. Possibly the most interesting fact to emerge from the visit was that John and Edel feel that selling via a website on the internet is not going to diminish the need for customers to visit the store. In their experience they believe that buying flowers for weddings in particular require that face to face contact and whilst the internet can be used as a brochure a visit to the store and a personal consultation is still the preferred option. This fact was all the more interesting when it emerged that Edel has a background in IT! Overall the key to the success of this business has been to offer a personalised service, a very important point for weddings and funerals. In addition other factors are the provision of a door to door delivery service and an ever growing product offering.
Visit to the grocery store in Oyndafjr the Faroes in June 2010 Oyndafjr is a village on ster, in the Faroe Islands. The village is located only a half an hour drive from a fairly densely populated Runavk, however road conditions make Oyndafjr an isolated village. The road to Oyndafjr winds from the main road, up to the mountains, then way back like a snake down the valley where Oyndafjr lays with a view of the Atlantic. Oyndafjr has 140 inhabitants and most of them work in Runavik. Relative to the village size, the number of families with children is rather high.

The shopkeeper of the grocery store in Oyndafjr is 82-years old Eivind Petersen. Eivind has worked in the store for 68 years. His uncle took over the old store in the village after he got ill and was forced to stop fishing and find himself a new job. Eivind Petersen was then 14 years old and started helping out in the store. Later he and his wife took over the store. In 1980 Eivind decided to build a new store and it was a big improvement. The new store was big and spacious and there was room for a greater variety of goods and an opportunity to sell other items such as gift items and fishing gear. However, turnover has steadily and continuously gone downwards because people buy goods in the cities where they get a wider variety and better prices, says Eivind. It's hard to compete in

these circumstances, especially when shipping and delivery is both costly and cumbersome. In all the years Eivind has been a shopkeeper in Oyndafjr, it has only been him and his wife who have taken care of the store. Sometimes the children or grandchildren have been helpful, but almost every day in 68 years Eivind has been behind the counter. Eivind has been on vacation only five times in his life and even then only for a very short time.

Today, Eivind hopes that someone would take over the store. He and his wife are tired after years of work. Eivind is looking forward to his daughter taking over the store and she is not entirely unwilling to do so. His daughter lives in the village as well, however she requires that there must be room for vacations and other activities in life, and she says that she has no desire to end up like her parents. But she does see opportunities in the store. She believes that with a few adjustments and participation in the RRR project, she can see options in changing the store concept and have a more targeted range of products and expand the store with a caf.

Quite a few tourists do come to Oyndafjr. It is especially "Rynkusteinarnir" which attracts turists. If the store can capture the attention of the tourists, revenue would grow and offer more possibilities so that a a family can make a living by it. Eivinds motto is: "If the store and school closes, the village dies." That is why it is so important for him to keep the store open. Until he finds a successor, he will, as long as he lives, get up every morning to sell his products over the counter. -Olga Biskopst-

Nrbutikken i Venabygd, 8th Feb 2010

In the afternoon February 8th the RRR group visited Nrbutikken Venabygd Handel on the beautiful Norwegian Mountains in Eastern Norway. The shopkeepers are Agnes and Dirk who had earlier had a shop in Belgium and who had moved to Venabygd in 2004 with their three children. At that time a project for finding new shopkeepers to Norwegian rural regions was running, and Agnes and Dirk found their new place with the help of this project. They had visited Norway in January 2004, moved to Norway in June 2004 and after two weeks they opened the shop. I challenge was the language but with help of a strong motivation they learned the language very fast. Agnes and Dirk own the facilities, and the family also lives in the house. The shop is mainly run by Agnes and Dirk is mainly working elsewhere, but he helps in the shop when possible. The shop is very dependent on Agnes and her capability, strength and wellbeing. The turnover last year was about 2, 5 million Norwegian crowns. A surprise for them had been that in Belgium the turnover was smaller but they were two people working in the shop there. The main customers come from the village, but also tourists are an important group. The village is very small, only 200 250 permanent inhabitants but there are a lot of cabins on the mountains. Also foreign tourists (German, Swedish and Dutch) have found the place. The shop also has a sign telling that service is offered also in German and Dutch languages. There are two other shops nearby.

The shop used to be an ICA shop earlier but a couple of years ago the shop joined the Nrbutikken chain. Mercur was helping the shopkeeper in this phase and Agnes considers the change of the chain has had only positive effects. The main products in the shop are the normal groceries, fresh bread, caf, fishing licences, small pharmacy, stamps, gas, and lottery. Lottery is very important by attracting customers to the shop.

Mercur had helped the shopkeepers in getting the lottery to the shop. Mercur had also helped in contacting the municipality, making plans, and in marketing. When moving from Belgium the shopkeepers didnt know the system, the region, the decision makers or people, and nobody knew them. Mercur helped them with contacts and knowledge. Agnes found Mercur service very helpful and a similar system didnt exist in Belgium. Agnes has found the community support very important. The feeling had been good already from the first visit to the village. The village inhabitants are loyal to the local shop and this is essential for the existence of the shop. BOOKSTORE ALVDAL BOKHANDELN, 9th Feb 2010

The first stop on our second day of the trip was at the bookstore in the municipality of Alvdal, where Norwegian author Kjell Aukrust was born. The total population in the county is about 2 500, but in Alvdal there are about 900-1000 inhabitants. Current owner Irene bought the shop in 2004 and has been able to generate positive results every year, annual turnover in 2008 was 3, 7 million NOK. There are also a lot of cabins in the area, 60% of customers are tourists and passers-by and 40% local. Irene mentioned that a lot of the tourists and cabin owners dont bring their own books with them anymore, but buy them at her shop. Shop holds a big variety of goods; books, toys, board games, stationery as well as some jewelry, but shopkeepers are still able to keep the variety controlled. They dont get everything their customers as for, mainly because the minimum orders from their suppliers are too big for the shop to be able to sell. Products are very nicely positioned, there is room to walk around and products are easy to find. To get rid of the old stock, store holds a Mammut sale every February. It doesnt really make a lot of money, but helps to rotate the stock and sell the old books. Also Irene mentioned that when the old stuff is gone, she can look at new things to do and try. Store has two main distributors plus some small publishers call every now and then and offer their products to the store. Orders from the main distributors are handled online. Amazon and other online service providers dont affect the sales of the store yet. Irene is taking advantage of the virtual world as well and has Twitter accounts, websites etc. to promote her store. Shopkeeper mentioned downsizing as one of their success factors. Previous owners had employed 3-4 full-time employees, now besides Irene herself, who works full-time, her husband works part-time, without any pay though. Their daughter and another part-time worker work every other Saturday and during summer seasons at the shop as well. Another success factor was the decision to close the print shop at the basement of the book store since it was not profitable. It tells a lot that the only interested buyer for the machinery was a local museum. : )

Third success factor must have been the Merkur project which the shop joined in two years ago. Main reason for joining the project was to see things from a new perspective and to get help making the right decisions at the right time. Irene mentioned that through the project she has been able to meet and share information with her colleagues as well, which has given her more confidence in her own work. The relationship between shopkeepers and their consultant Jon Hidle seems to be very informal and active, since they felt that they can call Jon whenever they need help or advice. As a fourth success factor I would mention cooperation with other entrepreneurs in the area for example in advertising to cabin owners. Local school also purchases their books from the shop, although the margin for those books is rather small. Local books are offered on commission at the store.

Kopparledens Landhandel, Tufsingdalen, 9th Feb 2010

The shop owner is Heidi, who originally comes from Oslo. She took over in 2005 with no experience from retailing but has learned a lot during the 5 years, much because of the help of the Merkur project. In the village there are about 130 permanent inhabitants but during the peak seasons, summer and Easter, the number of customers increases substantially. There are about 200 cabins in the region and the location of the shop is good because of Kopparleden, the road between Falun, Sweden and Norway. The road is popular especially among the motor cyclists, and the shop with its parking place is a (mobile) stop station. The shop is open 6 days a week. The annual turnover of the shop is about 4,5 mNOK. The business form is a limited company and the business and the building are owned by Heidi. The building was recently renovated with help of voluntary work. Heidi has six part-time assistants. In addition to the shop there is an information station, a post dep and a petrol station (not owned by Heidi). The nearest shop is about 40 km from Tufsingdalen. Kopparledens Landhandel is a part of the Nrbutikken chain, Heidi is the owner and manager of the business. On everything that goes through the cash machine i.e. turnover, she has to pay 0,87% to the Norges gruppen, which runs the Nrbutikken chain.She buys some products also from other suppliers. As the place is a rest stop for travelers, other services have and will be developed: canoeing, fish pond and a small camping area, fishing licenses, lottery, toilets and a bigger parking. The governmental road department has a man who looks after of the parking place regularly. Now Heidi is starting to build a small hut (open with roof, benches and a grill) where the travelers can cook.

The Merkur project assists the shop keeper with consultation and marketing but also financially with 5000 6000 annually. This money has been used for investments such as the layouts of the store, the electrical supply, a new coffee machine and an information station. Heidi told that she cannot compete on price on range but she can compete on people coming back. She is involved in many projects aiming at developing the village. Another project aims at developing the services in the area to avoid the travelers to continue to the next village. Part of the project will be to acknowledge the people about place where they can stop. With help of a GPS the motor cyclists can designate the place as a special stopping place. They have here petrol, toilets, water and the travelers also can stay overnight. Also they can cook their own food. In Norway the opening time regulations are quite strict but in the touristic areas it will be possible to keep open also on Sundays. That is also what Heidi wants to try because Sundays seem to be more important days than what she earlier thought. There is potential to do more business. So this is a multifunctional shop, concludes mr. Helge Shei, the manager of the Merkurprogramme. It has a pharmacy, an info station, a small coffee shop with coffee machine, chairs and a table, lottery, information from the municipalities, and other services described above.

RRR project group visited UIG Community Shop 24th June 2009, on second day of our 2nd international meeting in Stornoway, Scotland.

The shop is owned by the community. Anyone can buy shares of this shop. Prices are kept as low as possible; profit making is not a target but making the products and services available for villagers. In addition to regular groceries, the shop has a variety of other products and services, like dietary products, souvenirs, gas pump, post office, meeting room with video conferencing facilities, laundry, book shelf where people can change books, drink dispenser etc.

There are only 3 product deliveries in week. One important factor which helped in getting to the low figure is a compact cold storage room. Even vegetables remain fresh when you dont need to put them all immediately in shelves in your shop. Customers can sit and relax with a good book and hot drink and fill in the lottery. If they just passed by on their tour around Island of Lewis, checking the local art pieces and souvenirs, mailing some post cards to friends and buying food and drinks from the shop may interest them.
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RRR - RETAIL IN RURAL REGIONS (2009 - 2011)

Together we are trying to find solutions for rural retailers: What are the best options to increase shops profitability in rural areas? How to meet high standards of ICT use? How to improve service quality in rural communities? RRR - Retail in Rural regions project gives us resources and opportunity to make a difference. The overall objective is improved service quality in small communities by supporting the survival, development and growth of rural retail shops. Northern Periphery Programme (European Union, European Regional Development Fund) is partially financing the 1,3 M's project.

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What type of shops do we support? What support is available? Our aim is to increase the number of multifunctional shops in our region. A multifunctional store refers to a store that provides a wide range of services in addition to groceries. The shop has the ability to survive also in regions where the population is diminishing. Services can be both public and commercial. Due to the multifunctionality of such rural stores the retail owners must be able to handle a variety of tasks. Four factors are especially important and vital in order for a multifunctional store to be successful and are bottlenecks which this project will attempt to solve:

1. The retailers roles and competence levels. 2. The commitment from the communities. 3. Institutional frameworks. 4. Distribution Following this, it is important to develop retailers abilities to address these factors. They must be good retailers, of course; however they must also deal with different issues associated with social services, entrepreneurship and the various multifunctional services which are offered in addition to the regular grocery store retail. RRR project staff will help to overcome the bottlenecks of establishing multifunctional stores and will support the start-up and running of these kinds of stores. RRR participants are for example: Providing retailers consultancy on developing the best store models Providing multi-functional retail entrepreneurship programmes locally and trans-boundary in face-to-face work shops and via the Internet Implementing the best multifunction retail strategy models for the participating retail shops including service/ product selection planning Putting in place and implementing transnational collaboration (training, exchange of experiences and contacts between retailers, consultants and partner institutions) Creating a model for solving the transportation problems in each region Setting up a functioning e-retail platform with virtual learning material, information database and help desk

Who can participate? Shopkeepers and employees are encouraged to join the project activities if the location of the shop meets the following criteria: The rural area should consist of less than 3000 inhabitants Minimum 30 minutes travelling time to the nearest town or city offering a wide variety of services OR 10 km distance from the rural shop to next shop Or your participation can be assessed and approved based on other, well justified criteria.

Participation is free of charge. RRR project cannot compensate your own costs related to the participation (e.g. your working hours). You can make a decision on your activity level in the project after a needs analysis and recommendations. We also welcome participation in the project from other interested stakeholders and authorities with similar targets for cooperation. Please do not hesitate to contact us!

Lets work together to keep the cash flowing in rural shops!


As organised retail in rural India awaits the arrival of Reliance Retail, current majors like ITC, Godrej and DSCL are expanding their retail operations by setting up more stores, entering new states and offering newer product categories. A shift from selling agri-inputs will help these stores target the non-farming segments. It is a little known fact that, while 25% of the rural population is not engaged in agriculture, it earns 50% of the rural income. When organised retail first made its presence felt in rural India, it wasnt a pure retailing operation targeting the rural masses. Companies like DSCL and Godrej who had significant agri-business interests, set them up to meet the needs of farmers in a stores catchments area. A typical agri-input s one-stop shops meant to meet the occupational needs of farmers by providing agri-inputs and fertilisers. These stores, like DSCLs Hariyali Kisan Bazaar, ITCs Choupal Saagar etc. tend to be located in small towns that function as procurement hubs where the farmers come to sell their produce. Their earnings are tapped then and there, by getting them to combine their visit with shopping. These stores tend to target farmers with all sizes of holdings, We build our offerings for everyone, from the farmer owning 20 acres to the one owning 200, says Rajesh Gupta, business head, Hariyali Kisan Bazaar, It wouldnt be done any other way as there is a similarity on the application side, everyone needs the same inputs. While organised retail centred on these stores, unorganised retail revolves around the local village shop and the haat. Shops are usually present in villages with a population of more than 500 people.... Single Page Format Previous - 1 - 2 - 3 - Next

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They stock more product categories than what similar urban shops would, but there isnt much variety offered within a category. Haats are weekly mobile supermarkets that are spread over 2-3 acres of land, with more than 300 stalls, selling anything from animal feed to local medicines. Where unorganised retail disappoints is in that the goods sold are often spurious and there is no guarantee of quality for many of the goods being sold be it agri-inputs, FMCG etc. The typical shop is cluttered and congested with limited variety and few national brands. Many of the goods are sold at prices higher than the maximum retail price with shopkeepers giving goods shortages, transportation costs etc. as rationale What these stores ended up doing, according to Pradeep Kashyap, the director of MART, is make shopping for the rural consumer a hellish experience. This despite the fact that the rural market represents...

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STUDY OF RURAL CONSUMER BEHAVIOR TOWARDS RURAL RETAIL STORES


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Name: Krishan Kumar (2008 -2010) Title: STUDY OF RURAL CONSUMER BEHAVIOR TOWARDS RURAL RETAIL STORES

Executive Summary India, like Britain, is also a nation of shopkeepers. With over 12 mn retail outlets, India has one of the highest densities of retail outlets in the world with one retail outlet for 90 persons. Retailers inspired by the WalMart story of growth in small town America are tempted to focus on smaller towns and villages in India. However, a careful analysis of the town strata-wise population, population growth, migration trends and consumer spend analysis reveals a very different picture for India. After a long spell of shortages, which shackled consumer buying for decades, retail is becoming India's new mantra. The Sanskrit word "mantra" is not just "hymn" or "slogan"; it embraces aspiration and encompasses new India's way of life. While the retailing industry itself has been present through history in our country, it is only the recent past that has witnessed so much dynamism. We have entered the 21st century at a time when the demography of our population is changing significantly to drive organized retail growth. India now has a large young working population with a median age of 24. The number of nuclear families in urban areas is growing fast. Then there is the increase in working women population. Add to these the emerging opportunities in the service sector. Lifestyle habits are shifting from austerity to complete self-indulgence and Indians are now unapologetic about spending lavishly on non-essential goods such as luxury watches, cars, and hi-tech products. India can be said to have entered the second phase of retail growth when there is high-speed growth. There are retail chains like Tata's Westside, Pantaloon's Big Bazaar and Rahejas' Shoppers' Stop, to name a few,

along with global players such as McDonald's and Benetton, trying to tap country's vast potential. Bringing all these under one roof are mega malls such as Lifestyle, Fun Republic and Big Bazaar. Now, top names in international malls such as Marks and Spencer and Mango are also eying the Indian market. It is only later that the retailing scene will move to the other phases when the fruits of rapid growth will result in economies of scale and greater efficiency leading finally to consolidation through mergers and acquisitions. Thus, retailing in India has a very long haul ahead. Quantum jump in rural retail outlets In India for a long time a large chunk of retail outlets were grocery shop. This pattern had been changing in recent years, in urban and rural markets. Of late, India's largely rural population has also caught the eye of retailers looking for new areas of growth. A slew of supermarket chains, including those of the Tata and ITC, are set to storm the rural areas of the country as corporate realize the huge potential of the untapped market ITC launched the country's first rural mall 'Chaupal Sagar', offering a diverse product range from FMCG to electronic appliances to automobiles, attempting to provide farmers a one-stop destination for all of their needs. Companies such as Godrej and DCM Shriram Consolidated are launching `one-stop shops' for farmers and their communities. Godrej Agrovet, for instance, is planning to set up 1,000 Aadhar stores across rural India by 2010. DCM Shriram plans to set up 35 rural/semi-urban utility marts over 2006-07. Positioned as a one-stop shop, the Hariyali Kisaan Bazaar Chain will cater to a variety of farmers' needs by providing access to retail banking, LPG outlets and even a motorcycle showroom. As clear from the story on Reliance Fresh and Metro, organized retail sector can bring a revolutionary change in rural India unless it goes for quick short-term gains. With Wal-Mart famous for its 'Always Low Prices' coming in India with Bharati as equal partner, Indian farmers and rural craftsmen can hope for a better direct deal. Retailing does not benefit just the consumer. It can give huge benefits to other industries, to government, and to the entire economy. The Indian retail scenario is poised for a quantum leap. Not only are newer names set to dot the retail landscape but also new and emerging retail formats will drive the diversity of the fast-changing retail backdrop. Organized Retail means 'Big Stores' a common mythnothing can be further then the truth. In its very essence, organized retailing is about "aggregating value" and what shape, size and configuration your customer facing entity takes is largely a function of your offer and proposition. A growing population, a young workforce and zooming consumer confidence will fuel the expansion of the retail sector. As organized retail in rural India awaits the arrival of Reliance Retail, current majors like ITC, Godrej and DSCL are expanding their retail operations

by setting up more stores, entering new states and offering newer product categories. A shift from selling agri-inputs will help these stores target the non-farming segments. It is a little known fact that, while 25% of the rural population is not engaged in agriculture, it earns 50% of the rural income. The retail market is the next growth frontier for corporate India. It offers an opportunity for a large player to build a Rs. 40,000 Cr retail business spanning multiple categories by 2015 (at current prices). However, to capitalize on the opportunity, a player needs to be aggressive in its outlook and build scale quickly. India's rural retail market is expected to grow by 29 percent to 1.8 trillion rupees by 2012 helped by rising incomes and changing consumption patterns, is found in a survey conducted by industry. But poor infrastructure, supply chain inefficiency, and product pricing must be addressed if its full potential is to be realized, the report released by the Confederation of Indian Industry and Yes Bank on Thursday said. Rural retail includes fast moving consumer goods, durables, agricultural inputs and autos like tractors. In India rural per capita income would double to 14,000 rupees by 2012 as more families switch to commercial from subsistence farming, a big enough jump to spur demand for a wider range of products. Village households are expected to rise to 153 million in 2009-10 from 135 million in 2001-02, probably making rural India the largest potential market in the world. However, there is no organized marketing and distribution in 87 percent of India's villages, home to 50 percent of the rural population. Corporate are increasingly eyeing rural areas as drivers of future growth.

Objectives:
1. 2. 3. 4. 1. 2. 3. 4. To determine the importance of Indian rural market To know the features of rural retail stores To analyze the perception of the rural people in the context of retail stores To know about different between the rural and urban retailing To determine the importance of Indian rural market To know the features of rural retail stores To analyze the perception of the rural people in the context of retail stores To know about different between the rural and urban retailing

Recommendations & Suggestions:

The retailer approach should be more professional like in urban

The retailers should try for up selling and cross selling rather to focus on the bulk selling The promotion strategy should be local and easy to grab able for the target audience The quarries and questions should be addressed by retailer The awareness about product quality should be spread between customer so they can shift to these stores rather to traditional stores Stores should enhance their portfolio so that more and more customers can find their needs.

Limitations:

Researcher has observed that data was not sufficient and not up to the mark as per the expectations. Due to the diversity of the locations and lack of awareness researcher was not able to collect qualitative data. The stores were not helpful to the researcher. Customer data base are not provided by the retail stores because it is confidential for the stores and the companies. Stores have provided recorded data on the sales figures The bias opinions of customers and employees

Conclusion: In India for a long time a large chunk of retail outlets were grocery shop. This pattern had been changing in recent years, in urban and rural markets. Of late, India's largely rural population has also caught the eye of retailers looking for new areas of growth. A slew of supermarket chains, including those of the Tata and ITC, are set to storm the rural areas of the country as corporate realize the huge potential of the untapped market ITC launched the country's first rural mall 'Chaupal Sagar', offering a diverse product range from FMCG to electronic appliances to automobiles, attempting to provide farmers a one-stop destination for all of their needs. Companies such as Godrej and DCM Shriram Consolidated are launching `one-stop shops' for farmers and their communities. Godrej Agrovet, for instance, is planning to set up 1,000 Aadhar stores across rural India by 2010. DCM Shriram plans to set up 35 rural/semi-urban utility marts over 2006-07. Positioned as a one-stop shop, the Hariyali Kisaan Bazaar Chain will cater to a variety of farmers' needs by providing access to retail banking, LPG outlets and even a motorcycle showroom. Marketers are trying to grab this untapped market but still the reach of those players is mere they should more focused and rural oriented. There are some points which they should undertaken

The retailer approach should be more professional like in urban

The retailers should try for up selling and cross selling rather to focus on the bulk selling The promotion strategy should be local and easy to grab able for the target audience The quarries and questions should be addressed by retailer The awareness about product quality should be spread between customer so they can shift to these stores rather to traditional stores Stores should enhance their portfolio so that more and more customers can find their needs.

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The above article was extracted from dissertations in Marketing, Finance, Human Resources, Strategy, Information Systems by the students from Skyline College. Skyline College is amongst the top MBA and BBA institutes in Delhi, Gurgaon (NCR). For more information on Skyline College or the MBA, BBA programmes please CLICK HERE. For MBA, BBA Admission queries please CLICK HERE , & Also Skyline blog

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