-------


SHAWN J. KOLITCH, OSB No. 063980
E-mail: shawn@khpatent.com
THOMAS J. ROMANO, OSB No. 053661
E-mail: tromano@khpatent.com
DAVID C. BOURGEAU III, OSB No. 103476
E-mail: bourgeau@khpatent.com
KOLISCH HARTWELL, P.C.
520 S.W. Yamhill Street, Suite 200
PI EP'-' N A ~ ' -. ­
. ~ '-C . r::' lC.' 1.5:0::'t/.SDC-ORP
Portland, Oregon 97204
Telephone: (503) 224-6655
Facsimile: (503) 295-6679
Attorneys for Plaintiff
UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT
DISTRICT OF OREGON
PORTLAND DIVISION
SCALAR CORPORATION, a Japanese
corporation,
Plaintiff,
v.
OASIS SCIENTIFIC, INC., a South
Carolina corporation,
Defendant.
3'12 - CV-51 6 .­
Case No.
COMPLAINT FOR PATENT
INFRINGEMENT
DEMAND FOR JURY TRIAL
F or its complaint, Plaintiff Scalar Corporation ("Scalar") alleges against Defendant Oasis
Scientific, Inc. ("Oasis") as follows:
NATURE OF THE CASE
1. This is a civil suit for patent infringement under the patent laws of the United
States, 35 U.S.C. §§ 1 et seq., and specifically under 35 U.S.C. §§ 271 and 281.
Page 1 - COMPLAINT FOR PATENT INFRINGEMENT
• •
THE PARTIES
2. Scalar is a Japanese corporation, with a principal place of business and a mailing
address at San-Ei Building 1-22-2, 2nd Floor, Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-Ku, Tokyo 160-0023,
Japan.
3. Upon information and belief, Oasis is a South Carolina corporation with a mailing
address of P.O. Box 25574, Greenville, South Carolina 29616 and a registered agent located at
320 Ascot Ridge Lane, Greer, South Carolina 29650.
JURISDICTION AND VENUE
4. This Court has federal question jurisdiction under 28 U.S.c. §§ 1331 and 1338(a),
because ofthe claim under 35 U.S.C. § 271 for patent infringement.
5. This Court has personal jurisdiction in this action because Oasis conducts
business in the state of Oregon in connection with the allegations of this lawsuit.
6. Venue is proper in this judicial district under 28 U.S.c. § 1391 and 1400.
THE ASSERTED PATENT
7. Plaintiff Scalar owns U.S. Patent No. 5,442,489 ("the '489 patent"), issued
August 15, 1995.
8. The '489 patent covers handheld portable magnifiers. These magnifiers may be
used, for example, for educational, scientific, or law enforcement purposes, and may display
images on a display such as a computer monitor. The '489 patent is derived from a patent
application that was filed in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office ("USPTO") on September 23,
1994. USPTO examined the application, determined that the claimed invention was novel and
nonobvious, and awarded the '489 patent on August 15, 1995. A copy of this patent, as
originally issued, is attached as Exhibit A.
Page 2 COMPLAINT FOR PATENT INFRINGEMENT
• •
9. On August 6, 2007, Scalar requested reexamination of various claims of the' 489
patent from USPTO, based on prior art references uncovered during prosecution of the Korean
and Japanese counterparts to the '489 patent. Specifically, Scalar requested reexamination of
claims 1,6, 7, 11, 16,23 and 28 of the '489 patent in view of the newly uncovered references.
10. On March 30, 2010, USPTO issued an Ex Parte Reexamination Certificate,
confirming the patentability of original claim 6, amended claims 1, 7, 11, 16, 19,23 and 28, and
newly presented claims 33-50. A copy of the Ex Parte Reexamination Certificate is attached as
Exhibit B.
11. The reexamined '489 patent gives Scalar the right to exclude others from making,
using, offering for sale, and selling the claimed invention within the United States, and from
importing the claimed invention into the United States.
12. Since at least as early as September 12, 2006, Scalar has caused products covered
by the '489 patent to be marked with U.S. Pat. No. 5,442,489, in compliance with 35 U.S.C. §
287.
THE INFRINGING PRODUCTS
13. Oasis is making, using, offering for sale, selling, repamng and/or importing
handheld portable magnifiers and teaching the use of such magnifiers, including, but not
necessarily limited to, the ViTiny UM02 Handheld USB Digital Microscope, the Vi Tiny UM05
Handheld USB Digital Autofocus Microscope, the ViTiny Pro 10 Portable Digital Microscope,
the ViTiny Pro 10 Plus Portable Digital Microscope, the Vi Tiny VT-300 Portable Digital
Microscope, the ViTiny VT-101 Portable Digital Microscope, the MANIOll Handheld USB
Digital Microscope, the Firefly DE300 Polarized Handheld USB Digital
MicroscopelDermatoscope, the Firefly DE350 Wireless Polarized Handheld Digital
Page 3 COMPLAINT FOR PATENT INFRINGEMENT
• •
MicroscopelDermatoscope, the Firefly GT800 Handheld USB Digital Microscope, the Firefly
GT600 Wireless Handheld Digital Microscope, and the Firefly GT200 Handheld USB Digital
Microscope, all of which are covered by one or more claims of the reexamined '489 patent.
These products each include, among other features, an imaging system and a light source
enclosed within a one-handed graspable case and configured to display an image on an
associated monitor display. Copies of web pages indicating that Oasis otfers the infringing
products for sale are attached as Exhibit C.
CAUSE OF ACTION - INFRINGEMENT OF THE '489 PATENT
14. Oasis has infringed and is infringing the '489 patent by making, using, selling,
offering to sell, repairing and/or importing handheld portable magnifiers including, but not
necessarily limited to, the ViTiny UM02 Handheld USB Digital Microscope, the ViTiny UM05
Handheld USB Digital Autofocus Microscope, the Vi Tiny Pro 1 0 Portable Digital Microscope,
the ViTiny Pro10 Plus Portable Digital Microscope, the Vi Tiny VT -300 Portable Digital
Microscope, the ViTiny VT-101 Portable Digital Microscope, the MANlO11 Handheld USB
Digital Microscope, the Firefly DE300 Polarized Handheld USB Digital
MicroscopelDermatoscope, the Firefly DE350 Wireless Polarized Handheld Digital
MicroscopelDermatoscope, the Firefly GT800 Handheld USB Digital Microscope, the Firefly
GT600 Wireless Handheld Digital Microscope, and the Firefly GT200 Handheld USB Digital
Microscope, which are covered by one or more claims of the '489 patent, without authorization
from Scalar.
15. Infringement by Oasis has been and continues to be willful, with knowledge of
the '489 patent and Oasis's infringement thereof, entitling plaintiffs to increased damages under
35 U.S.C. § 284 and to attorneys' fees incurred in prosecuting this action under 35 U.S.C. § 285.
Page 4 COMPLAINT FOR PATENT INFRINGEMENT
e
e.
16. Scalar has suffered, and will continue to suffer, substantial damages in an amount
to be proven at trial, through lost profits, lost sales and/or lost royalties, due to infringement of
the' 489 patent by Oasis.
17. Scalar has suffered, and will continue to suffer, permanent and irreparable injury,
for which Scalar has no adequate remedy at law.
18. Scalar is entitled to relief provided by 35 U.S.C. §§ 281, 283, 284, and 285.
PRAYER FOR RELIEF
WHEREFORE, Plaintiff Scalar Corporation prays for judgment as follows:
A. That Oasis has infringed, and is infringing, the '489 patent in violation of 35
U.S.C. § 271;
B. That Oasis's infringement of the '489 patent is willful;
C. That Oasis be preliminarily and permanently enjoined against all acts of
infringement of the '489 patent pursuant to 35 U.S.C. § 283;
D. That Oasis be required to deliver to Scalar for destruction any and all articles in
its possession and/or under its control that infringe the '489 patent, including, but not limited to,
the ViTiny UM02 Handheld USB Digital Microscope, the ViTiny UM05 Handheld USB Digital
Autofocus Microscope, the ViTiny ProlO Portable Digital Microscope, the Vi Tiny ProtO Plus
Portable Digital Microscope, the ViTiny VT-300 Portable Digital Microscope, the ViTiny VT­
101 Portable Digital Microscope, the MANlOll Handheld USB Digital Microscope, the Firefly
DE300 Polarized Handheld USB Digital MicroscopelDermatoscope, the Firefly DE350 Wireless
Polarized Handheld Digital Microscope/Dermatoscope, the Firefly GT800 Handheld USB
Digital Microscope, the Firefly GT600 Wireless Handheld Digital Microscope, and the Firefly
Page 5 COMPLAINT FOR PATENT INFRINGEMENT
• •
GT200 Handheld USB Digital Microscope, along with any associated packaging and
advertisements;
E. That Oasis be ordered to pay Scalar the damages that Scalar has suffered due to
infringement of the '489 patent by Oasis, together with interest thereon and costs pursuant to 35
U.S.C. § 284, including profits lost by plaintiffs as a result of infringement of the '489 patent; in
any event Scalar shall be awarded no less than a reasonable royalty for the unauthorized sale of
the patented inventions by Oasis;
F. That this case be declared exceptional pursuant to 35 U.S.C. § 285, due to willful
infringement of the '489 patent by Oasis, and that Scalar be awarded trebled damages and
reasonable attorneys' fees; and
G. That Scalar be awarded such other and further relief as the Court deems just and
proper.
DEMAND FOR JURY TRIAL
Plaintiff Scalar Corporation hereby demands a trial by jury.
DATED this 22nd day of March, 2012.
Respectfully submitted,
KOLISCH HARTWELL, P.C.
~
B y / ~ __~ __~ ~ ~ ___________________
OLITCH, OSB No. 063980
E-mail: swn@khpatent.com
520 S.W. Yamhill Street, Suite 200
Portland, Oregon 97204
Telephone: (503) 224-6655
Facsimile: (503) 295-6679
OfAttorneys for Plaint(ff
Page 6- COMPLAINT FOR PATENT INFRINGEMENT


United States Patent [19] [11] Patent Number: 5,442,489
Yamamoto et at. [45] Date of Patent: Aug. 15, 1995
[54] MAGNIFYING OBSERVATION APPARATUS
[75] Inventors: Kiyokazu Yamamoto; Masao
Yamamoto, both of Tokyo, Japan
[73] Assignees: Scalar Corporation; Mitsubishi
Chemical Corporation, both of Japan
[21] AppL No.: 311,724
[22] Filed: Sep. 23, t994
Related U.s. Application Data
[63] Continuation of Ser.' No. 983,848, filed as
PCT/JP92/00836" July 2, 1992; abandoned.
[30] Foreign Application Priority Data
Jul. 4, 1991 [JP] Japan .................................. 3-059616
Jui. 4, 1991 [JP] Japan .................................. 3-0596n
Jul. 4, 1991 [JP] Japan .................................. 3·189569
[51] Int. Cl.6 ...•: ......................................... G02B 27/00
[52] U.S. Cl ..................................... 359/810; 3591798;
359/800; 359/802; 359/385
[58] Field of Searclt ............... 3591798, 799. 800, 801,
810.385.386.388,389.
390; 385/33. 119
[56] References Cited
U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS
3,621,1,31 11/1911 Wolff .................................. 358/104
3,625,607 1211911 Bravenec .............................. 355/56
3,8n,193 4/1915 Nakagawa ........................... 359nOO
4,116,,923 12/1919 Young et at. ....................... 348/320
4,881,128 11/1989 Yamada ...•.•.••.:,..,.. .............. 348/310
4,930,851 6/1990 Yamamoto .......................... 385/119
4,988,158 1/1991 Yamamoto ...•...... : ................. 385/33
5,126,812 6/1992 Birkle .................................. 385/119
FOREIGN PAlENT DOCUMENTS
61·296869 1211986 Japan.
62·13811 4/1981 Japan.
63·246131 10/1988 Japan.
1308521 12/1989 Japan.
4101411 4/1992 Japan.
OTIlER PUBLICATIONS
Edited by Minoru Shoji "Photographic lens Hand­
book" Feb. 15, 1978 Shashin Kogyo Shuppan-sha K.K.
{fokyo).
Primary Examiner-Georgia Y. Epps
Assistant Examiner-Thomas Robbins
Attorney, Agent, or Firm-Michael D. Bednarek; Marks
& Murase .
[57] ABSTRACT
The present invention relates to a magnifying observa­
tion apparatus of a video type in which an image of an
object to be ob.served which has been picked up by an
image pick·up apparatus incorporating an imaging de­
vice therein is reproduced on a monitor display and
observed. It is an object of the invention to attain a
compact structure of the entire system so as to permit
easy observation in a simple manner. According to the
present invention, in order to achieve such object, not
only the imaging device but also a control circuit unit
for the imaging device. an optical system for focusing
the image of the object to be observed on the imaging
device. and a light·source lamp for lighting the object to
be are incorporated in the image pick·up
apparatus.
32 Claims, 11 Drawing Sheets
Exhibit A to Complaint, Page 1 of 20

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PRIOR ART
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The magnifying and observing system disclosed in
MAGNIFYING OBSERVATION APPARATUS
This application is a continuation-in'part, continua­
tion of application Ser. No. 07/983,848, (iled as
PCT/JP92100836, July 2, 1992 now abandoned.
[FIELD OF ART]
The present invention relates to a magnifying obser­
vation apparatus suitable for magnifying and observing
various objects in various fields, including the fields of
beauty, medical care, science, and industry.
[BACKGROUND ART]
Heretofore, as magnifying and observing instruments
or devices there have been used, for example, micro­
scopes and magnifiers. But in the case of a microscope,
it is necessary to process an Object to be observed and
then take it to the microscope side. On the other hand,
in the case of a magnifier, it is possible to take the mag­
nifier itself to an object side to be observed and observe
the object without applying any processing thereto;
however, the magnification is low.
With such circumstances as background, the appli­
cant in the present case has previously developed a
magnifying and observing system having both the merit
of high magnification of the microscope and the merit
of handiness of the magnifier (Japanese Patent Laid
Open No. 308527/89, Japanese Patent Application Nos.
26462189 and 273419189, U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,930,851 and
4,988,158).
The magnifying and observing system comprises a
system body (not shown) composed of a monitor dis­
play and a controller. and an image pick-up apparatus (a
lens barrel and a light condensing guide which are re­
ferred to in Japanese Patent Laid Open No. 308527189)
100 shown in FIG. 13. The image pick-up apparatus 100
contains a magnifying and focusing optical system 102
and also incorporates therein optical fibers 103 for con­
ducting into the apparatus an illuminating light to illu­
minate an object M to be observed from a light source
provided on the system body side. The image pick-up
apparatus 100 is further provided at a front end thereof
with a light condensing guide lOS. While the image
pick-up apparatus is held by hand, the light condensing
guide lOS is brought into abutment with the object M or
is drawn close thereto, then an image obtained by an
imaging device (a solid-state image sensing device) 104
incorporated in the image pick-up apparatus 100 is re­
produced on the display and observed. The image pick­
up apparatus 100 is constructed so that the focus is sure
to be taken automatically when a front end of the light
condensing guide lOS is brought into abutment with the
object M or drawn close to the object up to a predeter­
mined distance. Anybody can make observation at a
magnification of fifty to several thousand diameters
without the need of any skill or practice.
In such magnifying and observing system, however, a
light source is disposed within the controller for obtain-.
ing a stronger illuminating light, which is conducted
from the light source to the image pick-up apparatus
through optical fibers. A control circuit unit interposed
between the imaging device and the display for repro­
. duction is also provided within the Controller. Thus, the
controller is needed in addition to the image pick-up
apparatus and the display, resulting in increase in size as
a whole. This point causes dissatisfaction in the case
where a greater importance is attached to handiness.
the foregoing Japanese Patent Laid Open No.
308527/89 or No. 26462/89 or Japanese Patent Applica­
tion No. 273419/89, the image pick-up apparatus is
provided with an illuminating means, as noted previ­
ously, and an image of an object observed is taken in
while the object is lighted by the illuminating means,
then it is reproduced on the display provided on the
system body side and is observed. Therefore, it is possi­
ble to make a stand-free observation, that is, carrying
the image pick-up apparatus by hand up to an object to
be observed and then making observation while keeping
the object in place.
In such observation system, however, the light
source for illuminating an object to be observed is
formed by optical fibers, as mentioned above. More
particularly, light is conducted through a bundle of
optical fibers from the external light source, and front
ends of the optical fibers of the bundle are arranged
annu1arly to form an internal light source. The forma­
tion of such an internal light source can afford a stron­
ger and uniform illuminating light, but requires the
external light source, or the construction of the image
pick-up apparatus becomes complicated. Besides, since
expensive optical fibers are used, an increase of cost is
unavoidable. Further, a very strong external light
source is needed because there occurs propagation loss.
Also in Japanese Patent Application No. 224327/90
(Laid Open No. 107411/92) there is shown an example
of a magnifying observation apparatus. This system has
been developed for making the magnifying observation
apparatus disclosed in the foregoing Japanese Patent
Laid Open No. 308527/89. or Japanese Patent Applica­
tion No. 26462189 or No. 273419/89 smaller in size and
easier to handle. To this end, several improvements are
made therein.
One of the improvements resides in a construction
wherein not only an imaging device but also a control
circuit unit for controlling the imaging device is incor­
porated in an image pick-up apparatus of the observa­
tion system in question. Another improvement resides
in that a front end portion of the image pick-up appara­
tus is bent sideways with respect to the body portion so
that it can be handled in a direction which permits easy
observation. At the same time, a reflecting mirror is
used to change the direction of image light from an
object observed. This is owing to the circumstances that
since the imaging device is integrally connected with
the control circuit unit, a light sensing surface of the
unaging device cannot be made directly perpendicu1ar
to the direction of image light incident from the side-
ways-bent front end portion of the image pick-up appa­
ratus. Thus, the structure using a reflecting mirror is not
always desirable. The use of a reflecting mirror results
in increase in the number of parts and a more compli­
cated structure. Moreover, for example, in the case of
using a polarized light, the polarized light is disturbed
by the reflecting mirror, so that an accurate observation
is impaired.
Further, all of the observation apparatus referred to
above involve troublesomeness such that the replace­
ment of optical system is necessary each time the magni­
fication is to be changed.
The use of a magnification-variable optical system
having a fixed focal plane is a solution to avoiding such
troublesomeness, but those known heretofore as such
magnification-variable structure are not suitable for
stand-free observation systems. In more particu1ar
Exhibit A to Complaint, Page 13 of 20
• •
5,442,489
3 4
terms, a zoom lens is a typical example ofsuch magnifi­
cation-variable structure, but the principle thereof is
such that a focal length is changed continuously by
changing a mutual spacing of plural constituent lenses.
Its design and structure are complicated and an increase
in size of the optical system used therein is unavoidable.
Thus, the zoom lens is not suitable to an observation
system for stand-free observation in which simple struc­
ture and small size are ideal.
In the present invention, the light-source lamp is
constituted as a lamp unit comprising plural lamps ar­
ranged in a predetermined state on a board. The whole
of the lamp unit can be mounted and removed. That is,
S by using a plurality of small lamps in a predetermined
state of arrangements it is made possible to accommo­
date ina narrow space a light source which can supply
a required illuminative force, and obtain illumination
which is uniform and does not give rise to unevenness in
The present invention which has been accomplished 10 luminance for an object to .be observed. Besides, since
under the above-mentioned background aims at attain­
ing a reduction in size and handiness to a greater extent
than in the conventional magnifying observation appa­
ratus having such basic structure as referred to above.
It is another object of the present invention to pro- 1S
vide a magnifying observation apparatus having a struc­
ture which does not require the use of optical fibers.
It is a further object of the present invention to pro­
vide a structure of an image pick-up apparatus having a
the of lamp umt can be mounted and re­
mo:v
ed
, It IS poss1ble to effect the replacement of lamps
easily. ,.
. In the moreover',a front c:nd por­
tic:m of the unage pick-up al?paratus IS bent
;-vtth the body IX;'l'tlon !hereof,.and the unag­
mg .devlce IS mcorporated the pick-up appara­
!US such a that a,light recetvmg of the
deVice to the optical aXIS of an
front end portion bent sideways with respect to a body 20 hght which IS the bent front end
portion thereof which structure does not require the use X:0l'tl?n. ,It IS pOSSIble to
of a reflecting mirror for focusing an image light inci- tion In a fac.mg state of, pick-up
. .., apparatus, that IS, while the longttudinal Side of the
dent from the bent front end portion onto a light reCetv-. . k t . laced' araIl I 'th th
. f" d . Image pIC -up appara us IS p e WI e
mg 0 an eVIce... .
. It IS a still of the Invention to a
sunple structure, a sun­
pIe zoommg structure, to an observatlon system
for stand-free observation.
[DISCLOSURE OF THE INVENTION]
According to the present invention, in a magnifying
observation apparatus wherein an image of an object
picked up by an image pick-up apparatus is reproduced
m p
2S surface of an object to be observed. For example, in
observing skin of user's face, observation can be done
more easily. Moreover, since the light receiving surface
of the imaging device is positioned perpendicularly to
the optical axis of an image light which is incident from
30 the bent front end portion, it is not necessary to change
the optical axis of the light and hence it is not necessary
to use a reflecting mirror.
Further, in the present invention. a simple zooming
structure is formed by allowing an objective lens and an
on a display and observed, at least an imaging device, a 3S imaging device to slide interlocked1y while forming a
control circuit unit for the imaging device, an optical predetermined relation between the two.
system for focusing the image of the object on the imag- This simple zooming structure utilizes the fact that a
ing and a lamp as a source for magnification, m, obtained by an optical system has the
an object to be observed, are mcorporated m the unage relation of m=b/a (a: distance between an object to be
pick-up. . 40 observed and the objective lens, b: distance between the
In apparatus according
to the .sm.
ce
and .the
control c:rrCtDt umt, m.addlbc:m to IMagtng deVice,
are also mcorporated m the unage pick-up apparatus,
the controller which is needed in the foregoing conven- 4S
tional systems is no longer necessary, so that the system
is reduced in size as a whole. Besides, since the lamp as
a light source incorporated in the image pick-up appara­
tus illuminates an object to be observed directly in close
proximity thereto, there is no propagation loss which SO
occurs in the use of optical fibers. and therefore it is
possible to use a lamp of a smaller output. Thus, the
incorporation of a light-source lamp into the image
pick-up apparatus leads to the possibility of a marked
reduction in size of the lamp itself. Also as to the control SS
circuit unit, since it is closer to the imaging device, it is
possible to use a control circuit unit of a far smaller
capacity tl1an in the conventional systetns. and thus the
incorporation of a control circuit unit into the image
objective lens and the imaging device). The value of
m=b/a is changed continuously by allowing the objec­
tive lens and the imaging device to slide in an inter­
locked state which satisfies' the relation of
1/a+ l/b= IIf (f: focal length ofthe objective lens). As
a result, it is possible to change magnification while
maintaining the image pick-up apparatus at a predeter­
mined certain distance from the object to be observed.
A preferred structure of such interlocked sliding of
the optical system and the'imaging device utilizes a cam
structure. More specifically, the objective lens is held in
a fixed state by an optical system holding cylinder hav­
ing a rolIer projection on the periphery thereof. while
the imaging device is held also in a fixed state by an
imaging device holding cylinder having a roller projec­
tion on the periphery thereof. The holding cylinders are
both held slidably by an intermediate cyJinder having a
rectilinear gtlide slot formed on the periphery thereof.
Further, the intermediate cylinder is held for relative
pick-up apparatus leads to the possibility of a great 60 rotation by a cam cylinder having cam slots for the
reduction in size of the same unit. That is, these reduc­
·tions in size permit their incorporation to a still further
extent, and such an organic correlation brings about the
reduction in size of the whole. The term "light-source
lamp" or "lamp" as used herein and also in the ap- 6S
pended claims is used in a broad concept which covers
not only incandescent lamps and fluorescent lamps but
also light etnitting diode and the like.
optical system and the imaging device, respectively,
which cam slots are formed in the periphery of the cam
cylinder. Upon rotation of the cam cyJinder, the roller
projections which are engaged through the gtlide slot of
the intermediate cyJinder with the cam slots for the
optical system and the imaging device, respectively, of
the cam cylinder, are all individually restricted their
movement by the cam slots each formed in a predeter-
Exhibit A to Complaint, Page 14 of 20
• •
5,442,489
5 6
mined curvilinear shape. Consequently, the objective The polarizing unit 16 comprises a second polarizer
lens and the imaging device slide interlockedly under a 18 and a polarization plane rotating means 19. Polarized
predetermined relationship while their rotation is pre­ light obtained by a first polarizer 22 which will be de­
vented by the guide slot of the intennediate cylinder. scribed later can be shut off by turning ON a non-reflec­
tion image switch 21 provided on the outer surface of
[BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS] is
the case 5. More specifically, in this embodiment, a
FIG. 1 is a construction diagram of an image pick-Up liquid crystal is used as the polarization plane rotating
apparatus according to a first embodiment of the inven- means 19. As shown in the circuit diagram of FIG. 4,
oon; upon turning ON of the non-reflection image switch 21,
FIG. 2 is a partial perspective view of the image 10 lamps 23, 23•... of the light source means 4 which will
pick-up apparatus of the first embodiment; be descnoed later go on and an oscillatOr 24 operates, so.
FIG. 3 is a perspective view showing a relation be- that the polarization plane rotating means 19 causes the
tween a lamp unit and connecting terminals in the image polarization plane of polarized light to rotate 9(t and
pick-Up apparatus of the first embodiment; hence the polarized light obtained by the first polarizer
FIG. 4 is an electric circuit diagram of the image IS 22 is cut off by the second polarizer 18. Conversely,
pick-up apparatus of the first embodiment; when the non-reflection image switch 21 is OFF, the
FIG. 5 is a construction diagram of an image pick-up polarized light can pass through the second polarizer
apparatus according to a second embodiment of the 18.
invention; It is a reflection image switch 25 that is disposed in
FIG. 6 is a partial perspective view of the image 20 paIa1lel with the non-reflection image switch 21. When
pick-up apparatus of the second embodiment; the switch 25 is turned ON, only the lamps 23, 23, ... of
FIG. 7 is a perspective view showing a relation be- the light source means 4 go on.
tween a lamp unit and connecting terminals in the image Thus, by utilizing the polarized light, it is made pOssi­
pick-Up apparatus of the second embodiment; ble to select an image light and perfonn more versatile
FIG. 8 is an electric circuit diagram of the image 25 observations. The light from the object M to be ob­
pick-up apparatus of the second embodiment; served is classified into a surface reflected light re-
FIG. 9 is a construction diagram of an image pick-up flected directly by the surface of the object M and a
apparatus according to a third embodiment of the in- non-surface reflected light which has once passed
vention; through the surface layer of the object M. The surface
FIG. 10 is an exploded perspective view of a slide 30 reflected light retains the polarizability obtained by the
mechanism; first polarizer 22, whereas the non-surface reflected
FIG. 11 is a construction diagram of an observation light loses polarizability and becomes a natural light.
system using the image pick-up apparatus of the third Therefore, an image containing such surface reflected
embodiment; light and an image not containing it can be observed
FIG. 12 is an explanatory diagram showing a relation 3S selectively according to whether the polarized light is
among an object to be observed, an objective lens and allowed to pass or cut off. By such a selective observa­
an imaging device; and tion it is made possible to observe a surface state or
FIG. 13 is a construction diagram ofan image pick-up structure of an object which can be seen more clearly
apparatus in ~ conventional magnifying system. by the use of a surface reflected light, as wen as a sur­
[F
ORMS FOR PRACTICING THE INVENTION] 40 face state or structure of an object which can be ~
. more clearly by the use of a non-surface reflected light,
Embodiments of the present invention will be de- both in a state easier to see. Thus, the versatility or
scribed hereinunder. observation is attained
The reason why the polarizing unit 16 is disposed just
First Embodiment (FIG. 1 to FIG. 4)
45 in front of the optical lens 14 is that the maximum oper-.
An image pick-up apparatus 1 according to this em- ating temperature of the polarization plane rotating
bodiment includes an imaging means 2, an optical means means 19 using liquid crystal is about 4 0 ~ C., but the
3 and a light source means 4, which are enclosed within temperature near the light source means 4 which will be
a case 5. It is ofa size which permits the apparatus to be described later sometimes exceeds the maximum operat­
grasped easily by one hand. Its front end portion is bent SO ing temperature, so at such a higher temperature the
in an inclined state so as to be suitable for observing the polarization plane rotating means 19 may not operate
face skin while the apparatus is held by one hand. accurately. ..
The imaging means 2 comprises an imaging device 10 The reflecting mirror 17 is provided for changing the
using a CCD and a control circuit unit 13 for control- optical path in accordance with the inclination of the
ling the imaging device 10 and for amplifying an image SS front end portion mentioned previously. It is a surface
signal. reflection type. More specifically, a reflective surface of
The optical means 3 comprises an optical lens 14 and the reflecting mirror 17 is exposed and light is reflected
plural flare stops 15, 15, .... The flare stops IS, IS, . . directly by the exposed reflective surface, unlike an
. are provided projectingly in an annular form to fonn a ordinary type of mirror in which a reflective surface is
minimum optical path T required. The fonnation of 60 formed at the back of a transparent material (e.g. glass)
such optical path T by the flare stops 15, 15, . . . is and light passes through the transparent material at the
extremely useful in obtaining a clear image. time of reflection.
In association with the optical means 3, a polarizing The use of such a surface reflection type reflecting
unit 16 is disposed just in front of the optical lens 14. mirror is related to the foregoing polarization. More
Further, in the optical path between the optical lens 14 65 particularly, since the polarizing unit 16 must be dis-
and an object M to be observed there is disposed a posed in a position rearer than· the reflecting mirror 17
reflecting mirror p in a front position with respect to for the reason stated above, the passage of polarized
the polarizing unit 16. light through a transparent material will result in the
Exhibit A to Complaint, Page 15 of 20
• •
5,442,489
7 8
polarizability thereof being disturbed, thus making it rays from the light emitted from the lamps 23, 23, ... J
impossible to effect accUIately such observation using thereby preventing the rise of the internal temperature
polarized light as mentioned above. The light source of the case 5. The first polarizer 22 functions to polarize
means 4 comprises a lamp unit 26, a diffusion preventing the light emitted from the lamps 23, 23, .... The light-
mirror 27 and a lighting/processing unit 28. 5 ing using the resulting polarized light is utilized as ex­
As shown in FIGS. 2 and 3, the lamp unit 26 com­ plained previously.
prises a plurality (four in this embodiment) of lamps 23,
23, ... arranged side by side on a board 29. It can be
Second Embodiment (FIG. 5 to FIG. 8)
mounted and removed through the board 29 with re- An image pick-up apparatus 201 according to this
spect to a mounting hole 30 formed in the case 5. 10 embodiment is basically the same as in the flI'St embodi-
As shown in FIG. 4, the four lamps 23,23, ... are ment, as shown in FIG. 5, and it comprises an imaging
connected in series, and assuming that a rated voltage of means 202, an optical means 203, and a light source
each lamp 23 is 2.5 V, a voltage of 12 V is applied to the means 204, which are enclosed in a case 2OS. The image
series-connected lamps. This is because by applying a pick-up apparatus 201 has a body portion of a size
voltage 20% higher than the total rated voltage of 10 V 15 which permits the user to grasp the body portion easily
of the four lamps 23, 23, ... there is obtained brightness by one hand. On the other hand, a front end portion of
which is twice the brightness obtained at such rated the apparatus 201 is bent in an inclined state with re-
voltage. On the other hand, the service life is reduced to spect to the body portion to suit the observation of, for
about one tenth. example. the face skin while the body portion is held by
The reason why such strong brightness is to be ob- 20 one hand.
tained at the sacrifice of the service life is that it is in- The imaging means 202. like the imaging means 2 in
tended to realize in a narrow space a lighting force the first embodiment. comprises an imaging device 210
which can afford a sufficient brightness even if there using a CCD and a control circuit unit 213 for control-
occurs extinction due to the first and second polarizers ling the imaging device 210 and for amplifying an image
22, 18. 25 signal. But a difference from the imaging means 2 in the
Further, the reason why the lamps 23, 23, ... are first embodiment is recognized in that the imaging de-
connected in series is that it is intended to reduce the vice 210 is connected to the control circuit unit 213
size of the lamp unit 26 and simplify the structure of an through a flexible cable 214, that is, the imaging device
electric system, for mounting in a narrow space. More 210 is rendered movable freely with respect to the con-
specifically, the size of each lamp is reduced by using a 30 trol circuit unit 213.
lamp of 2.5 V in rated voltage to thereby attain the Utilizing such free movability, the imaging device
reduction in size of the lamp unit 26, and a power supply 210 is disposed in such a manner that a light receiving
of 12 V necessary for the oscillator 24 can be used also surface 210!of the imaging device 210 is oJ;thogonal to
for the lamp unit 26 without using a transformer to an optical axis A of an image light which is incident
thereby simplify the structure of the electric system. 35 front the bent front portion of the image pick-up appa-
On the board 29 is formed a partial power-supply ralUS, that is, in such a manner as to eliminate the neces­
circuit 31 for the lamps 23, for example by printing, sity of changing the optical axis of the image light.
with terminal receiving holes 32, 32 being formed in It is a color filter 215 that is disposed in front of the
both end portions of the circuit 31. When the lamp unit imaging device 210. The color filter 215 functions to
26 is mounted into the mounting hole 30 as mentioned 40 adjust the wavelength characteristics of light which
previously, terminal pins 33p of connecting terminals 33 enters the imaging device 210, in accordance with color
are fitted in the terminal receiving holes 32, 32 to make characteristics of the imaging device.
connection with a power-supply circuit 31 in FIG. 4. As other components there are used optical means
The reason why the lamp 26 is constituted as above 203, optical lens 216, flare stops 217, polarizing unit 218,
and made detachable wholly as one unit is that the 45 second polarizer no, polarization plane rotating means
replacement thereof should be done in a simple manner 221, non-reflection image switch 223, first polarizer 224,
to further facilitate the use thereof since the service life light source means 204, lamp 225, oscillator 226, reflec­
of the lamp 23 is sacrificed for attaining a stronger tion image switch 227, lamp unit 228, diffusion prevent-
brightness as noted previously. In this connection, it is ing mirror 229, lighting/processing unit 230, partial
most preferable in mounting and removing operations SO power-supply circuit 231, terminal receiving hole 234,
to utilize the mounting hole 30 formed in the case 5, mounting hole 232, connecting terminal 235, terminal
provided that a complicated structure results. There- pin 235p, diffuser panel 237, and heat rays abSorbing
fore, instead of this structure there may be adopted a plate 238. Since these components are the same as in the
structure wherein a suitable receptacle portion for the first embodiment, explanations thereof are here omitted.
: n o ~ t i n g and removal of the lamp unit is formed in the 55 Third Embodi (FIG 9 FIG. "")
mtenor of the case 5. ment . to .......
The diffusion preventing mirror 27 is for preventing . As shown in FIG. -9, the image pick-up apparatus 302
the light from the lamps 23, 23, ... from entering the according to this embodiment contains an optical sys­
optical path of the optical means 3 direcdy and for tem unit 310 and an imaging unit 311, and is also pro-
directing the light efficiendy to the object M to be 60 vided with a lighting unit 311. The image pick-up appa­
observed. The mirror 27 is provided so as to cover the ratus 302 is used as in FIG. 11. An image picked up by
lamps 23, 23, ... from above like eaves. the apparatus 302 is reproduced on a display 304 of a
The lighting/processing unit 28 comprises a diffuser display apparatus 303 and is observed. The image pick-
panel 35, a heat rays absorbing plate 36 and the flI'St up apparatus 302 and the display apparatus 303 combine
polarizer 22, which are arranged in this order succes- 65 as a set and constitute a magnifying observation appara­
sively from the side closer to the lamp unit 26 so as to tus 301.
intersect the radiation of light from the lamp unit. The The optical unit 310 comprises an objective lens 313
heat rays absorbing plate 36 functions to remove heat and plural flare stops 314,314, .... Since the flare stops
Exhibit A to Complaint, Page 16 of 20
• •
5,442,489
9 10
314, 314, . . , are formed projectingly in an annular
shape to form a minimum optical path T required, the.
formation of such optical path T by those flare stops is
extremely useful in obtaining a clear image,
The imaging unit 311 comprises an imaging device S
315 and a control circuit unit 318 for controlling the
imaging device 315 and for amplifying an image signal,
the imaging device 315 and the control circuit unit 318
being connected with each other through a flexible
The lighting unit 3U comprises a light source 327 and
a light condensing guide 328 for radiating light from the
light source 327 efficiently to a portion to be observed.
In the light source 327, light from an external light-
source lamp (not shown) is conducted up to the image
pick-up apparatus, using a bundle of optical fibers ex­
tending through a cable 329, and front ends for irradia­
tion of optical fibers 329J, 329J, .. , of such optical fiber
bundle are implanted in an annu1ar holding member 330.
cable 319. 10 Light radiated from the irradiating front ends of the
The objective lens 313, flare stops 314, 314, ... and
imaging device 315 of both optical system 310 and im­
aging unit 311 are adapted to slide like arrow X in inter­
lock with each other by means of a slide mechanism
which utilizes a cam structure. 15
More specifically, as shown in FIG. ·10, the slide
mechanism comprises a plurality of holding cylinders
321 (321a, 321h, 321e, 321d) for the optical system and
for the imaging device, with roller projections 320
(320a, 320h, 320e, 32Od) being formed on the periphery 20
of the cylinders 321; an intermediate cylinder 323 hav­
ing rectilinear guide slots 322 formed in the periphery
thereof, and a cam c linder 325 having cam slots 324
, y . l'
324d) for the opt1cal and lor 2S
the formed on penphery thereof.
optical fibers 329J, 329J, .•. reache: an
Incident,end 330 a base of the light
gwde 32,8 will ?e descnb,ed below.
hgI;t condensmg gUIde 1.S formed m a hc:>lIow
senusphencal shape or a cylmdrical shape havmg a
hollo,":" semispherical ,front. portion, using a
material, e.g. an acrybc resm. A base end of Its rear end
portion is as the incident end .face 330, a
throu;lSh hole.331 IS formed ofIts front pot"bon.
light radiated from the light source 327
mcdent end face travels the solid mtenor
under total reflect10n and. IS up to the
through hole 33.1, then. radtates the J?Ot"bon to be ob­
served of the object M m a nearly honzontal state from
the inside surface of the hole. At the same time, light
which has leaked inside the Ii ht condensin 'de32B
These holding cylmders are combined together so that. ". g g.gm .
the hId' lind 321a 321h 321 d 321d are h ld WIthout .entenng the mCIdent end 330 Illummates
. 0 mg cy. ers .' .' e an , . e the portion to be observed as a drop light from above.
by the mterm<;chate which m tum The light condensing guide 32B also has a focusing
IS held by the cam cylmder 325 m a relat1vely rotatable 30 function. With its front end abutted to the object N to
manner. h I' 325 . ted b be observed, the objective lens 313 is focused on the
as t e cam cy mder. .IS rota y an object M.
operating nng 326, 320h, Although in this third embodiment the simple zoom
3lOe and 320d are all indlVldually restricted their moye- structure thereof is applied to the method in which light
ment by the cam 324a, 324c .324d which 3S is conducted through a bundle of optica1 fibers from an
are each formed a pred.etermmed curvilinear shape, external light-source lamp, that is, an external light-
whereby the holdmg 321a, 32lb, .and source lamp method, it can be done easily by those
3:n
d
are to like arrow X At this tIme, skilled in the art to apply the simple zoom structure of
smce th<; cylinders 321a, 321h, .321e and 321d . this embodiment to such a light-source lamp built-in
are therr by the guide slots 322 of 40 type structure as in each of the first and second embodi­
the lDtermediate cylmder 323. they are prevented from
rotating with the rotation of the cam cylinder 325. Con­
sequently, the objective lens 313, flare stops 314.314, .
. . and imaging device 315, which are held in a fIXed
state by the holding cylinders 321a, 321b, 321e and 321d. 45
slide interlockedly while maintaining a predetermined
relation.
The predetermined relation utilizes the fact that a
magnification, m, obtained by the optical system has the
ments on the basis of this third embodiment. .
We claim:
1. A magnifying observation apparatus for reproduc­
ing an image of an Object to be observed which has been
picked up by an image pick-up apparatus onto a monitor
display and observing it. said image pick-up apparatus
having a structure with a case of an essentially one-
handed grapsable size. said case having a viewing hoJe
formed therein and encasing therein at least an imaging
relation ofm=b/a (a: distance between the object M to SO device, a control circuit unit for the imaging device, an
be observed and the objective lens 313, b: distance be­
tween the objective JellS 313 and the imaging device
315, FIG. 12). The objective JellS 313 and the imaging
device 315 are allowed to slide interlockedly so that a
and b form a ratio which affords a stationary state be- SS
tween the image pick-up apparatus 302 and the object
M to be observed, on the basis of a predetermined rela­
tion,namely, a relation of lIa+ Ilb= I/f(f: foca1 length
of the objective lens), thereby changing m = b/a contin­
optical system for focusing the image of the object to be
observed on the imaging device, and a light-source
lamp encases by the casing for lighting the object to be
observed through the viewing hole.
2. A magnifying observation apparatus according to
claim I, wherein said light-source lamp is formed as a
lamp unit comprising a plurality of lamps arranged in a
predetermined state on a board in such a matmer that
the whole of the lamp unit can be mounted to and re­
uously. By using such a slide mechanism it is made 60 moved from said image pick-up apparatus.
possible to change the magnification in a fIXed state of 3. A magnifying observation apparatus according to
the distance between the image pickup apparatus 302 claim 1, wherein a front end portion ofsaid image pick-
and the object M to be observed, that is, a so-called up apparatus is bent sideways, and said imaging device
simple zoom structure is formed. As to the interlocking is incorporated in the image pick-up apparatus in such a
relation of the flare stops 314, 314, ... , these flare stops 65 manner that a light receiving surface of the imaging
follow the optical path T which varies in response to device is orthogonal to an optical axis of an image light
sliding motions of the objective lens 313 and the imag- which is incident from the thus-bent front end portion
ing device 315. of the image pick-up apparatus.
Exhibit A to Complaint, Page 17 of 20
• •
5,442,489
11 12
4. A magnifying observation apparatus according to 9. A magnifying observation apparatus according to
claim 1 wherein an objective lens ofsaid optical system claim 7, wherein an objective lens ofsaid optical system
and said imaging device slide in interlock with each and said imaging device slide in interlock with each
other while satisfying the relation of lIa+ Ilb= IIf (a: other while satisfying the relation of l/a+ 11b= 1/f,
distance between the object to be observed and the 5 where a is the distance between the object to be ob­
objective lens, b: distance between the objective lens served and the objective lens, b is the distance between
and the imaging device, f: focal length of the objective the objective lens and the imaging device, and f is the
lens). . " . focal length of the objective lens,
A magmf>;ng acc:ording to 10. A magnifying observation apparatus according to
claun 4, SlUd objective ,lens IS !teld 10 a ,fixed 10 claim 9, wherein said objective lens is held in a fixed
state by system hold1Og, cylinder haVlng. a state by an optical system holding cylinder having a
formed, on the penphery s:u
d
roller projection formed on the periphery thereof, said
unapng IS m a fl:'.ed state by an imaging device is held in a fixed state by an imaging
deVIce holding havmg a roller device holding cylinder having a roller projection
formed on the penphery thereof, both Said holding 15 formed on the periphery thereof both said holding
cylinde:s being slida?ly by an intermediate cylinders being held slidably by intermediate cylin­
der havmg a slot the penph- der having a rectilinear guide slot formed on the periph­
thereof, wd bang held rela- ery thereof, said intermediate cylinder being held rela­
bvely t?tatably by a cam cylinder haVlng a for tively rotatably by a cam cylinder having a cam slot for
system an? a cam for the ,wagIng de- 20 the optical system and a cam slot for the ima' de-
Vlce, SlUd cam slots bemg formed 10 the penphery ofthe .. , . ,gmg
. t ed' te li d d'd b' ti I d'd VIce, wd cam slots bemg formed 10 the penphery ofthe
e.:nng lad .cy n ealr'l
an
edSlUt tensI an intermediate cylinder, and said objective lens and said
wagI eVlce are ow 0 e 10 10 er ock W1 ' • d' all d s1'd" I k 'th
each other while forming a predetermined distance tmagIng eVlce ,are to I e 10 oc. W1
relation in response to rotation of said cam cylinder 25 while fOtmlng predete:rmned
through the roller projections which are engaged with rela on 10 response r'?tabon SlUd cam
the cam slots of the cam cylinder through the guide slot through the roller which are WIth
of said intermediate cylinder, the slots of cam, cylmder through the gwde slot
6, A magnifying observation apparatus for reproduc- of Said cylinder: ,
ing, on to a monitor display, an image of an object to be 30 A observabon that,Includes
observ.ed which has been picked up by an image pick-up an lnu;ge PIck-up appar,atus for an tmage of
apparatus said image pick-up apparatus having incorpo- an object wage. pIck-up appara­
rated therein at least an imaging device, a control cir- tus mowto; wd pIck-up appara,tus
cuit unit for the imaging device, an optical system for a casmg a hole, the
focusing the image of the object to be observed on the 35 at an a cm::
wt
imaging device, and a light source means for lighting UnIt, for a fra:n the unagIDg
the object to be observed, the optical system including deVl'7 and en;uttmg a Vldeo an optlcal srstem for
an objective lens and wherein the objective lens of said the tmage an ,object pr,?X1mate the
optical system and said imaging device slide in interlock .hole on lh:
e
imagIng deVlce, and a
with each other while satisfying the relation of 40 for lightmg :>bject to be .
l/a+ Ilb= Ilf where a is the distance between the 12, A magnifymg observation apparatus accord1Og to
object to be observed and the objective lens, b is the claim wherein said light-source is a lamp unit that
distance between the objective lens and the imaging compnses at least one lamp arranged on a board such
device, and f is the focal length of the objective lens, unit can be mounted to and removed from
7, A magnifying observation apparatus that includes 45 SlUd wage pIck-up apparatus,
and image pick-up apparatus for reproducing, onto a 13. A magnifying observation apparatus according to
monitor display, an image of an object located proxi- claim 11, wherein a front end portion of said image
mate the image pick-up apparatus which has been apparatus is bent sideways,
picked up by an image pick-up apparatus the image 14, A magnifying observation apparatus according to
pick-up apparatus including a casing having a viewing SO claim 11, wherein an objective lens of said optical
hole formed therein and further including at least an tem and said imaging device slide in interlock with each
imaging device, a control circuit unit for the imaging other,
device, an optical system for focusing the image of an IS, A magnifying observation apparatus according to
object to located proximate the viewing hole on the claim 11, wherein the image pick-up apparatus is con-
imaging device, and a light-source lamp for lighting the 55 nected to the monitor by a wire that transmits infoOlla­
object to be observed, wherein said light-source lamp is tion from the imaging device to the monitor,
formed as a lamp unit comprising a plurality of lamps 16. A magnifying observation apparatus that includes
arranged in a predetermined state on a board in such a an image pick.up apparatus for reproducing an image of
manner that the entire lamp unit can be mounted to and an object located proximate to image pick-Up apparatus
removed from said image pick·up apparatus, 60 onto a monitor display, said image pick-up apparatus
8. A magnifying observation apparatus according to comprising a casing, the casing enclosing at least an
claim 7, wherein a front end portion.of said image pick- imaging device, a control circuit unit for the imaging
up apparatus is bent sideways, and said imaging device device, an optical system for focusing the image of an
is incorporated in the image pick-up apparatus in such a object onto the imaging device, and a light,source lamp
manner tI1at a light receiving surface of the imaging 65 means for lighting the object to be observed.
device is orthogonal to an optical axis of an image light 17. A magnifying observation apparatus according to
which is incident from the thus-bent front end portion claim 16, wherein said light-source lamp means is a
of the image pick-up apparatus. lamp unit that comprises at least one lamp arranged on
Exhibit A to Complaint, Page 18 of 20
• •
5,442,489
13 14
a board such that the lamp unit can be mounted to and
removed from said image pick-up apparatus.
18. A magnifying observation apparatus according to
claim 16, wherein a front end portion of said image
pick-up apparatus is bent sideways.
19. A magnifying observation apparatus according to
claim 16, further comprising a viewing hole formed in
the casing and wherein said optical system focuses the
image of an object located'proximate the viewing hole 10
on the imaging device.
20. A magnifying observation apparatus according to
claim 16, wherein an objective lens of said optical sys­
tern and said imaging device slide in interlock with each
th t a(fust 'ficati 15
25. A magnifying observation apparatus according to
claim 23, wherein a front end portion of said image
pick-up apparatus is bent sideways.
26. A magnifying observation apparatus according to
5 claim 23, wherein an objective lens of said optical sys­
. tem and wd imaging device slide in interlock with each
other to adjust magnification.
27. A magnifying observation apparatus according to
claim 23, wherein the image pick-up apparatus is con­
nected to the monitor by a wire that transmits informa­
tion from the imaging device to the monitor,
28. A magnifying observation apparatus that includes
an pick-up appu:atus for an image of
an object !h7 lmage.ptek-up appara­
tus onto a momtor display, 5ald lmage pick-up apparatus
o er 0 J ,comprising a casing having a viewing hole, an imaging
A obse:va?on to
clwm 16, wherem an objective lens of swd optical sys­
tem is movable to adjust magnification.
22, A magnifying observation apparatus according to 20
. claim 16. wherein the image pick-up apparatus is con­
nected to the monitor by a wire that transmits a video
signal from the imaging device to the monitor.
23. A magnifying observation apparatus that includes
, . , , 25
an pick-up for an lmage of
an object PX:O
XlIllate
lmage,plck-up appara­
tus onto a momtor d1Splay. said lmage pIck-up apparatus
comprising a casing having a viewing hole, the casing
enclosing at least an imaging device, a control circuit 30
unit for the imaging device, an optical system for focus­
ing the image of an object located proximate the view­
ing hole on the imaging device, the optical system com-
P
rising an ob 'ective lens that is movable to adjust mag­
· . 35
nifi t
ca 10IL
, .. .
A magnifying obse:-:
ation
a,pparatus accordmg
23, further compnsmg a lIght-source lamp urut
that mcludes at least one lamp arranged on a board such
device that is movable in relation to the viewing hole,
the observation apparatus further comprising a control
circuit unit for the imaging device, an optical system
located in the image pick-up apparatus for focusing the
image of an object located proximate the viewing hole,
the optical comp,risinl? an objective lens that is
movable to .
A magnifying apparatus according l?
claim 28. further compnsmg a light-source lamp urut
that includes at least one lamp arranged in the image
pick-up apparatus casing on a board such that the lamp
unit can be mounted to and removed from said image
pick-up apparatus.
30, A magnifying observation apparatus according to
claim 28. wherein a front end portion of said image
pick-up is bent .
A to
clwm 28, an obJ7cuv7 ,of SaId sys­
tem and saJd Imagmg deVIce slide tn mterlock WIth each
th d' 'fi'
0 er to a Just magro cation.
32. A magnifying observation apparatus according to
claim 28, wherein the image pick-up apparatus is con­
nected to the monitor by a wire that transmits informa­
that the lamp unit can be mounted to and removed from 40 tion from the imaging device to the monitor,
said image pick-up apparatus, • • • • •
45
so
55
60
6S
Exhibit A to Complaint, Page 19 of 20
UNI.TATES PATENT AND
CERTIFICATE OF CORREC"T'ION
PATENT NO. : 5,442,489
DATED : August 15, 1995
INVENTOR(S) : Kiyokazu Yamamoto and Masso Yamamoto
It is certified that error appears in the above-identified patent and that said Letters Patent is hereby
corrected as shown below:
Column 11, line 46, change "and" into --an-.
Signed and Sealed this
Thirtieth Day ofJuly, 1996
Alte:sr:
Attesting Officer
Exhibit A to Complaint, Page 20 of 20
13
111111

IIII
(12) EX PARTE REEXAMINATION CERTIFICATE (7427th)
United States Patent (10) Number: US 5,442,489 Cl
Yamamoto et al. (45) Certificate Issued: Mar. 2010
Exhibit B to Complaint, Page 1 of 4
(54) MAGNIFYING OBSERVATION APPARATUS
(is) Inventors: KiyokllZll Yamamoto, Tokyo (JP);
Masao Yamamoto, Tokyo (JP)
(73) Assignee: Scalar Corporation, Shibuya-Ku, Tokyo
(lP)
Reexamination Request:
No. 901010,OO6,Aug. 6, 2007
Reexamination Certificate for:
Patent No.: 5,442,489
Issued: Aug. 15, 1995
Appl. No.: 08l3U,724
Filed: Sep. 23, 1994
Certificate of Correction issued Jui. 30, 1996.
Related U.s. Application Data
(63) Continuation-in-part of application No. 07/983,848, filed as
application No. PCT/JP92IOO836 on Jul. 2, 1992, nowaban­
doned.
(30) Foreign Application Priority Data
Jul. 4, 1991 . (JP) .............................................
Jul. 4, 1991 (JP) .............................................
Jul. 4, 1991 '(JP) ............................................. 3-189569
(51) InL Ct.
G02B 271(}(} (2006.01)
(52) U.S. Cl. .................. 3591810; 3481E1.087; 359/385;
359n98; 3591800; 359/802
(58) Field of Classification Search ........................ None
See application file for complete search history.
(56) References Cited
U.S. PATENT·DOCUMENTS
2.258,304 A 1011941 Stanton
2,280,561 A 411942 Wappler
3,279,460 A 10/1966 Sheldon
16
3.561,432 A • 211971 Yamaki et aI............... 6001167
3,582.181 A 611971 Doloresetal.
3.638.643 A 211972 Hotchkiss
3,884,222 A 511975 Moore
4,157,216 A 611979 Plummer
4,236,781 A 1211980 Arimura
4,288,690 A 911981 Sanner
(Continued)
FOREIGN PATENT DOCUMENTS
JP 56-68870 611981
JP 511984
IP 60-81645 5/1985
JP 61-296869 J2I1986
JP 411987
(Continued)
OTHER PUBUCATIONS
Article entitled "Analysis, Test And Measurement Issue"
published in Photonics, International Journal of Optics.
Lasers, Fiber Optics. Electro-Optics, Imaging and Optical
Computing, Oct. 1990, pp. 4, 5, 76.
Color Video Camera article published in The Dempa Shim­
bun,Jun. 25.1991 and English translation.
(Continued)
Primary Examiner-Minh T Nguyen
(57) ABSTRACT
The present invention relates to a magnifying observation
apparatus of a video type in which an image of an object to
be observed which has been picked up by an image pick-up
apparaWs incorporating an imaging device therein is repro­
duced on a monitor display and observed. It is an object of
the invention to attain a compact structure of the entire sys­
tem so as to pennit easy observation in a simple manner.
According to the present invention, in order to achieve such
object, not only the imaging device but also a control circuit
unit for the imaging device. an optical system for focusing
the image of the object to be observed on the imaging
device, and a light-source lamp for lighting the Object to be
observed, are incorporated in the image pick-up apparatus.

I 'If I
,.--­
• •
US 5,442,489 Cl
2
U.S. PATENT DOCUMENTS FOREIGN PATENT DOCUMENTS
4,310,228 A 111982 Terada
4,324,466 A 411982 Takayama
4,343,300 A 811982 Hattori
4,413.278 A III1 983 Feinbloom
4,414,608 A 1111983 Furihata
4,461.558 A 7/1984 Tanikawa el aI.
4,475.540 A 1011984 Takarnatsu et aI.
4.561,429 A 1211985 Satoet aI.
4.577.927 A 3/1986 Raney
4,590,923 A 511986 Watanabe
4.641.635 A 211987 Yabe
4.682.586 A 7/1987 Matsuo
4.727,416 A 211988 Cooper et aI.
4,832,003 A 511989 Yabe
4,846.155 A 7/1989 Kimura
4,854,302 A 8/1989 Allred, m
4,858,001 A 8/1989 Milbank et aI.
4,870,950 A 1011989 Kanbara et aI.
4.915,626 A 411990 Lernrney
4.947.245 A 8/1990 OgawaetaI.
4.989,083 A 111991 Elino
4,989,582 A 211991 Sakiyama et aI.
4.993,405 A 211991 Takarnura et aI.
5 . 0 l ~ 0 9 8 A 511991 Cooper et aI.
5,027,138 A 611991 Gandrud
5.049,070 A 9/1991 Ademovic
5,115,261 A 511992 NodaetaI.
5,115,307 A 511992 Cooper et aI.
5,159,380 A 1011992 Furuya et aI.
5.191.369 A 3/1993 Furuya et aI.
5.251,025 A 1011993 Cooper et aI.
5,267.087 A 11/1993 Weidemann
5,290.168 A 311994 Cooper et aI.
5,429,502 A 711995 Cooper et aI.
IP 62-086322 411987
IP 63-068807 3/1988
IP 63-142239 611988
IP 63-246731 1011988
IP 2-36266 311990
JP 2·207401 811990
JP 2·282202 1111990
IP 02·282202 1111990
JP 3·135276 611991
JP 5-006983 111993
OTHER PUBUCATIONS
Article entiUed "CCD-The Solid State Imaging Technol­
ogy" published in Fairchild Catalog 1982-1983, by Frank H.
Bower-3 pages.
Hayashi. Toshihiko, et al. Article entitled "Industrial CCD
Camera" Electronics, 1989-7, pp. 62-69 and English trans­
larion.
English translations of JP 61-296869. JP 63-246731, JP
2-36266, 2-282202, 05-6983,59-88135, 60-81645.
62-86322.63-68807,63-142239.
English language Abstracts of JP 2-207401 and JP
3-135276.
Article In The Dempa Shimbun, Sony To Release Micromini
Camera For Industrial Use (1/6 As Large As Before), Jun.
25,1991 ("Sony") (Exhibit 6).
Catalog For Fairchild Charge Coupled Device ("Fairchild")
(Exhibit 7).
Article In Electronics, Industrial CCD Camera, Hayashi.
Toshibiko. et 31.,1989-7 ("Hayashi") (Exhibit 8).
Advertisement in Photonics, Philips CCD Imaging Modules,
OcL 1990. p. 77 ("Philips") (Exhibit 9).
• cited by examiner
Exhibit B to Complaint, Page 2 of 4
• •
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
55
60
65
US 5,442,489 Cl
1
EX PARTE
REEXAMINATION CERTIFICATE
ISSUED UNDER 35 U.S.C. 307
THE PATENT IS HEREBY AMENDED AS
INDICATED BELOW.
Matter enclosed in heavy brackets [ ] appeared in the
patent, but has been deleted and is no longer a part of the
patent; matter printed in italics indicates additions made
to the patent.
AS A RESULT OF REEXAMINATION, IT HAS BEEN
DETERMINED THAT:
The patentability of claim 6 is con finned.
aaims 1, 7, 11, 16, 19, 23 and 28 are detennined to be
patentable as amended.
New claims 33-50 are added and detennined to be patent­
able.
Claims 2-5, 8-10, 12-15, 17-18, 20-22, 24-27 and
29-32 were not reexamined.
1. A magnifying.observation apparatus for reproducing an
image of an object to be observed which has been picked up
by an image pick-up apparatus onto a monitor display and
observing it, said image pick-up apparatus having a structure
with a case of an essentially one-handed [grapsabIe] grasp­
able size, said case having [a] an uncovered viewing hole
fonned therein and encasing therein at least an imaging
device, a control circuit unit for the imaging device, an opti­
cal system for focusing the image of the object to be
observed on the imaging device, and a light-source lamp
[encases] encased by the casing for lighting the object to be
observed through the viewing hole.
7. A magnifying observation apparatus that includes an
image pick-up apparatus for reproducing, onto a monitor
display, an image of an object located proximate the image
pick-up apparatus which has been picked up by an image
pick-up apparatus the image pick-up apparatus including a
c ~ i n g having [a] an uncovered viewing hole formed therein
and further including at least an imaging device, a control
circuit unit for the imaging device, an optical system for
focusing the image of [an] the object [to] located proximate
the viewing hole on the imaging device, and a light-source
lamp for lighting the object to be observed, wherein said
light-source lamp is fonned as a lamp unit comprising a
plurality of lamps arranged in a predetermined state on a
board in such a manner that the entire lamp unit can be
mounted to and removed from said image pick-up apparatus.
11. A magnifying observation apparatus that includes an
image pick-up apparatus for reproducing an image of an
object located proximate the image. pick-up apparatus onto a
monitor display, said image pick-up apparatus comprising a
casing having [a] an uncovered viewing hole, the casing
enclosing at least an imaging device, a control circuit unit for
processing a signal received from the imaging device and
emitting a video signal, an optical system for focusing the
image of [an] lhe object located proximate the viewing hole
on the imaging device, and a light-source for lighting the
object to be observed.
16. A magnifying observation apparatus that includes an
image pick-up apparatus for reproducing an image of an
object located proximate to lhe image pick-up apparatus
2
onto a monitor display, said image pick-up apparatus com­
prising a casing having an uncovered viewing Iwle, the cas­
ing enclosing at least an imaging device, a control circuit
unit for the imaging device, an optical system for focusing
the image of [an] Ihe object onto the imaging device, and a
light-source lamp means for lighting the object to be
observed
19. A magnifying observation apparatus according to
claim 16, [further comprising a viewing hole formed in the
casing and] wherein said optical system focuses the image of
an object located proximate the viewing hole on the imaging
device.
23. A magnifying observation apparatus that includes an
image pick-up apparatus for reproducing an image of an
Object located proximate the image pick-up apparatus onto a
monitor display, said image pick-up apparatus comprising a
casing having [a] an uncovered viewing hole, the casing
enclosing at least an imaging device, a control circuit unit for
the imaging device, an optical system for focusing the image
of[an] lhe object located proximate the viewing hole on the
imaging device, the optical system comprising an objective
lens that is movable to adjust magnification.
28. A magnifying observation apparatus that includes an
image pick-up apparatus for reproducting an image of an
object located proximate the image pick-up apparatus onto·a·
monitor display, said image pick-up apparatus comprising a
casing having [a] an uncovered viewing hole, an imaging
device that is movable in relation to the viewing hole, the
observation apparatus further comprising a control circuit
unit for the imaging device, an optical system located in the
image pick-up apparatus for focusing the image of [an] lhe
object located proximate the viewing hole, the optical sys­
tem comprising an objective lens that is movable to adjust
magnification.
33. A magnifying observation apparatuS according 10
claim 1. wherein lhe conlrol circuil unil controls Ihe imaging
device, and
wherein lhe optical syslemfocuses lhe image oflhe objecl
10 be observed on lhe imaging device and magnifies lhe
image. while Ihe image pick-up apparatuS is main­
lained al a predelennined fixed dislance from lhe objecl
10 be observed.
34. A magnifying observation apparatus according 10
claim 1. wherein lhe lighl-source lamp isfonned as a lamp
unil comprising a plurality oflamps a"anged in a predeler­
mined stale on a board in such a manner lhal lhe whole of
lhe lamp unil can be mounled 10 said image pick-up appara­
IUS.
35. A magnifying observation apparatus according 10
claim 1. wherein lhe viewing hole defines a geomelric center.
wherein Ihe oplical syslem defines an oplical axis, and
wherein lhe geomelric cenler of lhe viewing hole and lhe
optical axis oflhe optical sySlem are collinear.
36. A magnifying observation apparalus according 10
claim 1. wherein lhe imaging device captures color images
and sends lhe color images 10 lhe monilor display.
37. A magnifying observation apparatus according 10
claim 1. wherein lhe light-source lamp isfonned as a lamp
unil comprising a plurality of lamps mounled on a common
board. wherein lhe common board is fonned wilh a power
supply circuil for supplying power 10 Ihe plurality oflamps.
and wherein each one oflhe plurality oflamps illuminales in
response 10 eleclrical cu"ent.
Exhibit B to Complaint, Page 3 of 4
• •
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
US 5,442,489 CI
3
38. A magnifying observation apparatus according to
claim 1, wherein the optical system includes a lens having a
diameter and wherein the lens is spaced apanfrom the view­
ing hole by a distance greater than the diameter of the lens.
39. A magnifying observation apparatus according to
claim 1. wherein the optical system defines an optical axis
and w ~ r e i n the light-source lamp comprises lamps maunted
at an angle to the optical axis.
40. A magnifying observation apparatus according to
claim 1. wherein the light-source lamp comprises a plurality
of light elements mounted on a single circuit board.
41. A magnifying observation apparatus according to
claim I, wherein the optical system and the light-source
lamp are exposed through the viewing hole to environmental
conditions outside ofthe casing.
42. A magnifying observation apparatus according to
claim 6, wherein the image pick-up apparatus has a case
configured to be held and used by one hand and defines a
viewing hole.
wherein the control circuit unit controls the imaging
device. and
wherein the optical systemfocuses the image afthe object
to be observed on the imaging device and magnifies the
image. while the image pick-up apparatus is main­
tained at a predetenninedfixed distancefrom the object
to be observed.
43. A magnifying observation apparatus according to
claim 7, wherein the casing is configured to be held and used
by one Iwnd,
wherein the control circuit unit controls the imaging
device. and
wherein the optical system is configured to focus the
image of the object on the imaging device and magnify
the image. while the image pick-up apparatus is main­
tained at a predetemined fixed di:stance from the object.
44. A magnifying observation apparatus according to
claim I I, wherein the casing is configured to be held and
. used by one hand,
wherein the control circuit unit controls the imaging
device, and
wherein the optical system focuses the image ofthe object
on the imaging device and magnifies the image, while
the image pick-up apparatus is maintained at a prede­
terminedfixed distance from the object.
45. A magnifying observation apparatus according to
claim J6, wherein the casing is configured to be held and
used by one hand,
4
wherein the control circuit unit contois the imaging
device, and
wherein the optical system focuses the image ofthe object
onto the imaging device and magnifies the image, while
the image pick-up apparatus is maintained at a prede­
tennined fixed distance from the object.
46, A magnifying observation apparatus according to
claim 23, wherein the casing is configured to be held and
used by one hand,
wherein the control circuit unit comrols the imaging
device, and
wherein the optical system focuses the image ofthe object
on the imaging device and magnifies the image, while
the image pick-up apparatus is maintained at a prede­
tenninedfixed distance from the object.
47. A magnifying observation apparatus according to
claini 28, wherein the casing is configured to be held and
used by one hand,
wherein the control circuit unit controls the imaging
device. and
wherein the optical systemfacuses the image ofthe object
on the imaging device and magnifies the image. while
the image pick-up apparatus is maintained at a prede­
tenninedfixed distance from the object'
48. A magnifying observation apparatus according to
claim 33. wherein the predetennined fixed distance is the
distance between an outer edge of the viewing hole and the
object to be observed.
49. A magnifying observation apparatus according to
claim 1. wherein the viewing hole defines a plane and
wherein the optical system is configured to focus on the
plane so as to focus on the object when the object is abutted
against the viewing hole.
50. A magnifying observation apparatus according to
claim 1, wherein the control circuit unit controls the imaging
device, and
wherein the optical system focuses the image of the object
to be observed on the imaging device and magnifies the
image. while the imaging device is maintained at a pre­
determined fixed distance from the object to be
observed.
.. .. .. .. ..
Exhibit B to Complaint, Page 4 of 4
• •
.,
ViTiny UMOZ Handheld USB Digital Microscope
lx to 320x magnification on 22" monitor. 2M pixels CMOS image sensor. Also used as a camera,
video recorder as well as webcam. More details...
$89.98 i.§tiI,I'
ViTiny UM05 Handheld USB Digital Autofocus Microscope
Auto-focus feature. 2MP lens & CMOS sensor. 320x magnification on 2:;>" monitor. Far distance control mode
enables controlling all functions by software without a single touch. More details ...
$189.98
hh""
MAN1011 Handheld USB Digital Microscope
1)( to 250x magnification on 19" monitor. 2M pixels CMOS image sensor. Also used as a camera,
Video recorder as well as webcam. More detailS ...
$89.98
'·w,*,'
Z.OMP Handheld USB Digital Endoscope/Microscope with 8.Zmm Tube Diameter
lOx to 200x magnification on 1 r monitor. Multi-purpose USB digital video endoscope, microscope,
otoscope, and webcam. More details ...
$109.98
'·m,-
Short 2.0MP Handheld USB Digital Endoscope/Microscope with 8.2mm Tube Diameter
lOx to 200x magnification on 17" monitor. Multi-purpose USB digital video endoscope, microscope,
otoscope, and webcam. More detailS ...
$109.98
'UMM'
Z.OMP Handheld USB Digital Endoscope/Microscope with 12.0mm Tube Diameter
lOx to 200x magnification on 17" monitor. Multi-purpose USB digital video endoscope, microscope,
otoscope, and webcam. More detailS ...
$99.98
'Ml!.id"
1.3MP Handheld Telescopic USB digital Borescope/Microscope
1x to SOx magnification on 17" monitor. Multi-purpose USB digital video telescopic borescope,
endoscope, microscope, and webcam. More details ...
$109.98
I 4JfI_DEJOO Po""'''' "",o... US, " ...' "_Nm,""'...
'dfmPU'
2.0M pixels image resolution. Integrated Polarizer with 12 settings in 30 degree increments. Variable
magnification up to 150x (digitally) and up to SOx (optically). More details
.
~
1.6
61
6%'
Exhibit C to Complaint, Page 1 of 3
• •
$279.98
Firefly DEJ50 Wireless Polarized Handheld Digital Microscope/Dermatoscope
Wireless polarized digital microscope with image and video capture capabilities, and twelve distinct
levels of polarization. More details ...
$299.98 WdII.'5
ii
;
Firefly GT800 Handheld USB DIgital Microscope
2.0MP sensor resolution with up to 700x (digital) and 2JOx (OPtical) magnification. Comes with
fireflyPro advanced Image capture and measurement software. More details ...
$279.98 I.P.f·i5H"
FIrefly GT600 Wireless Handheld Digital Microscope
O.3SMP sensor resolution with up to 600x (digital) and 200x (optical) magnification. Wirelessly captures
pictures and videos. More details ...
$299.98
I.P.§!,,;
Firefly GT200 Handheld USB Digital Microscope
1.3MP sensor resolution with up to 230x optical magnification. Comes with FlreflyView image+vldeo
software. More details ...
$179.98 I.P.i".
U:'>B FleXible Inspection Camera Borescope Endoscope
2.1ft long flexible cable and 14mm camera head outer diameter. Ideal for detailed visual inspection in
hard-to-reach places. More details...
$74.98
'tU";
Mini 7mm USB Flexible Inspection Camera Borescope Endoscope
1.7ft long flexible cable and 7mm camera head outer diameter. Ideal for detailed visual inspection In hard
-to-reach places.
$74.98 ,#"MIII
Oasis ScientifiC Inc 2009-2012
Exhibit C to Complaint, Page 2 of 3
• •
ViTlny Pro10 Portable Digital Microscope
2.8" color TfT LCD screen with lOx to 200x magnification. Convenient to carry around in pocket.
No monitor/PC needed. More details ...
$289.98
IIbMB!!'
ViTlny ProW Plus Portable Digital Microscope
2.8" color TFT LCD screen with lOx to 200x magnification. Portable. No monitor/PC needed.
Supporters included to help examine soft and fragile materials. More details ...
$299.98 I.mg'
ViTlny VT-300 Portable Digital Microscope
2.S" color TfT LCD screen with lOx to 2.00x magnification. Portable. No monitor/PC needed. Include
supporter with height adjustment wheel and holding clips for flat objects. More details ...
$279.98 1·P.flt.ifii'
VT-101 Portable Digital Microscope
1.8" 262K color TFT LCD screen with 7x to 108x magnification. Convenient to carry around in
pocket. No monitor/PC needed. More details ...
$189.98
'.5f'5f!!'
Oasis ScientifiC Inc 2009-2012
Exhibit C to Complaint, Page 3 of 3

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