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Experimental Procedure 1- Place the specimen between the test ball and the plate.

2- Lower the test ball onto the sample 3- Slowly and consistently increase the load up to a force of 10 kN. It should take you at least 20 seconds to reach this load. 4- Hold the load for at least 30 seconds and then release it. 5- Remove the specimen and measure the diameter of the indentation- use a magnifying glass if needed. 6- Repeat the procedure five times, making sure that the indentations are not too close to each other or to the edge of the specimens. 7- Calculate the Brinell hardness umber for each of the 4 specimens. 8- Compare your result with the literature results.

Abstract For the present lab the Brinell Hardness Test was performed. In order to determine the hardness the material was indented with a hardened steel ball with a load of 10 kN. Then, the diameter of the indentation was measured. This procedure was repeated five times per specimen. The specimens used were aluminum, copper, brass and steel. Brinell tests are consistently used in the in the industry because they are easy to perform and they are not damaging to the material. In our experiment it was found that our results of the Brinell hardness ****** with the literature results. Introduction Brinell Hardness tests are used to calculate ease of plastic deformation. This is a common test in material quality control due to its simplicity and because it is not detrimental to the specimens being tested. This experiment consists on indenting the specimen with a ball made up of a harder material- in most cases it is a diamond or hardened steel ball. A load is applied for about 30 seconds and then the diameter of the indentation is measured. The Brinell hardness number is determined by dividing the load applied by the surface area of the indentation. The higher the number, the less likely the material will suffer plastic deformation. Brinell tests are not the only tests available to determine the hardness of a material; other tests include Vickers Hardness Test, Rockwell Hardness Test, Microhardness Test and the Mohs Hardness Test.

Results Table 1

Aluminum
Test Impression diameter ( ) D1 D2 D(average) 1 .124 .131 .1275 2 .129 .126 .1275 3 .132 .134 .133 4 .134 .130 .132 5 .131 .129 .130 Average Brinell Hardness Brinell Hardness reported in Literature Table 2 A 8.465 8.465 9.235 9.092 8.810 Brinell Remarks Hardness 120.49 120.49 110.45 112.19 115.78

Copper
Test Impression diameter ( ) D1 D2 D(average) 1 .158 .157 .1575 2 .154 .161 .1575 3 .158 .159 .1585 4 .155 .1557 .156 5 .154 .158 .156 Average Brinell Hardness Brinell Hardness reported in Literature Table 3 A 13.117 13.117 13.292 12.857 12.857 Brinell Remarks Hardness 77.76 77.76 76.74 79.33 79.33

Brass
Test Impression diameter ( ) D1 D2 D(average) 1 .114 .141 .1405 2 .139 .135 .137 3 .136 .139 .1375 4 .137 .139 .138 5 .139 .135 .137 Average Brinell Hardness Brinell Hardness reported in Literature Table 4 A Brinell Remarks Hardness 10.343 98.62 9.817 103.9 9.891 103.12 9.965 102.35 9.817 103.9

Steel
Test Impression diameter ( ) D1 D2 D(average) 1 .146 .140 .143 2 .150 .143 .146 3 .144 .144 .144 4 .142 .147 .1445 5 .146 .141 .143 Average Brinell Hardness Brinell Hardness reported in Literature A 10.728 11.28 10.884 10.962 10.806 Brinell Remarks Hardness 95.078 90.425 93.714 93.0428 94.393